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Sample records for post-operative abdominal pain

  1. Factors contributing to poor post-operative abdominal pain management in adult patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Al Samaraee, Ahmad; Rhind, Gill; Saleh, Usama; Bhattacharya, Vish

    2010-06-01

    Post-operative abdominal pain management can be a major issue facing medical and nursing staff in daily clinical practice. Effective pain control reduces post-operative morbidity as well as facilitates rehabilitation and accelerates recovery from surgery. In turn, poor pain control has been shown to alter body metabolic response that can lead to delayed recovery, with subsequent prolonged hospital stay and increased morbidity, and can lead to the development of a chronic pain state. Despite the significant developments in anaesthesia, delivery techniques and analgesia, post-operative abdominal pain management in adult patients remains suboptimal. Achieving effective pain management needs the implementation of an active approach in practice. This approach includes the provision of information and appropriate education tailored to the patients' needs and level of understanding, with the aim of reducing patient anxiety and avoiding unrealistic expectations. In addition, medical and nursing staff should continuously use the appropriate pain assessment tools to evaluate of post-operative pain in the surgical wards. Pain assessment needs to be regarded as the fifth vital sign and recorded on the patients observation chart. Analgesia should be used in a multimodal fashion and "by the clock" according to the patients needs. Moreover, governmental and professional guidelines need to be implemented to establish continuity of care, improve the quality of decision making and reduce unnecessary variations in practice Overall, there is a need for improved post-operative abdominal pain management in adults to enhance recovery, patient safety and reduce morbidity. This can be achieved with the appropriate education backed up with robust policies and guidelines, supported by up to date evidence. Copyright (c) 2009 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy of scheduled time ketorolac administration compared to continuous infusion for post-operative pain after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Di Stasio, E; Bevilacqua, F; Cafarotti, S; Scarano, A; Marana, E

    2012-11-01

    Ketorolac tromethanime is a non steroidal anti inflammatory drug and its efficacy on acute pain control after abdominal surgery has been well documented. It has a rapid onset and it can be given both for intra operative and for post operative pain management. In this study we aimed to evaluate if there were any differences in relieving post operative pain when Ketorolac was administered with continuous infusion or if it was given at prearranged times. 80 ASA I patients, scheduled for major gynecological surgery, were randomly assigned to 2 groups: group A patients were connected after surgical incision with a 24h analgesic infusor (2 ml/h) containing morphine (0.02 mg/kg/h) and Ketorolac (90 mg). Group B patients were connected after surgical incision with a 24h analgesic infusor (2 ml/h) containing morphine (0.02 mg/kg/h) at first and Ketorolac was then given in bolus after surgical incision and then every 8 hours for the first 24 hours. Post-operative pain scores were assessed using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) every 8 hours for 24 h. For a VAS value greater than 6, patients received Tramadol 100 mg. Post-operative pain scores showed a better pain relief for patients in the group B. Furthermore, the requirements of rescue analgesic were less in the group B [Tramadol was used for only 8 patients] than in the group A [Tramadol was used for 31 patients]. No adverse effects were registered in both groups. For post-operative pain Ketorolac administration at prearranged times, every 8 hours, offers greater benefits in respect to its continuous infusion.

  3. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-10-01

    Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P < 0.000) compared to the fifth post-operative hour. The number of patients with complete analgesia decreased on the third post-operative day (P = 0.001 compared to fifth post-operative day). The Spearman correlation coefficient between pain score on the third post-operative day and level of satisfaction with nurse's response, doctor's response to pain and the overall pain management was - 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management.

  4. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P < 0.000) compared to the fifth post-operative hour. The number of patients with complete analgesia decreased on the third post-operative day (P = 0.001 compared to fifth post-operative day). The Spearman correlation coefficient between pain score on the third post-operative day and level of satisfaction with nurse's response, doctor's response to pain and the overall pain management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management. PMID:27761037

  5. Effects of pregabalin on post operative morphine consumption and pain after abdominal hysterectomy with/without salphingo-oophorectomy: a randomized, double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Ittichaikulthol, Wichai; Virankabutra, Tanit; Kunopart, Mutita; Khamhom, Wachirapol; Putarawuthichai, Pipat; Rungphet, Suyawej

    2009-10-01

    Achieving post operative pain management is difficult with the use of only opioids analgesia. Multimodal pain management is a method to improve post operative analgesia with minimal side effects. Pregabalin has an analgesic and opioids sparing effects in post operative analgesia. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of premedication with pregabalin 300 mg compared with lorazepam 0.5 mg on post operative morphine consumption in women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy with/without salphingo-oophorectomy. Eighty ASA I-III, aged 18-65 year patients undergoing elective abdominal hysterectomy with/without salphingo-oophorectomy were randomized to receive either lorazepam 0.5 mg or pregabalin 300 mg 1 hr before surgery. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental (3-5 mg/kg) and atracurium (0.6 mg/kg) and maintained with sevoflurane with a fresh gas flow of 2 L/min (50% N2O in O2) and morphine 0.1-0.2 mg/kg. All patients received patient-controlled analgesia with morphine with a 1 mg incremental dose, 5-min lockout interval, and 4-hr limit of 40 mg post operative. Patients were studied at 0, 1, 4, 12 and 24 hours post operatively for verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS), morphine consumption, satisfaction score and side effects. The VNRS scores of the pregabalin group were significantly lower than the control group at 1, 4, 12 and 24 hours after surgery. The total morphine consumption at 24 hours post operatively of pregabalin group (7.11 +/- 5.57) was significantly lower than the control group (21.18 +/- 7.12) (p < 0.01). There were no differences between groups in somnolence and dizziness (p = 0.93) and nausea-vomiting (p = 0.11). The satisfaction score was higher in the pregabalin group. A 300 mg pregabalin administered 1 hr preoperatively before abdominal hysterectomy with/without salphingo-oophorectomy significantly reduced morphine consumption, VNRS pain score and improved satisfaction score at 24 hr post operatively without any significant

  6. Comparative study of ultrasound-guided abdominal field blocks versus port infiltration in laparoscopic cholecystectomies for post-operative pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ruchi; Joshi, Saurabh; Srivastava, Kuldeep; Tiwari, Shashank; Sharma, Nitin; Valecha, Umesh K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Post-operative pain is a major concern for day care surgeries like laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ultrasound guided abdominal field blocks (USAFB) with port site infiltrations for post-operative analgesia in terms of quality of pain relief, opioid consumption and patient satisfaction for day care surgeries Methods: Eighty patients presenting for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups either to receive port-site infiltration of local anaesthetic (n = 40, Group A) or USAFB (n = 40, Group B group). Numeric rating scores (NRS) were measured postoperatively to primarily assess the pain severity and opioid requirements. Data were analysed using Chi-Square test/Fisher's exact test for categorical data and Mann–Whitney test/unpaired t-test for quantitative data. Results: The study group (Group B) had significantly reduced NRS and opioid consumption over 24 h. The overall fentanyl consumption in patients receiving port infiltrations was approximately twice (200 ΁ 100 μg) as compared to patients in USAFB group (120 ΁ 74 μg) (P < 0.0001). Maximum fentanyl consumption was 400 μg (Group A) and 262 μg (Group B) over 24 h and the minimum requirement was 50 μg and zero, respectively. Conclusion: Superior post-operative analgesia was observed with USAFB which may help in minimising opioid-related adverse effects and facilitating faster recovery. PMID:27601741

  7. Nurses management of post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Buckley, H

    2000-06-01

    Nurses have the responsibility of adequately managing patients' post-operative pain. This literature review assesses whether nurses' management of post-operative pain is adequate or not, according to the literature findings. The findings reveal that nurses' management of patients' post-operative pain is not adequate and implies the concurrent need for improved nurse education and practice. The findings also indicate a need for ongoing research of this phenomenon.

  8. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is does not always reflect the seriousness ...

  9. [Post-operative pain therapy of a chronic pain patient].

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Michael T; Ittner, Karl Peter

    2006-11-01

    Post-operative pain therapy of chronic pain patients poses a challenge. Here we report the perioperative management of a 39-year-old male under chronic therapy with oxycodon, gabapentin and tolperison. Particular the pharmacointeractions regarding premedication and postoperative dose finding of opioids with intravenous PCIA are discussed.

  10. Post-operative Abdominal Wall Mucormycosis-a Case Series.

    PubMed

    Nain, Prabhdeep Singh; Matta, Harish; Singh, Kuldip; Chhina, Deepinder; Trehan, Munish; Batta, Nishant

    2015-12-01

    Mucormycosis is caused by saprophtytic fungi which cause acute invasive zygomycosis. It clinically presents with necrosis, and on histopathology, acute and chronic infiltrates are seen. It rarely infects a healthy host, but is devastating in an immunocompromised host. We studied five cases with post-operative abdominal wall mucormycosis, three females and two males. Three patients were post-operative while the other two had mucormycosis following trauma and infection was found in sutured wound. All were initially diagnosed as cases of necrotizing fasciitis. Two patients eventually survived after intensive medical therapy and extensive debridements.

  11. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  12. A randomised controlled trial on the efficacy and side-effect profile (nausea/vomiting/sedation) of morphine-6-glucuronide versus morphine for post-operative pain relief after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Binning, Alexander R; Przesmycki, Krzysztof; Sowinski, Piotr; Morrison, Lachlan M M; Smith, Terry W; Marcus, Paul; Lees, James P; Dahan, Albert

    2011-04-01

    Morphine is the first choice of treatment of severe post-operative pain, despite the occurrence of often discomforting (post-operative nausea or vomiting (PONV)) and sometimes dangerous (sedation, respiratory depression) side effects. Literature data indicate that morphine's active metabolite, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G), is a powerful analgesic with a possibly more favourable side-effect profile. In this multi-centre randomised controlled clinical trial patients undergoing major abdominal surgery were randomised to M6G or morphine treatment. Treatment started 30-60 min prior to the end of surgery and was continued postoperatively, after patients were titrated to comfort, via patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for 24-48 h. Pain intensity, nausea, vomiting and sedation scores were collected at regular intervals. In the study 268 patients were randomised to M6G and 249 to morphine. Withdrawal due to insufficient pain relief occurred predominantly just after surgery and was higher in the M6G group (16.8%) than in the morphine group (8.8%), suggesting a slower onset of analgesia for M6G compared to morphine. Subjects who continued on PCA remained equi-analgesic throughout the study. During the first 24h, nausea levels showed a 27% difference in favour of M6G which narrowly failed to reach statistical significance (P=0.052). Sub-analysis showed a significant reduction in nausea levels in females on M6G (30% difference, P=0.034). In all patients, similar reductions of 30-35% were observed in anti-emetic use, vomiting, PONV (a combined measure of nausea and vomiting) in favour of M6G, persisting for the first 24h postoperatively. Reductions in sedation were observed in the first 4h post-operative period for M6G patients.

  13. Post-operative pain control after tonsillectomy: dexametasone vs tramadol.

    PubMed

    Topal, Kubra; Aktan, Bulent; Sakat, Muhammed Sedat; Kilic, Korhan; Gozeler, Mustafa Sitki

    2017-06-01

    Tramadol was found to be more effective than dexamethasone in post-operative pain control, with long-lasting relief of pain. This study aimed to compare the effects of pre-operative local injections of tramadol and dexamethasone on post-operative pain, nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent tonsillectomy. Sixty patients between 3-13 years of age who were planned for tonsillectomy were included in the study. Patients were divided into three groups. Group 1 was the control group. Patients in Group 2 received 0.3 mg/kg Dexamethasone and Group 3 received 0.1 mg/kg Tramadol injection to the peritonsillary space just before the operation. Patients were evaluated for nausea, vomiting, and pain. When the control and the dexamethasone groups were compared; there were statistically significant differences in pain scores at post-operative 15 and 30 min, whereas there was no statistically significant difference in pain scores at other hours. When the control and tramadol groups were compared, there was a statistically significant difference in pain scores at all intervals. When tramadol and dexamethasone groups were compared, there was no statistically significant difference in pain scores at post-operative 15 and 30 min, 1 and 2 h, whereas there was a statistically significant difference in pain scores at post-operative 6 and 24 h.

  14. Children's nurses' post-operative pain assessment practices.

    PubMed

    Panjganj, Donya; Bevan, Ann

    2016-06-08

    Pain assessment is crucial to achieving optimal pain management in children. Pain that is insufficiently controlled can have extensive short- and long-term repercussions. Many studies continue to report that children experience unnecessary post-operative pain when they are in hospital. The purpose of this literature review was to explore post-operative pain assessment practices used by children's nurses. A literature search of databases was undertaken and inclusion criteria identified. Four themes emerged: pain assessment tools; behavioural cues; documentation; and communication between child, parent/carer and nurse. The findings showed that pain assessment tools were inadequately used, that children's behavioural cues were misinterpreted, and that there was inconsistency in the documentation of pain scores and in communication about pain scores between children, parent/carer and nurse. Addressing the key issues identified from the articles reviewed can help improve nursing practice and care.

  15. Use of epidural analgesia in post-operative pain management.

    PubMed

    Weetman, Carole; Allison, Wendy

    This article provides an overview of the use of epidural infusion analgesia in the management of patients with post-operative pain. Epidural analgesia is an effective method for relieving pain and has minimal side effects. However, life-threatening complications can occur and nurses need to be able to identify these and provide safe care for patients.

  16. [Visual analogue scale for measuring post-operative pain].

    PubMed

    Rauh, Katja Halladin; Andersen, Rikke Søby; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-06-10

    All patients with pain who are admitted to hospitals in Denmark must be assessed for levels of pain. However, it is not certain how pain should be measured. One way to measure pain is to use a visual analogue scale (VAS). This article focuses on how the VAS should be used in clinical practice in the assessment of post-operative pain. Furthermore, other suitable methods are compared with VAS. VAS is particularly useful for clinical research, but for daily clinical practice it may be easier to use a numeric rating scale.

  17. Influence of ethnicity on the perception and treatment of early post-operative pain

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Simon; Griffin-Teall, Nicola; Thompson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies indicated that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) groups tend to receive less analgesics compared to Caucasian (White) patients after similar surgical procedures. Most such data originated from North America and suggested that health-care professionals may perceive the expression of excessive pain by BAME patient groups as an exaggerated response to pain, rather than sub-optimal treatment. There are limited data comparing acute pain management between South Asian and White British patients. Objective: We aimed to investigate correlation between patients’ ethnicity and disparities of early post-operative pain perception/management, in an ethnically diverse population. Methods: We conducted a retrospective case note review of acute post-operative pain after total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) in 60 South Asian and 60 age-matched White British females. Data for 140 variables (pre-, intra- and post-operative) for each patient were recorded. We used propensity score matching to produce 30 closely matched patients in each group minimizing effects of recorded co-variates. Data were analysed with and without propensity score matching. Results: There were no significant differences in acute post-operative pain scores, morphine requirements, pain management, adverse effects or duration of post-operative care unit stay between South Asian and White British patients. The median duration of hospital stay of South Asian patients was longer (4.5 days versus 3.0 days, p < 0.001). Conclusion: We conclude that in an institution where both patients and health-care professionals are from an ethnically diverse population, neither post-operative pain nor pain management are influenced significantly by South Asian ethnicity. PMID:26516573

  18. Post-operative pain after knee arthroscopy and related factors.

    PubMed

    Drosos, G I; Stavropoulos, N I; Katsis, A; Kesidis, K; Kazakos, K; Verettas, D-A

    2008-06-13

    The aim of this study was to explore the intensity of post-arthroscopy knee pain during the first 24 hours, and to study the influence of pre-operative pain, tourniquet time and amount of surgical trauma on post-arthroscopy pain. In 78 male patients that underwent elective arthroscopic menisectomy or diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee, preoperative and post-operative pain were registered using the Visual Analogue Scale. Variance for repeated measures and for independent observations was analysed. Supplementary analgesia was required for 23% of the patients, more often in the recovery room and between 2 and 8 hours postoperatively. Of all factors analyzed, only time was statistically significant in determining the level of post-operative pain. Supplementary analgesia was required only in patients that underwent operative arthroscopy, and more often in patients with tourniquet time of more than 40 minutes. In conclusions, post-operative time is the most significant factor related to the post-arthroscopy knee pain.

  19. [Optimizing post-operative pain management in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Garcia, João Batista Santos; Bonilla, Patricia; Kraychette, Durval Campos; Flores, Fernando Cantú; Valtolina, Elizabeth Diaz Perez de; Guerrero, Carlos

    Post-operative pain management is a significant problem in clinical practice in Latin America. Insufficient or inappropriate pain management is in large part due to insufficient knowledge, attitudes and education, and poor communications at various levels. In addition, the lack of awareness of the availability and importance of clear policies and guidelines for recording pain intensity, the use of specific analgesics and the proper approach to patient education have led to the consistent under-treatment of pain management in the region. However, these problems are not insurmountable and can be addressed at both the provider and patient level. Robust policies and guidelines can help insure continuity of care and reduce unnecessary variations in practice. The objective of this paper is to call attention to the problems associated with Acute Post-Operative Pain (APOP) and to suggest recommendations for their solutions in Latin America. A group of experts on anesthesiology, surgery and pain developed recommendations that will lead to more efficient and effective pain management. It will be necessary to change the knowledge and behavior of health professionals and patients, and to obtain a commitment of policy makers. Success will depend on a positive attitude and the commitment of each party through the development of policies, programs and the promotion of a more efficient and effective system for the delivery of APOP services as recommended by the authors of this paper. The writing group believes that implementation of these recommendations should significantly enhance efficient and effective post-operative pain management in Latin America. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Post-operative pain management in paediatric surgery at Sylvanus Olympio University Teaching Hospital, Togo.

    PubMed

    Sama, Hamza Doles; Bang'na Maman, Aboudoul Fataou Ouro; Djibril, Mohaman; Assenouwe, Marcellin; Belo, Mofou; Tomta, Kadjika; Chobli, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pain management in paediatric surgery at Sylvanus Olympio University Teaching Hospital, Lome. A prospective descriptive study was conducted in the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care at Sylvanus Olympio teaching hospital from 1 January to 30 June 2012. Data collected include: demography, type of surgery, American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) classification, anaesthetic protocol, analgesia technique, post-operative complications and cost of analgesia. The study includes 106 post-operative children. Abdominal surgery was performed in 41.5% and orthopaedic surgery in 31.1%. A total of 75% of patients were classified ASA 1. General anaesthesia (GA) was performed in 88%. Anaesthetists supervised post-operative care in 21.7% cases. Multimodal analgesia was used in every case and 12% of patients received a regional block. The most frequently unwanted effects of analgesics used were nausea and/or vomiting in 12.3%. At H24, child under 7 years have more pain assessment than those from 7 to 15 years (46% vs 24%) and this difference was statistically significant (chi-square = 4.7598; P = 0.0291 < 0.05). The average cost of peri-operative analgesia under loco regional analgesia (LRA) versus GA during the first 48 h post-operative was US $23 versus $46. Our study showed that post-operative pain management in paediatric surgery is often not well controlled and paediatric loco regional analgesia technique is under practiced in sub Saharan Africa.

  1. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... and your health care provider may not feel pain medication is the safest option. In this case, distraction techniques such as guided imagery may help your child cope. You could also try progressive ...

  2. Predictors of Post-Operative Pain Relief in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis Undergoing the Frey or Whipple Procedure.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amitasha; Patel, Yuval A; Cruise, Michael; Matsukuma, Karen; Zaheer, Atif; Afghani, Elham; Yadav, Dhiraj; Makary, Martin A; Hirose, Kenzo; Andersen, Dana K; Singh, Vikesh K

    2016-04-01

    Post-operative pain relief in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is variable. Our objective was to determine clinical imaging or histopathologic predictor(s) of post-operative pain relief in CP patients undergoing the Whipple or Frey procedure. All patients who underwent a Whipple (n = 30) or Frey procedure (n = 30) for painful CP between January 2003 and September 2013 were evaluated. A toxic etiology was defined as a history of alcohol use and/or smoking. The pre-operative abdominal CT was evaluated for calcification(s) and main pancreatic duct (MPD) dilation (≥5 mm). The post-operative histopathology was evaluated for severe fibrosis. Clinical imaging and histopathologic features were evaluated as predictors of post-operative pain relief using univariable and multivariable regression analysis. A total of 60 patients (age 51.6 years, 53% males) were included in our study, of whom 42 (70%) reported post-operative pain relief over a mean follow-up of 1.1 years. There were 37 (62%) patients with toxic etiology, 36 (60%) each with calcification(s) and MPD dilation. A toxic etiology, calcifications, and severe fibrosis were associated with post-operative pain relief on univariable analysis (all p < 0.01). However, only a toxic etiology was an independent predictor of post-operative pain relief (OR 5.7, 95% CI 1.3, 24.5, p = 0.02). Only a toxic etiology, and not imaging or histopathologic findings, independently predicts post-operative pain relief in CP patients undergoing the Whipple or Frey procedure.

  3. Gender differences in post-operative pain and patient controlled analgesia use among adolescent surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Logan, Deirdre E; Rose, John B

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore gender differences in anticipatory emotional distress, coping strategies, post-operative pain perception, and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) use among adolescent surgical patients. One hundred and two 12-18-year-old adolescents undergoing surgeries with overnight hospital stay were recruited. Participants completed pre-operative measures of anxiety and anticipated pain. Post-operatively, they reported on coping skills, post-operative anxiety, and pain. Data on PCA use were recorded from medical records. Girls reported higher levels of pre-operative state anxiety and anticipated more pain. After surgery, girls and boys differed on their lowest daily pain ratings and average daily pain ratings, with girls reporting more pain in both cases. Reports of highest daily pain were similar across genders. Gender was found to moderate the relationship between anticipatory distress and post-operative pain, such that higher anticipatory distress before surgery predicted more post-operative pain for girls, but not for boys. Patterns of PCA use did not vary by gender on post-operative days 0 or 1. Findings suggest that adolescent boys' and girls' pain experiences are different in several important respects, although somewhat less divergent than has been reported in samples of adult males and females. Results have implications for the development of targeted intervention strategies to help adolescents cope effectively with acute post-operative pain.

  4. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  5. Epidural dexamethasone for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy: A dose ranging and safety evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    Hefni, Amira Fathy; Mahmoud, Mohamed Sidky; Al Alim, Azza Atef Abd

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Number of studies revealed that epidural bupivacaine-dexamethasone has the same analgesic potency as bupivacaine-fentanyl with opioid sparing and antiemetic effects. Different doses of dexamethasone were used in different studies. This study was designed to evaluate the optimum dose of epidural dexamethasone for post-operative analgesia. Materials and Methods: In this double-blinded randomized controlled study, we evaluated the efficiency and safety of different doses of epidural dexamethasone for post-operative analgesia in 160 patients aged 45-60 years scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy. Patient were randomly allocated into four groups to receive a total volume of 10 ml epidural plain bupivacaine 0.25% in the control group (Group D0) with either 4 mg dexamethasone in (Group D4) or 6 mg dexamethasone in (Group D6) or 8 mg dexamethasone in (Group D8). Patients then received general anesthesia. Sedation, satisfaction and visual analog pain scores (VAS) at rest and with effort were measured post-operatively. Meperidine was administered when VAS > or = 4. Intra-operative fentanyl dose, post-operative meperidine consumption and the time to first analgesic requirement were recorded by a blinded observer. Blood glucose was measured pre-operatively and at 4 h and 8 h after study drug administration. Wound healing and infection were assessed after 1 week. Results: Intraoperative fentanyl requirements were comparable among groups. The time to first analgesic requirement was significantly prolonged 5.5 times in D8 Group but only 1.5 times in D6 and D4 Groups more than the analgesic duration in the control Group D0, with a P < 0.01. There was a significant reduction in post-operative meperidine consumption during the first 24 h in the D8 (75%) in comparison with D6 and D4 Groups (50%), respectively, (P < 0.01) and the control Group D0 (0%) (P < 0.01). VAS scores were significantly lower and patient satisfaction score was significantly higher in the D8 and

  6. Factors related to post-operative metabolic acidosis following major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Chi-Min; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Jeon, Kyeongman; Suh, Gee Young; Choi, Dong Wook; Kim, Sung

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is frequently observed in perioperative patients, especially those who undergo major surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors related to post-operative metabolic acidosis and to attempt to identify the clinical effect of metabolic acidosis following major abdominal surgery. We included 172 patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (ICU) following major abdominal surgery. All cases were divided into either the acidosis or the normal group using immediate post-operative standard base excess (SBE). The following clinical data were retrospectively obtained from the chart and ICU database: basic clinical characteristics, operative data, type and volume of fluid infused during the operation, post-operative arterial blood gas analysis, lactate, and central venous oxygen saturation. The predominant intraoperative fluid was either 0.9% saline or lactated Ringer's solution. The operation length, estimated blood loss, total fluid infused, total saline infused, lactate and corrected chloride were significantly higher in the acidosis group; however, central venous oxygen saturation was lower in the normal group. Among these factors, total infused saline and lactate level were independent factors related to metabolic acidosis. The comparison between the types of fluid revealed that the saline group had a significantly lower SBE, strong ion difference and higher corrected chloride. SBE was significantly correlated with lactate and total infused saline. ICU and hospital length of stay were significantly longer in the acidosis group. Post-operative metabolic acidosis following major abdominal surgery was closely related to both hyperchloremic acidosis associated with large saline infusion and lactic acidosis caused by lactataemia. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. Acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1998-01-01

    Abdominal pain is among the most frequent ailments reported in the office setting and can account for up to 40% of ailments in the ambulatory practice. Also, it is in the top three symptoms of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) and accounts for 5-10% of all ED primary presenting ailments. There are several common sources for acute abdominal pain and many for subacute and chronic abdominal pain. This article explores the history-taking, initial evaluation, and examination of the patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. The goal of this article is to help differentiate one source of pain from another. Discussion of acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, ectopic pregnancy, diverticulitis, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are undertaken. Additionally, there is discussion of common laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, and treatment of the patient with the above entities.

  8. A qualitative analysis of the nursing documentation of post-operative pain management.

    PubMed

    Briggs, M; Dean, K L

    1998-03-01

    As part of trust-wide practice development project to improve post-operative pain management, a descriptive study was conducted in the orthopaedic directorate of a large teaching hospital in the north of England. Sixty-five patients were included in this prospective study. Patients were interviewed post-operatively about their pain experience, and present and worst pain scores were recorded. The nursing documentation relating to pain management was also transcribed and a content analysis of this nursing documentation is reported. Findings indicate that individual assessment of pain was poorly documented and that the nurses' record of the patient's post-operative pain experience differed from the patient report. Reliance on pharmacological methods of pain relief was evident and interventions to help patients cope with night time pain were rarely documented. The results are discussed in light of a theoretical framework for acute pain management and current research. Implications for practice are discussed and areas for further research are suggested.

  9. Acute pain Factors predictive of post-operative pain and opioid requirement in multimodal analgesia following knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Thomazeau, J; Rouquette, A; Martinez, V; Rabuel, C; Prince, N; Laplanche, J L; Nizard, R; Bergmann, J F; Perrot, S; Lloret-Linares, C

    2016-05-01

    Despite the development of multimodal analgesia for postoperative pain management, opioids are still required for effective pain relief after knee arthroplasty. We aimed to identify the determinants of post-operative pain intensity and post-operative opioid requirement in this context. In this observational prospective study, we recorded patient characteristics, pre-operative pain intensity, anxiety and depression levels, sensitivity and pain thresholds in response to an electrical stimulus, and mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Multivariate linear regression models were used to identify predictors of post-operative pain at rest and opioid requirement. We included 109 patients. Pre-operative pain at rest (p = 0.047), anxiety level (p = 0.001) and neuropathic pain symptoms (p = 0.030) were independently and positively associated with mean post-operative pain intensity adjusted for mean post-operative morphine equivalent dose (MED). Mean post-operative pain intensity at rest was lower (p = 0.006) in patients receiving celecoxib and pregabalin in the post-operative period, with all other variables constant. Mean post-operative MED over 5 days was low, but highly variable (78.2 ± 32.1 mg, from 9.9 to 170 mg). Following adjustment for mean post-operative pain intensity, it was independently negatively correlated with age (p = 0.004), and positively correlated with associated paracetamol treatment (p = 0.031). No genetic effect was detected in our sample. Our findings suggest that clinicians could use the pre-operative pain profile, in terms of anxiety levels, neuropathic pain symptoms, and chronic pre-operative pain intensity, to improve the efficacy of pain management after knee surgery. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  10. Thai Nurses' experiences of post-operative pain assessment and its' influence on pain management decisions.

    PubMed

    Chatchumni, Manaporn; Namvongprom, Ampaporn; Eriksson, Henrik; Mazaheri, Monir

    2016-01-01

    While many studies have addressed various issues with regards to pain management, there is limited knowledge about how nurses assess pain in surgical wards. This study aimed to describe Thai nurses' experiences of pain assessment in a surgical ward. A cross-sectional explorative study was conducted. Participants were selected through theoretical sampling. Data was collected through interviews with twelve registered nurses working in surgical wards. Qualitative content analysis guided the analysis of the data. Nurses use a double/triple check system, communicated to the healthcare team via records and protocols, and they used their skills and experiences in pain assessment. The results showed that nurses missed the opportunity to include the patients' self-reported pain in their accounts. Though much evidence of pain was collected, this did not seem to benefit the patients. Furthermore, the nurses were not using instruments to measure pain, which illustrates the potential unreliability of professionals who have differing opinions concerning the patients' pain. Thai nurses worked based on a 'patient-evidence' paradigm when assessing patients in pain; this should be shifted to an evidence-based paradigm. Furthermore, by including the patients' self-reported pain in their assessment, nurses would both improve the quality of the pain assessment and empower patients in their pain management. Pain management practices in Thailand should be improved through education, training, supportive innovation, and collegial competence development in order to improve the quality of care in the post-operative field.

  11. [Evaluation of immediate post-operative pain in heart surgery using the Behavioural Pain Scale].

    PubMed

    Pozas Abril, J; Toraño Olivera, M J; Latorre-Marco, I

    2014-01-01

    Patients in the immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery have abolished communication skills and therefore can not express pain. Pain produces significant adverse effects that alter the patients' course. Therefore, identifying and controlling them will lead to increased quality of care for the critical patient. To measure the degree of pain in patients in the immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery by scaling Behavioural Pain Scale. An observational, prospective and longitudinal. Patients over 18 years in the first 24 hours of admission with no communication problems who were under sedation and subjected to mechanical ventilation were included. Twenty patients were enrolled in the study. The Behavioural Pain Scale (BPS) was used during two procedures usually considered as a painful practice in the literature, that is, mobilization and/or postural changes and aspiration of secretions. Twenty-seven measurements were made of procedures considered as painful. The results obtained by applying the scale BPS showed that 70.4% of patients had no pain, 22.2% had mild to moderate pain and 7.4% had unacceptable pain. This study has identified that the patients suffer pain during the postoperative period. Within these patients, there is a small, but not insignificant number whose pain is unacceptable during this period. This finding serves as a beginning for a line of research to improve the handling of the postoperative pain during immediate post-operative cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Institutionalizing pain management: the Post-Operative Pain Management Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Dahl, June L; Gordon, Deb; Ward, Sandra; Skemp, Marty; Wochos, Sarah; Schurr, Michael

    2003-09-01

    Clinical practice and quality improvement (QI) guidelines for acute postoperative pain management have been developed to address the well-documented problem of undertreatment of postoperative pain. The Post-Operative Pain Management Quality Improvement Project (the POP Project) was initiated to determine whether an intervention designed to support hospitals in the development of QI efforts would lead to improvements in structures, processes, and outcomes consistent with recommended guidelines. A nationwide sample of 233 hospitals joined the project. The intervention consisted of written resource materials accompanied by support services that included an e-mail list server, a resource Web page, and assistance from POP Project staff via telephone. Data regarding critical structures, processes (practice patterns), and patient outcomes were collected at baseline before the intervention began and at follow-up 12 to 18 months later. Results showed a statistically significant increase from baseline (45%) to follow-up (72%) in the presence of structural elements that are critical to improving pain management. There were statistically significant improvements in practices including documented use of pain rating scales, decreased use of intramuscular opioids, and increased use of nonpharmacologic strategies. Patient survey data showed no change in pain outcomes. Evaluation data showed that 70% of hospitals were very or extremely satisfied with their participation in the POP Project and 90% of them planned to continue efforts to improve pain management after the POP Project ended. Further research is needed to determine how to translate the excellent results obtained for structure and process into meaningful outcomes for patients.

  13. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-termJust about everyone has had a " ... time or another. But sudden severe abdominal pain (stomach pain), also called acute pain, shouldn't be ...

  14. Functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P; Aziz, Q

    2005-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain or functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is an uncommon functional gut disorder characterised by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain attributed to the gut but poorly related to gut function. It is associated with abnormal illness behaviour and patients show psychological morbidity that is often minimised or denied in an attempt to discover an organic cause for symptoms. Thus the conventional biomedical approach to the management of such patients is unhelpful and a person's symptom experience is more usefully investigated using a biopsychosocial evaluation, which necessarily entails a multidisciplinary system of healthcare provision. Currently the pathophysiology of the disorder is poorly understood but is most likely to involve a dysfunction of central pain mechanisms either in terms of attentional bias, for example, hypervigilance or a failure of central pain modulation/inhibition. Although modern neurophysiological investigation of patients is promising and may provide important insights into the pathophysiology of FAPS, current clinical management relies on an effective physician-patient relationship in which limits on clinical investigation are set and achievable treatment goals tailored to the patient's needs are pursued. PMID:15998821

  15. Assessment of post-operative pain and its management among patients undergoing craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Saramma, P P; Mathew, Rikku

    2013-01-01

    Pain assessment and its management in patients undergoing craniotomy, especially those with communication barriers, continue to present challenges to nurses. The present study was undertaken to assess the level of post-operative pain suffered by patients after craniotomy, to identify the activities that increase/relieve pain and to find out association between pain score of patients and selected variables. A self-prepared validated questionnaire and Wong Bakers Faces pain scale were used as the tools. The post-operative pain was mild to moderate and decreased from first to third postoperative day. Pain relief was adequate with the combination therapy of non-narcotic analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The study revealed that there was no significant difference between the pain perception and age or gender of the patient. The activities that increased pain were surgical dressing removal and position changing. Nursing staff should focus on assessing and managing post-operative pain to improve quality of nursing care in order to improve the comfort of craniotomy patients.

  16. Post-operative pain management practices in patients with dementia - the current situation in Finland.

    PubMed

    Rantala, Maija; Kankkunen, Päivi; Kvist, Tarja; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe current post-operative pain management practices for patients with dementia and hip fracture in Finland. Older adults with hip fracture are at high risk of under treatment for pain, especially if they also have a cognitive disorder at the stage of dementia. Previous studies have provided limited information about the quality of acute pain treatment for persons with dementia. In this study data concerning current pain management practices was collected by questionnaire from 333 nursing staff. They worked in surgical wards of seven universities and ten city-centre hospitals. The response rate to the questionnaire was 53%. The data was analysed using factor analysis and parametric methods. Half the respondents (53%) considered that post-operative pain management was sufficient for patients with dementia. Less than one third of respondent nurses reported that pain scales were in use on their unit: the most commonly used scale was VAS. The use of pain scales was significantly related to the respondents' opinion of the sufficiency of post-operative pain management in this patient group (p<0.001). The findings can be utilised in nursing practice and research when planning suitable complementary educational interventions for nursing staff of surgical wards. Further research is needed to explain the current situation of pain management practices from the viewpoint of patients with dementia.

  17. Post-Operative Pain Management Practices in Patients with Dementia - The Current Situation in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, Maija; Kankkunen, Päivi; Kvist, Tarja; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe current post-operative pain management practices for patients with dementia and hip fracture in Finland. Older adults with hip fracture are at high risk of under treatment for pain, especially if they also have a cognitive disorder at the stage of dementia. Previous studies have provided limited information about the quality of acute pain treatment for persons with dementia. In this study data concerning current pain management practices was collected by questionnaire from 333 nursing staff. They worked in surgical wards of seven universities and ten city-centre hospitals. The response rate to the questionnaire was 53%. The data was analysed using factor analysis and parametric methods. Half the respondents (53%) considered that post-operative pain management was sufficient for patients with dementia. Less than one third of respondent nurses reported that pain scales were in use on their unit: the most commonly used scale was VAS. The use of pain scales was significantly related to the respondents’ opinion of the sufficiency of post-operative pain management in this patient group (p<0.001). The findings can be utilised in nursing practice and research when planning suitable complementary educational interventions for nursing staff of surgical wards. Further research is needed to explain the current situation of pain management practices from the viewpoint of patients with dementia. PMID:22723810

  18. Benefits of intravenous lidocaine on post-operative pain and acute rehabilitation after laparoscopic nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Tauzin-Fin, Patrick; Bernard, Olivier; Sesay, Musa; Biais, Matthieu; Richebe, Philippe; Quinart, Alice; Revel, Philippe; Sztark, Francois

    2014-07-01

    Intravenous (I.V.) lidocaine has analgesic, antihyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory properties and is known to accelerate the return of bowel function after surgery. We evaluated the effects of I.V. lidocaine on pain management and acute rehabilitation protocol after laparoscopic nephrectomy. A total of 47 patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic nephrectomy were included in a two-phase observational study where I.V. lidocaine (1.5 mg/kg/h) was introduced, in the second phase, during surgery and for 24 h post-operatively. All patients underwent the same post-operative rehabilitation program. Post-operative pain scores, opioid consumption and extent of hyperalgesia were measured. Time to first flatus and 6 min walking test (6MWT) were recorded. Patient demographics were similar in the two phases (n = 22 in each group). Lidocaine significantly reduced morphine consumption (median [25-75% interquartile range]; 8.5 mg[4567891011121314151617] vs. 25 mg[1920212223242526272829303132]; P < 0.0001), post-operative pain scores (P < 0.05) and hyperalgesia extent on post-operative day 1-day 2-day 4 (mean ± standard deviation (SD); 1.5 ± 0.9 vs. 4.3 ± 1.2 cm (P < 0.001), 0.6 ± 0.5 vs. 2.8 ± 1.2 cm (P < 0.001) and 0.13 ± 0.3 vs. 1.2 ± 1 cm (P < 0.001), respectively). Time to first flatus (mean ± SD; 29 ± 7 h vs. 48 ± 15 h; P < 0.001) and 6MWT at day 4 (189 ± 50 m vs. 151 ± 53 m; P < 0.001) were significantly enhanced in patients with i.v. lidocaine. Intravenous (I.V.) lidocaine could reduce post-operative morphine consumption and improve post-operative pain management and post-operative recovery after laparoscopic nephrectomy. I.V. lidocaine could contribute to better post-operative rehabilitation.

  19. Benefits of intravenous lidocaine on post-operative pain and acute rehabilitation after laparoscopic nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tauzin-Fin, Patrick; Bernard, Olivier; Sesay, Musa; Biais, Matthieu; Richebe, Philippe; Quinart, Alice; Revel, Philippe; Sztark, Francois

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intravenous (I.V.) lidocaine has analgesic, antihyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory properties and is known to accelerate the return of bowel function after surgery. We evaluated the effects of I.V. lidocaine on pain management and acute rehabilitation protocol after laparoscopic nephrectomy. Materials and Methods: A total of 47 patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic nephrectomy were included in a two-phase observational study where I.V. lidocaine (1.5 mg/kg/h) was introduced, in the second phase, during surgery and for 24 h post-operatively. All patients underwent the same post-operative rehabilitation program. Post-operative pain scores, opioid consumption and extent of hyperalgesia were measured. Time to first flatus and 6 min walking test (6MWT) were recorded. Results: Patient demographics were similar in the two phases (n = 22 in each group). Lidocaine significantly reduced morphine consumption (median [25-75% interquartile range]; 8.5 mg[4567891011121314151617] vs. 25 mg[1920212223242526272829303132]; P < 0.0001), post-operative pain scores (P < 0.05) and hyperalgesia extent on post-operative day 1-day 2-day 4 (mean ± standard deviation (SD); 1.5 ± 0.9 vs. 4.3 ± 1.2 cm (P < 0.001), 0.6 ± 0.5 vs. 2.8 ± 1.2 cm (P < 0.001) and 0.13 ± 0.3 vs. 1.2 ± 1 cm (P < 0.001), respectively). Time to first flatus (mean ± SD; 29 ± 7 h vs. 48 ± 15 h; P < 0.001) and 6MWT at day 4 (189 ± 50 m vs. 151 ± 53 m; P < 0.001) were significantly enhanced in patients with i.v. lidocaine. Conclusion: Intravenous (I.V.) lidocaine could reduce post-operative morphine consumption and improve post-operative pain management and post-operative recovery after laparoscopic nephrectomy. I.V. lidocaine could contribute to better post-operative rehabilitation. PMID:25190945

  20. Ibuprofen given pre- and post-operatively for the relief of pain.

    PubMed

    Hill, C M; Carroll, M J; Giles, A D; Pickvance, N

    1987-08-01

    155 patients undergoing surgical removal of lower third molars took part in a parallel group, randomised double-blind study to assess the analgesic effect of single pre-operative doses of ibuprofen (400 mg), codeine phosphate (30 mg), a combination of ibuprofen/codeine (400 mg/30 mg), placebo and post-operative single doses of the same combination or diflunisal (250 mg). Patients receiving the combination or ibuprofen pre-operatively took significantly longer between surgery completion and needing the post-operative study treatment than patients receiving codeine phosphate or placebo. At 1 1/2-2 h after post-operative administration, patients receiving the combination post-operatively reported significantly greater decreases in pain severity than those receiving diflunisal. Patients taking the combination post-operatively experienced significantly better pain relief than patients taking diflunisal at 1 and 2 h, but the reverse was true at 5 h. Side-effects reported were mild with no significant differences between the different treatment groups.

  1. Post-operative pain management: transition from epidural to oral analgesia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Donna; O'Neill, Olga; Beck, Alexandra

    Although managing pain in the acute surgical setting is a priority, there is a dearth of evidence to guide clinicians on how best to approach the discontinuation and transition of patients from epidural analgesia to oral analgesia post-operatively. This article describes an audit at a regional trust which examined data on patients' observations charts, as well as patients' self-reports of pain. The authors found that reducing epidural opioid concentrations post-operatively is useful in analgesic transition, using bupivacaine only for weaning has limited value, and that the timing of oral analgesia administration is important. They conclude that comprehensive pain assessment and better documentation are necessary to improve pain management practices. While the results demonstrate the advantage of reducing epidural opioid concentrations, decisions should be based on the needs of individual patients and not form part of a routine task.

  2. Predicting chronic post-operative pain following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, K J; Thomas, M; Fawole, A S; Lyndon, P J; White, C M

    2008-12-01

    Chronic post-operative pain (CPP) following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (LIHR) may cause significant morbidity and be more problematic than recurrence. Determining pre-operative risk may reduce morbidity. Our aim was to determine prevalence of CPP following LIHR and identify risk factors for its development. Data from patients undergoing LIHR (1996-2004) at one District General Hospital were collected, including demographics, body mass index, pre-operative pain, LIHR type (TEP or TAPP, primary/recurrent, unilateral/bilateral) and post-operative complications including CPP (pain lasting > or = 1 year). A total of 881 patients underwent LIHR (1,029 hernias). Of these, 523 (60%) patients completed the questionnaire, and 72/523 (13.8%) patients experienced CPP. Presence of pre-operative pain (P < 0.001), recurrent LIHR (P = 0.021) and age < 50 years (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with CPP. Chronic post-operative pain following LIHR is more prevalent than recurrence. Pre-operative pain, surgery for recurrent inguinal hernias (following anterior repair) and younger age at surgery predict development of CPP. Identification of 'high-risk' patients may improve management, reducing morbidity and cost.

  3. Improving the management of post-operative acute pain: priorities for change.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Winfried; Coluzzi, Flaminia; Fletcher, Dominique; Huygen, Frank; Morlion, Bart; Neugebauer, Edmund; Pérez, Antonio Montes; Pergolizzi, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Poor management of post-operative acute pain can contribute to medical complications including pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis, infection and delayed healing, as well as the development of chronic pain. It is therefore important that all patients undergoing surgery should receive adequate pain management. However, evidence suggests this is not currently the case; between 10% and 50% of patients develop chronic pain after various common operations, and one recent US study recorded >80% of patients experiencing post-operative pain. At the first meeting of the acute chapter of the Change Pain Advisory Board, key priorities for improving post-operative pain management were identified in four different areas. Firstly, patients should be more involved in decisions regarding their own treatment, particularly when fateful alternatives are being considered. For this to be meaningful, relevant information should be provided so they are well informed about the various options available. Good physician/patient communication is also essential. Secondly, better professional education and training of the various members of the multidisciplinary pain management team would enhance their skills and knowledge, and thereby improve patient care. Thirdly, there is scope for optimizing treatment. Examples include the use of synergistic analgesia to target pain at different points along pain pathways, more widespread adoption of patient-controlled analgesia, and the use of minimally invasive rather than open surgery. Fourthly, organizational change could provide similar benefits; introducing acute pain services and increasing their availability towards the 24 hours/day ideal, greater adherence to protocols, increased use of patient-reported outcomes, and greater receptivity to technological advances would all help to enhance performance and increase patient satisfaction. It must be acknowledged that implementing these recommendations would incur a considerable cost that purchasers of

  4. DIEP flap for breast reconstruction: Is abdominal fat thickness associated with post-operative complications?

    PubMed

    Modarressi, Ali; Müller, Camillo Theo; Montet, Xavier; Rüegg, Eva Meia; Pittet-Cuénod, Brigitte

    2017-08-01

    Some surgeons consider a high body mass index (BMI) or important abdominal fat excess as contraindications for breast reconstruction with free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. This study aimed to identify factors associated with post-operative complications by using this type of flap, with an emphasis on BMI and abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness. A retrospective chart review of 105 consecutive patients who underwent DIEP flap breast reconstruction at our institution was performed to assess post-operative complications. Among other risk factors, we specifically studied the influence of BMI and abdominal wall thickness on complication occurrence. Abdominal wall thickness was measured at 10 different points on the angio-computed tomography scan performed pre-operatively. Median age was 49.8 years (range, 27-69); average BMI was 25.57 kg/m(2) (range, 18.07-41.91). Immediate breast reconstruction was performed for 35% of patients, and five patients (4.7%) underwent bilateral reconstruction. Twenty-six patients (24.8%) presented 29 post-operative complications; 12 concerned abdominal complications (delayed wound healing [n = 6] and seroma [n = 6]) and 17 were related to complications of the reconstructed breast (six minimal necrosis treated conservatively, eight minor necrosis requiring surgical debridement and three total flap loss). The complication rate was not correlated with increased BMI or abdominal wall thickness. The only factor that significantly predicts DIEP flap complications was pre-operative radiotherapy (odds ratio = 4.05; p = 0.03). No significant correlation was observed between BMI of 25-35 kg/m(2) or abdominal wall thickness and post-operative complications of the donor site or DIEP flap. Therefore, these factors should not be considered as contraindication criteria. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. What's new in... the management of post-operative pain in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Pankaj; Pattni, Amit; Pearson, David

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative pain is a common occurrence within dentistry. The causative factors are not solely dependent on the procedure but a part is also played by the patient's ability to self-cope as well as their level of anxiety. This article discusses the effectiveness of analgesia available for prescription by general dental practitioners based on systematic reviews in the literature, with particular reference to third molar removal. In addition, other methods that can help reduce pain in the post-operative period are addressed, including the types of local anaesthetic used for the procedure and psychological aspects of patient care. The main aim is to update and aid dentists' decision making processes in choosing ways to lessen the pain experienced by patients following dental procedures.

  6. Lower Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, David J; Lee, Stephen D; Dubin, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Although most frequently presenting with lower abdominal pain, appendicitis, colitis, and diverticulitis can cause pain throughout the abdomen and can cause peritoneal and retroperitoneal symptoms. Evaluation and management of lower intestinal disease requires a nuanced approach by the emergency physician, sometimes requiring computed tomography, ultrasonography, MRI, layered imaging, shared decision making, serial examination, and/or close follow-up. Once a presumed or confirmed diagnosis is made, appropriate treatment is initiated, and may include surgery, antibiotics, and/or steroids. Appendicitis patients should be admitted. Diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease can frequently be managed on an outpatient basis, but may require admission and surgical consultation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patterns of post-operative pain medication prescribing after invasive dental procedures

    PubMed Central

    Barasch, Andrei; Safford, Monika M.; McNeal, Sandre F.; Robinson, Michelle; Grant, Vivian S.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated disparities in the prescription of analgesics following dental procedures that were expected to cause acute post-operative pain. Patients over the age of 19 years who had been treated by surgical and/or endodontic dental procedures were included in this study. We reviewed 900 consecutive charts and abstracted data on procedures, patients, and providers. We used chi-square and logistic regression models for analyses. There were 485 White subjects 357 African-American subjects included in this review; 81% of the African-American and 78% of White patients received a post-operative narcotic prescription (p=0.56). In multivariate regression models, patients over age 45 (p=0.003), those with insurance that covered medication and those with pre-existing pain (p=0.004) were more likely to receive narcotic analgesics. Students prescribed more narcotics than residents (p=0.001). No differences were found by race in prescribing analgesics. PMID:21371065

  8. Post-operative pain: the impact of prescribing patterns on nurses' administration of analgesia.

    PubMed

    Simons, Joan; Moseley, Laurence

    2008-10-01

    In the past 30 years, significant improvements have been made in the management of children's pain, with most children receiving analgesia post-operatively. However, the amount of analgesia administered to children after surgery varies depending on a number of factors. To measure the difference between what children are prescribed for analgesia post-operatively and what they are administered in the first 24 hours following surgery and to explore the influence of the analgesic being prescribed 'as required' or regularly. A retrospective chart review of 175 children was carried out at a children's hospital and a paediatric unit in a large teaching hospital. The analgesics that were administered in the first 24 hours post-surgery were morphine, codeine, diclofenac, ibuprofen and paracetamol. Each analgesic that was prescribed was administered in decreasing amounts relative to the strength of the analgesic. The highest percentage given was of paracetamol. When the prescription was for regular paracetamol, it was administered by nurses 88 per cent of the time, whereas when it was prescribed on a pro re nata (prn) or as required basis, 77 per cent of prescribed paracetamol was given. When analgesics were prescribed regularly, children had a considerably greater chance of receiving the analgesic. Nurses need to be more responsive to children in pain and acknowledge the value of prn prescribing of analgesics for children post-operatively. There is a need to increase nurses' confidence in assessing and responding to children's pain.

  9. Children's nurses' post-operative pain management practices: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Twycross, Alison

    2007-08-01

    Children continue to experience unrelieved moderate to severe pain post-operatively despite the evidence to guide practice being readily available. Previous studies have relied on self-report measures; there is a need to establish exactly how nurses manage children's pain in practice. To ascertain how nurses actually manage post-operative pain in children and whether pain management practices adhere to current best practice guidelines. An observational study was carried out. Structured and unstructured data were collected. A children's surgical ward in the English Midlands caring for children from birth to 16 years. Registered nurses (n=13) took part in the study. Each participant was observed continuously for a period of 5 hours per shift for two to four shifts each. The role of the observer as participant was adopted whereby the researcher could shadow the nurse and act primarily as an observer. Data were collected for 36 shifts (185 hours). While nurses administered analgesic drugs when a child complained of pain, in most other areas practices did not conform to current recommendations and are in need of improvement. Nurses did not, for example, routinely assess a child's pain, nor use non-drug methods of pain relief on a regular basis. The sub-optimal pain management practices may be attributable to several factors. The professional culture of nursing and/or ward culture may result in poor pain management practices being perpetuated. Nurses may not have the requisite theoretical knowledge to manage pain effectively. A lack of priority may also be attributed to pain management. These areas need exploring further.

  10. Post-operative pain therapy: prescription patterns in two Nigerian teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Faponle, A F; Soyannwo, O A

    2002-01-01

    In order to evaluate doctors prescriptions in post-operative pain management, a precoded, structured and pretested questionnaire was administered to resident doctors working in the department of surgery in two teaching hospitals in Nigeria. The questionnaires were completed voluntarily by all the doctors involved. Fifty-five completed questionnaires were analysed. Fifty-three per cent of the doctors aimed at relieving just enough pain for the patient to be comfortable. The others aimed at complete pain relief. Drug availability was the most important factor determining what the doctors prescribed. Anaesthetists had little or no influence on their choice of drugs. Forty-five per cent of the doctors thought that they had been adequately educated in pain control. However, the level of training did not influence the response (p > 0.05). Intramuscular opioid, 6-8 hourly, was the most preferred route of drug administration. It was concluded that prescribing patterns for post-operative pain therapy in Nigeria has changed little in the last decade. The new treatment modalities, which are being utilized in developed countries, are still not being used in this country.

  11. Intraligamental analgesia for post-operative pain control in children having dental extractions under general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Anand, P; Wilson, R; Sheehy, E C

    2005-03-01

    This was to assess the effectiveness and safety of intraligamental local analgesia (ILA) for postoperative pain control in children having dental extractions under general anaesthesia (GA). The variables affecting the effectiveness of ILA were also investigated. Data were collected from children having permanent molars extracted under GA using a randomised half mouth study design. ILA (bupivicaine 0.5% with 1:200,000 adrenaline) was used on the randomly assigned experimental side prior to extraction of the teeth, and the contralateral control side received no ILA. Children were interviewed pre- and post-operatively by the principal investigator (PA) who was blind to the side of ILA. Pre- and post-operative anxiety levels of each child were measured using the Venham Picture Test (VPT). Patients were asked to rate which side was better in terms of pain control, whether they felt numbness and whether they preferred the numbness. Their post-operative pain levels were also measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Self-inflicted trauma following ILA was noted. Thirty children, with a mean age of 11.3 years (SD+/-1.7) completed the study. None of the patients had self-inflicted soft tissue trauma following ILA. Nineteen children (63%) found that pain control was better post-operatively on the side with ILA. Twenty-one children (70%) reported numbness following ILA of whom 14 (67%) said that they preferred this. VAS scores were not significantly different between the experimental and control sides. A higher percentage of boys (85%) than girls (47%) rated the ILA side "better" (p = 0.034). VPT scores were significantly higher for girls postoperatively (p = 0.048). ILA was a useful and safe adjunct for postoperative pain control in children having permanent teeth extracted under GA. The technique was found to be more effective in boys than girls. However, less than half the children in this study preferred the side with numbness. Further research is needed to

  12. [Mesenteric cyst is a rare origin for abdominal pain in children].

    PubMed

    Dawar, Mirwais; Madsen, Mogens Rørbæk

    2015-02-16

    A ten-year-old boy with known episodes of moderate abdominal pain during 18 months suddenly developed severe abdominal pain, and a CT scan showed a 25 × 15 cm cystic process. The patient was operated and a mesenteric cyst was removed along with 15 cm of small bowel. Post-operative course was uneventful. Mesenteric cysts are rare, but should be considered as an origin for abdominal pain in children, particularly after exclusion of more common diagnoses.

  13. Initial evaluation of a canine stifle arthrotomy post-operative pain model.

    PubMed

    Tomas, A; Bledsoe, D; Wall, S; Davidson, G; Lascelles, B D X

    2015-06-01

    Most models of acute post-operative orthopedic pain involve the injection of a clinically irrelevant pro-inflammatory agent. The ideal model should, however, be clinically relevant and allow full functional recovery of enrolled animals after research is completed. This study explored the validity of a model employing arthrotomy and objectively measured limb use. Six purpose-bred Beagles underwent arthrotomies on each stifle with a washout period in between. Using a randomized crossover design, each dog received placebo and an extended-release buprenorphine (ER-Bup) preparation. Static and dynamic ground reaction forces (GRFs) were measured prior to and for 72 h following surgery using a pressure sensitive walkway (PSW). GRFs for each hind limb were compared using difference (delta), and symmetry indices (SI). The effects of surgery and of treatment were analyzed using repeated measures ANCOVA. The results indicated significantly decreased limb use compared to baseline for placebo, and significantly increased limb use in the ER-Bup group over placebo at all times for % bodyweight distribution (%BWdistrib), peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI). There was a significant treatment by time interaction for velocity (P = 0.03) and %BWdistrib (P = 0.01, 0.003). Overall, the data show that reduced limb use was present for at least 72 h following arthrotomy. In addition, the use of the ER-Bup analgesic decreased lameness, confirming the validity of this approach as a model of post-operative pain. Subjective assessments did not detect the pain-inducing effects of arthrotomy or pain-alleviating effects of treatment, and subjective measures of procedural pain in research dogs need to be developed.

  14. Assessment of post-operative pain management among acutely and electively admitted patients - a Swedish ward perspective.

    PubMed

    Magidy, Mahnaz; Warrén-Stomberg, Margareta; Bjerså, Kristofer

    2016-04-01

    Swedish health care is regulated to involve the patient in every intervention process. In the area of post-operative pain, it is therefore important to evaluate patient experience of the quality of pain management. Previous research has focused on mapping this area but not on comparing experiences between acutely and electively admitted patients. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of post-operative pain management quality among acutely and electively admitted patients at a Swedish surgical department performing soft-tissue surgery. A survey study design was used as a method based on a multidimensional instrument to assess post-operative pain management: Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management (SCQIPP). Consecutive patients at all wards of a university hospital's surgical department were included. Data collection was performed at hospital discharge. In total, 160 patients participated, of whom 40 patients were acutely admitted. A significant difference between acutely and electively admitted patients was observed in the SCQIPP area of environment, whereas acute patients rated the post-operative pain management quality lower compared with those who were electively admitted. There may be a need for improvement in the areas of post-operative pain management in Sweden, both specifically and generally. There may also be a difference in the experience of post-operative pain quality between acutely and electively admitted patients in this study, specifically in the area of environment. In addition, low levels of the perceived quality of post-operative pain management among the patients were consistent, but satisfaction with analgesic treatment was rated as good. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Coblation tonsillectomy versus dissection tonsillectomy: a comparison of intraoperative time, intraoperative blood loss and post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Izny Hafiz, Z; Rosdan, S; Mohd Khairi, M D

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the intraoperative time, intraoperative blood loss and post operative pain between coblation tonsillectomy and cold tonsillectomy in the same patient. A prospective single blind control trial was carried out on 34 patients whom underwent tonsillectomy. The patients with known bleeding disorder, history of unilateral peritonsillar abscess and unilateral tonsillar hypertrophy were excluded. Operations were done by a single surgeon using cold dissection tonsillectomy in one side while coblation tonsillectomy in the other. Intraoperative time, intraoperative blood loss and post operative pain during the first 3 days were compared between the two methods. Results showed that the intraoperative time was significantly shorter (p<0.001) and intraoperative blood loss was significantly lesser (p<0.001) in coblation tonsillectomy as compared to cold tonsillectomy. Post operative pain score was significantly less at 6 hours post operation (p<0.001) in coblation tonsillectomy as compared to cold tonsillectomy. However, there were no differences in the post operative pain scores on day 1, 2 and 3. In conclusion, coblation tonsillectomy does have superiority in improving intraoperative efficiency in term of intraoperative time and bleeding compared to cold dissection tonsillectomy. The patient will benefit with minimal post operative pain in the immediate post surgery duration.

  16. Barriers to, and facilitators of post-operative pain management in Iranian nursing: a qualitative research study.

    PubMed

    Rejeh, N; Ahmadi, F; Mohammadi, E; Anoosheh, M; Kazemnejad, A

    2008-12-01

    Unrelieved post-operative pain continues to be a major clinical challenge, despite advances in management. Although nurses have embraced a crucial role in pain management, its extent is often limited in Iranian nursing practice. To determine Iranian nurses' perceptions of the barriers and facilitators influencing their management of post-operative pain. This study was qualitative with 26 participant nurses. Data were obtained through semi-structured serial interviews and analysed using the content analysis method. Several themes emerged to describe the factors that hindered or facilitated post-operative pain management. These were grouped into two main themes: (1) barriers to pain management after surgery with subgroups such as powerlessness, policies and rules of organization, physicians leading practice, time constraints, limited communication, interruption of activities relating to pain, and (2) factors that facilitated post-operative pain management that included the nurse-patient relationship, nurses' responsibility, the physician as a colleague, and nurses' knowledge and skills. Postoperative pain management in Iran is contextually complex, and may be controversial. Participants believed that in this context accurate pain management is difficult for nurses due to the barriers mentioned. Therefore, nurses make decisions and act as a patient comforter for pain after surgery because of the barriers to effective pain management.

  17. Feasibility of international data collection and feedback on post-operative pain data: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Zaslansky, R; Chapman, C R; Rothaug, J; Bäckström, R; Brill, S; Davidson, E; Elessi, K; Fletcher, D; Fodor, L; Karanja, E; Konrad, C; Kopf, A; Leykin, Y; Lipman, A; Puig, M; Rawal, N; Schug, S; Ullrich, K; Volk, T; Meissner, W

    2012-03-01

    Post-operative pain exacts a high toll from patients, families, healthcare professionals and healthcare systems worldwide. PAIN-OUT is a research project funded by the European Union's 7th Framework Program designed to develop effective, evidence-based approaches to improve pain management after surgery, including creating a registry for feedback, benchmarking and decision support. In preparation for PAIN-OUT, we conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of international data collection with feedback to participating sites. Adult orthopaedic or general surgery patients consented to participate between May and October 2008 at 14 collaborating hospitals in 13 countries. Project staff collected patient-reported outcomes and process data from 688 patients and entered the data into an online database. Project staff in 10 institutions met the enrolment criteria of collecting data from at least 50 patients. The completeness and quality of the data, as assessed by rate of missing data, were acceptable; only 2% of process data and 0.06% of patient-reported outcome data were missing. Participating institutions received access to select items as Web-based feedback comparing their outcomes to those of the other sites, presented anonymously. We achieved proof of concept because staff and patients in all 14 sites cooperated well despite marked differences in cultures, nationalities and languages, and a central database management team was able to provide valuable feedback to all. © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  18. Investigation of Central Pain Processing in Post-Operative Shoulder Pain and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Carolina; Fillingim, Roger B.; Bishop, Mark; Wu, Samuel S.; Wright, Thomas W.; Moser, Michael; Farmer, Kevin; George, Steven Z.

    2014-01-01

    Measures of central pain processing like conditioned pain modulation (CPM), and suprathreshold heat pain response (SHPR) have been described to assess different components of central pain modulatory mechanisms. Central pain processing potentially play a role in the development of postsurgical pain, however, the role of CPM and SHPR in explaining postoperative clinical pain and disability is still unclear. Seventy eight patients with clinical shoulder pain were included in this study. Patients were examined before shoulder surgery, at 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. The primary outcome measures were pain intensity and upper extremity disability. Analyses revealed that the change score (baseline – 3 months) of 5th pain rating of SHPR accounted for a significant amount of variance in 6 month postsurgical clinical pain intensity and disability after age, sex, preoperative pain intensity, and relevant psychological factors were considered. The present study suggests that baseline measures of central pain processing were not predictive of 6 month postoperative pain outcome. Instead, the 3 month change in SHPR might be a relevant factor in the transition to elevated 6-month postoperative pain and disability outcomes. In patients with shoulder pain, the 3 month change in a measure of central pain processing might be a relevant factor in the transition to elevated 6-month postoperative pain and disability scores. PMID:24042347

  19. The impact of intra-operative sufentanil dosing on post-operative pain, hyperalgesia and morphine consumption after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Fechner, J; Ihmsen, H; Schüttler, J; Jeleazcov, C

    2013-04-01

    There is an ongoing debate whether opioids when used for intra-operative analgesia may enhance post-operative pain. We studied the effect of two different intra-operative dosings of sufentanil on post-operative morphine consumption, pain and hyperalgesia after cardiac anaesthesia. Forty-two male patients (age: 48-74 years) undergoing first-time coronary artery bypass graft surgery were randomized to one of two groups receiving total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol and a target controlled infusion of sufentanil with a target of 0.4 ng/mL (group SL, n = 20) or 0.8 ng/mL (group SH, n = 22) plasma concentration. Post-operative morphine requirement in the first 48 h was assessed using patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Pain rating during deep inspiration, and the extent of primary and secondary hyperalgesia near the sternotomy wound were assessed. The post-operative morphine requirements in the first 48 h were 0.68 ± 0.21 mg/kg in group SL and 0.96 ± 0.44 mg/kg in group SH (p < 0.05). In group SL, pain during deep inspiration was significantly lower on the first post-operative day (p < 0.05). Primary hyperalgesia had its maximum on the second and third post-operative day, without a difference between the two groups. The extent of secondary mechanical pinprick hyperalgesia was not different between the groups. Intra-operative dosing of sufentanil significantly influenced post-operative morphine consumption, pain and hyperalgesia. For cardiac anaesthesia in combination with propofol, a sufentanil target concentration of 0.4 ng/mL may be preferable. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  20. Ear Acupuncture for Post-Operative Pain Associated with Ambulatory Arthroscopic Knee Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-14

    E7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH 14 Jan 2014 Final Report Ear acupuncture for post-operative pain associated with ambulatory arthroscopic...DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. The purpose of this study is to compare ear acupuncture plus standard therapy versus...3298 Ear Acupuncture for Post-operative Pa111 Assoc1ated With Ambulatory Arthroscopic Knee Surgery A Randomized Controlled Trial ’• V ’’ ’-’ I

  1. Comparison of the effect of pre- and post-operative physical therapy versus post-operative physical therapy alone on pain and recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmed; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of pre-operative and post-operative physical therapy versus post-operative physical therapy alone on pain and recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty patients (18 males and 32 females) ranging in age from 48 to 80 years (mean 63.28, SD 9.44) participated in a 6-week two-arm randomized rater-blinded trial. One group received pre- and post-operative physical therapy whereas the other group received only post-operative physical therapy. Pain and function were measured with a visual analogue scale and a lower extremity functional scale at baseline (pre-operative) as well as week 3 and week 6 post-operative. [Results] The differences in pain intensity and functional score at week 3 and week 6 post-operative remained statistically insignificant between the two groups. [Conclusion] The reduction of pain and recovery of function was similar in subjects who received pre- and post-operative physical therapy and those who received only post-operative physical therapy after total knee arthroplasty. Additional pre-operative physical therapy did not bring about any further improvement in pain intensity or recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty.

