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Sample records for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence

  1. Artificial urinary sphincter for post-prostatectomy incontinence: a review.

    PubMed

    James, Mary H; McCammon, Kurt A

    2014-06-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter remains the gold standard for treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. The AMS 800 (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN, USA) is the most commonly implanted artificial urinary sphincter. Having been on the market for almost 40 years, there is an abundance of literature regarding its use, but no recent review has been published. We reviewed the current literature regarding the indications, surgical principles, outcomes and complications of artificial urinary sphincter implantation for stress urinary incontinence after prostatectomy. A PubMed search was carried out for articles on the artificial urinary sphincter from 1995 to present. The review was centered on articles related to the use of the AMS 800 for stress urinary incontinence in males after prostatectomy. Relevant articles were reviewed. The majority of patients will achieve social continence (1 pad per day) after artificial urinary sphincter implantation; however, rates of total continence (no pad usage) are significantly lower. Patient satisfaction outcomes average greater than 80% in most series. Potential complications requiring reoperation include infection (0.5-10.6%) and urethral erosion (2.9-12%). Revision surgeries are most commonly as a result of urethral atrophy, which ranges from 1.6 to 11.4%. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier freedom from reoperation ranges from 50 to 79%, while the 10-year Kaplan-Meier freedom from mechanical failure is 64%. The artificial urinary sphincter is a reliable device with good outcomes. As expected with any prosthetic device, complications including mechanical failure, infection, erosion and recurrent incontinence remain significant concerns. Despite known complications, the patient satisfaction rates after artificial urinary sphincter implantation remain high. Appropriate patient counseling and adherence to surgical principles are imperative.

  2. The effects of Pilates method on pelvic floor muscle strength in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cíntia S; Pedriali, Fabiana R; Urbano, Mariana R; Moreira, Eliane H; Averbeck, Marcio A; Almeida, Silvio Henrique M

    2017-05-02

    To assess the effects of a Pilates exercise program compared to conventional pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) protocol on pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. Patients were randomized into three treatment groups (G1: Pilates, G2: electrical stimulation combined with PFMT, and G3: control group). Duration of therapy was 10 weeks. Baseline assessment included the 24 h pad-test and the ICI-Q questionnaire. PFMS was measured using a manometric perineometry device at baseline and 4 months after radical prostatectomy (RP). The level of significance was P < 0.05. One hundred twenty three patients were randomized and 104 patients completed the study protocol (G1: n = 34; G2: n = 35; G3: n = 35). Post-treatment assessment showed statistically significant improvements in maximum strength in G2, increased endurance in G1 and G2, and increment of muscle power in all three groups (P < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in the mean changes of maximum strength, endurance, and muscle power between groups after treatment (P > 0.05). G1 and G2 achieved a higher number of fully continent patients than G3 (P < 0.05). At the end of treatment, 59% of patients in G1, 54% in G2, and 26% in G3 were continent (no pads/day). Improvements in PFMS parameters were distinct among active treatment groups versus controls, but did not predict recovery of urinary continence at final assessment. The Pilates method promoted similar outcomes in the proportion of fully continent patients when compared to conventional PFMT 4 months after RP. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Comprehensive approach for post-prostatectomy incontinence in the era of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Haga, Nobuhiro; Takinami, Ruriko; Tanji, Ryo; Onagi, Akifumi; Matsuoka, Kanako; Koguchi, Tomoyuki; Akaihata, Hidenori; Hata, Junya; Ogawa, Soichiro; Kataoka, Masao; Sato, Yuichi; Ishibashi, Kei; Aikawa, Ken; Kojima, Yoshiyuki

    2017-08-09

    Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) has enabled steady and stable surgical procedures due to both meticulous maneuvers and magnified, clear, 3-dimensional vision. Therefore, better surgical outcomes have been expected with RARP than with other surgical modalities. However, even in the RARP era, post-prostatectomy incontinence has a relatively high incidence as a bothersome complication. To overcome post-prostatectomy incontinence, it goes without saying that meticulous surgical procedures and creative surgical procedures, i.e., "Preservation", "Reconstruction", and "Reinforcement" of the anatomical structures of the pelvis, are most important. In addition, medication and appropriate pad usage might sometimes be helpful for patients with post-prostatectomy incontinence. However, patients who have 1) BMI > 26 kg/m(2), 2) prostate volume > 70 mL, 3) eGFR < 60 mL/min, or a 4) Charlson comorbidity index > 2 have a tendency to develop post-prostatectomy incontinence despite undergoing the same surgical procedures. It is important for patients who have a high risk for post-prostatectomy incontinence to be given information about delayed recovery of post-prostatectomy incontinence. Thus, not only the surgical procedures, but also a comprehensive approach, as mentioned above, are important for post-prostatectomy incontinence.

  4. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may begin around the time of menopause. Urgency urinary incontinence happens when people have a sudden need ... urinary incontinence is a mix of stress and urgency urinary incontinence. You may leak urine with a laugh ...

  5. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... you to restrict your activities and limit your social interactions Increase the risk of falls in older adults ... increase your risk of developing urinary incontinence include: Gender. Women are more likely to have stress incontinence. ...

  6. Management of recurrent post-prostatectomy incontinence after previous failed retrourethral male slings

    PubMed Central

    Al-Najar, Amr; Kaufmann, Sascha; Boy, Soenke; Naumann, Carsten Maik; Jünemann, Peter-Klaus; van der Horst, Christof

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to establish the feasibility of combining 2 minimally invasive procedures in patients with failed primary treatment (male sling) in post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI) patients. Methods: From January 2007 to July 2008, 40 men with PPI were implanted with a suburethral tape (2 patients with Seratim, 3 with I-Stop and 35 with Advance). The median preoperative pad count was 4 (range 2–10). Prior to sling placement, 6 patients had undergone ProACT implantation. Of these, 4 patients required explantation due to balloon migration and 2 patients had their balloons kept in situ, with the balloons deflated. Results: Twenty-five patients were socially continent at this time. Fifteen patients (37.5%) did not improve or their improvement was not significant. These patients had a preoperative pad count between 7 and 10. Two of these patients had prostate adjustable continence therapy (ProACT) systems still in place. By gradually filling the balloons to 3 mL, both of these patients achieved complete continence, which was maintained at a mean follow-up of 8.5 months. Three patients with prior pelvic irradiation received an artificial urinary sphincter and achieved continence at mean follow-up of 8.3 months. The remaining 10 patients received a ProACT system in addition to the already implanted sling. After appropriate healing and filling of the balloons (average balloon volume 5 mL), all 10 patients reached complete continence; they were pad-free at a mean follow-up of 6 months (range 3–9). Conclusions: The combination of ProACT and a suburethral tape was demonstrated to be a possible treatment option in recurrent or persistent PPI. PMID:21470536

  7. Management of male urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Katie C.; Lucas, Malcolm G.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of male urinary incontinence seen is secondary to sphincter weakness following prostatic surgery. As there is a rising elderly population and increasing numbers of surgical interventions for prostate cancer, incidence of male incontinence is increasing. Hence, management of male incontinence has become a subject of increased interest for urologists. Various non-surgical and surgical approaches have been suggested for this devastating condition. Non-invasive therapies are suggested for early postoperative and mild incontinence. For surgical treatment the artificial urinary sphincter is still labeled the gold standard despite the introduction of several more minimally invasive treatments. However, as yet there is no consensus on the optimal timing and best modality for managing these men. Well designed, centrally funded clinical trials are required to establish which treatment modality to offer and when in the broad spectrum of male incontinence. This review focuses mainly on the management of post-prostatectomy incontinence since the management of other types varies little from the modalities of treatment in women. PMID:20877603

  8. [Urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Annette

    2010-01-01

    Incontinence is a common age-dependent and increasing problem in women that may mainly present as stress incontinence, overactive bladder, mixed incontinence or other forms. A thorough history, gynaecological and neurological examination and urinalysis as initial step will lead to the diagnosis and treatment. If midstream urine is difficult to receive, a catheter urine will be easy to obtain. Further investigations as urodynamics, cystoscopy and ultrasound may be required. As initial step, stress incontinence should be treated with physiotherapy and pelvic floor exercises, if not successful with operations as suburethral slings. Slings have good long-term success rates of approximately 85 % with a low morbidity and can even be inserted under local anaesthetic. The treatment of idiopathic overactive bladder consists of bladder training, a behavioural therapy, and mainly anticholinergics. Anticholinergics may cause side effects particularly in the elderly who are under several medications that may add anticholinergic effects as antidepressants, antibiotics or antihistaminics.

  9. Urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Norton, Peggy; Brubaker, Linda

    2006-01-07

    Urinary incontinence is common in women, but is under-reported and under-treated. Urine storage and emptying is a complex coordination between the bladder and urethra, and disturbances in the system due to childbirth, aging, or other medical conditions can lead to urinary incontinence. The two main types of incontinence in women, stress urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence, can be evaluated by history and simple clinical assessment available to most primary care physicians. There is a wide range of therapeutic options, but the recent proliferation of new drug treatments and surgical devices for urinary incontinence have had mixed results; direct-to-consumer advertising has increased public awareness of the problem of urinary incontinence, but many new products are being introduced without long-term assessment of their safety and efficacy.

  10. Urinary Incontinence in Women.

    PubMed

    Jay, J; Staskin, D

    1998-10-01

    Despite the prevalence of urinary incontinence, most affected women don't seek help, primarily because of embarrassment or because they are not aware that effective treatment is available. Failure to store urine may be caused by an abnormality in any component of the lower urinary tract. Common abnormalities are poor bladder compliance and bladder outlet failure. Patients who experience failure to empty can present with recurrent urinary tract infections, retention or incontinence. Using a symptom-based classification of incontinence, this would be referred to as overflow incontinence. Other possible categories of urinary incontinence are failure to store and empty and functional incontinence. A combination of a failure to store and empty is difficult to diagnose and treat clinically. Treatments are directed at the particular cause of incontinence and can include medical or surgical therapies.

  11. AdVance and AdVance XP slings for the treatment of post-prostatectomy incontinence.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Ricarda M; Kretschmer, Alexander; Stief, Christian G; Füllhase, Claudius

    2015-01-01

    To examine the outcomes with the AdVance XP and AdVance slings in the management of post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI). Eighty patients were treated with the AdVance resp. AdVance XP at one tertiary reference centre. The initial patients were implanted with the AdVance male sling with no associated surgery. Following the introduction of the AdVance XP sling, subsequent patients were implanted with the AdVance XP slings. Measurements included: daily pad usage, 24-h pad weight test, International Quality of Life Questionnaire, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form and the Patient Global Impression of Improvement. Adverse events were recorded. Follow-up was available for 39 and 41 patients treated with the AdVance and AdVance XP slings, respectively. At a median follow-up of 24.7 months, 69.3 % of patients could be classified as cured or improved in the AdVance group and at a median follow-up of 11.9 months, 90.3 % of AdVance XP-treated patients. At 3-month follow-up, 96.8 and 97.3 % of patients could be classed as cured or improved in the AdVance and AdVance XP groups, respectively (not significant). There were no perioperative complications. Two AdVance and three AdVance XP serious post-operative complications were reported, which were resolved following treatment. QOL was improved in both treatment groups. Both the AdVance and the AdVance XP slings are effective and safe for the treatment of PPI.