  2. Histological analysis of tonsillectomies: relationship with surgical technique, post-operative pain and haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Magdalena, M L; Solé, A; Blanco, V; Rodrigo, J P

    2016-12-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal technique to decrease post-tonsillectomy morbidity. Histopathological analysis can estimate collateral tissue damage. This study compared histological findings for tonsils removed by cold or electrocautery dissection and their relationship with post-operative complications. Two adult out-patient groups were included in the study: 37 who underwent cold dissection and 37 who underwent electrocautery dissection. Histological analysis was used to assess tissue damage. Tissue damage was significantly higher in the electrocautery dissection group (p = 0.002), as were the number of emergency department visits (p = 0.01) and the need for supplemental analgesia (p = 0.013). Patients in the cold dissection group experienced less pain (p = 0.001) and fewer secondary haemorrhage episodes. Cold dissection produces less tissue damage, which is associated with lower incidence of complications. This study suggests that cold dissection is the technique of choice for tonsillectomy.

  3. Grading of Extraction and Its Relationship with Post-operative Pain and Trismus, along with Proposed Grading for Trismus

    PubMed Central

    Vashisth, Shirin; Mishra, Saurabh; Singh, Surendra Pratap; Sharma, Shalini

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extraction of mandibular third molars are somewhat a matter of interest because of its malpositioning , curved roots, proximity to vital structures due to this the procedure is often associated with post operative complications like pain and trismus. The extraction of third molar was classified in four grads according to the difficulty of the procedure. Aims: The purpose of this paper is to find any significant relationship between grading of extraction and post operative complications like pain and trismus. Materials and Methods: A total number of 180 patients need to go for extraction of third molar was included in the study. The variables taken into account were grading of extraction, pain six hour post operatively trismus one day after extraction, and trismus five day after extraction. The four grades of extractions as described by Parent in 1974 were statistically analyzed by computing pearson product moment correlation coefficient with post operative pain and trismus first and fifth day to find any co relation between them. Results: The grading of extraction was found significantly correlated with post operative pain, trismus one day after and fifth day of surgery. PMID:25121055

  4. Incident reporting in post-operative patients managed by acute pain service.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Syeda Fauzia; Hamid, Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Incident reporting is a reliable and inexpensive tool used in anaesthesia to identify errors in patient management. A hospital incident reporting system was already present in our hospital, but we were unable to find any incident related to acute pain management. Hence, acute pain service (APS) was started for voluntary incident reporting in post-operative patients to identify critical incidents, review the root cause and suggest remedial measures. All post-operative patients managed by APS were included in this observational study. A proforma was developed by APS, which included information about the type of incident (equipment and patient-related, human errors), severity of incident, person responsible and suggestions to prevent the same incident in the future. Patients and medical staff were informed about the reporting system. Whenever an incident was identified, a proforma was filled out by APS resident and data entered in SPSS programme. Total of 98 (1.80%) incidents were reported in 5432 patients managed by APS during 3 years period. Average age of the patients was 46 ± 17 years. Majority of incidents were related to epidural care (71%) and occurred in surgical wards (87%). Most of the incidents occurred due to human error and infusion delivery set-related defects. Incident reporting proved to be a feasible method of improving quality care in developing countries. It not only provides valuable information about areas which needed improvement, but also helped in developing strategies to improve care. Knowledge and attitudes of medical and paramedical staff are identified as the targeted area for improvement.

  5. Systematic review of the effectiveness of nursing interventions in reducing or relieving post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Linda; Chang, Anne; Fraser, Jennifer A; Gaskill, Deanne; Nash, Robyn; Wallace, Karen

    2008-12-01

    Objectives  The primary objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of nursing interventions for the relief/reduction of post-operative pain when compared with either standard care or other nursing interventions. Inclusion criteria  Types of studies This review included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and other quasi-randomised experimental research designs. Types of participants Adults treated for post-operative pain in an acute care hospital. Types of interventions Interventions included in the review were only those directly administered by nursing staff such as: (i) administration of analgesia: including oral, intramuscular injection, patient controlled analgesia, epidural; (ii) pre-operative patient education; (iii) assessment and documentation of intensity of pain at regular intervals; (iv) protocols, clinical pathways or flow-sheets used in the management of pain; and (v) non-pharmacological interventions such as massage and relaxation. Types of outcome measures The primary outcome was the relief or reduction of post-operative pain. Other measures included analgesia consumption, patient satisfaction and length of hospital stay. Search strategy  Search terms were chosen after reviewing text words and MeSH terms in relevant articles and databases. A search for published and unpublished research covering the period 1985-2004 (inclusive) was conducted, using 11 major electronic databases. Reference lists of retrieved articles were hand searched. The search was restricted to reports published in English. Assessment of quality  The methodological quality of eligible studies was appraised by two independent reviewers, using a standardised critical appraisal tool. Differences in opinion were decided by consensus after discussion with a third investigator. Data extraction and analysis  Data were extracted from the studies that met the criteria for methodological quality. Two reviewers independently extracted data for each

  6. Preoperative scar hyperalgesia is associated with post-operative pain in women undergoing a repeat Caesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Ortner, C M; Granot, M; Richebé, P; Cardoso, M; Bollag, L; Landau, R

    2013-01-01

    Over 1.4 million Caesarean deliveries are performed annually in the United States, out of which 30% are elective repeat procedures. Post-operative hyperalgesia is associated with an increased risk for persistent post-surgical pain; however, there are no data on whether residual scar hyperalgesia (SHA) from a previous Caesarean delivery (CD) persists until the next delivery. We hypothesized that residual SHA may be present in a substantial proportion of women and is associated with increased post-operative pain. One hundred and sixty-three women scheduled for a repeat CD under spinal anaesthesia were enrolled into the study. Mechanical temporal summation (mTS) and SHA index were measured preoperatively. SHA was considered present when the index was >0. Post-operative pain scores at 12, 24 and 48 h and wound hyperalgesia (WHA) at 48 h were recorded. SHA was present in 67 women 41% with a median SHA index of 0.42 (Q (25)  = 0.25; Q (75)  = 1.1, range 0.03-4.25). Women with SHA had overall higher post-operative pain scores and SHA was correlated with preoperative mTS (r = 0.164, p < 0.05), post-operative pain severity (r = 0.25, p < 0.002) and WHA at 48 h (r = 0.608, p < 0.001). Severe pain (visual analogue pain scale-S48 ≥ 7, n = 20) was predicted with a sensitivity and specificity of 60% and 62%, respectively. Positive predictive value was 18% and negative predictive value was 92%. Preoperative SHA is present in 41% of women scheduled for repeat CD and is associated with increased mTS and post-operative pain. Screening for preoperative SHA may predict women at risk for increased post-operative pain, and guide post-operative analgesia to include anti-hyperalgesic drugs. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  7. Effects of Modification of Pain Protocol on Incidence of Post Operative Nausea and Vomiting.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Snir, Nimrod; Sharfman, Zachary T; Rinehart, Joseph B; Calderon, Michael-David; Bahn, Esther; Harrington, Brian; Ahn, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    A Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) care model applies a standardized multidisciplinary approach to patient care using evidence-based medicine to modify and improve protocols. Analysis of patient outcome measures, such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), allows for refinement of existing protocols to improve patient care. We aim to compare the incidence of PONV in patients who underwent primary total joint arthroplasty before and after modification of our PSH pain protocol. All total joint replacement PSH (TJR-PSH) patients who underwent primary THA (n=149) or TKA (n=212) in the study period were included. The modified protocol added a single dose of intravenous (IV) ketorolac given in the operating room and oxycodone immediate release orally instead of IV Hydromorphone in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU). The outcomes were (1) incidence of PONV and (2) average pain score in the PACU. We also examined the effect of primary anesthetic (spinal vs. GA) on these outcomes. The groups were compared using chi-square tests of proportions. The incidence of post-operative nausea in the PACU decreased significantly with the modified protocol (27.4% vs. 38.1%, p=0.0442). There was no difference in PONV based on choice of anesthetic or procedure. Average PACU pain scores did not differ significantly between the two protocols. Simple modifications to TJR-PSH multimodal pain management protocol, with decrease in IV narcotic use, resulted in a lower incidence of postoperative nausea, without compromising average PACU pain scores. This report demonstrates the need for continuous monitoring of PSH pathways and implementation of revisions as needed.

  8. Scalpel versus diathermy of midline skin incisions: comparison of mean pain scores on second post-operative day.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Summaya; Ali, Aun; Zainab, Saima; Junaid Khan, Muhammad Taha

    2017-10-01

    To determine the mean post-operative pain in scalpel versus diathermy opening of midline laparotomies. The randomised controlled study was conducted at Civil Hospital and Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from May to November 2010, and comprised patients undergoing midline laparotomy. Patients were equally divided into two groups; those who received incision with diathermy were placed in group A, and those who received incision with scalpel in group B. Mean post-operative pain scores were recorded using numerical analogue scale on second post-operative day. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 58 patients, there were 29(50%) in each group. The overall mean age of the patients was 31.8±12.8 years. Besides, 40(68.9%) patients were male. The mean post-operative pain scores at 48 hours in diathermy group was 1.48±0.68 while in scalpel group it was 2.17±0.46 (p<0.05). The use of diathermy for midline laparotomy incision had significant advantage over scalpel in reducing pain on second post-operative day.

  9. Challenges in the optimisation of post-operative pain management with opioids in obese patients: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lloret-Linares, C; Lopes, A; Declèves, X; Serrie, A; Mouly, S; Bergmann, J-F; Perrot, S

    2013-09-01

    An increasing number of obese patients are undergoing surgery, particularly bariatric and orthopaedic surgery. The physiological differences between obese and normal-weight subjects may modify not only anaesthetic requirements during surgery but also post-operative analgesic management, raising a number of challenges in a critical period. In this review, we analyse studies of post-operative pain management with opioids in obese subjects. We discuss the genetic factors common to pain and obesity and the factors potentially modifying opioid pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in obese patients, and we analyse the overall efficacy and safety of opioids for pain management during the post-operative period in obese patients. Both modifications to surgical methods and additional analgesic treatments to decrease the requirement for opioids may improve early rehabilitation and quality of care and reduce adverse effects in obese patients.

  10. The effect of Kombucha on post-operative intra-abdominal adhesion formation in rats.

    PubMed

    Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Mohammadi, Hussein Benagozar

    2009-04-01

    Peritoneal adhesions are fibrous bands of tissues formed between organs that are normally separated and/or between organs and the internal body wall after peritoneal injury. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of intra-peritoneal administration of Kombucha on intra-peritoneal adhesions. Eighty Wistar rats were subjected to standardized lesion by scraping model and were randomly divided into two groups. Group I received no treatment, and Group II received 15 ml of Kombucha solution intra-peritoneally. On the post-operative 14th day adhesion intensity score, inflammatory cell reaction and number of adhesion bands were determined. In the control group, there were no rats with grade 0 and I adhesions. In the group II, there were 26 rats (78.8%) with grade 0-2 adhesions. Adhesion intensity was significantly less in group II (P<0.0001). Number of adhesion bands was significantly less in group II (P<0.001). It was concluded that intra-peritoneal administration of Kombucha might be useful for preventing peritoneal adhesions.

  11. Post-operative pain management in head and neck cancer patients: predictive factors and efficacy of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, C; Malagò, M; Crema, L; Aimoni, C; Matarazzo, T; Bortolazzi, S; Ciorba, A; Pelucchi, S; Pastore, A

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing interest about all aspects of pain sensation for patients undergoing head and neck surgery, and efforts have been made to better assess, monitor and reduce the occurrence of pain. The aetiology of pain is considered to be "multifactorial", as it is defined by several features such as personal experience, quality perception, location, intensity and emotional impact. The aim of this paper is: (i) to evaluate the efficacy of analgesic treatment in patients with head and neck cancer treated by surgery, and (ii) to study the variables and predictive factors that can influence the occurrence of pain. A total of 164 patients, affected by head and neck cancer and surgically treated, between December 2009 and December 2013, were included in this study. Data collected include age, gender, assessment of anaesthetic risk, tumour localisation, pathological cancer stage, TNM stage, type of surgery performed, complexity and duration of surgery, post-operative complications, postoperative days of hospital stay and pain evaluation on days 0, 1, 3 and 5 post-surgery. We studied the appropriateness of analgesic therapy in terms of incidence and prevalence of post-operative pain; we also related pain to patient characteristics, disease and surgical treatment to determine possible predictive factors. The population studied received adequate pain control through analgesic therapy immediately post-surgery and in the following days. No associations between gender, age and post-operative pain were found, whereas pathological cancer stage, complexity of surgery and tumour site were significantly associated with the risk of post-operative pain. Adequate pain control is essential in oncological patients, and particularly in head and neck cancer patients as the prevalence of pain in this localisation is reported to be higher than in other anatomical sites. Improved comprehension of the biological and psychological factors that characterise pain perception will help to

  12. Hypothermia Increases Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression and Decreases Post-Operative Intra-Abdominal Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Chang; Wang, Hsuan-Mao; Chou, Tzung-Hsin; Wu, Meng-Che; Hsueh, Kuang-Lung; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia during operation decreases postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. We sought to determine the most appropriate duration of hypothermia, and whether hypothermia affects the expression of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Methods 80 male BALB/c mice weighing 25–30 g are randomized into one of five groups: adhesion model with infusion of 15°C saline for 15 minutes (A); 30 minutes (B); 45 minute (C); adhesion model without infusion of cold saline (D); and sham operation without infusion of cold saline (E). Adhesion scores and tPA levels in the peritoneum fluid levels were analyzed on postoperative days 1, 7, and 14. Results On day 14, the cold saline infusion groups (A, B, and C) had lower adhesion scores than the without infusion of cold saline group (D). However, only group B (cold saline infusion for 30 minutes) had a significantly lower adhesion scores than group D. Also, group B was found to have 3.4 fold, 2.3 fold, and 2.2 fold higher levels of tPA than group D on days 1, 7, and 14 respectively. Conclusions Our results suggest that cold saline infusion for 30 minutes was the optimum duration to decrease postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. The decrease in the adhesion formations could be partly due to an increase in the level of tPA. PMID:27583464

  13. Immediate post-operative pain in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery with bone patellar tendon bone graft versus hamstring graft.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Kapoor, Dheeraj; Kapoor, Love; Malhotra, Anubhav; Masih, Gladson David; Kapoor, Anil; Joshi, Shweta

    2016-06-08

    Pain in the immediate post-operative period after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery, apart from an unpleasant experience for the patient, can act as a barrier for static quadriceps contractions and optimum execution of the initial rehabilitation protocol resulting in slow recovery and a later return to full function for a sportsperson. There is no report in the literature comparing pain in the immediate post-operative period after using the two most widely used autografts, bone patellar tendon bone (BPTB) graft and hamstring graft. The present study compared the visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score in the immediate post-operative period after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with the BPTB and hamstring autografts. Both groups consisted of 50 patients each. The mean age of the BPTB and hamstring cohorts was 26.9 ± 7.3 years (age range 18-59 years) and 26.7 ± 9.0 years (age range 17-52 years), respectively. Unpaired t test was applied to compare pain scores between the BPTB and hamstring cohorts. In the present study, patients in the BPTB cohort showed higher mean pain scores across all the post-operative time intervals except at 6 h. However, the difference in the mean VAS pain score at post-operative 6, 12,18, 24, 36 and 48 h in the two groups was statistically not significant (p value of 1, 0.665, 0.798, 0.377, 0.651 and 0.215 at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36 and 48 h, respectively). Our study concludes that the arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft and hamstring autograft is associated with similar pain in the immediate post-operative period. As a result, aggressive physiotherapy regime is not affected by the type of graft being used for ACL reconstruction, as the pain scores in the immediate post-operative period are similar for both techniques. Clinical Trials Registry-India, CTRI/2016/01/006502.

  14. Chemical Mediators of Inflammation and Resolution in Post-Operative Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Padmini S.; Leeson, Stanley; Porter, Timothy F.; Owens, Christopher D.; Kim, Ji Min; Conte, Michael S.; Serhan, Charles N.; Gelman, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Temporal–metabolomic studies of local mediators during inflammation and its resolution uncovered novel pathways and mediators, e.g., lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins that stimulate key resolution responses. Since these studies were carried out with isolated human cells and in animal models, it is important to determine in humans whether temporal profiles between pro-inflammatory mediators and pro-resolving mediators are demonstrable in vivo. To this end, we examined patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery. Profiles of mediators including eicosanoids were assessed in addition to pro-resolving mediators. The results demonstrate temporal relationships for local-acting peptides (e.g., VEGF, IL-10, TGFβ) and lipid mediators (leukotrienes and resolvins). In addition, profiles obtained for AAA patients divided into two groups based on their temporal profile: one group consistent with a pro-inflammatory and another with a resolving profile. Together, these translational metabolomic profiles demonstrate for the first time the temporal relationships between local mediators in humans relevant in inflammation resolution. PMID:21286796

  15. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    PubMed

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis.

  16. Low post-operative mortality after surgery on patients with screening-detected abdominal aortic aneurysms: a Swedvasc registry study.

    PubMed

    Linné, A; Smidfelt, K; Langenskiöld, M; Hultgren, R; Nordanstig, J; Kragsterman, B; Lindström, D

    2014-12-01

    Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) substantially reduces aneurysm-related mortality in men and is increasing worldwide. This cohort study compares post-operative mortality and complications in men with screening-detected vs. non-screening-detected AAAs. Data were extracted from the Swedish National Registry for Vascular Surgery (Swedvasc) for all screening-detected men treated for AAA (n = 350) and age-matched controls treated for non-screening-detected AAA (n = 350). There were no differences in baseline characteristics besides age, which was lower in the screening-detected group than in the non-screening-detected group (median 66 vs. 68, p < .001). Open repair was used more frequently than endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) in patients with screening-detected AAAs than in non-screening-detected controls (56% vs. 45% p = .005). No differences in major post-operative complications at 30 days were observed between the groups. In patients treated with open repair there were no differences in 30-day, 90-day or 1-year mortality in screening-detected patients compared to non-screening-detected controls (1.0% vs. 3.2% p = .25, 2.1% vs. 4.5% p = .23, 4.1% vs. 5.8% p = .61). None of the patients treated with EVAR in either group died within 30 days. The 90-day mortality after EVAR was lower in patients with screening-detected AAA than in those with non-screening-detected AAAs (0.0% vs. 3.1%, p = .04). No difference in the 1-year mortality was detected in the EVAR-patients between the two groups (1.4% vs. 4.7%, p = .12). The contemporary post-operative mortality after AAA surgery was low in this national audit of patients with screening-detected AAAs and age-matched controls. Patients with screening-detected AAAs have the same frequency of complications at 30 days as patients with non-screening-detected AAA. This study gives further support to national screening programs for the detection of AAA in men. Copyright © 2014 European Society for Vascular Surgery

  17. What is the impact of theoretical knowledge on children's nurses' post-operative pain management practices? An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Twycross, Alison

    2007-10-01

    Despite the availability of the evidence to guide pain management practices, practices are often sub-optimal with children experiencing moderate to severe pain post-operatively. Limited theoretical knowledge about managing pain has been suggested as one reason for this. Several studies have identified gaps in nurses' theoretical knowledge. However, the affect of theoretical knowledge on pain management practices has not been explored. This explored whether there is a relationship between nurses' theoretical knowledge and the quality of their practices. Nurses (n=13) on one children's surgical ward were shadowed for a five-hour period during two-four shifts. Data about post-operative pain management practices were collected using a pain management checklist and field notes. Nurses (n=12) also completed the revised pain management knowledge test. Questionnaire scores were compared to the observational data. No positive relationship was found between nurses' level of theoretical knowledge and how well they actually managed pain. Nurses did not appear to routinely apply theoretical knowledge in practice. This may explain, at least in part, why pain management practices remain poor despite the evidence to guide practice being readily available. The hypothesis, put forward in other studies, that increasing nurses' theoretical knowledge about pain will improve practices may be overly simplistic.

  18. Utility of numerical and visual analog scales for evaluating the post-operative pain in rural patients.

    PubMed

    Mudgalkar, Nikhil; Bele, Samir D; Valsangkar, Sameer; Bodhare, Trupti N; Gorre, Mahipal

    2012-11-01

    Visual analog scales (VAS) and numeric analog scales (NAS) are used to assess post-operative pain, but few studies indicate their usefulness in rural illiterate population in India. This study was designed to 1) Compare the impact of literacy on the ability to indicate pain rating on VAS and NAS in post-operative rural patients. 2) Assess the level of agreement between the pain scales. Cross sectional, hospital based study. Informed consent was obtained from patients prior to undergoing surgical procedures in a teaching hospital. Post surgery, patients who were conscious and coherent, were asked to rate pain on both VAS and NAS. The pain ratings were obtained within 24 hours of surgery and within 5 minutes of each other. Percentages, chi square test, regression analysis. A total of 105 patients participated in the study. 43 (41%) of the sample was illiterate. 82 (78.1%) were able to rate pain on VAS while 81 (77.1%) were able to rate pain on NAS. There was no significant association between pain ratings and type of surgery, duration of surgery and nature of anaesthesia. In multivariate analysis, age, sex and literacy had no significant association with the ability to rate pain on VAS (P value 0.652, 0.967, 0.328 respectively). Similarly, no significant association was obtained between age, sex and literacy and ability to rate pain on NAS (P value 0.713, 0.405, 0.875 respectively). Correlation coefficient between the scales was 0.693. VAS and NAS can be used interchangeably in Indian rural population as post-operative pain assessment tools irrespective of literacy status.

  19. The effect of complementary therapies on post-operative pain control in ambulatory knee surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Timothy; Downham, Christopher; Barlow, David

    2013-10-01

    Ambulatory knee surgery is a common procedure with over 100,000 knee arthroscopies performed in the U.K. in 2010-2011. Pain after surgery can decrease patient satisfaction, delay discharge, and decrease cost effectiveness. Multi-modal therapies, including complementary therapies, to improve pain control after surgery have been recommended. However, a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the use of complementary therapies to enhance pain control after ambulatory knee surgery is lacking, and this article aims to address this deficit. CINHAL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, AMED and CENTRAL databases were searched. Only Randomised Controlled Trials were included. All eligible papers were quality assessed using the Jadad system, and data was extracted using piloted forms. Two independent reviewers performed each stage of the review. Full details of the study methodology can be found on Prospero, a systematic review register. Five studies satisfied our eligibility criteria: three reporting on acupuncture, one on homeopathy, and one on acupoints. Acupoint pressure was the only study that demonstrated reduced pain compared with placebo. This study was the least methodologically robust. Arnica, although demonstrating a significant reduction in swelling, did not affect post-operative pain. Acupuncture did not affect post-operative pain; however, a reduction in ibuprofen use was demonstrated in two studies. Before recommending complementary therapy for routine use in ambulatory knee surgery, further work is required. Two areas of future research likely to bear fruit are demonstrating robust evidence for the effect of acupoint pressure on post-operative pain, and quantifying the positive effect of homeopathic arnica on post-operative swelling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Physiological Indices of Stress Prior to and Following Total Knee Arthroplasty Predict the Occurrence of Severe Post-Operative Pain.

    PubMed

    Cremeans-Smith, Julie K; Greene, Kenneth; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2016-05-01

    The severe pain and disability associated with osteoarthritis often motivate individuals to undergo arthroplastic surgery. However, a significant number of surgical patients continue to experience pain following surgery. Prior research has implicated both the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in the sensitization of pain receptors and chronic pain conditions. This study uses a prospective, observational, cohort design to examine whether physiological stress responses before and after surgery could predict post-operative pain severity. Participants included 110 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Physiological indices of stress included the measurement of catecholamine and cortisol levels in 15-hour urine samples collected prior to and 1 month following surgery, as well as in-hospital heart rate and blood pressure (before and after surgery), which were abstracted from medical records. Patients completed the pain subscale of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) [Bellamy et al., J Orthop Rheumatol 1: , 95 (1988)] 2.5 weeks prior to surgery and at a 3-month follow-up. Contrary to expectations, lower stress hormone levels at baseline were related to more severe post-operative pain. Data at later time points, however, supported our hypothesis: cardiovascular tone shortly before surgery and urinary levels of epinephrine 1 month following surgery were positively related to pain severity 3 months later. Results suggest that the occurrence of post-operative pain can be predicted on the basis of stress physiology prior to and following arthroplastic surgery. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Maintenance of Pain in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Czyzewski, Danita I; Self, Mariella M; Williams, Amy E; Weidler, Erica M; Blatz, Allison M; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdominal pain frequency and compared the predictive value of 3 methods for assessing pain-stooling relations (ie, diary, parent report, child report). Seventy-six children (7-10 years old at baseline) who presented for medical treatment of functional abdominal pain were followed up 18 to 24 months later. Baseline anxiety and abdominal pain-stooling relations based on pain and stooling diaries and child- and parent questionnaires were examined in relationship to the persistence of abdominal pain frequency. Children's baseline anxiety was not related to persistence of pain frequency. Children who, however, displayed irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms at baseline maintained pain frequency at follow-up, whereas in children in whom there was no relationship between pain and stooling, pain frequency decreased. Pain and stool diaries and parent report of pain-stooling relations were predictive of pain persistence but child-report questionnaires were not. The presence of IBS symptoms in school-age children with functional abdominal pain appears to predict persistence of abdominal pain over time, whereas anxiety does not. Prospective pain and stooling diaries and parent report of IBS symptoms were predictors of pain maintenance, but child report of symptoms was not.

  2. Maintenance of Pain in Children with Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Czyzewski, Danita I.; Self, Mariella M.; Williams, Amy E.; Weidler, Erica M.; Blatz, Allison M.; Shulman, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdominal pain frequency and compared the predictive value of three methods for assessing pain-stooling relations (i.e., diary, parent report, child report). Methods Seventy-six children (7–10-years-old at baseline) who presented for medical treatment of functional abdominal pain were followed up 18–24 months later. Baseline anxiety and abdominal pain-stooling relations based on pain and stooling diaries and child- and parent-questionnaires were examined in relationship to the persistence of abdominal pain frequency. Results Children’s baseline anxiety was not related to persistence of pain frequency. However, children who displayed irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms at baseline maintained pain frequency at follow-up, whereas in children in whom there was no relationship between pain and stooling, pain frequency decreased. Pain and stool diaries and parent report of pain-stooling relations were predictive of pain persistence but child-report questionnaires were not. Conclusions The presence of IBS symptoms in school age children with functional abdominal pain appears to predict persistence of abdominal pain over time, while anxiety does not. Prospective pain and stooling diaries and parent report of IBS symptoms were predictors of pain maintenance, but child report of symptoms was not. PMID:26301615

  3. A multicentre survey of the current acute post-operative pain management practices in tertiary care teaching hospitals in Maharashtra

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, Samina Khaliloddin; Razvi, Syed Shamim; Kulkarni, Sadhana Sudhir; Parab, Swapnil

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Undertreated pain can have negative consequences on patients' health as well as the health-care system. The present study was aimed at identifying the current trends in post-operative pain management and availability of acute pain services (APS). In addition, it is also an attempt to assess the availability of analgesia for non-surgical cases, and the attitudes, beliefs, and perceptions of clinicians regarding acute pain management in the tertiary hospitals in the state of Maharashtra (India). Methods: This was a cross-sectional, multicentre questionnaire survey involving the anaesthesiologists and surgeons. Percentages, median, interquartile ranges were calculated and compared by employing a Wilcoxon sign rank test. Results: Data from thirty centres revealed that the surgeons played a major role in treating pain, while most of the anaesthesiologists treated pain primarily in the operation theatre and recovery room. An APS was operational in seven hospitals. The most frequently employed techniques to achieve analgesia were the administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids and epidural analgesia. The majority of the centres had no written protocol and dedicated staff for pain management, pain assessment was not adequately stressed, and only five out of the thirty centres included in the study provided ongoing pain education to health professionals even when the hospitals claimed to provide APS. The major hurdles in providing optimal analgesia and implementing APS were a lack of pain education, equipment and administrative problems. Conclusion: Thus, the tertiary centres in Maharashtra fall short of providing optimal acute post-operative pain management. PMID:28405034

  4. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... belly Has had a recent injury to the abdomen Is having trouble breathing Call your provider if ...

  5. The effect of intravenous tranexamic acid on blood loss and early post-operative pain in total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pauzenberger, L; Domej, M A; Heuberer, P R; Hexel, M; Grieb, A; Laky, B; Blasl, J; Anderl, W

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the impact of intravenous tranexamic acid on the reduction of blood loss, transfusion rate, and early post-operative clinical outcome in total shoulder arthroplasty. A randomised, placebo-controlled trial which included 54 patients undergoing unilateral primary stemless anatomical or stemmed reverse total shoulder arthroplasty was undertaken. Patients received either 100 ml saline (placebo, n = 27), or 100 ml saline together with 1000 mg of tranexamic acid (TXA, n = 27) intravenously prior to skin incision and during wound closure. Peri-operative blood loss via an intra-articular drain was recorded and total blood loss was calculated. The post-operative transfusion rate was documented. Assessment of early clinical parameters included the visual analogue scale for pain (VAS), documentation of haematoma formation and adverse events. Mean peri-operative blood drainage (placebo: 170 ml versus TXA: 50 ml, p = 0.001) and calculated mean total blood loss (placebo: 1248.2 ml versus TXA: 871.0 ml, p = 0.009) were significantly lower in the TXA group. No transfusions were necessary during the study period in either group. Mean VAS for pain significantly decreased from pre-operative (VAS 7) to the early post-operative period (VAS 1.7, p < 0.001). Significant differences regarding mean post-operative pain between placebo (VAS 2.0) and TXA (VAS 1.3) were detected (p = 0.05). The occurrence of haematomas was significantly more frequent in the placebo (59.3%, n = 16) than in the TXA group (25.9%, n = 6, p = 0.027). Whereas only mild haematomas developed in the TXA group, in the placebo group a total of 22.2% (n = 6) developed either moderate or severe haematomas. No adverse events associated with administration of TXA occurred. Intravenous administration of TXA successfully reduced mean peri-operative blood drainage, total estimated blood loss, pain during the first post-operative days, and haematoma formation in total shoulder

  6. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath catheters: A feasible and effective, opioid-sparing, post-operative pain management technique: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Sumitra; Mapari, Amol; Paliwal, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Epidural analgesia, though the gold standard of post-operative pain management for laparotomies, is associated with limitations and is contraindicated in many patients. Opioid-based pain management, which is an alternative to epidural, has been implicated in post-operative nausea, vomiting, and ileus. We report successful management of post operative pain with ultrasound guided rectus sheath (RS) catheters. RS block is a promising alternative in scenarios were epidural is contraindicated, has failed or in case of unexpected change in the surgical plan. PMID:25788745

  7. Impact of Age, Gender and Anesthesia Modality on Post-Operative Pain in Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pope, David; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M.; Manning, Blaine T.; Sepula, Mykel; Markwell, Stephen J.; Saleh, Khaled J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Optimizing pain control following total knee arthroplasty is of utmost importance to the immediate post-operative course. Various anesthesia modalities are available, but studies comparing multiple anesthesia modalities, patient age, and sex are limited. Questions/Purpose The purpose of our study was to examine the impact of patient age, gender, and perioperative anesthesia modality on postoperative pain following primary total knee arthroplasty. Methods 443 patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty by 14 surgeons with some combination of general anesthesia, spinal anesthesia, femoral nerve block, and intrathecal morphine were identified. Anesthesia route and type, length of surgery, post-operative patient-reported pain measures using the Visual Analog Scale, opioid consumption, and length of hospital stay were recorded for each patient and used to compare differences among study groups. Results No significant differences were noted between anesthesia groups with regards to postoperative pain or length of hospital stay. Patients receiving spinal anesthesia and femoral nerve block without intrathecal morphine were significantly older than other groups. Patients receiving general anesthesia required significantly more daily intravenous morphine equivalents than patients receiving spinal anesthesia. Patients receiving spinal anesthesia with femoral nerve block and intrathecal morphine consumed the least amount of morphine equivalents. When comparing males and females among all groups, females had significantly higher pain ratings between 24-36 and 24-48 hours postoperatively. Conclusion Although no significant differences were noted on pain scores, patients who received spinal anesthesia with intrathecal morphine and femoral nerve block used less narcotic pain medication than any other group. Females reported significantly higher pain between 24-48 hours post-op compared with males but not significantly greater anesthetic usage. Level of

  8. Abdominal Pain following Gastric Bypass: Suspects & Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Greenstein, Alexander J.; O’Rourke, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Gastric bypass remains the mainstay of surgical therapy for obesity. Abdominal pain after gastric bypass is common, and accounts for up to half of all postoperative complaints and emergency room visits. This manuscript reviews the most important causes of abdominal pain specific to gastric bypass and discusses management considerations. Data Sources The current surgical literature was reviewed using PubMed, with a focus on abdominal pain after gastric bypass and the known pathologies that underlie its pathogenesis. Conclusions The differential diagnosis for abdominal pain after gastric bypass is large and includes benign and life-threatening entities. Its diverse causes require a broad evaluation that should be directed by history and clinical presentation. In the absence of a clear diagnosis, the threshold for surgical exploration in patients with abdominal pain after gastric bypass should be low. PMID:21333269

  9. Effects of tramadol or morphine in dogs undergoing castration on intra-operative electroencephalogram responses and post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Kongara, K; Chambers, J P; Johnson, C B; Dukkipati, V S R

    2013-11-01

    To compare the effects of pre-operatively administered tramadol with those of morphine on electroencephalographic responses to surgery and post-operative pain in dogs undergoing castration. Dogs undergoing castration were treated with either pre-operative morphine (0.5 mg/kg S/C, n = 8) or tramadol (3 mg/kg S/C, n = 8). All dogs also received 0.05 mg/kg acepromazine and 0.04 mg/kg atropine S/C in addition to the test analgesic. Anaesthesia was induced with thiopentone administered I/V to effect and maintained with halothane in oxygen. Respiratory rate, heart rate, end-tidal halothane tension (EtHal) and end-tidal CO2 tension (EtCO2) were monitored throughout surgery. Electroencephalograms (EEG) were recorded continuously using a three electrode montage. Median frequency (F50), total power (Ptot) and 95% spectral edge frequency (F95) derived from EEG power spectra recorded before skin incision (baseline) were compared with those recorded during ligation of the spermatic cords of both testicles. Post-operatively, pain was assessed after 1, 3, 6 and 9 h using the short form of the Glasgow composite measure pain scale (CMPS-SF). Dogs premedicated with tramadol had higher mean F50 (12.2 (SD 0.2) Hz) and lower Ptot (130.39 (SD 12.1) µv(2)) compared with those premedicated with morphine (11.5 (SD 0.2) Hz and 161.8 (SD 15.1) µv(2), respectively; p<0.05) during ligation of testicle 1. There were no differences in EEG responses between the two treatment groups during ligation of testicle 2 (p>0.05). The F95 of the EEG did not differ between the two groups during the ligation of either testicle (p > 0.05). Post-operatively, no significant differences in the CMPS-SF score were found between animals premedicated with tramadol and morphine at any time during the post-operative period. No dog required rescue analgesia. Tramadol and morphine administered pre-operatively provided a similar degree of post-operative analgesia in male dogs at the doses tested.

  10. Systematic review of the analgesic efficacy and tolerability of COX-2 inhibitors in post-operative pain control.

    PubMed

    Chen, L-C; Elliott, R A; Ashcroft, D M

    2004-06-01

    To evaluate the relative analgesic efficacy and tolerability of single-dose COX-2 inhibitors in post-operative pain management. Systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The area under the pain relief vs. time curve was used to evaluate the proportion of patient achieving at least 50% pain relief using validated equations. The proportions of patients experiencing any adverse event or specific adverse events were also examined. In all, 18 RCTs were included which contained 2783 patients. The results of the effects of single-dose analgesics on the basis of 50% of patients achieving pain relief over 6 h from dental pain models suggested that oral rofecoxib 50 mg was more effective than codeine/paracetamol 60/600 mg, and the rate ratio (RR) was 2.11 (95% CI 1.6-2.75). Valdecoxib 40 mg was also more effective than oxycodone/paracetamol 10/1000 mg (RR 1.34; 95% CI 1.11-1.62). There was no significant differences between other oral COX-2 inhibitors and non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), except that celecoxib 200 mg was less effective than ibuprofen 400 mg (RR 0.66; 95% CI 0.48-0.90) and rofecoxib 50 mg (RR 0.65; 95% CI 0.49-0.87). The results from orthopaedic pain model showed no significant difference between rofecoxib 50 mg and naproxen sodium 550 mg (RR 1.04; 95% CI 0.73-1.49). The adverse effects of single-dose COX-2 inhibitor used in short-term post-operative pain management were generally mild and less than non-selective NSAIDs, although there was no significant difference. The analgesic efficacy and tolerability of single-dose COX-2 inhibitors were more effective than opioid-containing analgesics and similar to non-selective NSAIDs in post-operative pain management. Further studies are needed to examine the efficacy and tolerability of COX-2 inhibitors compared against active comparators over a longer duration to assess whether these short-term effects are mirrored by longer-term outcomes and to determine their ultimate

  11. A comparison of ibuprofen and ibuprofen-codeine combination in the relief of post-operative oral surgery pain.

    PubMed

    Walton, G M; Rood, J P

    1990-10-20

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics are commonly prescribed to out-patients who have undergone oral surgical procedures, since they are said to provide excellent pain relief for mild to moderate pain, allied with minimal side-effects. One hundred patients were entered into a randomised clinical trial to compare the efficacy of a simple non-steroidal analgesic with that of a combination analgesic compound following the removal of lower third molars under local anaesthesia. Pain scores were measured for patients post-operatively by means of a verbal rating scale for 3 days and data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results suggest that this combination product offers no advantages (but shows definite disadvantages) when compared to an effective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory product.

  12. Co-administration of dextromethorphan and morphine: reduction of post-operative pain and lack of influence on morphine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Suski, Maciej; Bujak-Gizycka, Beata; Madej, Jozef; Kacka, Katarzyna; Dobrogowski, Jan; Woron, Jaroslaw; Olszanecki, Rafal; Korbut, Ryszard

    2010-08-01

    We investigated co-analgesic effect of dextromethorphan in adolescent post-operative patients with idiopathic scoliosis. In a double-blind study, 60 patients with ASA physical status I-II were randomised into two groups. Group dextromethorphan (n = 30; age: 15.9 +/- 2.4 years) was given oral dextromethorphan 30 or 45 mg 1 hr before surgery and 8, 20 and 32 hr after operation. Group placebo (n = 30; age: 16.5 +/- 2.7 years) received placebo at identical times. Post-operative analgesic requirements were assessed using nurse-controlled analgesia system. Pain was assessed using numeric rating scale before first administration of morphine and at 2, 3, 4, 6, 24 and 48 hr after operation. Blood samples were taken 20 min. after the first use of morphine (within 1 hr after operation). The total use of analgesics during surgery was lower in the dextromethorphan group. The dose of morphine providing relief immediately after surgery, as well as total analgesic requirements in the first and second day after surgery did not differ between groups. Subjectively evaluated pain intensity score (numeric rating scale) was lower for the dextromethorphan patients in the first 4 hr, but not later after surgery. Plasma levels of morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide and morphine-3-glucuronide did not differ between groups. Dextromethorphan did not influence morphine glucuronidation, in terms of promotion of formation of any morphine glucuronides. In conclusion, in young patients subjected to spine surgery, addition of dextromethorphan to morphine reduced pain only in early post-operative period. In such patients, co-analgesic action of dextromethorphan was not associated with significant changes in plasma levels of morphine metabolites.

  13. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  14. Functional Abdominal Pain: "Get" the Function, Loose the Pain.

    PubMed

    Draeger-Muenke, Reinhild

    2015-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain is a mind-body, psychosocial, and self-reinforcing experience with significant consequences for the sufferer and the surrounding support network. The occurrence of unpredictable symptoms and their severity add an element of dread and feeling out-of-control to daily life and often reduce overall functioning in a downward spiral. Two clinical presentations of functional abdominal pain are offered in this article (composites to protect confidentiality) dealing with abdominal pain syndrome and abdominal migraines. The treatment demonstrates the use of hypnotic principles for self-regulation, exploration, and meaning-making. Hypnosis treatment is conducted in combination with mindfulness-based interventions and Traditional Chinese Medicine's (TCM) teachings regarding abdominal health and illness. The clinical examples illustrate medical findings that suggest children with early life stress and an early onset of gastrointestinal somatization may not simply outgrow their functional abdominal pain but may suffer into adulthood.

  15. Maintenance of pain in children with functional abdominal pain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdomina...

  16. Strategies in assessing post operative pain--a South African study.

    PubMed

    Klopper, Hester; Andersson, Helena; Minkkinen, Maria; Ohlsson, Cecilia; Sjöström, Björn

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this validation study was to describe strategies used in postoperative pain assessment among a group of nurses in South Africa. A mixed qualitative and quantitative study was conducted in a 950-bed academic hospital complex. Surgical nurses (n = 12) carried out pain assessments of postoperative patients (n = 36) in pain. Data were collected using detailed interviews and pain intensity was estimated on a visual analogue scale (VAS, 0-10 cm). Nurses used four categories of criteria (a) how the patient looks, (b) what the patient says, (c) the patient's way of talking, and (d) experience of similar circumstances and drew on their past experiences in five different ways: (a) some patients report lower pain intensity than expected, (b) a typology of patients, (c) a focus on listening to patients, (d) what to look for, and (e) what to do for patients were identified. The system of categories described by Sjöström [Sjöström B. Assessing acute postoperative pain. Assessment strategies and quality of clinical experience and professional role. Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis; 1995] was valid for this sample with an additional category. The different categories seem to be complementary and necessary for assessing pain in others. The findings have implications for professionals who provide care for patients in pain.

  17. Evaluation of piroxicam-beta-cyclodextrin, piroxicam, paracetamol and placebo in post-operative oral surgery pain.

    PubMed

    Dolci, G; Ripari, M; Pacifici, L; Umile, A

    1994-01-01

    Two hundred ninety-eight patients with post-operative pain after the surgical removal of an impacted third molar were randomly assigned, on a double-blind basis, to receive a single oral dose of piroxicam 20 mg, or piroxicam-beta-cyclodextrin equivalent to 20 mg piroxicam, or paracetamol 500 mg, or placebo. Using a semi-quantitative self-rating scale, patients rated their pain and its relief at 30-min intervals for the first 2 h, and then hourly for 4 h after treatment administration. All active medications were reported to be significantly superior to placebo. The three active drugs were comparable for the degree of analgesia up to the third hour, after which the effect of paracetamol decreased significantly as compared to piroxicam-beta-cyclodextrin and piroxicam. Piroxicam-beta-cyclodextrin and paracetamol were more rapid than piroxicam in inducing analgesia. The tolerability for the active drugs was comparable to that for placebo.

  18. [Clinical study of post-operative pain following coblation tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy in children with sleep-disordered breathing].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenyun; Liu, Dabo; Zhong, Jianwen; Liu, Shaofeng; Qiu, Shuyao; Wei, Wei; Xu, Jiajian; Shao, Jianbo; Zhong, Jie

    2013-06-01

    To explore the characteristics of post-operative pain following coblation tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy in children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and explore the correlation between the first day post-operative pain scores and age and operating time. 1) A total of 113 SDB children scheduled to undergo coblation tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy were recruited. 113 children were divided into two groups according to the method of operation, children who underwent coblation tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy were enrolled in study group one and children who underwent coblation adenoidectomy only were in study group two. Be sides, children of study group one with a history of chronic tonsillitis were in chronic tonsillitis group, children without a history of chronic tonsillitis were in non-chronic tonsillitis group. 2) The parents scored pain in their children on a VAS (anchored by "no pain" at 0 and "worst pain" at 10) in the morning, before using any analgesics and having breakfast, over the first 3 and the seventh post-operative days. 3) Post-operative pain scores were compared between both the study group one and two and chronic tonsillitis group and non-chronic tonsillitis group. Futhermore, the correlation between the first day post-operative pain scores and age and operating time were also analysed. 1) The difference of post-operative pain scores over the first 3 and the seventh post-operative days were significant between the study group one and group two (P<0.05). 2) Non-chronic tonsillitis group were significantly less painful than chronic tonsillitis group on day 1, day 2 and day 7 (z=-2.004, -2.059, -2.334, P<0.05). But there was no significant difference in pain levels on day 3 (P>0.05). 3) The first day post-operative pain scores was correlated with age (r=0.273, P<0.01) and operating time (r=0.423, P<0.01). The first day post-operative pain scores was correlated with age and operating time. Children with a history of chronic tonsillitis were

  19. Preoperative ultra-rapid opiate detoxification for the treatment of post-operative surgical pain.

    PubMed

    Blum, James M; Biel, Sarang S; Hilliard, Paul E; Jutkiewicz, Emily M

    2015-06-01

    Over the past two decades, the prescription of high dose opiate therapy has continued to accelerate in an attempt to treat patients with chronic pain. This presents a substantial challenge when patients on high dose opiate therapy require surgery, as opiate pain relief is a cornerstone of postoperative pain management. These patients have exceptionally challenging pain to control. This is likely due to downregulation of existing opiate receptors and the reluctance of clinicians to increase doses of opiates to exceptionally high levels to facilitate pain relief. We hypothesize that using the method of ultra-rapid opiate detoxification (UROD), it would be possible to rapidly increase the number of opiate receptors and return patients to a more naive state, which would be susceptible to exogenous opiate administration. Validation of this hypothesis is supported by two mechanisms, the first of which are reports of patients that underwent UROD for opiate addition that subsequently suffer respiratory arrests when beginning to rapidly abuse opiates shortly after treatment. Additionally there are data demonstrating the tapering of opiate therapy prior to elective surgery results in better pain control. In conclusion, we hypothesize that patients on chronic high dose opiates could obtain substantially better pain relief if they underwent UROD prior to surgery. This technique could be administered shortly before surgery and may dramatically improve the patients' recoveries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Post-operative orofacial pain, temporomandibular dysfunction and trigeminal sensitivity after recent pterional craniotomy: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Brazoloto, Thiago Medina; de Siqueira, Silvia Regina Dowgan Tesseroli; Rocha-Filho, Pedro Augusto Sampaio; Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; de Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli

    2017-05-01

    Surgical trauma at the temporalis muscle is a potential cause of post-craniotomy headache and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of pain, masticatory dysfunction and trigeminal somatosensory abnormalities in patients who acquired aneurysms following pterional craniotomy. Fifteen patients were evaluated before and after the surgical procedure by a trained dentist. The evaluation consisted of the (1) research diagnostic criteria for TMD, (2) a standardized orofacial pain questionnaire and (3) a systematic protocol for quantitative sensory testing (QST) for the trigeminal nerve. After pterional craniotomy, 80% of the subjects, 12 patients, developed orofacial pain triggered by mandibular function. The pain intensity was measured by using the visual analog scale (VAS), and the mean pain intensity was 3.7. The prevalence of masticatory dysfunction was 86.7%, and there was a significant reduction of the maximum mouth opening. The sensory evaluation showed tactile and thermal hypoesthesia in the area of pterional access in all patients. There was a high frequency of temporomandibular dysfunction, postoperative orofacial pain and trigeminal sensory abnormalities. These findings can help to understand several abnormalities that can contribute to postoperative headache or orofacial pain complaints after pterional surgeries.

  1. Post operative pain experiences of central Australian aboriginal women. What do we understand?

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Clare; Stevens, John

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the postoperative pain experiences of Central Australian Aboriginal women and the subsequent interpretation of that pain experience by non-Aboriginal female nurses. Qualitative study using grounded theory methodology. Postoperative surgical setting of a Central Australian regional hospital. Five Aboriginal female clients who had undergone a surgical procedure, eight non-Aboriginal female nurses and four Aboriginal female health workers employed by a Central Australian regional hospital. Aboriginal women have culturally appropriate ways of expressing and managing pain that are not well understood by non-Aboriginal female nurses. In addition, the Aboriginal women inappropriately endow non-Aboriginal nurses with the same powers and skills expected of healers from their culture. This phenomenon resulted in the non-Aboriginal nurses lacking the cultural insight and the appropriate knowledge and tools required to assess and manage the postoperative pain of Central Australian Aboriginal women effectively or efficiently. Non-Aboriginal nurses have a profound knowledge deficit about the postoperative pain experiences of Central Australian Aboriginal women. This deficit is evident through the use of culturally inappropriate and unreliable pain assessment strategies and tools and the misinterpretation of traditional pain relief strategies, such as the use of pituri, rubbing and centreing. The findings of this study suggested that nurse/client interactions related to language and role interpretation were in cultural conflict. The nurses expected the Aboriginal women to adopt pain behaviours as understood from the nurses' culture. The nurses anticipated that the client would contribute to their own care by communicating pain experiences in ways that are familiar and are believed to be universal. The Aboriginal women expected the nurses to conduct business similar to that of their own traditional tribal healers, 'to see within' and to 'just

  2. An Unusual Case of Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Bobby; De Portu, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    Renal calyceal rupture is a usual etiology of abdominal pain in the emergency department. We present a case of unexpected renal calyx rupture in a patient with symptomatology of renal colic. A discussion and review are provided. PMID:23326726

  3. Comparison of Efficacy and Safety of Intramuscular Piroxicam and Tramadol for Post-operative Pain in Patients Undergoing Caesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Thippeswamy, Tejashree; Bengalorkar, Girish M; Mariyappa, Narayanaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Post-caesarean section pain can be both stressful and unfavourable. Effective and rapid reduction of pain facilitates early ambulation and care of the new born. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) and opioids are used for pain relief but they are associated with adverse effects both in the mother and the child. Aim To evaluate efficacy and safety of piroxicam and tramadol in post-caesarean section pain. Materials and Methods Primigravidae who underwent elective caesarean section received either piroxicam 20mg or tramadol 100mg intra-muscularly, following recovery from anaesthesia. Severity of pain was assessed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and side-effects to study drugs were noted. Rescue analgesic butorphanol 2mg was administered if VAS score was more than four. Patient’s satisfaction score was assessed at 12 hours post-operatively. Results Mean age in piroxicam and tramadol groups were 23.32±3.43 and 22.03±2.0 years respectively. Significant reduction in pain was observed at 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours in both groups (p<0.001). Pain relief was significant at 2, 4 and 8 hours in piroxicam group compared to tramadol. Twenty-one and 12 patients in tramadol and piroxicam groups received rescue analgesic respectively. Sedation and nausea was significantly higher in tramadol group (p<0.001), 46.66% of patients graded their satisfaction score as good and 15% as excellent in piroxicam group. Conclusion Intra-muscular piroxicam was effective in reducing post-caesarean section pain for 24 hours with minimal side-effects compared to tramadol. PMID:28050391

  4. Evaluation of Using Behavioural Changes to Assess Post-Operative Pain in the Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus)

    PubMed Central

    Ellen, Yvette; Flecknell, Paul; Leach, Matt

    2016-01-01

    To manage pain effectively in people and animals, it is essential to recognise when pain is present and to assess its intensity. Currently there is very little information regarding the signs of post-surgical pain or its management in guinea pigs. Studies from other rodent species indicate that behaviour-based scoring systems can be used successfully to detect pain and evaluate analgesic efficacy. This preliminary study aimed to establish whether behaviour-based scoring systems could be developed to assess post-surgical pain in guinea pigs. This prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled study used 16 guinea pigs, and evaluated changes in behaviour following either anaesthesia alone or anaesthesia and orchiectomy. Behaviour was assessed using a combination of manual and automated scoring of remotely obtained video footage. A small number of behaviours were identified that appeared to have high specificity for pain caused by orchiectomy. However, the behaviours were displayed infrequently. The most common was a change in posture from standing to recumbency, sometimes with one hind leg extended either to the side or behind the body. A composite behaviour score incorporating these abnormal behaviours differentiated between the effects of surgery and anaesthesia alone (p<0.0001), and between animals that received analgesia post-operatively compared to an untreated group (p<0.0001). Although behavioural changes occurred in these guinea pigs after orchiectomy, the changes were relatively subtle and the individual specific pain-related behaviours occurred infrequently. However, it may prove possible to develop a behaviour-based scoring system for routine use in this species using a combination of pain-related behaviours. PMID:27583446

  5. The Efficacy of Acupuncture in Post-Operative Pain Management: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Shun; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Chen, I-Fan; Huang, Shihping Kevin; Tzeng, Pei-Chuan; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative pain resulting from surgical trauma is a significant challenge for healthcare providers. Opioid analgesics are commonly used to treat postoperative pain; however, these drugs are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. Objective This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupuncture-related techniques in treating postoperative pain. Data Source MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases were searched until Sep 30, 2014. Study Eligibility Criteria Randomized controlled trials of adult subjects (≥ 18 years) who had undergone surgery and who had received acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or acupoint electrical stimulation for managing acute post-operative pain were included. Results We found that patients treated with acupuncture or related techniques had less pain and used less opioid analgesics on Day 1 after surgery compared with those treated with control (P < 0.001). Sensitivity analysis using the leave-one-out approach indicated the findings are reliable and are not dependent on any one study. In addition, no publication bias was detected. Subgroup analysis indicated that conventional acupuncture and transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) were associated with less postoperative pain one day following surgery than control treatment, while electroacupuncture was similar to control (P = 0.116). TEAS was associated with significantly greater reduction in opioid analgesic use on Day 1 post surgery than control (P < 0.001); however conventional acupuncture and electroacupuncture showed no benefit in reducing opioid analgesic use compared with control (P ≥ 0.142). Conclusion Our findings indicate that certain modes of acupuncture improved postoperative pain on the first day after surgery and reduced opioid use. Our findings support the use of acupuncture as adjuvant therapy in treating postoperative pain. PMID:26959661

  6. The Efficacy of Acupuncture in Post-Operative Pain Management: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Shun; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Chen, I-Fan; Huang, Shihping Kevin; Tzeng, Pei-Chuan; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pain resulting from surgical trauma is a significant challenge for healthcare providers. Opioid analgesics are commonly used to treat postoperative pain; however, these drugs are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupuncture-related techniques in treating postoperative pain. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases were searched until Sep 30, 2014. Randomized controlled trials of adult subjects (≥ 18 years) who had undergone surgery and who had received acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or acupoint electrical stimulation for managing acute post-operative pain were included. We found that patients treated with acupuncture or related techniques had less pain and used less opioid analgesics on Day 1 after surgery compared with those treated with control (P < 0.001). Sensitivity analysis using the leave-one-out approach indicated the findings are reliable and are not dependent on any one study. In addition, no publication bias was detected. Subgroup analysis indicated that conventional acupuncture and transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) were associated with less postoperative pain one day following surgery than control treatment, while electroacupuncture was similar to control (P = 0.116). TEAS was associated with significantly greater reduction in opioid analgesic use on Day 1 post surgery than control (P < 0.001); however conventional acupuncture and electroacupuncture showed no benefit in reducing opioid analgesic use compared with control (P ≥ 0.142). Our findings indicate that certain modes of acupuncture improved postoperative pain on the first day after surgery and reduced opioid use. Our findings support the use of acupuncture as adjuvant therapy in treating postoperative pain.

  7. Post-operative stress fractures complicating surgery for painful forefoot conditions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Max R; Jack, Christopher; Jones, Gareth G; Singh, Samrendu K

    2010-01-01

    A stress fracture is caused by repetitive or unusual loading of a bone leading to mechanical failure. Fatigue type stress fractures occur in normal bone exposed to abnormally high repetitive loads, whereas insufficiency type stress fractures occur in abnormal bone exposed to normal loads. We describe three cases of insufficiency stress fractures that have complicated surgery for painful forefoot conditions. The diagnosis and management of these cases are discussed. Stress fractures should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient who continues or develops pain after surgery to the forefoot.

  8. [New trends in the treatment of post-operative pain in general and gastrointestinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Santeularia Vergés, María Teresa; Català Puigbò, Elena; Genové Cortada, Mercè; Revuelta Rizo, Miren; Moral García, María Victoria

    2009-08-01

    The correct application of multimodal analgesia appropriate to the pain intensity, the characteristics of the surgery and the hospitalisation scheme provide the key to improving the management of postoperative pain, which is currently still under treated. In highly complex surgeries the best benefit is obtained by combining systemic analgesic drugs with regional analgesia techniques. Epidural analgesia, not only provides an excellent quality of analgesia, but can prevent complications and reduce postoperative morbidity. Recently, peripheral blocks and parietal infiltration techniques, with or without catheter, have gained prominence in the postoperative analgesia of haemorrhoids and hernia repair. All these analgesic techniques are integrated into the concept of early postoperative rehabilitation and pursue the objective of minimising the side effects associated with the treatment and facilitate the functional recovery of the patient. In addition, proper postoperative pain management, not only increases the quality of in-patient care but is also a factor to consider in the development of chronic post-surgical pain, where the impact is significant and impairs the quality of life of the patients.

  9. Detection and Prevention of Post-Operative Deep Vein Thrombosis [DVT] Using Nadroparin Among Patients Undergoing Major Abdominal Operations in India; a Randomised Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Anandan; Srivastava, Dina N; Ballehaninna, Uma K; Chumber, Sunil; Dhar, Anita; Misra, Mahesh C; Parshad, Rajinder; Seenu, V; Srivastava, Anurag; Gupta, Narmada P

    2010-08-01

    Deep vein thrombosis [DVT] is one of the most dreaded complications in post-operative patients as it is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Majority of patients with postoperative DVT are asymptomatic. The pulmonary embolism, which is seen in 10% of the cases with proximal DVT, may be fatal. Therefore it becomes imperative to prevent DVT rather than to diagnose and treat. Only one randomized trial has been reported from India to assess the effectiveness of low molecular weight heparin in preventing post-operative DVT. To assess the risk of DVT in North Indian patients following major abdominal operations and to evaluate the effectiveness of Nadroparin, A Low Molecular Weight Heparin (LMWH) therapy in preventing post-operative DVT. Sixty five patients were randomised preoperatively into Group-I; Nadroparin prophylaxis and Group-II: No prophylaxis. The primary outcome was the occurrence of DVT, diagnosed by bilateral lower limb venogram performed, seven to ten days after operation. Secondary outcome measures included adverse effects of radio-opaque dye, intra-operative blood loss, operating time, postoperative platelet count, intraoperative blood transfusion requirements and the total duration of postoperative bed rest. No case of DVT occurred in either group. There was no statistical difference in the risk of secondary outcome measures in the two groups. DVT was not observed in any of the patients, even with several high risk factors indicating a possible protective mechanism in the North Indian population.

  10. Management of acute and post-operative pain in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Malvinder S

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common and patients with many co-morbid conditions frequently have to undergo surgical procedures and, therefore, require effective pain management. The pharmacokinetics of various analgesic agents are not well studied in patients with chronic kidney disease and the risk of accumulation of the main drug or their metabolites, resulting in serious adverse events, is a common scenario on medical and surgical wards. It is common for these patients to be cared for by 'non-nephrologists' who often prescribe the standard dose of the commonly used analgesics, without taking into consideration the patient's kidney function. It is important to recognize the problems and complications associated with the use of standard doses of analgesics, and highlight the importance of adjusting analgesic dosage based on kidney function to avoid complications while still providing adequate pain relief. PMID:24358847

  11. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed by characteristic symptoms for at least 12 weeks during the preceding 12 months in the absence of a structural or biochemical explanation. The irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal bloating, functional constipation, and functional diarrhea are distinguished by symptom-based diagnostic criteria. Unspecified FBD lacks criteria for the other FBDs. Diagnostic testing is individualized, depending on patient age, primary symptom characteristics, and other clinical and laboratory features. Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is defined as either the FAP syndrome, which requires at least six months of pain with poor relation to gut function and loss of daily activities, or unspecified FAP, which lacks criteria for the FAP syndrome. An organic cause for the pain must be excluded, but aspects of the patient's pain behavior are of primary importance. Treatment of the FBDs relies upon confident diagnosis, explanation, and reassurance. Diet alteration, drug treatment, and psychotherapy may be beneficial, depending on the symptoms and psychological features.


Keywords: functional bowel disorder; functional constipation; functional diarrhea; irritable bowel syndrome; functional abdominal pain; functional abdominal bloating; Rome II PMID:10457044

  12. Prolonged Analgesic Effect of PRF-108 and PRF-110 on Post-operative Pain in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Castel, David; Naveh, Michael; Aharon, Arnon; Doron, Ofer; Meilin, Sigal

    2016-06-01

    Local anesthetic infusion techniques have been reported to reduce opiate requirements and pain scores following different kinds of surgery, including orthopedic surgery, inguinal hernia, and Cesarean surgery in women. PRF-108 and PRF-110 formulations were applied to the wound space in an incisional model in pigs to test the hypothesis that these formulations have better and longer analgesic effects than the commercially available ropivacaine solution (Naropin(®), AstraZeneca). The data show significantly better analgesic activity with PRF-108 and PRF-110 compared to ropivacaine. The duration of the analgesic efficacy of PRF-108 and PRF-110 was at least five times longer than that was measured following treatment with ropivacaine. The data further suggest that active clearance from the injection site (the wound) is much slower for PRF-108 and PRF-110 than for the commercial ropivacaine solution. Assessing the local concentration of PRF compounds and commercially available ropivacaine solution suggests that active clearance from the injection site (the wound) is much slower for PRF-108 and PRF-110 than for ropivacaine. PainReform.

  13. Micro opioid receptor A118G polymorphism and post-operative pain: opioids' effects on heterozygous patients.

    PubMed

    De Capraris, A; Cinnella, G; Marolla, A; Salatto, P; Da Lima, S; Vetuschi, P; Consoletti, L; Gesualdo, L; Dambrosio, M

    2011-01-01

    The single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) 118A>G in the micro-1 opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) is associated with a decrease in the analgesic effects of opioids. The aim of this study is to assess whether 118A >G polymorphism could influence the analgesic response to opioid-based postoperative pain (POP) therapy. The study consisted of two parts: section alpha, observational, included 199 subjects undergoing scheduled surgical procedures with pain management standardized on surgery invasiveness and on expected level of postoperative pain; section beta, randomized, included 41 women undergoing scheduled caesarean delivery with continuous intra-operative epidural anesthesia and post-operative analgesia (CEA). In both sections, POP was measured over 48 h (T6h-T24h-T48h) by the visual analogue scale (VAS). In section beta we also tested the responsiveness of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) expressed by cortisol levels. In section alpha, with cluster analysis, subjects were analyzed according to their genotype: a group (no. 1) of 34 patients reporting VAS score >3 at every time lapse was identified and included only A118G carriers, while wild-type (A118A - absence of 118A>G polymorphism) patients were unevenly distributed between those with cluster no. 2 (VAS score <3 at every study steps) and those with cluster no. 3 (VAS score progressively reducing from T6h). In section beta, A118G carriers receiving epidural sufentanil had the lowest VAS scores at T24h; also in these patients, cortisol levels remained more stable, with a mild decrease at T6h. This study shows that the OPRM1 118A>G polymorphism affects postoperative pain response in heterozygous patients: they have a different postoperative pain response than patients with wild-type genes, which may affect the efficacy of the analgesic therapy.

  14. [Post-operative pain after ultrasound transversus abdominis plane block versus trocar site infiltration in laparoscopic nephrectomy: a prospective study].

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ana M; Guimarães, Joana; Nunes, Catarina S; Couto, Paula S; Amadeu, Eduarda

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is useful in reducing post-operative pain in laparoscopic nephrectomy compared to placebo. The purpose of this work is to compare post-operative pain and recovery after TAP block or trocar site infiltration (TSI) in this surgery. A prospective, single blinded study on patients scheduled for laparoscopic nephrectomy. Patients were assigned to two groups: TSI Group: trocar site infiltration at the end of surgery; TAP Group: unilateral ultrasound-guided TAP block after induction. Sevoflurane and remifentanil, in a target controlled infusion mode, were used for maintenance of general anesthesia. Before the end of surgery paracetamol, tramadol and morphine were administered. Visual analogue scale (VAS 0-100mm) at rest and with cough was applied in three moments: in recovery room (T1 at admission and T2 before discharge) and 24h after surgery (T3). Pain scores with incentive spirometer were also evaluated at T3. In recovery, morphine was administered as a rescue drug whenever VAS>30mm. Time to oral intake, chair sitting, ambulation and length of hospital stay were evaluated 24h after surgery. Student's t-test and Chi-square test, and linear regression models. A p-value<0.05 was considered significant. Data are presented as mean (SD). Forty patients were enrolled in the study. The primary outcome variable, VAS pain scores did not show a statistical significant difference between groups (p>0.05). VAS at rest (TAP vs. TSI groups) was: T1=33±29 vs. 39±32, T2=10±9 vs. 17±18 and T3=7±12 vs. 10±18. VAS with cough (TAP vs. TSI groups) was: T1=51±34 vs. 45±32, T2=24±24 vs. 33±23 and T3=20±23 vs. 23±23. VAS with incentive spirometer (TAP vs. TSI groups) was: T3=21±27 vs. 21±25. Intraoperative remifentanil consumption was similar between TAP (0.16±0.07mcg.kg(-1).min(-1)) and TSI (0.18±0.9mcg.kg(-1).min(-1)) groups. There were no differences in opioid consumption between TAP (4.4±3.49mg) and TSI (6.87±4.83mg) groups during

  15. Dilatation of the cervix at non-labour caesarean section: Does it improve the patients' perception of pain post-operatively?

    PubMed

    Sakinci, M; Kuru, O; Olgan, S; Gunduz, S; Bakir, V L; Kaya, O; Bakirci, I T

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the effect of cervical dilatation at non-labour caesarean section on post-operative pain and maternal morbidity. This prospective, randomised, single-blinded trial was conducted from March 2013 to February 2014. In all, 199 patients were enrolled in the study: 102 in non-dilated group and 97 in cervical dilatation group. Based on Visual Analogue Scale, there were no significant differences between the two groups on post-operative 8th, 24th and 48th hour pain scores. We observed thinner endometrial cavity thickness, shorter operation time and shorter hospitalisation duration in cervical dilatation group. However, change in haemoglobin concentrations and puerperal fever rates were found to be comparable between the groups. In conclusion, intra-operative cervical dilatation does not seem to benefit in terms of post-operative pain, change in haemoglobin concentrations or puerperal fever.

  16. Cross-sectional evaluation of post-operative pain and flare-ups in endodontic treatments using a type of rotary instruments.

    PubMed

    Tanalp, Jale; Sunay, Hakki; Bayirli, Gündüz

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the general incidence of post-operative pain and flare-ups in patients who were endodontically treated by two endodontics specialists using rotary instruments (Hero 642, Micro Mega, France) with the same treatment protocol. Records of 382 teeth belonging to 268 patients treated by two endodontics specialists during a 6-month period were kept and evaluated. Post-operative pain between treatment visits was categorized using a pre-established scoring system. Ninety-five patients were males, whereas 173 were females. Pulpal necrosis without periapical pathosis was determined as the most common indication for endodontic treatment (21.7%) followed by irreversible pulpitis and re-treatment without periapical lesions (18.3%, 18.3%, respectively). The general prevalence of post-operative pain and flare-ups was determined as 8.1%, whereas cases that could be classified as real flare-ups which were severe and required an unscheduled visit (scores 2 and 3) comprised 3.4% of the cases. No statistically significant correlation was determined between gender and post-operative pain and flare-up (p = 0.05). There was a significant correlation between number of appointments and the presence of pain and flare-ups. Teeth undergoing multiple visits had a higher risk of developing post-operative pain and flare-ups compared to those with single appointments with a statistical significance (p = 0.03). Teeth with pre-operative pain were more prone to developing post-operative pain and discomfort with a statistically significant difference (p = 0.02). While no significant correlation was determined between tooth vitality and pain and flare-ups (p = 0.5), a statistically significant relationship existed between the presence of a periapical pathosis and post-operative pain and flare-ups. Cases with a periapical lesion had a higher risk of developing pain and flare-ups compared to those with no periapical involvement (p = 0.0001). Future

  17. Comparison of pre-emptive ibuprofen, paracetamol, and placebo administration in reducing post-operative pain in primary tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Baygin, Ozgul; Tuzuner, Tamer; Isik, Berrin; Kusgoz, Adem; Tanriver, Mehmet

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates preliminary investigations that a pre-emptive analgesia administration may reduce post-extraction pain. This prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind trial was planned to compare the efficacy of the pre-emptive administration of ibuprofen, paracetamol, and placebo in reducing post-extraction pain in children. Forty-five children, ages 6-12, who needed primary mandibular molar tooth extraction were treated in paediatric dental clinics, with treatment preceded by local anaesthesia and analgesic drugs during the preoperative period. A five-face scale was used to evaluate pain reaction during the injection, extraction, and post-operative period. Self-report scores were recorded when the local anaesthesia had been administered in soft tissues and both before and after the extraction was completed. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (with Bonferroni correction paired t-test as the post hoc test) were used at a confidence level of 95%. The use of pre-emptive analgesics showed lower scores compared to the placebo, irrespective of the age, weight, gender of the child, and the number of teeth extracted during the study period. Additionally, ibuprofen exhibited lower pain scores (P < 0.05) compared to paracetamol at the 15-min (P < 0.001) and 4-h (P < 0.009) periods. Preoperative use of ibuprofen and paracetamol may provide a pre-emptive analgesic effect in paediatric patients who receive adequate analgesia during mandibular primary tooth extraction. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. TNF-α concentrations in pre-operative synovial fluid for predicting early post-operative function and pain after fast-track total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Zietek, Pawel; Dziedziejko, Violetta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Zietek, Joanna; Stępień-Słodkowska, Marta; Bialecka, Monika; Zietek, Maciej; Kotrych, Daniel; Kamiński, Adam; Kowalska, Aleksandra

    2016-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) helps regulate neuroinflammation and anxiety and could conceivable predict early post-operative pain and function after fast-track total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In patients with severe osteoarthritic knees undergoing TKA, we assessed: the correlations between pre-operative concentrations of TNF-α in synovial fluid; pre- and six-week post-operative knee function and pain; pre- and post-operative anxiety; pre- and post-operative synovial fluid concentrations of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP); age and body mass index (BMI). Of 100 enrolled patients, 78 had evaluable TNF-α data, and 58 had evaluable COMP data. Pre-operative TNF-α concentrations were inversely correlated with post-operative pain scores during walking (rS=-0.26, P=0.03) and with change of pain at rest during six weeks after TKA (rs=-0.28, P=0.03) and were directly correlated with a higher post-operative Knee Society score (KSS) (rS=0.43, P<0.001) and with greater increases in this score during six weeks after TKA (rS=0.33, P=0.001). Mean TNF-α concentrations were higher in the 39 patients reporting any pre-operative pain at rest than in 36 patients reporting no pre-operative pain (P=0.015) and were the only independent predictor of pre-operative pain at rest (OR=13, P=0.02). Independent predictors of better post-operative knee function were higher log-transformed TNF-α concentrations (β=0.38, P=0.002) and male sex (β=0.28, P=0.02). High levels of pre-operative TNF-α concentrations could be used as an independent predictor of better knee function at six weeks of follow-up. In patients with lower pre-operative TNF-α concentrations, post-operative pain management may improve the early outcome of the operated joint. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging for chronic abdominal pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Diagnostic imaging is often not indicated in chronic abdominal pain. In particular, undifferentiated abdominal pain is rarely an indication for a CT scan. CT scanning is overused even when imaging is required. Other modalities may be preferable. A normal CT scan does not rule out cancer. Alarm symptoms, including anaemia, blood in the stool, waking at night with gastrointestinal symptoms, and weight loss, should be investigated. The most appropriate modality depends on the symptoms. Clinical information on request forms for CT scans should be specific and include the suspected condition as this helps the radiologist to determine an appropriate imaging protocol.

  20. Management of pain after abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Patel, C. V.; Koppikar, M. G.; Patel, M. S.; Parulkar, G. B.; Pereira, L. M. Pinto

    1980-01-01

    1 Dipyrone 2.5 g was compared with pethidine 100 mg in a double-blind parallel group study. 2 Patients with moderate or severe postoperative pain following abdominal surgery received one of the two drugs intramuscularly. 3 The two treatment groups were homogeneous when analyzed by age, weight, height, sex, and initial severity of pain. 4 The onset degree and duration of pain relief afforded by both drugs was similar when the groups were compared as a whole or according to initial pain level. 5 No side-effects were attributed to either drug in this study. PMID:7437276

  1. The association between component malalignment and post-operative pain following navigation-assisted total knee arthroplasty: results of a cohort/nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Czurda, Thomas; Fennema, Peter; Baumgartner, Martin; Ritschl, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies have noted an adverse relationship between implant malalignment during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and post-operative pain. Although some evidence exists indicating that computer-assisted surgical navigation for TKA can improve the accuracy of component alignment, its impact on clinical outcomes is currently unknown. The dual goals of the present cohort/nested case-control study were to (1) compare self-reported responses to the Western Ontario-McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire between computer-assisted TKA (123 patients) using the imageless PiGalileo navigation system and conventional TKA (207 patients) [cohort analysis], and (2) to investigate a potential association between malalignment and post-operative pain in 19 painful knees and 19 asymptomatic knees obtained from the cohort analysis using matched sampling [nested case-control study]. In the cohort analysis, a relevant but non-significant (P = 0.06) difference in the occurrence of chronic pain was observed between the navigated (12%) and conventional arms (20%). Median post-operative WOMAC pain score was 100 (range, 50-100) in the conventional group and 100 (range, 65-100) in the navigated group. However, the Mann-Whitney test revealed a significant difference in favor of the navigated group (P = 0.01). In the nested case-control analysis, radiological outcomes and computer tomography (CT) measurements of femoral rotation were compared between the groups. The CT rotation measurements yielded evidence of a relationship between post-operative pain and incorrect rotational alignment of the femoral component of more than 3 degrees (OR: 7; 95% CI: 1.2-42; P = .033). In conclusion, there was no clinical benefit to computer-assisted navigation; however, a statistically significant relationship was observed between incorrect rotational alignment of the femoral component and symptoms of post-operative pain following TKA.

  2. [Gynaecological abdominal pain in adolescent females].

    PubMed

    Fernández Avalos, S; Muñoz-Santanach, D; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, V; Luaces Cubells, C

    2010-05-01

    To determine the prevalence, the presentation, the evaluation and the evolution of abdominal pain of gynaecological cause in adolescents who came to a Paediatric Emergency Department. An observational and descriptive study was performed. All adolescent female aged 12 to 18 years who came to Emergency Service during 2008 with abdominal pain were included. The patients diagnosed with gynaecological disorders were studied. Six hundred and ninety-nine adolescents with abdominal pain were evaluated and 54 (7,7%) of them were of gynaecological cause. Their mean age was 15,2 (SD 1,7) years. Fifty-one (94,4%) had had the menarche. Thirteen (59,3%) of the 32 adolescents, who were asked, said that they had had sex. The median evolution of pain was 2 days (p25-75: 6hours-4days). The most frequent associated symptoms were micturition syndrome (11; 20,4%) and vomiting (9; 16,7%). Thirty-one (57,4%) adolescents were evaluated by two or more specialists. Forty-two (77,7%) patients were subjected to complementary examinations; abdominal ultrasound (29; 53,7%) and urinary sediment (26; 48,1%) were the two most common. The main diagnoses were peri-ovular pain (16; 29,6%) and dysmenorrhoea (14; 25,9%). Six (9,3%) patients were admitted to the hospital and 4 (7,4%) needed surgery. Although the main causes of abdominal pain in adolescent females are physiological, an accurate anamnesis and physical examination is essential to rule out other more serious causes. A multidisciplinary evaluation is often necessary to make a correct diagnosis. Copyright 2009 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of tramadol, morphine or their combination in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy on peri-operative electroencephalographic responses and post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Kongara, K; Chambers, J P; Johnson, C B

    2012-03-01

    To compare the peri-operative electroencephalogram (EEG) responses and post-operative analgesic efficacy of pre-operative morphine or tramadol with a combination of low-dose pre-operative morphine and post-operative tramadol, in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Dogs undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy were treated with either pre-operative morphine (0.5 mg/kg S/C, n=8), or tramadol (3 mg/kg S/C, n=8), or pre-operative low-dose morphine (0.1 mg/kg S/C) and post-operative tramadol (3 mg/kg I/V, n=8). All dogs received routine pre-anaesthetic medication, and anaesthesia was induced with I/V thiopentone to effect and maintained with halothane in oxygen. Respiratory rate, heart rate, end-tidal halothane tension (EtHal) and end-tidal CO₂ tension (EtCO₂) were monitored throughout surgery. The EEG was recorded continuously in a three electrode montage. Median frequency (F50), total power (Ptot) and 95% spectral edge frequency (F95) of the EEG power spectra were compared during different 100-second periods of surgery: prior to and during skin incision, ligation of each ovarian pedicle, ligation of uterine body and skin closure. Post-operatively, pain was assessed using the short form of the Glasgow composite measure pain scale (CMPS-SF). There was no difference in F50 or Ptot of the EEG between baseline and noxious surgical events within each treatment group, or between the three groups (p>0.05). The mean F95 was higher during the first three periods of surgery for dogs administered tramadol and low-dose morphine than those that received 0.5 mg/kg morphine (p=0.001). Dogs that received low-dose morphine and tramadol had lower CMPS-SF pain scores after ovariohysterectomy than those that received either tramadol or morphine alone (p=0.001). There was no difference in pain scores between dogs in the latter two groups. Tramadol and morphine administered pre-operatively provided an equal degree of post-operative analgesia in dogs after ovariohysterectomy. A combination

  4. Assessment of the patient with acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elaine; Lynch, Antonia; Cugnoni, Helen

    Abdominal pain has many causes, from simple to complex presentations. Patients with abdominal pain may have a number of physiological and psychological needs. Nurses have a key role to play in patient assessment, history talking and management.

  5. Intravenous Ibuprofen for Treatment of Post-Operative Pain: A Multicenter, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Gago Martínez, Andrea; Escontrela Rodriguez, Blanca; Planas Roca, Antonio; Martínez Ruiz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are often used as components of multimodal therapy for postoperative pain management, but their use is currently limited by its side effects. The specific objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new formulation of intravenous (IV) ibuprofen for the management of postoperative pain in a European population. A total of 206 patients from both abdominal and orthopedic surgery, were randomly assigned in 1:1 ratio to receive 800 mg IV-ibuprofen or placebo every 6 hours; all patients had morphine access through a patient controlled analgesia pump. The primary outcome measure was median morphine consumption within the first 24 hours following surgery. The mean±SEM of morphine requirements was reduced from 29,8±5,25 mg to 14,22±3,23 mg (p = 0,015) and resulted in a decrease in pain at rest (p = 0,02) measured by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) from mean±SEM 3.34±0,35 to 0.86±0.24, and also in pain during movement (p = 0,02) from 4.32±0,36 to 1.90±0,30 in the ibuprofen treatment arm; while in the placebo group VAS score at rest ranged from 4.68±0,40 to 2.12±0,42 and during movement from 5.66±0,42 to 3.38±0,44. Similar treatment-emergent adverse events occurred across both study groups and there was no difference in the overall incidence of these events. Perioperative administration of IV-Ibuprofen 800 mg every 6 hours in abdominal surgery patient's decreases morphine requirements and pain score. Furthermore IV-Ibuprofen was safe and well tolerate. Consequently we consider appropriate that protocols for management of postoperative pain include IV-Ibuprofen 800 mg every 6 hours as an option to offer patients an analgesic benefit while reducing the potentially risks associated with morphine consumption. EU Clinical Trials Register 2011-005007-33.

  6. Intravenous Ibuprofen for Treatment of Post-Operative Pain: A Multicenter, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Escontrela Rodriguez, Blanca; Planas Roca, Antonio; Martínez Ruiz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are often used as components of multimodal therapy for postoperative pain management, but their use is currently limited by its side effects. The specific objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new formulation of intravenous (IV) ibuprofen for the management of postoperative pain in a European population. Methods and Findings A total of 206 patients from both abdominal and orthopedic surgery, were randomly assigned in 1:1 ratio to receive 800 mg IV-ibuprofen or placebo every 6 hours; all patients had morphine access through a patient controlled analgesia pump. The primary outcome measure was median morphine consumption within the first 24 hours following surgery. The mean±SEM of morphine requirements was reduced from 29,8±5,25 mg to 14,22±3,23 mg (p = 0,015) and resulted in a decrease in pain at rest (p = 0,02) measured by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) from mean±SEM 3.34±0,35 to 0.86±0.24, and also in pain during movement (p = 0,02) from 4.32±0,36 to 1.90±0,30 in the ibuprofen treatment arm; while in the placebo group VAS score at rest ranged from 4.68±0,40 to 2.12±0,42 and during movement from 5.66±0,42 to 3.38±0,44. Similar treatment-emergent adverse events occurred across both study groups and there was no difference in the overall incidence of these events. Conclusions Perioperative administration of IV-Ibuprofen 800 mg every 6 hours in abdominal surgery patient’s decreases morphine requirements and pain score. Furthermore IV-Ibuprofen was safe and well tolerate. Consequently we consider appropriate that protocols for management of postoperative pain include IV-Ibuprofen 800 mg every 6 hours as an option to offer patients an analgesic benefit while reducing the potentially risks associated with morphine consumption. Trial Registration EU Clinical Trials Register 2011-005007-33 PMID:27152748

  7. Moderate evidence to recommend submucosal injection of dexamethasone in reducing post-operative oedema and pain after third molar extraction.

    PubMed

    Freda, Nicolas M; Keenan, Analia Veitz

    2016-06-01

    of -1.79 (95% CI -3.28 to -0.30) and showed a statistically significant difference favouring dexamethasone.ConclusionsThe review found moderate quality evidence that submucosal injections of dexamethasone reduced post-operative oedema and pain compared to a placebo following impacted third molar surgery. There was no significant difference, in regards to trismus, between placebo and dexamethasone.

  8. Diagnostic yield of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy in children with abdominal pain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abdominal pain is the most common indication for OGD in children. However, existing studies examining the diagnostic outcomes of OGD in children with abdominal pain are limited. We conducted the current study to examine the diagnostic yield of OGD with biopsy in the evaluation of abdominal pain and ...

  9. Refractory Abdominal Pain in a Hemodialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Ying; Chen, Xiao-nong; Shi, Hao; Xie, Jingyuan; Chen, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) is a rare disorder. Failure of an early diagnosis may cause progressive intestinal ischemia, leading to abdominal pain, sepsis, and death. Patients with end-stage renal disease are among the highest risk populations for developing this lethal complication. The key to a correct diagnosis at an early stage is a high index of suspicion in predisposed patients. In our case, we present a 62-year-old female undergoing maintenance hemodialysis for 8 years; she complained of abdominal pain after hemodialysis in the last 3 months; NOMI was suspected after a CT angiography. She partially recovered after multiple clinical interventions such as decreased ultrafiltration, an increased dose of low molecular-weight heparin and the use of vasoactive drugs. In conclusion, NOMI can be reversible if it is diagnosed as early as possible and after the necessary diagnostic measurements are initiated. PMID:26266246

  10. Plain abdominal radiographs and abdominal CT scans for nontraumatic abdominal pain--added value?

    PubMed

    Nagurney, J T; Brown, D F; Novelline, R A; Kim, J; Fischer, R H

    1999-11-01

    We conducted a retrospective descriptive study to determine the value of plain abdominal radiographs in emergency department (ED) patients also receiving abdominal computed tomography scans (CT) for the evaluation of nontraumatic abdominal, back and flank pain (NTAP). Cases were identified through radiology log books. Medical records and radiology reports were reviewed to determine whether the CT confirmed the findings of the plain abdominal radiographs, and whether the clinical course confirmed the results of either. Test characteristics for the plain abdominal radiograph and for the CT, using the clinical course including subsequent invasive procedures as the gold standard, were calculated. Of 177 patients who received CTs, 97 (55%) also received plain abdominal radiographs. Among the 74 patients who were admitted to the hospital and had complete data, the sensitivity and specificity for the plain abdominal radiographs were .43 and .75 respectively, compared to .91 and .94 for the CT scan (P(sens.) < .05, P(spec.) < .05). In 4 patients (5%), both studies failed to identify pathology shown in a subsequent procedure. In ED patients with NTAP, the plain abdominal radiograph may have some value as a screening tool; however, in patients in whom a CT is likely to be ordered anyway, a plain abdominal radiograph is unhelpful and often misleading.

  11. Preemptive analgesia by using celecoxib combined with tramadol/APAP alleviates post-operative pain of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongwei; Zhang, Hua; Luo, Jiao; Zhou, Aiguo; Zhang, Jian

    2017-09-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of preemptive analgesia (PA) by using celecoxib combined with low-dose tramadol/acetaminophen (tramadol/APAP) in treating post-operative pain of patients undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 132 patients scheduled for TKA were included in this study. Three-day pre-operative medication was administrated in PA group with subsequent effective intra- and post-operative multimodal analgesia, while control patients received multimodal analgesia without PA. Visual analog scale (VAS) was utilized to assess the pain intensity at rest and during movement. VAS scores of participants were recorded 3 days before surgery, 1 day, 3 days, 1 week, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months postoperatively. Moreover, the length of hospital stay, expense of hospitalization, C-reactive protein (CRP) values during hospitalization, and complications during medication were also recorded. PA showed superiority over control at 3 weeks (P = 0.013) and 6 weeks (P = 0.046) in resting pain, and 1 week (P = 0.015), 3 weeks (P = 0.003), 6 weeks (P = 0.003) and 3 months (P = 0.012) postoperatively in movement pain. There was no statistically significant difference in the length of hospital stay, total expense, CRP values, as well as complications. Based on satisfactory intra- and post-operative analgesia, PA by 3-day administration of celecoxib and low-dose tramadol/APAP might be an effective and safe therapy regarding patients undergoing TKA in terms of alleviating post-operative pain.

  12. Effect of Karamardādi Yoga versus diclofenac sodium in post-operative pain management: A randomized comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hegana, Rahul; Toshikhane, Hemant Devaraj; Toshikhane, Sangeeta; Amin, Hetal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Post-operative pain is Nociceptive i.e., anticipated unavoidable physiological pain which is caused due to tissue trauma. Drugs such as NSAIDs (Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs) and Opioids are used for post-operative pain management but are associated with their own drawbacks. Karamardādi Yoga has been in use in Ayurvedic practice for analgesia. It is known to relieve pain and can be used to supplement anaesthesia and also get rid of adverse effect of modern analgesic drugs. Aims and Objective: To study the comparative effect of Karamardādi Yoga and Diclofenac sodium in post-operative pain management. Materials and Methods: Randomized clinical trial with Group A (Control Group: Tab Diclofenac sodium 50 mg as a single dose) and Group B (Trial Group: Cap Karamardādi Yoga 500 mg as a single dose). Those who had undergone haemorrhoidectomy operation under local anaesthesia were selected as per inclusion criteria. Vitals, desirable effect and undesirable effect, total surgical time, requirement of 1st dose of analgesic, requirement of rescue analgesic and pain determined by VAS (Visual Analog Scale) were the assessment criteria and were observed and recorded. Results: Karamardādi Yoga does not show any undesirable or serious ill effects and altered values of vitals as per statistical analysis. As per VAS scale, pain felt by Trial group was earlier than control group. Conclusions: Karamardādi Yoga has analgesic property but its analgesic property and pain threshold capacity is lesser than those of Diclofenac sodium. PMID:27621519

  13. Management of post-operative pain by placement of an intraoperative intercostal catheter after single port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery: a propensity-score matched study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-Feng; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Liu, Hung-Pin; Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Liu, Yun-Hen; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Chao, Yin-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background The establishment of a golden standard for post-operative analgesia after thoracic surgery remains an unresolved issue. Benefiting from the rapid development of single port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), a good candidate for the alleviation of patients’ pain is the placement of an intercostal catheter (ICC) safely after uniport VATS. We hypothesized that continual infusion through ICC could provide effective analgesia for patients with only one wound and we evaluate its postoperative analgesic function in uniport VATS patients with or without intercostal nerve blockade. Methods Since March 2014, 235 patients received various kinds of single port VATS. We identified 50 patients who received single port VATS with intercostal nerve blockade and retrospectively compared them with a group of patients who had received single port VATS without intercostal nerve blockade. The operative time, post operation day 0, 1, 2, 3 and discharge day pain score, narcotic requirements, drainage duration and post-operative hospital stay were collected. In order to establish a well-balanced cohort study, we also used propensity scores matching (1:1) to compare the short term clinical outcome in two groups. Results No operative deaths occurred in this study. The uniport VATS with intercostal nerve blockade group was associated with less post operation day 0 and day 1 pain score, and narcotic requirements in our cohort study (P<0.001, <0.001, and 0.003). After propensity scores matching, there were 50 patients in each group. Mean day 0 and day 1, day 2, day 3 pain score, drainage duration, post-operative hospital stay, and narcotic requirements were smaller in uniport VATS with intercostal nerve blockade (P<0.001, <0.001, 0.038, 0.007, 0.02, 0.042, and 0.003). Conclusions In conclusion, in patients post single port VATS, continual intercostal nerve block with levobupivacaine infusion appears to be a safe, effective and promising technique in our study, associated

  14. Management of post-operative pain by placement of an intraoperative intercostal catheter after single port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery: a propensity-score matched study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Feng; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Liu, Hung-Pin; Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Liu, Yun-Hen; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Chao, Yin-Kai; Wu, Ching-Yang

    2016-06-01

    The establishment of a golden standard for post-operative analgesia after thoracic surgery remains an unresolved issue. Benefiting from the rapid development of single port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), a good candidate for the alleviation of patients' pain is the placement of an intercostal catheter (ICC) safely after uniport VATS. We hypothesized that continual infusion through ICC could provide effective analgesia for patients with only one wound and we evaluate its postoperative analgesic function in uniport VATS patients with or without intercostal nerve blockade. Since March 2014, 235 patients received various kinds of single port VATS. We identified 50 patients who received single port VATS with intercostal nerve blockade and retrospectively compared them with a group of patients who had received single port VATS without intercostal nerve blockade. The operative time, post operation day 0, 1, 2, 3 and discharge day pain score, narcotic requirements, drainage duration and post-operative hospital stay were collected. In order to establish a well-balanced cohort study, we also used propensity scores matching (1:1) to compare the short term clinical outcome in two groups. No operative deaths occurred in this study. The uniport VATS with intercostal nerve blockade group was associated with less post operation day 0 and day 1 pain score, and narcotic requirements in our cohort study (P<0.001, <0.001, and 0.003). After propensity scores matching, there were 50 patients in each group. Mean day 0 and day 1, day 2, day 3 pain score, drainage duration, post-operative hospital stay, and narcotic requirements were smaller in uniport VATS with intercostal nerve blockade (P<0.001, <0.001, 0.038, 0.007, 0.02, 0.042, and 0.003). In conclusion, in patients post single port VATS, continual intercostal nerve block with levobupivacaine infusion appears to be a safe, effective and promising technique in our study, associated with a shorter hospital stay and less

  15. An observer-blind randomised parallel group study comparing the efficacy and tolerability of tenoxicam and piroxicam in the treatment of post-operative pain after oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Roelofse, J A; Swart, L C; Stander, I A

    1996-11-01

    Tenoxicam and piroxicam were compared for analgesic efficacy in 58 patients undergoing removal of bilateral impacted third molar teeth, under general anaesthesia. Pain intensity was assessed over a 7 day period by the patient using verbal and visual analogue scales. The patients received one hour pre-operatively dormicum 7.5 mg orally and either tenoxicam 40 mg or piroxicam 40 mg rectally. This was followed by tenoxicam 20 mg daily in effervescent form, or piroxicam 20 mg daily in despersible tablet form for 7 days. Surgical and anaesthetic techniques were standardized for all patients. Therapeutic gain was assessed by comparing hourly pain levels 4 hours post-operatively and then twice daily for 7 days. Trismus was evaluated pre-operatively, at one hour, 24 hours and 7 days post-operatively. Analysis of the results showed a statistical significant difference between the treatment groups only 4 hours post-operatively, patients in the tenoxicam group experiencing less pain than those in the piroxicam group (p = < 0.05).

  16. Is the systemic inflammatory reaction to surgery responsible for post-operative pain after tonsillectomy, and is it "technique-related"?

    PubMed

    Roje, Zeljka; Racic, Goran; Kardum, Goran; Selimovic, Mirnes

    2011-08-01

    Investigate the influence of operative technique on post-operative morbidity and the systemic inflammatory response after tonsillectomy. In addition, our aim was to compare the systemic inflammatory reaction, post-operative pain severity, and required time before the resumption of normal physical activity between two groups of tonsillectomized children and to correlate characteristics of the systemic inflammatory reaction to post-operative morbidity. This prospective, randomized, and single-blind study included 100 children between the ages of 3-16 years and who were scheduled for a tonsillectomy at our department for chronic tonsillitis and/or respiratory obstruction. The children were randomly assigned into one of two groups: either a conventional tonsillectomy with bipolar diathermy coagulation or a radiofrequency tonsillectomy procedure; both groups had a 14-day follow-up. We investigated the severity and duration of postoperative pain (based on the use of analgesics during the postoperative period), the postoperative day that they resumed normal physical activity, and the rate of postoperative hemorrhage. In order to assess the systemic inflammatory response, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured before the surgery and seven days after the procedure. After the surgery CRP levels increased to a statistically significant level (t = -4.7; p < 0.001) in conventional tonsillectomy group. There was a statistically significant correlation between increased blood CRP levels after the surgery and the level of post-operative analgesic consumption, which was based on an increased number of analgesic applications (r = 0.28; p < 0.01) and a greater number of days in which analgesics were consumed (r = 0.26; p < 0.01). There was also a correlation between increased blood CRP levels and a longer required time to resume normal physical activities (r = 0.30; p < 0.01). Post-operative morbidity after tonsillectomy appears to depend on the systemic inflammatory

  17. Microlaparoscopy for recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Turial, S; Enders, J; Schwind, M; Schier, F

    2010-05-01

    This prospective study evaluated the diagnostic and therapeutic feasibility and safety of microlaparoscopy for the management of chronic abdominal pain in children. The study included 45 children (13 boys and 32 girls; age range from 6 to 16 years, average 9.5 years) undergoing diagnostic microlaparoscopy for chronic abdominal pain. Microlaparoscopy (the exclusive use of 2 mm instrument sets and small diameter scopes, i. e. 1.7 mm, 1.9 mm and 2.4 mm) was performed after common organic diseases were ruled out by careful baseline investigations. No complications occurred which were related to the exclusive use of 2 mm instruments and small scopes. CT scans were avoided in all patients. No intraoperative pathological findings were found in 18 children. In another 18 children, the intraoperative findings indicated the need for further surgical intervention. At follow-up, 26 patients reported that they were totally pain-free; 10 children had partial resolution after surgery, and 8 children reported only minimal resolution. In 20 cases, the procedures were accomplished as an outpatient surgery. Microlaparoscopy seems to be a safe and effective diagnostic tool with a favorable diagnostic accuracy, minimal access trauma and superior cosmesis in children.

  18. The Efficacy and Clinical Safety of Various Analgesic Combinations for Post-Operative Pain after Third Molar Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Au, Alvin Ho Yeung; Choi, Siu Wai; Cheung, Chi Wai; Leung, Yiu Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To run a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials aiming to answer the clinical question “which analgesic combination and dosage is potentially the most effective and safe for acute post-operative pain control after third molar surgery?”. Materials and Methods A systematic search of computer databases and journals was performed. The search and the evaluations of articles were performed by 2 independent reviewers in 3 rounds. Randomized clinical trials related to analgesic combinations for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery that matched the selection criteria were evaluated to enter in the final review. Results Fourteen studies with 3521 subjects, with 10 groups (17 dosages) of analgesic combinations were included in the final review. The analgesic efficacy were presented by the objective pain measurements including sum of pain intensity at 6 hours (SPID6) and total pain relief at 6 hours (TOTPAR6). The SPID6 scores and TOTPAR6 scores of the reported analgesic combinations were ranged from 1.46 to 6.44 and 3.24 – 10.3, respectively. Ibuprofen 400mg with oxycodone HCL 5mg had superior efficacy (SPID6: 6.44, TOTPAR6: 9.31). Nausea was the most common adverse effect, with prevalence ranging from 0-55%. Ibuprofen 200mg with caffeine 100mg or 200mg had a reasonable analgesic effect with fewer side effects. Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis may help clinicians in their choices of prescribing an analgesic combination for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery. It was found in this systematic review Ibuprofen 400mg combined with oxycodone HCL 5mg has superior analgesic efficacy when compared to the other analgesic combinations included in this study. PMID:26053953

  19. Incidence of post-operative pain following single visit endodontics in vital and non-vital teeth: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Sumita; Mehta, Deepil

    2013-01-01

    This clinical study was conducted to compare the post-operative pain following single visit endodontics in vital and non-vital teeth, with and without periapical radiolucency. A total of 60 adult patients requiring root canal therapy in anterior and premolar teeth were selected for this study. Single sitting root canal treatment was carried out and the subjects were recalled after 2 weeks and instructed to fill out a series of self-report questionnaires for responses about pain in the interim after 1 day, 2 day, 3 day, 1 week and 2 weeks. In vital teeth (Group I) 60% of the treated cases had pain, of which 36% had mild pain (non-significant) and 24% had moderate pain (significant). In non-vital teeth without periapical radiolucency (Group II) 64% of cases had pain, of which 48% had mild pain (non-significant) and 16% had moderate pain (significant). In non-vital teeth with periapical radiolucency (Group III) 32% of the cases had pain of which 24% had mild pain (non-significant) and 8% had moderate pain (significant). None of the teeth in any of the groups had severe pain. There was no statistical difference between incidence of pain in vital and non-vital teeth without periapical radiolucency. Non-vital teeth with periapical radiolucency exhibited relatively less pain as compared with non-vital teeth without periapical radiolucency, but the pain continued in a significant percent of teeth even after 2 weeks. Pain incidence dropped significantly within a period of 1 day to 2 weeks in vital teeth and non-vital teeth without periapical radiolucency. There was a tendency for less incidence of significant pain after a single visit root canal treatment in these groups. Results obtained were comparable with those obtained by several investigators. PMID:24124293

  20. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency presenting as recurrent abdominal pain in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mhanni, Aizeddin A; Prasad, Chitra; Rockman-Greenberg, Cheryl

    2011-09-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain remains one of the most common symptoms in pediatrics. We present the case of a 3-year-old girl who had recurrent episodes of abdominal pain requiring more than 13 visits to the emergency department. A diagnosis of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency was eventually made. Urea cycle disorders often present beyond the neonatal period with frequent vomiting episodes; however, recurrent abdominal pain as a presenting symptom is unusual. Unnecessary invasive investigations of recurrent abdominal pain in childhood can be avoided by considering inborn errors of metabolism earlier in the differential diagnosis.

  1. [Recurrent abdominal pain and "chronic appendicitis"].

    PubMed

    Leardi, S; Delmonaco, S; Ventura, T; Chiominto, A; De Rubeis, G; Simi, M

    2000-01-01

    Chronic appendicitis may be the cause of recurrent abdominal pain. This hypothesis is the subject of controversy. The aim is to clarify the possible existence of a chronic inflammation of the appendix by a clinical and histopathologic study. The case history and the preoperative symptoms and serum findings of 269 patients with appendectomy have been studied. All the appendices have been histologically examined. Chronic appendicitis was diagnosed when at least two typical histological factors of chronic inflammation were present. The histological findings of the appendices have been correlated with preoperative clinical and serum findings of the patients. 14-46 months after the appendectomy, the patients have been examined. Histological examination revealed 187 cases (69.5%) with acute appendicitis, 44 cases (16.3%) with non disease of appendix and 38 cases (14.2%) with chronic appendicitis. Recurrent abdominal pain and normal leukocyte count were closely correlated (chi 2 = 18.3, p < 0.001; chi 2 = 21.3, p < 0.001 respectively) with diagnosis of chronic appendicitis. 81.8% of 33 patients with chronic appendicitis who underwent follow-up had relief of all the symptoms after appendectomy. Therefore, the study seems to confirm the existence of a clinico-pathological condition that can be defined as chronic appendicitis, resolvable with appendectomy.

  2. Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst presenting as recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kerr, John M; Ukpeh, Henry; Steinbok, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Spinal arachnoid cysts are an infrequently reported cause of abdominal pain in children. In this report, we describe the unusual case of an extradural arachnoid cyst presenting as recurrent abdominal pain in a pediatric patient without any signs of cord or nerve root compression. A 14-year-old girl with recurrent abdominal pain as the only symptom of a spinal extradural arachnoid cyst is reported. The patient was incidentally diagnosed with an intraspinal mass on abdominal computed tomography (CT) during the course of investigating her abdominal pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging confirmed the diagnosis of a T11-L2 extradural arachnoid cyst. After resection of the T11-L2 arachnoid cyst, the patient's abdominal pain resolved. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing abdominal pain as the sole presenting feature of a spinal arachnoid cyst in the pediatric population. This case illustrates that abdominal pain may be the first and only presentation of spinal arachnoid cysts in children. Spinal pathology should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained abdominal pain, even when there are no other symptoms of spinal disease.

  3. [Psychological diagnostics of functional abdominal pain in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Schlarb, Angelika A; Bock, Inga; Gulewitsch, Marco D; Hautzinger, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Given the high prevalence and possible psychosocial consequences of functional abdominal pain in children and adolescents, appropriate instruments for early diagnostics are required to work effectively against long-term chronic courses of this disorder. This report describes several self-report scales and reviews their applicability. In addition, questionnaires and interviews which assess pain intensity and associated factors as well as specific instruments for assessing functional abdominal pain in children and adolescents are introduced. It can be declared that none of the examined instruments grasps all relevant factors of pain. Especially in German there are only few appropriate diagnostic instruments for functional abdominal pain in children.

  4. Intravenous lidocaine for post-operative pain relief after hand-assisted laparoscopic colon surgery: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Tikuišis, R; Miliauskas, P; Samalavičius, N E; Žurauskas, A; Samalavičius, R; Zabulis, V

    2014-04-01

    Perioperative intravenous (IV) infusion of lidocaine has been shown to decrease post-operative pain, shorten time to return of bowel function, and reduce the length of hospital stay. This randomized, prospective, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluated the impact of IV lidocaine on the quality of post-operative analgesia and other outcomes after hand-assisted laparoscopic colon surgery. Sixty four patients with colon cancer scheduled for elective colon resection were involved in this study. Patients were randomized to receive either lidocaine infusion [lidocaine group (LG)] or normal 0.9 % saline infusion [placebo group (PG)] for a period of 24 h. Anaesthetic and surgical techniques were standardized. Twenty-four-hour post-operative analgesia in the recovery area was maintained by continuous infusion of 0.1 μg/kg/h fentanyl. The primary outcome of the study was post-operative pain control. Pain was assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS) scores at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h after surgery. Patients with a VAS score >3 were treated with ketorolac 30 mg as needed. Secondary outcomes included time to resumption of bowel function and length of hospital stay. Data in the two groups were compared using the two-tailed Student's t test. All statistical tests were two-tailed at a significance level of 0.05. Demographic characteristics and clinical features of both groups were similar. Intensity of pain at rest in LG compared with PG was significantly lower during the first 24 h post-operatively. LG patients reported significantly less pain during movements at 2-, 12-, and 24-h post-surgery than PG patients. The study showed that ketorolac consumption was significantly higher in PG: mean ketorolac consumption in LG was 43.77 ± 13.86 mg and in PG 51.67 ± 13.16 mg (p = 0.047). Compared with placebo, lidocaine infusion produced a 32 % reduction in time to the first drink (Cohen's d = 3.85), 16 % reduction in time to the first full diet

  5. Abdominal epilepsy as an unusual cause of abdominal pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Yilmaz; Sefer, Ustebay; Dondu, Ulker Ustebay; Ismail, Ozanli; Yusuf, Ehi

    2016-09-01

    Abdominal pain, in etiology sometimes difficult to be defined, is a frequent complaint in childhood. Abdominal epilepsy is a rare cause of abdominal pain. In this article, we report on 5 year old girl patient with abdominal epilepsy. Some investigations (stool investigation, routine blood tests, ultrasonography (USG), electrocardiogram (ECHO) and electrocardiograpy (ECG), holter for 24hr.) were done to understand the origin of these complaints; but no abnormalities were found. Finally an EEG was done during an episode of abdominal pain and it was shown that there were generalized spikes especially precipitated by hyperventilation. The patient did well on valproic acid therapy and EEG was normal 1 month after beginning of the treatment. The cause of chronic recurrent paroxymal abdominal pain is difficult for the clinicians to diagnose in childhood. A lot of disease may lead to paroxysmal gastrointestinal symptoms like familial mediterranean fever and porfiria. Abdominal epilepsy is one of the rare but easily treatable cause of abdominal pain. In conclusion, abdominal epilepsy should be suspected in children with recurrent abdominal pain.

  6. Developmental fluoxetine exposure normalizes the long-term effects of maternal stress on post-operative pain in Sprague-Dawley rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Knaepen, Liesbeth; Rayen, Ine; Charlier, Thierry D; Fillet, Marianne; Houbart, Virginie; van Kleef, Maarten; Steinbusch, Harry W; Patijn, Jacob; Tibboel, Dick; Joosten, Elbert A; Pawluski, Jodi L

    2013-01-01

    Early life events can significantly alter the development of the nociceptive circuit. In fact, clinical work has shown that maternal adversity, in the form of depression, and concomitant selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment influence nociception in infants. The combined effects of maternal adversity and SSRI exposure on offspring nociception may be due to their effects on the developing hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system. Therefore, the present study investigated long-term effects of maternal adversity and/or SSRI medication use on nociception of adult Sprague-Dawley rat offspring, taking into account involvement of the HPA system. Dams were subject to stress during gestation and were treated with fluoxetine (2×/5 mg/kg/day) prior to parturition and throughout lactation. Four groups of adult male offspring were used: 1. Control+Vehicle, 2. Control+Fluoxetine, 3. Prenatal Stress+Vehicle, 4. Prenatal Stress+Fluoxetine. Results show that post-operative pain, measured as hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli after hind paw incision, was decreased in adult offspring subject to prenatal stress alone and increased in offspring developmentally exposed to fluoxetine alone. Moreover, post-operative pain was normalized in prenatally stressed offspring exposed to fluoxetine. This was paralleled by a decrease in corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) levels in prenatally stressed offspring and a normalization of serum CBG levels in prenatally stressed offspring developmentally exposed to fluoxetine. Thus, developmental fluoxetine exposure normalizes the long-term effects of maternal adversity on post-operative pain in offspring and these effects may be due, in part, to the involvement of the HPA system.

  7. Analgesic efficacy of a single dose of lumiracoxib compared with rofecoxib, celecoxib and placebo in the treatment of post-operative dental pain.

    PubMed

    Kellstein, D; Ott, D; Jayawardene, S; Fricke, J

    2004-03-01

    This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study compared the efficacy and tolerability of lumiracoxib (a novel COX-2 selective inhibitor) with rofecoxib, celecoxib and placebo in patients with moderate-to-severe post-operative dental pain. Following third molar extraction, patients received single oral doses of lumiracoxib 400 mg, rofecoxib 50 mg, celecoxib 200 mg or placebo (n = 355). Additional patients from a similar study, assigned to lumiracoxib, rofecoxib or placebo (n = 155), were included for analysis of the primary variable, Summed Pain Intensity Difference over the first 8 h post dose (SPID-8). For SPID-8, lumiracoxib was superior to rofecoxib (p < 0.05), celecoxib (p < 0.001) and placebo (p < 0.001). Lumiracoxib demonstrated the fastest onset of analgesia and the longest time to rescue medication use. Patient global evaluation of lumiracoxib was comparable to rofecoxib and superior to celecoxib and placebo. All treatments were well tolerated. Lumiracoxib 400 mg provides rapid, effective and sustained relief of post-operative dental pain, comparable or superior to rofecoxib.

  8. Evaluation of complications and feasibility of indwelling epidural catheter use for post-operative pain control in dogs in the home environment.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L R; McAbee, K P; Stephenson, N; Stanke, N J; Booms, M L; Degner, D D

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the use of indwelling epidural catheters post-operatively in dogs in a home environment, and to report associated complications. Dogs undergoing surgical procedures of the hind limb (n=83) were included in the study and were administered 0.05 or 0.10 mg/kg epidural morphine via an indwelling epidural catheter every 6 hours. Data compiled relating to catheter placement included time of placement, ease of placement and problems encountered, number of attempts of placement, and individual placing the catheter. A client questionnaire was provided to evaluate side effects, complications, pain, and ease of use of the epidural catheter system after discharge from the hospital and catheter removal at home. Side effects were compared between the dogs receiving 0.05 or 0.1 mg/kg epidural morphine. The most common patient complication was abnormal urination patterns (32/82, 39%); specifically dribbling urine where laying, emptying the entire bladder where laying, not urinating for extended periods of time, and taking a longer time to pass urine were reported. There were no significant differences in the number or types of side effects reported in either dosing group. The most common technical issues reported by owners were difficulty getting the needle into the injection port (10/81, 12%) and removing the adhesive covering keeping the epidural catheter system in place (19/78, 24%). There were no reports of inflammation or discharge at the catheter site in any of the dogs. Of the respondents surveyed, 76/79 (97%) found the epidural catheter system easy to use at home in the post-operative period. Indwelling epidural catheters are a feasible method of administration of post-operative analgesia in the immediate post-operative period in the home environment and were associated with only a few minor complications in this population.

  9. The efficacy of multimodal high-volume wound infiltration in primary total knee replacement in facilitating immediate post-operative pain relief and attainment of early rehabilitation milestones.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Purnajyoti

    2014-05-01

    Inadequate pain relief after lower limb joint replacement surgery has been a well-recognised limiting factor affecting post-operative mobilisation and length of hospital stay. Multimodal local wound infiltration with local anaesthetics, adrenaline and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents can lower the opiate intake, reduce the length of stay and enhance early mobilisation in knee replacement patients. A retrospective review of 64 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement was undertaken. Thirty-two patients (cases) had their wounds infiltrated with ropivacaine, adrenaline and ketorolac by the operating surgeon, intraoperatively. Subsequently, a 19G wound catheter placed into the knee joint. They received two further top-up doses of the same combination at 10 and 20 h post-operatively. This group was compared with a control group of 32 patients who did not receive any local infiltration. Both groups were comparable in terms of BMI and age. Post-operative opiate drug consumption in first 48 h after surgery, length of hospital stays and time taken to mobilise after surgery were recorded. There was significant reduction in opiate consumption in the treatment group with an average consumption of 49.35 mg of morphine compared to 71.48 mg in the control group (p = 0.004). The median length of hospital stay was significantly reduced from 5 days in the control group to 4 days in the treatment group (p = 0.03). The patients in the treatment group mobilised around 19 h earlier (p = 0.001). No major post-operative complications were encountered in either group. Wound infiltration is an effective and safe technique that promotes early rehabilitation and discharge of patients following primary total knee replacement.

  10. [Surgical management of acute abdominal pain in children].

    PubMed

    Scheye, T

    1999-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is one of the most frequent causes of admission to an emergency department of a children's hospital. It continues to be a clinical challenge and the diagnosis viewed with the most apprehension is acute appendicitis. The clinical examination must be meticulous and repeated in order to assess the evolution of the abdominal syndrome and to adapt the paraclinic examinations. All the abdominal pains are not surgical but justify an admission for observation in pediatric surgical department.

  11. Abdominal Pain Caused by a Potentially Fatal Attraction.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Danielle Claire; Scace, Candace; Shah, Bhairav; Weiner, Evan; Prasad, Rajeev

    2016-11-19

    Abdominal pain is a challenging presentation in children. Examination findings and etiology vary greatly, spanning a vast spectrum from flatulence to frank peritonitis with septic shock. Here, we discuss a 10-year-old boy with 24 hours of progressively worsening lower abdominal pain, nausea, and subjective fevers. History and physical examination findings were consistent with appendicitis. However, physicians were surprised when the single-view abdominal radiograph showed an unanticipated, somewhat perplexing discovery.

  12. Early Postoperative Pain After Keyless Abdominal Rope-Lifting Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hüseyınoğlu, Ürfettin; Çıçek, Melek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery is a novel, gasless, single-incision laparoscopic surgical technique. In this study we aimed to compare the postoperative pain from keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery with carbon dioxide laparoscopy performed for benign ovarian cysts. Methods: During a 20-month period, 77 women underwent surgery for a benign ovarian cyst. Keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery and conventional carbon dioxide laparoscopy techniques were used for the operations in 32 women and 45 women, respectively. The 2 operative techniques were compared with regard to demographic characteristics; preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data including early postoperative pain scores; and frequency of shoulder pain and analgesic requirements. Results: Data regarding demographic characteristics, preoperative findings, cyst diameters and rupture rates, intra-abdominal adhesions, intraoperative blood loss, and postoperative hospital stay did not differ between groups (P > .05). However, the mean operative and abdominal access times were significantly longer in the keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery group (P < .05). Visual analog scale pain scores at initially and at the second, fourth, and 24th hours of the postoperative period were significantly lower in the keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery group (P < .05). Similarly, keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery caused significantly less shoulder pain and additional analgesic use (P < .05). Conclusion: Keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery seems to cause less pain in the management of benign ovarian cysts in comparison with conventional carbon dioxide laparoscopy. PMID:25848177

  13. Abdominal pain in physical therapy practice: 3 patient cases.

    PubMed

    Rodeghero, Jason R; Denninger, Thomas R; Ross, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Resident's case problem. Abdominal pain is a common symptom, but not a common diagnosis, of patients referred to physical therapists for examination and intervention. For patients with primary symptoms of abdominal pain, a thorough evaluation must be performed to determine if symptoms are musculoskeletal in nature or of a nonmusculoskeletal origin that would warrant a referral to a different healthcare provider. This report describes the management of 3 adults with primary complaints of abdominal pain who were referred for physical therapy evaluation and treatment. Two of the patients had secondary symptoms of hip and/or low back pain and had previously undergone extensive medical testing for their chronic abdominal pain, without a definitive diagnosis having been determined. A physical therapy evaluation was conducted, and treatment, including manual physical therapy and exercise, was administered to address all relative impairments, once the physical therapist had determined that the patients' symptoms were of musculoskeletal origin. The third patient included in this series was referred to a physical therapist with a diagnosis of greater trochanteric versus iliopsoas bursitis. However, the patient had abdominal pain that was more acute in nature and a history and physical examination findings that were concerning for abdominal pain of nonmusculoskeletal origin. Both patients with abdominal pain of musculoskeletal origin showed marked improvement in pain and disability after 7 treatment sessions. The third patient was referred to her primary care physician, and ultrasound examination of the abdomen revealed several intrauterine masses that were consistent with uterine fibroids. Following uterine fibroid embolization, the patient was symptom free. Although not routinely managed by physical therapists, abdominal pain is a relatively common patient symptom that can have several causes, both musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal. This paper emphasizes the importance

  14. Management of abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    El-Radhi, A Sahib

    Abdominal pain (AP) is a very common complaint caused by a variety of conditions. Mild or moderate AP affects practically all children of all ages. The pain usually settles spontaneously without medical intervention. AP severe enough to require medical intervention has both surgical and non-surgical causes. It is responsible for considerable morbidity, missed school days, and significant use of health resources. Children usually present either with an acute or recurrent AP. In comparison, chronic AP with persistent symptoms, lasting days or weeks, is rare in children. Surgical conditions may be the underlying causes in acute AP, but non-surgical conditions are diagnosed more commonly in children with recurrent AP. Management can be difficult, time-consuming and often clinically challenging to diagnose and treat. In most instances, the cause of AP can be diagnosed through the history and physical examination. The main objective in managing an affected child is to differentiate between benign, self-limited conditions such as constipation or gastroenteritis, and more life-threatening surgical conditions such as intussusception or appendicitis. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and Crohn's disease should be considered in any child presenting with recurrent AP.

  15. Revision of failed hip resurfacing to total hip arthroplasty rapidly relieves pain and improves function in the early post operative period

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the results of 25 consecutive patients who underwent revision of a hip resurfacing prosthesis to a total hip replacement. Revisions were performed for recurrent pain and effusion, infection and proximal femoral fractures. Both components were revised in 20 cases. There were 12 male and 13 female patients with average time to revision of 34.4 and 26.4 months respectively. The mean follow up period was 12.7 months (3 to 31). All patients reported relief of pain and excellent satisfaction scores. Two patients experienced stiffness up to three months post operatively. Pre operative Oxford, Harris and WOMAC hip scores were 39.1, 36.4 and 52.2 respectively. Mean post operative scores at last follow up were 17.4, 89.8 and 6.1 respectively (p < 0.001 for each score). These results show that conversion of hip resurfacing to total hip arthroplasty has high satisfaction rates. These results compare favourably with those for revision total hip arthroplasty. PMID:21114835

  16. Assessment of post-operative pain in cats: a case study on veterinary students of Universiti Putra Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mei Yan; Chen, Hui Cheng; Omar, Mohamed Ariff

    2014-01-01

    The ability to assess and control pain is listed as one of the desired Day One competencies among veterinary graduates. As such, a study was conducted to examine the current status and effectiveness of a video-based training module on the attitude toward and knowledge of pain assessment in cats among fourth- and final-year veterinary students of Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) in January of 2013. A total of 92 students participated in this study, resulting in a response rate of 60.1%. Upon completion of a pre-training survey, the respondents undertook an interactive video-based presentation, followed by a post-training survey. The majority of the students (96.7%) agreed on the importance of pain management. Before the training, many (76.1%) disagreed that they had received adequate training, while 53.3% were not confident in their pain-recognition skills. After training, their knowledge and confidence in pain assessment increased. Responses to the survey were not associated with differences in gender, level of study, or field of interest. Students were found to have mistaken some physiologic parameters as good pain indicators after ovariohysterectomy. Their assessment of three standardized video cases revealed that they could recognize prominent signs of pain but failed to identify changes in behavior that were more subtle. Refinement to the training module is required to address the above deficiencies.

  17. [Perioperative pain management for abdominal and thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Englbrecht, J S; Pogatzki-Zahn, E M

    2014-06-01

    Abdominal and thoracic surgical procedures can result in significant acute postoperative pain. Present evidence shows that postoperative pain management remains inadequate especially after "minor" surgical procedures. Various therapeutic options including regional anesthesia techniques and systemic pharmacotherapy are available for effective treatment of postoperative pain. This work summarizes the pathophysiological background of postoperative pain after abdominal and thoracic surgery and discusses the indication, effectiveness, risks, and benefits of the different therapeutic options. Special focus is given to the controversial debate about the indication for epidural analgesia, as well as various alternative therapeutic options, including transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block, paravertebral block (PVB), wound infiltration with local anesthetics, and intravenous lidocaine. In additional, indications and contraindications of nonopioid analgesics after abdominal and thoracic surgery are discussed and recommendations based on scientific evidence and individual risk and benefit analysis are made. All therapeutic options discussed are eligible for clinical use and may contribute to improve postoperative pain outcome after abdominal and thoracic surgical procedures.

  18. Pre-emptive injection of peri-articular-multimodal drug for post-operative pain management in total knee arthroplasty: a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Motififard, Mahdi; Omidian, Ali; Badiei, Sajad

    2017-05-01

    Severe post-operative pain is one of the main problems after total knee arthroplasty. In this study, we investigated the effect of a peri-articular multimodal drugs injections pre-emptively on post-operative pain control and knee functions following total knee arthroplasty. This study was a double-blind randomized clinical trial. Eligible cases including 137 patients-aged 30 to 80 years old-were randomly divided into one of two groups: the drug group received a cocktail consisting of bupivacaine hydrochloride, morphine sulphate, epinephrine, and ketorolac. The control group received epinephrine only. The injections were given 15 minutes before incision. Joint range of motion (ROM) and the severity of pain by using visual analog scale (VAS) of 1 to 10 and patient's facial expression, were assessed in the pre-operative visit, after 24 hours, 48 hours, and six weeks after operation. Knee Society score (KSS) was recorded before the operation, six weeks, and six months after the operation for each patient. The data of VAS showed no significant difference between the groups before operation but there was statistically significant difference between the two groups at 24 hours, 48 hours, and six weeks after the operation. In KSS, difference was not significant between the two groups before the operation and six months after surgery while our results showed a statistically significant difference between groups six weeks after the operation. In ROM, there was no significant difference between the groups before operation. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups at 24 hours, 48 hours and six weeks after the operation. Complications were recorded at six weeks after surgery. Peri-articular multimodal injection including bupivacaine, morphine, and ketorolac preferably with pre-emptive injection method provided proper post-operative pain relief, less opioid consumption, and better early rehabilitation following TKA at 48 hours after

  19. Pre-operative Predictive Factors of Post-operative Pain in Patients With Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Clara; Díaz-Heredia, Jorge; Berraquero, María Luisa; Crespo, Pablo; Loza, Estíbaliz; Ruiz Ibán, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    To analyze pre-surgical predictive factors of post-surgical pain in patients undergoing hip or knee arthoplasty. A systematic literature review was performed. We defined a sensitive strategy on Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library up to May 2013. The inclusion criteria were: patients undertaking knee and/or hip arthroplasty, adults with moderate or severe pain (≥4 on a Visual Analog Scale) in whom predictive factors of post-surgical pain were evaluated before surgery. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, controlled trials and observational studies were selected. We excluded animals and basic science articles, reviews of prosthesis, prosthesis due to fractures, patients with rheumatic diseases or studies with mixed population in which disaggregated data was not possible to obtain. A total 37 articles of moderate quality were selected. The articles included representative patients undergoing a knee or hip arthroplasty in our country; most of them were aged 60 years or above, with osteoarthritis, and with a high rate of obesity and comorbidities. We found great variability regarding the type of studies and predictive factors. There was a strong association between post-surgical pain and the following pre-surgical factors: female gender, low socio-economic status, higher pain, comorbidities, low back pain, poor functional status, and psychological factors (depression, anxiety or catastrophic pain). There are pre-surgical factors that might influence post-surgical pain in patients undergoing a knee or hip arthroplasty. Therefore, they should be taken into account when considering an arthroplasty. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  20. Abdominal pain – learning when not to intervene!

    PubMed Central

    Tachamo, Niranjan; Timilsina, Bidhya; Nazir, Salik; Lohani, Saroj

    2016-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis (EA) is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain. It is a benign condition but may mimic other serious causes of acute abdomen such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, and gynecological emergency in severe cases. Knowledge of this condition in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain can save unnecessary hospital admission, antibiotics, and surgery. In this article, we present the case of a 43-year-old female who presented to our hospital with a 2-day history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain and diarrhea. She was diagnosed with EA with computed tomography of abdomen with contrast and was managed conservatively with good outcome. PMID:27987280

  1. Managing Postoperative Analgesic Failure: Tramadol Versus Morphine for Refractory Pain in the Post-Operative Recovery Unit.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Kelly; Nolan, Aoife; Barnard, John; Tozer, Megan; Harris, David; Sleigh, Jamie

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to discover whether co-analgesia with tramadol or additional morphine was more effective for patients who still had severe pain despite being given 10 mg intravenous morphine in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). All eligible patients were consented and recruited to the trial pre-operatively, but only a small subgroup – whose pain was not successfully controlled (pain score 6/10 or more) after receiving 10 mg of morphine in the PACU—were then randomized to enter the trial and receive, in a double blinded fashion, the analgesic study drug; which consisted of either a further 10 mg of morphine, or 100 mg of tramadol, titrated intravenously to control their pain. The groups were compared as to: the time to readiness for discharge, the patient’s pain scores over time, and the presence of side effects. There was no statistically significant difference in any of the outcomes measured. The time to readiness for discharge from PACU was 119 minutes in the morphine group and 120 minutes in the tramadol group. However in approximately half the cases who entered the trial (i.e., where pain had not been controlled with the pre-enrollment baseline 10 mg of morphine in PACU) neither a further 10 mg of morphine nor 100 mg of tramadol effectively relieved the patient’s pain. We found no difference between additional morphine and co-analgesia with tramadol in this study. Patients who don’t respond to reasonable doses of opioids in PACU are very likely to be unresponsive to further opioids, and other non-opioid analgesic techniques (such as regional anesthesia) should be considered early in this group of patients.

  2. Incidence of post-operative pain after single visit and multiple visit root canal treatment: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Smita; Garg, Aniket

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To compare the incidence and intensity of post-obturation pain after single or multi visit root canal treatment on single rooted teeth in a randomized controlled trial. Materials and Methods: Two hundred patients requiring root canal treatment on permanent single rooted teeth (both vital and non vital) were included. The patients were assigned randomly into two groups of 100 patients each. The teeth in Group1 (n = 100) were obturated at the first visit, whilst those in Group 2 (n = 100) were obturated in a second visit 7 days later. A modified Heft Parker visual analog scale was used to measure pre-operative pain and post-obturation pain at 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after obturation. Independent-sample T-tests was used for statistical analysis. Results: Twelve patients were excluded from the study as they failed to follow the scheduled revisit. Data were obtained from the remaining 188 patients. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence and intensity of post-obturation pain experienced by two groups. Conclusions: The incidence and intensity of post-obturation pain experience following one- or two-visit root canal treatment on teeth with a single canal were not significantly different. PMID:23112477

  3. Pre-emptive effect of dexamethasone injection and consumption on post-operative swelling, pain, and trismus after third molar surgery. A prospective, double blind and randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Pradeep D.; Rastogi, Sanjay; Gupta, Prashant; Niranjanaprasad Indra, B.; Thomas, Roy; Choudhury, Rupshikha

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the preventative effect of intravenous 4 mg of dexamethasone and 8 mg oral dexamethasone on post-operative pain, swelling and trismus after the surgical extraction of mandibular third molars. Materials and methods A randomized clinical trial comprised of 200 patients (control group I intravenous and experimental group II orally) with impacted lower third molars, average age 20.8 years with no local or systemic problems, with bilateral impacted lower third molars, were operated under local anesthesia. Group I was given 4 mg IV and group II was given 8 mg orally of dexamethasone 1 h before procedure. The choice of which side to operate first and the amount of concentration of medication to use was made randomly and double-blindly. Post-operative pain was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) and the degree of swelling was evaluated through facial reference points' variation. The presence of trismus was analyzed through measurement of the interincisal distance (IID). These assessments were obtained before the operation and 24 h, 48 h and 7th POD. Results No significant difference was found in facial swelling and trismus between IV 4 mg injection and oral 8 mg consumption after lower third molar surgery (student t test P > 0.05). The visual analogue scale scores for pain assessment showed no significant difference between IV injection and oral route of dexamethasone (student t test P > 0.05). Conclusion Patients can be administered 8 mg oral dexamethasone is as effective as 4 mg intra venous route without much difference in final outcome at any given point of time. PMID:25853044

  4. Common Functional Gastroenterologic Disorders Associated With Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Sletten, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Although abdominal pain is a symptom of several structural gastrointestinal disorders (eg, peptic ulcer disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 4 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with abdominal pain: functional dyspepsia, constipation-predominant and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, and functional abdominal pain syndrome. Together, these conditions affect approximately 1 in 4 people in the United States. They are associated with comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia, depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Symptoms are explained by disordered gastrointestinal motility and sensation, which are implicated in a variety of peripheral (eg, postinfectious inflammation, luminal irritants) and/or central (eg, stress and anxiety) factors. These disorders are defined and can generally be diagnosed by symptoms alone. Often prompted by alarm features, selected testing is useful to exclude structural disease. Identifying the specific diagnosis (eg, differentiating between functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome) and establishing an effective patient-physician relationship are the cornerstones of therapy. Many patients with mild symptoms can be effectively managed with limited tests, sensible dietary modifications, and over-the-counter medications tailored to symptoms. If these measures are not sufficient, pharmacotherapy should be considered for bowel symptoms (constipation or diarrhea) and/or abdominal pain; opioids should not be used. Behavioral and psychological approaches (eg, cognitive behavioral therapy) can be very helpful, particularly in patients with chronic abdominal pain who require a multidisciplinary pain management program without opioids. PMID:27492916

  5. Evaluation of a post-operative pain-like state on motivated behavior in rats: Effects of plantar incision on progressive-ratio food-maintained responding

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Emily; Krivitsky, Rebecca; Cone, Katherine; Atherton, Phillip; Pitre, Travis; Lanpher, Janell; Giuvelis, Denise; Bergquist, Ivy; King, Tamara; Bilsky, Edward J.; Stevenson, Glenn W.

    2015-01-01

    There has been recent interest in characterizing the effects of pain-like states on motivated behaviors in order to quantify how pain modulates goal-directed behavior and the persistence of that behavior. The current set of experiments assessed the effects of an incisional post-operative pain manipulation on food-maintained responding under a progressive-ratio (PR) operant schedule. Independent variables included injury state (plantar incision or anesthesia control) and reinforcer type (grain pellet or sugar pellet); dependent variables were tactile sensory thresholds and response breakpoint. Once responding stabilized on the PR schedule, separate groups of rats received a single ventral hind paw incision or anesthesia (control condition). Incision significantly reduced breakpoints in rats responding for grain, but not sugar. In rats responding for sugar, tactile hypersensitivity recovered within 24 hrs, indicating a faster recovery of incision-induced tactile hypersensitivity compared to rats responding for grain, which demonstrated recovery at PD2. The NSAID analgesic, diclofenac (5.6 mg/kg) completely restored incision-depressed PR operant responding and tactile sensitivity at 3 hr following incision. The PR schedule differentiated between sucrose and grain, suggesting that relative reinforcing efficacy may be an important determinant in detecting pain-induced changes in motivated behavior. PMID:26494422

  6. Recurrent abdominal pain in children: a clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Quak, Seng Hock

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘recurrent abdominal pain’, or RAP, refers mainly to the duration of painful period and frequency of pain. The commonly accepted duration is at least three months in the preceding period, and over this three-month period, there are at least three episodes of pain that are severe enough to affect the daily activities of the affected patients. Over the years, with advances in medical technology and better understanding of the pathophysiology of abdominal pain, more and more organic causes have been identified. However, the most common cause of RAP in children is still functional in origin. PMID:25820843

  7. Imperforate hymen: cause of lower abdominal pain in teenage girls.

    PubMed

    Mou, J W C; Tang, P M Y; Chan, K W; Tam, Y H; Lee, K H

    2009-11-01

    Imperforate hymen is a relatively rare congenital anomaly. However, it is not an uncommon cause of lower abdominal pain presenting in teenage girls. Without careful history taking and thorough examination, the condition can be missed easily. We report an imperforate hymen presenting as abdominal pain in three teenage girls aged 12, 12 and 13 years, respectively, within a six-month period. The presentation was reviewed and the various types of hymenotomy were discussed.