  12. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Intrinsic sphincter deficiency repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Urine leakage that gets worse Pain where the injection was done Allergic reaction to the material Implant ...

  13. Urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshitaka; Brown, Heidi W; Brubaker, Linda; Cornu, Jean Nicolas; Daly, J Oliver; Cartwright, Rufus

    2017-07-06

    Urinary incontinence symptoms are highly prevalent among women, have a substantial effect on health-related quality of life and are associated with considerable personal and societal expenditure. Two main types are described: stress urinary incontinence, in which urine leaks in association with physical exertion, and urgency urinary incontinence, in which urine leaks in association with a sudden compelling desire to void. Women who experience both symptoms are considered as having mixed urinary incontinence. Research has revealed overlapping potential causes of incontinence, including dysfunction of the detrusor muscle or muscles of the pelvic floor, dysfunction of the neural controls of storage and voiding, and perturbation of the local environment within the bladder. A full diagnostic evaluation of urinary incontinence requires a medical history, physical examination, urinalysis, assessment of quality of life and, when initial treatments fail, invasive urodynamics. Interventions can include non-surgical options (such as lifestyle modifications, pelvic floor muscle training and drugs) and surgical options to support the urethra or increase bladder capacity. Future directions in research may increasingly target primary prevention through understanding of environmental and genetic risks for incontinence.

  14. Female urinary incontinence and sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Renato Lains

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females. This article is a review of both the concepts of female urinary incontinence and its impact on global and sexual quality of life. Nowadays, it is assumed that urinary incontinence, especially urge urinary incontinence, promotes anxiety and several self-esteem damages in women. The odour and the fear of incontinence during sexual intercourse affect female sexual function and this is related with the unpredictability and the chronicity of incontinence, namely urge urinary incontinence. Female urinary incontinence management involves conservative (pelvic floor muscle training), surgical and pharmacological treatment. Both conservative and surgical treatments have been studied about its benefit in urinary incontinence and also the impact among female sexual function. Unfortunately, there are sparse articles that evaluate the benefits of female sexual function with drug management of incontinence. PMID:28124522

  15. Female urinary incontinence and sexuality.

    PubMed

    Mota, Renato Lains

    2017-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females. This article is a review of both the concepts of female urinary incontinence and its impact on global and sexual quality of life. Nowadays, it is assumed that urinary incontinence, especially urge urinary incontinence, promotes anxiety and several self-esteem damages in women. The odour and the fear of incontinence during sexual intercourse affect female sexual function and this is related with the unpredictability and the chronicity of incontinence, namely urge urinary incontinence. Female urinary incontinence management involves conservative (pelvic floor muscle training), surgical and pharmacological treatment. Both conservative and surgical treatments have been studied about its benefit in urinary incontinence and also the impact among female sexual function. Unfortunately, there are sparse articles that evaluate the benefits of female sexual function with drug management of incontinence.

  16. [Conservative treatment of urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Soljanik, I; Schorsch, I; Stanislaus, P; Bauer, R; Mayer, M; Hocaoglu, Y; Becker, A; May, F

    2007-09-20

    Urinary incontinence can be treated with medicinal products in addition to active pelvic floor muscle training and electrostimulation. A local hormone therapy should be first discussed with the gynaecologist. The active substance duloxetine has been used for a few years for treating stress incontinence. Several older and newer active substances are available for treating irritable bladder and stress incontinence.

  17. Urinary incontinence. Noninvasive treatment options.

    PubMed

    Maloney, C; Cafiero, M R

    1999-06-01

    One in six women older than 45 experiences incontinence, but 31% of them never discuss their condition with anyone. A proactive approach on the part of all health care providers is needed to break this silence, particularly among clinicians who care for women. Urinary incontinence is classified as stress, urge, mixed, overflow or functional incontinence. Differential diagnosis of incontinence is essential to choosing appropriate treatment options. This article outlines noninvasive treatment options that are specific to diagnosis.

  18. Urinary Incontinence in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ouslander, Joseph G.

    1981-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common and distressing problem for elderly patients, their families and friends, and the health professionals who care for them. It is a heterogeneous condition, and appropriate management depends on a thorough evaluation and understanding of the multiple factors that can play a role in its cause and perpetuation. Identifying reversible causes of transient incontinence, and appropriate management of incontinence that is associated with acute illness, can be important in preventing the problem from becoming established. A thorough diagnostic evaluation of urinary incontinence in the elderly, and appropriate use of the different types of therapy, will greatly improve the management in these cases. The need and opportunities for research to improve the management of incontinent elderly persons should be considered by all those involved in caring for this population. PMID:7039134

  19. [Urinary incontinence and obesity].

    PubMed

    Legendre, G; Fritel, X; Capmas, P; Pourcelot, A-G; Fernandez, H

    2012-06-01

    Obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI) more than or equal to 30kg/m(2), promotes pelvic floor disorders such as urinary incontinence (UI) and genital prolapse. Datas from cohort studies found an association between high BMI and the onset of UI. This association seems to be predominant with for mixed UI and stress UI. For the urge UI and overactive bladder syndrome, the analysis of the literature found a weaker association. The weight is therefore the only modifiable risk factor. Thus, the weight loss by a hypocaloric diet associated with pelvic floor muscle training should be the front line treatment in the obese patient suffering from UI. Bariatric surgery can be discussed in the most obese patient, even if the risk/benefit balance should be weighed because of significant morbidity of this surgery. The results of sub urethral sling (by retropubic tension-free vaginal tape or transobturator sling) in obese patients appear to be equivalent to those obtained in patients of normal weight. Datas on per- and postoperative complications for suburethral slings are reassuring.

  20. Urinary incontinence - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help with my urinary incontinence? What are Kegel exercises? What can I do when I want ... tape Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Self catheterization - ...

  1. Post-stroke urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Z; Birns, J; Bhalla, A

    2013-11-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of the current evidence on post-stroke urinary incontinence. An electronic database search was performed to identify relevant studies and review articles related to Urinary Incontinence (UI) in the stroke population between the years 1966 and 2012. Urinary incontinence following stroke is a common problem affecting more than one-third of acute stroke patients and persisting in up to a quarter at 1 year. It is well established that this condition is a strong marker of stroke severity and is associated with poorer functional outcomes and increased institutionalisation and mortality rates compared with those who remain continent. Despite evidence linking better outcomes to those patients who regain continence, the results of national audits have demonstrated that the management of UI following stroke is suboptimal, with less than two-thirds of stroke units having a documented plan to promote continence. Current evidence supports a thorough assessment to categorise the type and severity of post-stroke urinary incontinence. An individually tailored, structured management strategy to promote continence should be employed. This has been associated with better stroke outcomes and should be the aim of all stroke health professionals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Urinary Incontinence: Management and Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, defined as the involuntary leakage of urine, is a common health problem in both women and men. Children may also suffer from this condition. Management and treatment of urinary incontinence depends primarily on the specific type of incontinence and the underlying problem causing the leakage for a given patient. Because…

  3. Risk of Urinary Incontinence Following Prostatectomy: The Role of Physical Activity and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Luly, Jason; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Andriole, Gerald L.; Kibel, Adam S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Urinary incontinence is one of the most commonly reported and distressing side effects of radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma. Several studies have suggested that symptoms may be worse in obese men but to our knowledge no research has addressed the joint effects of obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. We evaluated the association of obesity and lack of physical activity with urinary incontinence in a sample of men who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods Height and weight were abstracted from charts, and obesity was defined as body mass index 30 kg/m2 or greater. Men completed a questionnaire before surgery that included self-report of vigorous physical activity. Men who reported 1 hour or more per week of vigorous activities were considered physically active. Men reported their incontinence to the surgeon at their urology visits. Information on incontinence was abstracted from charts at 6 and 58 weeks after surgery. Results At 6 weeks after surgery 59% (405) of men were incontinent, defined as any pad use. At 58 weeks after surgery 22% (165) of men were incontinent. At 58 weeks incontinence was more prevalent in men who were obese and physically inactive (59% incontinent). Physical activity may offset some of the negative consequences of being obese because the prevalence of incontinence at 58 weeks was similar in the obese and active (25% incontinent), and nonbese and inactive (24% incontinent) men. The best outcomes were in men who were nonobese and physically active (16% incontinent). Men who were not obese and were active were 26% less likely to be incontinent than men who were obese and inactive (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.52–1.06). Conclusions Pre-prostatectomy physical activity and obesity may be important factors in post-prostatectomy continence levels. Interventions aimed at increasing physical activity and decreasing weight in patients with prostate cancer may improve quality of life by offsetting the negative side effects

  4. Discreet products for women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Evans, Debra

    It is estimated that 10 million women in the UK suffer with urinary incontinence (Hunskarr et al, 2004). Many women consider bladder weakness to be an inevitable consequence of childbirth or the menopause. Haslam (2004) reported on a telephone survey that examined whether women were aware of stress urinary incontinence, their attitude to it and the impact it had on their daily lives. In the UK, 505 women were interviewed, 206 of whom responded positively to a question about symptoms of stress urinary incontinence, giving a prevalence rate of 41 per cent. There is also evidence that most patients with urinary incontinence do not present to their doctors

  5. EAU guidelines on urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Thüroff, Joachim W; Abrams, Paul; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Artibani, Walter; Chapple, Christopher R; Drake, Marcus J; Hampel, Christian; Neisius, Andreas; Schröder, Annette; Tubaro, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    The first European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on incontinence were published in 2001. These guidelines were periodically updated in past years. The aim of this paper is to present a summary of the 2009 update of the EAU guidelines on urinary incontinence (UI). The EAU working panel was part of the 4th International Consultation on Incontinence (ICI) and, with permission of the ICI, extracted the relevant data. The methodology of the 4th ICI was a comprehensive literature review by international experts and consensus formation. In addition, level of evidence was rated according to a modified Oxford system and grades of recommendation were given accordingly. A full version of the EAU guidelines on urinary incontinence is available as a printed document (extended and short form) and as a CD-ROM from the EAU office or online from the EAU Web site (http://www.uroweb.org/guidelines/online-guidelines/). The extent and invasiveness of assessment of UI depends on severity and/or complexity of symptoms and clinical signs and is different for men, women, frail older persons, children, and patients with neuropathy. At the level of initial management, basic diagnostic tests are applied to exclude an underlying disease or condition such as urinary tract infection. Treatment is mostly conservative (lifestyle interventions, physiotherapy, physical therapy, pharmacotherapy) and is of an empirical nature. At the level of specialised management (when primary therapy failed, diagnosis is unclear, or symptoms and/or signs are complex/severe), more elaborate assessment is generally required, including imaging, endoscopy, and urodynamics. Treatment options include invasive interventions and surgery. Treatment options for UI are rapidly expanding. These EAU guidelines provide ratings of the evidence (guided by evidence-based medicine) and graded recommendations for the appropriate assessment and according treatment options and put them into clinical perspective. Copyright

  6. [EAU Guidelines on Urinary Incontinence].