  8. Effect of Intraoperative Platelet-Rich-Plasma Treatment on Post Operative Donor Site Knee Pain in Patellar Tendon Autograft ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brian L.; Hobart, Sarah; Porter, David; Hogan, Daniel E.; McHugh, Malachy P.; Bedford, Benjamin B.; Nicholas, Stephen J.; Klein, Devon; Harousseau, Kendall

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Donor site morbidity in the form of anterior knee pain is a frequent complication after bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this Level I study was to examine the effect of the intraoperative administration of platelet-rich plasma on post operative knee pain and patellar defect healing. Methods: Fifty-nine patients (29±12 y/o) undergoing BPTB ACL reconstruction and eligible to enter the study, were randomized to the treatment (PRP; n=31) or non treatment (sham n=28) arms of the study just prior to surgery. In either case, 10 cc of venous blood was drawn prior to the induction of anesthesia and either discarded (sham) or processed (PRP) for preparation of a PRP gel to be later mixed with donor site bone chips and inserted into the patellar defect. At 12 weeks and 6 months after surgery, patients completed IKDC forms and VAS pain scores for ADLs and kneeling (0-10 scale). Healing indices at the donor site were assessed by MRI at 6 months and included the following measurements taken from axial sequences: AP tendon dimensions at the level of the superior tibial cortex, roof of the intercondylar notch and width at the largest patella graft deficit. Mixed model ANOVA was used to assess the effect of PRP on patient symptoms and MRI indices of donor site healing. The primary dependent variable was VAS kneeling pain. It was estimated that with 25 patients per group there would be 80% power to detect a 1.5-point difference in kneeling pain between treatments at P<0.05. A between group difference of 1.5-points in VAS for kneeling pain was deemed to represent a clinically relevant difference. Results: VAS Kneeling Pain at 12 weeks tended to be lower in the PRP versus placebo group (4.5±3.6 vs. 6.2±2.4, P=0.051) but no difference was apparent at 6 months (3.7±3.2 vs. 4.4±2.9, P=0.41). Kneeling pain decreased from 12 weeks to 6 months (P<0.001) with a trend for a greater decrease in the placebo group (Time by Treatment P

  9. Chlorhexidine gel and less difficult surgeries might reduce post-operative pain, controlling for dry socket, infection and analgesic consumption: a split-mouth controlled randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Haraji, A; Rakhshan, V

    2015-03-01

    Reports on post-surgical pain are a few, controversial and flawed (by statistics and analgesic consumption). Besides, it is not known if chlorhexidine can reduce post-extraction pain adjusting for its effect on prevention of infection and dry socket (DS). We assessed these. A total of 90 impacted mandibular third molars of 45 patients were extracted. Intra-alveolar 0·2% chlorhexidine gel was applied in a split-mouth randomised design to one-half of the sockets. None of the included patients took antibiotics or analgesics afterwards. In the first and third post-operative days, DS formation and pain levels were recorded. Predictive roles of the risk factors were analysed using fixed-effects (classic) and multilevel (mixed-model) multiple linear regressions (α = 0·05, β≤0·1). In the first day, pain levels were 5·56 ± 1·53 and 4·78 ± 1·43 (out of 10), respectively. These reduced to 3·22 ± 1·41 and 2·16 ± 1·40. Pain was more intense on the control sides [both P values = 0·000 (paired t-test)]. Chlorhexidine had a significant pain-alleviating effect (P = 0·0001), excluding its effect on DS and infection. More difficult surgeries (P = 0·0201) and dry sockets were more painful (P = 0·0000). Age had a marginally significant negative role (P = 0·0994). Gender and smoking had no significant impact [P ≥ 0·7 (regression)]. The pattern of pain reduction differed between dry sockets and healthy sockets [P = 0·0102 (anova)]. Chlorhexidine can reduce pain, regardless of its infection-/DS-preventive effects. Simpler surgeries and sockets not affected by alveolar osteitis are less painful. Smoking and gender less likely affect pain. The role of age was not conclusive and needs future studies.

  10. Supraspinal TRPV1 modulates the emotional expression of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Jurik, Angela; Ressle, Andrea; Schmid, Roland M; Wotjak, Carsten T; Thoeringer, Christoph K

    2014-10-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type-1 (TRPV1) is critically involved in peripheral nociceptive processes of somatic and visceral pain. However, the role of the capsaicin receptor in the brain regarding visceral pain remains elusive. Here, we studied the contribution of TRPV1 to abdominal pain transmission at different nociceptive pathway levels using TRPV1 knock-out mice, resiniferatoxin-mediated deletion of TRPV1-positive primary sensory neurons, and intracerebral TRPV1 antagonism. We found that constitutive genetic TRPV1 deletion or peripheral TRPV1 deletion reduced acetic acid-evoked abdominal constrictions, without affecting referred abdominal hyperalgesia or allodynia in an acute pancreatitis model of visceral pain. Notably, intracerebral TRPV1 antagonism by SB 366791 significantly reduced chemical and inflammatory spontaneous abdominal nocifensive responses, as observed by reduced expressions of nociceptive facial grimacing, illustrating the affective component of pain. In addition to the established role of cerebral TRPV1 in anxiety, fear, or emotional stress, we demonstrate here for the first time that TRPV1 in the brain modulates visceral nociception by interfering with the affective component of abdominal pain. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Imaging and laboratory testing in acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Nova L; Jahnes, Katherine; Mills, Angela M

    2011-05-01

    When discussing which laboratory tests or imaging to order in the setting of acute abdominal pain, it is practical to organize information by disease process (eg, acute appendicitis, cholecystitis). Because studies on the accuracy of diagnostic tests are of necessity related to the presence or absence of specific diagnoses, and because clinicians frequently look to tests to help them rule in or rule out specific conditions, this article is organized by region of pain and common abdominal diagnoses. It focuses on the contributions that laboratory testing and imaging make in the emergency management of abdominal complaints. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Idiopathic postpartum intussusception: a rare cause of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kocakoc, Ercan; Bozgeyik, Zulkif; Koc, Mustafa; Balaban, Mehtap

    2010-01-01

    To present a case with acute abdominal pain due to idiopathic intestinal intussusception diagnosed by ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) during the early postpartum period. A 21-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain, nausea and emesis after a normal vaginal delivery. Laboratory tests done at admission were within normal limits except for leukocytosis. Physical examination revealed abdominal distention, guarding and rebound tenderness. Abdominal ultrasound and oral contrast-enhanced CT showed a complex mass in the hypogastrium, with a typical configuration of intussusception. Emergent laparotomy revealed ileoileal invagination approximately 70 cm to the ileocecal valve but no lead point. A partial ileal resection was performed. This case shows that when intussusception is suspected, an abdominal ultrasound should be performed even in patients with atypical symptoms. CT may be used to confirm the diagnosis. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Post operative pain management in shoulder surgery: Suprascapular and axillary nerve block by arthroscope assisted catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Basat, H Çağdaş; Uçar, D Hakan; Armangil, Mehmet; Güçlü, Berk; Demirtaş, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pain management is the part of shoulder surgery to improve patient satisfaction, start rehabilitation process rapidly and decrease for hospital stay. Various treatment modalities have been used for pain management, but they have some limitations, side effects and risks. Throughout intraoperative and postoperative period, nerve blocks have been used more popularly than others because of efficacy. For the regional nerve block, local anesthetic should be infiltrated close to the nerve for maximum effect. Consequently, aim of this study was to evaluate analgesic efficacy when catheters are placed with assistance of arthroscope to block suprascapular and axillary nerves in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff under general anesthesia. 24 patients (5 males, 19 females; mean age: 54.3 years) who underwent arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff between June 2014 and September 2014 and were catheterized to block suprascapular and axillary nerves during shoulder arthroscopy were included in the study. Clinical outcomes were assessed using visual analog scale (VAS) scores preoperatively and at 0 h, 6 h, 12 h, 18 h, 24 h, and postoperative day 2. Preoperative and postoperative 0 h, 6 h, 12 h, 18 h, 24 h, and day 2 mean VAS scores were 6.38 ± 0.77, 0.44 ± 0.42, 0.58 ± 0.42, 0.63 ± 0.40, 0.60 ± 0.44, 0.52 ± 0.42, and 1.55 ± 0.46, respectively. No statistical difference was found among 0 h, 6 h, 12 h, 18 h, and 24 h time points; however, comparison of postoperative day 2 and postoperative 0 h, 6 h, 12 h, 18h and 24 h VAS scores showed statistically significant difference (P < 0.05). All patients were discharged at the end of 24 h with no complication. The mean time (in minutes) required for blocking suprascapular nerve and axillar nerve were 14.38 ± 3.21 and 3.75 ± 0.85, respectively. These results demonstrated that blocking two nerves with arthroscopic approach was an excellent pain management method in postoperative period. Accordingly

  14. Hepatosplenic cat-scratch disease and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Dunn, M W; Berkowitz, F E; Miller, J J; Snitzer, J A

    1997-03-01

    There have been several recent reports that cat-scratch disease (CSD) causes a multiplicity of atypical clinical syndromes. We recently diagnosed hepatosplenic CSD in a child who was seen with fever and abdominal pain. We report this case and 10 other patients with hepatosplenic CSD and highlight the importance of abdominal pain in this clinical entity. This was a retrospective review of charts of patients with a diagnosis of cat-scratch disease at Egleston Children's Hospital between January, 1985, and June, 1996. From these cases patients with hepatosplenic CSD were selected for study. Seven children (64%) had significant abdominal pain, and in three children abdominal pain was their chief complaint. All children in the study had pathologic evidence of CSD or elevated titers of antibodies to Bartonella henselae. Ultrasound examination showed that all children had microabscesses in the spleen, and eight had abscesses in the liver. One of the most remarkable findings in this large series of cases of hepatosplenic CSD was that 64% of the patients complained of abdominal pain. All children in this study received antibiotics. It was our clinical impression that once antibiotics had been started, the patients appeared to improve very quickly. With an increased index of suspicion, the use of B. henselae serology and an abdominal ultrasound examination, the diagnosis of this underrecognized disease might be more readily made.

  15. [Diagnostic difficulties in pediatric abdominal pain with potential appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Iwańczak, Barbara; Stawarski, Andrzej; Czernik, Jerzy; Bronowickip, Krzysztof; Iwańczak, Franciszek; Pytrus, Tomasz; Klempous, Jan; Godziński, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric abdominal pain is one of the most common symptom of children brought to attention of primary care physicians and pediatric surgeons. In many children clinical symptoms may be uncharacteristic and may lead to diagnostic difficulties. Clinical analysis of children with right lower quadrant abdominal pain suspected of appendicitis or children with periappendicular mass. The histories of 14 children aged from 18 months to 17 years treated in Pediatric Clinic were analysed. All children were operated because of right lower quadrant abdominal pain or abdominal mass before admission to the Pediatric Clinic or during hospitalization in Pediatric Clinic. Intraoperatively in all children pathologies other than appendicitis were the cause of symptoms. The most often Crohn's disease were recognized (9 children), in 2 cases with concomitant other pathologies (fecal tumor of appendix in one case and with peritoneal abscess after perforation of intestinal wall). Sporadically the inflammation of the mesenterial lymph nodes caused by Yersinia infection suggested appendicitis. In one boy with ulcerative colitis, during exacerbation of the disease appendicitis complicated by rupture and peritonitis was observed. In 18-month old child with right lower quadrant abdominal mass invagination complicated by perforation of the ileum was recognized. In the case of 14-years old boy 6 months after appendectomy we observed mechanical intestinal obstruction complicated by perforation and peritonitis. Carcinoid of the appendix was the cause of abdominal pain in one child. 1. Appendicitis is the most frequent surgical etiology of the right lower quadrant pediatric abdominal pain. 2. Despite new diagnostic imagines there are no definite criteria to recognize appendicitis, in most cases physical examination and very carefull evaluation of abdominal pain are the most important. 3. All children with periappendipected of Crohn's disease. 4. All children with equivocal presentations of

  16. Evaluation of a protocol-based intervention to promote timely switching from intravenous to oral paracetamol for post-operative pain management: an interrupted time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Sabry, Nirmeen; Dawoud, Dalia; Alansary, Adel; Hounsome, Natalia; Baines, Darrin

    2015-12-01

    Timely switching from intravenous to oral therapy ensures optimized treatment and efficient use of health care resources. Intravenous (IV) paracetamol is widely used for post-operative pain management but not always switched to the oral form in a timely manner, leading to unnecessary increase in expenditure. This study aims to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted intervention to promote timely switching from the IV to oral form in the post-operative setting. An evidence-based prescribing protocol was designed and implemented by the clinical pharmacy team in a single district general hospital in Egypt. The protocol specified the criteria for appropriate prescribing of IV paracetamol. Doctors were provided with information and educational sessions prior to implementation. A prospective, quasi-experimental study was undertaken to evaluate its impact on IV paracetamol utilization and costs. Data on monthly utilization and costs were recorded for 12 months before and after implementation (January 2012 to December 2013). Data were analysed using interrupted time series analysis. Prior to implementation, in 2012, total spending on IV paracetamol was 674 154.00 Egyptian Pounds (L.E.) ($23,668.00). There was a non-significant (P > 0.05) downward trend in utilization (-32 ampoules per month) and costs [reduction of 632 L.E. ($222) per month]. Following implementation, immediate decrease in utilization and costs (P < 0.05) and a trend change over the follow-up period were observed. Average monthly reduction was 26% (95% CI: 24% to 28%, P < 0.001). A multifaceted, protocol-based intervention to ensure timely switching from IV-to-oral paracetamol achieved significant reduction in utilization and cost of IV paracetamol in the first 5 months of its implementation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Diagnostic imaging of acute abdominal pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Sarah L; Knudson, Mark P

    2015-04-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presentation in the outpatient setting and can represent conditions ranging from benign to life-threatening. If the patient history, physical examination, and laboratory testing do not identify an underlying cause of pain and if serious pathology remains a clinical concern, diagnostic imaging is indicated. The American College of Radiology has developed clinical guidelines, the Appropriateness Criteria, based on the location of abdominal pain to help physicians choose the most appropriate imaging study. Ultrasonography is the initial imaging test of choice for patients presenting with right upper quadrant pain. Computed tomography (CT) is recommended for evaluating right or left lower quadrant pain. Conventional radiography has limited diagnostic value in the assessment of most patients with abdominal pain. The widespread use of CT raises concerns about patient exposure to ionizing radiation. Strategies to reduce exposure are currently being studied, such as using ultrasonography as an initial study for suspected appendicitis before obtaining CT and using low-dose CT rather than standard-dose CT. Magnetic resonance imaging is another emerging technique for the evaluation of abdominal pain that avoids ionizing radiation.

  18. Dietary issues in recurrent abdominal pain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many children and adults suffer from belly pain that comes and goes. This article reviews the scientific evidence that in some people, the type of diet they eat can cause pain. In some children, not having enough fiber in the diet can cause belly pain. Adding specific types of fiber can improve the ...

  19. [Children's abdominal pain--from symptoms to diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Mielczarek, Jadwiga; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Bak-Romaniszyn, Leokadia

    2009-05-01

    Abdominal pain is an ambiguous symptom and for this reason it is a common cause of clinic visits. Abdominal pain might have various etiology--it could be organic, environmental, as well as psychological factors. To analyze the ailments character as well as factors connected with children's abdominal pain from their manifestation to diagnosis. 226 children (143 girls and 83 boys) at the age of 3-18 years (an average age--12.5 +/- 3.9) admitted to ICZMP with the abdominal pain as a preliminary diagnosis were examined. The examination was based on the questionnaire prepared for this purpose as well as patients' medical documentation. Ailments of the 47.3% of children lasted few months. 65.9% of patients felt the pain everyday or few times a week, in 59.3% of cases it had variable character. Localization of the pain was intra-abdomen in 77.7% of cases, however 61.5% of patients described it as changeably located. Pain attack predominating (35% of patients) lasted more than 1 h and usually had medium intensity. It was the stress that provoked abdominal pain in 35% of cases. Character logical features that might have influence on child's mental reactions were noted in 47.4% of patients. The pain connected with food intake occurred in 20.8% of cases. Food that might cause abdominal pain was eaten by 96% of children, the most popular were consumed everyday: sweets (42%), chips (23.9%) and sweetened fizzy drinks (20.8%). On the basis of examination and observation four groups of diseases were diagnosed: I--44.7%--inflammatory diseases of alimentary tract (predominating--25.7% of children suffered from gastritis, 12.4% of them had H. pylori infection), II group--32.3%--functional disorders (children with dyspepsia--22.1%), III--11.5%--parasitic diseases (ascariasis--8.8%) and IV group--11.5%--other disorders. 52.2% of children suffered from one disease, 38.1% from two, 9.3% from three. Children directed to hospital diagnostics predominating complained of lingering, lasting

  20. Pre-emptive intraperitoneal local anaesthesia: an effective method in immediate post-operative pain management and metabolic stress response in laparoscopic appendicectomy, a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Thanapal, Mohana Raj; Tata, Mahadevan D; Tan, Ann J; Subramaniam, Thiruselvi; Tong, Jenny M G; Palayan, Kandasami; Rampal, Sanjay; Gurunathan, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopic surgeries are associated with reduced surgical stress response and shortened post-operative recovery, intense pain and high analgesia requirements in the immediate post-operative period are often the chief complaints. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-emptive intraperitoneal local anaesthetic drugs on post-operative pain management and metabolic stress response in laparoscopic appendicectomy. The method used was a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled study. Patients with clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis who fulfil the criteria, were taken into this study. Primary outcomes investigated were consumption of patient-controlled analgesia during the immediate post-operative period (first 6 h) and subsequent 18 h as well as serum cortisol sampling. Total of 120 patients were recruited into three different treatment groups (placebo, ropivacaine, levobupivacaine). In order to maintain visual analogue score of 0-1 during the immediate post-operative period, patients in the placebo group required significantly (P < 0.001) higher dose of analgesia (morphine/mg) - 11 mg (8.3-15.5) as compared with ropivacaine - 4 mg (3.0-6.0) and levobupivacaine - 3.5 mg (2.0-5.0). The immediate post-operative serum cortisol showed a significant increase in serum cortisol in the placebo group (P = 0.001) as compared with ropivacaine and levobupivacaine groups. Pre-emptive intraperitoneal local anaesthesia in laparoscopy surgery is a safe, non-invasive procedure that can benefit patients by reducing the immediate post-operative pain intensity and metabolic stress response of the body. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  1. "Abdominal crunch"-induced rhabdomyolysis presenting as right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Haas, D C; Bohnker, B K

    1999-02-01

    A young, active duty sailor presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain. History, physical, and laboratory findings initially suggested cholecystitis or related disease. Further evaluation found myoglobinuria and a recently increased exercise program, leading to the diagnosis of exercise-induced right upper abdominal wall rhabdomyolysis. Although not a common cause of abdominal pain, this diagnosis should be considered in the patient with abdominal pain and a recently increased exercise program, particularly exercises of the abdominal wall such as "abdominal crunches."

  2. Common Functional Gastroenterological Disorders Associated With Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Adil E; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Sletten, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Although abdominal pain is a symptom of several structural gastrointestinal disorders (eg, peptic ulcer disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 4 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with abdominal pain: functional dyspepsia, constipation-predominant and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, and functional abdominal pain syndrome. Together, these conditions affect approximately 1 in 4 people in the United States. They are associated with comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia and depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Symptoms are explained by disordered gastrointestinal motility and sensation, which are implicated in various peripheral (eg, postinfectious inflammation and luminal irritants) and/or central (eg, stress and anxiety) factors. These disorders are defined and can generally be diagnosed by symptoms alone. Often prompted by alarm features, selected testing is useful to exclude structural disease. Identifying the specific diagnosis (eg, differentiating between functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome) and establishing an effective patient-physician relationship are the cornerstones of therapy. Many patients with mild symptoms can be effectively managed with limited tests, sensible dietary modifications, and over-the-counter medications tailored to symptoms. If these measures are not sufficient, pharmacotherapy should be considered for bowel symptoms (constipation or diarrhea) and/or abdominal pain; opioids should not be used. Behavioral and psychological approaches (eg, cognitive behavioral therapy) can be helpful, particularly in patients with chronic abdominal pain who require a multidisciplinary pain management program without opioids. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: a persistent painful hip

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Dinnish; Ashraf, Nadeem; Ahmad, Adil; Menon, Jay

    2013-01-01

    The presentation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with isolated hip pain is a rare phenomenon. We present an atypical case of a 58-year-old previously fit man who presented with a 6-month history of progressively worsening left hip pain associated with unintentional weight loss, tender bilateral testicular swellings and a large non-tender palpable mass on abdominal examination. Urgent abdominal CT scan findings revealed a 15 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm extending to the aortic bifurcation associated with an extensive left hydronephrosis. In theatre, the diagnosis of inflammatory AAA (IAAA) was confirmed following the presence of pyuria and a successful repair with an open approach using a bifurcated dacron graft was performed. PMID:24038286

  4. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: a persistent painful hip.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Dinnish; Ashraf, Nadeem; Ahmad, Adil; Menon, Jay

    2013-09-13

    The presentation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with isolated hip pain is a rare phenomenon. We present an atypical case of a 58-year-old previously fit man who presented with a 6-month history of progressively worsening left hip pain associated with unintentional weight loss, tender bilateral testicular swellings and a large non-tender palpable mass on abdominal examination. Urgent abdominal CT scan findings revealed a 15 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm extending to the aortic bifurcation associated with an extensive left hydronephrosis. In theatre, the diagnosis of inflammatory AAA (IAAA) was confirmed following the presence of pyuria and a successful repair with an open approach using a bifurcated dacron graft was performed.

  5. Imperforate hymen: a cause of abdominal pain in female adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lardenoije, Céline; Aardenburg, Robert; Mertens, Helen

    2009-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with primary amenorrhea and had had cyclical abdominal pain for almost a year. At examination we observed a painful mass in the lower abdomen and normal secondary sex characteristics. Perineal examination showed a bluish bulging hymen. Transabdominal ultrasonography revealed a dense mass in the pelvis measuring about 12×11 cm. We diagnosed an imperforate hymen with haematocolpos and haematometra. The hymen was opened surgically and a large quantity of menstrual blood was drained from the vagina and uterus. Postoperative recovery was normal without any pain. The patient now menstruates regularly. An imperforate hymen occurs in 0.05% of women. It is important to be aware of this while examining a female adolescent presenting with cyclical abdominal pain and primary amenorrhea. Late discovery of an imperforate hymen may lead to pain, infections, hydronephrosis and endometriosis with subfertility as a possible consequence. PMID:21686660

  6. Self-report assessment of recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Guariso, G; Mozrzymas, R; Gobber, D; Benini, F; Zancan, L; Zacchello, F

    1999-01-01

    Pain is the principal, and often the only symptom in cases of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP). The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical background behind the pain symptom and the pain's capacity for differentiation in the diagnostic assessment of a group of 86 children suffering from RAP and observed at a pediatric gastroenterology service. The self-rating methods applied to the children included a verbal scale and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for scoring the pain, and the Eland method, which is based on a graphic representation of the pain to enable its quantification and localization. Regardless of the pain assessment emerging from this study, the children were divided into 3 groups on the basis of a standardized diagnostic procedure, i.e. G1--upper gastrointestinal tract disease; G2--RAP with no apparent organic cause; G3--intestinal disease. The intensity of the pain fails to distinguish between the three groups, while other features seem more useful, e.g. variability in the pain's intensity, the number and location of painful sites, and the how the pain is graphically represented. Drawings typical of RAP with no apparent organic cause characteristically represent the pain more accurately and in greater detail, using more colors and a certain refinement in the performance of the drawing, with varying types of pain in subsequent episodes, and involving several abdominal and even extra-abdominal sites. In our experience, this method might contribute towards the completion and standardization of the child's clinical history and clinical evaluation. Such methods would have to be validated by further clinical studies, however.

  7. Sudden onset abdominal pain and distension: an imaging sparkler.

    PubMed

    Klair, Jagpal Singh; Girotra, M; Medarametla, S; Shah, H R

    2014-11-01

    We present a case of a middle-aged patient presenting with acute onset abdominal pain and distension who had signs of bowel obstruction on physical exam. He was afebrile, hemodynamically stable with no peritoneal signs. Abdominal radiograph and CT scan were pathognomic for sigmoid volvulus. Through this case report we want to discuss the presentation, diagnosis, management options for sigmoid volvulus and importance of features suggestive of ischemic bowel that necessitates different management options.

  8. Acute abdominal pain and constipation due to lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mongolu, S; Sharp, P

    2013-01-01

    Although uncommon, lead poisoning should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of unexplained acute abdominal pain in both adults and children. We present the case of a 35-year-old Asian male who presented with abdominal pain and constipation secondary to lead poisoning. Initially, the source of lead exposure was not apparent; this was later found to be due to ingestion of an Ayurvedic herbal medicine for the treatment of infertility. Lead poisoning due to the ingestion of Ayurvedic remedies is well described. We discuss the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of lead poisoning. This case illustrates one of the rarer medical causes of acute abdominal pain and emphasizes the need to take a thorough history (including specific questioning regarding the use of over-the-counter and traditional/ herbal remedies) in cases of suspected poisoning or drug toxicity.

  9. Post-operative pain control for burn reconstructive surgery in a resource-restricted country with subcutaneous infusion of local anesthetics through a soaker catheter to the surgical site: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Fuzaylov, Gennadiy; Kelly, Tara L; Bline, Cheryl; Dunaev, Alexander; Dylewski, Maggie L; Driscoll, Daniel N

    2015-12-01

    Post-operative pain can significantly affect a patient's ability to recover following surgery. In this study we introduced the concept of post-operative pain evaluation of burn patients as well as a technique for placement and use of subcutaneous catheters for continuous infusion of local anesthetic to provide analgesia following skin harvest from the lateral thigh in a hospital in resource-restricted country--Ukraine. A total of 109 patients were enrolled in this study. In the control group 64 patients received the standard post-operative pain regimen of metamizole 1 g and/or ketorolac 3%- 30 mg at the discretion of the nursing staff. In the interventional group, 45 patients received the catheter infusion of local anesthetic by elastomeric pump which was placed intraoperatively; it continuously delivers a regulated flow 4-5 ml/h of procaine 0.5% for 48 h to a patient's surgical donor site with the standard pain regimen available for breakthrough pain. All patients were assessed post-operatively and in the peri-dressing change period by the nursing staff. Blood pressure, heart rate, and pain scores were documented based on the Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale. All data were analyzed using SAS version 9.3. The Student's t test and Fisher's exact test were used to assess differences between groups for continuous variables. The Mann-Whitney U Test was used to examine differences in pain scores between groups. A p value of <0.05 was considered significant. The median pain score immediately following surgery was 5.0 in the control group, which was significantly greater (p=0.03) than median pain score of 4.0 for the patients receiving continuous infusion of procaine. However, there is no statistically significant difference in the median pain score (3.0 and 3.0) after the initial dressing change (p=0.73). Our Ukrainian colleagues now have a method of objective pain assessment and a new technique in pain management. With assessment linked to intervention, improvement in

  10. Diet and functional abdominal pain in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    van Tilburg, Miranda A L; Felix, Christopher T

    2013-08-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is a common complaint among children and adolescents. For many patients, symptoms exacerbate with eating. This review discusses findings concerning the role of diet in FAP. The foods that are discussed are divided into 2 major groups: food allergies or intolerances, which focus on milk, gluten, and fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols; and functional foods, which hone in on foods that reduce abdominal pain in adolescents such as fiber, peppermint oil, and probiotics. Lastly, we discuss the role of eating habits in FAP and how the physiology of eating may be the real culprit of symptoms associated with eating.

  11. Is abdominal wall tenderness a useful sign in the diagnosis of non-specific abdominal pain?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, D. W.; Dixon, J. M.; Seabrook, G.; Collin, J.

    1988-01-01

    Pain arising from the abdominal wall has been implicated as a cause of non-specific abdominal pain (NSAP), and the presence of abdominal wall tenderness (AWT) has been proposed as an accurate diagnostic test for NSAP. One hundred and fifty eight patients admitted to hospital with abdominal pain were tested for the presence of positive AWT. In 53 patients the final diagnosis was appendicitis and positive AWT was found in five. Thirty eight patients were found to have a variety of other recognised pathological diagnoses, none of whom had a positive AWT. In 67 patients a diagnosis of NSAP was made in the absence of other pathological diagnosis, 19 of whom had positive AWT, which was significantly different from the other diagnostic groups. This study confirms the presence of AWT in up to 28% of patients with NSAP, and suggests that testing for AWT is of value in patients with abdominal pain, although a positive AWT is not as accurate a predictor of NSAP as previously reported. PMID:2970820

  12. Post-operative breast cancer patients diagnosed with skeletal metastasis without bone pain had fewer skeletal-related events and deaths than those with bone pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Skeletal metastases are often accompanied by bone pain. To investigate the clinical meaning of bone pain associated with skeletal metastasis in breast cancer patients after surgery, we explored whether the presence of bone pain was due to skeletal-related events (SREs) or survival (cause specific death, CSD), retrospectively. Methods Consecutive breast cancer patients undergoing surgery between 1988 and 1998 were examined for signs of skeletal metastasis until December 2006. Patients who were diagnosed as having skeletal metastasis were the subjects of this study. Bone scans were performed annually for 5, 7 or 10 years; they were also conducted if skeletal metastasis was suspected. Data concerning bone pain and tumor markers at the time of skeletal metastasis diagnosis, and data relating to various factors including tumors, lymph nodes and hormone receptors at the time of surgery, were investigated. The relationships between factors such as bone pain, SRE and CSD were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox's analysis. Results Skeletal metastasis occurred in 668 patients but the pain status of two patients was unknown, therefore 666 patients were included in the study. At the time of skeletal metastasis diagnosis 270 patients complained of pain; however, 396 patients did not. Analysis of data using Cox's and Kaplan-Meier methods demonstrated that patients without pain had fewer SREs and better survival rates than those with pain. Hazard ratios regarding SRE (base = patients without pain) were 2.331 in univariate analysis and 2.243 in multivariate analysis. Hazard ratios regarding CSD (base = patients without pain) were 1.441 in univariate analysis and 1.535 in multivariate analysis. Similar results were obtained when analyses were carried out using the date of surgery as the starting point. Conclusion Bone pain at diagnosis of skeletal metastasis was an indicator of increased SRE and CSD. However, these data did not support recommendations of

  13. Safety and efficacy of botox injection in alleviating post-operative pain and improving quality of life in lower extremity limb lengthening and deformity correction

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Reggie C; Montpetit, Kathleen; Ruck-Gibis, Joanne; Thorstad, Kelly; Raney, Ellen; Aiona, Michael; Platt, Robert; Finley, Allen; Mackenzie, William; McCarthy, James; Narayanan, Unni

    2007-01-01

    Background Distraction osteogenesis is the standard treatment for the management of lower limb length discrepancy of more than 3 cm and bone loss secondary to congenital anomalies, trauma or infection. This technique consists of an osteotomy of the bone to be lengthened, application of an external fixator, followed by gradual and controlled distraction of the bone ends. Although limb lengthening using the Ilizarov distraction osteogenesis principle yields excellent results in most cases, the technique has numerous problems and is not well tolerated by many children. The objective of the current study is to determine if Botulinum Toxin A (BTX-A), which is known to possess both analgesic and paralytic actions, can be used to alleviate post-operative pain and improve the functional outcome of children undergoing distraction osteogenesis. Methods/Design The study design consists of a multi centre, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Patients between ages 5–21 years requiring limb lengthening or deformity correction using distraction will be recruited from 6 different sites (Shriners Hospital for Children in Montreal, Honolulu, Philadelphia and Portland as well as DuPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware and Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ont). Approximately 150 subjects will be recruited over 2 years and will be randomized to either receive 10 units per Kg of BTX-A or normal saline (control group) intraoperatively following the surgery. Functional outcome effects will be assessed using pain scores, medication dosages, range of motion, flexibility, strength, mobility function and quality of life of the patient. IRB approval was obtained from all sites and adverse reactions will be monitored vigorously and reported to IRB, FDA and Health Canada. Discussion BTX-A injection has been widely used world wide with no major side effects reported. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time BTX-A is being used under the

  14. Safety and efficacy of botox injection in alleviating post-operative pain and improving quality of life in lower extremity limb lengthening and deformity correction.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Reggie C; Montpetit, Kathleen; Ruck-Gibis, Joanne; Thorstad, Kelly; Raney, Ellen; Aiona, Michael; Platt, Robert; Finley, Allen; Mackenzie, William; McCarthy, James; Narayanan, Unni

    2007-09-28

    Distraction osteogenesis is the standard treatment for the management of lower limb length discrepancy of more than 3 cm and bone loss secondary to congenital anomalies, trauma or infection. This technique consists of an osteotomy of the bone to be lengthened, application of an external fixator, followed by gradual and controlled distraction of the bone ends. Although limb lengthening using the Ilizarov distraction osteogenesis principle yields excellent results in most cases, the technique has numerous problems and is not well tolerated by many children. The objective of the current study is to determine if Botulinum Toxin A (BTX-A), which is known to possess both analgesic and paralytic actions, can be used to alleviate post-operative pain and improve the functional outcome of children undergoing distraction osteogenesis. The study design consists of a multi centre, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Patients between ages 5-21 years requiring limb lengthening or deformity correction using distraction will be recruited from 6 different sites (Shriners Hospital for Children in Montreal, Honolulu, Philadelphia and Portland as well as DuPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware and Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ont). Approximately 150 subjects will be recruited over 2 years and will be randomized to either receive 10 units per Kg of BTX-A or normal saline (control group) intraoperatively following the surgery. Functional outcome effects will be assessed using pain scores, medication dosages, range of motion, flexibility, strength, mobility function and quality of life of the patient. IRB approval was obtained from all sites and adverse reactions will be monitored vigorously and reported to IRB, FDA and Health Canada. BTX-A injection has been widely used world wide with no major side effects reported. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time BTX-A is being used under the context of limb lengthening and

  15. [13-Year old boy with abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Irene; Klinkhamer, Paul J J M; van de Poll, Marcel C G

    2012-01-01

    A 13-year old boy presents with pain in the lower right abdomen, showing clinical signs of appendicitis. During McBurney' incision an appendix sana was seen. Histologic examination showed penetrating enterobiasis. This was treated with mebendazol.

  16. [Hereditary angioedema: strange cause of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Salas-Lozano, Nereo Guillermo; Meza-Cardona, Javier; González-Fernández, Coty; Pineda-Figueroa, Laura; de Ariño-Suárez, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: el angioedema hereditario es un trastorno inflamatorio episódico, que se hereda de manera autosómica dominante y se caracteriza por episodios de edema periférico. Los pacientes pueden tener edema de la pared de cualquier víscera hueca, incluido el intestino. Caso clínico: se comunica el caso de un paciente masculino de 33 años de edad, sin antecedentes de importancia, con dolor abdominal, localizado en el epigastrio, irradiado al cuadrante inferior derecho, acompañado de 5 vómitos. La tomografía abdominal mostró engrosamiento de la pared de la segunda y tercera porción del duodeno, con infiltración de grasa y líquido libre. Los exámenes de laboratorio mostraron: concentraciones bajas del complemento C4 (5.5 mg/dL) y actividad del inhibidor de C1 del complemento de 30%. Conclusiones: el angioedema hereditario es consecuencia de la deficiencia (tipo I) o disfunción (tipo II) del inhibidor C1 del complemento. El dolor abdominal asociado con angioedema es de inicio súbito, como dolor cólico, recurrente y de intensidad moderada. En la actualidad existen dos medicamentos aprobados por la Food and Drug Administration para el tratamiento de pacientes con esta afección.

  17. Evaluation of the effect of intra-operative intravenous fluid on post-operative pain and pulmonary function: a randomized trial comparing 10 and 30 ml kg(-1) of crystalloid.

    PubMed

    Straub, B D; Aslani, A; Enohumah, K; Rahore, R; Conrick-Martin, I; Kumar, D; Campbell, M; Dicker, P; Mocanu, E; Loughrey, J P; Hayes, N E; McCaul, C L

    2014-12-01

    Existing evidence suggests that administration of intravenous fluids has been shown to improve outcomes including pain in gynecological laparoscopic surgery but the optimum fluid dose has not been determined. To determine the effect of administration of intravenous fluids on post-operative pain and pulmonary function after gynecological laparoscopy. In a prospective randomized double-blinded study 100 ASA 1 and 2 elective patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopy were randomized to receive intravenous compound sodium lactate 10 ml kg(-1) (CSL10-restrictive) or 30 ml kg(-1) (CSL30-liberal) administered intra-operatively. The primary outcome measure was the post-operative pain score at 24, 48 and 72 h, assessed by 0-10 verbal rating scale (VRS). Pulmonary function (FEV1, FVC, PEFR) and oxygen saturation were also measured. Patients who received CSL 30 had lower post-operative pain scores than CSL 10 (ANCOVA-mean difference = 0.47, 95 % CI 0.11-0.83, P = 0.01). Post-operative pain VRS was lower in CSL30 than CSL10 at 48 h (mean difference 0.56, 95 % CI 0.04-1.09, P = 0.036). Patients in CSL30 reported shoulder tip pain less frequently than those in CSL10 (30.4 vs. 43.9 % of assessments, P = 0.03, OR 0.58) but reported wound pain more frequently 39.0 vs. 24.2 %, P = 0.01, OR 2.0). Indices of pulmonary function did not differ between groups at any time. Liberal compared to restrictive administration of i.v. crystalloid is associated with a clinical modest reduction in pain. Pulmonary dysfunction was not increased with liberal fluid administration.

  18. Slipping Rib Syndrome as Persistent Abdominal and Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Bolaños-Vergaray, Juan Javier; de la Gala García, Francisco; Obaya Rebollar, Juan Carlos; Bové Alvarez, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Slipping rib syndrome is an overlooked cause of persistent abdominal or chest pain. The etiology of this syndrome is not well understood, but the characteristic pain is from hypermobility of the false ribs. Although it is a diagnosis of exclusion, misdiagnosis may lead to an excessive workup. A simple clinical examination via the hooking maneuver is the most significant feature of its diagnosis. We describe the case of a 41-year-old woman with slipping rib syndrome.

  19. Treatment of abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Tack, Jan F; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2014-08-01

    Functional abdominal pain in the context of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a challenging problem for primary care physicians, gastroenterologists and pain specialists. We review the evidence for the current and future non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options targeting the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Cognitive interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy and hypnotherapy have demonstrated excellent results in IBS patients, but the limited availability and labor-intensive nature limit their routine use in daily practice. In patients who are refractory to first-line therapy, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are both effective to obtain symptomatic relief, but only TCAs have been shown to improve abdominal pain in meta-analyses. A diet low in fermentable carbohydrates and polyols (FODMAP) seems effective in subgroups of patients to reduce abdominal pain, bloating, and to improve the stool pattern. The evidence for fiber is limited and only isphagula may be somewhat beneficial. The efficacy of probiotics is difficult to interpret since several strains in different quantities have been used across studies. Antispasmodics, including peppermint oil, are still considered the first-line treatment for abdominal pain in IBS. Second-line therapies for diarrhea-predominant IBS include the non-absorbable antibiotic rifaximin and the 5HT3 antagonists alosetron and ramosetron, although the use of the former is restricted because of the rare risk of ischemic colitis. In laxative-resistant, constipation-predominant IBS, the chloride-secretion stimulating drugs lubiprostone and linaclotide, a guanylate cyclase C agonist that also has direct analgesic effects, reduce abdominal pain and improve the stool pattern.

  20. [Epiploic appendagitis: a rare cause of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    García-Marín, Andrés; Nofuentes-Riera, Carmen; Mella-Laborde, Mario; Pérez-López, Mercedes; Pérez-Bru, Susana; Rubio-Cerdido, José María

    2014-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis is an atypical cause of abdominal pain whose knowledge could avoid diagnostic or treatment errors. Diagnosis has been performed with abdominal ultrasound or tomography with the only treatment being nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. To analyze patients diagnosed in our hospital. We performed a 4-year retrospective and descriptive study (March 2009-March 2013) of patients diagnosed with epiploic appendagitis in our hospital. Seventeen patients were included, 14 females and three males with a median age of 57 years. Symptom delay was 72 h. Abdominal pains were located in the left lower quadrant in 64.7% and right lower quadrant in 35.3% of patients. Blood test demonstrated leukocytes 6,300 (5,000-9,500), neutrophils 61.6% (57-65.8), and C reactive protein 1.5 (0.85-2.92). Diagnosis was confirmed with abdominal ultrasound or tomography in 88.2% and intraoperatively in 11.8%. Epiploic appendagitis was more frequent in women. Abdominal pain was located in the lower quadrant, more predominant in left than right. Blood tests were normal except for increased levels of C-reactive protein. Diagnosis was made mostly preoperatively due to imaging tests, avoiding unnecessary surgical intervention.

  1. Recurrent abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recurrent abdominal pain continues to be one of the most ubiquitous conditions faced by the healthcare team, and has a significant emotional and economic impact. We have moved from considering it a psychological condition to recognizing the physiological and environmental contributions, and consider...

  2. Assessment of Abdominal Pain in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Polly Gerber

    2003-01-01

    Pediatric abdominal pain can be a difficult condition to accurately assess for the nurse to determine whether the child's need is for teaching, treating, or transferring. This article describes the process as well as practical tips to be used by the nurse in the school setting. Distinguishing characteristics and findings, including key physical…

  3. Assessment of Abdominal Pain in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Polly Gerber

    2003-01-01

    Pediatric abdominal pain can be a difficult condition to accurately assess for the nurse to determine whether the child's need is for teaching, treating, or transferring. This article describes the process as well as practical tips to be used by the nurse in the school setting. Distinguishing characteristics and findings, including key physical…

  4. Does the use of an acellular dermal graft in abdominal closure after rectus flap harvest impact the occurrence of post-operative hernia?

    PubMed

    Saman, Masoud; Kadakia, Sameep; Ducic, Yadranko

    2015-12-01

    Patients with rectus free flap harvest extending below the arcuate line are predisposed to postoperative hernia formation. As such, many authors have advocated the use of closure adjuncts to increase the integrity of the closure and prevent hernia or abdominal wall bulging. Busy level 1 public trauma center in metropolitan Fort Worth, Texas Following harvest of the rectus free flap, 48 patients underwent primary closure; 24 of these patients had defects extending below the arcuate line. Forty patients were closed with an acellular dermal graft; 22 of these patients had defects extending below the arcuate line. Postoperative hernia formation and local infection rate were examined in a minimum follow-up period of 1 year. Regardless of closure method, no hernias were observed in the postoperative period. Using an unpaired t test and an alpha value of 0.05, there was no statistically significant difference in the infection rate between the two groups. Following rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flap harvest, the use of an acellular dermal graft in abdominal wall closure may not be of any further advantage in the prevention of hernia. Retrospective (Level III).

  5. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L.; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  6. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  7. [Cyriax's syndrome. A cause of diagnostic error in abdominal pains].

    PubMed

    Monnin, J L; Pierrugues, R; Bories, P; Michel, H

    The slipping rib syndrome is characterized by upper abdominal pain due to irritation of the intercostal nerve by incomplete dislocation of the costal cartilage of the 8th, 9th, or 10th ribs. Twenty-three new cases are reported and the literature is reviewed. Diagnosis is only clinical. The pain is precipitated by movement and certain postures; it is faithfully reproduced by pressure on one particular point of the costal margin and is relieved by local injection of an anaesthetic. Pain from a slipping rib is usually attributed to visceral causes, which is a source of diagnostic errors.

  8. Abdominal pain of spinal origin. Value of intercostal block.

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    A prospective study was made of 73 patients presenting in one year with abdominal pain provisionally diagnosed as of spinal origin. The criteria for audit of diagnosis and treatment are defined. The diagnosis was confirmed in 53 patients, 49 of whom had been treated with a lignocaine intercostal block in the relevant segment. Thirty-three of these (67.3%) had both complete and prolonged relief. It is suggested that the block causes interruption of a vicious circle of pain and muscle spasm in a 'spinal reflex pain syndrome'. PMID:860866

  9. Chronic postsurgical pain and neuropathic symptoms after abdominal hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Palabıyık, Onur; Tuna, Ayça Taş; Kaya, Burak; Erkorkmaz, Ünal; Akdemir, Nermin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) is an important clinic problem. It is assessed that prevalence of chronic pain extends to 30% but it is contended that there are various risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of chronic pain after hysterectomy, risk factors of chronicity, neuropathic features of pain, and sensorial alterations at surgery area. Between years 2012 and 2015, 16 to 65 ages old patients that electively undergone total abdominal hysterectomy bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and passed minimum 3 months after surgery were included to study. Visual analog scale (VAS) and Douleur Neuropathique 4-questionnaire (DN-4) surveys were used to evaluate pain symptoms, algometry device was used for evaluating abdominal pressure threshold and Von Frey Filament was used for sensorial alterations. Ninety-three of 165 eligible patients were included to study. As the groups were compared by demographic data, no difference was obtained (P > 0.05). There was no difference between groups regarding patient and surgery attributes (P > 0.05). Most frequently performed incision type was Pfannenstiel. Neuropathic symptoms were observed in 90 patients (96.8%). Sensorial alterations as hypoesthesia and hyperesthesia were detected around abdominal scar in 18 patients (19.4%) with pinprick test. Neuropathic symptoms should not be ignored in studies evaluating CPSP and a standard methodology should be designed for studies in this topic. PMID:27537570

  10. Abdominal and lower back pain in pediatric idiopathic stabbing headache.

    PubMed

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Ohara, Tomoichiro; Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Kure, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic stabbing headache (ISH) is a primary headache syndrome characterized by transient, sharp, stabbing pains located in the first division of the trigeminal nerve. Reports of pediatric ISH are rare, and extracephalic pain in pediatric ISH is extremely rare. Here we report the case of a 7-year-old male patient suffering from frequent, short, stabbing headache, which was occasionally associated with abdominal and lower back pain. Various investigations were normal. He was diagnosed with ISH, and valproic acid was administered to relieve his headache and accompanying symptoms. Our case demonstrates that abdominal and lower back pain may occur in pediatric ISH. This case may provide new evidence linking ISH and migraine by showing that extracephalic symptoms accompanying ISH are similar to those of migraine. We hypothesize that the mechanism underlying the headache and abdominal and lower back pain associated with ISH may be similar to that of a migraine headache. Accumulating additional cases by asking specific questions regarding the presence of the unusual symptoms presented in our case may help to establish a detailed clinical profile of these unfamiliar and peculiar symptoms in the pediatric ISH population.

  11. Managing nonmalignant chronic abdominal pain and malignant bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Bicanovsky, Lesley K; Lagman, Ruth L; Davis, Mellar P; Walsh, Declan

    2006-03-01

    Evaluation of abdominal pain requires an understanding of the possible causes(benign or malignant) and recognition of typical patterns and clinical presentation. Abdominal pain has multiple causes; associated signs and symptoms may aid in the diagnosis. Remember that some patients will not have a textbook presentation, and unusual causes for pain must be considered. Those with chronic pancreatitis with structural complications should be operated on early, whereas those with other types of chronic pancreatitis should receive medical therapy focusing on alleviating symptoms. Control of the most troublesome symptoms will provide the best management for IBS. Pharmacologic success in bowel obstruction depends on the level and degree of obstruction. Decision making is based on reasonable expectations of survival, treatment-related success, performance status, and goals of care. Quality of life will be enhanced by appropriate symptom management.

  12. [Food allergy in pathogenesis of chronic abdominal pain in children].

    PubMed

    Ignyś, I; Bartkowiak, M; Baczyk, I; Targońska, B; Krawczyński, M

    1995-04-01

    Food allergy has been implicated lately in the etiopathogenesis of abdominal pain in children, with particular attention pain to gastritis and/or duodenitis. The aim of the study was to analyse the cause-and-effect relationship between chronic abdominal pain in children, endoscopic and histopatological picture, and food allergy, as well as to evaluate the applied elimination diet and/or antiallergic treatment on the improvement of both the clinical status and endoscopic picture. In 71 children gastrofiberoscopic examinations, food skin tests, and specific and total IgE allergen serum tests were performed. In the majority of examined children one could observe an improvement of clinical status and of the endoscopic-histopatological picture of the stomach mucous membrane after application an elimination diet and/or treatment with sodium cromoglycate.

  13. Safety and efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine versus oral tramadol for the treatment of post-operative pain following surgery for fracture neck of femur: A prospective, randomised clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sameer N; Badiger, Santhoshi V; Tokur, Shreesha B; Naik, Prashanth A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transdermal buprenorphine, which is used in chronic pain management, has rarely been studied for use in acute pain management. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch to oral tramadol for post-operative analgesia, following proximal femur surgeries. Methodology: Fifty adult patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture under spinal anaesthesia were included in this study. One group (Group TDB) received transdermal buprenorphine 10 mcg/h patch applied a day before the surgery and other group received oral tramadol 50 mg three times a day for analgesia (Group OT). They were allowed to take diclofenac and paracetamol tablets for rescue analgesia. Pain scores at rest, on movement, rescue analgesic requirement and side effects were compared between the groups over 7 days. Chi-square and independent sample t-test were used for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Results: Resting pain scores and pain on movement were significantly lower in TDB Group on all 7 days starting from 24 h post-operatively. Rescue analgesic requirement was significantly lower in TDB Group compared to OT Group. All the patients needed rescue analgesic in OT Group whereas 68% of the patients needed the same in TDB Group. Incidence of vomiting was less and satisfaction scores were much higher in TDB Group as compared to OT Group (79% vs. 66%, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Transdermal buprenorphine can be safely used for post-operative analgesia and is more efficacious in reducing post-operative pain after 24 hours, with fewer side effects when compared to oral tramadol. PMID:28405035

  14. Safety and efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine versus oral tramadol for the treatment of post-operative pain following surgery for fracture neck of femur: A prospective, randomised clinical study.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sameer N; Badiger, Santhoshi V; Tokur, Shreesha B; Naik, Prashanth A

    2017-03-01

    Transdermal buprenorphine, which is used in chronic pain management, has rarely been studied for use in acute pain management. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch to oral tramadol for post-operative analgesia, following proximal femur surgeries. Fifty adult patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture under spinal anaesthesia were included in this study. One group (Group TDB) received transdermal buprenorphine 10 mcg/h patch applied a day before the surgery and other group received oral tramadol 50 mg three times a day for analgesia (Group OT). They were allowed to take diclofenac and paracetamol tablets for rescue analgesia. Pain scores at rest, on movement, rescue analgesic requirement and side effects were compared between the groups over 7 days. Chi-square and independent sample t-test were used for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Resting pain scores and pain on movement were significantly lower in TDB Group on all 7 days starting from 24 h post-operatively. Rescue analgesic requirement was significantly lower in TDB Group compared to OT Group. All the patients needed rescue analgesic in OT Group whereas 68% of the patients needed the same in TDB Group. Incidence of vomiting was less and satisfaction scores were much higher in TDB Group as compared to OT Group (79% vs. 66%, P < 0.001). Transdermal buprenorphine can be safely used for post-operative analgesia and is more efficacious in reducing post-operative pain after 24 hours, with fewer side effects when compared to oral tramadol.

  15. An uncommon cause of abdominal pain: Mesenteric cyst

    PubMed Central

    Ünlüer, Erden Erol; Ünlüer, Seran; Şahı̇n, Yusuf; Kamer, Kemal Erdı̇nç; Karagöz, Arı̇f; Tan, Gözde Canan

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are benign cystic lesions. Here, we present the case of a patient with abdominal pain, which was diagnosed as mesenteric cyst. A 28-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain and distention. Abdominal palpation revealed a smooth-surfaced mass palpable in the left upper quadrant. Ultrasonography depicted a hypoechoic heterogeneous mass-like structure with a size of 15 × 12 cm. Computerized tomography (CT) showed a well-defined cystic structure with a size of 12 × 12.5 cm near to the duodenum and pancreas. The patient was admitted, and the cystic structure was drained with a percutaneous drainage catheter; then, sclerotherapy was performed using ethyl alcohol with the aid of ultrasonography. The material was sent to the pathology lab and revealed negative results for malignant cell and mucin. The patient underwent a control CT with contrast, which revealed the catheter at the site of the operation and no cystic lesion after procedure. He was discharged 1 week after the procedure. Mesenteric cysts are extremely rare benign lesions of the abdomen, and emergency physicians must consider this disease in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. The percutaneous drainage technique performed on our patient is a safe technique for the treatment of selected patients. PMID:28250978

  16. An uncommon cause of abdominal pain: Mesenteric cyst.

    PubMed

    Ünlüer, Erden Erol; Ünlüer, Seran; Şahı N, Yusuf; Kamer, Kemal Erdı Nç; Karagöz, Arı F; Tan, Gözde Canan

    2016-03-01

    Mesenteric cysts are benign cystic lesions. Here, we present the case of a patient with abdominal pain, which was diagnosed as mesenteric cyst. A 28-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain and distention. Abdominal palpation revealed a smooth-surfaced mass palpable in the left upper quadrant. Ultrasonography depicted a hypoechoic heterogeneous mass-like structure with a size of 15 × 12 cm. Computerized tomography (CT) showed a well-defined cystic structure with a size of 12 × 12.5 cm near to the duodenum and pancreas. The patient was admitted, and the cystic structure was drained with a percutaneous drainage catheter; then, sclerotherapy was performed using ethyl alcohol with the aid of ultrasonography. The material was sent to the pathology lab and revealed negative results for malignant cell and mucin. The patient underwent a control CT with contrast, which revealed the catheter at the site of the operation and no cystic lesion after procedure. He was discharged 1 week after the procedure. Mesenteric cysts are extremely rare benign lesions of the abdomen, and emergency physicians must consider this disease in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. The percutaneous drainage technique performed on our patient is a safe technique for the treatment of selected patients.

  17. Spinal cord stimulation for chronic visceral abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kapural, Leonardo; Nagem, Hassan; Tlucek, Heather; Sessler, Daniel I

    2010-03-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may reduce pain scores and improve function in patients with chronic visceral abdominal pain. We thus present our large clinical experience in SCS for visceral abdominal pain. We trialed spinal cord stimulation in 35 patients, each of whom was shown by retrograde differential epidural block to have either visceral pain (n = 32) or mixed visceral and central pain (n = 3). SCS trials lasted 4 to 14 days (median 9 days). SCS lead tips were mostly positioned at T5 (n = 11) or T6 (n = 10). Thirty patients (86%) reported at least 50% pain relief upon completion of the trial. Among these, pretrial visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores averaged 8.2 +/- 1.6 (SD) and opioid use averaged 110 +/- 119 mg morphine sulfate equivalents. During the trial, VAS pain scores decreased to 3.1 +/- 1.6 cm (P < 0.001, Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test) and opioid use decreased to 70 +/- 68 mg morphine equivalent a day (P = 0.212). Five patients failed the trial, one was lost to follow-up, and 19 were followed for the whole year. Seven patients were either followed for less than a year (n = 3) or the SCS system was removed due to infection or lead migration (n = 4). One patient despite the successful trial felt no improvements at 6 months after the implant and requested an explant of the SCS device. Among the 28 patients who received permanent implant, 19 were followed at least a year. Their VAS pain scores remained low (3.8 +/- 1.9 cm; P < 0.001) at 1 year, as did opioid use (38 +/- 48 mg morphine equivalents; P = 0.089). Spinal cord stimulation may be a useful therapeutic option for patients with severe visceral pain.

  18. Protozoa as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, Carolien F M; Schweizer, Joachim J; Büller, Hans A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether protozoa can be identified as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), and whether protozoan infections can be recognized by a specific clinical presentation. For 2 years, all patients (ages 4-16 years) fulfilling the Apley criteria of RAP referred to secondary care were prospectively evaluated for protozoa (Giardia lamblia, Dientamoeba fragilis, Blastocystis hominis) and treated if positive. Re-examination followed at least 10 days after treatment. Disappearance of pain with eradication and a pain-free follow-up of at least 6 months were considered to be indicative of a causal relation with RAP. The predictive value of the characteristics of the pain for protozoan infections was calculated. Of 220 included patients (92 boys, mean age 8.8 years), 215 brought a stool sample; 73 (34%) carried parasites, 10 of whom had 2 parasites, 2 had 3 parasites. Sixty-five patients were treated. Twenty-five (11%) were pain-free after eradication (21 had D fragilis, 8 B hominis, 4 G lamblia), of whom 11 had another infection (2) or constipation (9) as second diagnosis for the pain. Five had recurrence of infection with D fragilis and were again pain-free with eradication. Patients with protozoa as cause of their pain did not show differences with respect to their presentation when compared with patients with an asymptomatic infection and patients without protozoa. Protozoa were found as the cause of pain in 6% to 11% of children with RAP. These patients did not show a characteristic presentation when compared with patients with other causes of abdominal pain.

  19. Clinical Effect and Efficacy Factors of Modified Piperacillin-Tazobactam Dosing Regimens in Abdominal Tumor Patients with Post-Operative Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Lu, Yang; He, Xin; Zhao, Hongwei; Wang, Donghao; Wang, Wanhua

    This study was conducted to observe the clinical efficacy of long-term piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP) infusion and identify the factors affecting its curative effect against pneumonia in patients who had undergone surgery for abdominal tumor. The 100 patients were divided into four clinical groups according to the severity of their infection: Simple pneumonia, pneumonia with pleural effusion, pneumonia and atelectasis, and severe pneumonia. Each group of patients was then divided into control and treatment groups using a completely random design. The control group received TZP as a regular infusion, and the treatment group received TZP as a long-term infusion. The cure time in the different groups was compared according to the administration regimen, and stratified analysis was carried out to identify the efficacy factors of long-term TZP infusion for patients with each kind of pneumonia. The average cure time for TZP differed significantly among the groups. In particular, the average cure times in the simple pneumonia, pneumonia with pleural effusion, pneumonia and atelectasis, and severe pneumonia groups were 6.800 ± 0.342, 7.320 ± 0.304, 10.840 ± 0.571, and 15.942 ± 0.973 d (p < 0.001). In each group, the usage time of antibiotics in the treatment groups was significantly shorter than in the control group (8.87 ± 0.64 vs. 15.95 ± 2.02 d; p < 0.001). The cure times (d) for simple pneumonia and pneumonia and atelectasis were conspicuously lower in the treatment groups than in the control group (5.667 ± 0.256 vs. 7.846 ± 0.451; p < 0.001; 9.667 ± 1.432 vs. 11.923 ± 0.947; p = 0.024). The factors associated with continuous treatment effectiveness were being male, age <70 years, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score ≥17 points, minimum inhibitory concentration of the pathogen 8 mcg/mL, oxygenation index >200 mm Hg, serum procalcitonin concentration >4 ng/mL, and serum albumin

  20. Plain abdominal radiography in acute abdominal pain--is it really necessary?

    PubMed

    Sreedharan, Sadhishaan; Fiorentino, Mark; Sinha, Sankar

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study are to audit the ordering of abdominal radiographs (AXR) in the emergency department (ED) and evaluate the current practices, knowledge and attitudes of emergency physicians with regard to ordering AXRs in patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective study was undertaken at an ED of a tertiary hospital in Tasmania using clinical notes on patient presenting with acute abdominal pain who underwent an AXR. The study also included a short questionnaire, which assessed emergency physicians' knowledge of current imaging guidelines and clinical practice when ordering an AXR. During the study period, 108 patients satisfied the selection criteria, and the AXR was reported as normal in 76 % (n = 82; p value <0.05), non-specific in 12 % (n = 13; p value <0.05) and abnormal in 12 % (n = 13; p value <0.05) of patients. Of those patients, 25 % (n = 27) of the AXRs did not meet indications listed in the Diagnostic Imaging Pathways published by the Western Australia Department of Health and were found not to benefit patient care. Of the 19 doctors who completed the survey, only 16 % (n = 3) were aware of any clinical guidelines for imaging in this setting. Current guidelines should be followed when ordering imaging for patients with acute abdominal pain to minimise unnecessary patient radiation exposure, avoid delays in diagnosis and definitive patient management, reduce costs and therefore increase efficiency in ED.

  1. [Helicobacter pylori diagnosis in children with recurrent abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Méndez Nieto, C M; Ramírez Mayans, J; Cervantes Bustamente, R; Mata Rivera, N; Cuevas Schatz, F; Martínez, C; Gómez Suárez, R; Navarrete, N

    1994-01-01

    We studied 40 children with recurrent abdominal pain during a period of six months (january to june 1993) entered at the gastroenterology service of the Instituto Nacional de Pediatria in México City. In all of then we performed in all of them an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with 3 biopsies from gastric mucosa (antrum) for histological examination and urease tests. We also did an ELISA test looking for an H. Pylori specific serum IgG response. Our control group were 40 healthy children in whom we did only the ELISA test. We did not find any statistics differences between the histologic findings (gold standard) and the urease and ELISA tests. With IgG antibodies prevalence for H. Pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain were 57% in contrast with our control group in whom the prevalence was 5%.

  2. Chronic abdominal pain in a patient with escobar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ülkü Mete; Tekın, Yeşim Bayoğlu; Kir Şahın, Figen; Erdıvanli, Başar; Kazdal, Hızır

    2015-01-01

    Escobar syndrome is characterized with multiple pterygia or webs of the skin and multiple congenital anomalies. We present a 15-year-old patient with Escobar syndrome who complained of persistent blunt abdominal pain for 1 year. Preoperative evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of imperforate hymen, and the patient underwent hymenectomy under intravenous sedation. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and her complaints resolved completely. After a 3-month follow-up, she reported having normal menstrual bleeding intervals each month without any complications. Patients with Escobar syndrome may suffer from abdominal pain due to imperforate hymen. Careful evaluation of these patients must include a complete gynaecological assessment and, if indicated, surgical treatment must be performed without delay. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. A multivariate analysis of childhood abdominal pain in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Anatol, T I; Holder, Y

    1995-04-01

    This is a multivariate analysis of the data recorded in assessing 1158 consecutive admissions presenting to a children's surgical ward with acute abdominal pain. There were 56 binary variables available for entry into the analysis. A statistical software package was used to perform a stepwise discriminant analysis on the data. The program selected 18 variables as having discriminating power in assigning patients to the six diagnostic groups. In order of discriminating power these were, mainly, a positive urine culture, the bowel history, the findings on rectal examination, the location of abdominal tenderness, the presence of a mass, and the white cell count. Lesser discriminating potential was assigned to the presence of dehydration; fluid levels on erect abdominal films, a rise in temperature, an increased pulse rate, the presence of urinary symptoms, and the general appearance of the child. Use of these data led to an overall correct classification of 80.7% of cases. It is concluded that these variables should be included in the assessment of children with acute abdominal pain.

  4. [Imperforate hymen can cause abdominal pain and primary amenorrhoea].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vibeke; Vyrdal, Christian

    2013-05-20

    Imperforate hymen (HI) is a rare condition caused by the hymen covering the entire opening of the vagina. This prevents the menstruation blood from being drained and the blood fills up the vagina and later the uterus and Fallopian tubes. The produced strain on these organs causes cyclic pain in the lower abdomen. We present two cases where two adolescent girls were diagnosed with HI. It is important to remember HI as a differential diagnosis in young girls with amenorrhoea and lower abdominal pain. In both cases a hymenectomy was performed and the patients recovered afterwards.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound for chronic abdominal pain and gallbladder disease.

    PubMed

    Dill, B; Dill, J E; Berkhouse, L; Palmer, S T

    1999-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a major advance in gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS, which is invaluable in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancer, is now being used in the diagnosis of chronic upper abdominal pain. EUS combined with stimulated biliary drainage (EUS/SBD) aids in the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis, cholecystitis, microlithiasis, and various conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract. This article describes the EUS/SBD procedure and nursing care. Two case histories illustrating potential benefits to patients are presented.

  6. Systematic review of treatments for recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Weydert, Joy A; Ball, Thomas M; Davis, Melinda F

    2003-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review of evaluated treatments for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in children. Online bibliographic databases were searched for the terms "recurrent abdominal pain," "functional abdominal pain," "children," or "alternative therapies" in articles classified as randomized controlled trials. The abstracts or full text of 57 relevant articles were examined; 10 of these met inclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria required that the study involve children aged 5 to 18 years, subjects have a diagnosis of RAP, and that subjects were allocated randomly to treatment or control groups. The methodology and findings of these articles were evaluated critically, and data were extracted from each article regarding study methods, specific interventions, outcomes measured, and results. Studies that evaluated famotidine, pizotifen, cognitive-behavioral therapy, biofeedback, and peppermint oil enteric-coated capsules showed a decrease in measured pain outcomes for those who received the interventions when compared with others in control groups. The studies that evaluated dietary interventions had conflicting results, in the case of fiber, or showed no efficacy, in the case of lactose avoidance. Evidence for efficacy of treatment of RAP in children was found for therapies that used famotidine, pizotifen, cognitive-behavioral therapy, biofeedback, and peppermint oil enteric-coated capsules. The effects of dietary fiber were less conclusive, and the use of a lactose-free diet showed no improvement. There seemed to be greater improvement when therapy (famotidine, pizotifen, peppermint oil) was targeted to the specific functional gastrointestinal disorder (dyspepsia, abdominal migraine, irritable bowel syndrome). The behavioral interventions seemed to have a general positive effect on children with nonspecific RAP. Many of these therapies have not been used widely as standard treatment for children with RAP. Although the mechanism of action for each effective therapy

  7. Incidental discovery of radiopaque pills on abdominal CT in a patient with abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Judge, Bryan S; Hoyle, John D

    2008-07-01

    We present a case in which a young female ingested several tablets of an over-the-counter cough and cold remedy over the course of a week. Pill fragments were identifiable and incidentally discovered when a CT scan of the abdomen was performed to evaluate the cause of her abdominal pain. Discovery of radiopaque pills on diagnostic imaging studies warrants further history and appropriate testing to rule out a life-threatening ingestion.

  8. Comparison of ambulance dispatch protocols for nontraumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Lammers, R L; Roth, B A; Utecht, T

    1995-11-01

    To compare rates of undertriage and overtriage of six ambulance dispatch protocols for the presenting complaint of nontraumatic abdominal pain, and to identify the optimal protocol. Retrospective prehospital and emergency department chart review to classify patients' conditions as "emergency" or "nonemergency." Utility analysis was used to identify the preferred protocol and monetary cost-effectiveness analysis to identify the least expensive protocol. County emergency medical services (EMS) system with five receiving hospitals serving a mainly urban population of approximately 350,000. Records of 902 patients who called 911 for nontraumatic abdominal pain were reviewed; patients not transported were excluded. Twenty-seven county EMS medical directors completed questionnaires. Six ambulance dispatch protocols for nontraumatic abdominal pain were developed: indiscriminate-dispatch, four selective protocols, and no-dispatch. A dichotomous classification system was derived prospectively from the prehospital and medical records of patients who had activated the EMS system before the study period to define "emergency" and "nonemergency" conditions associated with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Emergency criteria identified patients with conditions requiring medical treatment within 1 hour. Reviewers determined, for each patient, whether an ambulance would have been dispatched by each of the protocols. Undertriage and overtriage rates were calculated for each protocol. County EMS medical directors assigned utility values to four potential outcomes of ambulance dispatch by the direct scaling method. The outcomes comprised correct and incorrect decisions to dispatch ambulances to patients with and without emergencies. The protocols were compared by decision analysis. A cost analysis was also performed, using an estimated marginal cost per transport of $302. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated the effect of varying the cost of an undertriage error and the cost per response. Of

  9. Medic - Abdominal Pain: A Decision Support Program for the Management of Acute Abdominal Pain. (User’s Manual)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-11

    the program helps you to diagnose five serious causes of abdominal pain in males aged 17 to 70: acute apperKlicitis (APPEND), renal colic (RO)LIC...section is for quick referenc). Analgesia : Demerol 50-150 mg IM q 3-4 hours Hydration: D5NS at 150-200 ml/hour 2. DSCUSSIC Renal colic is caused by the...five additional categories for female patients. They are: Acute Appendicttis; Renal Colic ; Cholecystitis; Perforated Duodenal Ulcer; Small Bowel

  10. A Multi-Center, Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Intravenous-Ibuprofen (IV-Ibuprofen) for Treatment of Pain in Post-Operative Orthopedic Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Neil; Rock, Amy; Pavliv, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether pre- and post-operative administration of intravenous ibuprofen (IV-ibuprofen) can significantly decrease pain and morphine use when compared with placebo in adult orthopedic surgical patients. Design This was a multi-center, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Setting This study was completed at eight hospitals; six in the United States and two in South Africa. Patients A total of 185 adult patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. Interventions Patients were randomized to receive either 800 mg IV-ibuprofen or placebo every 6 hours, with the first dose administered pre-operatively. Additionally, all patients had access to intravenous morphine for rescue. Outcome Measures Efficacy of IV-ibuprofen was demonstrated by measuring the patient's self assessment of pain using a visual analog scale (VAS; assessed with movement and at rest) and a verbal response scale (VRS). Morphine consumption during the post-operative period was also assessed. Results In the immediate post-operative period, there was a 25.8% reduction in mean area under the curve-VAS assessed with movement (AUC-VASM) in patients receiving IV-ibuprofen (P < 0.001); a 31.8% reduction in mean AUC-VAS assessed at rest (AUC-VASR; P < 0.001) and a 20.2% reduction in mean VRS (P < 0.001) compared to those receiving placebo. Patients receiving IV-ibuprofen used 30.9% less morphine (P < 0.001) compared to those receiving placebo. Similar treatment emergent adverse events occurred in both study groups and there were no significant differences in the incidence of serious adverse events. Conclusion Pre- and post-operative administration of IV-ibuprofen significantly reduced both pain and morphine use in orthopedic surgery patients in this prospective randomized placebo-controlled trial. PMID:20609131

  11. [Cultural and migration aspects in functional abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Buri, Caroline; Laederach, Kurt

    2011-08-01

    Compared to Europe's mean immigrant contingent of 7.3 to 8.6 % Switzerland holds the highest contingent of foreign population with 23.5 %. Therefore it is of utmost importance that physicians have a knowledge of the specific characteristics of immigrant patients. The influence of personality factors (experience, behavior) is not independent from the influence of culturally-related environmental factors (regional differences in diet, pollutants, meanings, etc.). In addition, different cultural groups rate their quality of life differently. Psychological reasons for recurrent abdominal pain are stress (life events), effects of self-medication (laxatives, cocaine) and sexual abuse but also rare infectious diseases are more common among immigrants (e.g. tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, etc.). Migration-specific characteristics are mainly to find in the semiotics of the symptoms: not every abdominal pain is real pain in the abdomen. Finally, it is crucial to make the distinction between organic, functional and psychological-related pain. This can, however, usually only be accomplished in the context of the entire situation of a patient and, depending on the situation, with the support of a colleague from the appropriate cultural group or an experienced interpreter. In this review we limit ourselves to the presentation of the working population of the migrants, because these represent the largest group of all migrants. The specific situation of asylum seekers will also be refrained to where appropriate.

  12. Principles of post-operative patient care.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Elaine

    Surgery causes physiological stress on the body and carries inherent risks such as shock and haemorrhage. This article discusses cardiogenic and hypovolaemic shock and outlines the principles of safe and effective post-operative care, including recognising hypovolaemia, maintaining fluid balance and administering pain control.

  13. Fructose intolerance/malabsorption and recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Lustig, Daniel; Pflugeisen, Bethann M; Amoroso, Paul J; Sherif, Dalia; Saeed, Rasha; Shamdeen, Shaza; Tuider, Judith; Abdullah, Bisher

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to ascertain whether pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain had concurrent fructose intolerance as determined by a standardized dose breath hydrogen test (BHT), and whether symptoms would improve with a low-fructose diet. The fructose BHT test was administered to patients evaluated in clinic with unexplained chronic abdominal pain alone or associated with constipation, gas or bloating, and/or diarrhea. The patients were given a standard dose of 1 g/kg fructose to maximum of 25 g. Hydrogen and methane were measured at 8 time points. The test was presumed positive if breath hydrogen exceeded 20 ppm above baseline. If positive, patients were given a dietitian-prescribed low-fructose diet. A total of 222 patients were part of the study. Ages ranged from 2 to 19 years with a mean of 10.5. BHT for fructose was performed in all of the patients and it was positive for fructose intolerance in 121 of 222 patients (54.5%). A total of 101 of 222 (45.5%) patients had negative BHT for fructose intolerance. All BHT-positive patients had a nutrition consult with a registered dietitian and were placed on a low-fructose diet. Using a standard pain scale for children, 93 of 121 patients (76.9%) reported resolution of symptoms on a low-fructose diet (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, 55 of 101 patients (54.4%) with negative BHT for fructose reported resolution of symptoms without a low-fructose diet (P = 0.37). Fructose intolerance/malabsorption is common in children with recurrent/functional abdominal pain and a low-fructose diet is an effective treatment.

  14. An unusual cause of acute abdominal pain in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Tariq; Latif, Hina; Shabbir, Bilquis

    2014-07-01

    Dengue fever is an acute febrile viral disease caused by the bite of Aedes aegypti mosquito. It is a major health problem especially in tropical and subtropical areas including South East Asia and Pakistan. In the past few years, dengue fever has been endemic in Northern Punjab. Physicians managing dengue fever come across varied and uncommon complications of dengue fever. We report a case of dengue fever that developed severe right upper quadrant abdominal pain and induration after extreme retching and vomiting for 2 days. A rectus sheath hematoma was confirmed on noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Rectus sheath hematoma as a complication of dengue fever has rarely been reported before and never from this part of the world. Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon and often clinically misdiagnosed cause of abdominal pain. It is the result of bleeding into the rectus sheath from damage to the superior or inferior epigastric artery or their branches or from a direct tear of the rectus muscle. It can mimic almost any abdominal condition (See Fig.) (See Table).

  15. Laparoscopic appendectomy for chronic right lower quadrant abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    van Rossem, Charles C; Treskes, Kaij; Loeza, David L; van Geloven, Anna A W

    2014-10-01

    The appendix can be a rare cause for chronic right lower quadrant abdominal pain (RLQAP), even though no objective disorder can be determined to the appendix. This condition can be described as chronic appendicitis or (neurogenic) appendicopathy. After careful selection, elective appendectomy is performed in our centre for this group of patients. All patients that underwent an elective appendectomy between 2006 and 2013 were prospectively analysed. Inclusion criterion was chronic RLQAP without abnormalities seen on imaging. Exclusion criterion was pain after conservative treatment of (complicated) appendicitis or an abnormal appendix on imaging like a mass, mucocoele or faecolith. Primary outcome was the effect on the pain postoperatively. In the period of the study, ten patients met the inclusion criteria and underwent an appendectomy for chronic RLQAP. Average preoperative pain score assessed with visual analogue scale (VAS) was 8.6. Preoperative work-up showed no abnormalities. No macroscopic abnormalities were seen during surgery in any of the patients. Histopathological analysis was obtained and showed limited abnormalities in eight of ten patients, mostly suspicion of previous inflammation. Postoperatively, no complications occurred, and at revision after 3 weeks, average VAS was 1.0. Long-term follow-up showed that patients remained free of symptoms; average VAS after a median of 33 months was 1.0. A significant reduction of pain was achieved after an appendectomy in all patients suffering from chronic RLQAP in this series. Seven out of ten patients were completely free of pain.

  16. Hereditary angioedema (HAE): a cause for recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Soni, Parita; Kumar, Vivek; Alliu, Samson; Shetty, Vijay

    2016-11-14

    A 44-year-old Hispanic woman presented to the emergency room with a 2-day history of sudden onset of severe cramping left lower quadrant abdominal pain associated with ∼20 episodes diarrhoea. Abdominal CT scan exhibited bowel wall oedema and acute extensive colitis. On the basis of the preliminary diagnosis of acute abdomen, the patient was admitted under the surgical team and treated for acute colitis. Since her family history was significant for hereditary angioedema (HAE), complement studies were performed which revealed low complement C4 levels and abnormally low values of C1q esterase inhibitor. Thus, the diagnosis of HAE type I was established. This case report summarises that the symptoms of HAE are often non-specific, hence making the underlying cause difficult to diagnose.

  17. [Abdominal pain syndrome recurring after 40 years: critical revision].

    PubMed

    Zancan, L; Guariso, G; Gobber, D

    1996-01-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) syndrome is described by Apley 40 years ago. The definition of condition, still generally accepted, is at least three episodes of abdominal pain over a period of three months, with pain of intensity which affects the behaviour of the child. The prevalence of condition among school children is 10-15%. Apley's classic studies demonstrated organic disease in only 10% of the children. Apley's conclusions have dominated pediatric writing through present era. In recent years, however, a number of reports have appeared in the medical literature that have suggested that careful investigation of children with RAP may reveal previously unsuspected functional or morphologic abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract. These have included reports of peptic disease and Helicobacter Pylori infection, abnormal antro-duodenal motility, lactase malabsorption, gastro-esophageal reflux. Nevertheless these abnormalities cannot be correlated always with specific complaints. Therefore pathogenetic background is not clarified. Despite greater understanding of these disorders the enigme remains. There is a need for controlled studies in non selected patients.

  18. Abdominal Pain in the Presence of Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: If in Doubt, Cut It Out!

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Koufopoulos, Georgios; Paulou, Konstantinos; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2017-02-03

    Although small (<5 cm) abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) have been associated with symptoms and indication for intervention scarcely, the clinicians should never exclude such potential association especially in the absence of other overt pathological findings. In such cases, a surgical exploration with consequent intervention, if feasible, should be justified to prevent a detrimental evolution in a dubious scenario. In this article, we present 2 cases of patients with small AAA presenting with severe abdominal pain. In the absence of other solid clinical and radiological pathological findings, both patients underwent laparotomy where an inflammatory small AAA was identified and subjected either to resection and restoration with a tube graft or secondary endovascular repair because the periaortic fibrosis precluded the open repair. The characteristics and rationale of treatment modalities are exemplified and discussed.

  19. Helicobacter pylori gastritis in a child with sickle cell anemia and recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, L; Mahoney, D H; Redel, C A

    1997-01-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain is a common complaint in children with sickle cell disease. Helicobacter pylori gastritis has recently been described in association with recurrent abdominal pain in children. A case report is given of a 16-year-old black male with hemoglobin SS disease presenting with recurrent abdominal pain and hematemesis. Endoscopic exam of the upper gastrointestinal tract revealed gastritis, and biopsy confirmed H. pylori infection. Serology studies demonstrated increased anti-H. pylori antibody titers. The young man responded well to treatment, with resolution of his symptoms. Helicobacter pylori infection is a new diagnostic consideration for children with recurrent abdominal pain and should be included in the differential diagnosis of children with sickle cell disease, especially when abdominal pain is recurrent and accompanied by vomiting. Larger case studies will be necessary to determine the true incidence of H. pylori in children with sickle cell disease and recurrent abdominal pain.

  20. Abdominal ultrasound in patients with acute right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Philbrick, T H; Kaude, J V; McInnis, A N; Wright, P G

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonography was performed as the first imaging procedure in 100 patients who presented with acute right upper quadrant pain suggestive of cholecystitis or cholelithiasis. In the final analysis 46 patients were found to have gallbladder disease (40 patients with cholelithiasis, 5 with acalculous cholecystitis, and 1 with a cholesterol polyp in the gallbladder). In 22 of 54 patients with a normal gallbladder, other abdominal disease was found. The error rate for ultrasound was 5%, and in 4 patients ultrasound was not the suitable procedure for the diagnosis. In 91 patients the ultrasonographic diagnosis was correct.

  1. Rectus sheath haematoma: a rare masquerader for abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Changal, Khalid Hamid; Saleem, Saad; Ghous, Ghulam

    2017-04-13

    Rectus sheath haematoma is a rare cause of abdominal pain. It can be easily confused for other causes of acute abdomen and may even lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Our patient has the rectus sheath haematoma because of violent coughing and on presentation had no obvious clinical sign pointing to the same. Diagnosis was made by a CT scan of the abdomen, and patient was treated conservatively. Rectus sheath haematomas are usually present on the posterior aspect of the rectus muscles and thus may not be clinically appreciable.

  2. Acute Abdominal Pain: Bayesian Analysis in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, A. C.; Moodie, P. F.

    1982-01-01

    A non-sequential Bayesian analysis was deemed a suitable approach to the important clinical problem of analysis of acute abdominal pain in the Emergency Room. Using series reported in the literature as a data source complemented by expert clinical estimates of probabilities of clinical data a program has been established in St. Boniface, Canada. Prior to implementing the program as an online, quickly available diagnostic aid, a prospective preliminary study has shown that the performance of computer plus clinician is significantly better than either clinician or computer alone. A major emphasis has been developing the acceptability of the program in real-life diagnoses in the Emergency Room.

  3. Diphyllobothrium latum infection in a child with recurrent abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Diphyllobothrium latum infection in humans is not common in Republic of Korea. We report a case of fish tapeworm infection in a 10-year-old boy after ingestion of raw perch about 8 months ago. The patient complained of recurrent abdominal pain and watery diarrhea. A tapeworm, 85 cm in length, without scolex and neck, was spontaneously discharged in the feces of the patient. The patient was treated with 15-mg/kg single dose praziquantel, and follow-up stool examination was negative after one month. There was no evidence of relapse during the next six months. PMID:26692882

  4. A Curious Case of Right Upper Quadrant Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Grock, Andrew; Chan, Wendy; deSouza, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 36-year-old man presented with sudden-onset right upper quadrant abdominal pain and vomiting. A bedside ultrasound, performed to evaluate hepatobiliary pathology, revealed a normal gallbladder but free intraperitoneal fluid. After an expedited CT and emergent explorative laparotomy, the patient was diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction with ischemia secondary to midgut volvulus. Though midgut volvulus is rare in adults, delays in definitive diagnosis and management can result in bowel necrosis. Importantly, an emergency physician must be able to recognize bedside ultrasound findings associated with acutely dangerous intrabdominal pathology. PMID:27625732

  5. Imperforate hymen-a rare cause of abdominal pain: two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dane, Cem; Dane, Banu; Erginbas, Murat; Cetin, Ahmet

    2007-08-01

    To document an unusual cause of abdominal pain in premenarcheal adolescent girls. Case report. A training and research hospital in Istanbul. Two cases of hematocolpos in two adolescent girls due to imperforate hymen were reported. Both of them manifested lower abdominal pain and urinary retention. Hymenotomy was performed in both the cases. Imperforate hymen is a rare diagnosis, but should be considered when dealing with premenarcheal adolescent girls with lower abdominal symptoms or back pain.

  6. Abdominal Pain: A Comparison between Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction and Chronic Idiopathic Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Christensen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Most spinal-cord-injured patients have constipation. One-third develop chronic abdominal pain 10 years or more after injury. Nevertheless, very little is known about the nature of abdominal pain after spinal cord injury (SCI). It may be neuropathic or caused by constipation. Aim. To compare characteristics of abdominal pain in SCI with able-bodied with chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC). Subjects and Methods. 21 SCI and 15 CIC patients were referred for treatment of bowel symptoms. Constipation-related symptoms were assessed with the Cleveland Constipation Scoring System and the International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Bowel Function Data Set. Characteristics of abdominal pain were described using the Brief Danish Pain Questionnaire. Total gastrointestinal transit times (GITT) were measured by radiopaque markers. Results. Seventeen (81%) SCI and 14 (93%) CIC patients reported abdominal pain or discomfort within the last month (P = 0.38). Pain was considered more intense by CIC than by SCI patients (P < 0.05). Only minor differences were found in patient's qualitative description of abdominal pain or in the location of pain. In neither SCI nor CIC was pain associated with GITT. Conclusion. Most characteristics of abdominal pain among SCI patients resemble those of CIC. This indicates that constipation is a major cause of pain after SCI. PMID:24159329

  7. 'Tell me about your pain': abdominal pain and a history of bullying.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Paola; Jenkner, Alessandro; De Vito, Rita; Boldrini, Renata; Chiodi, Patrizia; Celesti, Lucia; Giampaolo, Rosaria

    2011-03-24

    A 7-year-old girl was brought to our outpatient clinic to investigate recurrent abdominal pain. She was unwilling to attend the school. Her mother reported bullying at school and nosebleeds. The girl rated her pain 9 on a visual analogue score card ranging from 1 to 10. Physical examination disclosed painful bruising and haematomas. Emergency laboratory blood tests indicated by the history, physical examination and the pain intensity showed reduced numbers of white blood cells and platelets. A bone marrow smear on admission disclosed 100% blasts and suggested an initial diagnosis of leukaemia but also disclosed the pseudo-rosettes typically seen in neuro-ectodermic tumours. The diagnosis of stage IV primary neuroblastoma was confirmed by trephine biopsies and high urinary catecholamines. The girl died 10 months later. This unusual case underlines the need for outpatient paediatricians to involve children in their initial diagnostic work-up by asking them about their pain thus expediting the diagnosis.

  8. A rare case of febrile abdominal pain revealing Horton's disease.

    PubMed

    Chaudet, Arnaud; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Ghazali, Aiham Daniel

    2017-07-08

    Horton's disease is a systemic inflammatory vasculitis, usually found in persons over 50years old. It affects medium and large-sized arteries stemming from the external carotid, especially the superficial temporal arteries. It can affect extracranial large vessels but only rarely the aorta. Diagnosis of aortitis is difficult and its incidence is probably underestimated. A 68-year-old Caucasian woman consulted in an emergency department for febrile abdominal pain with inflammatory syndrome. Abdomen was soft with right-side flank sensitivity. A contrast-enhanced CT scan showed aortitis from the descending aorta to the iliac arteries without complication. Because of age, clinical presentation and aortitis, Horton disease was suspected. The temporal artery biopsy showed a histological aspect of degenerative endarteritis with intimal thickening and luminal stenosis. High-dose corticosteroid therapy was introduced which improved clinical conditions and resulted in the amendment of the pain. In the present case, this patient had Horton's disease, based on 3 criteria of The American College of Rheumatology (age, temporal artery abnormalities and inflammatory syndrome) associated with aortitis. However, aortitis is a rare complication of Horton disease and is a major cause of mortality inasmuch as it can be complicated by aneurysm and dissection. It is unusual to diagnose Horton's disease from aortitis symptoms without complications. The aorta represents the most severe localization of Horton's disease. It should not be ignored in etiological hypotheses regarding febrile abdominal pain in the elderly. Corticosteroids should be started rapidly at high doses and temporal artery biopsy should be planned. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Current Clinical Opinions, Attitudes and Awareness of Interns Regarding Post-operative and Cancer Pain Management in A Tertiary Care Centre.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Rachna; Chilkoti, Geetanjali; Saxena, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This prospective study was aimed to assess the opinion, awareness and attitude of interns regarding pain assessment, pain management and common barriers in effective pain therapy for patients experiencing pain. A questionnaire including demographic details, knowledge of the tools of pain assessment, choice of drugs used, side effects, lacunae in existing knowledge and barriers in pain management was designed. A total of 160 interns were approached, out of which 149 returned the completed questionnaire. Only a few of them had a chance exposure to cancer pain management but none of them had undergone any formal training, teaching or classes in this field. Most respondents knew that the pain can be measured and the ways to do it. A significant number considered morphine as the preferred drug for managing cancer pain and thought morphine is responsible for addiction and respiratory depression. About 72% interns knew about transdermal preparation of fentanyl and its usage in malignancy but only a few were aware of buprenorphine transdermal patch. Though they were enthusiastic about relieving the cancer patients from suffering, they had limited knowledge of how to achieve this. The common barriers identified by them were lack of adequate knowledge and training and limited availability of opioids. The results of this study emphasize the need of special training programs pain management in order to change the current prevailing situation and improve the quality of analgesia provided to the patients.

  10. Pre-operative and post-operative effect of a pain management programme prior to total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Berge, Daniel J; Dolin, Simon J; Williams, Amanda CdeC; Harman, Rachel

    2004-07-01

    Patients may wait some time for total hip replacement with conservative management of pain and disability, but no attempts to rehabilitate them. This study randomised 40 patients accepted for and awaiting total hip replacement to a brief rehabilitative psychologically based pain management programme (PMP) or to a control group with no intervention. Patients were assessed before randomisation, 3 months after the PMP or equivalent waiting time, and again one year later after total hip replacement. Assessments included pain, impact of pain (Arthritis Impact Scale: AIMS), mobility (timed walk), sleep and analgesic consumption. The patients who had learned pain management reported lower pain intensity and pain distress and less sleep disturbance than waiting list controls, but no improvement in function or analgesic consumption. Six patients opted to delay, but this did not differ between groups. Post-hip replacement both groups improved in pain and some aspects of activity (AIMS) with greater improvement in the PMP group for physical activity and total AIMS scores, suggesting that some techniques had continued to be of use post-surgically. Rehabilitative pain management may be useful to patients pre-operatively in managing everyday pain, but not to the extent that they opt to delay surgery; it may also improve their function after hip replacement.

  11. Pain Outcomes in Patients Undergoing CT-Guided Celiac Plexus Neurolysis for Intractable Abdominal Visceral Pain.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Mark R; Gabriel, Ryan T; Elbich, Jeffrey D; Wolfe, Luke G; Sydnor, Malcolm K

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess outcomes in patients who have undergone celiac plexus neurolysis (CPN) as treatment for refractory abdominal visceral pain at a tertiary care medical center. This study involved retrospective analysis of all patients who had undergone computed tomography (CT)-guided CPN over a 7-year period, as identified in the medical record. Cases were categorized into 1 of 3 groups-group 1: patients getting at least moderate improvement in pain but with improvements subsiding within 2 days; group 2: patients with some sustained pain relief but still requiring heavy doses of narcotics; group 3: patients with major or complete sustained reduction in pain where the narcotic dose was able to be reduced. One hundred thirty-eight cases were identified, 51 of which had no or insufficient follow-up, leaving 87 cases for analysis. Of the 87 cases, 31 (36%) were categorized as group 1, 21 (24%) as group 2, and 35 (40%) as group 3. There were no statistical differences in outcomes based on patient age, gender, time since diagnosis, or type of cancer. Documented postoperative complications were diarrhea (11 cases) and 1 case each of obtundation, hypotension, and presyncopal event. We conclude that patients undergoing CT-guided CPN for abdominal visceral pain achieve moderate or major short-term pain relief in a majority of cases. The procedure is safe with minimal complications.

  12. A Systematic Review of the Impact of Educational Programs on Factors That Affect Nurses' Post-Operative Pain Management for Children.

    PubMed

    AlReshidi, Nahar; Long, Tony; Darvill, Angela

    2017-05-26

    Despite extensive research in the international arena into pain and its management, there is, as yet, little research on the topic of pain in children in Saudi Arabia and in the Gulf countries generally. A systematic review was conducted to explore the impact of education programs on factors affecting paediatric nurses' postoperative pain management practice. This was done in order to advise the creation of an educational program for nurses in Saudi Arabia. Knowledge about pain, attitudes towards pain, beliefs about children's pain, perceptions of children's reports of pain, self-efficacy with regard to pain management, and perceptions of barriers to optimal practice were all considered to be relevant factors. The review was restricted to randomized controlled trials and quasi-experimental designs, excluding studies focussed on chronic pain or populations other than solely children. Studies published in English between 2000 and 2016 were identified using CINAHL, MEDLINE, Ovid SP, The Cochrane Library, ProQuest, and Google Scholar databases. Of 499 published studies identified by the search, 14 met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. There was evidence of educational programs exerting a postive impact on enhancing pediatric nurses' knowledge of pain and modifing their attitudes towards it, but only limited evidence was available about the impact on nurses' beliefs and perceptions of children's reports of pain, nurses' self-efficacy, or barriers to optimal practice. None of the studies was conducted in Saudi Arabia. Studies were needed to address additional aspects of preparedness for effective postperative pain management. Details of educational programs used as experimental intervention must be included in reports.

  13. Effects of Intra-Operative Total Intravenous Anaesthesia with Propofol versus Inhalational Anaesthesia with Sevoflurane on Post-Operative Pain in Liver Surgery: A Retrospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Siu Wai; Wong, Stanley Sau Ching; Chan, Albert Chi Yan; Irwin, Michael G; Cheung, Chi Wai

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients receiving total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol have been shown to experience less postoperative pain. We evaluated the post-operative analgesic effects of propofol compared with sevoflurane maintenance of anesthesia in liver surgery. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02179437). Methods In this retrospective study, records of patients who underwent liver surgery between 2010 and 2013 were reviewed. Ninety-five patients anesthetized with propofol TIVA were matched with 95 patients anesthetized with sevoflurane. Numeric pain rating scale (NRS) pain scores, postoperative morphine consumption, side effects and patients’ satisfaction with pain relief were evaluated. Results The TIVA group reported lower NRS pain scores during coughing on postoperative days 1 and 2 but not 3 (p = 0.0127, p = 0.0472, p = 0.4556 respectively). They also consumed significantly less daily (p = 0.001 on day 1, p = 0.0231 on day 2, p = 0.0004 on day 3), accumulative (p = 0.001 on day 1, p<0.0001 on day 2 and p = 0.0064 on day 3) and total morphine (p = 0.03) when compared with the sevoflurane group. There were no differences in total duration of intravenous patient controlled analgesia (PCA) morphine use and patient satisfaction. No difference was found in reported side effects. Conclusion Patients anesthetized with propofol TIVA reported less pain during coughing and consumed less daily, accumulative and total morphine after liver surgery. PMID:26901037

  14. [The effect of pre-warming for patients under abdominal surgery on body temperature, anxiety, pain, and thermal comfort].

    PubMed

    Park, Ok Bun; Choi, Heejung

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of pre-warming on body temperature, anxiety, pain, and thermal comfort. Forty patients who were scheduled for abdominal surgery were recruited as study participants and were assigned to the experimental or control group. For the experimental group, a forced air warmer was applied for 45-90 min (M=68.25, SD=15.50) before surgery. Body temperature and anxiety were measured before and after the experiment, but pain and thermal comfort were assessed only after the surgery. Hypotheses were tested using t-test and repeated measured ANOVA. The experimental group showed higher body temperature than the control group from right before induction to two hours after surgery. Post-operative anxiety and pain in the experimental group were less than those of the control group. In addition, the score of thermal comfort was significantly higher in the experiment group. Pre-warming is effective in maintaining body temperature, lowering sensitivity to pain and anxiety, and promoting thermal comfort. Therefore, pre-warming can be recommended as a preoperative nursing intervention.

  15. Cold atmospheric plasma for local infection control and subsequent pain reduction in a patient with chronic post-operative ear infection

    PubMed Central

    Isbary, G; Shimizu, T; Zimmermann, J L; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E; Stolz, W

    2013-01-01

    Following surgery of cholesteatoma, a patient developed a chronic infection of the external auditory canal, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli, which caused severe pain. The application of cold atmospheric plasma resulted in a significant reduction in pain and clearance of bacterial carriage, allowing antibiotics and analgesics to be ceased. PMID:25356328

  16. Abdominal pain and nausea in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Walters, Randall; Bowen, Denise J

    2016-04-01

    Girls presenting with lower abdominal pain have a broad differential diagnosis. Transabdominal ultrasound should be performed in all girls presenting in the ED with lower abdominal pain. If ovarian torsion is suspected, surgical intervention should be initiated quickly to preserve the viability of the ovary.

  17. Citalopram Treatment of Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Comorbid Internalizing Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campo, John V.; Perel, James; Lucas, Amanda; Bridge, Jeff; Ehmann, Mary; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Brent, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the potential efficacy, tolerability, and safety of citalopram in the treatment of functional pediatric recurrent abdominal pain and comorbid internalizing disorders. Method: Twenty-five clinically referred children and adolescents with recurrent abdominal pain aged 7 to 18 years, inclusive, participated in a 12-week,…

  18. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH.

  19. Acute abdominal pain following fracture of a heterotopically formed bone incorporating a prolene mesh.

    PubMed

    Nageswaran, H; Dunkley, A

    2010-09-01

    A case is presented of severe abdominal pain around a healed scar following fracture of a heterotopically formed bone. This should be considered an unusual differential diagnosis in patients with acute pain of unknown origin who had open abdominal surgery in the past. To our knowledge, we have also reported the first case of hetertopic bone formation incorporating a prolene mesh.

  20. [Abdominal acute pain as initial symptom of invasive meningococcus serogroup A illness].

    PubMed

    Sanz Álvarez, Débora; Blázquez Gamero, Daniel; Ruiz Contreras, Jesús

    2011-04-01

    The abdominal acute pain as an initial symptom of meningococcemia is an infrequent entity rarely described in the literature. We present a 10 month-old infant with fever and acute abdominal pain, who was admitted in Emergency Care. Later, Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A was isolated from blood cultures.

  1. Citalopram Treatment of Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Comorbid Internalizing Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campo, John V.; Perel, James; Lucas, Amanda; Bridge, Jeff; Ehmann, Mary; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Brent, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the potential efficacy, tolerability, and safety of citalopram in the treatment of functional pediatric recurrent abdominal pain and comorbid internalizing disorders. Method: Twenty-five clinically referred children and adolescents with recurrent abdominal pain aged 7 to 18 years, inclusive, participated in a 12-week,…

  2. [Abdominal pain as a presentation by lead poisoning. Case report].

    PubMed

    Mottiera, Daniel M; Cargnel, Elda

    2017-04-01

    Acute lead poisoning is not a common pathology seen in the pediatrician's office. Lead poisoning symptoms can be digestive or neurological, and they can be confused with other pathologies. That is the reason why it should be considered and, in case of doubt, complementary studies to confirm lead poisoning should be requested. This is the case of a nine-year-old child that comes to the office with a strong abdominal pain and vomiting, and after a close physical examination and a detailed anamnesis, a suspicious diagnosis of "acute" lead poisoning is obtained. Therefore, the infant is hospitalized, and after taking a venous sampling to confirm the lead level, a chelation therapy is performed under the toxicology expert's supervision.

  3. Masturbation mimicking abdominal pain or seizures in young girls.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, D R; Morrison, A

    1990-05-01

    Five girls, 7 to 27 months of age, had masturbatory posturing that did not involve rubbing of the genitalia or copulatory movements. This activity was mistakenly attributed to abdominal pain or seizures, and prompted unnecessary diagnostic tests. The posturing began at 3 to 14 months and consisted of "leaning episodes" in which the suprapubic region was applied to a firm edge or the parent's knee in one patient, stiffening of the lower extremities in a standing or sitting position in the second patient, and stiffening of the lower extremities while lying on their sides or supine in three infant patients. The posturing was often accompanied by irregular breathing, facial flushing, and diaphoresis, and lasted less than a minute to hours at a time. Management consisted of convincing the parents of the harmless nature of the activity, which then lessened the reinforcing effect of their responses. The posturing subsided, in time, without medical or surgical treatment.

  4. Atypical abdominal pain: post-traumatic transverse colon stricture.

    PubMed

    Rotar, Raluca; Uwechue, Raphael; Sasapu, Kishore Kumar

    2013-08-23

    A driver presented to the emergency department 1 day after an accident driving his excavator with abdominal pain and vomiting. He was admitted to the surgical ward 2 days later, after reattending. A CT scan revealed wall thickening and oedema in the transverse colon. This was supported by a subsequent CT virtual colonoscopy which raised the suspicion of neoplasia. A follow-up colonoscopy was not carried further than the transverse colon due to an indurated, tight stricture. Biopsies from that area showed ulceration and inflammatory changes non-specific for ischaemia, drug-induced changes or inflammatory bowel disease. As a consequence of the subocclusive symptoms and the possibility of a neoplastic diagnosis, a laparoscopic-assisted transverse colectomy was performed. The histology of the resected segment revealed post-traumatic inflammation and fibrosis with no evidence of neoplasia.

  5. Abdominal Pain and Ascites: Not Always Related to Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kisang, Gilbert; Green, Michael; Tofteland, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract with an estimated prevalence of one in 100,000. The typical presentation consists of vague gastrointestinal symptoms with the mucosal involvement of the digestive system. Rarely, it presents as eosinophilic ascites. We report the case of a 22-year-old female who presented with acute onset abdominal pain and ascites. The laboratory studies were remarkable for eosinophilia and the ascitic fluid demonstrated high eosinophilic counts. Push enteroscopy with biopsy supported the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis, with likely serosal involvement. Other differential diagnoses were excluded. A prednisone taper along with dietary treatment was initiated. We report complete resolution of symptoms two weeks following the initiation of therapy. Nine months later, she remains asymptomatic without recurrence of ascites. PMID:27843730

  6. Laparoscopic Treatment of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Chronic Severe Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Divarci, Emre; Celtik, Ulgen; Dokumcu, Zafer; Celik, Ahmet; Ergun, Orkan

    2017-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by chronic postprandial abdominal pain and weight loss caused by compression on celiac artery. A 17-year-old girl with chronic severe abdominal pain and weight loss was referred to our clinic. Other causes of chronic abdominal pain were investigated and excluded. The compression on celiac artery was detected on Doppler ultrasound and diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography angiography. The patient underwent laparoscopic release of median arcuate ligament. There were no intraoperative complications; however, partial pain response was observed postoperatively that necessitated para-spinal ganglion blockage. The patient is symptom-free in 1-year follow-up period. PMID:28082779

  7. Imperforate Hymen - a rare cause of acute abdominal pain and tenesmus: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mwenda, Aruyaru Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Imperforate hymen is a rare condition that presents with amenorrhea, cyclical abdominal pains and urine retention among pubertal girls. A 14 year old girl with imperforate hymen underwent hymenotomy for hematocolpometra, having presented with abdominal pains and tenesmus.

  8. Imperforate Hymen - a rare cause of acute abdominal pain and tenesmus: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mwenda, Aruyaru Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Imperforate hymen is a rare condition that presents with amenorrhea, cyclical abdominal pains and urine retention among pubertal girls. A 14 year old girl with imperforate hymen underwent hymenotomy for hematocolpometra, having presented with abdominal pains and tenesmus. PMID:24009804

  9. A Neurofeedback-Based Intervention to Reduce Post-Operative Pain in Lung Cancer Patients: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marzorati, Chiara; Casiraghi, Monica; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Background Thoracic surgery appears to be the treatment of choice for many lung cancers. Nevertheless, depending on the type of surgery, the chest area may be painful for several weeks to months after surgery. This painful state has multiple physical and psychological implications, including respiratory failure, inability to clear secretions by coughing, and even anxiety and depression that have negative effects on recovery. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a neurofeedback-based intervention on controlling acute post-surgery pain and improving long-term recovery in patients who undergo thoracotomy for lung resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at an academic oncologic hospital. Methods This study will be based on a 2-parallel group randomized controlled trial design, intervention versus usual care, with multiple in-hospital assessments and 2 clinical, radiological, and quality of life follow-ups. Participants will be randomized to either the intervention group receiving a neurofeedback-based relaxation training and usual care, or to a control group receiving only usual care. Pain intensity is the primary outcome and will be assessed using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NRS) in the days following the operation. Secondary outcomes will include the effect of the intervention on hospital utilization for pain crisis, daily opioid consumption, anxiety, patient engagement, blood test and chest x-ray results, and long-term clinical, radiological, and quality of life evaluations. Outcome measures will be repeatedly taken during hospitalization, while follow-up assessments will coincide with the follow-up visits. Pain intensity will be assessed by mixed model repeated analysis. Effect sizes will be calculated as mean group differences with standard deviations. Results We expect to have results for this study before the end of 2016. Conclusions The proposed innovative, neurofeedback- and relaxation-based approach to support post

  10. Prospective randomized controlled trial comparing standard analgesia with combined intra-operative cystic plate and port-site local anesthesia for post-operative pain management in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Protic, Mladjan; Veljkovic, Radovan; Bilchik, Anton J; Popovic, Ana; Kresoja, Milana; Nissan, Aviram; Avital, Itzhak; Stojadinovic, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Various mechanisms, including somatic and visceral nociceptive stimulation, have been suggested as a cause for pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). We therefore conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial (PRCT) to evaluate whether somatovisceral pain blockade reduces pain after LC. Analgesic efficacy of multimodal analgesia is superior to standard analgesia for patients undergoing elective LC for symptomatic cholelithiasis. Specifically, topical cystic plate and port-site injection with 0.25 % bupivacaine significantly reduces pain after LC. This study was designed as single-blinded PRCT. This study was conducted in an academic medical center. Between February and May 2010 we randomly assigned 63 patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis in a 1:1 ratio to non-opioid/opioid analgesic combinations (Control Group, n = 32) and non-opioid/opioid analgesic combinations plus topical 0.25 % bupivacaine onto the cystic plate and local 0.25 % bupivacaine port-site injection, post-LC (Study Group, n = 31). Primary endpoint was patient-reported pain 1, 4, 6, 12, 24 h and 1 week post-LC using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS 0-10). Study groups were comparable clinicopathologically. There were no adverse events. A statistically significant reduction in mean pain score was apparent in Study Group patients in comparison with Control Group (mean VAS 4.83 ± 2.33 vs. 6.80 ± 1.87; p < 0.001) at all early (1-6 h) post-operative time points following LC. This PRCT shows significantly improved pain control with somatovisceral pain blockade over non-opioid/opioid analgesic combinations following LC for symptomatic cholelithiasis. For centers not utilizing adjunctive local anesthetic for LC, this topical use of bupivacaine may improve patient comfort during recovery. This trial was registered on www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT# 01972620.

  11. Pharmacological interventions for recurrent abdominal pain in childhood.

    PubMed

    Martin, Alice E; Newlove-Delgado, Tamsin V; Abbott, Rebecca A; Bethel, Alison; Thompson-Coon, Joanna; Whear, Rebecca; Logan, Stuart

    2017-03-06

    Between 4% and 25% of school-aged children at some stage complain of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) of sufficient severity to interfere with their daily lives. When no clear organic cause is found, the children are managed with reassurance and simple measures; a large range of pharmacological interventions have been recommended for use in these children. To determine the effectiveness of pharmacological interventions for RAP in children of school age. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and eight other electronic databases up to June 2016. We also searched two trials registers and contacted researchers of published studies. Randomised controlled trials involving children aged five to 18 years old with RAP or an abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder, as defined by the Rome III criteria (Rasquin 2006). The interventions were any pharmacological intervention compared to placebo, no treatment, waiting list, or standard care. The primary outcome measures were pain intensity, pain duration or pain frequency, and improvement in pain. The secondary outcome measures were school performance, social or psychological functioning, and quality of daily life. Two review authors independently screened titles, abstracts, and potentially relevant full-text reports for eligible studies. Two review authors extracted data and performed a 'Risk of bias' assessment. We used the GRADE approach to rate the overall quality of the evidence. We deemed a meta-analysis to be not appropriate as the studies were significantly heterogeneous. We have consequently provided a narrative summary of the results. This review included 16 studies with a total of 1024 participants aged between five and 18 years, all of whom were recruited from paediatric outpatient clinics. Studies were conducted in seven countries: seven in the USA, four in Iran, and one each in the UK, Switzerland, Turkey, Sri Lanka, and India. Follow

  12. Red Flags of Organic Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Children: Study on 100 Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Motamed, Farzaneh; Mohsenipour, Reihaneh; Seifirad, Soroush; Yusefi, Azizolah; Farahmand, Fatemeh; Khodadad, Ahmad; Falahi, Gholamhosein; Najafi, Mehri

    2012-01-01

    Objective A variety of sign, symptoms and laboratory findings are more common in children with organic abdominal pains. This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of organic and functional abdominal pains and relation of red flags to organic pains in 100 children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP). Methods One hundred consecutive patients with RAP were enrolled in the study. A complete interview and physical examination was made for each patient, accompanied by a series of laboratory, clinical and para-clinical examinations. The data were recorded and analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was used to model and formulize correlations between sign, symptoms, and laboratory findings with organic and functional abdominal pain. Findings Among 100 patients (52% male, 48% female, Age: 9.29±3.17) diagnostic works up revealed organic pain for 57 patients. The most common symptoms of the patients included constipation, diarrhea, chest pain, cough, headache, vomiting, hematuria, and dysuria. Fecal incontinence, delayed puberty, organomegaly, jaundice, and family history of inflammatory bowel disease were reported in none of the patients with RAP. Fever, pain not located in periumbilical area, nocturnal pain, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, weight loss, growth disorder, and abdominal tenderness were among the red flags which revealed diagnosis of organic pain in this study. Conclusion A series of red flags could increase likelihood of finding organic pain in children with RAP. PMID:23429658

  13. Multidetector computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-06-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pediatric acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department (ED) due to its unclear clinical presentation and non-specific findings in physical examinations, laboratory data, and plain radiographs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) performed in the ED on pediatric patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective chart review of children aged <18 years with acute abdominal pain who visited the emergency department and underwent MDCT between September 2004 and June 2007 was conducted. Patients with a history of trauma were excluded. A total of 156 patients with acute abdominal pain (85 males and 71 females, age 1-17 years; mean age 10.9 ± 4.6 years) who underwent abdominal MDCT in the pediatric ED during this 3-year period were enrolled in the study. One hundred and eighteen patients with suspected appendicitis underwent abdominal MDCT. Sixty four (54.2%) of them had appendicitis, which was proven by histopathology. The sensitivity of abdominal MDCT for appendicitis was found to be 98.5% and the specificity was 84.9%. In this study, the other two common causes of nontraumatic abdominal emergencies were gastrointestinal tract (GI) infections and ovarian cysts. The most common etiology of abdominal pain in children that requires imaging with abdominal MDCT is appendicitis. MDCT has become a preferred and invaluable imaging modality in evaluating uncertain cases of pediatric acute abdominal pain in ED, in particular for suspected appendicitis, neoplasms, and gastrointestinal abnormalities.

  14. Anaemia and abdominal pain due to occupational lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Fonte, Rodolfo; Agosti, Antonio; Scafa, Fabrizio; Candura, Stefano M

    2007-02-01

    We describe a 47-year-old patient with chronic anaemia with basophilic stippling of erythrocytes, recurrent abdominal colics, discoloration of gums, sensitive polyneuropathy to the four limbs, hyperuricaemia, hepatosteatosis with raised transaminases, and a long ignored history of lead exposure in a battery recycling plant. The diagnosis of poisoning was confirmed by high lead levels in the blood and urine, decreased erythrocyte delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D), raised erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZP), and elevated urinary excretion of porphyrins. Chelation with EDTA resulted in increased urinary lead excretion, gradual improvement of the clinical picture, and progressive normalization of lead biomarkers. The case highlights the importance of occupational anamnesis for the diagnosis of lead poisoning, an uncommon condition which may mimic a variety of internal and surgical diseases. Since antiquity, lead has been extensively mined, produced, and utilized in a variety of industrial settings, such as metallurgy, construction, production of plastics, ceramics, paints and pigments. Lead and its compounds are systemic toxicants, and a wide range of adverse health effects (including haematological, gastrointestinal, neuropsychiatric, cardiovascular, renal, endocrine, and reproductive disorders) has been observed in exposed workers. The general population (particularly children) may also be exposed to toxic lead levels due to air, soil, food and water contamination. Thanks to the improvement of workplace hygienic conditions, the pathological picture of occupational lead poisoning (plumbism, saturnism) has gradually become less serious, at least in the most industrialized countries, and has progressively changed into aspecific, subclinical manifestations. We describe here an unusual case (nowadays) of anaemia and recurrent abdominal pain due to lead poisoning from battery recycling.

  15. 38-year-old woman with recurrent abdominal pain, but no fever

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Kentaro; Toma, Tomoko; Yachie, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with 2 days history of left-flank pain. She had similar episodes of abdominal pain as well as chest pain several times, but symptoms disappeared spontaneously. Each time she developed pain, there was no fever. After ruling out common causes of recurrent abdominal pain, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) was considered as a potential diagnosis. Genetic tests revealed multiple heterozygote mutations, which may be associated with FMF. Patients with Mediterranean fever mutations may present with atypical presentations without fever, like in this case. Astute clinical suspicion is required to make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:22505824

  16. Psychosocial interventions for recurrent abdominal pain in childhood.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rebecca A; Martin, Alice E; Newlove-Delgado, Tamsin V; Bethel, Alison; Thompson-Coon, Joanna; Whear, Rebecca; Logan, Stuart

    2017-01-10

    This review supersedes the original Cochrane review first published in 2008 (Huertas-Ceballos 2008).Between 4% and 25% of school-aged children complain of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) severe enough to interfere with their daily activities. No organic cause for this pain can be found on physical examination or investigation for the majority of such children. Although many children are managed by reassurance and simple measures, a large range of psychosocial interventions involving cognitive and behavioural components have been recommended. To determine the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for reducing pain in school-aged children with RAP. In June 2016 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, eight other databases, and two trials registers. We also searched the references of identified studies and relevant reviews. Randomised controlled trials comparing psychosocial therapies with usual care, active control, or wait-list control for children and adolescents (aged 5 to 18 years) with RAP or an abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder defined by the Rome III criteria were eligible for inclusion. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Five review authors independently selected studies, assessed them for risk of bias, and extracted relevant data. We also assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. This review includes 18 randomised controlled trials (14 new to this version), reported in 26 papers, involving 928 children and adolescents with RAP between the ages of 6 and 18 years. The interventions were classified into four types of psychosocial therapy: cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), hypnotherapy (including guided imagery), yoga, and written self-disclosure. The studies were carried out in the USA, Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, Germany, and Brazil. The majority of the studies were small and short term; only two studies included more than 100 participants, and only five studies had

  17. Fishbone perforation through a Meckel's diverticulum: a rare laparoscopic diagnosis in acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Christensen, H

    1999-08-01

    The use of diagnostic laparoscopy in acute abdominal pain, especially when patients have been admitted for acute pain in the lower abdominal quadrants, improves the accuracy of diagnosis and leads to improvements in treatment procedures. A case is reported of a 24-year-old woman admitted under suspicion of appendicitis. The appendix was found to be normal, and a perforation caused by a fishbone was discovered in a Meckel's diverticulum. The diverticulum was resected by a combined laparoscopic and open procedure. Diagnostic laparoscopy should be performed routinely in cases of acute abdominal pain in the lower quadrants of suspected appendiceal origin to avoid overlooking other causes of the symptoms.

  18. Predictors of Abdominal Pain in Depressed Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Srinath, Arvind I.; Goyal, Alka; Zimmerman, Lori A.; Newara, Melissa C.; Kirshner, Margaret A.; McCarthy, F. Nicole; Keljo, David; Binion, David; Bousvaros, Athos; DeMaso, David R.; Youk, Ada; Szigethy, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have high rates of abdominal pain. The study aims were to (1) Evaluate biological and psychological correlates of abdominal pain in depressed youth with IBD, (2) Determine predictors of abdominal pain in Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods 765 patients ages 9–17 with IBD seen over 3 years at two sites were screened for depression. Depressed youth completed comprehensive assessments for abdominal pain, psychological (depression and anxiety), and biological (IBD-related, through disease activity indices and laboratory values) realms. Results 217 patients with IBD (161 CD, 56 UC) were depressed. 163 (120 CD, 43 UC) patients had complete API scores. In CD, abdominal pain was associated with depression (r=0.33; p<0.001), diarrhea (r=0.34; p=0.001), ESR (r=0.22; p=0.02), low albumin (r=0.24; p=.01), weight loss (r=0.33; p=0.001), and abdominal tenderness (r=0.38, p=0.002). A multivariate model with these significant correlates represented 32% of the variance in pain. Only depression (p=0.03), weight loss (p=0.04), and abdominal tenderness (p=0.01) predicted pain for CD patients. In UC, pain was associated with depression (r=0.46; p=0.002) and nocturnal stools (r=.32; p=.046). In the multivariate model with these significant correlates 23% of the variance was explained, and only depression (p=0.02) predicted pain. Conclusions The psychological state of pediatric patients with IBD may increase the sensitivity to abdominal pain. Thus, screening for and treating comorbid depression may prevent excessive medical testing and unnecessary escalation of IBD medications. PMID:24983975

  19. FACTORS RELATED TO ABDOMINAL PAIN IN GASTROPARESIS: CONTRAST TO PATIENTS WITH PREDOMINANT NAUSEA AND VOMITING

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Factors associated with abdominal pain in gastroparesis are incompletely evaluated and comparisons of pain versus other symptoms are limited. This study related pain to clinical factors in gastroparesis and contrasted pain/discomfort- with nausea/vomiting-predominant disease. Methods Clinical and scintigraphy data were compared in 393 patients from 7 centers of the NIDDK Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium with moderate-severe (Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Disorders Symptoms [PAGI-SYM] score ≥3) vs. none-mild (PAGI-SYM <3) upper abdominal pain and predominant pain/discomfort vs. nausea/vomiting. Key Results Upper abdominal pain was moderate-severe in 261 (66%). Pain/discomfort was predominant in 81 (21%); nausea/vomiting was predominant in 172 (44%). Moderate-severe pain was more prevalent with idiopathic gastroparesis and with lack of infectious prodrome (P≤0.05) and correlated with scores for nausea/vomiting, bloating, lower abdominal pain/discomfort, bowel disturbances, and opiate and antiemetic use (P<0.05) but not gastric emptying or diabetic neuropathy or control. Gastroparesis severity, quality of life, and depression and anxiety were worse with moderate-severe pain (P≤0.008). Factors associated with moderate-severe pain were similar in diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis. Compared to predominant nausea/vomiting, predominant pain/discomfort was associated with impaired quality of life, greater opiate, and less antiemetic use (P<0.01), but similar severity and gastric retention. Conclusions & Inferences Moderate-severe abdominal pain is prevalent in gastroparesis, impairs quality of life, and is associated with idiopathic etiology, lack of infectious prodrome, and opiate use. Pain is predominant in one fifth of gastroparetics. Predominant pain has at least as great an impact on disease severity and quality of life as predominant nausea/vomiting. PMID:23414452

  20. Dietary interventions for recurrent abdominal pain in childhood.

    PubMed

    Newlove-Delgado, Tamsin V; Martin, Alice E; Abbott, Rebecca A; Bethel, Alison; Thompson-Coon, Joanna; Whear, Rebecca; Logan, Stuart

    2017-03-23

    This is an update of the original Cochrane review, last published in 2009 (Huertas-Ceballos 2009). Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), including children with irritable bowel syndrome, is a common problem affecting between 4% and 25% of school-aged children. For the majority of such children, no organic cause for their pain can be found on physical examination or investigation. Many dietary inventions have been suggested to improve the symptoms of RAP. These may involve either excluding ingredients from the diet or adding supplements such as fibre or probiotics. To examine the effectiveness of dietary interventions in improving pain in children of school age with RAP. We searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, eight other databases, and two trials registers, together with reference checking, citation searching and contact with study authors, in June 2016. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing dietary interventions with placebo or no treatment in children aged five to 18 years with RAP or an abdominal pain-related, functional gastrointestinal disorder, as defined by the Rome III criteria (Rasquin 2006). We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We grouped dietary interventions together by category for analysis. We contacted study authors to ask for missing information and clarification, when needed. We assessed the quality of the evidence for each outcome using the GRADE approach. We included 19 RCTs, reported in 27 papers with a total of 1453 participants. Fifteen of these studies were not included in the previous review. All 19 RCTs had follow-up ranging from one to five months. Participants were aged between four and 18 years from eight different countries and were recruited largely from paediatric gastroenterology clinics. The mean age at recruitment ranged from 6.3 years to 13.1 years. Girls outnumbered boys in most trials. Fourteen trials recruited children with a diagnosis under the broad umbrella of RAP or functional

  1. Post-operative antibiotics after appendectomy and post-operative abscess development: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael J; Harrison, Ewen; Paterson-Brown, Simon

    2013-02-01

    Appendectomy is one of the most common emergency operations. Prophylaxis against infective complications involves post-operative antibiotics. There is no consensus as to the optimum antibiotic regimen. This study aimed to assess the relation between the duration of the post-operative antibiotic administration and intra-abdominal infections (IAIs). All patients who underwent appendectomy between September 1, 2009, and August 31, 2010, were identified. The appearance of the appendix at operation, post-operative antibiotics, white blood cell count, and temperature at the time of conversion of intravenous (IV) to oral antibiotics were compiled. IAIs were assessed as the final outcome. Two hundred sixty six patients underwent appendectomy-188 for simple appendicitis and 78 for complicated appendicitis. There were 18 IAIs (6.8%) overall, 10 (12.8%) after complicated appendicitis and eight (4.2%) after simple appendicitis. Prolonging antibiotics beyond the operation in the simple appendicitis group did not alter the incidence of IAI. Similarly, in the complicated appendicitis group, prolonging antibiotics beyond five days did not alter the incidence of IAI. Furthermore, in patients with complicated appendicitis, the presence of leukocytosis, fever, or both when IV antibiotics were converted to oral drugs was associated with the development of IAI (p=0.013). In simple appendicitis, post-operative antibiotics may not be beneficial at all. In complicated appendicitis, prolonging the course of antibiotics was not associated with a reduced IAI rate. However, cessation of IV antibiotics when fever or leukocytosis was present was associated with IAI development.

  2. [Gallbladder contractility in children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Iwańczak, Franciszek; Siedlecka-Dawidko, Jolanta; Iwanczak, Barbara

    2013-07-01

    III Rome Criteria of functional gastrointestinal disorders in children, distinguished the disturbances with abdominal pain, to which irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal pains, functional dyspepsia and abdominal migraine were included. THE AIM OF THE STUDY was sonographic assessment of the gallbladder and its contractility in functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children. The study comprised 96 children aged 6 to 18 years, 59 girls and 37 boys. Depending on diagnosis, the children were divided into three groups. 38 children with functional abdominal pain constituted the first group, 26 children with irritable bowel syndrome were included to the second group, the third group consisted of 32 healthy children (control group). Diagnosis of functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome was made based on the III Rome Criteria. In irritable bowel syndrome both forms with diarrhea (13) and with constipation (13) were observed. Anatomy and contractility of the gallbladder were assessed by ultrasound examination. The presence of septum, wall thickness, thick bile, vesicle volume in fasting state and 30th and 60th minute after test meal were taken into consideration. Test meal comprised about 15% of caloric requirement of moderate metabolism. Children with bile stones and organic diseases were excluded from the study. Thickened vesicle wall and thick bile were present more frequently in children with irritable bowel syndrome and functional abdominal pain than in control group (p < 0.02). Fasting vesicle volume was significantly greater in children with functional abdominal pain than in irritable bowel syndrome and control group (p = 0.003, p = 0.05). Vesicle contractility after test meal was greatest in children with functional abdominal pain. Evaluation of diminished (smaller than 30%) and enlarged (greater then 80%) gallbladder contractility at 30th and 60th minute after test meal demonstrated disturbances of contractility in children

  3. Severe Abdominal Pain as the First Manifestation of Rabies

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Jamshid; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza; Shahcheraghi, Seyed Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Rabies is an acute fatal viral disease that is generally transmitted from animals to humans following wild and domestic animal bites. The rabies virus enters the body from the area where the individual is bitten, and then the virus moves towards the brain and involves the nerves. Case Presentation: During the years 2001-2011, there have been 73 reported rabies cases. About 50,000 reported human deaths are annually due to rabies. The actual number of human deaths due to rabies in Asia especially India, Pakistan and Bangladesh are more than these numbers, since there is no advanced surveillance system for disease control to determine the actual number of infected and fatal human cases. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) reports, more than 10 million people who are bitten by animals are annually treated by prophylactic treatment regimens for rabies, worldwide. Conclusions: This paper reports on a case of human rabies with the first disease manifestation (severe abdominal pain). The patient reported extensive biting on his left leg by a dog. He had a slight fever of 38.1°C. It has been recommended that a careful history should be taken from patients for diagnosis of rabies disease. A complete history should be taken from patients for diagnosis of disease, because rabies could be wrong with various diseases with atypical symptoms. because various diseases with atypical symptoms or long incubation periods can visit. PMID:25485053

  4. Post-operative urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Steggall, Martin; Treacy, Colm; Jones, Mark

    Urinary retention is a common complication of surgery and anaesthesia. The risk of post-operative urinary retention is increased following certain surgical procedures and anaesthetic modalities, and with patients' advancing age. Patients at increased risk of post-operative urinary retention should be identified before surgery or the condition should be identified and treated in a timely manner following surgery. If conservative measures do not help the patient to pass urine, the bladder will need to be drained using either an intermittent catheter or an indwelling urethral catheter, which can result in catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This article provides an overview of normal bladder function, risk factors for developing post-operative urinary retention, and treatment options. Guidance drawn from the literature aims to assist nurses in identifying at-risk patients and inform patient care.

  5. Abdominal pain and asthenia as common clinical features in hospitalized children for giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Pedro; Núñez, Fidel A; Bello, Janet; González, Odalys M; Fernández, Raquel; Escobedo, Angel A

    2013-09-01

    Giardiasis is a disease with worldwide distribution, although its prevalence differs from country to country. In order to investigate the clinical pattern of giardiasis in in-patient children, a case-control study was carried out. In-patient children who had Giardia lamblia infection were compared with non Giardia-infected children, focusing only on 4 clinical manifestations: diarrhoea, abdominal pain, asthenia and vomiting. In multivariable analysis, abdominal pain (odds ratio [OR] 4.71, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 2.66-8.32) and asthenia (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.16-9.37) had positive and independent associations with Giardia infection. The present study supports the potential role of G. lamblia in abdominal pain in children who attend- and are admitted- to a hospital in Havana City, and highlights the importance to keep abdominal pain and asthenia in mind in hospital admitted children in the event of an association with an evocative epidemiological context.

  6. The complaints and dietary habits of the patients with gastritis and undefined abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Harju, E

    1985-02-01

    The complaints and dietary habits of sixteen patients with gastritis and fourteen with undefined abdominal pain were studied by recording method. The results showed that the symptoms of the patients with gastritis and undefined abdominal pain were similar and mostly postprandial and they can be regarded as local (abdominal pain, meteorism, discomfort and heartburn) and/or general (sweating, nausea and faintness). The patients have variations of the symptomatic and asymptomatic periods. The symptomatic patients with gastritis have significantly higher number of daily meals than the asymptomatic patients with gastritis. The daily intake of food, energy and nutrients are low especially in the symptomatic patients with gastritis. It is concluded that the symptoms experienced by the patients with gastritis or undefined abdominal pain are related to the eating so that the daily dietary habits are disturbed. The produced a low intake of food, energy and nutrients especially in the patients with symptomatic gastritis.

  7. Clinical features and associated factors of abdominal pain in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shiwen; Lian, Fan; Chen, Dongying; Li, Hao; Qiu, Qian; Zhan, Zhongping; Ye, Yujin; Xu, Hanshi; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical characteristics of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-induced abdominal pain in a cohort in South China and identify the risk factors for SLE-induced abdominal pain. This is a retrospective cohort study of SLE patients with complaint of abdominal pain admitted to the first affiliated university hospital of Sun Yat-sen University between 2002 and 2011. Demographic information, clinical features, laboratory findings, SLE Disease Activity Index, and imaging characteristics were documented. Of the 3823 SLE patients reviewed, 213 patients complained of abdominal pain and 132 cases were considered SLE-induced. The most common causes were lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV; 73.5%, 97/132) and lupus pancreatitis (LP; 17.4%, 23/132). Other causes included appendicitis, acute gastroenteritis, and peritonitis. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated the European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM) score was significantly associated with lupus-induced abdominal pain (OR = 1.858, 95% CI: 1.441-2.394, p < 0.001), LMV (OR = 1.713, 95% CI: 1.308-2.244, p < 0.001), and LP (OR = 2.153, 95% CI: 1.282, 3.617, p = 0.004). The serum D-dimer level (OR = 1.004, 95% CI: 1.002-1.005, p < 0.001) was a strongly associated factor for lupus-induced abdominal pain. Moderate and large amounts of ascetic fluid was significantly associated with lupus-induced abdominal pain and LMV. Elevated liver enzymes was a risk factor for LP (OR = 34.605, 95% CI: 3.591-333.472, p = 0.002). LMV and LP were the leading causes of SLE-induced abdominal pain. The serum D-dimer was a strongly associated factor for lupus-induced abdominal pain. ECLAM score was a reliable index in assessment of SLE-associated abdominal pain. Elevated liver enzymes, and moderate or large amounts of ascites, were positively associated with lupus-induced abdominal pain.

  8. Wandering spleen torsion causing acute abdominal pain in a child: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Llorens Marina, Carlos I; Cedeño, Alex; Lugo-Vicente, Humberto; Chapel, Cristel; Rivera, Glorimar; Diaz, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Wandering spleen is a rare occurrence where the spleen normal fixation to the abdominal wall is lost and thus allowed to change in position. We report a case of a child who presented with acute abdominal pain secondary to a wandering spleen complicated by torsion of its vascular pedicle. The diagnosis was promptly made using computed tomography and managed with splenectomy.

  9. Sonography of Abdominal Pain in Children: Appendicitis and Its Common Mimics.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Thomas Ray; Corwin, Michael T; Davoodian, Andrew; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is very common in the pediatric population (<18 years of age). Sonography is a safe modality that can often differentiate the frequently encountered causes of abdominal pain in children. This pictorial essay will discuss the sonographic findings of acute appendicitis, including the imaging appearance of a perforated appendicitis. It will also present the sonographic features of the relatively common mimics of appendicitis, such as mesenteric adenitis/gastroenteritis, intussusception, Meckel diverticulum, and ovarian torsion.