    PubMed

    Thüroff, J W; Abrams, P; Andersson, K-E; Artibani, W; Chapple, C R; Drake, M J; Hampel, C; Neisius, A; Schröder, A; Tubaro, A

    2011-01-01

    The first European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on incontinence were published in 2001. These guidelines were periodically updated in past years. The aim of this paper is to present a summary of the 2009 update of the EAU guidelines on urinary incontinence (UI). The EAU working panel was part of the 4th International Consultation on Incontinence (ICI) and, with permission of the ICI, extracted the relevant data. The methodology of the 4th ICI was a comprehensive literature review by international experts and consensus formation. In addition, level of evidence was rated according to a modified Oxford system and grades of recommendation were given accordingly. A full version of the EAU guidelines on urinary incontinence is available as a printed document (extended and short form) and as a CD-ROM from the EAU office or online from the EAU Web site (http://www.uroweb.org/guidelines/online-guidelines/). The extent and invasiveness of assessment of UI depends on severity and/or complexity of symptoms and clinical signs and is different for men, women, frail older persons, children, and patients with neuropathy. At the level of initial management, basic diagnostic tests are applied to exclude an underlying disease or condition such as urinary tract infection. Treatment is mostly conservative (lifestyle interventions, physiotherapy, physical therapy, pharmacotherapy) and is of an empirical nature. At the level of specialised management (when primary therapy failed, diagnosis is unclear, or symptoms and/or signs are complex/severe),more elaborate assessment is generally required, including imaging, endoscopy, and urodynamics. Treatment options include invasive interventions and surgery. Treatment options for UI are rapidly expanding. These EAU guidelines provide ratings of the evidence (guided by evidence-based medicine) and graded recommendations for the appropriate assessment and according treatment options and put them into clinical perspective. Copyright

  7. Urinary incontinence: is cesarean delivery protective?

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Ingrid

    2006-10-01

    About half of all women develop transient urinary incontinence during pregnancy. Three months postpartum, the prevalence and incidence rates of urinary incontinence are 9% to 31% and 7% to 15%, respectively. Antenatal incontinence increases the risk of postpartum incontinence, which in turn increases the risk of long-term persistent incontinence. After the first delivery, women delivered vaginally have two-fold more incontinence than those delivered by cesarean. The protective effect of cesarean on urinary incontinence may dissipate after further deliveries, decreases with age, and is not present in older women. Data are mixed about whether cesarean done before labor confers greater protection than cesarean done after labor. To understand the true impact of cesarean delivery on urinary incontinence, future studies must compare incontinence by planned (not actual) delivery modes, consider a woman's entire reproductive career, focus on leakage severe enough to be problematic, consider other bladder symptoms as well as incontinence, and take into account other risk factors, particularly antepartum urinary incontinence.

  8. [Female urinary incontinence: An update].

    PubMed

    González-Ruiz de León, C; Pérez-Haro, M L; Jalón-Monzón, A; García-Rodríguez, J

    2017-03-16

    The urinary incontinence is a highly prevalent symptom in the adult female population. It has important psychosocial and economic connotations, and affects the quality of life of these patients. As it is an under-diagnosed problem due to patients not always consulting for it, it is very important to keep this in mind and to provide an opportunistic screening from Primary Health Care. It is difficult to determine the costs of this, but it is estimated to be the 2% of the health budget. Because of all of this, it is very important to know how to make a correct diagnose of this condition, to determine the different types of incontinence, possible causes, and treatments available. The purpose of this review is to show the different diagnostic and therapeutic tools available, to show the Primary Health Care role in this condition, and when to refer to specialist care.

  9. Factors associated with urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Yarnell, J W; Voyle, G J; Sweetnam, P M; Milbank, J; Richards, C J; Stephenson, T P

    1982-03-01

    Possible aetiological factors for urinary incontinence were examined in a prevalence study among a random sample of 1000 women aged 18 and over. Infective factors were not markedly associated with incontinence but mechanical factors such as parity and obesity were. No association was found, however, between a history of perineal damage at childbirth and incontinence. Women with incontinence had on average a higher score for a 'neuroticism' trait elicited by questionnaire than women without the disorder.

  10. [Therapy for urinary incontinence in general practice].

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, A; Füsgen, I

    2009-08-01

    In national and international guidelines the general practitioner plays an important role in the diagnosis and first-line therapy for urinary incontinence. Nevertheless, there is a lack of data concerning details of the management of incontinence in primary care in Germany. Therefore a series of nationwide educational events for general practitioners and gynaecologists was used to perform a survey dealing with the situation of urinary incontinence in general practice. With 2530 questionnaires filled out and returned, this is the largest European survey on this subject. General practitioners declare in 57.3 % to be often involved with urinary incontinence. They usually question elderly patients about urinary incontinence (73.7 %) or those patients with diseases carrying the risk of developing urinary incontinence (64.9 %). Based on the diagnostic options in primary care, an incontinence anamnesis and urine evaluation are performed. A sonography or micturition diary was more infrequent in primary care in this survey. General practitioners most frequent refer the patient to a specialist (76.6 %) or prescribe the incontinence-type anticholinergic drugs (59.4 %) or absorbent products (45.4 %); duloxetine (27.3 %) is less frequently prescribed. The knowledge about urinary incontinence is gained in educational events (72.2 %); the course of studies was the source of incontinence skills for general practitioners only in 35 %. In conclusion, this survey gives a realistic view on the incontinence management in primary care in Germany. The majority of general practitioners are engaged in incontinence, perform basic diagnostic features and prescribe drugs or absorbent products. The course of (university medical school) studies as a source of skills to diagnose or to treat incontinence should be improved.

  11. Urinary incontinence: the role of menopause.

    PubMed

    Trutnovsky, Gerda; Rojas, Rodrigo Guzman; Mann, Kristy Pamela; Dietz, Hans P

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of menopause and hormone therapy on the symptoms and signs of stress urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. Records of women who attended a tertiary urogynecological unit were reviewed retrospectively. A standardized interview included evaluations of symptoms, menopause age (ie, time since last menstrual period or onset of menopausal symptoms), current or previous hormone use, and visual analogue scales for bother. Multichannel urodynamics, including urethral pressure profilometry and determination of abdominal leak point pressure, was performed. Of 382 women seen during the inclusion period, 62% were postmenopausal. Current systemic or local hormone use was reported by 7% and 6%, respectively. Two hundred eighty-eight women (76%) reported symptoms of stress urinary incontinence, with a mean bother of 5.7, and 273 women (72%) reported symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, with a mean bother of 6.4. On univariate analysis, symptoms and bother of urge incontinence were significantly related to menopause age, whereas this relationship was not found for stress incontinence. After calendar age was controlled for, length of menopause showed no significant relationship with any symptom or sign of urinary incontinence. Hormone deficiency after menopause is unlikely to play a major role in urinary incontinence.

  12. Postoperative urinary incontinence exacerbates nocturia-specific quality of life after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Haga, Nobuhiro; Aikawa, Ken; Hoshi, Seiji; Yabe, Michihiro; Akaihata, Hidenori; Hata, Junya; Satoh, Yuichi; Ogawa, Soichiro; Ishibashi, Kei; Kojima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    To elucidate the effect of postoperative urinary incontinence on nocturia-related quality of life after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. A total of 100 consecutive patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy completed a nocturia quality of life questionnaire score and a frequency-volume chart before and after surgery. These patients were divided into two groups by continence status (continent and incontinent) according to the number of pad exchanges per day and the 1-h pad test after surgery. Assessment was carried out before surgery, and then at 3 and 12 months after surgery. The Nocturia Quality of Life questionnaire total score and the Bother/Concern subscore were significantly lower in incontinent patients at 3 and 12 months after surgery (Nocturia Quality of Life questionnaire total score: Bother/Concern subscores P = 0.006: P = 0.04 at 3 months after surgery; and P = 0.04: P = 0.02 at 12 months). Both nocturnal maximum voided volume and nocturnal frequency were not significantly different between continent and incontinent patients. On multivariate analysis, nocturnal urinary frequency (P = 0.01) and urinary incontinence (P = 0.005) were significantly associated with nocturia-specific quality of life. Although the number of nocturia episodes was not significantly different between the continent and incontinent patients after surgery, the Nocturia Quality of Life questionnaire score was significantly worse in incontinent patients. In these patients, other than the number of nocturia episodes, psychological stress might worsen the Nocturia Quality of Life questionnaire score. Therefore, prevention of post-prostatectomy incontinence might be important to avoid aggravating the Nocturia Quality of Life questionnaire score. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. 2: Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dorey, G

    The first part of this article (Dorey, 2000) described the subjective and objective assessment of men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This article will examine treatment protocols for stress incontinence, urge incontinence, post-prostatectomy incontinence, post-micturition dribble, overflow incontinence, reflex incontinence and functional incontinence. Pelvic floor muscle exercises, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, urge suppression techniques, and fluid intake are discussed. It is concluded that men with LUTS can benefit from conservative treatment.

  14. Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... incontinence. Over time, the leakage may come back. Alternative Names ... Incontinence Update Panel of the American Urological Association Education and Research. Update of AUA guideline on the ...

  15. Obesity and female stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Osborn, David James; Strain, Matthew; Gomelsky, Alex; Rothschild, Jennifer; Dmochowski, Roger

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for stress urinary incontinence in the obese female patient and draw conclusions regarding the optimal treatment of this condition in this unique patient population. Obesity results in increased intra-abdominal pressure and this leads to weakening of the pelvic floor innervation and musculature. Weight loss through lifestyle modification and bariatric surgery improves stress urinary incontinence. Success of stress urinary incontinence surgery in obese women is similar to nonobese patients. Obese women should not be excluded from potentially curative surgery based on their body mass index (BMI) alone.

  16. [Urinary incontinence in patients with acute ictus].

    PubMed

    Suñer Soler, R; Vega Iñigo, R; García Garrido, L; García Gutiérrez, T; Mascort Toral, Z; Segura Martín, T; Dávalos Errando, A

    2000-02-01

    This project won the "Ausonia" Incontinence First Prize among those projects submitted during 1999. This article analyzes the prevalence of urinary incontinence among patients diagnosed as suffering acute ictus after 3 months, 6 months and 12 months. The authors also investigate those factors associated with acute ictus incontinence, how incontinence influences a patient's evolution, and how incontinence affects the environment where recuperation occurs, at home or in an institution, while the patient is recovering. The results confirm that acute urinary incontinence is a forecasting factor, independent of the poor middle and long range functional prognosis, and that the potential prognosis is superior than the seriousness of the neurological deficit at the moment a patient enters a hospital.

  17. Urinary Incontinence: Causes and Methods of Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the third of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. Here, the author introduces the types and physiology of urinary incontinence. The author also…

  18. Urinary Incontinence: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Child Health and Human Development) Also in Spanish What is Urinary Incontinence? (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish Diagnosis and Tests Cystoscopy and Ureteroscopy (National Institute ...

  19. [A prophylactic program for strain urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Stadnicka, Grazyna; Iwanowicz-Palus, Grazyna J; Bień, Agnieszka M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to work out a prophylactic program for strain urinary incontinence. Analysis of literature on the subject and results of own investigations presented in the first part of the paper indicate that the program of prophylaxis of strain urinary incontinence should primarily include: (1) Preparation of the medical staff (nurses, midwives) for propagating health education among women on prevention of strain urinary incontinence. (2) Preparation of adequate educational materials in the form of brochures, leaflets, information posters about symptoms, causes and prophylaxis of urinary incontinence indicating health care institutions available to all women when the disease is suspected or already present. (3) Propagation of problems connected with strain urinary incontinence in the mass media providing information to a wide audience in order to make people realize the significance of this social problem and break stereotypes associated with this disease of "shame". (4) Preparation of sets of exercises for the muscles of the base of the pelvis to be performed during pregnancy, confinement and menopause to maintain their proper function. (5) Indicating factors predisposing to strain urinary incontinence with focus on possibilities of their reduction or elimination.

  20. New drug treatments for urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dudley; Cardozo, Linda

    2010-04-01

    Urinary incontinence remains a common and distressing condition affecting many women and is known to have a significant effect on quality of life (QoL). Whilst conservative and behavioural therapy are important in the management of women with both stress incontinence and overactive bladder (OAB) ultimately many may benefit from pharmacological therapy. Antimuscarinic drugs are the commonly used agents in the treatment of OAB although often compliance and persistence are affected by adverse effects. Consequently many newer agents remain under investigation. In addition duloxetine has recently been introduced for the management of women with stress incontinence and may offer an alternative to surgery in selected cases. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current and new developments in the management of women with urinary incontinence as well as reviewing the role of oestrogen therapy in relation to lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  1. [Stress urinary incontinence. Its surgical management].

    PubMed

    Neri Ruz, E S; Azcona Arteaga, F J

    1991-10-01

    Ninety eight patients with stress urinary incontinence treated surgically at Central Military Hospital, were studied. We analyzed the risk factors as age, weight, height, parity, menopause age, and previous medical and surgical procedures. They were divided in two groups. The Group I, vaginal approach, with 35 patients and Group II, retropubic surgery, with 63 patients. There were no differences both groups regarding age, weight, height, parity and menopausal age. The most frequent illness associated with stress urinary incontinence, was pelvic floor relaxation. The complications were 17.1% and 33.3%, respectively. The efficacy of Burch is procedure for the management of stress urinary incontinence, with a success rate of 84.1% versus 62.1% in the vaginal approach, was confirmed.

  2. Female Epispadias Presenting as Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Nusret; Zvizdic, Zlatan; Milišic, Emir; Karavdic, Kenan; Paddy, Dewan

    2017-01-01

    Isolated female epispadias without bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital anomaly affecting 1 in 484,000 females. The presenting features of female epispadias are urinary incontinence and abnormal anatomical features. A 6-year-old girl presented with primary urinary incontinence who on physical examination had a bifid clitoris and labia minora. The vagina and hymen were normal. Voiding cystourethrogram showed no reflux and a funnel shaped proximal urethra. With the diagnosis of isolated female epispadias, one-stage reconstruction of the urethra, bladder neck, labia minora and clitoris was performed.

  3. Female Epispadias Presenting as Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jonuzi, Asmir; Popovic, Nusret; Zvizdic, Zlatan; Milišic, Emir; Karavdic, Kenan; Paddy, Dewan

    2017-01-01

    Isolated female epispadias without bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital anomaly affecting 1 in 484,000 females. The presenting features of female epispadias are urinary incontinence and abnormal anatomical features. A 6-year-old girl presented with primary urinary incontinence who on physical examination had a bifid clitoris and labia minora. The vagina and hymen were normal. Voiding cystourethrogram showed no reflux and a funnel shaped proximal urethra. With the diagnosis of isolated female epispadias, one-stage reconstruction of the urethra, bladder neck, labia minora and clitoris was performed.

  4. Urinary incontinence following radical vulvectomy.

    PubMed

    Reid, G C; DeLancey, J O; Hopkins, M P; Roberts, J A; Morley, G W

    1990-05-01

    Although incontinence has been reported after radical vulvectomy, its relationship to operative technique, anatomy, and treatment has not been defined. Twenty-one patients having vulvectomies for vulvar cancer were prospectively evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with urodynamic function studies. A portion of the urethra was removed in four patients undergoing radical vulvectomy, and 14 had a vulvectomy excision that came within 1 cm of the distal urethra. Six patients (28%) developed a change of continence, with three developing total incontinence, two stress incontinence, and one urge incontinence. All four patients who had a portion of the urethra excised developed stress or total incontinence. The other two patients with incontinence (one total, one urge) had the vulvectomy excision that came close to the urethra. No patient had a change in continence when surgery did not involve or come close to the urethra. When the four patients with a distal urethral resection were compared with patients in whom the urethra was not excised, there was a significant decrease postoperatively in functional urethral length (P less than .0001), anatomical urethral length (P less than .0001), and distal urethral pressure transmission ratios in Q3 (P = .004), Q4 (P = .02), and Q5 (P = .005); but no difference in urethral support (Q-tip test), flow rates, residual urine, bladder capacity, maximal urethral pressure, resting closure pressure, or squeeze pressure. Histologic examination of urethral specimens demonstrated that a portion of the compressor urethrae muscle was often excised. Radical vulvectomy by itself does not cause incontinence, but it would appear that removal of a portion of the urethra increases the chance of incontinence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Does electrostimulation cure urinary incontinence?

    PubMed

    Fall, M

    1984-04-01

    A followup study is presented of a prospective series of women treated with an inflatable intravaginal electrode carrier and an external pulse generator. The devices were individually adjustable with respect to electrode positioning and stimulation parameters. The study included 40 women with detrusor instability and/or genuine stress incontinence. The primary results for urge symptoms were favorable. Of the patients 73 per cent were primarily free of symptoms during treatment and 45 per cent remained free of symptoms after withdrawal of treatment, including two-thirds in whom re-education persisted during the followup of 6 years. Of the patients with genuine stress incontinence 40 per cent exhibited persistent re-education. There were considerable discrepancies between symptomatic cure or improvement, and the urodynamic findings at followup. Intravaginal electrical stimulation may be regarded as the treatment of choice for urge incontinence due to detrusor instability, and in mixed stress and urge incontinence. The method also is an alternative to an operation in some women with genuine stress incontinence.

  6. The medical management of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Ahmed; Drake, Marcus J; Hashim, Hashim

    2010-01-15

    Urinary incontinence is the involuntary leakage of urine; it affects millions of people worldwide, causing significant detrimental effects on their quality of life. Direct expenses, such as containment products, long-term drug prescriptions and surgery, complemented by indirect costs, such as reduced employment productivity, result in overall expenditure running to billions of dollars. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) occurs on physical exertion, and results from weakness of the bladder outlet. Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) results from inability to resist a sudden compelling desire to pass urine, arising as a consequence of bladder dysfunction. Clinical evaluation clarifies the underlying mechanisms and excludes diseases causing similar symptoms. Urodynamic studies to measure bladder and abdominal pressures and deduce the bladder and outlet function are undertaken when invasive treatments are being considered or when the nature of the incontinence is not entirely clear. Initial management of SUI involves pelvic floor muscle exercise training; if insufficient symptom improvement results, surgical measures are needed. UUI treatment commences with advice on suitable fluid intake and measures to improve ability to defer voiding, followed by antimuscarinic drugs. Refractory UUI is a difficult problem, currently managed with a range of surgical interventions, including bladder injections of botulinum-A neurotoxin, augmentation cystoplasty and nerve stimulation methods. New treatment options are needed, because of the risk of impeding voiding function, resulting in urinary retention. Persistent leakage is controlled with containment products, such as pads, or collection devices, such as catheters.

  7. Urinary incontinence in the elderly. Drug treatment options.

    PubMed

    Chutka, D S; Takahashi, P Y

    1998-10-01

    Urinary incontinence is commonly seen in the elderly. It has multiple complications and is often the reason an elderly person is forced to abandon independent living and enter a nursing home. There are multiple causes of urinary incontinence: it is not a single entity or a specific diagnosis. In most patients, the incontinence can be placed into 1 of the following 4 categories: detrusor overactivity (urge incontinence), overflow incontinence, stress incontinence (outlet incompetence) or functional incontinence. To understand the pathophysiology of urinary incontinence, some knowledge of the urinary tract anatomy and physiology is required. It is also important to know how the anatomy and physiology changes in response to the aging process. Successful treatment depends on the specific cause of the incontinence. If incorrectly diagnosed, various treatments may actually worsen the incontinence or cause other problems. Since most elderly patients do not volunteer a problem of urinary incontinence, questions regarding the presence of symptoms must be asked. In most patients, the specific type of incontinence can be diagnosed with a thorough medical history and physical examination. Several simple and widely available laboratory tests may also be useful in the evaluation. Occasionally, urological consultation or urodynamic testing should be performed. Once correctly diagnosed, there are a large number of pharmacological as well as nonpharmacological treatments (behavioural, surgical) available. This article concentrates on the pharmacological therapies for patients with various types of urinary incontinence. Since most patients with urinary incontinence are elderly, they are more susceptible to the effects as well as the adverse effects of medications. This must be taken into account before any pharmacological therapy is initiated. Although many elderly patients believe their symptoms of urinary incontinence to be a part of growing old, urinary incontinence is never a

  8. Nonsurgical Treatment of Urinary Incontinence in Elderly Women.

    PubMed

    Parker, William P; Griebling, Tomas Lindor

    2015-11-01

    Urinary incontinence is a prevalent condition in elderly women with significant associated morbidity. Incontinence can by grouped into several types: stress incontinence, urgency incontinence, overflow incontinence, functional incontinence, and mixed urinary incontinence. Careful evaluation, including history and physical examination, is critical to making the correct diagnosis and guiding therapy. A variety of nonsurgical treatments, including behavioral therapies, pelvic floor muscle exercise, medications, and other treatments, are available; can be successful for many older women; and may preclude the need for surgery. Working closely with the patient, understanding her goals of care, and targeting treatments accordingly are essential for success.

  9. Selecting appropriate absorbent products to treat urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Payne, Drew

    2015-11-01

    Urinary incontinence can have a significant negative effect on a person's life, especially if left unmanaged and untreated. Continence assessment, often carried out by community nurses, is an important element in the management of a person's urinary incontinence, and so is the selection of appropriate absorbent incontinence pads. This article reviews: the causes and effects of urinary incontinence; how to derive the most appropriate information from a continence assessment; strategies for selecting incontinence pads for a person, on the basis of the results of the continence assessment; and some of the problems and risks associated with the use of incontinence pads.

  10. Cell Therapy for Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Hart, Melanie L; Izeta, Ander; Herrera-Imbroda, Bernardo; Amend, Bastian; Brinchmann, Jan E

    2015-08-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is the involuntary loss of urine and is a common condition in middle-aged and elderly women and men. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is caused by leakage of urine when coughing, sneezing, laughing, lifting, and exercise, even standing leads to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Other types of UI also exist such as urge incontinence (also called overactive bladder), which is a strong and unexpected sudden urge to urinate, mixed forms of UI that result in symptoms of both urge and stress incontinence, and functional incontinence caused by reduced mobility, cognitive impairment, or neuromuscular limitations that impair mobility or dexterity. However, for many SUI patients, there is significant loss of urethral sphincter muscle due to degeneration of tissue, the strain and trauma of pregnancy and childbirth, or injury acquired during surgery. Hence, for individuals with SUI, a cell-based therapeutic approach to regenerate the sphincter muscle offers the advantage of treating the cause rather than the symptoms. We discuss current clinically relevant cell therapy approaches for regeneration of the external urethral sphincter (striated muscle), internal urethral sphincter (smooth muscle), the neuromuscular synapse, and blood supply. The use of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells is a major step in the right direction, but they may not be enough for regeneration of all components of the urethral sphincter. Inclusion of other cell types or biomaterials may also be necessary to enhance integration and survival of the transplanted cells.