  10. Blastocystis Hominis and Chronic Abdominal Pain in Children: Is there an Association between Them?

    PubMed

    Toro Monjaraz, Erick Manuel; Vichido Luna, Miguel Angel; Montijo Barrios, Ericka; Cervantes Bustamante, Roberto; Zárate Mondragón, Flora; Huante Anaya, Alfonso; Cadena León, José; Mendez, Monserrat Cazares; López Ugalde, Martha; Ramirez Mayans, Jaime A

    2017-08-03

    Chronic abdominal pain has many etiologies, one of them being parasites. The aim of this study was to find an association between chronic abdominal pain in children and Blastocystis hominis (Bh). Clinical files of patients with Bh and functional abdominal pain were reviewed. A comparison was made between patients who showed an improvement of their symptoms and those who did not. Out of the 138 patients who had functional abdominal pain and Bh, 37 patients did not receive any treatment (26.8%), while 101 received it and were treated with different antimicrobial agents (73.2%); regarding the improvement of symptoms, a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed. Chronic abdominal pain in children has different etiologies; however, we have documented through this work that it is appropriate to provide antimicrobial treatment for patients with Bh and chronic abdominal pain. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Establishment and Application of Early Risk Stratification Method for Acute Abdominal Pain in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Zhen; Tian, Ci; Xiao, Hong-Li; Wang, Bao-En

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute abdominal pain is a common symptom of emergency patients. The severity was always evaluated based on physicians’ clinical experience. The aim of this study was to establish an early risk stratification method (ERSM) for addressing adults with acute abdominal pain, which would guide physicians to take appropriate and timely measures following the established health-care policies. Methods: In Cohort 1, the records of 490 patients with acute abdominal pain that developed within the past 72 h were enrolled in this study. Measurement data and numeration data were compared with analysis of variance and Chi-square test, respectively. Multiple regression analysis calculated odd ratio (OR) value. P and OR values showed the impacts of factors. ERSM was established by clinical experts and statistical experts according to Youden index. In Cohort 2, data from 305 patients with acute abdominal pain were enrolled to validate the accuracy of the ERSM. Then, ERSM was prospectively used in clinical practice. Results: The ERSM was established based on the scores of the patient's clinical characteristics: right lower abdominal pain + 3 × diffuse abdominal pain + 3 × cutting abdominal pain + 3 × pain frequency + 3 × pain duration + fever + 2 × vomiting + 5 × stop defecation + 3 × history of abdominal surgery + hypertension history + diabetes history + hyperlipidemia history + pulse + 2 × skin yellowing + 2 × sclera yellowing + 2 × double lung rale + 10 × unconsciousness + 2 × right lower abdominal tenderness + 5 × diffuse abdominal tenderness + 4 × peritoneal irritation + 4 × bowel sounds abnormal + 10 × suspicious diagnosis + white blood cell count + hematocrit + glucose + 2 × blood urea nitrogen + 3 × creatine + 4 × serum albumin + alanine aminotransferase + total bilirubin + 3 × conjugated bilirubin + amylase. When the score was <18, the patient did not need hospitalization. A score of ≥18 and <38 indicated that the patient should be under

  12. Comparative Analysis of Length of Stay and Inpatient Costs for Orthopedic Surgery Patients Treated with IV Acetaminophen and IV Opioids vs. IV Opioids Alone for Post-Operative Pain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan N; Pham, An; Strassels, Scott A; Balaban, Stela; Wan, George J

    2016-09-01

    Recovery from orthopedic surgery is oriented towards restoring functional health outcomes while reducing hospital length of stay (LOS) and medical expenditures. Optimal pain management is a key to reaching these objectives. We sought to compare orthopedic surgery patients who received combination intravenous (IV) acetaminophen and IV opioid analgesia to those who received IV opioids alone and compared the two groups on LOS and hospitalization costs. We performed a retrospective analysis of the Premier Database (Premier, Inc.; between January 2009 and June 2015) comparing orthopedic surgery patients who received post-operative pain management with combination IV acetaminophen and IV opioids to those who received only IV opioids starting on the day of surgery and continuing up to the second post-operative day. The quarterly rate of IV acetaminophen use for all hospitalizations by hospital served as the instrumental variable in two-stage least squares regressions controlling for patient and hospital covariates to compare the LOS and hospitalization costs of IV acetaminophen recipients to opioid monotherapy patients. We identified 4,85,895 orthopedic surgery patients with 1,74,805 (36%) who had received IV acetaminophen. Study subjects averaged 64 years of age and were predominantly non-Hispanic Caucasians (78%) and female (58%). The mean unadjusted LOS for IV acetaminophen patients was 3.2 days [standard deviation (SD) 2.6] compared to 3.9 days (SD 3.9) with only IV opioids (P < 0.0001). Average unadjusted hospitalization costs were $19,024.9 (SD $13,113.7) for IV acetaminophen patients and $19,927.6 (SD $19,578.8) for IV opioid patients (P < 0.0001). These differences remained statistically significant in our instrumental variable models, with IV acetaminophen associated with 0.51 days shorter hospitalization [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.58 to -0.44, P < 0.0001] and $634.8 lower hospitalization costs (95% CI -$1032.5 to -$237.1, P = 0.0018). Compared

  13. Post-operative Analgesia in Opioid Dependent Patients: Comparison of Intravenous Morphine and Sublingual Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Shaabanali; Mahmoudi, Ghafar Ali; Solhi, Hassan; Sadeghi-Sedeh, Bahman; Behzadi, Reza; Kazemifar, Amir Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute and chronic pain is prevalent in patients with opioid dependence. Lack of knowledge concerning the complex relationship between pain, opioid use, and withdrawal syndrome can account for the barriers encountered for pain management. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of sublingual (SL) buprenorphine for post-operative analgesia, compared with intravenous (IV) morphine. Methods A total of 68 patients, aged 20-60 years were randomly selected from whom had been underwent laparotomy due to acute abdomen in a University Teaching Hospital in Arak, Iran, and were also opioid (opium or heroin) abuser according to their history. After end of the surgery and patients’ arousal, the patients were evaluated for abdominal pain and withdrawal syndrome by visual analog scale (VAS) and clinical opioid withdrawal score (COWS), respectively 1, 6, and 24 h after the surgery. They received either morphine 5 mg IV or buprenorphine 2 mg SL, 1 h after end of the surgery, and then every 6 h for 24 h. Findings VAS was 4.47 ± 0.73 and 2.67 ± 0.53 at h 6 and 24 in buprenorphine group, respectively. The corresponding score was 5.88 ± 0.69 and 4.59 ± 0.74 in morphine group. At the same time, patients in buprenorphine experienced less severe withdrawal syndrome. Conclusion The present study confirmed the efficacy of SL buprenorphine as a non-invasive, but effective method for management of post-operative pain in opioid dependent patients. Result of this study showed that physicians can rely on SL buprenorphine for post-operative analgesia. PMID:26322212

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection, serum pepsinogens, and pediatric abdominal pain: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Eias; Naamna, Medhat; Mawassy, Kadri; Beer-Davidson, Gany; Muhsen, Khitam

    2017-08-01

    The significance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains poorly recognized. We examined associations of H. pylori infection and serum pepsinogens (PGs), as non-invasive markers of gastritis, with pediatric abdominal pain. A case-control study was conducted among 99 children aged 5-17 years admitted to one hospital for abdominal pain (cases) without an apparent organic reason. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, sera were tested and compared with 179 controls for anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and PGI and PGII levels. Multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for potential confounders. H. pylori IgG sero-positivity was 34.3 and 36.3% in cases and controls, respectively, P = 0.7. H. pylori-infected children had higher median PGI and PGII levels and a lower PGI/PGII ratio than uninfected children. Cases infected with H. pylori had a higher median PGII level (P < 0.001) and lower PGI/PGII ratio (P = 0.036) than controls infected with H. pylori. The percentage of cases with PGII ≥7.5 μg/L, as indication for antral inflammation, was higher than in controls: 58.6 versus 44.7%, P = 0.027. Children with PGII levels ≥7.5 μg/L had increased risk for abdominal pain: adjusted prevalence ratio 1.73 [95% confidence intervals 1.02, 2.93], P = 0.039. Children with increased serum PGII levels, as an indication of gastritis, are more likely to have abdominal pain. Serum PGs can be a useful non-invasive marker for gastritis, in evaluating children with severe abdominal pain with no apparent organic reason. What is Known: • The significance of Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains debated. • Serum pepsinogens (PGs), non-invasive markers of gastric inflammation, were rarely utilized in assessing the association between H. pylori in pediatric abdominal pain of unknown origin. What is New: • High serum PGII level, as an indication of gastritis, rather than H. pylori

  15. Multidetector CT in emergency radiology: acute and generalized non-traumatic abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Paolantonio, Pasquale; Rengo, Marco; Ferrari, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is an imaging technique that provides otherwise unobtainable information in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A correct working diagnosis depends essentially on understanding the individual patient's clinical data and laboratory findings. In haemodynamically stable patients with acute severe and generalized abdominal pain, MDCT is now the preferred imaging test and gives invaluable diagnostic information, also in unstable patients after stabilization. In this descriptive review, we focus our attention on acute, severe and generalized or undifferentiated non-traumatic abdominal pain. The main differential diagnoses are acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal perforation, ruptured abdominal aneurysm and acute mesenteric ischaemia. We will provide radiologist readers with a technical guide to optimize MDCT imaging protocols and list the major CT signs essential to reach a correct diagnosis and guide the best treatment. PMID:26689097

  16. Persistence of an infected urachus presenting as acute abdominal pain. Case report.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Diana Martin; Matos, Pablo Prieto; Hernandez, Juan Carlos Diez; Muñoz, Jorge Liras; Villasana, Luis de Celis

    2009-09-01

    We report a case of urachal remnant disease and review the literature. We present the case of an urachal cyst in a 13-year-old patient who was admitted to the emergency department with acute abdominal pain. Differential diagnosis of his symptoms was made with other diseases such as appendicitis and inflammatory bowel disease. Urachal remnant diseases are rare and they usually present during the neonatal period with fever and wet navel, lower abdominal pain around the middle line, palpable mass and urination symptoms with or without urinary infections. The presentation as acute abdominal pain in an older child is less common, and its differential diagnosis must be performed with other abdominal or pelvic acute diseases. The most appropriate imaging technique is an ultrasound exam.

  17. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adolescents with Abdominal Pain: Comparison with EoE-Dysphagia and Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Kiranmai; Gupta, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Compare EoE-AP with EoE-D for clinical, endoscopy (EGD), histology and outcomes and also with FAP-N. Method. Symptoms, physical findings, EGD, histology, symptom scores, and treatments were recorded for the three groups. Cluster analysis was done. Results. Dysphagia and abdominal pain were different in numbers but not statistically significant between EoE-AP and EoE-D. EGD, linear furrows, white exudates were more in the EoE-D and both combined were significant (p < 0.05). EoE-D, peak and mean eosinophils (p  0.06) and eosinophilic micro abscesses (p  0.001) were higher. Follow-Up. Based on single symptom, EoE-AP had 30% (p  0.25) improvement, EoE-D 86% (p < 0.001) and similar with composite score (p  0.57 and <0.001, resp.). Patients who had follow-up, EGD: 42.8% with EoE-AP and 77.8% with EoE-D, showed single symptom improvement and the eosinophil count fell from 38.5/34.6 (peak and mean) to 31.2/30.4 (p  0.70) and from 43.6/40.8 to 25.2/22.8 (p < 0.001), respectively. FAP-N patients had similar symptom improvement like EoE-D. Cluster Analysis. EoE-AP and FAP-N were similar in clinical features and response to treatment, but EoE-D was distinctly different from EoE-AP and FAP-N. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that EoE-AP and EoE-D have different histology and outcomes. In addition, EoE-AP has clinical features similar to the FAP-N group. PMID:27610357

  18. The overlap of functional abdominal pain in pediatric Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Lori A.; Srinath, Arvind I.; Goyal, Alka; Bousvaros, Athos; Ducharme, Peter; Szigethy, Eva; Nurko, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Children with Crohn’s disease (CD) may report abdominal pain despite clinical remission, suggesting that functional abdominal pain (FAP) may be playing a role. Aim This study aims to explore the presence and impact of FAP in children with CD in remission. Methods Children, aged 9–17, with CD were enrolled. Demographic information, the Pediatric Crohn’s Disease Activity Index (PCDAI), and the Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI) were obtained. Disease remission was defined by physician global assessment, normal labs, and absence of 3 or more stools a day, nocturnal stooling, bloody diarrhea, concurrent steroid therapy, strictures, or disease flare within 6 months. FAP was defined as patients with abdominal pain and CD remission. Rates of depression (CDI >9) were compared. Results 139/307 children reported abdominal pain. Of this group, 18/139 (13%) met criteria for FAP. Despite clinical remission, 8/18 CD FAP patients were classified with active disease by PCDAI. CD FAP patients had a higher rate of depression than CD patients in remission with no abdominal pain (55.6% vs. 29.9%; p=0.03), similar to patients with abdominal pain from active CD (55.6% vs. 44.8%; p=0.62). Conclusions A proportion of children with CD in remission have FAP. These children are at significant risk for depression. Future studies are needed to determine whether depression contributes to functional pain development or if pain itself leads to depression. Especially given that functional pain may exaggerate disease activity, clinicians caring for children with CD and FAP should consider evaluating for depressive disorders before escalating therapy. PMID:23407043

  19. Increased gastrointestinal permeability and gut inflammation in children with functional abdominal pain and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and fecal calprotectin concentration in children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome (FAP/IBS) versus control subjects and ascertain potential relationships with pain symptoms and stooling, GI permeability a...

  20. Increasing frequency of opioid prescriptions for chronic abdominal pain in US outpatient clinics.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Spencer D; Meek, Patrick D; Shah, Nilay D

    2011-12-01

    Opioids are sometimes used to treat chronic abdominal pain. However, opioid analgesics have not been proven to be an effective treatment for chronic abdominal pain and have been associated with drug misuse, constipation, and worsening abdominal pain. We sought to estimate the national prescribing trends and factors associated with opioid prescribing for chronic abdominal pain. Chronic abdominal pain-related visits by adults to US outpatient clinics were identified using reason-for-visit codes from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (1997-2008). Data were weighted to produce national estimates of opioid prescriptions over time. Logistic regression analyses, adjusted for complex survey design, were performed to identify factors associated with opioid use. The number of outpatient visits for chronic abdominal pain consistently decreased over time from 14.8 million visits (95% confidence interval [CI], 11.6-18.0 visits) in 1997 through 1999 to 12.2 million visits (95% CI, 9.0-15.6 visits) or 1863 visits per 100,000 population in 2006 through 2008 (P for trend = 0.04). Conversely, the adjusted prevalence of visits for which an opioid was prescribed increased from 5.9% (95% CI, 3.5%-8.3%) in 1997 through 1999 to 12.2% (95% CI, 7.5%-17.0%) in 2006 through 2008 (P = 0.03 for trend). Opioid prescriptions were most common among patients aged 25 to 40 years old (odds ratio [OR] 4.6; 95% CI, 1.2-18.4). Opioid prescriptions were less common among uninsured (OR 0.1; 95% CI, 0.04-0.40) and African American (OR 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9) patients. From 1997 to 2008 opioid prescriptions for chronic abdominal pain more than doubled. Further studies are needed to better understand the reasons for and consequences of this trend. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of Abdominal Segmental Hernia, Constipation, and Pain Following Herpes Zoster with Paravertebral Block.

    PubMed

    Kim, Saeyoung; Jeon, Younghoon

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) most commonly occurs in elderly patients and involves sensory neurons resulting in pain and sensory changes. Clinically significant motor deficits and visceral neuropathies are thought to be relatively rare. A 72-year-old man presented with abdominal segmental hernia, constipation, and pain following HZ in the left T9-10 dermatome. Sixteen days before presentation, he had developed a painful herpetic rash in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Approximately 10 days after the onset of the rash, constipation occurred and was managed with daily oral medication with bisacodyl 5 mg. In addition, 14 days after the onset of HZ, the patient noticed a protrusion of the left upper abdominal wall. Abdominal x-ray, ultrasound of the abdomen, and electrolyte analysis showed no abnormalities. General physical examination revealed a reducible bulge in his left upper quadrant and superficial abdominal reflexes were diminished in the affected region. Electromyographic testing revealed denervational changes limited to the left thoracic paraspinal muscles and supraumbilical muscles, corresponding to the affected dermatomes. He was prescribed with 500 mg of famciclovir 3 times a day for 7 days, and pregabalin 75 mg twice a day and acetaminophen 650 mg 3 times a day for 14 days. However, his pain was rated at an intensity of 5 on the numerical analogue scale from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable). A paravertebral block was performed at T9-10 with a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine 3 mL and triamcinolone 40 mg. One day after the procedure, the abdominal pain disappeared. In addition, 5 days after the intervention, the abdominal protrusion and constipation were resolved. He currently remains symptom free at a 6 month follow-up.

  2. Small bowel diverticulitis with severe anemia and abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    De Minicis, Samuele; Antonini, Filippo; Belfiori, Valerio; Lo Cascio, Massimiliano; Marraccini, Barbara; Piergallini, Simona; Mosca, Piergiorgio; Macarri, Giampiero

    2015-01-01

    The current case report is related to a male patient with diabetes, obesity [body mass index (BMI) 33], hypertension and recurrence of anemia associated to melena and deep asthenia. M.P., a 60-year-old obese individual, was referred to our department by the primary care unit (PCU) of our hospital for severe anemia (Hemoglobin 6.5 g/dL) associated to episodes of melena and abdominal pain. In the past 5 mo the patient referred to the local hospital 3 times for episodes of melena (hemoglobin levels showed anemia 9.8 g/dL) but the main gastroenterological exams were completely negative (colonoscopy and gastroscopy). The PCU of our Hospital, after stabilization of the main parameters and blood transfusion for the low levels of hemoglobin, referred the patient to gastroenterologists: the patient was subjected to both colonoscopy and gastroscopy that were negative. Due to the condition of acute severe hemorrhage the patient, during the first 3 h from the access to the PCU, was subjected to arteriography that did not reveal any hemorrhagic foci or vascular alterations. The video capsule for the study of the small bowel showed the presence of blood beginning from the third portion of duodenum but deep gastroscopy did not reveal it. The patient was then subjected to double balloon endoscopy that revealed a severe diverticulosis of the small bowel with blood from the diverticula. The entero-tomografia computerizzata confirmed the diagnosis and revealed an extension of the diverticula for almost the entire small bowel (no diverticula in the colon). The patient was subjected to wide spectrum antibiotic therapy with resolution of the symptoms and stabilization of hemoglobin levels. The surgeon suggests no indication to surgery for the wide area involved from the disease and potential high risk of complication due to the high BMI. At home, the patient started a monthly therapy with rifaximin and probiotics associated to mesalazine. At present, after 12 mo from the last episode of

  3. Effect of systematic relaxation techniques on anxiety and pain in older patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jasper, Melanie

    2013-10-01

    Inadequate pain control in older patients who have undergone abdominal surgery can lead to many complications. This study investigates the effect of systematic relaxation techniques on pain and anxiety in older patients undergoing abdominal surgery. One hundred twenty-four patients were randomly assigned into the experimental and control groups. The systematic relaxation techniques consisted of older patients in the experimental group slowly reading relaxing sentences during recovery in ambulation after the surgery. Patients' satisfaction with pain and anxiety relief was recorded, as was their use of opioid analgesia. Statistically significant differences in pain and anxiety, and in analgesic use, were reported between the patients in experimental and control groups after the intervention. These relaxation techniques can be incorporated into the care plan to reduce pain and anxiety after surgery as well as offering a measure for increasing the patients' independence in pain management control. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Unexplained lower abdominal pain associated with sacroiliac joint dysfunction: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Kim, Kyongsong; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Isobe, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman and a 31-year-old man presented with chronic lower back pain and unexplained lower abdominal pain. Both patients had groin tenderness at the medial border of the anterior superior iliac spine. The results of radiographical and physical examinations suggested sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Sacroiliac joint injection relieved their symptoms, including groin tenderness. In our experience, groin tenderness is highly specific for sacroiliac joint dysfunction. We speculate that spasm of the iliac muscle can cause groin pain and tenderness. Groin pain and a history of unexplained abdominal pain, with lower back pain, are symptoms that suggest sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Additionally, compression of the iliac muscle is a simple and useful maneuver; therefore, it can be used as a screening test for sacroiliac joint dysfunction, alongside other provocation tests.

  5. Evaluation of plain abdominal radiographs in the diagnosis of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, R L; Heineken, P; Hedgcock, M W; Federle, M; Goldberg, H I

    1982-08-01

    In an effort to develop referral criteria for the ordering of abdominal radiographs for patients presenting with abdominal symptoms, we prospectively studied the relation between clinical data and radiographic abnormalities. Of 1780 examinations, 179 (10.0%) showed some radiographic abnormality. If abdominal radiographs would have been limited to those patients who had moderate or severe abdominal tenderness, or to patients with a high clinical suspicion of bowel obstruction, renal or ureteral calculi, trauma, ischemia, or gallbladder disease, regardless of the degree of tenderness, 956 (53.7%) examinations would not have been done. All radiographic abnormalities reflecting a serious pathologic process would have been identified. Only 33 (3.5) abnormalities of limited significance, almost all localized or generalized ileus, would have been undetected. The adoption of these referral criteria would result in minimal loss of clinicall useful information, large financial savings, and a reduction in radiation exposure.

  6. Evaluation of plain abdominal radiographs in the diagnosis of abdominal pain.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, R L; Heineken, P; Hedgcock, M W; Federle, M; Goldberg, H I

    1983-01-01

    In an effort to develop referral criteria for the ordering of abdominal radiographs for patients presenting with abdominal symptoms, we prospectively studied the relation between clinical data and radiographic abnormalities. Of 1780 examinations, 179 (10.0%) showed some radiographic abnormality. If abdominal radiographs would have been limited to those patients who had moderate or severe abdominal tenderness, or to patients with a high clinical suspicion of bowel obstruction, renal or ureteral calculi, trauma, ischemia, or gallbladder disease, regardless of the degree of tenderness, 956 (53.7%) examinations would not have been done. All radiographic abnormalities reflecting a serious pathologic process would have been identified. Only 33 (3.5%) abnormalities of limited significance, almost all localized or generalized ileus, would have been undetected. The adoption of these referral criteria would result in minimal loss of clinically useful information, large financial savings, and a reduction in radiation exposure. PMID:6830353

  7. Evaluation of plain abdominal radiographs in the diagnosis of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, R L; Heineken, P; Hedgcock, M W; Federle, M; Goldberg, H I

    1983-04-01

    In an effort to develop referral criteria for the ordering of abdominal radiographs for patients presenting with abdominal symptoms, we prospectively studied the relation between clinical data and radiographic abnormalities. Of 1780 examinations, 179 (10.0%) showed some radiographic abnormality. If abdominal radiographs would have been limited to those patients who had moderate or severe abdominal tenderness, or to patients with a high clinical suspicion of bowel obstruction, renal or ureteral calculi, trauma, ischemia, or gallbladder disease, regardless of the degree of tenderness, 956 (53.7%) examinations would not have been done. All radiographic abnormalities reflecting a serious pathologic process would have been identified. Only 33 (3.5%) abnormalities of limited significance, almost all localized or generalized ileus, would have been undetected. The adoption of these referral criteria would result in minimal loss of clinically useful information, large financial savings, and a reduction in radiation exposure.

  8. Uncommon causes of acute abdominal pain: multidetector computed tomography pearls and pitfalls for the radiologist on call.

    PubMed

    Mellado, José María; Martín, Joaquín; Solanas, Susana; Yanguas, Nerea; Salceda, Javier; Cozcolluela, María Rosa

    2012-01-01

    We review uncommon causes of acute abdominal pain in which inconclusive multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) studies were followed by emergency surgery and unexpected diagnoses. Despite dedicated protocols and technical advances, MDCT of uncommon causes of acute abdominal pain still represents a significant challenge for the radiologist on call. We emphasize diagnostic pearls and pitfalls that may help the radiologist on call identify or suspect these uncommon causes of acute abdominal pain on MDCT. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. ABDX A Decision Support System for the Management of Acute Abdominal Pain. Version 3.0. Programmer’s Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-31

    Abdominal Pain. 8.3 TX3.DKT This is the encrypted treatment protocol for Renal Colic . 8.4 TX4.DAT This is the encrypted treatment protocol for...resplength% - 7 menuheading$ - "Your Diagnosis" ELSE "APPENDICITIS "NON-SPECIFIC ABDOMINAL PAIN" " RENAL COLIC "PERFORATED DUODENAL ULCER...5) 6) "APPENDICITIS " -NON-SPECIFIC ABDOMINAL PAIN" " RENAL COLIC "PERFORATED DUODENAL ULCER " "CHOLECYSTITIS "SMALL BOWEL OBSTRUCTION Choices

  10. Pain reported during prolonged standing is associated with reduced anticipatory postural adjustments of the deep abdominals.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Paul W M; Romero, Rick; Brooks, Cristy

    2014-11-01

    Within the context of low back pain, the measurement of deep abdominal anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) during rapid limb movement has received much interest. There is dispute about the association between APAs and back pain. Moreover, there is limited evidence examining compensatory postural adjustments (CPAs) in back pain. This study examined the relationship between APAs and CPAs with pain reported in the low back during 2 h of prolonged standing. Twenty-six participants with no history of severe back pain performed 2-h prolonged standing. APAs and CPAs of the deep abdominal muscles (transverse abdominis/internal obliques) were measured by surface electromyography during rapid shoulder flexion and extension. APAs and CPAs measured pre-standing revealed symmetrical anticipatory activity, but an asymmetry between the different sides of the abdominal wall for CPAs. APAs and CPAs measured pre-standing were not associated with pain reported during standing. For the whole group, APA amplitudes were reduced post-standing during shoulder flexion (p = 0.005). Pain reported during standing was associated with the changes in APA amplitudes post-standing (rs = 0.43, p = 0.002). These findings support previous research using hypertonic saline injections to induce back pain that showed reduced APA amplitudes, and extends findings to suggest pain does not effect compensatory postural adjustments.

  11. Menarche? A Case of Abdominal Pain and Vaginal Bleeding in a Preadolescent Girl.

    PubMed

    Riney, Lauren C; Reed, Jennifer L; Kruger, Laura L; Brody, Alan J; Pomerantz, Wendy J

    2015-11-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints in the pediatric ED. Because of the broad range of potential diagnoses, it can pose challenges in diagnosis and therapy in the preadolescent girl. An 11-year-old previously healthy girl presented to our pediatric ED with fever, decreased appetite, vaginal bleeding, and abdominal pain. Initial evaluation yielded elevated creatinine levels, leukocytosis with bandemia, elevated inflammatory markers, and urine concerning for a urinary tract infection. She began receiving antibiotics for presumed pyelonephritis and was admitted to the hospital. After worsening respiratory status and continued abdominal pain, a computed tomography scan was obtained and a pelvic foreign body and abscess were identified. Adolescent gynecology was consulted for examination under anesthesia for abscess drainage and foreign body removal. A foreign body in the vagina or uterus can present as vaginal discharge, vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, dysuria, or hematuria. Because symptoms can be diverse, an intravaginal or uterine foreign body should be considered in the preteen female patient presenting to the ED with abdominal pain.

  12. Chronic pancreatitis pain pattern and severity are independent of abdominal imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, C Mel; Yadav, Dhiraj; Ye, Tian; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Sandhu, Bimaljit S; Lewis, Michele D; Al-Kaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory A; Forsmark, Christopher E; Guda, Nalini M; Conwell, Darwin L; Banks, Peter A; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Brand, Randall E; Slivka, Adam; Sherman, Stuart; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Whitcomb, David C; Anderson, Michelle A

    2015-03-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by inflammation, atrophy, fibrosis with progressive ductal changes, and functional changes that include variable exocrine and endocrine insufficiency and multiple patterns of pain. We investigated whether abdominal imaging features accurately predict patterns of pain. We collected data from participants in the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 Continuation and Validation, a prospective multicenter study of patients with chronic pancreatitis performed at 13 expert centers in the United States from July 2008 through March 2012. Chronic pancreatitis was defined based on the detection of characteristic changes by cross-sectional abdominal imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasonography, or histology analyses. Patients were asked by a physician or trained clinical research coordinator if they had any abdominal pain during the year before enrollment, those who responded "yes" were asked to select from a list of 5 pain patterns. By using these patterns, we classified patients' pain based on timing and severity. Abnormal pancreatitis-associated features on abdominal imaging were recorded using standardized case report forms. Data were collected from 518 patients (mean age, 52 ± 14.6 y; 55% male; and 87.6% white). The most common physician-identified etiologies were alcohol (45.8%) and idiopathic (24.3%); 15.6% of patients reported no abdominal pain in the year before enrollment. The most common individual pain pattern was described as constant mild pain with episodes of severe pain and was reported in 45% of patients. The most common imaging findings included pancreatic ductal dilatation (68%), atrophy (57%), and calcifications (55%). Imaging findings were categorized as obstructive for 20% and as inflammatory for 25% of cases. The distribution of individual imaging findings was similar among patients with different patterns of pain. The distribution of pain patterns did not differ among

  13. Chronic Pancreatitis Pain Pattern and Severity are Independent of Abdominal Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, C. Mel; Yadav, Dhiraj; Tian, Ye; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Lewis, Michele D.; Al-Kaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory A.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Guda, Nalini; Conwell, Darwin L.; Banks, Peter A.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Brand, Randall E; Slivka, Adam; Sherman, Stuart; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, David C.; Anderson, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by inflammation, atrophy, fibrosis with progressive ductal changes, and functional changes that include variable exocrine and endocrine insufficiency and multiple patterns of pain. We investigated whether abdominal imaging features accurately predict patterns of pain. Methods We collected data from participants in North American Pancreatitis Study 2 Continuation and Validation, a prospective multicenter study of patients with chronic pancreatitis performed at 13 expert centers in the United States from July 2008 through March 2012. Chronic pancreatitis was defined based on detection of characteristic changes by cross-sectional abdominal imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasonography, or histology analyses. Patients were asked by a physician or trained clinical research coordinator if they had any abdominal pain in the year before enrollment; those that responded “yes” were asked to select from a list of 5 pain patterns. Using these patterns, we classified patients’ pain based on timing and severity. Abnormal pancreatitis-associated features on abdominal imaging were recorded using standardized case report forms. Results Data were collected from 518 patients (mean age, 52±14.6 years; 55% male; and 87.6% white). The most common physician-identified etiologies were alcohol (45.8%) and idiopathic (24.3%); 15.6% of patients reported no abdominal pain in the year before enrollment. The most common individual pain pattern was described as constant mild pain with episodes of severe pain, reported in 45% of patients. The most common imaging findings included pancreatic ductal dilatation (68%), atrophy (57%), and calcifications (55%). Imaging findings were categorized as obstructive for 20% and inflammatory for 25% of cases. The distribution of individual imaging findings was similar among patients with different patterns of pain. The distribution of pain patterns did not

  14. Guideline for the diagnostic pathway in patients with acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Gans, Sarah L; Pols, Margreet A; Stoker, Jaap; Boermeester, Marja A

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic practice for acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department varies widely and is mostly based on doctor's preferences. We aimed at developing an evidence-based guideline for the diagnostic pathway of patients with abdominal pain of non-traumatic origin. All available international literature on patients with acute abdominal pain was identified and graded according to their methodological quality by members of the multidisciplinary steering group. A guideline was synthetized, providing evidence-based recommendations together with considerations based on expertise of group members, patient preferences, costs, availability of facilities, and organizational aspects. Uniform terminology is needed in patients with acute abdominal pain to avoid difficulty in interpretation and ease comparison of findings between studies. We propose the use of the following definition for acute abdominal pain: pain of nontraumatic origin with a maximum duration of 5 days. Clinical diagnosis: Clinical evaluation is advised to differentiate between urgent and nonurgent causes. The diagnostic accuracy of clinical assessment is insufficient to identify the correct diagnosis but can discriminate between urgent and nonurgent causes. Patients suspected of nonurgent diagnoses can safely be reevaluated the next day. Based on current literature, no conclusions can be drawn on the differences in accuracy between residents and specialists. No conclusions can be drawn on the influence of a gynecological consultation. In patients suspected of an urgent condition, additional imaging is justified. CRP and WBC count alone are insufficient to discriminate urgent from nonurgent diagnoses. Diagnostic imaging: There is no place for conventional radiography in the work-up of patients with acute abdominal pain due to the lack of added value on top of clinical assessment. Computed tomography leads to the highest sensitivity and specificity in patients with acute abdominal pain. Positive predictive

  15. Can C-reactive protein and white blood cell count alone rule out an urgent condition in acute abdominal pain?

    PubMed

    Paolillo, Ciro; Spallino, Ilenia

    2016-02-01

    Up to 10% of all patients at the Emergency Department present for acute abdominal pain. The C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell (WBC) are routinely determined as part of the workup of patients with abdominal pain. Three large prospective cohort studies comprising a total of 2961 adult patients with acute abdominal pain were selected. CRP levels and WBC counts were compared between patients with urgent and nonurgent final diagnoses. These studies conclude that the laboratory values individually are weak discriminators and cannot be used as a triage instrument in the selection of patients with acute abdominal pain requiring additional diagnostic tests.

  16. Right upper quadrant abdominal pain as the initial presentation of polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Gago, Ricardo; Shum, Lee Ming; Vilá, Luis M

    2017-02-22

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a necrotising vasculitis that involves medium and small vessels. PAN generally presents with constitutional, cutaneous, neurological, renal and gastrointestinal manifestations. However, PAN initially involving a single organ/system is uncommon. Here, we present a 42-year-old man who was hospitalised because of severe right upper quadrant abdominal pain that started 2 months before. Physical examination was remarkable for right upper quadrant abdominal tenderness. Abdominopelvic CT showed lymphadenopathy but no hepatic, gallbladder, pancreatic, intestinal or renal abnormalities. Abdominal angiography showed multiple small aneurysms located in the jejunal and hepatic arteries characteristic of PAN. He had a prompt and remarkable response to high-dose corticosteroids and oral cyclophosphamide. Our case, together with other reports, suggests that PAN should be considered in patients presenting with right upper abdominal pain. Timely diagnosis and treatment reduce the overall morbidity and mortality of the disease.

  17. Intravenous phentolamine infusion alleviates the pain of abdominal visceral cancer, including pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Masako; Yasukawa, Ken'ichi; Kamiizumi, You; Yokoyama, Ryouji

    2007-01-01

    This case report series describes eight patients (four patients with pancreatic carcinoma, one patient with hepatocellular carcinoma, one patient with gastric and rectal carcinoma, one with sigmoid colon cancer, and one with rectal cancer), whose abdominal cancer pain was treated with intravenous phentolamine infusion at 80 mg x day(-1) for 2 days. All but one of the patients had already been treated with opioids. All eight patients complained of severe abdominal pain; in five patients the pain radiated to the back, and there was associated anal pain in two patients. Analgesia was achieved in three patients; pain alleviation was obtained in four patients, but was not sustained in two of these four patients; and the treatment in one patient could not be judged for efficacy because epidural morphine was used together with the phentolamine. Adverse effects of phentolamine were tachycardia and/or hypotension.

  18. Antinociceptive effect of botulinum toxin type A on experimental abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Drinovac, Višnja; Bach-Rojecky, Lidija; Babić, Ana; Lacković, Zdravko

    2014-12-15

    Visceral pain, especially in the abdominal region, represents one of the most common types of pain. Its chronic form is usually very hard to treat by conventional analgesic agents and adjuvants. We investigated the antinociceptive effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in male Wistar rats in two models of visceral pain: peritonitis induced by intraperitoneal injection of 1% acetic acid and colitis induced by intracolonic instillation of 0.1% capsaicin. Pain was measured as the number of abdominal writhes. Additionally, referred mechanical sensitivity in the ventral abdominal area was evaluated by von Frey test and the extent of spinal c-Fos expression was immunohistochemically examined. BTX-A significantly reduced the number of abdominal writhes in both models of visceral pain after intrathecal application in a dose of 2 U/kg. In the experimental colitis model, BTX-A (2 U/kg) reduced both referred mechanical allodynia and c-Fos expression in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (S2/S3 segments). In contrast to intrathecal administration, BTX-A (2 U/kg) administered into the cisterna magna had no effect on pain suggesting that the primary site of its action is a spinal cord.

  19. Outcomes of Ultrasound-Guided Trigger Point Injection for Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Alnahhas, Mhd Firas; Oxentenko, Shawn C; Locke, G Richard; Hansel, Stephanie; Schleck, Cathy D; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Farrugia, Gianrico; Grover, Madhusudan

    2016-02-01

    Abdominal wall pain (AWP) is an important cause of chronic abdominal pain. History and physical examination are critical to the diagnosis of AWP. Trigger point injection (TPI) using either a steroid or a local anesthetic or a combination of both is often used to treat AWP. To determine the efficacy of ultrasound-guided TPI and to determine the predictors of a successful response. Patients who received ultrasound-guided TPI between July 2010 and June 2011 were surveyed. The primary outcome was determined using the Treatment Efficacy Questionnaire (TEQ). Electronic medical records were reviewed to determine patient, pain and TPI characteristics. Linear regression was used to determine the predictors of a successful response on the TEQ. Right upper quadrant was the most common site of AWP, and the median pain duration was 12 months. Pain was rated as >8 (1-10 scale) by 57 % and 30 % described it as an ache. Narcotic use was reported in 38 %, and 73 % had a history of at least one abdominal surgery. Forty-four of the 120 (37 %) patients met the criteria for responder on the TEQ. Compared to before treatment, 36 % reported being "significantly better" and 22 % "slightly better." Multiple linear regression analysis showed that higher somatization negatively predicted response. None of the other historical, examination or TPI characteristics were associated with response to the TPI. TPI can provide significant, long-term symptom relief in a third of patients with chronic abdominal pain attributed to AWP. Somatization was inversely related to the treatment success.

  20. [Intussusception of the appendix. A rare cause of acute abdominal pain in childhood].

    PubMed

    Eckert, K; Radeloff, E; Liedgens, P

    2012-02-01

    Intussusception of the appendix is a rare clinical entity and the preoperative diagnosis is challenging. We report the case of a 12-year-old girl with right-sided abdominal pain and concomitant peranal bleeding. Preoperative abdominal ultrasound showed partial appendicular intussusception which was confirmed by laparotomy. Appendectomy was carried out including a wide peripheral cecal ring. Peranal bleeding restarted 7 weeks after discharge and colonoscopy revealed ulcerative colitis. The etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for appendicular intussusception are discussed.

  1. ROLE OF DIAGNOSTIC LAPAROSCOPY IN EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF CHRONIC ABDOMINAL PAIN IN CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Talat, Nabila; Afzal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Rasool, Naima; Wasti, Arsalan Raza; Saleem, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic abdominal Pain in children is a very common cause of hospital admission. Many of them are discharged without a diagnosis even after battery of investigations. Laparoscopy plays a significant role in diagnosis and management of many causes of acute and chronic abdominal pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of laparoscopy as an efficient diagnostic and management tool in children with chronic abdominal pain. A descriptive, prospective case series was collected in the department of Paediatric surgery Mayo's Hospital Lahore, over the period of 5 years between Jan 2007-Dec 2013. The data of consecutive 50 patients, who were admitted in the department with the diagnosis of chronic abdominal pain, was recorded. All patients who had 2-3 admissions in hospital for last 2 months and failed to establish a definitive diagnosis after clinical examination and base line investigations underwent laparoscopy. The details of associated symptoms, finding of laparoscopy, laparoscopic procedures done, definitive diagnosis, histopathology, complications and relief of symptoms were collected and analysed and results were evaluated using SPSS-17. Out of 50 patients studies, 27/50 (54%) were male, 23/50 (46%) were female. Age ranged from 2-12 years, with the mean age of 7.24 year. Tuberculosis abdomen, adhesions, mesenteric lymphadenitis, appendicitis and cholecystitis were the final diagnosis. Five abdomens were found normal on laparoscopy. Complete pain relief was achieved in 30/50 (60%), reduced intensity of pain was gained in 12/50 (24%) cases while 16% (8/50) still complained of pain. Laparoscopy is an efficient diagnostic and treatment tool in children with chronic unexplained abdominal pain. It avoids serial examinations; prolong admission, battery of investigations and unnecessary surgeries.

  2. Colonoscopic diagnosis of appendiceal intussusception in a patient with intermittent abdominal pain: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli, Hamid; Sadrkabir, Sayed Mohammad; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2007-01-01

    Intussusception of the appendix is a rare condition. Most cases are diagnosed during operation of the patients suspected to have appendicitis. In this report we present a seventy one year-old man with a history of periumbilical intermittent abdominal pain for several months. None of the paraclinical tests were useful for determining the diagnosis. Colonoscopy performed during the last episode of abdominal pain revealed the prolapsed appendix in the cecum and the patient was sent to the operating room. Macroscopic appearance of the appendix was normal and microscopic examination revealed follicular hyperplasia and acute focal appendicitis. Appendiceal intussusception should be considered in differential diagnosis of intermittent abdominal pain and colonoscopic diagnosis could be very important to avoid dangerous or unnecessary decision making. PMID:17696262

  3. [Eradication of Helicobacter pylori in patients with recurrent abdominal pain using a triple drug treatment].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Mayans, J; Zamora Dávila, E; Cervantes Bustamante, R; Mata Rivera, N; Oyervides García, C I; Cuevas Schacht, F; Sosa de Martínez, M C

    1996-01-01

    Different antibiotics, antagonist H2 and others have been used for elimination and/or eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Evaluate elimination of Helicobacter pylori with amoxicillin, bismuth subsalicylate and ranitidine; and the improvement of recurrent abdominal pain. 20 children with recurrent abdominal pain associated to gastritis and histologic identification of Helicobacter pylori were studied under a period of 18 months (January 1992 to June 1993), at Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, México, D.F. All children were treated simultaneously with: Amoxicillin, 15 days, plus ranitidine and bismuth subsalicylate for one month. Helicobacter pylori was eliminated in 14 of 20 children studied. All these children had an important improvement of recurrent abdominal pain. Elimination of Helicobacter pylori and clinical improvement was present in 14 of 20 children studied (70%).

  4. [Intra-abdominal pressure as a surgery predictor in patients with acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Campos-Muñoz, Manuel Alejandro; Villarreal-Ríos, Enrique; Chimal-Torres, Mariano; Pozas-Medina, Josué Atila

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la presión intraabdominal es el estado de equilibrio de la presión de la cavidad abdominal en reposo y puede presentar cambios durante la ventilación mecánica o espontánea. El objetivo fue determinar la presión intraabdominal como predictor de cirugía en el paciente con dolor abdominal agudo. Métodos: se llevó a cabo un estudio de casos y controles anidado en una cohorte de pacientes con dolor abdominal agudo en el servicio de urgencias de un hospital de segundo nivel, en el periodo comprendido entre abril y diciembre de 2013. Se incluyeron 37 pacientes, todos fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente con previa toma de la presión intraabdominal. Se formaron los grupos con el resultado del estudio anatomopatológico: con evidencia de proceso inflamatorio abdominal agudo (n = 28) y sin evidencia de proceso inflamatorio abdominal agudo (n = 9). Resultados: en los casos el 100 % presentó presión intraabdominal alta con una p = 0.01, RM: 5 (IC 95 %: 2.578-9.699). En los casos la media de la presión intraabdominal fue de 11.46 y en los controles de 9.2 (p = 0.183). Conclusiones: el dolor abdominal que requiere cirugía para su resolución tiene relación directa con una presión intraabdominal > 5 mmHg.

  5. Laparoscopic treatment of lower abdominal pain related to chronic appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Pandza, Haris; Custović, Samir; Cović, Ranko; Delibegovic, Samir

    2008-01-01

    The appendicitis is one of the most common entities that could be met at surgical department. Chronic pelvic pain of right iliac fossa is common and it causes disability and distress and results in significant costs to health services. Often, investigation by laparoscopy reveals no obvious cause for pain. There are several possible explanations for chronic pelvic pain including undetected irritable bowel syndrome, the vascular hypothesis where pain is thought to arise from dilated pelvic veins in which blood flow is markedly reduced and altered spinal cord and brain processing of stimuli in women with chronic pelvic pain. As the pathophysiology of chronic pelvic pain is not well understood, its treatment is often unsatisfactory and limited to symptom relief. We aimed to identify and review treatments for chronic pelvic pain related to appendicitis. Frequently ultrasound and CT scan cannot confirm the diagnosis of chronic appendicitis due to non significant swelling of vermiform appendix. The study excludes patients with a diagnosis of pelvic congestion syndrome, those with pain known to be caused by gynecological disorders or irritable bowel syndrome. Detailed history, clinical examination, and serological and radiological investigations failed to reveal the cause of the pain in all cases. We presumed that pain is caused by chronic appendicitis with appendicolithiasis and that removal of appendix will result in symptom relief. We performed study with 75 patients treated by laparoscopic appendectomy. Duration of symptoms ranged from 3 to 48 months, with a mean of 13.1 months. All patients included in this study had right iliac fossa pain lasting more than three months. We performed radiological contrast studies to verify appendicolithiasis of irregularity of appendicular wall. Patient with mild symptoms were excluded, only patients that have symptoms that cause disability were operated. We compared pain according to localization, duration and character. We evaluated

  6. Influence of Hamstring and Abdominal Muscle Activation on a Positive Ober's Test in People with Lumbopelvic Pain.

    PubMed

    Tenney, H Rich; Boyle, Kyndall L; Debord, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    To assess the immediate effect of hamstring and abdominal activation on pain levels as measured by the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) and hip range of motion as measured by Ober's Test in people with lumbopelvic pain. Thirteen participants with lumbopelvic pain and positive Ober's Tests completed an exercise developed by the Postural Restoration Institute™ to recruit hamstrings and abdominal muscles. There was a significant increase in passive hip-adduction angles (p<0.01) and decrease in pain (p<0.01) immediately after the intervention. Specific exercises that activate hamstrings and abdominal muscles appear to immediately improve Ober's Test measurements and reduce pain as measured by the NPS in people with lumbo-pelvic pain. Hamstring/abdominal activation, rather than iliotibial band stretching, may be an effective intervention for addressing lumbopelvic pain and a positive Ober's Test.

  7. Influence of Hamstring and Abdominal Muscle Activation on a Positive Ober's Test in People with Lumbopelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tenney, H. Rich; DeBord, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the immediate effect of hamstring and abdominal activation on pain levels as measured by the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) and hip range of motion as measured by Ober's Test in people with lumbopelvic pain. Methods: Thirteen participants with lumbopelvic pain and positive Ober's Tests completed an exercise developed by the Postural Restoration Institute™ to recruit hamstrings and abdominal muscles. Results: There was a significant increase in passive hip-adduction angles (p<0.01) and decrease in pain (p<0.01) immediately after the intervention. Conclusion: Specific exercises that activate hamstrings and abdominal muscles appear to immediately improve Ober's Test measurements and reduce pain as measured by the NPS in people with lumbo-pelvic pain. Hamstring/abdominal activation, rather than iliotibial band stretching, may be an effective intervention for addressing lumbopelvic pain and a positive Ober's Test. PMID:24381375

  8. Widespread pressure pain hypersensitivity and ultrasound imaging evaluation of abdominal area after colon cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Jiménez, Antonio; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Molina-Barea, Rocio; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Galiano-Castillo, Noelia; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the presence of widespread pressure pain sensitivity in cancer patients following partial colorectal resection in the abdominal and lower back area and to describe the presence of abnormalities in abdominal and lower back muscle morphology. Twenty colon cancer survivors (eight females, mean age 56.60 ± 7.76 years) and 20 matched healthy controls (10 females, mean age 54.22 ± 8.12 years) participated. Abdominal and lower back pain was assessed after undergoing surgery using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were bilaterally assessed over the supraumbilical, infraumbilical, and lower back areas and the second metacarpal. Ultrasound imaging was used to measure the depth of the abdominal muscles, the width of the midline abdominal fascia and the width of the lumbar multifidus. Ten months after finishing oncological treatments, patients who underwent partial colorectal resection reported significantly higher pain levels in the low-back area (P = 0.003) but not in the abdominal area (P = 0.426) compared with the matched controls. After surgery, the colon patients reported significantly higher BPI-intensity (P < 0.001) and BPI-interference scores (P = 0.009) compared with the matched controls. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant between-groups difference in dominant-side lumbar, supraumbilical and infraumbilical (P ≥ 0.01), and second-metacarpal (P < 0.05) PPT levels. A significant between-groups difference was found by the ANOVA in ultrasound imaging of the depth of the internal oblique muscle (F = 4.887, P = 0.035) but not in the other ultrasound imaging measurements. Ten months after oncology treatment, colon cancer survivors show widespread pressure pain muscle hyperalgesia and reduced depths of dominant-side internal oblique muscles compared with matched controls. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Pain Perception in Abdominal Surgery Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    in blood pressure , pulse pressure , heart rate , cardiac stroke volume, and peripheral vascular...studied 60 healthy adults, measuring heart rate while the subjects performed fist, chest, and abdominal tensing and relaxation . Valsalva ratio was...action. The heart rate increases , lung airways expand, the pupils enlarge, blood is shunted from the digestive and excretory organs and sent to

  10. Abdominal wall Type-I complex regional pain syndrome treated effectively with peripheral nerve field stimulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linqiu; Chou, Henry; Holder, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a well-documented complication of abdominal surgery. However, abdominal wall complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare medical condition. We present a case of abdominal wall CRPS and its treatment with peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNfS). A 34-year-old female presented with right periumbilical pain for 2 years. She developed burning, sharp and stabbing pain with allodynia (extremely sensitive to wind and light touch) and erythema or pallor 2 weeks after an exploratory appendectomy. The extensive evaluation ruled out the underlining pathology. After she failed conservative therapies, she underwent a 7-day trial of thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and abdominal wall PNfS. Thoracic SCS failed to provide pain relief; however, PNfS provided significant relief (>90%) of burning sensation. It has now been 5 years since the PNfS was implanted and she continues to demonstrate substantial pain relief. PMID:28044002

  11. Characterizing abdominal pain in IBS: guidance for study inclusion criteria, outcome measurement and clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, B. M. R.; Bolus, R.; Harris, L. A.; Lucak, S.; Chey, W. D.; Sayuk, G.; Esrailian, E.; Lembo, A.; Karsan, H.; Tillisch, K.; Talley, J.; Chang, L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Although irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multisymptom disorder, abdominal pain drives illness severity more than other symptoms. Despite consensus that IBS trials should measure pain to define study entry and determine efficacy, the optimal method of measuring pain remains uncertain. Aim To determine whether combining information from multiple pain dimensions may capture the IBS illness experience more effectively than the approach of measuring `pain predominance' or pain intensity alone. Methods Irritable bowel syndrome patients rated dimensions of pain, including intensity, frequency, constancy, predominance, predictability, duration, speed of onset and relationship to bowel movements. We evaluated the impact of each dimension on illness severity using multivariable regression techniques. Results Among the pain dimensions, intensity, frequency, constancy and predictability were strongly and independently associated with illness severity; the other dimensions had weaker associations. The clinical definition of `pain predominance', in which patients define pain as their most bothersome symptom, was insufficient to categorize patients by illness severity. Conclusions Irritable bowel disease pain is multifaceted; some pain dimensions drive illness more than others. IBS trials should measure various pain dimensions, including intensity, constancy, frequency and predictability; this may improve upon the customary use of measuring pain as a unidimensional symptom in IBS. PMID:20807217

  12. [Imperforate hymen as a cause of abdominal pain in adolescents: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ibarrola Vidaurre, María; Arribas García, Sara; Gimeno Ballester, Juan; Gil Sáenz, Francisco José; Fonseca Pérez, Marta; Durán Urdániz, Gabriel

    2014-02-01

    The imperforate hymen is a congenital anomaly of the female genital development. This is a rare pathology with an estimated incidence of 0.1% in female newborns. In many cases, the diagnosis goes unnoticed until puberty, debuting with cyclical abdominal pain in adolescents who have not submitted menarche. Diagnosis is based on history and physical examination, although additional tests, especially the ultrasound that allows to confirm clinical diagnosis and to exclude other genital malformations. We report a case of a 13-year-old that was diagnosed after consulting several times for recurrent abdominal pain.

  13. Isolated omental panniculitis in a child with abdominal pain: case report.

    PubMed

    Oztan, Mustafa O; Ozdemir, Tunc; Uncel, Melek; Diniz, Gulden; Koyluoglu, Gokhan

    2016-12-01

    Isolated omental panniculitis is a rare entity mostly seen in adults. It presents with the inflammation of the fatty tissue of the omentum. The symptoms may vary from local (e.g. abdominal tenderness or palpable mass) to systemic manifestations including abdominal pain, back pain, fever, weight loss and bowel disturbances. We presented this case as a first awareness of omental panniculitis in a child which must be kept in mind at the differential diagnosis of ileus so that unnecessary surgeries might be avoided.

  14. Five minutes of extended assisted ventilation with an open umbilical trocar valve significantly reduces postoperative abdominal and shoulder pain in patients undergoing laparoscopic hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Radosa, Julia C; Radosa, Marc P; Mavrova, Russalina; Rody, Achim; Juhasz-Böss, Ingo; Bardens, David; Brün, Karin; Solomayer, Erich-Franz; Baum, Sascha

    2013-11-01

    Residual carbon dioxide contributes substantially to pain following laparoscopic surgery. We evaluated the effects of extended assisted ventilation (EAV) with an open umbilical trocar valve for five additional minutes following laparoscopic hysterectomy on postoperative abdominal and shoulder pain levels. We also examined whether a combination of EAV and trocar site infiltration (TSI) with lidocaine could further reduce postoperative pain levels. In this prospective randomized trial, the effectiveness of EAV and EAV/TSI in reducing postoperative abdominal and shoulder pain were compared with that of a standard treatment regime in 283 patients undergoing laparoscopic hysterectomy (total or supracervical). Pain levels were evaluated by self-assessment questionnaire using a numeric rating scale (NRS) and by postoperative piritramid requirement, a surrogate parameter for postoperative analgesic drug requirement. The incidence of nausea and vomiting was also assessed. Compared with the standard treatment regime, EAV reduced abdominal pain levels significantly at 3h (NRS score, 3.21 ± 1.56 vs. 4.73 ± 1.71) and 24h (3.82 ± 1.49 vs. 4.95 ± 1.68) postoperatively (both p < 0.01). EAV also significantly reduced shoulder pain at 24h (EAV vs. control, 4.28 ± 1.51 vs. 5.14 ± 1.49) and 48 h (3.64 ± 1.66 vs. 4.22 ± 1.43) postoperatively (both p < 0.01). Patients in the EAV group had significantly lower piritramid requirements compared with standard treatment at 3h post-operatively (4.28 ± 2.09 mg vs. 6.31 ± 2.21 mg; p<0.01). EAV/TSI showed no additional benefit in terms of pain reduction compared with EAV alone. Incidences of postoperative nausea and vomiting were not reduced by EAV or EAV/TSI. EAV was found to be an effective and safe method to reduce postoperative pain levels in patients undergoing laparoscopic hysterectomy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of a Computer-Assisted Diagnosis Program for Acute Abdominal Pain with Physician-Collected Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-26

    Appendicitis Nonspecific Abdominal Pain Renal Colic Perforated Duodenal Ulcer Cholecystitis Small Bowel Obstruction APPY NONSAP* RCOLIC PERFDU CHOLE...Diagnostic Category Males Females Appendicitis Nonspecific Abdominal Pain Renal Colic Perforated Duodenal Ulcer Cholecystitis Small Bowel ... Obstruction .18 • TO ■ .03 .001** .05 .03 .12 • 75 .01 .001** .11 .02 *Rounded to nearest hundredth, except for PERFDU. **This is an

  16. Abdominal Pain in the Female Patient: A Case of Concurrent Acute Appendicitis and Ruptured Endometrioma

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Martine A.; Lin, Elizabeth; Baek, Ji Yoon; Andoni, Alda; Wang, Xiao Hui

    2016-01-01

    General surgeons are often asked to evaluate acute abdominal pain which has an expanded differential diagnosis in women of childbearing age. Acute appendicitis accounts for many surgical emergencies as a common cause of nongynecologic pelvic pain. In some rare instances, acute appendicitis has been shown to occur simultaneously with a variety of gynecologic diseases. We report a case of concurrent acute appendicitis and ruptured ovarian endometrioma. PMID:28097032

  17. Non-Specific Abdominal Pain and Air Pollution: A Novel Association

    PubMed Central

    Fichna, Jakub; Rowe, Brian H.; Porada, Eugeniusz; Vincent, Renaud; Madsen, Karen; Ghosh, Subrata; Storr, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background We studied whether short-term exposure to air pollution was associated with non-specific abdominal pain in epidemiologic and animal studies. Methods Patients visiting the emergency department with non-specific abdominal pain were identified in Edmonton (1992 to 2002, n = 95,173) and Montreal (1997 to 2002, n = 25,852). We calculated the daily concentrations for ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and particles <10 (PM10) or <2.5 (PM2.5) µm. A case crossover study design was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) associated with an increase in the interquartile range of the air pollutants. We investigated differential effects by age and sex. Mice were gavaged with urban particle extracts. In animal models, colonic motility was tested, and visceral abdominal pain was measured using a writhing test, and behavioral response to oil of mustard and neostigmine. Motility and pain was measured acutely (1.5 hours after gavage) and chronically (7-days and 21-days after gavage). Results Emergency department visits for non-specific abdominal pain were primarily by women between the ages of 15–24 years. Individuals aged 15 to 24 years were at increased risk of non-specific abdominal pain in Edmonton (same day CO: OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.02–1.06; and NO2: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.03–1.09). The risk of air pollution among 15–24 year olds in Montreal was significantly positive (same day CO: OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.05–1.17; NO2: OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.01–1.16; SO2: OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.10–1.25; PM2.5: OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.04–1.15). Abdominal pain was increased by an acute gavage of pollution extract but not to chronic exposure to pollutants. Colonic transit was delayed following chronic but not acute exposure with the pollutants. Conclusions Epidemiological and animal data suggest that short-term exposure to air pollution may

  18. Transdermal Buprenorphine Patches for Postoperative Pain Control in Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prithvi Kumar; Verma, Reetu; Chandra, Girish; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Bogra, Jaishri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic derivative of thebaine; its low concentration is sufficient to provide effective pain relief. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch in postoperative pain management. Materials and Methods After ethical approval and taking informed consent from the patients, they were randomized into three groups (n=30 in each group) using a computer generated random number table. Group A: placebo patch; Group B: buprenorphine (10mg) patch and Group C: buprenorphine (20mg) patch. Haemodynamic and analgesic effects were compared by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Turkey’s post hoc test. The proportion of side effects was compared using the Chi-square test. Results Haemodynamic changes were not statistically different in all the three groups A, B and C, whereas at the end of surgery VAS score of Group A subjects was significantly higher (4.93±0.98) as compared to Group B (1.73±0.64) and Group C (1.40±0.50). On 2nd postoperative day, no pain was reported by the Group C patients and on 4th day after surgery, no pain was reported by Group B patients. Conclusion The transdermal buprenorphine patch (20mg) was effective in attenuating postoperative pain, maintaining haemodynamic stability requiring no rescue analgesia, with fewer postoperative rescue analgesic requirements in low dose of buprenorphine patch (10mg) group. PMID:27504383

  19. Pulsatile Mass Sensation with Intense Abdominal Pain; Atypical Presentation of the Nutcracker Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Ahmet; Barutca, Hakan; Kocaaslan, Cemal; Orman, Süleyman; Şahin, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Patients with Nutcracker syndrome generally present with nonspecific abdominal pain, with the left renal vein (LRV) lodged between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. In rare cases this can result in atypical gastrointestinal symptoms, making the diagnosis of Nutcracker syndrome challenging. Case Report A 28-year-old female patient presented with complaints of severe abdominal pain and palpable pulsatile abdominal mass located in the left epigastric area. Computed tomography angiography revealed that the LRV was lodged in the aortomesenteric region with a dilated left ovarian vein and pelvic varicose veins. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy were normal. The patient was diagnosed as Nutcracker syndrome and discharged to be treated with analgesics. Conclusions Nutcracker syndrome can be seen with atypical gastrointestinal and vascular symptoms. Computed tomography angiography is a reliable and robust technique to prove the diagnosis of nutcracker syndrome. PMID:28058069

  20. Diagnostic value of a peroral sucrose permeability test in children with recurrent upper abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Pinotić, Ljerka; Zecić-Fijacko, Mirjana; Vcev, Aleksandar; Paulini, Dubravko; Mihaljević, Silvije; Horvat, Darko; Mandić, Zlatko; Votava-Raić, Ana; Boranić, Milivoj

    2004-12-01

    The access of ingested sucrose into blood and urine indicates the presence of mucosal lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract. The study involved 42 children, aged 5-15, having recurrent upper abdominal pain and 43 peers with minor extra-abdominal complaints. Sucrose in urine was determined by thin layer chromatography. The test was positive in 27 out of 42 children having recurrent abdominal pain (64.3%) and in none of the control children (chi2 = 37.6, p < 0.0001). When correlated with endoscopic findings it was falsely negative in 12 out of 38 patients with endoscopically verified lesions of the stomach or duodenum and falsely positive in 1 out of 4 without lesions. Sensitivity of the test was 68.4%, specificity 97.9%, positive predictive value 96.3%. The test cannot be used as an alternative to endoscopy, but may serve for screening of candidates for it.

  1. Efficacy of a Brief Relaxation Training Intervention for Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Katrina M.; Meadows, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    This study is a preliminary investigation of the efficacy of a brief intervention for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) via a multiple baseline across subjects design. The intervention consisted of a single 1-hour session including psychoeducation and coaching of breathing retraining; the length, duration, and content of the intervention were…

  2. Efficacy of a Brief Relaxation Training Intervention for Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Katrina M.; Meadows, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    This study is a preliminary investigation of the efficacy of a brief intervention for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) via a multiple baseline across subjects design. The intervention consisted of a single 1-hour session including psychoeducation and coaching of breathing retraining; the length, duration, and content of the intervention were…

  3. Imaging patterns with 99mTc-PIPIDA in evaluating abdominal pain

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.F.; Gordon, L.; Selby, J.B. Sr.

    1983-11-01

    A random retrospective review of hepatobiliary scans on 86 adult patients with abdominal pain revealed four distinct imaging patterns: normal, cystic duct obstruction, obstructive, and sick liver pattern. A normal pattern was found to exclude acute cholecystitis and was the pattern most frequently observed.

  4. The role of emergency MRI in the setting of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Ditkofsky, Noah G; Singh, Ajay; Avery, Laura; Novelline, Robert A

    2014-12-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common reasons for patients to present to the emergency department (ED) in the USA, with an estimated seven million visits in 2007-2008, a figure which represents 8 % (±0.2 %) [2] of all ED visits and a 31.8 % increase from 1999-2000. Abdominal pain has a broad differential diagnosis that encompasses multiple organ systems and can provide a significant diagnostic challenge to the ED physician. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) currently plays a limited role in the assessment of abdominal pain presenting to the ED in the nongravid population, its utility in the pregnant and pediatric population has already been proven. A proven diagnostic track record, lack of ionizing radiation and the ability to provide excellent tissue contrast without the use of nephrotoxic iodinated contrast, makes MRI an attractive imaging modality. As physicians and patients become more aware of the potential risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, ED MRI utilization is likely to increase. In this article, we discuss the MRI appearance of some of the most common diagnoses, which present as abdominal pain to the ED.

  5. Transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation at Jiaji points reduce abdominal pain after colonoscopy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanqing; Wu, Weilan; Yao, Yusheng; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Qiuyan; Qiu, Liangcheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) at Jiaji acupuncture points has therapeutic potential for relieving viscera pain and opioid-related side effects. This prospective, randomized, triple-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was to investigate the efficacy of TEAS on abdominal pain after colonoscopy. Methods: Consecutive outpatients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II underwent selective colonoscopy were randomly assigned into two groups for either TEAS or sham pretreatment. The primary outcomes were the incidence of abdominal pain after colonoscopy. The secondary outcomes included the incidence of abdominal distension, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), duration of PACU stay, and patient’s satisfaction and acceptance. Results: Among the 229 patients analyzed, fewer occurrence of post-procedural abdominal pain (11.4% vs 25.2%, P = 0.007) and distension (1.8% vs 7.8%, P = 0.032) were observed in TEAS group, when compared with the sham group. The duration of PACU stay was significant shortened in TEAS group (P < 0.001). Meanwhile, patients’ satisfaction score to medical service was higher (P < 0.001), and their acceptance to colonoscopy was improved (P = 0.011). Conclusion: Pretreatment with TEAS can reduce post-procedural discomfort, provide more efficient medical resources utilization, and improved patient’s satisfaction and colonoscopy acceptance. PMID:26131193

  6. Spinal cord stimulation for intractable chronic upper abdominal pain: a case report of the first patient in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahrouqi, Haitham; Munro, Zea; Acland, Richard H; MacFarlane, Martin R

    2012-12-14

    We present the first patient in New Zealand to undergo Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) for intractable upper abdominal pain. The patient was a 53-year-old man with a 20-year history of debilitating upper abdominal pain associated with chronic pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic divisum. Prior to the SCS, he was prescribed 680 mg of morphine sulphate equi-analgesia a day. Despite the intense analgesia, he still suffered monthly attacks of upper abdominal pain requiring hospitalisation. Nine months after implanting a Spinal Cord Stimulator, the monthly attacks ceased, his background pain was effectively controlled and the need for opioids decreased to 510 mg of morphine sulphate equi-analgesia a day.