  11. Effects of bariatric surgery on urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bulbuller, Nurullah; Habibi, Mani; Yuksel, Mustafa; Ozener, Onur; Oruc, Mehmet Tahir; Oner, Osman Zekai; Kazak, Mehmet Altug

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is an important modifiable etiological factor associated with several diseases. There is strong evidence that urinary incontinence (UI) is positively correlated with body mass index (BMI). Aim One of the many benefits experienced by obese patients after bariatric surgery is decrease in UI. To investigate this correlation, we aimed to examine the effects of weight loss on UI in female patients who had undergone laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Materials and methods Obese female patients (n=120), ≥18 years of age, and planning to undergo LSG were included in this prospective study. We administered the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-UI-SF) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) to the patients prior to surgery and 6 months after the surgery. Using the collected data, we determined the incidence of UI and examined the relationship between the preoperative and postoperative BMI and UI values. Results The mean age of the patients was 39.19 (standard deviation [SD] =9.94) years and the mean preoperative BMI was 46.17 (SD =5.35). Of the 120 patients, 72 (60%) complained of UI preoperatively. Among these 72 patients, 23 (31.95%) described urge incontinence, 18 (25%) stress incontinence, and 31 (43.05%) mixed-type incontinence. At 6 months postoperatively, the percentage of excess weight loss was 70.33% (SD =14.84%). For all three UI subtypes, the 6-month postoperative ICIQ-UI-SF and IIQ-7 scores decreased significantly compared to the preoperative scores (P<0.05). Conclusion LSG results in a clinically significant improvement in most common types of UI, regardless of patient reproductive history, existence of comorbid conditions, and smoking status. PMID:28176911

  12. Surgical management of pediatric urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Dave, Sumit; Salle, Joao Luiz Pippi

    2013-08-01

    The surgical management of pediatric urinary incontinence secondary to neurogenic bladder and congenital anomalies is challenging, and continues to evolve with new surgical innovations. The goal of these surgical procedures is to achieve complete and socially acceptable urinary dryness, while preserving volitional voiding where possible, without causing damage to the upper tracts. This review focuses on recent studies and highlights the pros and cons of these advances, based on our experience. The short-term success in achieving urinary continence has to be tempered with the long-term implications of these reconstructive procedures, about which our knowledge is limited.

  13. Obesity and Urinary Incontinence: Epidemiology and Clinical Research Update

    PubMed Central

    Subak, Leslee L.; Richter, Holly E.; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We reviewed the epidemiological literature on the association of obesity and urinary incontinence, and summarized clinical trial data on the effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence. Materials and Methods We systematically searched for published community based prevalence studies with bivariate or multivariate analysis of the association of urinary incontinence and overweight/obesity in women. Case series and randomized controlled trials of the effect of surgical, behavioral and pharmacological weight loss on urinary incontinence are summarized. Results Epidemiological studies showed that obesity is a strong independent risk factor for prevalent and incident urinary incontinence. There was a clear dose-response effect of weight on urinary incontinence with each 5-unit increase in body mass index associated with about a 20% to 70% increase in the urinary incontinence risk, and the maximum effect of weight rarely exceeded an OR of greater than 4 to 5 on well controlled analyses. The odds of incident urinary incontinence during 5 to 10 years increased by approximately 30% to 60% for each 5-unit increase in body mass index. There may be a stronger association of increasing weight with prevalent and incident stress incontinence, including mixed incontinence, than with urge incontinence and overactive bladder syndrome. Weight loss studies indicated that surgical and nonsurgical weight loss led to significant improvements in urinary incontinence symptoms. Conclusions Epidemiological studies document overweight and obesity as important risk factors for urinary incontinence. Weight loss by surgical and more conservative approaches is effective to decrease urinary incontinence symptoms and should be strongly considered a first line treatment in this patient population. PMID:19846133

  14. Male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. 1: Assessment.

    PubMed

    Dorey, G

    Male lower urinary tract symptoms include frequency, nocturia, urgency, urge incontinence, stress incontinence, post-micturition dribble and post-prostatectomy incontinence. All of these symptoms can be treated conservatively. In this article, the first of two parts, a detailed subjective and objective assessment is provided based on a Delphi study undertaken by the author. The objective assessment includes a digital rectal examination to assess the pelvic floor muscle strength in order to provide a patient-specific exercise programme. The diagnosis of stress incontinence, urge incontinence, post-prostatectomy incontinence, post-micturition dribble and functional incontinence is made from the assessment. Men with lower urinary tract symptoms need a detailed subjective and objective assessment before a diagnosis is made and individual treatment is planned.

  15. The coexistence of anal incontinence in women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Ekin, Murat; Kupelioglu, L C; Yasar, L; Savan, K; Akcig, Z; Ozcan, A J

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the coexistentence of anal incontinence (AI) in patients with urinary incontinence (UI). UDI 6 questionnaire was applied to consecutive 800 patients for the determination of symptomatic UI. Cases were also questioned for AI. The patients with the complaint of UI were evaluated for the coexistence of AI. Each patient with AI, had completed the Cleveland Clinic Florida Fecal Incontinence questionnaire for the determination of the severity of AI. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U test were used for the evaluation of qualitative data. Multivariable analysis using logistic regression was done to test the overall significance of all variables that were significantly associated with UI using univariate analysis. There were 233 (29.1%) cases of UI and 105 (13.1%) cases of AI. 60 (7.5%) of these patients were suffering from both UI and AI. 60 (57.1%) of 105 patients with AI also had UI. In patients with UI, the coexistence of AI was found in 25.7%. There was a positive correlation between UI and AI (R = 0.240, Chi-square P < 0.001). In logistic regression model, AI [(OR) 3.5, 95% confidence interval 2.26, 5.49], parity and episiotomy were found to be associated with UI. Parity and vaginal delivery by episiotomy were risk factors for the occurrence of AI. AI is positively correlated with UI patients. Symptoms of AI must be questioned in all gynecology patients. Unnecessary episiotomy should be avoided.

  16. Sacral Nerve Stimulation For Urinary Urge Incontinence, Urgency-Frequency, Urinary Retention, and Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness, safety, and cost of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) to treat urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence. Background: Condition and Target Population Urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence are prevalent, yet rarely discussed, conditions. They are rarely discussed because patients may be uncomfortable disclosing their symptoms to a health professional or may be unaware that there are treatment options for these conditions. Briefly, urge incontinence is an involuntary loss of urine upon a sudden urge. Urgency-frequency is an uncontrollable urge to void, which results in frequent, small-volume voids. People with urgency-frequency may or may not also experience chronic pelvic pain. Urinary retention refers to the inability to void despite having the urge to void. It can be caused by a hypocontractile detrusor (weak or no bladder muscle contraction) or obstruction due to urethral overactivity. Fecal incontinence is a loss of voluntary bowel control. The prevalence of urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, and urinary retention in the general population is 3.3% to 8.2%, and the prevalence of fecal incontinence is 1.4% to 1.9%. About three-quarters of these people will be successfully treated by behaviour and/or drug therapy. For those who do not respond to these therapies, the options for treatment are management with diapers or pads, or surgery. The surgical procedures are generally quite invasive, permanent, and are associated with complications. Pads and/or diapers are used throughout the course of treatment as different therapies are tried. Patients who respond successfully to treatment may still require pads or diapers, but to a lesser extent. The Technology Being Reviewed: Sacral Nerve Stimulation Sacral nerve stimulation is a procedure where a small device attached to an electrode is

  17. Urinary incontinence after vaginal delivery or cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Borges, João Bosco Ramos; Guarisi, Telma; Camargo, Ana Carolina Marchesini de; Gollop, Thomaz Rafael; Machado, Rogério Bonassi; Borges, Pítia Cárita de Godoy

    2010-06-01

    To assess the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence, urge incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence among women residing in the city of Jundiaí (São Paulo, Brazil), and the relation between the type of incontinence and the obstetric history of these women. A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted. A total of 332 women were interviewed; they were seen for whatever reason at the public primary healthcare units of the city of Jundiaí, from March 2005 to April 2006. A pre-tested questionnaire was administered and consisted of questions used in the EPINCONT Study (Epidemiology of Incontinence in the County of Nord-Trondelag). Statistical analysis was carried out using the χ2 test and odds ratio (95%CI). Urinary incontinence was a complaint for 23.5% of the women interviewed. Stress urinary incontinence prevailed (50%), followed by mixed urinary incontinence (35%) and urge incontinence (15%). Being in the age group of 35-64 years, having a body mass index of 30 or greater and having had only vaginal delivery or cesarean section, with uterine contraction, regardless of the number of pregnancies, were factors associated with stress urinary incontinence. However, being in the age group of 55 or older, having a body mass index of 30 or greater and having had three or more pregnancies, only with vaginal deliveries, were factors associated with mixed urinary incontinence. One third of the interviewees complained of some type of urinary incontinence, and half of them presented stress urinary incontinence. Cesarean section, only when not preceded by contractions, was not associated with stress urinary incontinence. The body mass index is only relevant when the stress factor is present.

  18. [Anatomic principles of urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Dorschner, W; Stolzenburg, J U; Neuhaus, J

    2001-05-01

    The morphological fundamentals of urinary continence are still subject to controversy. This was the reason for a renewed examination of the sphincter musculature of the lower urinary tract. This study included 50 male and 15 female autopsy specimens. The organs of the lower urinary tract including the neighboring organs had been removed in their entirety and histologically reprocessed en bloc as a complete series of sections. We were able to demonstrate that the internal sphincter or m. sphincter vesicae is represented as a circular, distinct structure which elliptically embraces the internal urethral orifice. Lamellas of the detrusor are not involved in the formation of the internal sphincter. In females and males, the external sphincter consists of a striated and a smooth muscular part (m. sphincter urethrae transversostriatus et glaber). In transverse sections, the muscle has a horseshoe shape. It is completely separated by connective tissue from the musculature of the pelvic floor. A deep transverse perineal muscle does not exist. The histological findings were used for the construction of a digital three-dimensional model of the anatomy of the lower urinary tract. Computer animations of the model with integrated original histologies were generated and stored as a computer video on a CD-ROM attached to this journal.

  19. [Nursing diagnoses of urinary incontinence in patients with stroke].

    PubMed

    Leandro, Telma Alteniza; Araujo, Thelma Leite de; Cavalcante, Tahissa Frota; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; Oliveira, Tyane Mayara Ferreira de; Lopes, Ana Cecília Menezes

    2015-12-01

    Identifying the prevalence of Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), Urge urinary incontinence (UUI), Functional urinary incontinence (FUI), Overflow urinary incontinence (OUI) and Reflex urinary incontinence (RUI) nursing diagnoses and their defining characteristics in stroke patients. A cross-sectional study with 156 patients treated in a neurological clinic. Data were collected through interviews and forwarded to nurses for diagnostic inference. 92.3% of the patients had at least one of the studied diagnoses; OUI showed the highest prevalence (72.4%), followed by FUI (53.2%), RUI (50.0%), UUI (41.0%) and SUI (37.8%). Overdistended bladder and reports of inability to reach the toilet in time to avoid urine loss were the most prevalent defining characteristics. A statistically significant association of the defining characteristics with the studied diagnosis was verified. The five incontinence diagnoses were identified in the evaluated patients, with different prevalence.

  20. Treatment of mixed urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Gomelsky, Alex; Dmochowski, Roger R

    2011-10-01

    Deciding on an optimal therapy for mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) is challenging, as a single-treatment modality may be inadequate for alleviating both the urge and stress component. A MEDLINE search was conducted regarding English-language literature pertaining to the treatment for MUI focusing on literature within the last 18 months. Behavioral therapy and lifestyle modification, such as moderate weight loss and caffeine reduction, should be considered first-line options for all women with MUI. The addition of pelvic floor muscle therapy may have an additional salutary effect. Treatment of the urge component with antimuscarinics is effective; however, the stress component is likely to persist after therapy. Treatment with vaginal estrogen cream may help in the short-term, but long-term benefits are unknown. Anti-incontinence surgery may have a positive impact on both the stress and urge components of MUI; however, it appears that women with MUI may have lower cure rates compared to women with pure stress urinary incontinence. The optimum treatment of MUI may often require multiple treatment modalities. Although surgery may often have a positive impact on both components, its routine implementation should be approached with caution and patients should be carefully selected and counseled. (C) 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  1. [Sport and urinary incontinence in women].

    PubMed

    Lousquy, R; Jean-Baptiste, J; Barranger, E; Hermieux, J-F

    2014-09-01

    Women are more attentive to their physical appearance and a quarter of French women use to practice a regular physical activity. Benefits of sport on general health are recognized. However, sport may be the cause of various diseases when it is poorly chosen or improperly performed. In literature, intensive exercise is a risk factor for urinary incontinence, defined as "the complaint of any involuntary leakage of urine". It is essentially stress urinary incontinence, occurring because of the phenomenon of intrabdominal hyperpressure, inherent with certain activities, and excess capacity of sphincters. Some sports are more risky than others, and high-level sportswomen are the most exposed. Health professionals must invest in information, screening, prevention, counseling and treatment track athletes So, the general practitioner and the doctor of sports play a vital role in informing, screening, prevention, therapeutic and monitoring of sportswomen. Better information is needed because according to the severity of incontinence and its impact, there are simple, effective, more or less invasive treatment options. The aim of this study was to establish an inventory of scientific knowledge and to improve the management of these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacteriuria is associated with urge urinary incontinence in older women

    PubMed Central

    Rodhe, Nils; Englund, Lars; Mölstad, Sigvard; Samuelsson, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between bacteriuria and frequency and type of urinary incontinence in elderly people living in the community. Bacteriuria and urinary incontinence are common conditions and often coexisting in this population; the authors have previously reported the prevalence of bacteriuria to be 22.4% in women and 9.4% in men. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting The catchment area of a primary healthcare centre in a Swedish middle-sized town. Subjects Residents, except for those in nursing homes, aged 80 and over. Participation rate: 80.3% (431/537). Main outcome measures Urinary cultures and questionnaire data on urinary incontinence. Results In women the OR for having bacteriuria increased with increasing frequency of urinary incontinence; the OR was 2.83 (95% CI 1.35–5.94) for women who were incontinent daily as compared with continent women. Reporting urge urinary incontinence increased the risk of having bacteriuria: 3.36 (95% CI 1.49–7.58) in comparison with continent women while there was no significant association between stress urinary incontinence and bacteriuria. The prevalence of bacteriuria among men was too low to make any meaningful calculations about the association between bacteriuria and frequency and type of incontinence. Conclusion Bacteriuria is associated with more frequent leakage and predominantly with urge urinary incontinence. The causes of this association and their clinical implications remain unclear. There might be some individuals who would benefit from antibiotic treatment, but further studies are warranted. PMID:18297561

  3. Factors Related to Urinary Incontinence among the Malaysian Elderly.

    PubMed

    Eshkoor, S A; Hamid, T A; Shahar, S; Mun, C Y

    2017-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a prevalent condition in the elderly that is the spontaneous leakage of urine. It is an age-related problem and increases especially in people aged above 65 years. It can cause many psychological, behavioral, biological, economic and social effects. The treatment of urinary incontinence can reduce morbidity and mortality. Thus, this study aimed to determine the effects of variables including age, ethnicity, gender, education, marital status, body weight, blood elements and nutritional parameters on urinary incontinence among the Malaysian elderly. The study was on 2322 non-institutionalized Malaysian elderly. The hierarchy logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the risk of independent variables for urinary incontinence among respondents. The findings indicated that approximately 3.80% of subjects had urinary incontinence. In addition, constipation was found a significant factor that increased the risk of urinary incontinence in samples (p=0.006; OR=3.77). The increase in dietary monounsaturated fat (p=0.038; OR=0.59) and plasma triglyceride levels (p=0.029; OR=0.56) significantly reduced the risk of incontinence in subjects. Many of suspected variables including socio-demographic factors, diseases, nutritional minerals, blood components and body weight were non-relevant factors to urinary incontinence in respondents. Constipation increased the risk of urinary incontinence in subjects, and increase in dietary monounsaturated fat and plasma triglyceride levels decreased the risk.

  4. The Challenge of Urinary Incontinence in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Worrall, Graham

    1989-01-01

    By 2021 Canada will have an enormous population older than 65 years of age. Before the wholesale introduction of programs for seniors with urinary incontinence, careful evaluation of present treatments and the extent to which they can usefully be applied in the community is necessary. We need more information about the diagnosis and treatment of urinary incontinence in the elderly and about both patient and caregiver compliance with treatment for urinary incontinence. There is a great need for research on the efficiency of programs targeted at the incontinent group and for community surveys to reassess the problem's long-term consequences. PMID:21249070

  5. The Management of Urinary Incontinence by Community-Living Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitteness, Linda S.

    1987-01-01

    Explored ways elderly people (N=30) manage urinary incontinence. Subjects tended to dismiss their urinary incontinence as a normal part of aging and used various behavioral and psychological strategies to maintain their independence, usually without any assistance from the health professions. Management strategies commonly involved some degree of…

  6. [Intrinsic sphincter deficiency and female urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Cour, F; Le Normand, L; Lapray, J-F; Hermieu, J-F; Peyrat, L; Yiou, R; Donon, L; Wagner, L; Vidart, A

    2015-06-01

    Stress urinary female incontinence (SUI) is primary due to intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD) and urethral hypermobility. Despite a lack of standardised international definition, ISD needs to be clearly diagnosed in order to be correctly treated. This work is an update about the female ISD produced from a review of a published article. This review of article published on this subject in the Medline (Pubmed database), selected according to their scientific relevants, of consensus conferences and published guidelines, has been performed by the committee for women pelvic floor surgery of the French Urological Association. Although there is no international consensus definition, we can consider that the ISD is a composite concept combining urodynamic data (MUCP < 20 or 30 cmH20) and one or more clinical information (no urethral mobility, negative urethral support test, failure of a first surgery, leakage during abdominal straining, high stress incontinence scores). Imaging can provide additional evidence for intrinsic sphincter deficiency diagnosis, but the correlation between imaging and function remains low. By standardizing methodology and interpretations to better diagnose women with ISD, it may be possible to improve preoperative planning and outcomes for these patients. A retropubic midurethral sling can be performed as a first surgery. In case of a lack of urethral mobility, the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) remains the gold standard. Adjustable continence therapy (ACT(®)) can be proposed as an alternative option. The efficacy and safety of muscle-derived cell therapy in ISD needs more studies. Injection of bulking agents may be an option according to the severity and the expectations of the patient. Bladder overactivity needs to be treated as first-line in case of mixed urinary incontinence. In elderly women, a careful evaluation of the bladder contractility and comorbidity must be performed. A geriatric evaluation can be necessary. Clinical and

  7. Urinary incontinence in the bitch: an update.

    PubMed

    Reichler, I M; Hubler, M

    2014-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI), defined as the involuntary loss of urine during the filling phase of the bladder (Abrams et al. 2002), is a commonly seen problem in veterinary practice. Urinary sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) after spaying is the most common micturition disorder, and its medical treatment is normally successful, even though the underlying pathophysiological mechanism is not fully understood. Hormonal changes inducing structural and functional alterations in the bladder, as well as in the urethra composition, are discussed. To manage incontinent patients successfully, possible underlying abnormalities besides USMI should be ruled out. In the majority of cases, history, physical examination and simple tests including urinalysis and urine bacterial culture lead to a presumed aetiology. If USMI is the most likely cause, then the advantage of further diagnostic tests should be discussed with the owner before starting a trial therapy with alpha-adrenergic drugs. Potential side effects of this therapy have to be mentioned even though they rarely occur. It is important to thoroughly evaluate the success of the initial treatment. Its failure should lead to further diagnostic testing. Specialized clinical assessments may provide an aetiological diagnosis, and this could serve as a basis for discussing further treatment options. Surgical procedures, which may in rare cases cause irreversible side effects, may be instituted. If incontinence reoccurs after initial treatment was successfully performed, the diagnostic work-up including urinalysis should always be repeated. As results of urinalysis did not correlate well with results of bacterial culture, a urine culture is recommended (Comer and Ling 1981). Cystocentesis is the preferred method of urine collection (Bartges 2004). Equivocal results of quantitative cultures of urine samples obtained during midstream voiding or by catheterization require repeat collection by cystocentesis (Comer and Ling 1981).

  8. High Costs of Urinary Incontinence Among Women Electing Surgery to Treat Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Subak, Leslee L.; Brubaker, Linda; Chai, Toby C.; Creasman, Jennifer M.; Diokno, Ananias C.; Goode, Patricia S.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Kusek, John W.; Leng, Wendy W.; Lukacz, Emily S.; Norton, Peggy; Tennstedt, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate costs for incontinence management, health-related quality of life, and willingness to pay for incontinence improvement in women electing surgery for stress urinary incontinence. METHODS A total of 655 incontinent women enrolled in the Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial, a randomized surgical trial. Baseline out-of-pocket costs for incontinence management were calculated by multiplying self-report of resources used (supplies, laundry, dry cleaning) by national resource costs ($2006). Health-related quality of life was estimated with the Health Utilities Index Mark 3. Participants estimated willingness to pay for 100% improvement in incontinence. Potential predictors of these outcomes were examined by using multivariable linear regression. RESULTS Mean age was 52±10 years, and mean number of weekly incontinence episodes was 22±21. Mean and median (25%, 75% interquartile range) estimated personal costs for incontinence management among all women were $14±$24 and $8 (interquartile range $3, $18) per week, and 617 (94%) women reported any cost. Costs increased significantly with incontinence frequency and mixed compared with stress incontinence. The mean and median Health Utilities Index Mark 3 scores were 0.73±0.25 and 0.84 (interquartile range 0.63, 0.92). Women were willing to pay a mean of $118±$132 per month for complete resolution of incontinence, and willingness to pay increased significantly with greater expected incontinence improvement, household income, and incontinent episode frequency. CONCLUSION Urinary incontinence is associated with substantial costs. Women spent nearly $750 per year out of pocket for incontinence management, had a significant decrement in quality of life, and were willing to pay nearly $1,400 per year for cure. PMID:18378749

  9. [A survey on urinary incontinence in the institutionalized elderly].