  7. Low yield of routine duodenal biopsies for evaluation of abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Sterling M; Kwong, Wilson T; Kalmaz, Denise; Savides, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the yield of biopsying normal duodenal mucosa for investigation of abdominal pain. METHODS: This is a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with duodenal biopsies of normal appearing duodenal mucosa for an indication that included abdominal pain. All the patients in this study were identified from an electronic endoscopy database at a single academic medical center and had an EGD with duodenal biopsies performed over a 4-year period. New diagnoses that were made as a direct result of duodenal biopsies were identified. All duodenal pathology reports and endoscopy records were reviewed for indications to perform the examination as well as the findings; all the medical records were reviewed. Exclusion criteria included age less than 18 years, duodenal mass, nodule, or polyp, endoscopic duodenitis, duodenal scalloping, known celiac disease, positive celiac serology, Crohns disease, or history of bone marrow transplant. Information was collected in a de-identified database with pertinent demographic information including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, and descriptive statistics were performed. RESULTS: About 300 patients underwent EGD with biopsies of benign appearing or normal appearing duodenal mucosa. The mean age of patients was 44.1 ± 16.8 years; 189 of 300 (63%) were female. A mean of 4.3 duodenal biopsies were performed in each patient. In the subgroup of patients with abdominal pain without anemia, diarrhea, or weight loss the mean age was 43.4 ± 16.3 years. Duodenal biopsies performed for an indication that included abdominal pain resulting in 4 new diagnoses (3 celiac disease and 1 giardiasis) for an overall yield of 1.3%. 183 patients with abdominal pain without anemia, diarrhea, or weight loss (out of the total 300 patients) underwent duodenal biopsy of duodenal mucosa resulting in three new diagnoses (two cases of celiac disease and one giardiasis) for a yield of 1

  8. Low yield of routine duodenal biopsies for evaluation of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Sterling M; Kwong, Wilson T; Kalmaz, Denise; Savides, Thomas J

    2015-06-28

    To determine the yield of biopsying normal duodenal mucosa for investigation of abdominal pain. This is a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with duodenal biopsies of normal appearing duodenal mucosa for an indication that included abdominal pain. All the patients in this study were identified from an electronic endoscopy database at a single academic medical center and had an EGD with duodenal biopsies performed over a 4-year period. New diagnoses that were made as a direct result of duodenal biopsies were identified. All duodenal pathology reports and endoscopy records were reviewed for indications to perform the examination as well as the findings; all the medical records were reviewed. Exclusion criteria included age less than 18 years, duodenal mass, nodule, or polyp, endoscopic duodenitis, duodenal scalloping, known celiac disease, positive celiac serology, Crohns disease, or history of bone marrow transplant. Information was collected in a de-identified database with pertinent demographic information including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, and descriptive statistics were performed. About 300 patients underwent EGD with biopsies of benign appearing or normal appearing duodenal mucosa. The mean age of patients was 44.1 ± 16.8 years; 189 of 300 (63%) were female. A mean of 4.3 duodenal biopsies were performed in each patient. In the subgroup of patients with abdominal pain without anemia, diarrhea, or weight loss the mean age was 43.4 ± 16.3 years. Duodenal biopsies performed for an indication that included abdominal pain resulting in 4 new diagnoses (3 celiac disease and 1 giardiasis) for an overall yield of 1.3%. 183 patients with abdominal pain without anemia, diarrhea, or weight loss (out of the total 300 patients) underwent duodenal biopsy of duodenal mucosa resulting in three new diagnoses (two cases of celiac disease and one giardiasis) for a yield of 1.6%. Duodenal biopsies of

  9. Analgesia for Older Adults with Abdominal or Back Pain in Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Angela M.; Edwards, J. Matthew; Shofer, Frances S.; Holena, Daniel N.; Abbuhl, Stephanie B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association between age and analgesia for emergency department (ED) patients with abdominal or back pain. Methods: Using a fully electronic medical record, we performed a retrospective cohort study of adults presenting with abdominal or back pain to two urban EDs. To assess differences in analgesia administration and time to analgesia between age groups, we used chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis test respectively. To adjust for potential confounders, we used a generalized linear model with log link and Gaussian error. Results: Of 24,752 subjects (mean age 42 years, 65% female, 69% black, mean triage pain score 7.5), the majority (76%) had abdominal pain and 61% received analgesia. The ≥80 years group (n=722; 3%), compared to the 65–79 years group (n=2,080; 8%) and to the <65 years group (n=21,950; 89%), was more often female (71 vs. 61 vs. 65%), black (72 vs. 65 vs. 69%), and had a lower mean pain score (6.6 vs. 7.1 vs. 7.6). Both older groups were less likely to receive any analgesia (48 vs. 59 vs. 62%, p<0.0001) and the oldest group less likely to receive opiates (35 vs. 47 vs. 44%, p<0.0001). Of those who received analgesia, both older groups waited longer for their medication (123 vs. 113 vs. 94 minutes; p<0.0001). After controlling for potential confounders, patients ≥80 years were 17% less likely than the <65 years group to receive analgesia (95% CI 14–20%). Conclusion: Older adults who present to the ED for abdominal or back pain are less likely to receive analgesia and wait significantly longer for pain medication compared to younger adults. PMID:21691471

  10. Validity and reliability of a pain location tool for pediatric abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hamill, James K; Cole, Alana M; Liley, Andrew; Hill, Andrew G

    2015-06-01

    For children with surgical problems, pain location conveys important clinical information. We developed a Location and Level of Intensity of Postoperative Pain (Lolipops) tool consisting of a body outline with a seven-sector abdominal grid, the International Association for the Study of Pain Revised Faces Pain Scale, and a recording chart. The aim of the study was to assess the validity and reliability of Lolipops. Children aged 5-14 years who had undergone laparoscopic appendectomy took both nurse- and investigator-administered Lolipops, and an investigator administered Varni Thompson Pediatric Pain Questionnaires, within 24 hours of surgery. The average age of the 42 participants was 10.7 years; 64% were boys; 24 (57.1%) had acute appendicitis, 13 (31%) had perforated appendicitis, and 5 (11.9%) were uninflamed. Pain scores were higher at the laparoscopic port incision sites than in upper abdominal sites distant from incisions or expected inflammation, mean (SD) 3.3 (2.3) and 1.1 (1.8), respectively (p < .0001). In children with acute appendicitis, pain scores were higher in the right iliac fossa than in upper abdominal sites, mean (SD) 3.3 (2.5) and 0.4 (0.7), respectively (p = .001). In children with perforated appendicitis, Lolipops demonstrated a more widespread pain pattern. Correlations between nurse and investigator were fair to moderate with an overall intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.597. This study presents a new tool to measure the location of pain in pediatric surgical patients and shows it to be valid and reliable.

  11. Differential epidural block predicts the success of visceral block in patients with chronic visceral abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Maged K; Tolba, Reda; Kapural, Leonardo; Mitchell, Justin; Lopez, Rocio; Mahboobi, Ramatia; Vrooman, Bruce; Mekhail, Nagy

    2012-11-01

    Differential thoracic epidural regional block, also known as a differential neural block (DNB), involves the placement of an epidural catheter placed in the thoracic epidural space to achieve appropriate anesthesia in a dermatomal distribution. This is a retrospective case series evaluating how well a DNB may predict success of subsequent visceral blockade in patients with chronic abdominal pain of visceral origin. Of 402 patients who had a DNB performed for unexplained abdominal pain from January 2000 to January 2009, 81 patients were found to have results consistent with visceral pain and thus underwent subsequent visceral blockade. Basic demographic data, years of chronic pain, history of psychosocial issues, initial visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, pain location, and medication usage were documented in our electronic medical record database. Parameters regarding DNB and visceral blocks also were documented. Descriptive statistics were computed for all variables. The positive predictive value (PPV) for DNB for whom visceral block was successful (at least a 50% reduction in VAS) was calculated. Additionally, subjects with successful visceral blocks were compared to those with unsuccessful visceral blocks. All patients with chronic abdominal pain with normal gastrointestinal studies who underwent DNB. Tertiary Outpatient Pain Management Clinic.   Retrospective Cohort Study. Mean age of patients was 46 (± 15) years, 73% were female, and median duration of pain was 5 years. 67% of subjects were taking opioid analgesics. PPV of DNB was 70.4%. Only factor found to be statistically significant with visceral block success was baseline VAS with higher scores associated with DNB predictive success (6.8 ± 1.7 vs. 5.5, 1.8; P = 0.004). Use of membrane stabilizing medications was significantly more common in subjects for whom visceral block was not successful (46% vs. 25%; P = 0.058). Area underneath curve (AUC) for VAS was found to be 0.70 (95% CI: 0.57, 0

  12. Triage of the child with abdominal pain: A clinical algorithm for emergency patient management

    PubMed Central

    Michalowski, Wojtek; Rubin, Steven; Slowinski, Roman; Wilk, Szymon

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To create a simplified clinical algorithm for the triage of children with abdominal pain. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. SETTING: Emergency room at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario. METHODS: A data mining methodology (rough sets analysis) was applied to a randomized data set obtained from 175 emergency room admission charts of patients. Patients were placed into two diagnostic decision classes: appendicitis confirmed by a pathological report, and resolution (this classification implied the resolution of all clinical complaints and physical findings, with no pathological diagnosis and no operative procedure). RESULTS: Nine clinical symptoms and signs were identified as being important in the management of children with abdominal pain. A clinically based algorithm for the triage of such children was developed. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to develop a clinical algorithm for the triage of children with abdominal pain that can also be used by nonmedical professionals. A template for such an algorithm can be used as the basis for diagnosing other paediatric emergencies, such as chest pain, headaches and joint pain. PMID:20084204

  13. Clinical Presentation of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Saps, Miguel; Mintjens, Stijn; Pusatcioglu, Cenk K; Cohen, Daniel M; Sternberg, Petra

    2017-08-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity and abnormal coping are common in children with functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). Thus, it would be expected that children with visceral hypersensitivity would report more pain if their gut is acutely inflamed. The aim of the study was to compare clinical symptoms and somatization of children with and without FAPDs at time of an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Seventy children with acute gastroenteritis and their parents completed the Rome III Diagnostic Questionnaire for Pediatric Functional GI Disorders and the Children's Somatization Inventory. Twenty-one percent of children were diagnosed with an FAPD. Children with FAPDs showed significantly more nongastrointestinal somatic symptoms than children without FAPDs. There were no significant differences in abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or school absenteeism between both groups at time of consultation.

  14. Could kinesiology taping help mitigate pain, breathlessness and abdominal-related symptoms in cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Gourav; Rose, Alison; Briggs, Michelle; Johnson, Mark I

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a woman who was an amateur athlete diagnosed with primary breast cancer, and 10 years later with terminal metastatic cancer. This case report was prepared posthumously in co-operation with her next of kin (husband). The patient first presented to a sports physiotherapist (AR) for her pain-management and to help maintain physical fitness so that she could continue with sports and an active lifestyle. The patient continued with physiotherapy for several months to enable her to be active. However, when her health deteriorated significantly due to advancing cancer, the treatment was modified and aimed at improving the patient's general well-being. The physiotherapist applied kinesiology tape over the patient's lower rib cage, diaphragm and abdomen in an attempt to manage pain, breathlessness and abdominal bloating. The patient reported alleviation of pain, breathlessness, abdominal discomfort and nausea, accompanied by improvements in eating, drinking, energy levels and physical function. PMID:28237944

  15. Could kinesiology taping help mitigate pain, breathlessness and abdominal-related symptoms in cancer?

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Gourav; Rose, Alison; Briggs, Michelle; Johnson, Mark I

    2017-02-24

    We present the case of a woman who was an amateur athlete diagnosed with primary breast cancer, and 10 years later with terminal metastatic cancer. This case report was prepared posthumously in co-operation with her next of kin (husband). The patient first presented to a sports physiotherapist (AR) for her pain-management and to help maintain physical fitness so that she could continue with sports and an active lifestyle. The patient continued with physiotherapy for several months to enable her to be active. However, when her health deteriorated significantly due to advancing cancer, the treatment was modified and aimed at improving the patient's general well-being. The physiotherapist applied kinesiology tape over the patient's lower rib cage, diaphragm and abdomen in an attempt to manage pain, breathlessness and abdominal bloating. The patient reported alleviation of pain, breathlessness, abdominal discomfort and nausea, accompanied by improvements in eating, drinking, energy levels and physical function. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Present state and future challenges in pediatric abdominal pain therapeutics research: Looking beyond the forest

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Craig A; Schurman, Jennifer V; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    At the present time, it is nearly impossible to treat pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with pain in an evidence based fashion. This is due to the overall lack of controlled studies and, even more importantly, the complexity of the contributors to disease phenotype which are not controlled or accounted for in most therapeutic trials. In this manuscript, we review the challenges of defining entry criteria, controlling for the large number of biopsychosocial factors which may effect outcomes, and understanding pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors when designing therapeutic trials for abdominal pain in children. We also review the current state of pediatric abdominal pain therapeutics and discuss trial design considerations as we move forward. PMID:26558142

  17. [Professor WU Xu's clinical experiences on acupuncture for acute upper abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Liang; Lu, Bin; Sun, Jian-Hua; Ai, Bing-Wei; Bao, Chao; Wu, Wen-Zhong; Li, Jian-Bing; Liu, Lan-Ying; Wu, Wen-Yun; Pei, Li-Xia; Zhou, Jun-Ling; Li, Yan-Cai; Qin, Shan

    2014-03-01

    The clinical experiences and proven cases of distinguished doctor of TCM, professor WU Xu, on acupuncture for acute upper abdominal pain is introduced. Professor WU's manipulation characteristics of acupuncture for acute upper abdominal pain, including acute cholecystitis, kidney stone, acute stomach pain, are one-hand shape but both hands in nature, moving like Tai Chi, force on the tip of needle, movement of qi mainly. The main technique posture is one-hand holding needle with middle finger for pressing, the needle is hold by thumb and index finger, and is assisted by middle finger. The special acupuncture experience of emergency is treatment according to syndrome differentiation, combination of acupuncture and moxibustion, selecting acupoint based on experience, blood-letting acupuncture therapy and so on.

  18. First Clinical Judgment by Primary Care Physicians Distinguishes Well Between Nonorganic and Organic Causes of Abdominal or Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Martina, Benedict; Bucheli, Bruno; Stotz, Martin; Battegay, Edouard; Gyr, Niklaus

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the accuracy of a preliminary diagnosis based solely on patient history and physical examination in medical outpatients with abdominal or chest pain. DESIGN Prospective observational study. setting General medical outpatient clinic in a university teaching hospital. participants One hundred ninety new, consecutive patients with a mean age of 44 years (SD = 14 years, range 30–58 years) with a main complaint of abdominal or chest pain. measurements and main results The preliminary diagnosis, established on the basis of patient history and physical examination, was compared with a final diagnosis, obtained after workup at completion of the chart. A nonorganic cause was established in 66 (59%) of 112 patients with abdominal pain and in 65 (83%) of 78 with chest pain. The preliminary diagnosis of “nonorganic” versus “organic” causes was correct in 79% of patients with abdominal pain and in 88% of patients with chest pain. An “undoubted” preliminary diagnosis predicted a correct assessment in all patients with abdominal pain and in all but one patient with chest pain. Overall, only 4 patients (3%) were initially incorrectly diagnosed as having a nonorganic cause of pain rather than an organic cause. In addition, final nonorganic diagnosis (n = 131) was compared with long-term follow-up by obtaining information from patients and, if necessary, from treating physicians. Follow-up information, obtained for 71% of these patients after a mean of 29 months (range 18–56 months) identified three other patients that had been misdiagnosed as having abdominal pain of nonorganic causes. Compared with follow-up, the diagnostic accuracy for nonorganic abdominal and chest pain at chart completion was 93% and 98%, respectively. conclusions A preliminary diagnosis of nonorganic versus organic abdominal or chest pain based on patient history and physical examination proved remarkably reliable. Accuracy was almost complete in patients with an

  19. Abdominal pain and a raised amylase? It's not always pancreatitis. . .

    PubMed

    Oluwatowoju, I O; Abu, O E; Lawson, G

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 72 year old man with a history of COPD and heavy alcohol consumption who was initially diagnosed with acute pancreatitis based on a presentation with epigastric pain and elevated serum amylase. Review of his notes revealed several previous similar admissions and extensive normal investigations apart from persistently elevated amylase. Further analysis showed evidence of macroamylasaemia which accounted for the apparently high serum amylase level.

  20. Importance of parental conceptual model of illness in severe recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Crushell, Ellen; Rowland, Marion; Doherty, Mairin; Gormally, Siobhan; Harty, Sinead; Bourke, Billy; Drumm, Brendan

    2003-12-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) affects up to 15% of children. A biopsychosocial approach to the treatment of children with RAP has been proposed as an alternative to the traditional medical model. The aim of this study was to examine whether the parental conceptual model of illness is a factor in the long-term outcome of children with severe RAP. The study was undertaken in 2 parts: 1) a review of the medical and psychiatric records (including Child Behavior Checklist [CBCL]) of all children with RAP of sufficient severity to necessitate hospitalization during a 5-year period and 2) a structured telephone interview to collect information on ongoing abdominal pain, other somatic symptoms, school attendance, and the parents' opinion as to the cause of the child's pain. Twenty-eight of 30 children who were identified were available for follow-up. Twenty-three (82%) were tertiary referrals from other pediatric services, and 20 had pain for >6 months. On admission 7 (25%) of 28 had a depressive disorder, and 8 (29%) had an anxiety/depressive disorder. Twenty-one of 28 parents completed the CBCL, and on analysis of the CBCL, 11 (52%) children had scores in the clinical range (>65). At follow-up (mean: 3.56 years; standard deviation: 1.59), 14 (50%) of 28 continued to complain of pain. These children also complained of multiple other somatic complaints and had repeated school absences. Only 1 (7%) of 14 parents of children with ongoing pain believed that there was a psychological cause for their child's pain, whereas 11 (78%) of 14 parents of the children who had recovered believed that the cause was attributable to psychological factors (odds ratio: 47.67; 95% confidence interval: 3.56-1511.6). The acceptance by parents of a biopsychosocial model of illness is important for the resolution of recurrent abdominal pain in children.

  1. Gastric Electrical Stimulation for Abdominal Pain in Patients with Symptoms of Gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Lahr, Christopher J.; Griffith, James; Subramony, Charu; Halley, Lindsey; Adams, Kristen; Paine, Elizabeth R.; Schmieg, Robert; Islam, Saleem; Salameh, Jay; Spree, Danielle; Kothari, Truptesh; Kedar, Archana; Nikitina, Yana; Abell, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal pain physiology may be better understood studying electrophysiology, histology, and symptom scores in patients with the symptoms of gastroparesis (Gp) treated with gastric electrical stimulation (GES). Ninety-five Gp patients’ symptoms were recorded at baseline and during temporary and permanent GES. Gastric-emptying times and cutaneous, mucosal, and serosal electrogastrograms were obtained. S100-stained, full-thickness gastric biopsies were compared with autopsy controls. Sixty-eight patients reported severe pain at baseline. Severe pain patients’ mean pain scores decreased with temporary GES from 3.62 to 1.29 (P < 0.001) and nonsevere pain from 1.26 to 0.67 (P = 0.01). With permanent GES, severe mean pain scores fell to 2.30 (P < 0.001); nonsevere pain changed to 1.60 (P = 0.221). Mean follow-up was 275 days. Mean cutaneous, mucosal, and serosal frequencies and frequency-to-amplitude ratios were markedly higher than literature controls. For patients with Gp overall and subdivided by etiology and severity of pain, S-100 neuronal fibers were significantly reduced in both muscularis propria layers. GES improved severe pain associated with symptoms of Gp. This severe pain is associated with abnormal electrogastrographic activity and loss of S100 neuronal fibers in the stomach’s inner and outer muscularis propria and, therefore, could be the result of gastric neuropathy. PMID:23635579

  2. Pulmonary Embolism Presenting as Abdominal Pain: An Atypical Presentation of a Common Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    John, Elizabeth; Parikh, Payal

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent diagnosis made in the emergency department and can present in many different ways. Abdominal pain is an unusual presenting symptom for PE. It is essential to maintain a high degree of suspicion in these patients, as a delay in diagnosis can be devastating for the patient and confers a high risk of mortality if left untreated. Here, we report the case of a 53-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with worsening right upper quadrant abdominal pain with fevers. Initial imaging was benign, although lab work showed worsening leukocytosis and bilirubin. Abdominal pathology seemed most likely, but the team kept PE on the differential. Further imaging revealed acute pulmonary embolus in the segmental branch of the right lower lobe extending distally into subsegmental branches. The patient was started on anticoagulation and improved drastically. This case highlights the necessity of keeping a broad differential and maintaining a systematic approach when dealing with nonspecific complaints. Furthermore, a discussion on the pathophysiology on why PE can present atypically as abdominal pain, as well as fevers, is reviewed. Using this information can hopefully lead to a subtle diagnosis of PE in the future and lead to a life-saving diagnosis. PMID:27642528

  3. Differential diagnosis of a patient referred to physical therapy with low back pain: abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mechelli, Filippo; Preboski, Zachary; Probaski, Zachory; Boissonnault, William G

    2008-09-01

    Resident's case problem. A 38-year-old man with a history of chronic episodic low back pain (LBP) was referred to physical therapy by his physician. Concerns ascertained from the patient's history included an insidious onset of unrelenting, deep, boring pain that was constant, irrespective of movements or posture changes, or time of day. In addition, the patient reported night pain and the inability to find relief in recumbent positions. The primary warning signs associated with the physical examination were unremarkable examination of the lumbar spine, pelvis, and hip regions (symptoms not altered and minimal impairments detected), and a strong nontender, palpable pulse noted over the left lateral lumbar region, with the patient prone, and over the midline and left upper/lower abdominal quadrants, with the patient supine. Suspicion of the presence of an abdominal aortic aneurysm led the therapist to immediately refer the patient to an allopathic physician. The subsequent abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography scanning revealed a 10-cm-diameter abdominal aortic aneurysm. The patient was immediately hospitalized and underwent surgical repair within two days. LBP is the most frequent condition for patients seeking care from physical therapists in outpatient settings. The challenge for clinicians is to recognize patients in whom LBP may be related to underlying pathological conditions. A prompt referral of patients presenting with suspicious findings to the appropriate physician may lead to a more timely diagnosis, with the goal of minimizing or preventing morbidity and mortality.

  4. Paraspinal and Extensive Epidural Abscess: The Great Masqueraders of Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Andrew; Aung, Thu Thu; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Paraspinal and epidural abscesses are rare conditions often diagnosed later in the disease process that can have significant morbidity and mortality. Predisposing risk factors include diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and previous history of spinal surgery or injection. They can threaten the spinal cord by compressive effect, leading to sensory motor deficits and ultimately paralysis and death. Diagnosis may be a challenge due to the delayed presentation of nonspecific back pain or radicular pain such as chest pain or abdominal pain. We present a rare case on a patient with periumbilical pain, constipation, and urinary retention who was ultimately diagnosed with a paraspinal abscess extending into the epidural space from T1 to S2. He underwent decompressive laminectomy with incision and drainage of the abscesses. The patient made an excellent recovery postoperatively, and repeat magnetic resonance imaging at six weeks showed resolution of the abscess. PMID:26770847

  5. ‘Tell me about your pain’: abdominal pain and a history of bullying

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, Paola; Jenkner, Alessandro; De Vito, Rita; Boldrini, Renata; Chiodi, Patrizia; Celesti, Lucia; Giampaolo, Rosaria

    2011-01-01

    A 7-year-old girl was brought to our outpatient clinic to investigate recurrent abdominal pain. She was unwilling to attend the school. Her mother reported bullying at school and nosebleeds. The girl rated her pain 9 on a visual analogue score card ranging from 1 to 10. Physical examination disclosed painful bruising and haematomas. Emergency laboratory blood tests indicated by the history, physical examination and the pain intensity showed reduced numbers of white blood cells and platelets. A bone marrow smear on admission disclosed 100% blasts and suggested an initial diagnosis of leukaemia but also disclosed the pseudo-rosettes typically seen in neuro-ectodermic tumours. The diagnosis of stage IV primary neuroblastoma was confirmed by trephine biopsies and high urinary catecholamines. The girl died 10 months later. This unusual case underlines the need for outpatient paediatricians to involve children in their initial diagnostic work-up by asking them about their pain thus expediting the diagnosis. PMID:22699481

  6. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Weydert, Joy A; Shapiro, Daniel E; Acra, Sari A; Monheim, Cynthia J; Chambers, Andrea S; Ball, Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    Background Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. Methods 22 children, aged 5 – 18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, and missed activities due to abdominal pain using a daily pain diary collected at baseline and during the intervention. Monthly phone calls to the children reported the number of days with pain and the number of days of missed activities experienced during the month of and month following the intervention. Children with ≤ 4 days of pain/month and no missed activities due to pain were defined as being healed. Depression, anxiety, and somatization were measured in both children and parents at baseline. Results At baseline the children who received guided imagery had more days of pain during the preceding month (23 vs. 14 days, P = 0.04). There were no differences in the intensity of painful episodes or any baseline psychological factors between the two groups. Children who learned guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation had significantly greater decrease in the number of days with pain than those learning breathing exercises alone after one (67% vs. 21%, P = 0.05), and two (82% vs. 45%, P < 0.01) months and significantly greater decrease in days with missed activities at one (85% vs. 15%, P = 0.02) and two (95% vs. 77%. P = 0.05) months. During the two months of follow-up, more children who had learned guided imagery met the threshold of ≤ 4 day of pain each month and no missed activities (RR = 7.3, 95%CI [1.1,48.6]) than children who learned only the breathing exercises. Conclusion The therapeutic efficacy of guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation found in this

  7. Neurolytic transversus abdominal plane block with alcohol for long-term malignancy related pain control.

    PubMed

    Hung, Joseph C; Azam, Nyla; Puttanniah, Vinay; Malhotra, Vivek; Gulati, Amitabh

    2014-01-01

    There have been several case reports in the literature of neurolytic transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks being used for malignant abdominal wall pain. However, most used phenol as a neurolytic agent. We found only a single case report by Sakamoto using alcohol for TAP neurolysis. Unfortunately this patient passed away only 5 days after performance of the block. We attempt to extend upon the existing literature by describing neurolytic TAP blockade outcomes using alcohol on 3 cancer patients with metastatic disease to the abdominal wall. Two of our 3 patients had colorectal cancer invading the abdominal musculature. The third patient had a metastatic neuroendocrine nodule in the left rectus muscle. In our case series, all 3 patients had sustained and significant (greater than 50%) relief of abdominal wall pain after performing TAP neurolysis using alcohol. Ultrasound guidance was used for all blocks. The concentration of alcohol used varied from 33% to 77% between patients. Duration of relief lasted between 17 days and 6 months. Opioid use either decreased or remained relatively stable for prolonged periods of time after neurolysis. Other than one patient with transient post-procedure pain related to alcohol injection, there were no significant complications. Addition of a depo steroid for diagnostic TAP blockade prior to neurolysis did not appear to extend or provide additional analgesia. Based on our observations, TAP neurolysis using alcohol also offers a feasible option for long-term control of malignant abdominal wall pain. Further investigation is needed to determine if alcohol offers any significant advantage compared with phenol.

  8. Jejunal choristoma: a very rare cause of abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Olajide, T A; Agodirin, S O; Ojewola, R W; Akanbi, O O; Solaja, T O; Odesanya, Johnson Oluremi; Ariyibi, O O

    2014-01-01

    Choristoma is development of a normal tissue in an aberrant location. This report describes jejunal salivary choristoma (JSC) causing recurring episodes of abdominal discomfort in a 5-year-old girl. Exploratory laporatomy revealed a pale yellow subserosal jejunal lesion. Wedge resection of the lesion and repair of the bowel were performed. The child did well postoperatively and has since that time been free of pain at follow-up. Histopathological examination of the resected lesion revealed salivary gland choriostoma. Literature review (PUBMED search engine) revealed no previous report of this rare clinicopathologic entity. We conclude that choriostoma should be considered a possible differential when evaluating abdominal complaint in children.

  9. Dietary and pharmacological treatment of abdominal pain in IBS.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Boeckxstaens, Guy

    2017-05-01

    This review introduces the principles of visceral sensation and appraises the current approaches to management of visceral pain in functional GI diseases, principally IBS. These approaches include dietary measures including fibre supplementation, low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols diet, and pharmacological approaches such as antispasmodics, peppermint oil, antidepressants (tricyclic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), 5-HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron, ondansetron, ramosetron), non-absorbed antibiotic (rifaximin), secretagogues (lubiprostone, linaclotide), μ-opioid receptor (OR) and κ-OR agonist, δ-OR antagonist (eluxadoline), histamine H1 receptor antagonist (ebastine), neurokinin-2 receptor antagonist (ibodutant) and GABAergic agents (gabapentin and pregabalin). Efficacy and safety are discussed based on pivotal trials or published systematic reviews and meta-analysis, expressing ORs or relative risks and their 95% CIs. Potential new approaches may be based on recent insights on mucosal expression of genes, and microRNA and epigenetic markers in human biopsies and in animal models of visceral hypersensitivity.The objectives of this review are to appraise the physiology and anatomy of gut sensation and the efficacy in the relief of visceral pain (typically in IBS) of several classes of therapies. These include fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and different classes of medications (box 1). Box 1Classes of pharmacological agents for visceral painAntidepressants (tricyclic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors)Peppermint oil5-HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron, ondansetron, ramosetron)Non-absorbed antibiotic (rifaximin)Secretagogues (lubiprostone, linaclotide)μ-Opioid receptor (OR) and κ-OR agonist and δ-OR antagonist (eluxadoline)Histamine H1 receptor antagonist (ebastine)Neurokinin-2 receptor antagonist (ibodutant)GABAergic agents

  10. Abdominal pain and nausea in the diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngitis in boys.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Hiroshi; Nago, Naoki; Kiyokawa, Hiromichi; Fukushi, Motoharu

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the accuracy of gastrointestinal symptoms, including abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting, in the diagnosis of Group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis in children and to determine differences in diagnostic accuracy in boys versus girls. This retrospective cross-sectional study included 5,755 consecutive patients aged <15 years with fever in the electronic database at a primary care practice. Gastrointestinal symptoms were recorded in the database according to the International Classification of Primary Care codes, and the data were extracted electronically. The reference standard was GAS pharyngitis diagnosed with a rapid test. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of probable GAS pharyngitis were excluded from the primary analysis. Among the 5,755 children with fever, 331 (5.8%) were coded as having GAS pharyngitis, including 218 (65.9%) diagnosed with rapid tests and 113 (34.1%) clinically diagnosed with probable GAS pharyngitis. Among patients with fever and abdominal pain, rapid-test-confirmed GAS pharyngitis was significantly more common in boys (11/120, 9.2%) than in girls (3/128, 2.3%; p=0.026). The positive likelihood ratio of abdominal pain was 1.49 (95% CI =0.88-2.51): 2.41 (95% CI =1.33-4.36) in boys and 0.63 (95% CI =0.20-1.94) in girls. The positive likelihood ratio of nausea was 2.05 (95% CI =1.06-4.00): 2.74 (95% CI =1.28-5.86) in boys and 1.09 (95% CI =0.27-4.42) in girls. The association between abdominal pain and GAS pharyngitis was stronger in boys aged <6 years than in boys aged 6-15 years. Abdominal pain and nausea were associated with GAS pharyngitis in boys, but not in girls. Abdominal pain and nausea may help determine the suitability of rapid tests in younger boys with fever and other clinical findings consistent with GAS pharyngitis, even in the absence of sore throat.

  11. Lead intoxication due to ayurvedic medications as a cause of abdominal pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Varun; Midha, Vandana; Mahajan, Ramit; Narang, Vikram; Wander, Praneet; Sood, Ridhi; Sood, Ajit

    2017-02-01

    Though a majority of cases of lead intoxication come from occupational exposures, traditional and folk remedies have also been reported to contain toxic amounts of lead. We present a large series of patients with lead poisoning due to intake of Ayurvedic medicines, all of whom presented with unexplained abdominal pain. This was a retrospective, observational case series from a tertiary care center in India. The charts of patients who underwent blood lead level (BLL) testing as a part of workup for unexplained abdominal pain between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed. The patients with lead intoxication (BLLs >25 μg/dl) were identified and demographics, history, possible risk factors, clinical presentation and investigations were reviewed. Treatment details, duration, time to symptomatic recovery, laboratory follow-up and adverse events during therapy were recorded. BLLs were tested in 786 patients with unexplained abdominal pain and high levels were identified in 75 (9.5%) patients, of which a majority (73 patients, 9.3%) had history of Ayurvedic medication intake and only two had occupational exposure. Five randomly chosen Ayurvedic medications were analyzed and lead levels were impermissibly high (14-34,950 ppm) in all of them. Besides pain in abdomen, other presenting complaints were constipation, hypertension, neurological symptoms and acute kidney injury. Anemia and abnormal liver biochemical tests were observed in all the 73 patients. Discontinuing the Ayurvedic medicines and chelation with d-penicillamine led to improvement in symptoms and reduction in BLLs in all patients within 3-4 months. The patients presenting with severe recurrent abdominal pain, anemia and history of use of Ayurvedic medicines should be evaluated for lead toxicity. Early diagnosis in such cases can prevent unnecessary investigations and interventions, and permits early commencement of the treatment.

  12. Emotion awareness and coping in children with functional abdominal pain: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    van der Veek, Shelley M C; Derkx, H H F; de Haan, Else; Benninga, Marc A; Boer, Frits

    2012-01-01

    Literature on somatization suggests that patients suffering from medically unexplained symptoms are less aware of their emotions and use maladaptive coping strategies when coping with everyday problems. In addition, coping is hypothesized to mediate between emotion awareness and medically unexplained symptoms. Scientific evidence for the relevance of this hypothesis for children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) is, however, lacking. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate this hypothesis in Dutch children with functional abdominal pain (FAP), aged 7-18 years. Between April 2007 and April 2010, a total of 114 referred children with FAP, 235 schoolchildren without abdominal pain and 407 schoolchildren with some abdominal pain (AP) of diverse etiology filled out questionnaires concerning their pain, emotion awareness and coping. MANOVA was used to investigate group differences in emotional awareness and coping. Structural equation modeling was used to investigate the mediational role of coping. The results showed that children with FAP scored significantly lower on most aspects of emotion awareness than children without AP, although these differences were small. Contrary to expectations, children with FAP were more aware of a link between emotions and bodily sensations than children without AP. As for coping, we found that children with FAP used avoidant coping more often than children without AP. Overall, children with FAP mostly did not differ in their emotional awareness and coping compared to children with some AP. Problem focused coping had a small mediating effect for two aspects of emotion awareness. We conclude that children with FAP show only small differences in emotion awareness and coping compared to children without AP, and are practically no different from children with some AP. Contrary to common belief, it can be questioned whether emotion awareness and general coping are useful targets for psychological treatments of FAP to

  13. [Appendicitis versus non-specific acute abdominal pain: Paediatric Appendicitis Score evaluation].

    PubMed

    Prada Arias, Marcos; Salgado Barreira, Angel; Montero Sánchez, Margarita; Fernández Eire, Pilar; García Saavedra, Silvia; Gómez Veiras, Javier; Fernández Lorenzo, José Ramón

    2017-02-18

    Non-specific acute abdominal pain is the most common process requiring differential diagnosis with appendicitis in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess the Paediatric Appendicitis Score in differentiating between these two entities. All patients admitted due to suspicion of appendicitis were prospectively evaluated in our hospital over a two-year period. Cases of non-specific acute abdominal pain and appendicitis were enrolled in the study. Several variables were collected, including Score variables and C-reactive protein levels. Descriptive, univariate and multivariate analyses and diagnostic accuracy studies (ROC curves) were performed. A total of 275 patients were studied, in which there were 143 cases of non-specific acute abdominal pain and 132 cases of appendicitis. Temperature and right iliac fossa tenderness on palpation were the variables without statistically significant differences, and with no discrimination power between groups. Pain on coughing, hopping, and/or percussion tenderness in the right lower quadrant was the variable with greater association with appendicitis. The Score correctly stratified the patients into risk groups. Substitution of temperature for C-reactive protein in the Score increased diagnostic accuracy, although with no statistically significant differences. The Paediatric Appendicitis Score helps in differential diagnosis between appendicitis and non-specific acute abdominal pain. It would be advisable to replace the temperature in the Score, since it has no discrimination power between these groups. C-reactive protein at a cut-off value of 25.5mg/L value could be used instead. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  14. Compartment syndrome obscured by post-operative epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Md. Quamar; Ali, Mir Sadat; Al Ruwaili, Majed; Al Sayed, Hassan Noori

    2012-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is an orthopedic emergency that require early recognition and urgent intervention to avoid catastrophic complications. High index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis based on a constellation of signs and symptoms that include pain out of proportion and worsened by passive stretching, altered sensorium and palpable tenseness. Any event thus, that masks pain, may lead to delay the diagnosis of compartment syndrome. We report here a case of polytrauma where post-operative analgesia was administered using epidural catheter, which obscured pain and lead to delay in recognition of compartment syndrome. Authors wish to share a lesson, learned at the expense of tragedy. PMID:24765418

  15. Uncommon Causes of Acute Abdominal Pain – A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Mahesh; Balasubramaniam, Rajan; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Yadavalli, Shanthala; Ahetasham, Mohammed; Devarapalli, Sravya

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdomen is one of the most common clinical conditions requiring a radiological investigation. Ultrasound is the primary modality of choice which can diagnose some of the common causes of acute abdomen. However, sometimes the underlying cause for the pain is far more complicated than expected mandating a high degree of suspicion to suggest further investigation with contrast enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we have compiled a comprehensive series of selected cases to highlight the conditions which can be easily overlooked unless carefully sought for. This article also emphasizes the importance of multimodality approach to arrive at the final diagnosis with an increased overall diagnostic accuracy which in turn improves patient management and prognosis. PMID:27014500

  16. Diaphoresis and abdominal pain caused by extra-adrenal paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lennard; Sung, Wei Lin; Akhtar, Mohammed Majid; Whyte, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A 63-year-old lady presented with suprapelvic pain, weight loss and night sweats. On examination, she was noted to be hypertensive with a distended abdomen. Imaging (CT) revealed a 9.5 cm retroperitoneal mass with a high degree of vascularity and necrotic centre. The patient’s urinary and plasma catecholamines were significantly raised and subsequent radio-isotope scan suggested the tumour was likely to be of a neuroendocrine nature. A diagnosis of a malignant paraganglioma was made. Malignant paragangliomas derive from sympathetic tissue and secrete catecholamines. Diagnostic uncertainty might lead to biopsy of tumour but this carries a high-risk of catecholamine-induced complications such as hypertensive crisis, cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac ischaemia and must be avoided. PMID:22761199

  17. Functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Eric; Nurko, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are both associated with recurrent abdominal pain and are among the most commonly diagnosed medical problems in pediatrics. The majority of patients with mild complaints improve with reassurance and time. For a distinct subset of patients with more severe and disabling illness, finding effective treatment for these disorders remains a challenge. Based on the biopsychosocial model of functional disease, the Rome III criteria have helped frame FAP and IBS in terms of being a positive diagnosis and not a diagnosis of exclusion. However, the lack of a single, proven intervention highlights the complex interplay of pathologic mechanisms likely involved in the development of childhood FAP and IBS and the need for a multidisciplinary, integrated approach. This article discusses the epidemiology, proposed mechanisms, clinical approach and therapeutic options for the management of FAP and IBS in children and adolescents. PMID:21731470

  18. Acute Cytomegalovirus Hepatitis in an Immunocompetent Host as a Reason for Upper Right Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kai Oliver; Angst, Eliane; Hetzer, Franc Heinrich; Gingert, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus infections are widely distributed with a seroprevalence of up to 100%. The majority of the cases take a silent course or deal with unspecific clinical symptoms. Complications in immunocompetent patients are rare but may affect the liver and lead up to an acute organ failure. In this case report, we describe a 35-year-old immunocompetent female with an acute cytomegalovirus infection presenting as acute hepatitis with ongoing upper right abdominal pain after cholecystectomy. Upper right abdominal pain is a common symptom with a wide range of differential diagnoses. If common reasons can be excluded, we want to sensitize for cytomegalovirus infection as a minor differential diagnosis even in immunocompetent patients. PMID:27403100

  19. Chronic abdominal pain in children: what to do following the medical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Banez, Gerard A

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an empirically informed but clinically oriented review of conventional, alternative, and rehabilitation therapies for chronic or recurrent abdominal pain in children. Cognitive-behavioral procedures, including contingency management training for parents and self-regulation training for children, emerge as a probably efficacious treatment. Symptom-based pharmacological therapies can be helpful, but may be best reserved for children with severe symptoms that have not responded to simple management. Biofeedback therapy, hypnotherapy, and peppermint oil are among the most promising alternative therapies. For patients with severe functional disability, an interdisciplinary rehabilitation approach may be warranted. As more is learned about different therapies for recurrent abdominal pain, an integrative approach that blends these interventions may become increasingly common.

  20. Sacral neuromodulation as a treatment for neuropathic clitoral pain after abdominal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Marcelissen, Tom; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip; de Wachter, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) may be beneficial in the treatment of patients with chronic pelvic pain, although it is not an FDA-approved indication. We present a case of a 51-year-old patient that presented with symptoms of lower urinary tract dysfunction and clitoral pain after an abdominal hysterectomy. Electrophysiological evaluation suggested a pudendal nerve lesion. After failure of conservative treatment, she was offered SNM as a treatment for her voiding symptoms. During test stimulation, she experienced only moderate improvement in voiding symptoms, but a striking improvement in pain symptoms. She underwent a two-stage implantation of a neurostimulator with a successful outcome after 6 months' follow-up. The results of this report suggest that SNM may be effective in patients with neuropathic pelvic pain.

  1. An Unusual Cause of Abdominal Pain: Three Lead Pellets within the Appendix Vermiformis

    PubMed Central

    Muderris, Vecdi; Yagmurkaya, Orhan; Yalkin, Omer; Celebi, Fehmi

    2015-01-01

    Most ingested foreign bodies usually pass out in the feces uneventfully. Complications such as intestinal perforation and bleeding usually occur with sharp, thin, stiff, long, and pointed objects. This case describes the management of three lead pellets within the appendix vermiformis. A 45-year-old male visited our clinic complaining of a 4-month history of abdominal pain. The patient inquiry revealed that he had eaten hunted rabbit meat on numerous occasions and had unintentionally ingested three lead pellets. Plain abdominal films and a barium enema showed foreign bodies in the right lower abdominal quadrant. Since the lead pellets were thought to have migrated extraluminally, they were removed through laparotomy under fluoroscopic guidance. An appendectomy was performed. Pathologically, three lead pellets were embedded in the appendix, which showed signs of intramucosal inflammation. Foreign bodies causing appendicitis are rare. However, if stiff or pointed objects enter the appendicular lumen, there is a high risk of appendicitis, perforation, or abdominal pain. An appendectomy was required to remove the ingested lead pellets in the appendix. PMID:26106500

  2. Lead Poisoning From a Ceramic Jug Presenting as Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte-Torres, Alejandra; Groshaus, Horacio; Rioux, Kevin; Yarema, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Lead poisoning may present with non-specific symptoms that may result in unnecessary investigations. We report a case of acute lead poisoning in a previously healthy 28-year-old man who presented with recurrent abdominal pain, jaundice, constipation, and weight loss. An extensive diagnostic work-up was completed with inconclusive results. A detailed history revealed an unusual source of lead exposure. Chelation therapy resulted in substantial clinical and biochemical improvement. PMID:26958573

  3. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing.

  4. Acute Abdominal Pain Caused by an Infected Mesenteric Cyst in a 24-Year-Old Female

    PubMed Central

    Ponten, Joep B.; Zijta, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    A mesenteric cyst is a rare cause for abdominal pain. This umbrella term includes cystic entities which reside in the mesentery. We present a case of an infected false mesenteric cyst in a 24-year-old female patient without prior surgery or known trauma. Mainstay of treatment involves surgical resection, although less invasive treatments have been described. Prognosis depends on the origin of the cyst. PMID:27190668

  5. Acute Abdominal Pain Caused by an Infected Mesenteric Cyst in a 24-Year-Old Female.

    PubMed

    Sudiono, Davy R; Ponten, Joep B; Zijta, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    A mesenteric cyst is a rare cause for abdominal pain. This umbrella term includes cystic entities which reside in the mesentery. We present a case of an infected false mesenteric cyst in a 24-year-old female patient without prior surgery or known trauma. Mainstay of treatment involves surgical resection, although less invasive treatments have been described. Prognosis depends on the origin of the cyst.

  6. An unusual cause of abdominal pain in an HIV-positive man

    PubMed Central

    Saing, Chit; Yoganathan, Kathir G

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an HIV-positive man on antiretroviral therapy (ART) who developed abdominal pain due to acute-on-chronic intestinal ischaemia secondary to superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (SMVT) requiring emergency surgery. He was found to have persistently low levels of protein C on thrombophilia screening. To the best of our knowledge, the association linking SMVT to protein C deficiency in an HIV-infected patient has never been reported in the literature. PMID:25819818

  7. Early pain after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. A qualitative systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tolver, M A; Rosenberg, J; Bisgaard, T

    2012-05-01

    Early post-operative pain after laparoscopic groin hernia repair may, as in other laparoscopic operations, have its own individual pain pattern and patient-related predictors of early pain. The purpose of this review was to characterise pain within the first post-operative week after transabdominal pre-peritoneal repair (TAPP) and total extraperitoneal repair (TEP), and to identify patient-related predictors of early pain. A qualitative systematic review was conducted. Pubmed, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane database were searched for studies on early pain (first week) after TAPP or TEP. We included 71 eligible studies with 14,023 patients. Post-operative pain is most severe on day 0 and mainly on a level of 13-58 mm on a visual analogue scale and decreases to low levels on day 3. There seems to be no difference in pain intensity and duration when TEP and TAPP are compared. Deep abdominal pain (i.e. groin pain/visceral pain) dominates over superficial pain (i.e. somatic pain) and shoulder pain (i.e. referred pain) after TAPP. Predictors of early pain are young age and pre-operative high pain response to experimental heat stimulation. Furthermore, evidence supported early pain intensity as a predictive risk factor of chronic pain after laparoscopic groin hernia repair. Early pain within the first week after TAPP and TEP is most severe on the first post-operative day, and the pain pattern is dominated by deep abdominal pain. Early post-operative pain is most intense in younger patients and can be predicted by pre-operative high pain response to experimental heat stimulation. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  8. Recovery from post-operative anaemia.

    PubMed

    Wallis, J P; Wells, A W; Whitehead, S; Brewster, N

    2005-10-01

    Acceptance of lower transfusion thresholds and shorter post-operative stays results in patients leaving hospital after surgery with lower haemoglobin (Hb) than previously. We undertook a prospective observational study to assess the haematological response to post-operative anaemia and to determine the utility of quality of life (QoL) measures in assessing the impact of anaemia on such patients. Thirty patients undergoing unilateral hip arthroplasty had blood samples taken and QoL questionnaires administered pre-operatively and at 7, 28 and 56 days post-operatively. Increased erythropoiesis was evident at day 7 post-operatively. Approximately two-thirds of the post-operative Hb deficit was corrected by day 28. There was evidence of functional iron deficiency in more than one-quarter of patients at day 56. QoL scores used did not show any relationship with Hb in the post-operative period. Red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3DPG) levels increased in proportion to the degree of post-operative anaemia. We concluded that substantial recovery of Hb occurs between day 7 and day 28 post-operatively. Complete recovery of Hb may be delayed beyond day 56 due to development of iron deficiency. Patients are at significant risk of developing post-operative iron deficiency depending on operative blood loss and pre-operative iron stores. Increased red cell 2,3DPG may offset the effect of anaemia on oxygen delivery. We found no evidence that anaemia produces a measurable effect on chosen QoL scores in the post-operative period.

  9. Abdominal pain, bloating, and diarrhea in the United States: prevalence and impact.

    PubMed

    Sandler, R S; Stewart, W F; Liberman, J N; Ricci, J A; Zorich, N L

    2000-06-01

    The prevalence and impact of abdominal pain, bloating, and diarrhea in the adult US population are largely unknown. We conducted a national, cross-sectional, telephone survey of US households to provide estimates of the frequency, duration, severity, and impact of specific digestive symptoms during the previous month. A total of 2510 subjects completed interviews (70.7% response rate). Among the respondents, 1017 (40.5%) reported one or more digestive symptoms within the month before the interview, including abdominal pain or discomfort 21.8%, bloating or distension 15.9%, and diarrhea or loose stools 26.9%. Women were more likely than men to report abdominal pain or discomfort (24.4% vs 17.5%) and bloating or distension (19.2% vs 10.5%), but not diarrhea or loose stools (27.1% vs 26.7%). Symptoms were less common among those > or =60 years of age. More than 65% of respondents rated symptoms as moderate or severe in intensity, and the majority reported limitations in daily activities. We conclude that digestive symptoms are more common than previously recognized and have a significant impact.

  10. Soap Suds Enemas Are Efficacious and Safe for Treating Fecal Impaction in Children With Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Chumpitazi, Corrie E; Henkel, Erin B; Valdez, Karina L; Chumpitazi, Bruno P

    2016-07-01

    Constipation is a common cause of pediatric abdominal pain and emergency department (ED) presentation. Despite the high prevalence, there is a dearth of clinical information and wide practice variation in childhood constipation management in the ED. The objective of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of soap suds enema (SSE) in the therapy for fecal impaction in children with abdominal pain within the pediatric ED setting. The primary outcome was stool output following SSE. Secondary outcomes were adverse events, admissions, and return visits within 72 hours. The present study is a retrospective cross-sectional study performed in the ED at a quaternary care children's hospital of patients seen during a 12-month period who received an SSE for fecal impaction. Five hundred twelve patients (53% girls, median age 7.8 years, range: 8 months-23 years) received SSE therapy during a 1-year period. Successful therapy (bowel movement) following SSE occurred in 419 (82%). Adverse events included abdominal pain in 24 (5%) and nausea/vomiting in 18 (4%). No SSE-related serious adverse events were identified. Following SSE, 405 (79%) were subsequently discharged, of which 15 (3.7%) returned to the ED for re-evaluation within 72 hours. SSE is an efficacious and safe therapeutic option for the acute treatment of childhood fecal impaction in the ED setting.

  11. Soap Suds Enema are Efficacious and Safe for Treating Fecal Impaction in Children with Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chumpitazi, Corrie E.; Henkel, Erin B.; Valdez, Karina L.; Chumpitazi, Bruno P.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Constipation is a common cause of pediatric abdominal pain and emergency department (ED) presentation. Despite the high prevalence, there is a dearth of clinical information and wide practice variation in childhood constipation management in the ED. Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of soap suds enema (SSE) in the treatment of fecal impaction in children with abdominal pain within the pediatric emergency department (ED) setting. The primary outcome was stool output following SSE. Secondary outcomes were adverse events, admissions, and return visits within 72 hours. Methods This is a retrospective cross-sectional study performed in the ED at a quaternary care children’s hospital of patients seen over a 12-month period who received a SSE for fecal impaction. Results Five hundred twelve patients (53% female, median age 7.8 years, range: 8 months-23 years) received SSE therapy over a 1-year period. Successful therapy (bowel movement) following SSE occurred in 419 (82%). Adverse events included abdominal pain in 24 (5%) and nausea/vomiting in 18 (4%). No SSE-related serious adverse events were identified. Following SSE, 405 (79%) were subsequently discharged, of which 15 (3.7%) returned to the ED for re-evaluation within 72 hours. Conclusions and Relevance SSE is an efficacious and safe therapeutic option for the acute treatment of childhood fecal impaction in the ED setting. PMID:26655947

  12. An unusual cause of paediatric abdominal pain: Mesenteric masses accompanied with volvulus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Shan; Zhang, Jun; Kong, Xiang Ru; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Li, Chang Chun

    2016-07-01

    Volvulus caused by mesenteric masses is rare and may result in serious consequences. This study aimed to better characterize volvulus caused by mesenteric masses in children. A retrospective study was conducted in 24 patients who underwent surgical treatment between January 1994 and January 2014 in one single institution. There were 10 boys and 14 girls. The most frequent findings were abdominal pain (100%), emesis (91.7%) and nausea (83.3%). Physical examination showed positive ileus signs in majority cases, and palpable mass was found in half of the patients. Ultrasound and CT scans revealed mesenteric masses in 21 and 24 patients, and 'whirlpool sign' was observed in 19 and 22 patients, respectively. Emergency laparotomy was performed in all patients. Histological examination revealed that 18 cystic masses were lymphangioma, 5 solid cases were lipoma and the remaining one was lipoblastoma. The postoperative course was uneventful in 22 patients, and postoperative obstruction and incision infection occurred in 2 patients. There was no evidence of recurrence at follow-up. Volvulus caused by mesenteric masses is a rare but potentially life-threatening cause of abdominal pain, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of paediatric acute abdominal pain.

  13. Perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Baral, B K; Bhattarai, B K; Rahman, T R; Singh, S N; Regmi, R

    2010-12-01

    Due to unpleasant nature and physiological consequences of postoperative pain, search of safe and effective modalities for its management has remained a subject of interest to clinical researchers. Analgesic action of lidocaine infusion in patients with chronic neuropathic pain is well known but its place in relieving postoperative pain is yet to be established. The study aimed to assess the effectiveness of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative pain intensity and analgesic requirement. Sixty patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery were recruited in this randomized double blinded study. Thirty patients received lidocaine 2.0% (intravenous bolus 1.5 mg/kg followed by an infusion of 1.5 mg/kg/h), and 30 patients received normal saline according to randomization. The infusion started 30 min before skin incision and stopped 1 h after the end of surgery. Postoperative pain intensity and analgesic (diclofenac) requirement were assessed at the interval 15 minutes for 1 hour then 4 hourly up to 24 hours. The pain intensity at rest and movement as well as the total postoperative analgesic (diclofenac) requirement were significantly lower (142.50 +/- 37.80 mg vs.185.00 +/- 41.31 mg, P<0.001) in lidocaine group. The extubation time was significantly longer in lidocaine group (14.43 +/- 3.50 minutes vs. 6.73 +/- 1.76 minutes, P<0.001). The time for the first dose of analgesic requirement was longer in lidocaine group (60.97 +/- 18.05 minutes vs.15.73 +/- 7.46 minutes, P<0.001). It can be concluded that perioperative infusion of low dose of lidocaine decreases the intensity of postoperative pain, reduces the postoperative analgesic consumption, without causing significant adverse effects in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery.

  14. Yoga Therapy for Abdominal Pain-Related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Korterink, Judith J; Ockeloen, Lize E; Hilbink, Mirrian; Benninga, Marc A; Deckers-Kocken, Judith M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare effects of 10 weeks of yoga therapy (YT) and standard medical care (SMC) on abdominal pain and quality of life (QoL) in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs). Sixty-nine patients, ages 8 to 18 years, with AP-FGIDs, were randomized to SMC complemented with YT or SMC alone. YT is a mixture of yoga poses, meditation, and relaxation exercises and was given once a week in group sessions. SMC consisted of education, reassurance, dietary advice, and fibers/mebeverine, if necessary. Pain intensity (pain intensity score [PIS] 0-5) and frequency (pain frequency score [PFS] 0-4) were scored in a pain diary, and QoL was measured with KIDSCREEN-27. Follow-up was 12 months. Treatment response was defined as ≥50% reduction of weekly pain scores. At 1-year follow-up, treatment response was accomplished in 58% of the YT group and in 29% of the control group (P = 0.01); no significant differences for other time points were found. YT, and not SMC, resulted in a significant reduction of PIS (P < 0.01) and PFS (P < 0.01) after 12 months. During the study, however, YT was not significantly superior compared with SMC. Subanalyses for time points demonstrated a significant greater reduction of PIS at 12 months in favor of YT. No differences were found for QoL. YT was more effective in the reduction of reported monthly school absence (P = 0.03). At 1-year follow-up, YT in addition to standard care was superior compared with SMC according to treatment success, PIS, and reduction of school absence. YT, however, was not significantly more effective in improving PFS or QoL, compared with SMC.

  15. Acceptance-based interoceptive exposure for young children with functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Nancy; Mauro, Christian; Craske, Michelle; Wagner, H Ryan; Datta, Nandini; Hopkins, Hannah; Caldwell, Kristen; Kiridly, Adam; Marsan, Samuel; Maslow, Gary; Mayer, Emeran; Egger, Helen

    2017-10-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is a common childhood somatic complaint that contributes to impairment in daily functioning (e.g., school absences) and increases risk for chronic pain and psychiatric illness. Cognitive behavioral treatments for FAP target primarily older children (9 + years) and employ strategies to reduce a focus on pain. The experience of pain may be an opportunity to teach viscerally hypersensitive children to interpret the function of a variety of bodily signals (including those of hunger, emotions) thereby reducing fear of bodily sensations and facilitating emotion awareness and self-regulation. We designed and tested an interoceptive exposure treatment for younger children (5-9 years) with FAP. Assessments included diagnostic interviews, 14 days of daily pain monitoring, and questionnaires. Treatment involved 10 weekly appointments. Using cartoon characters to represent bodily sensations (e.g., Gassy Gus), children were trained to be "FBI agents" - Feeling and Body Investigators - who investigated sensations through exercises that provoked somatic experience. 24 parent-child dyads are reported. Pain (experience, distress, and interference) and negative affect demonstrated clinically meaningful and statistically significant change with effect sizes ranging from 0.48 to 71 for pain and from 0.38 to 0.61 for pain distress, total pain: X(2) (1, n = 24) = 13.14, p < 0.0003. An intervention that helps children adopt a curious stance and focus on somatic symptoms reduces pain and may help lessen somatic fear generally. NCT02075437. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Abdominal pain in an adult with Type 2 diabetes: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Panagoulias, George; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Ladas, Spiros S

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Chronic abdominal pain (CAP) may be a manifestation of diseases involving many intra-abdominal organs. Beside diseases affecting subjects without diabetes mellitus, diabetic patients may have CAP due to diabetes-related complications like neuritis, motor diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and autonomic dysfunction. Atherosclerosis is 2–4 times more common in patients with diabetes and affects mainly carotid, coronary, iliac and lower limb arteries as well as aorta. Another less common complication is chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI, intestinal angina), caused by atherosclerotic obstruction of the celiac artery and its branches and results in episodic or constant intestinal hypoperfusion. Case presentation We present a case of a diabetic patient with CMI in whom the diagnosis was delayed by almost 5 years. The dominant symptoms were crampy abdominal postprandial pain, anorexia, changes in bowel habits and cachexia. Conventional angiography revealed significant stenosis of the celiac artery and complete obstruction of the inferior mesenteric artery. Noteworthy, no significant stenoses in carotids or limbs' arteries were found. Revascularization resulted in clinical improvement 1 week post-intervention. Conclusion CAP in patients with diabetes may be due to CMI. The typical presentation is crampy postprandial abdominal pain in a heavy smoker male patient with long-standing diabetes, accompanied by anorexia, changes in bowel habits and mild to moderate weight loss. At least two of the three main splanchnic arteries must be significantly occluded in order CMI to be symptomatic. The diagnostic procedure of choice is conventional angiography and revascularization of the occluded arteries is the radical treatment. PMID:18798976

  17. Continuous wound infusion of local anesthetic for the control of pain after elective abdominal colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Polglase, Adrian L; McMurrick, Paul J; Simpson, Paul J B; Wale, Roger J; Carne, Peter W G; Johnson, William; Chee, Justin; Ooi, Corrine W; Chong, Jennifer W D; Kingsland, Sally R; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2007-12-01

    Local anesthetic wound infusion has been investigated in recent years as a potential alternative to standard analgesic regimens after major surgery. This study investigates the efficacy of a continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine in conjunction with best practice postoperative analgesia after midline laparotomy for abdominal colorectal surgery. We performed a randomized, participant and outcome assessor-blinded, placebo-controlled trial on patients presenting for major abdominal colorectal surgery at our institution between December 2003 and February 2006. Patients were allocated to receive ropivacaine 0.54 percent or normal saline via a dual catheter Painbuster Soaker (I-Flow Corporation, OH, USA) continuous infusion device into their midline laparotomy wound for 72 hours postoperatively. A total of 310 patients were included in this study. The continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine after abdominal colorectal surgery conveys minimal benefit compared with saline wound infusion. No statistically significant difference could be shown for: pain at rest, morphine usage, length of stay, mobility, nausea, or return of bowel function. There was a small, statistically significant difference in mean pain on movement on Day 1 for the ropivacaine group (adjusted mean difference -0.6 (range, -1.08 to -0.13)). Although this trend continued on Days 2 and 3, the differences between groups were no longer statistically significant. Management of pain after major abdominal colorectal surgery is best achieved through adopting a multimodal approach to analgesia. Delivery of ropivacaine to midline laparotomy wounds via a Painbuster Soaker device is safe, but we have not demonstrated any significant clinical advantage over current best practice.

  18. Diagnostic laparoscopy and adhesiolysis: does it help with complex abdominal and pelvic pain syndrome (CAPPS) in general surgery?

    PubMed

    McClain, Gregory D; Redan, Jay A; McCarus, Steven D; Caceres, Aileen; Kim, John

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal pains secondary to adhesions are a common complaint, but most surgeons do not perform surgery for this complaint unless the patient suffers from a bowel obstruction. The purpose of this evaluation was to determine if lysis of bowel adhesions has a role in the surgical management of adhesions for helping treat abdominal pain. The database of our patients with complex abdominal and pelvic pain syndrome (CAPPS) was reviewed to identify patients who underwent a laparoscopic lysis of adhesion without any organ removal and observe if they had a decrease in the amount of abdominal pain after this procedure. Thirty-one patients completed follow-up at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. At 6, 9, and 12 months postoperation, there were statistically significant decreases in patients' analog pain scores. We concluded that laparoscopic lysis of adhesions can help decrease adhesion-related pain. The pain from adhesions may involve a more complex pathway toward pain resolution than a simple cutting of scar tissue, such as "phantom pain" following amputation, which takes time to resolve after this type of surgery.

  19. A Case of Chronic Abdominal Neuropathic Pain and Burning after Female Genital Cutting.

    PubMed

    Hadid, Vicky; Dahan, Michael Haim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Female genital cutting is prevalent in the Middle Eastern and African countries. This ritual entails not only immediate complications such as infection, pain, and haemorrhage, but also chronic ones including dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia. However, there is limited data on neuropathic pain secondary to female genital mutilation when searching the literature. Case. This case discusses a 38-year-old female with a history of infibulation who presented with a chronic burning abdominal and anterior vulvar pain including the related investigations and treatment. Discussion. This case brings to light the additional delayed complication of this ritual: sensory neuropathy. Our goal is to educate health professionals to be aware of these complications and to appropriately investigate and treat them in order to find a solution to relieve the patients' symptoms.

  20. Functional abdominal pain patient subtypes in childhood predict functional gastrointestinal disorders with chronic pain and psychiatric comorbidities in adolescence and adulthood.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lynn S; Sherman, Amanda L; Bruehl, Stephen; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A

    2012-09-01

    Although pediatric functional abdominal pain (FAP) has been linked to abdominal pain later in life, childhood predictors of long-term outcomes have not been identified. This study evaluated whether distinct FAP profiles based on patterns of pain and adaptation in childhood could be identified and whether these profiles predicted differences in clinical outcomes and central sensitization (wind-up) on average 9years later. In 843 pediatric FAP patients, cluster analysis was used to identify subgroups at initial FAP evaluation based on profiles of pain severity, gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI symptoms, pain threat appraisal, pain coping efficacy, catastrophizing, negative affect, and activity impairment. Three profiles were identified: high pain dysfunctional, high pain adaptive, and low pain adaptive. Logistic regression analyses controlling for age and sex showed that, compared with pediatric patients with the low pain adaptive profile, those with the high pain dysfunctional profile were significantly more likely at long-term follow-up to meet criteria for pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) (odds ratio: 3.45, confidence interval: 1.95 to 6.11), FGID with comorbid nonabdominal chronic pain (odds ratio: 2.6, confidence interval: 1.45 to 4.66), and FGID with comorbid anxiety or depressive psychiatric disorder (odds ratio: 2.84, confidence interval: 1.35 to 6.00). Pediatric patients with the high pain adaptive profile had baseline pain severity comparable to that of the high pain dysfunctional profile, but had outcomes as favorable as the low pain adaptive profile. In laboratory pain testing at follow-up, high pain dysfunctional patients showed significantly greater thermal wind-up than low pain adaptive patients, suggesting that a subgroup of FAP patients has outcomes consistent with widespread effects of heightened central sensitization. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  1. Pain-related bias in the classification of emotionally ambiguous facial expressions in mothers of children with chronic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Liossi, Christina; White, Paul; Croome, Natasha; Hatira, Popi

    2012-03-01

    This study sought to determine whether mothers of young people with chronic abdominal pain (CAP) compared to mothers of pain-free children show a pain recognition bias when they classify facial emotional expressions. One hundred demographically matched mothers of children with CAP (n=50) and control mothers (n=50) were asked to identify different emotions expressed by adults in 2 experiments. In experiment 1, participants were required to identify the emotion in a series of facial images that depicted 100% intensity of the following emotions: Pain, Sadness, Anger, Fear, Happiness, and Neutral. In experiment 2, mothers were required to identify the predominant emotion in a series of computer-interpolated ("morphed") facial images. In this experiment, pain was combined with Sad, Angry, Fearful, Happy, and Neutral facial expressions in different proportions-that is, 90%:10%, 70%:30%, 50%:50%, 30%:70%, 10%:90%. All participants completed measures of state and trait anxiety, depression, and anxiety sensitivity. In experiment 1, there was no difference in the performance of the 2 groups of mothers. In experiment 2, it was found that overall mothers of children with CAP were classifying ambiguous emotional expressions predominantly as pain. Mean response times for CAP and control groups did not differ significantly. Mothers of children with CAP did not report more anxiety, depression, and anxiety sensitivity compared to control mothers. It is concluded that mothers of children with CAP show a pain bias when interpreting ambiguous emotional expressions, which possibly contributes to the maintenance of this condition in children via specific parenting behaviours.