    PubMed

    Homma, Y; Takai, K; Takahashi, S; Higashihara, E; Aso, Y; Urushibara, A

    1992-08-01

    A survey on urinary incontinence in 161 (41 male, 120 female) institutionalized elderly was independently performed by urologists and attending nurses. Urinary incontinence was found in 107 cases (66%), with 76 cases (47%) suffering from severe leakage (more than 5 times a day and needs diaper). The prevalences of incontinence and severe leakage were 63% and 52% at geriatric hospitals, 59% and 29% at intermediate care centers and 78% and 63% at nursing homes, respectively. The risk factors for incontinence were consciousness disturbance, urinary urgency, impaired mobility and dementia, and those for severe leakage were apathy, loss of urinary sensation, dementia and impaired mobility. The type of incontinence was considered functional one in 81% of cases. The agreement of the incontinence type evaluated by urologists and that by nurses was found in 90% of incontinent cases. Incontinence was estimated "incurable" in 54% of cases by attending nurses. These observations indicate a high prevalence of severe and "incurable" incontinence in the institutionalized elderly, urgently warranting an effective remedy for the increasing aged society.

  10. Major Odorants Released as Urinary Volatiles by Urinary Incontinent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sudhir Kumar; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Choi, Si On; Sa, In Young; Oh, Soo Yeon

    2013-01-01

    In this study, volatile urinary components were collected using three different types of samples from patients suffering from urinary incontinence (UI): (1) urine (A); (2) urine + non-used pad (B); and (3) urine + used pad (C). In addition, urine + non-used pad (D) samples from non-patients were also collected as a reference. The collection of urinary volatiles was conducted with the aid of a glass impinger-based mini-chamber method. Each of the four sample types (A through D) was placed in a glass impinger and incubated for 4 hours at 37 °C. Ultra pure air was then passed through the chamber, and volatile urine gas components were collected into Tedlar bags at the other end. These bag samples were then analyzed for a wide range of VOCs and major offensive odorants (e.g., reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs), carbonyls, trimethylamine (TMA), ammonia, etc.). Among the various odorants, sulfur compounds (methanethiol and hydrogen sulfide) and aldehydes (acetaldehyde, butylaldehyde, and isovaleraldehyde) were detected above odor threshold and predicted to contribute most effectively to odor intensity of urine incontinence. PMID:23823973

  11. Major odorants released as urinary volatiles by urinary incontinent patients.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sudhir Kumar; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Choi, Si On; Sa, In Young; Oh, Soo Yeon

    2013-07-03

    In this study, volatile urinary components were collected using three different types of samples from patients suffering from urinary incontinence (UI): (1) urine (A); (2) urine + non-used pad (B); and (3) urine + used pad (C). In addition, urine + non-used pad (D) samples from non-patients were also collected as a reference. The collection of urinary volatiles was conducted with the aid of a glass impinger-based mini-chamber method. Each of the four sample types (A through D) was placed in a glass impinger and incubated for 4 hours at 37 °C. Ultra pure air was then passed through the chamber, and volatile urine gas components were collected into Tedlar bags at the other end. These bag samples were then analyzed for a wide range of VOCs and major offensive odorants (e.g., reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs), carbonyls, trimethylamine (TMA), ammonia, etc.). Among the various odorants, sulfur compounds (methanethiol and hydrogen sulfide) and aldehydes (acetaldehyde, butylaldehyde, and isovaleraldehyde) were detected above odor threshold and predicted to contribute most effectively to odor intensity of urine incontinence.

  12. Expert system for management of urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, R.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this nursing informatics and outcomes research study was to determine the effectiveness of an expert system for disseminating knowledge to ambulatory women health care consumers with urinary incontinence. Clinical knowledge from the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) patient guideline for urinary incontinence and research literature for behavioral treatments provided the knowledge base for the expert system. Two experimental groups (booklet and expert system) and one control group were utilized. Study results suggest the use of an expert system as one effective communication means for disseminating clinical information in an advisory capacity to ambulatory women with urinary incontinence. PMID:8563340

  13. Predictors of female urinary incontinence at midlife and beyond.

    PubMed

    Menezes, M; Pereira, M; Hextall, A

    2010-02-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is an important middle age health issue and approximately 20% of women over 40 years of age have problems with continence. Urinary incontinence poses a significant negative impact on social functioning and quality of life to many individuals. It is estimated that around three million people are regularly incontinent in the UK with a prevalence of about 40 per 1000 adults. There are various factors which can cause incontinence such as pregnancy, childbirth, obesity, menopause, or just inherent connective-tissue weakness. All of these factors can cause pathophysiology changes in the muscular and fascial structures of the pelvic floor and lead to pelvic support defects and possibly pelvic floor dysfunction. We aim with this review article to highlight predictors or predisposing factors of incontinence; in order to help clinicians during their decisions and put in place a policy of a preventive strategy to decrease the incontinence rate in the general population.

  14. Animal Models of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a common health problem significantly affecting the quality of life of women worldwide. Animal models that simulate SUI enable the assessment of the mechanism of risk factors for SUI in a controlled fashion, including childbirth injuries, and enable preclinical testing of new treatments and therapies for SUI. Animal models that simulate childbirth are presently being utilized to determine the mechanisms of the maternal injuries of childbirth that lead to SUI with the goal of developing prophylactic treatments. Methods of assessing SUI in animals that mimic diagnostic methods used clinically have been developed to evaluate the animal models. Use of these animal models to test innovative treatment strategies has the potential to improve clinical management of SUI. This chapter provides a review of the available animal models of SUI, as well as a review of the methods of assessing SUI in animal models, and potential treatments that have been tested on these models. PMID:21290221

  15. Hysterectomy and urinary incontinence in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kudish, Bela I; Shveiky, David; Gutman, Robert E; Jacoby, Vanessa; Sokol, Andrew I; Rodabough, Rebecca; Howard, Barabara V; Blanchette, Patricia; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate an association between hysterectomy and urinary incontinence (UI) in postmenopausal women. Women (aged 50-79) with uteri (N = 53,569) and without uteri (N = 38,524) who enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study between 1993 and 1996 were included in this secondary analysis. Baseline (BL) and 3-year demographic, health/physical forms and personal habit questionnaires were used. Statistical analyses included univariate and logistic regression methods. The baseline UI rate was 66.5 %, with 27.3 % of participants having stress urinary incontinence (SUI), 23 % having urge UI (UUI), and 12.4 % having mixed UI (MUI). 41.8 % of women had undergone hysterectomy, with 88.1 % having had the procedure before age 54. Controlling for health/physical variables, hysterectomy was associated with UI at BL (OR 1.25, 95 % CI 1.19, 1.32) and over the 3-year study period (OR 1.23, 95 % CI 1.11, 1.36). Excluding women with UI at BL, a higher incidence of UUI and SUI episodes was found in hysterectomy at year 3. Among women who had undergone hysterectomy, those with bilateral oophorectomy (BSO) did not have increased odds of developing UI at BL or over the 3-year study period. Hormone use was not associated with a change in UI incidence (estrogen + progesterone, p = 0.17; unopposed estrogen, p = 0.41). Risk of UI is increased in postmenopausal women who had undergone hysterectomy compared with women with uteri.

  16. [Neurogenic urinary incontinence. Value of surgical management].

    PubMed

    Kutzenberger, J

    2008-06-01

    Damage to the CNS, the cauda equina, and the pelvic nerval structures causes neurogenic bladder dysfunction with neurogenic urinary incontinence (NUI). The definitive diagnosis of NUI is made with urodynamic examination methods. The most frequent cause of NUI is neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The treatment concept must take into account the physical and emotional restrictions. The treatment of NUI due to NDO is a domain of conservative therapy, i.e., mostly antimuscarinics and intermittent catheterization (IC). In about 30%, there is a good chance for therapy failures. An advancement in therapy is the injection of BTX-A into the detrusor. The missing drug approval is a disadvantage.Operative treatments are considered if conservative and minimally invasive therapies are unsuccessful. Sacral deafferentation (SDAF) and sacral anterior root stimulator implantation (SARSI) are available as organ-preserving techniques only for paraplegics with NDO and reflex urinary incontinence and neuromodulation for the other forms of NDO provided that a successful percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE) test has previously taken place. Augmentation cystoplasty is indicated if SDAF and neuromodulation cannot be used and the bladder wall is damaged irreversibly by fibrosis. Kidney function of at least 25% and acceptance of IC are prerequisites. Myectomy (autoaugmentation) has an indication similar to augmentation cystoplasty but there must not be any fibrosis. Bladder neck insufficiency (BNI) caused by paralysis or iatrogenically can be treated by the implantation of an alloplastic sphincter high at the bladder neck. A stable reservoir function is required. If not all methods are possible, the ileum conduit or the suprapubic bladder fistula can be the last resort.

  17. Urinary incontinence in a vulnerable population: older women.

    PubMed

    Criner, J A

    2001-01-01

    Urinary incontinence creates a tremendous hardship on older women and results in social isolation, anxiety, low self-esteem, depression, and decreased life satisfaction. Stress, urge, overflow, and functional incontinence can be treated by behavioral methods, medications, or invasive techniques. The nurse should complete a health history before making an informed decision with the older women about the most appropriate treatment plan. There can be improved quality of life for women with incontinence if health care providers focus on this problem.

  18. Management of urinary incontinence in women: scientific review.

    PubMed

    Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna M; Straus, Sharon E

    2004-02-25

    Urinary incontinence is a common health problem among women that negatively impacts quality of life. Therefore, it is important that primary care physicians have an understanding of how to manage urinary incontinence effectively. To review the most recent, high-quality evidence regarding the etiology and management of urinary incontinence in women. Searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and the ACP Journal Club were performed to identify English-language articles published between 1998-2003 that focused on the etiology or treatment of urinary incontinence in adult women. The references of each retrieved article were reviewed and an expert in the field was contacted to identify additional relevant articles. Using a combination of more than 80 search terms, we included articles of etiology that were cohort studies, case-control studies, cross-sectional studies, or systematic reviews of cohort, case-control, and/or cross-sectional studies. Studies of treatment had to be randomized controlled trials or systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials. The quality of each article was assessed independently by each author and inclusion (n = 66) was determined by consensus. Multiple factors have been found to be associated with urinary incontinence, some of which are amenable to modification. Factors associated with incontinence include age, white race, higher educational attainment, pregnancy-related factors, gynecological factors, urological and gastrointestinal tract factors, comorbid diseases, higher body mass index, medications, smoking, caffeine, and functional impairment. There are several effective nonpharmacological treatments including pelvic floor muscle training, electrical stimulation, bladder training, and prompted voiding. Anticholinergic drugs are effective in the treatment of urge urinary incontinence. Several surgical interventions are effective in the management of stress incontinence, including open retropubic colposuspension and

  19. Evaluation of a behavioral treatment for female urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Santacreu, Marta; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2011-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a medical, psychological, social, economic, and hygienic problem. Although it is difficult to state its prevalence, all authors agree that it is related to age and gender. This study aimed to carry out a urinary incontinence behavioral treatment in order to reduce urine leakages in 14 participants recruited from a senior center. The program consists of daily training of the pelvic floor muscles with a weekly control by a supervisor during a 2-month period and follow-up of results 2 months after the last control session. Urinary incontinence episodes were reduced by 75.67% after program completion. It appears that pelvic floor muscles training, carried out under controlled and constant supervision, significantly reduces urinary leakage. Moreover, maintaining this improvement after treatment depends on the continuation of the exercises as well as on the urinary leakage frequency baseline and the urinary leakage frequency during the last treatment session. PMID:21753868