  2. Comparison of Contraction Rates of Abdominal Muscles of Chronic Low Back Pain Patients in Different Postures

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Kang Hoon; Baek, Il-Hun; Goo, Bong-Oh

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the contraction rates of abdominal muscles in relation to the posture of chronic lumbar pain patients and normal subjects. [Subjects] The subjects were 17 chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients and 17 normal people between the ages of 20 and 59. [Methods] Experimental postures included a supine position, a sitting position, and a standing position. Measurements were taken at rest and during abdominal contraction. The measurement at rest was taken during expiration with comfortable breathing, and the measurement during contraction was taken at maximum expiration of forced expiration. Muscle contraction rates (on contraction and at relaxation) were calculated. [Results] There were significant differences between CLBP patients and normal subjects in the transversus abdominis (TrA) in the standing position. [Conclusion] Changes in contraction rates of the abdominal muscles of normal subjects and CLBP patients were examined in different postures at maximum expiration. It was found that the contraction rate of TrA in CLBP patients in a standing position, is significantly lower than that of normal subjects. PMID:24259882

  3. Preliminary study on attitudes, opinions and knowledge of Italian veterinarians with regard to abdominal visceral pain in dogs.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Alice; Di Salvo, Alessandra; Steagall, Paulo V; Zampini, Danilo; Polisca, Angela; Della Rocca, Giorgia

    2016-07-01

    To determine the attitudes, opinions and knowledge of Italian veterinarians regarding abdominal visceral pain in canine practice. Prospective online survey. An online questionnaire was created on a Google Form spreadsheet and the weblink was circulated to Italian veterinarians on several mailing lists. The questionnaire, which was available between November 2012 and July 2013, comprised 18 closed, semi-closed and open questions divided into five sections (aetiology, recognition and assessment, drug choices for canine visceral pain, general knowledge about pain management and desire for further education, and demographic information). A total of 527 responses to the questionnaire were completed. Pancreatitis (19%), gastroenteritis (17%) and gastrointestinal obstructions or foreign bodies (9%) were highlighted as the most frequent causes of abdominal visceral pain. Posture, gait and movement changes (32%) and physiological changes (31%) were commonly quoted for pain recognition and assessment. Most respondents (74%) did not use pain scoring systems. Pancreatitis and peritonitis were considered the most painful abdominal conditions. Opioids (40%), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (21%) and tramadol (20%) were cited as drugs for the management of visceral pain. A large percentage of respondents (97%) believed that their knowledge regarding pain management required improvement. There is practitioner interest for more continuing education in the subject. Most respondents were women (66%), aged between 25 and 40 years (57%). Internal medicine (56%), surgery (34%) and anaesthesiology (29%) were the main three speciality areas of interest in this study. This online survey represents the opinion of a small number of Italian veterinarians regarding the assessment and treatment of canine abdominal visceral pain. The results show that Italian veterinarians are aware of the main causes and clinical signs of canine visceral pain. Pain-scoring systems are not often used for

  4. Antinociceptive effects of novel melatonin receptor agonists in mouse models of abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunqiu; Fichna, Jakub; Laudon, Moshe; Storr, Martin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the antinociceptive action of the novel melatonin receptor (MT) agonists, Neu-P11 and Neu-P12 in animal models of visceral pain. METHODS: Visceral pain was induced by intracolonic (ic) application of mustard oil or capsaicin solution or by intraperitoneal (ip) administration of acetic acid. Neu-P11, Neu-P12, or melatonin were given ip or orally and their effects on pain-induced behavioral responses were evaluated. To identify the receptors involved, the non-selective MT1/MT2 receptor antagonist luzindole, the MT2 receptor antagonist 4-P-PDOT, or the μ-opioid receptor antagonist naloxone were injected ip or intracerebroventricularly (icv) prior to the induction of pain. RESULTS: Orally and ip administered melatonin, Neu-P11, and Neu-P12 reduced pain responses in a dose-dependent manner. Neu-P12 was more effective and displayed longer duration of action compared to melatonin. The antinociceptive effects of Neu-P11 or Neu-P12 were antagonized by ip or icv. administered naloxone. Intracerebroventricularly, but not ip administration of luzindole or 4-P-PDOT blocked the antinociceptive actions of Neu-P11 or Neu-P12. CONCLUSION: Neu-P12 produced the most potent and long-lasting antinociceptive effect. Further development of Neu-P12 for future treatment of abdominal pain seems promising. PMID:24574803

  5. Attentional bias to pain and social threat in pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain and pain-free youth before and after performance evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Joy E.; Lipani, Tricia A.; Baber, Kari F.; Dufton, Lynette; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A.; Walker, Lynn S.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated attentional biases for pain and social threat versus neutral stimuli in 54 youth with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and 53 healthy control subjects (ages 10 to 16 years). We assessed attentional bias using a visual probe detection task (PDT) that presented pain and social threat words in comparison to neutral words at conscious (1250 ms) and preconscious (20 ms) presentation rates. We administered the PDT before and after random assignment of participants to a laboratory stressor—failure versus success feedback regarding their performance on a challenging computer game. All analyses controlled for trait anxiety. At the conscious rate of stimulus presentation, FAP patients exhibited preferential attention toward pain compared with neutral stimuli and compared with the control group. FAP patients maintained preferential attention toward conscious pain stimuli after performance feedback in both failure and success conditions. At the preconscious rate of stimulus presentation, FAP patients’ attention was neutral at baseline but increased significantly toward pain stimuli after performance feedback in both failure and success conditions. FAP patients’ somatic symptoms increased in both failure and success conditions; control youth’s somatic symptoms only increased after failure. Regarding social threat, neither FAP nor control youth exhibited attentional bias toward social threat compared with neutral stimuli at baseline, but both FAP and control youth in the failure condition significantly increased attention away from social threat after failure feedback. Results suggest that FAP patients preferentially attend to pain stimuli in conscious awareness. Moreover, performance evaluation may activate their preconscious attention to pain stimuli. PMID:21420789

  6. Delayed abdominal muscle onsets and self-report measures of pain and disability in chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Paul; Murphy, Bernadette

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was the measure the onset time of the transverse abdominis (TA) muscle during rapid unilateral shoulder movements in individuals with chronic low back pain (LBP), and to evaluate the relationship between latency times and self-report measures of pain and disability. Descriptive cross-sectional study. University laboratory. Eighty individuals with chronic LBP of a non-specific origin (males n=44, females n=36). Responses of the right and left surface TA/internal obliques were measured using surface electromyography (EMG) during rapid unilateral shoulder flexion, abduction, and extension. Pain intensity was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS), and disability with the Oswestry disability index (ODI). Seventy-five percent of individuals were identified as lacking feedforward activation. A significant sidexdirection main effect was identified, with the ipsilateral latency more delayed in flexion and abduction (F(2316)=58.2, p<0.001). Individuals without feedforward activation had lower ODI scores (23.2+/-6.9% vs 31.0+/-9.2%, mean difference 7.8%, 95% CI 3.9 to 11.6%, p<0.001). Regression analysis found that 17% of the variance in VAS scores for the entire sample (n=80) were explained by the latency times measured. This relationship was stronger when the sample was separated into individuals who did (n=20), and did not (n=60) have feedforward activation. Deep abdominal muscle onsets during rapid limb movement were significantly associated with self-rated pain scores. Seventy-five percent of individuals with chronic non-specific LBP exhibited delayed activation. No evidence has been provided in this study to support, or refute the use of specific localized deep abdominal contractions for exercise rehabilitation programs. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Emergency assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain using low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D; Halfon Poletti, Alice; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Zaidi, Habib; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2017-08-01

    To determine if radiation dose delivered by contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for acute abdominal pain can be reduced to the dose administered in abdominal radiography (<2.5 mSv) using low-dose CT (LDCT) with iterative reconstruction algorithms. One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients requiring CECT for acute abdominal pain were included, and their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. CECT was immediately followed by LDCT. LDCT series was processed using 1) 40% iterative reconstruction algorithm blended with filtered back projection (LDCT-IR-FBP) and 2) model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm (LDCT-MBIR). LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR images were reviewed independently by two board-certified radiologists (Raters 1 and 2). Abdominal pathology was revealed on CECT in 120 (79%) patients. In those with BMI <30, accuracies for correct diagnosis by Rater 1 with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR, when compared to CECT, were 95.4% (104/109) and 99% (108/109), respectively, and 92.7% (101/109) and 100% (109/109) for Rater 2. In patients with BMI ≥30, accuracies with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR were 88.1% (37/42) and 90.5% (38/42) for Rater 1 and 78.6% (33/42) and 92.9% (39/42) for Rater 2. The radiation dose delivered by CT to non-obese patients with acute abdominal pain can be safely reduced to levels close to standard radiography using LDCT-MBIR. • LDCT-MBIR (<2.5 mSv) can be used to assess acute abdominal pain. • LDCT-MBIR (<2.5 mSv) cannot safely assess acute abdominal pain in obese patients. • LDCT-IR-FBP (<2.5 mSv) cannot safely assess patients with acute abdominal pain.

  8. Perioperative adjuvant corticosteroids for post-operative analgesia in elective knee surgery - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Hasan Raza; Trivella, Marialena; Hamilton, Thomas W; Strickland, Louise; Murray, David; Pandit, Hemant

    2017-04-27

    Elective knee surgery is performed to reduce chronic pain and improve function in degenerate knees. Treatment of acute post-operative pain is suboptimal in 75% of patients despite multimodal analgesic approaches resulting in higher post-operative opiate consumption. The effect of corticosteroids as an adjunct for post-operative pain control remains undefined. The databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL (Cochrane library) will be searched from their inception to present using broad search criteria for eligible randomised/quasi-randomised controlled trials investigating perioperative corticosteroid adjunctive use in elective knee surgery. Meta-analyses will be conducted according to the recommendations from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. This systematic review of the perioperative adjunctive use of corticosteroids will assess the analgesic effects, post-operative nausea and vomiting, opiate consumption, infection rates and time till discharge and assess whether adjunctive corticosteroids should be encouraged in elective knee surgery. PROPSERO CRD42016049336.

  9. [Impact of a pre-operative mobilisation program using the Viv-Arte training model based on kinesthetic mobilisation on mobility, pain, and post-operation length of stay of patients receiving an elective medial laparotomy: a prospective, randomised, controlled pilot study].

    PubMed

    Haasenritter, Jörg; Eisenschink, Anna Maria; Kirchner, Elisabeth; Bauder-Missbach, Heidi; Brach, Michael; Veith, Jessica; Sander, Silvia; Panfil, Eva-Maria

    2009-02-01

    A medial incision is a common surgical technique to obtain access to the abdomen. Thereby, the muscles involved in movement are manipulated, leading to post-operative restrictions in mobility and pain determined by movement. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the impact of a pre-operative training session using the Viv-Arte model, which is based on kinesthetic mobilisation principles. The parameters to be measured were mobility, pain, and length of hospital stay for patients, who were undergoing elective medial laparotomy. In addition, the study tested the research design and to identify possible effect sizes. The method chosen was a prospective, randomised, controlled, and unblinded design. Twenty-seven patients were involved (median=63 years, 19 of the patients were male) who were to have a medial incision for cystectomy. The intervention involved pre-operative training of post-operative mobility techniques. Mobility was tested using the "Mobilitätstest für Patienten im Akutkrankenhaus (MOTPA) (Mobility test for patients in hospital)"; pain intensity was assessed using the visual analogue scale. The intervention and control groups were comparable for all variables. There were no significant differences in the two groups related to the objectives. It is possible that the study groups or the operationalisation were not appropriate for testing the effects of the intervention. It seems important to continue to develop instruments that are appropriate for measuring the effect of mobility-related interventions.

  10. The effect of abdominal bracing in combination with low extremity movements on changes in thickness of abdominal muscles and lumbar strength for low back pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Hee; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Byoung Hee

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of abdominal bracing with low extremity movement on changes in thickness of abdominal muscles and lumbar strength. [Subjects] Sixteen patients with chronic low back pain were randomly assigned to two groups: an abdominal bracing with active straight leg raise (ABSLR) group and abdominal bracing with ankle dorsiflexion (ABDF) group. [Methods] All subjects were evaluated for their abdominal muscle strength using a MedX Lumbar Extension Machine and thickness of external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transverse abdominis (TrA) muscles using rehabilitative ultrasound imaging. Subjects in both groups were instructed to perform Abdominal bracing (AB). Simultaneously, those in the ABSLR group performed active SLR, and those in the ABDF group performed ankle dorsiflexion. [Results] In comparison between the ABSLR and ABDF groups, significant differences in the thickness of the IO and TrA muscles were observed after the intervention in the ABSLR group. Also, lumbar strength was showed a significant increase in both groups after interventions. [Conclusion] The results of this study demonstrated that ABSLR is a more effective method than ABDF for improvement of abdominal stabilization by increasing the thicknesses of the TrA and IO.

  11. The Effect of Abdominal Bracing in Combination with Low Extremity Movements on Changes in Thickness of Abdominal Muscles and Lumbar Strength for Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Hee; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Byoung Hee

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of abdominal bracing with low extremity movement on changes in thickness of abdominal muscles and lumbar strength. [Subjects] Sixteen patients with chronic low back pain were randomly assigned to two groups: an abdominal bracing with active straight leg raise (ABSLR) group and abdominal bracing with ankle dorsiflexion (ABDF) group. [Methods] All subjects were evaluated for their abdominal muscle strength using a MedX Lumbar Extension Machine and thickness of external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transverse abdominis (TrA) muscles using rehabilitative ultrasound imaging. Subjects in both groups were instructed to perform Abdominal bracing (AB). Simultaneously, those in the ABSLR group performed active SLR, and those in the ABDF group performed ankle dorsiflexion. [Results] In comparison between the ABSLR and ABDF groups, significant differences in the thickness of the IO and TrA muscles were observed after the intervention in the ABSLR group. Also, lumbar strength was showed a significant increase in both groups after interventions. [Conclusion] The results of this study demonstrated that ABSLR is a more effective method than ABDF for improvement of abdominal stabilization by increasing the thicknesses of the TrA and IO. PMID:24567697

  12. Abdominal CT scanning in reproductive-age women with right lower quadrant abdominal pain: does its use reduce negative appendectomy rates and healthcare costs?

    PubMed

    Morse, Bryan C; Roettger, Richard H; Kalbaugh, Corey A; Blackhurst, Dawn W; Hines, William B

    2007-06-01

    Although acute appendicitis is the most frequent cause of the acute abdomen in the United States, its accurate diagnosis in reproductive-age women remains difficult. Problems in making the diagnosis are evidenced by negative appendectomy rates in this group of 20 per cent to 45 per cent. Abdominal CT scanning has been used in diagnosing acute appendicitis, but its reliability and usefulness remains controversial. There is concern that the use of CT scanning to make this diagnosis leads to increased and unwarranted healthcare charges and costs. The purpose of our study is to determine if abdominal CT scanning is an effective test in making the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in reproductive-age women (age, 16-49 years) with right lower quadrant abdominal pain and to determine if its use is cost-effective. From January 2003 to December 2006, 439 patients were identified from our academic surgical database and confirmed by chart review as undergoing an appendectomy with a pre- or postoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Data, including age, presence and results of preoperative abdominal CT scans, operative findings, and pathology reports were reviewed. Comparison of patients receiving a preoperative CT scan with those who did not was performed using chi-squared analysis. In the subgroup of reproductive-age women, there was a significant difference in negative appendectomy rates of 17 per cent in the group that received abdominal CT scans versus 42 per cent in the group that did not (P < 0.038). After accounting for the patient and insurance company costs, abdominal CT scan savings averaged $1412 per patient. Abdominal CT scanning is a reliable, useful, and cost-effective test for evaluating right lower quadrant abdominal pain and making the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in reproductive-age women.

  13. [Abdominal pain and flatulence. Intestinal and pulmonary tuberculosis. IgG kappa paraproteinemia].

    PubMed

    Schulthess, G; Osterwalder, P; Valentini, T; Bicik, I; Widmer, U

    1998-03-04

    A 21-year-old woman suffered from cramplike abdominal pain, flatulence and occasional diarrhoea for about one year. Over the past few weeks the abdominal symptoms exacerbated, besides productive cough and subfebrile temperatures developed. Coloscopy revealed two isolated, short ulcers in the proximal colon. The histological examination of the biopsies taken from these ulcers indicated granulomatous inflammation. Moreover small acinar infiltrates in both pulmonary apices were visualized. The findings in this patient originating from Turkey were suspicious for intestinal and pulmonary tuberculosis. Though sensitive methods were used (Ziehl-Neelson stam, amplified M. tuberculosis direct test, a polymerase chain reaction) direct tests allowed no detection of mycobacteria. Antituberculous therapy was initiated on a probatory basis to which the patient responded well and promptly. The diagnosis was confirmed by culture results: M. tuberculosis was grown from colonic biopsies, morning sputa and bronchioalveolar lavage.

  14. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of symptom triage is to decide when, and where, you should seek care when you have symptoms. Symptom triage does not replace a physician evaluation or make ...

  15. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not ...

  16. Activation of lumbar paraspinal and abdominal muscles during therapeutic exercises in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Arokoski, Jari P; Valta, Taru; Kankaanpää, Markku; Airaksinen, Olavi

    2004-05-01

    To assess the activities of paraspinal and abdominal muscles during therapeutic exercises for the treatment of patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP), and to study the effects of active physical rehabilitation on these activities. A cross-sectional study comparing muscle activities during 18 stabilization exercises, and a prospective follow-up of patients with CLBP during rehabilitation. Rehabilitation clinic in university hospital in Finland. Nine volunteers (5 men, 4 women) aged 27 to 58 years. Three months of active outpatient rehabilitation (4 to 6 times in a rehabilitation clinic, supplemented with self-motivated exercise at home) supervised by a physiotherapist. Surface electromyography was recorded bilaterally from L5 level paraspinal, rectus abdominis, and obliquus externus abdominis muscles. The recorded signal was averaged and normalized to the maximal electromyographic amplitude obtained during the maximal voluntary contraction. The measurements were taken before and after the exercise treatment period. CLBP patients showed variable trunk muscle activity patterns during the different therapeutic exercises, similar to those that we reported earlier in healthy subjects. The maximal trunk isometric extension (pre, 147.3+/-75.9Nm; post, 170.1+/-72.3Nm) and flexion (pre, 72.0+/-37.9Nm; post, 93.5+/-42.5Nm) torques did not show a significant changes during the exercise period. However, trunk rotation-flexion torque (pre, 52.9+/-26.5Nm; post, 82.4+/-65.8Nm) increased significantly (35.8%) after the exercise period (P<.05). The corresponding maximal electromyographic amplitudes of back and abdominal muscles remained unchanged. Disability, as assessed by visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index, did not change. The CLBP patients performed therapeutic exercises with similar abdominal and back extensor muscle activities in the same way as the healthy subjects in our earlier studies. In this study, active physical rehabilitation had no

  17. Health Outcomes in US Children with Abdominal Pain at Major Emergency Departments Associated with Race and Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Louise; Haberland, Corinna; Thurm, Cary; Bhattacharya, Jay; Park, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Over 9.6 million ED visits occur annually for abdominal pain in the US, but little is known about the medical outcomes of these patients based on demographics. We aimed to identify disparities in outcomes among children presenting to the ED with abdominal pain linked to race and SES. Methods Data from 4.2 million pediatric encounters of abdominal pain were analyzed from 43 tertiary US children’s hospitals, including 2.0 million encounters in the emergency department during 2004-2011. Abdominal pain was categorized as functional or organic abdominal pain. Appendicitis (with and without perforation) was used as a surrogate for abdominal pain requiring emergent care. Multivariate analysis estimated likelihood of hospitalizations, radiologic imaging, ICU admissions, appendicitis, appendicitis with perforation, and time to surgery and hospital discharge. Results Black and low income children had increased odds of perforated appendicitis (aOR, 1.42, 95% CI, 1.32- 1.53; aOR, 1.20, 95% CI 1.14 – 1.25). Blacks had increased odds of an ICU admission (aOR, 1.92, 95% CI 1.53 - 2.42) and longer lengths of stay (aHR, 0.91, 95% CI 0.86 – 0.96) than Whites. Minorities and low income also had lower rates of imaging for their appendicitis, including CT scans. The combined effect of race and income on perforated appendicitis, hospitalization, and time to surgery was greater than either separately. Conclusions Based on race and SES, disparity of health outcomes exists in the acute ED setting among children presenting with abdominal pain, with differences in appendicitis with perforation, length of stay, and time until surgery. PMID:26267816

  18. Health outcomes in US children with abdominal pain at major emergency departments associated with race and socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Wang, Louise; Haberland, Corinna; Thurm, Cary; Bhattacharya, Jay; Park, K T

    2015-01-01

    Over 9.6 million ED visits occur annually for abdominal pain in the US, but little is known about the medical outcomes of these patients based on demographics. We aimed to identify disparities in outcomes among children presenting to the ED with abdominal pain linked to race and SES. Data from 4.2 million pediatric encounters of abdominal pain were analyzed from 43 tertiary US children's hospitals, including 2.0 million encounters in the emergency department during 2004-2011. Abdominal pain was categorized as functional or organic abdominal pain. Appendicitis (with and without perforation) was used as a surrogate for abdominal pain requiring emergent care. Multivariate analysis estimated likelihood of hospitalizations, radiologic imaging, ICU admissions, appendicitis, appendicitis with perforation, and time to surgery and hospital discharge. Black and low income children had increased odds of perforated appendicitis (aOR, 1.42, 95% CI, 1.32- 1.53; aOR, 1.20, 95% CI 1.14 - 1.25). Blacks had increased odds of an ICU admission (aOR, 1.92, 95% CI 1.53 - 2.42) and longer lengths of stay (aHR, 0.91, 95% CI 0.86 - 0.96) than Whites. Minorities and low income also had lower rates of imaging for their appendicitis, including CT scans. The combined effect of race and income on perforated appendicitis, hospitalization, and time to surgery was greater than either separately. Based on race and SES, disparity of health outcomes exists in the acute ED setting among children presenting with abdominal pain, with differences in appendicitis with perforation, length of stay, and time until surgery.

  19. Screening for psychiatric comorbidity in children with recurrent headache or recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Machnes-Maayan, Ditti; Elazar, Maya; Apter, Alan; Zeharia, Avraham; Krispin, Orit; Eidlitz-Markus, Tal

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent pain symptoms in children are associated with psychiatric comorbidities that could complicate treatment. We investigated the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in children with recurrent headache or recurrent abdominal pain and evaluated the screening potential of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire compared with the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA). Eighty-three outpatients aged 5-17 years attending a tertiary medical center for a primary diagnosis of migraine (n = 32), tension-type headache (n = 32), or recurrent abdominal pain (n = 19), and 33 healthy matched controls completed the brief self-reporting Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire followed by the Development and Well-Being Assessment. Findings were compared among groups and between instruments. The pain groups were characterized by a significantly higher number of Development and Well-Being Assessment diagnoses (range 0-11) than controls and a significantly greater prevalence (by category) of Development and Well-Being Assessment diagnoses (P < 0.001 for both). Anxiety and depression were the most prevalent Development and Well-Being Assessment diagnoses. Comorbidities were more severe in the headache groups than the controls (P < 0.001). In general, any diagnosis by the Development and Well-Being Assessment was associated with a significantly higher Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire score (P < 0.001). Abnormal scores on the emotional, conduct, and hyperactivity Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire scales were significantly predictive of a Development and Well-Being Assessment diagnosis (P < 0.003). Children referred to specialized outpatient pediatric units for evaluation of recurrent pain are at high risk of psychopathology. The Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire may serve as a rapid cost-effective tool for initial screening of these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multimodal pain control is associated with reduced hospital stay following open abdominal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Santoso, Joseph T; Ulm, Michael A; Jennings, Patrick W; Wan, Jim Y

    2014-12-01

    To study the association of a multimodal pain protocol (MMPC) and reduced hospital stay after open abdominal hysterectomy. The study design was a comparison of a prospective cohort with a retrospective historical control. We enrolled endometrial cancer patients undergoing open abdominal hysterectomy with lymphadenectomy by the same surgeon. Control patients from 2008 to 2010 who received morphine PCA alone were compared with a similar demographic group of patients from 2011 to 2013 who received MMPC. MMPC consisted of gabapentin (900mg PO) and acetaminophen (1g IV) administered 45-60min preoperatively. The surgical site was injected with bupivacaine with 0.5% epinephrine prior to incision. The postoperative pain control regimen consisted of gabapentin (300mg PO every 6h), acetaminophen (1g IV every 8h for 24h postoperatively), ketorolac (15mg IV every 6h for 48h postoperatively), morphine PCA (2mg IV every 10min, no basal rate) and oxycodone/acetaminophen (10/325mg PO every 6h as needed). Length of hospital stay (LOH) of the study cohort (N=105 with MMPC) was compared with the historical with postoperative morphine alone (N=113 without MMPC). There were no differences in demographic, uterine cancer stage, or comorbidities between the two arms. The LOH was 1.6 days for patients receiving MMPC and 3.3 days for patients who received morphine alone (P<0.001). Multimodal pain control is associated with significantly reduced hospital stay after open abdominal hysterectomy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Are fear avoidance beliefs associated with abdominal muscle activation outcome for patients with low back pain?

    PubMed

    Unsgaard-Tøndel, Monica; Nilsen, Tom Ivar Lund; Magnussen, Jon; Vasseljen, Ottar

    2013-09-01

    Activation of transversus abdominis and fear avoidance beliefs have both been related to low back pain (LBP). This exploratory study aims to investigate associations between fear avoidance beliefs at baseline and deep abdominal muscle activation after an 8-week period of supervised exercises for chronic LBP. A cohort of patients with chronic non-specific LBP (N = 108) enrolled in a clinical trial was studied longitudinally. Fear avoidance beliefs for physical activity and work were measured before intervention. Activation in transversus abdominis and obliquus internus abdominis during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre and rapid arm flexion was measured by ultrasound before and after intervention. Associations between baseline fear avoidance beliefs and deep abdominal muscle activation after exercises were analysed with multiple linear regression methods. High fear avoidance beliefs for physical activity (≥16 on the subscale) were negatively associated with transversus abdominis slide after the intervention period, β = -4.92 (-8.40 to -1.45). There were no associations between fear avoidance beliefs for physical activity and abdominal muscle onset, transversus abdominis or obliquus internus contraction ratio. Fear avoidance beliefs for work were not associated with any of the muscle activation parameters. This study suggests that there is some negative association between fear avoidance beliefs for physical activity before intervention and transversus abdominis recruitment measured by lateral slide after intervention. No other significant associations between fear avoidance beliefs and abdominal muscle activation were found. We cannot exclude random findings, meaning that the results should be considered hypothesis generating for further investigations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Soft Tissue Mobilization to Resolve Chronic Pain and Dysfunction Associated With Postoperative Abdominal and Pelvic Adhesions: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yui Y; Smith, Ryan W; Koppenhaver, Shane

    2015-12-01

    Case report. Common complications from abdominal and pelvic surgery include adhesions and chronic pain. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis is sometimes used to reduce adhesions and related pain. Physical therapy interventions, such as soft tissue mobilization (STM), may be used for this condition; however, evidence to support its effectiveness is lacking. A 28-year-old woman with a history of 5 abdominal/pelvic surgeries presented with right-sided lower abdominal and anterior hip pain, which had been present since she had undergone a laparoscopic appendectomy with a right ovarian cystectomy surgery 1 year earlier. As an active-duty member in the US Navy, due to pain and weakness, she was unable to perform required curl-ups for her fitness test. Though she had been previously treated both surgically with laparoscopic adhesiolysis and nonsurgically with physical therapy consisting of stretching and strengthening exercises, her pain and function did not improve. She was again evaluated and treated with physical therapy and, based on the examination findings, STM was used to address her pain and dysfunction, which were thought to be related to intra-abdominal adhesions. Following 5 sessions of physical therapy over a 3-week period that included STM and therapeutic exercises, followed by 5 additional sessions over a 4-week period that focused on therapeutic exercises, the patient reported substantially decreased pain, improved function, and a full return to previous level of activity, including unrestricted physical training in a military setting. The outcomes for this patient suggest that STM may be effective as a conservative treatment option for pain and dysfunction related to intra-abdominal adhesions from abdominal/pelvic surgery. Studies with a higher level of evidence, including potential comparison between STM and traditional laparoscopic adhesiolysis, are needed to further determine benefits of nonsurgical care for this condition.

  3. Multicystic benign mesothelioma of the pelvic peritoneum presenting as acute abdominal pain in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jung-Hee; Jeon, Seob; Lee, Ji-Hye; Nam, Kye-Hyun; Bae, Dong-Han

    2013-03-01

    Multicystic benign mesothelioma (MBM) of the peritoneum is a very rare condition. Since the first description of MBM in 1979, approximately 100 cases have been reported. This is a case report of MBM of the pelvic peritoneum presenting as acute abdominal pain in a young woman. Laparoscopy confirmed multiple grapelike clusters of cysts that originated in the peritoneum of the rectouterine pouch and histopathologic diagnosis was confirmed as MBM of the pelvic peritoneum. We hope to alert gynaecologists of the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to MBM which can be accomplished by laparoscopy.

  4. Multicystic benign mesothelioma of the pelvic peritoneum presenting as acute abdominal pain in a young woman

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jung-Hee; Lee, Ji-Hye; Nam, Kye-Hyun; Bae, Dong-Han

    2013-01-01

    Multicystic benign mesothelioma (MBM) of the peritoneum is a very rare condition. Since the first description of MBM in 1979, approximately 100 cases have been reported. This is a case report of MBM of the pelvic peritoneum presenting as acute abdominal pain in a young woman. Laparoscopy confirmed multiple grapelike clusters of cysts that originated in the peritoneum of the rectouterine pouch and histopathologic diagnosis was confirmed as MBM of the pelvic peritoneum. We hope to alert gynaecologists of the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to MBM which can be accomplished by laparoscopy. PMID:24327991

  5. 73-year-old woman with abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J.R.

    1987-03-20

    A 73-year-old woman presented with a six-day history of abdominal pain that had started in the epigastrium, but recently had become more intense in the right lower quadrant. Peptic ulcer had been diagnosed three years prior to presentation and had been managed medically. On physical examination, epigastric tenderness as well as guarding and rebound tenderness in the right lower quandrant were present. Mild leukocytosis was reported. Computed tomography demonstrated a 5-cm retrocecal mass with low attenuation (fluid content) surrounded by an irregularly thickened uncalcified wall. Multiple areas of tissue debris were seen extending into the mass, but no true separation was present.

  6. A case of abdominal pain with dyslipidemia: difficulties diagnosing cholesterol ester storage disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, S J; Daimee, U; Block, R C

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol ester storage disease is an exceptionally rare dyslipidemia with less than 150 cases reported in the medical literature. The diagnosis of Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease is often missed by virtue of the fact that the symptoms mimic both inborn metabolic defects and hepatic steatosis. Patients with Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease usually present with atypical complaints including abdominal pain from altered gut motility. Blood analysis typically reveals abnormal liver function tests with coincident dyslipidemia. We present a case of a young woman with Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease who was followed over two decades. We discuss issues common to her initial protracted diagnosis with management options over time.

  7. A 23-year-old Man with Leptospirosis and Acute Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Momal; Kao, Janet J

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by the spirochete Leptospira interrogans. Most cases of leptospirosis are mild to moderate, and self-limited. The course of disease, however, may be complicated by multiorgan dysfunction such as in Weil's disease. We present a case of Weil's disease with pancreatitis in a young Caucasian man residing in Hawai‘i. Although leptospirosis is common in Hawai‘i, few patients present with pancreatitis. This report of leptospirosis-induced pancreatitis should help raise awareness of clinicians to assess for pancreatitis when evaluating a patient with leptospirosis and acute abdominal pain. PMID:27738562

  8. Internet-based decision-support server for acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Eich, H P; Ohmann, C

    2000-08-01

    The paper describes conception and prototypical design of a decision-support server for acute abdominal pain. Existing formal methods to develop and exchange scores, guidelines and algorithms are used for integration. For scoring systems a work-up to separate terminological information from structure is described. The terminology is separately stored in a data dictionary and the structure in a knowledge base. This procedure enables a reuse of terminology for documentation and decision-support. The whole system covers a decision-support server written in C++ with underlying data dictionary and knowledge base, a documentation module written in Java and a CORBA middleware that establishes a connection via Internet.

  9. Jejunojejunal intussusception secondary to submucosal lipoma resulting in a 5-year history of intermittent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Seow-En, Isaac; Foo, Fung Joon; Tang, Choong Leong

    2014-10-29

    Jejunal lipomata are an unusual cause of adult intussusception. We report a case of a 44-year-old Chinese woman who presented with a 3-day history of abdominal pain and nausea; she had a 5-year history of similar episodic symptoms after meals. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed a fat-density lead point in the jejunum resulting in intussusception. Single port laparoscopic surgery was performed with reduction of the intussusception, bowel resection and primary anastamosis. Histology confirmed a benign submucosal lipoma. We discuss the recent published literature on this rare entity and show CT images and intraoperative pictures. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. [Hypnotherapeutic treatment approaches in children and adolescents suffering from functional abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gulewitsch, Marco D; Schlarb, Angelika A

    2011-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain significantly impairs day-to-day function. It is one of the most frequent somatic complaints among children and adolescents. For most of those affected, despite some indication of their possible presence, physiological factors fail to explain the symptoms adequately. The increased level of psychological symptoms suggests that the focus should be on behavioural and psychological aspects. Brief hypnotherapeutic treatment methods show encouraging results. A review of the current literature; potential mechanisms of effective intervention and their practical applicability are discussed.

  11. Validation of a Symptom Provocation Test for Laboratory Studies of Abdominal Pain and Discomfort in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Lynn S.; Williams, Sara E.; Smith, Craig A.; Garber, Judy; Van Slyke, Deborah A.; Lipani, Tricia; Greene, John W.; Mertz, Howard; Naliboff, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Assessed the convergent and discriminant validity of a water load symptom provocation test (WL-SPT) in creating visceral sensations similar to the naturally occurring sensations experienced by children with functional abdominal pain. Methods Participants were pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain (N = 110) and healthy school children (N = 120) between the ages of 8 and 16 years. Pain patients completed questionnaires describing gastrointestinal (GI) and nongastrointestinal (non-GI) symptoms associated with their typical abdominal pain episodes. Weeks later, the WL-SPT was administered to pain patients and well children. Before and immediately following the WL-SPT, children rated their symptoms. Results The WL-SPT produced (a) significant increases in children’s GI symptoms that were reliably predicted by the children’s naturally occurring GI symptoms, and (b) significantly greater increases in GI symptoms in pain patients than in well children. Conclusions The WL-SPT produces clinically relevant symptoms for laboratory studies of children with functional abdominal pain. PMID:16861396

  12. The effect of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seong Hun; Sim, Yong Hyeon; Kim, Myung Hoon; Bang, Ju Hee; Son, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Jae Woong; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study is designed to compare the effects of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females. [Subjects and Methods] Forty elderly females aged 65 or older who had complained of low back pain for three months or longer were selected as the subjects. They were randomly and equally assigned to either an abdominal drawing-in group or a myofascial release group. The subjects conducted exercise three times per week, 40 minutes each time, for eight weeks. As evaluation tools, visual analogue scale for pain, remodified schober test for flexibility, and upright posture with eye opening on hard platform, upright posture with eye closing on hard platform, upright posture with eye opening on soft platform, upright posture with eye closing on soft platform using tetrax for balance were used. [Results] The abdominal drawing-in exercise group saw significant difference in pain and balance after the exercise compared to before the exercise. The myofascial release group saw significant difference in pain and flexibility after exercise compared to before the exercise. [Conclusion] The above study showed that abdominal drawing-in exercise affected elderly females regarding pain and balance and myofascial release influenced their pain and flexibility. PMID:27821941

  13. The effect of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong Hun; Sim, Yong Hyeon; Kim, Myung Hoon; Bang, Ju Hee; Son, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Jae Woong; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] This study is designed to compare the effects of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females. [Subjects and Methods] Forty elderly females aged 65 or older who had complained of low back pain for three months or longer were selected as the subjects. They were randomly and equally assigned to either an abdominal drawing-in group or a myofascial release group. The subjects conducted exercise three times per week, 40 minutes each time, for eight weeks. As evaluation tools, visual analogue scale for pain, remodified schober test for flexibility, and upright posture with eye opening on hard platform, upright posture with eye closing on hard platform, upright posture with eye opening on soft platform, upright posture with eye closing on soft platform using tetrax for balance were used. [Results] The abdominal drawing-in exercise group saw significant difference in pain and balance after the exercise compared to before the exercise. The myofascial release group saw significant difference in pain and flexibility after exercise compared to before the exercise. [Conclusion] The above study showed that abdominal drawing-in exercise affected elderly females regarding pain and balance and myofascial release influenced their pain and flexibility.

  14. Importance of Addressing Anxiety in Youth With Functional Abdominal Pain: Suggested Guidelines for Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Natoshia R.; Lynch-Jordan, Anne; Mezoff, Adam G.; Farrell, Michael K.; Cohen, Mitchell B.; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

    2015-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is a common pediatric disorder associated with impairment in functioning that may persist for the long term. Anxiety is common in youth with FAP, and may be an important factor in predicting youth who are at greatest risk for increased impairment because of pain symptoms. In this article, we examine the relation between anxiety and impairment in youth with FAP. Furthermore, we explore various biopsychosocial factors (eg, neurobiological substrates, coping strategies, social factors) that may be implicated in the relation among FAP, anxiety, and increased impairment. Finally, we propose physician guidelines for screening and treatment of youth with FAP and co-occurring anxiety. Youth with FAP and co-occurring anxiety may benefit from cognitive-behavioral therapy in the context of multidisciplinary care. PMID:23412539

  15. Benefit of follow-up CT in emergency department patients with persistent non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Asrani, Ashwin V; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari F; Novelline, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    To determine the benefit of a short-term follow-up abdominopelvic computed tomography (APCT) examination among emergency department (ED) patients with persistent abdominal pain and an initially negative CT. During a 5-year period from January 2004 to December 2008, our institution's radiology department performed approximately 56,000 APCTs examinations in the ED. Sixty-eight percent of the APCT examinations used intravenous contrast. Nine hundred fifty-seven patients received two APCTs within 1 week for non-traumatic abdominal pain in the ED. Sixty-four patients with initially negative APCTs presented to the ED within 1 week with persistent abdominal pain and received follow-up APCT imaging. The mean follow-up period was 2.6 days. The mean interval period in which the second APCT yielded a positive result was 2.0 days. Seventy-five percent of follow-up examinations were performed with intravenous contrast. Twenty-three percent of patients had positive findings on the follow-up examination. Seventy-three percent of the follow-up positive findings were referable to bowel pathology. The cause of abdominal pain remained elusive at 1 week in 23% of patients. Short-term follow-up APCT examinations in patients with persistent, unexplained abdominal pain may be of benefit if the second APCT is performed with intravenous contrast in patients suspected of having bowel pathology.

  16. Management of postoperative pain in abdominal surgery in Spain. A multicentre drug utilization study

    PubMed Central

    Vallano, Antonio; Aguilera, Cristina; Arnau, Josep Maria; Baños, Josep-Eladi; Laporte, Joan-Ramon

    1999-01-01

    Participating centres: Hospital Universitario San Juan, Alicante: Maria Jesús Olaso, Javier Agulló, Clara Faura. Hospital Torrecárdenas, Almería: Carmen Fernández Sánchez, Miguel Lorenzo Campos, Juan Manuel Rodríguez Alonso. Hospital Quirúrgic Adriano, Barcelona: Carmen Alerany Pardo, Paquita Alvarez González, Teresa Martín Benito. Hospital Universitari del Mar-IMIM, Barcelona: Magí Farré, Maite Terán. Corporació Sanitària Parc Taulí, Sabadell: Montserrat Cañellas, Sergio Zavala, Josep Planell. Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau: Gonzalo Calvo, Rosa Morros, Silvia Mateo. Hospital General Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona: Carmen Bosch, María José Martínez. Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga: Maribel Lucena, José Antonio González, Gabriel Carranque. Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, Madrid: Emilio Vargas, Amparo Gil López-Oliva, Míriam García Mateos. Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander: Mario González, Antonio Cuadrado. Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Macarena, Sevilla: Juan Antonio Durán, Pilar Máyquez, María Isabel Serrano. Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla: Jaume Torelló, Juan Ramón Castillo, María de las Nieves Merino. Aims Postoperative pain is common in hospital-admitted patients. Its management is determined by different therapeutic traditions and by the attitudes of health professionals in each hospital. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of prescription and administration of analgesic drugs used for postoperative pain after abdominal surgery in Spanish hospitals, to know the prevalence and the severity of postoperative pain, and to determine the extent of variability in the management of postoperative pain among the participating centres. Methods The study was a multicentre descriptive cross-sectional drug utilization study in 12 Spanish hospitals. The subjects were an unselected sample of consecutive patients undergoing abdominal

  17. The effect of using an abdominal binder on postoperative gastrointestinal function, mobilization, pulmonary function, and pain in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Arici, Emine; Tastan, Sevinc; Can, Mehmet Fatih

    2016-10-01

    Evidence on the effectiveness of using a binder following abdominal surgery and its effect on gastrointestinal function, mobilization, pulmonary function, and pain is currently unclear. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of abdominal binder usage on gastrointestinal function, mobilization, pulmonary function, and postoperative pain in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. This research was conducted as a randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted at the Department of General Surgery at a military education and research hospital in Ankara, Turkey, between September 2013 and April 2014. 104 patients were assessed for eligibility. The study was conducted on 84 eligible patients. The study sample consisted of 84 patients who underwent effective major abdominal surgery. The patients were randomized into two groups, the intervention group, which used an abdominal binder and the control group, which did not. Gastrointestinal function, mobilization, pulmonary function, and the pain status of both groups were evaluated on the first, fourth, and seventh days before and after surgery, and the intergroup results were compared. No significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of gastrointestinal and pulmonary function on the first, fourth, and seventh days following surgery (p>0.05). A comparative assessment of mobility by walking distance showed that patients in the intervention group were able to walk further on the fourth [mean (SD); 221.19 (69.08) m] and seventh [227.85 (60.02) m] days after surgery (p=0.003, p<0.001). There were differences in the acute pain status between patients in both groups (p<0.05). On the first [mean (SD); 8.80 (5.03)], fourth [4.83 (2.78)], and seventh [3.09 (3.17)] days after surgery, the sensory sub-scale pain scores were higher in the control group (p<0.001). On the first [mean (SD); 10.16 (6.14)], fourth [5.28 (3.52)], and seventh [3.30 (3.51)] days after surgery the total pain scores were

  18. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  19. [New abdominal wall reconstruction technique with a plastic-rehabilitative intent (back pain improvement)].

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Beniamino; Grappolini, Simone; Blandini, Daniele; De-Anna, Dino; Savio, Stefano; Ferrari, Paolo; Ferrari, Giovanni; William, Pillosu; Campanini, Isabella; Guido, Vezzosi; Tenchini, Paolo; Benuzzi, Giorgia; Palmieri, Lucia

    2004-01-01

    Many abdominal wall reconstruction techniques have generally failed to pay attention to a number of anatomical considerations concerning the continuity of the thoraco-lumboabdominal fascia that envelops the dorsal and ventral muscles. We have introduced a new surgical technique (round mesh) developed to improve the abdominal wall weakness or pathology (hernia, laparocele) with the aim of restoring the muscular synergy between the anterior and posterior trunk compartments, thus improving sacroiliac stability, posture, and standing effort endurance. One hundred patients of both sexes were enrolled in this investigation. All were affected by abdominal wall impairment, frank hernia or laparocele, and had been complaining of lumbar and sciatic pain for long periods without any definite intervertebral disk pathology. They underwent pre- and postoperative subjective and objective evaluation and insertion of a prefascial polypropylene mesh with a posterior martingale that passes across the spine and paravertebral muscles, ending in two wider rectangles that are criss-crossed ventrally and finally sutured to the iliopubic brim. All the patients improved either subjectively or objectively with the round mesh procedure. This new technique is particularly useful in cases of reduction or impairment of the recti abdominis, transverse and oblique muscles, because simple suture and plication of these muscles is no guarantee of long-term functional restoration.

  20. Chronic pelvic pain reveals sacral osteomyelitis three years after abdominal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Akhaddar, Ali; Mahi, Mohammed; Elouennass, Mostapha; Niamane, Redouane; Elmoustarchid, Brahim; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2009-12-01

    Deep pelvic abscess is a well-known infective complication in gynecologic practice. However, sacral osteomyelitis has been reported rarely. We describe sacral infection presenting three years after abdominal hysterectomy and point out the difficulty in management. Case report and review of the pertinent literature. A 46-year-old woman who had undergone abdominal hysterectomy three years before presented with an 8-month history of abdominopelvic pain recently intensifying in the sitting position without fever. Gynecologic, urinary, and rectal examination did not yield positive findings. An abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan was normal except for sacral osteolysis. A neoplasm was suspected, but magnetic resonance imaging revealed an S2-S4 cystic collection with presacral extension. Neurologic examination did not show any focal deficits. A posterior CT-guided biopsy-aspiration yielded purulent fluid. Pathologic examination revealed inflammatory granulations without any malignant tumor. Abscess cultures grew three microorganisms. The patient's symptoms resolved completely after 3 months of antibiotic therapy. Sacral osteomyelitis has not been reported previously after abdominal hysterectomy. Early diagnosis was made difficult by the absence of neurologic findings. Such postoperative infection should be considered after pelvic surgery. Minimally invasive needle aspiration may confirm the diagnosis and reduce the necessary extent of surgical intervention.

  1. Isolated superior mesenteric artery thrombosis: a rare cause for recurrent abdominal pain in a child.

    PubMed

    Dahshan, Ahmed; Donovan, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    A 4-year-old boy was evaluated for recurrent abdominal pain and failure to thrive over a 1-year period in a pediatric subspecialty clinic. Results of the extensive workup mostly were unremarkable. Eventually, imaging studies of the abdominal aorta revealed an isolated thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery trunk and compensatory hypertrophy of the inferior mesenteric artery. He had been having abdominal angina symptoms and fear of eating. A detailed family history suggested a possible hypercoagulable state. However, an extensive hematologic evaluation did not reveal a recognizable defect that could produce thrombotic events. He was treated by arterial graft bypass surgery and started on conventional anticoagulants. Several months later, he developed repeat, near-total thrombosis of the graft with recurrence of his symptoms. After balloon dilation of the graft and starting him on appropriate anticoagulant maintenance regimen, he had good symptom relief, and the graft remained patent. This presentation was unusually prolonged for the type of vascular problem identified. The possibility of vascular problems in children, therefore, should be considered. Unidentified cause of hereditary clotting tendency is another challenging aspect of this case.

  2. Association of Helicobacter pylori and giardiasis in children with recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Zeyrek, Dost; Zeyrek, Fadile; Cakmak, Alpay; Cekin, Abdurrahim

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the frequency and the relationship of H. pylori infection and giardiasis in children with recurrent abdominal pain. The study group included 98 patients and 88 healthy controls. Patients' sera were examined for anti-H. pylori specific IgG antibodies using H. pylori IgG ELISA. Analysis of stool samples was carried out by the H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA) enzyme immunoassay. For the diagnosis of giardiasis, all stool samples were examined by saline-Lugol and formalin-ethyl-acetate sedimentation methods. H. pylori was detected in 40 (49.0%) patients and 40 (45.5%) controls. G. intestinalis was detected in 30 (30.6%) patients and 18 (20.4%) controls. There was no significant difference in frequency between the groups in the distribution of H. pylori (p=0.6) and giardiasis (p=0.4). The frequency of the combination of H. pylori infection and giardiasis in the patient groups was 22.4% compared to 6.8% in the control groups and this result was statistically significant (p=0.002). It seems that the relationship of H. pylori infection and giardiasis represent an important ethiologic factor in children with recurrent abdominal pain.

  3. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain: Utility of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Eugene Mun Wai; Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur

    2009-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common surgical condition that is usually managed with early surgery, and is associated with low morbidity and mortality. However, some patients may have atypical symptoms and physical findings that may lead to a delay in diagnosis and increased complications. Atypical presentation may be related to the position of the appendix. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain may be clinically indistinguishable from acute pathology in the gallbladder, liver, biliary tree, right kidney and right urinary tract. We report a series of four patients with retrocecal appendicitis who presented with acute right upper abdominal pain. The clinical diagnoses at presentation were acute cholecystitis in two patients, pyelonephritis in one, and ureteric colic in one. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen at presentation showed subhepatic collections in two patients and normal findings in the other two. Computed tomography (CT) identified correctly retrocecal appendicitis and inflammation in the retroperitoneum in all cases. In addition, abscesses in the retrocecal space (n = 2) and subhepatic collections (n = 2) were also demonstrated. Emergency appendectomy was performed in two patients, interval appendectomy in one, and hemicolectomy in another. Surgical findings confirmed the presence of appendicitis and its retroperitoneal extensions. Our case series illustrates the usefulness of CT in diagnosing ascending retrocecal appendicitis and its extension, and excluding other inflammatory conditions that mimic appendicitis. PMID:19630119

  4. Strongyloides appendicitis: unusual etiology in two siblings with chronic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Komenaka, Ian K; Wu, George C H; Lazar, Eric L; Cohen, Jason A

    2003-09-01

    Appendicitis is one of the most common causes of acute surgical disease in children and young adults. Parasites, however, are one of the uncommon etiologies. An 8-year-old girl and her 7-year-old sister presented with more than 2 months of chronic abdominal pain that became worse over a 1-week period before presentation. The 2 sisters presented 1 month apart. Both had similar symptomatology and physical examination findings. At operation, the surgical findings included an inflamed appendix with a cross section of the parasite Strongyloides. Strongyloides appendicitis has occurred almost exclusively in areas endemic to the parasite. Its environment is more common outside the United States but occasionally is seen in the Southeast region and in institutionalized individuals. The presentation of acute exacerbation of chronic abdominal pain coupled with the pathologic finding of Strongyloides in an acutely inflamed appendix, should alert the clinician of other possible cases. This increased index of suspicion will allow more prompt diagnosis and help avoid the morbidity of delayed operation.

  5. Carcinoid tumor of the minor papilla in complete pancreas divisum presenting as recurrent abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tumors of the minor papilla of the duodenum are extremely rare, and they are mostly neuroendocrine tumors, such as somatostatinomas and carcinoid tumors. However, true incidence of carcinoid tumors in minor papilla might be much higher, because patients with minor papillary tumors usually remain asymptomatic. We report a very unusual case of carcinoid tumor in a patient with complete pancreas divisum with a review of the literature. Case presentation A 56-year-old female patient was referred for evaluation of pancreatic duct dilatation noted on abdominal ultrasonography and computerized tomography. She complained of intermittent epigastric pain for 6 months. A MRCP and ERCP revealed complete pancreas divisum with dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. On duodenoscopy, a small, yellows, subepithelial nodule was visualized at the minor papilla; biopsy of this lesion revealed a carcinoid tumor. She underwent a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histologic evaluation showed a single nodule, 1 cm in diameter, in the submucosa with duodenal and vascular invasion and metastasis to the regional lymph nodes. Conclusion Although the size of the carcinoid tumor was small and the tumor was hormonally inactive, the concomitant pancreas divisum led to an early diagnosis, the tumor had aggressive behavior. Carcinoid tumors of the minor papilla should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent abdominal pain or pancreatitis of unknown cause. PMID:20149263

  6. Carcinoid tumor of the minor papilla in complete pancreas divisum presenting as recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Gil; Kim, Tae Nyeun; Kim, Kyeong Ok

    2010-02-12

    Tumors of the minor papilla of the duodenum are extremely rare, and they are mostly neuroendocrine tumors, such as somatostatinomas and carcinoid tumors. However, true incidence of carcinoid tumors in minor papilla might be much higher, because patients with minor papillary tumors usually remain asymptomatic. We report a very unusual case of carcinoid tumor in a patient with complete pancreas divisum with a review of the literature. A 56-year-old female patient was referred for evaluation of pancreatic duct dilatation noted on abdominal ultrasonography and computerized tomography. She complained of intermittent epigastric pain for 6 months. A MRCP and ERCP revealed complete pancreas divisum with dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. On duodenoscopy, a small, yellows, subepithelial nodule was visualized at the minor papilla; biopsy of this lesion revealed a carcinoid tumor. She underwent a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histologic evaluation showed a single nodule, 1 cm in diameter, in the submucosa with duodenal and vascular invasion and metastasis to the regional lymph nodes. Although the size of the carcinoid tumor was small and the tumor was hormonally inactive, the concomitant pancreas divisum led to an early diagnosis, the tumor had aggressive behavior. Carcinoid tumors of the minor papilla should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent abdominal pain or pancreatitis of unknown cause.

  7. Cognitive behavior therapy for pediatric functional abdominal pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van der Veek, Shelley M C; Derkx, Bert H F; Benninga, Marc A; Boer, Frits; de Haan, Else

    2013-11-01

    This randomized controlled trial investigated the effectiveness of a 6-session protocolized cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) compared with 6 visits to a pediatrician (intensive medical care; IMC) for the treatment of pediatric functional abdominal pain (FAP). One hundred four children aged 7 to 18 were randomized to CBT or IMC. CBT was delivered primarily by trained master's degree students in psychology; IMC was delivered by pediatricians or pediatric gastroenterologists. Assessments were performed pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 6- and 12-month follow-up. Primary outcomes were level of abdominal pain (AP) as reported on questionnaires and diaries. Secondary outcomes were other gastrointestinal complaints, functional disability, other somatic complaints, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Both CBT and IMC resulted in a significant decrease in AP (P < .001), but no significant difference was found between the treatments in their effectiveness (P > .05 for all end points). According to the questionnaire-derived data, 1 year after treatment, 60% of children that received CBT had significantly improved or recovered, versus 56.4% of children receiving IMC, which did not significantly differ (P = .47). These percentages were 65.8% versus 62.8% according to the diary-derived data, which also did not significantly differ (P = .14). Additionally, nearly all secondary outcomes improved after treatment. CBT was equally effective as IMC in reducing AP in children with FAP. More research into the specific working mechanisms of CBT for pediatric FAP is needed.

  8. Tongue piercing and chronic abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting--two cases.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung Kyu; Chung, Danielle; LaRiccia, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of unclear etiology are frustrating to patients and physicians alike. The integrative medicine procedures of acupuncture and neural therapy may provide treatment options. Tongue piercing, which is prevalent in 5.6% of the adolescent population, may be a contributing factor in upper gastrointestinal symptoms. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) To demonstrate the usefulness of an integrative medicine treatment approach in two cases of patients with chronic abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting of unclear etiology who had failed standard medical management. (2) To identify scars from tongue piercings as a possible contributing factor in chronic upper GI symptoms of unclear etiology. Two retrospective case studies are presented of young adult females who were seen in a private multi-physician integrative medicine practice in the US. The patients were treated with neural therapy and acupuncture. The desired outcome was the cessation or reduction of the frequency of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Both patients had resolution of their symptoms. From this study, we have concluded the following: (1) Tongue scars from tongue rings may be causes of chronic upper gastrointestinal symptoms. (2) Neural therapy and acupuncture may be helpful in the treatment of chronic upper GI symptoms related to tongue scars.

  9. Recurrent abdominal pain in children and adolescents – a survey among paediatricians

    PubMed Central

    Schlarb, Angelika A.; Gulewitsch, Marco D.; Bock genannt Kasten, Inga; Enck, Paul; Hautzinger, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about prevalence and usual treatment of childhood and adolescent recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in outpatient paediatricians’ practice. This study’s primary objective was to acquire insights into the usual paediatricians’ treatment and their estimation of prevalence, age and gender of RAP patients. Further objectives were to assess to which extent family members of patients report similar symptoms, how paediatricians rate the strain of parents of affected children and adolescents and how paediatricians estimate the demand for psychological support. Methods: Provided by a medical register, 437 outpatient paediatricians received a questionnaire to assess their perception of several psychosomatic problems and disorders including recurrent abdominal pain. Results: According to paediatricians’ estimation, 15% of all visits are caused by patients with RAP. In 22% of these cases of RAP, at least one family member has similar problems. In about 15% of all RAP cases, parents ask for professional psychological support concerning their children’s issues, whereas 40% of paediatricians wish for psychological support considering this group of patients. Conclusions: Estimated frequencies and paediatricians’ demands show the need for evidence-based psychological interventions in RAP to support usual medical treatment. PMID:21468324

  10. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Written Self-Disclosure for Functional Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Wallander, Jan L.; Madan-Swain, Avi; Klapow, Josh; Saeed, Shehzad

    2009-01-01

    Written self-disclosure (WSD) has rarely been evaluated as an intervention for paediatric diseases. To test the efficacy of WSD for youth ages 11–18 with a diagnosis of functional recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), 63 were randomly assigned to receive standard medical care (SMC) alone or WSD in addition to SMC. WSD was administered in three 20-minute sessions, one in the clinic and two by phone in the home. Measures of self-reported pain frequency, somatisation severity, and quality of life were completed at baseline and three-month and six-month follow-up points. Blind review of electronic medical records provided data on clinic visit and phone consultation utilization for the six months prior to and following baseline. Practice of WSD in addition to SMC was associated with significantly fewer activity-limiting GI pain experiences (d = .61) and reduced health care utilization (d = .59) six-months later compared to SMC alone. There were no significant effects for somatisation severity or quality of life at six months. WSD may be a useful treatment adjunct for reducing pain frequency and resulting health care utilization in a portion of youth with functional RAP. PMID:20419562

  11. A randomised controlled trial of written self-disclosure for functional recurrent abdominal pain in youth.

    PubMed

    Wallander, Jan L; Madan-Swain, Avi; Klapow, Josh; Saeed, Shehzad

    2011-04-01

    Written self-disclosure (WSD) has rarely been evaluated as an intervention for paediatric diseases. To test the efficacy of WSD for youths aged 11-18 years with a diagnosis of functional recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), 63 were randomly assigned to receive standard medical care (SMC) alone or WSD in addition to SMC. WSD was administered in three 20-min sessions, one in the clinic and two by phone in the home. Measures of self-reported pain frequency, somatisation severity and quality of life (QOL) were completed at baseline and 3- and 6-month follow-up points. Blind review of electronic medical records provided data on clinic visit and phone consultation utilisation for the 6 months prior to and following baseline. Practice of WSD in addition to SMC was associated with significantly fewer activity-limiting gastrointestinal pain experiences (d = 0.61) and reduced health care utilisation (d = 0.59) 6 months later compared to SMC alone. There were no significant effects for somatisation severity or QOL in 6 months. WSD may be a useful treatment adjunct for reducing pain frequency and resulting health care utilisation in a portion of youths with functional RAP.

  12. [Surgery for children and adolescents. Post-operative phase].

    PubMed

    Ruzafa Martínez, María; Ruiz García, María Jesús; Gómez García, Carmen I

    2004-05-01

    The authors explain the third and last phase in the surgical process, the post-operative phase. The authors propose a standardized model of nursing care for children and adolescents. The third and last phase in the surgical process commences at the moment the child arrives in the recovery room and lasts until he/she is released from the hospital. This phase includes the treatment applied in the recovery room and later in a hospital ward or in the child's home. The authors use the Gordon Functional Health Patterns. Special emphasis is given to the perception-management health pattern, the nutritional-metabolic pattern, the elimination pattern, the exercise-activity pattern, and the cognitive-perception pattern. Of special importance is the vigilance during the first post-operative hours, as well as the child's parenteral nutrition or total parenteral nutrition, TPN, and the evaluation of pain according to the age of the child. The authors select the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association) Nursing Diagnoses which appear most frequently in this post-operative phase.

  13. [Evaluation of diagnostic scales for appendicitis in patients with lower abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Alvaro; Domínguez, Luis Carlos; Bermúdez, Charles; Serna, Adriana

    2007-09-01

    Diagnosis of apendicitis is difficult; however several clinical scales have been developed that attempt to improve diagnostic accuracy. The operational characteristics of Alvarado and Fenyö scales were defined in patients with abdominal pain suggestive of appendicitis and were compare with clinical and pathological diagnoses. A prospective trial assessed the diagnostic tests. Sign, symptoms, and laboratory tests were included in scales selected. Surgeon decision was maintained independent from the results of the scales. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and positive and negative likelihood ratio for each scale was compared with the surgeon evaluation. The sample included 374 patients with approximately equal sexes. Of these 269 patients underwent surgery. Howeve, 16.9% of the male and 31.4% of female patients did not have appendicitis. For men, a diagnosis made by the surgeon had better sensitivity than scales (86.2% vs. 73% for Alvarado and 67.2% for Fenyö) without significant differences in specificity. For women, surgeon and Alvarado scale diagnoses were similar, and better than Fenyö scale (77.1% vs. 79.5% for Alvarado and 47% for Fenyö), but specificity was higher for Fenyö scale (92.9% vs. 71.4% for Alvarado and 75.9% for surgeon). Accuracy in diagnosis of appendicitis increases with a higher Alvarado score. For men with abdominal pain on right lower quadrant, surgeon diagnosis is more accurate than scales. For women, Fenyö scale offers a better sensitivity. Alvarado score can facilitate decision-making in patients with these abdominal symptoms.

  14. Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block for postoperative pain management: a review.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Jan; Wickerts, Liselott; Forsberg, Sune; Ledin, Gustaf

    2015-01-01

    Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block has a long history and there is currently extensive clinical experience around TAP blocks. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the present evidence on the effects of TAP block and to provide suggestions for further studies. There are several approaches to performing abdominal wall blocks, with the rapid implementation of ultrasound-guided technique facilitating a major difference in TAP block performance. During surgery, an abdominal wall block may also be applied by the surgeon from inside the abdominal cavity. Today, there are more than 11 meta-analyses providing a compiled evidence base around the effects of TAP block. These analyses include different procedures, different techniques of TAP block administration and, importantly, they compare the TAP block with a variety of alternative analgesic regimes. The effects of TAP block during laparoscopic cholecystectomy seem to be equivalent to local infiltration analgesia and also seem to be beneficial during laparoscopic colon resection. The effects of TAP are more pronounced when it is provided prior to surgery and these effects are local anaesthesia dose-dependent. TAP block seems an interesting alternative in patients with, for example, severe obesity where epidural or spinal anaesthesia/analgesia is technically difficult and/or poses a risk. There is an obvious need for further high-quality studies comparing TAP block prior to surgery with local infiltration analgesia, single-shot spinal analgesia, and epidural analgesia. These studies should be procedure-specific and the effects should be evaluated, both regarding short-term pain and analgesic requirement and also including the effects on postoperative nausea and vomiting, recovery of bowel function, ambulation, discharge, and protracted recovery outcomes (assessed by e.g., postoperative quality of recovery scale).

  15. [Elimination of Helicobacter pylori in patients with recurrent abdominal pain with simultaneous administration of ranitidine, bismuth subsalicylate and clarithromycin].

    PubMed

    Ramirez Mayans, J A; Zamora Davila, E; Cervantes Bustamante, R; Mata Rivera, N; Oyervides Garcia, I; Cuevas, S; Zarate Mondragón, F E

    1996-01-01

    Elimination of Helicobacter pylori with Chlaritromicin, Bismuth subsalicylate and Ranitidine; and improvement of recurrent abdominal pain. ANTECEDENT: Different antibiotics, antagonist H2 and others has been used for elimination and, or eradication of Helicobacter pylori. 22 children with recurrent abdominal pain associated to gastritis and histologic identification of Helicobacter pylori were studied under a period of 18 months (january 1992 to june 1993), at Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, México, D:F: All children were treated simultaneously with: Chlaritromicin, 15 days, Plus ranitidine and bismuth subsalicylate for one month. Helicobacter pylori was eliminate in 14 of 22 children studied. All these children had an important improvement of recurrent abdominal pain. Elimination of Helicobacter pylori and clinical improvement was present in 14 of 22 children studied (63.7%).

  16. Perioperative and post-operative complications of transvaginal ultrasound-guided oocyte retrieval: prospective study of >1000 oocyte retrievals.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, A K; Glawatz, M; Griesinger, G; Diedrich, K; Ludwig, M

    2006-12-01

    Although transvaginal ultrasound-guided oocyte retrievals (OR) are performed routinely worldwide, there is very little systematic data about its complications. We performed a prospective cohort study following the perioperative and post-operative complications of over 1058 ORs. Additionally, we assessed the pain experienced during the OR. A total of 1166 OR were performed during the study period, of which 1058 (90.7%) ORs were included prospectively. Incomplete data meant that the remaining 9.3% were excluded. No complications were caused by sedation or general anaesthesia. Vaginal bleeding was observed in 2.8% of procedures, without any cases of intra-abdominal bleeding. An injury of pelvic structures (a ureteral lesion) occurred in one case. No case of pelvic infection, but one case of unexplained fever, was observed. A severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) occurred in 2.7% of cases. Although most patients tolerated the OR well, 3% of patients