  20. Urodynamic study in women with pure stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Valdevenito, J P; Águila, F; Naser, M; Manríquez, V; Wenzel, C; Díaz, J P

    2015-03-01

    To describe the results of urodynamic study in women with pure stress urinary incontinence symptoms, including the characteristics of the overactive detrusor. No other clinical assessments were taken into account. A retrospective study in women with urinary incontinence consecutively evaluated by urodynamic study. From a total of 710 women, only 108 (15%) with pure stress urinary incontinence symptoms were selected. Women with prior urinary incontinence surgery, pelvic organ prolapse (stage ≥iii), pelvic radiotherapy, using medication active on the lower urinary tract and neurological diseases were excluded. Infusion rate was 70 ml/min. Detrusor overactivity was induced only by cough. A standardized cough stress test with progressive cough intensity was carried out. Reference urodynamic values for stress incontinent women are described. Urodynamic stress incontinence was observed in 79 women (73.1%), detrusor overactivity in 4 (3.7%) and mixed urodynamic diagnosis in 15 (13.8%). Test was inconclusive in 10 patients (9.2%). Two women had detrusor overactivity incontinence (1.9%). One patient had detrusor overactivity induced by cough without urodynamic stress incontinence (0.9%). There was an association between detrusor overactivity and nocturia ≥2 (P=.002; odds ratio: 3.74; 95% confidence interval: 1.22-11.39). One woman had a bladder outlet obstruction (0.9%). In women with pure stress urinary incontinence, without knowing the outcome of other clinical assessments, urodynamic study can provide useful information to define the proper therapy. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Glycemic Control and Urinary Incontinence in Women with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Andrew J.; Thai, Julie N.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Huang, Elbert S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Although many studies have shown that diabetes increases the risk for urinary incontinence, it is unclear whether poor glycemic control in women with diabetes is associated with incontinence. This study aims to determine the relationship between the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level and urinary incontinence in a large, diverse cohort of older women. Methods We examined 6026 older women who responded to a survey (62% response rate) and were enrolled in the Diabetes and Aging Study, an ethnically stratified random sample of patients with diabetes enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Our primary independent variable was the mean of all HbA1c measurements in the year preceding the survey. Outcomes included the presence/absence of incontinence and limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. We used modified Poisson regression and ordinal logistic regression models to account for age, race, body mass index, parity, diabetes treatment, duration of diabetes, and comorbidity. Results Sixty-five percent of women reported incontinence (mean age 59±10 years). After adjustment, HbA1c levels were not associated with the presence or absence of incontinence. However, among women reporting incontinence, HbA1c ≥9% was associated with more limitations due to incontinence than HbA1c <6% (adjusted odds ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval: 1.09–2.57). Conclusion In this cross-sectional analysis, HbA1c level is not associated with the presence or absence of incontinence. However, for women with incontinence, poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≥9%) is associated with more limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether improving glycemic control to HbA1c <9% leads to fewer limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. PMID:24032999

  2. Caffeine and urinary incontinence in US women.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Jonathan L; Richter, Holly E; Redden, David T; Goode, Patricia S; Burgio, Kathryn L; Markland, Alayne D

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize associations between caffeine consumption and severity of urinary incontinence (UI) in US women. We hypothesized that moderate and high caffeine intake would be associated with UI in US women when controlling for other factors associated with UI. US women participated in the 2005-2006 and 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a cross-sectional, nationally representative survey. Using the Incontinence Severity Index, UI was categorized as "any" and "moderate/severe". Types of UI included stress, urge, mixed, and other. Food diaries were completed, and average water (grams/day), total dietary moisture (grams/day), and caffeine (milligrams/day) intake were calculated into quartiles. Stepwise logistic regression models were constructed adjusting for sociodemographics, chronic diseases, body mass index, self-rated health, depression, physical activity, alcohol use, dietary water and moisture intake, and reproductive factors. From the 4,309 nonpregnant women (aged ≥20 years) who had complete UI and dietary data, UI prevalence for any UI was 41.0 % and 16.5 % for moderate/severe UI, with stress UI the most common type (36.6 %). Women consumed a mean caffeine intake of 126.7 mg/day. After adjusting for multiple factors, caffeine intake in the highest quartile (≥204 mg/day) was associated with any UI [prevalence odds ratio (POR) 1.47, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.07-2.01], but not moderate/severe UI (POR 1.42, 95 % CI 0.98-2.07). Type of UI (stress, urgency, mixed) was not associated with caffeine intake. Caffeine intake ≥204 mg/day was associated with any UI but not with moderate/severe UI in US women.

  3. Parturition events and risk of urinary incontinence in later life.

    PubMed

    Thom, David H; Brown, Jeanette S; Schembri, Michael; Ragins, Arona I; Creasman, Jennifer M; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K

    2011-11-01

    To examine the association between specific events during vaginal deliveries and urinary incontinence later in life. A retrospective cohort study of 1,521 middle-aged and older women with at least one vaginal delivery who were long-term members of an integrated health delivery system. Age, race/ethnicity, current incontinence status, medical, surgical history, pregnancy and parturition history, menopausal status, hormone replacement, health habits, and general health were obtained by questionnaire. Labor and delivery records, archived since 1948, were abstracted by professional medical record abstractors to obtain parturition events including induction, length of labor stages, type of anesthesia, episiotomy, instrumental delivery, and birth weight. The primary dependent variable was current weekly urinary incontinence (once per week or more often) versus urinary incontinence less than monthly (including no incontinence) in past 12 months. Associations of parturition events and later incontinence were assessed in multivariate analysis with logistic regression. The mean age of participants was 56 years. After adjustment for multiple risk factors, weekly urinary incontinence significantly associated with age at first birth (P = 0.036), greatest birth weight (P = 0.005), and ever having been induced for labor (OR = 1.51; 95%CI = 1.06-2.16, P = 0.02). Risk of incontinence increased from OR = 1.35 (95%CI = 0.92-1.97, P = 0.12) for women with one induction to OR = 2.67 (95%CI = 1.25-5.71, P = 0.01) for women with two or more inductions (P = 0.01 for trend). No other parturition factors were associated with incontinence. Younger age at first birth, greatest birth weight, and induction of labor were associated with an increased risk of incontinence in later life. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Parturition Events and Risk of Urinary Incontinence in Later Life

    PubMed Central

    Thom, David H.; Brown, Jeanette S.; Schembri, Michael; Ragins, Arona I.; Creasman, Jennifer M.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.

    2011-01-01

    Aims To examine the association between specific events during vaginal deliveries and urinary incontinence later in life. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 1521 middle-aged and older women with at least 1 vaginal delivery who were long-term members of an integrated health delivery system. Age, race/ethnicity, current incontinence status, medical, surgical history, pregnancy and parturition history, menopausal status, hormone replacement, health habits, and general health were obtained by questionnaire. Labor and delivery records, archived since 1948, were abstracted by professional medical record abstractors to obtain parturition events including induction, length of labor stages, type of anesthesia, episiotomy, instrumental delivery, and birth weight. The primary dependent variable was current weekly urinary incontinence (once per week or more often) vs urinary incontinence less than monthly (including no incontinence) in past 12 months. Associations of parturition events and later incontinence were assessed in multivariate analysis with logistic regression. Results The mean age of participants was 56 years. After adjustment for multiple risk factors, weekly urinary incontinence significantly associated with age at first birth (p=.036), greatest birth weight (p=.005), and ever having been induced for labor (OR=1.51; 95% CI=1.06–2.16, p=.02). Risk of incontinence increased from OR=1.35 (95% CI=0.92–1.97, p=0.12) for women with one induction to OR=2.67 (95% CI= 1.25–5.71, p=.01) for women with 2 or more inductions (p=0.01 for trend). No other parturition factors were associated with incontinence. Conclusions Younger age at first birth, greatest birth weight, and induction of labor were associated with an increased risk of incontinence in later life. PMID:21780171

  5. Challenges of Conducting Multi-Center, Multi-Disciplinary Urinary Incontinence Clinical Trials: Experience of the Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network

    PubMed Central

    Steers, William; Richter, Holly; Nyberg, Leroy; Kusek, John; Kraus, Stephen; Dandrea, Kimberly; Chai, Toby; Brubaker, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Aims The Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network (UITN) was established in 2000 as a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional network by the National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) to investigate treatments for urinary incontinence in women. Methods Over 8 years this network composed of urologists, urogynecologists, geriatricians, behavioral psychologists, physical therapists, nurses, epidemiologists, social scientists and statisticians from nine academic sites and a Data Coordinating Center has been effective in designing and completing prospective randomized clinical trials for treatments of urinary incontinence in women. Results Two major clinical trials have been completed and a third has completed recruitment. The focus of the completed trials was a comparison of surgical methods to treat stress urinary incontinence whereas the third examined the potential benefit of combined behavioral intervention and antimuscarinic drug therapy to eliminate the need for long-term use of drug therapy alone to manage urge urinary incontinence. The scientific output of the network measured by abstracts, original papers and presentations demonstrates the productivity of the network. Conclusions Many unique challenges are posed by a multi-disciplinary team located at sites across the United States undertaking several clinical trials. This review presents some of the logistics, barriers, tactics, and strategies used to create this successful clinical trials network focused on urinary incontinence. PMID:19030190

  6. Anticholinergic Therapy vs. OnabotulinumtoxinA for Urgency Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Visco, Anthony G.; Brubaker, Linda; Richter, Holly E.; Nygaard, Ingrid; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R.; Menefee, Shawn A.; Schaffer, Joseph; Lowder, Jerry; Khandwala, Salil; Sirls, Larry; Spino, Cathie; Nolen, Tracy L.; Wallace, Dennis; Meikle, Susan F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anticholinergic medications and onabotulinumtoxinA are used to treat urgency urinary incontinence, but data directly comparing the two types of therapy are needed. METHODS We performed a double-blind, double-placebo–controlled, randomized trial involving women with idiopathic urgency urinary incontinence who had five or more episodes of urgency urinary incontinence per 3-day period, as recorded in a diary. For a 6-month period, participants were randomly assigned to daily oral anticholinergic medication (solifenacin, 5 mg initially, with possible escalation to 10 mg and, if necessary, subsequent switch to trospium XR, 60 mg) plus one intradetrusor injection of saline or one intradetrusor injection of 100 U of onabotulinumtoxinA plus daily oral placebo. The primary outcome was the reduction from baseline in mean episodes of urgency urinary incontinence per day over the 6-month period, as recorded in 3-day diaries submitted monthly. Secondary outcomes included complete resolution of urgency urinary incontinence, quality of life, use of catheters, and adverse events. RESULTS Of 249 women who underwent randomization, 247 were treated, and 241 had data available for the primary outcome analyses. The mean reduction in episodes of urgency urinary incontinence per day over the course of 6 months, from a baseline average of 5.0 per day, was 3.4 in the anticholinergic group and 3.3 in the onabotulinumtoxinA group (P = 0.81). Complete resolution of urgency urinary incontinence was reported by 13% and 27% of the women, respectively (P = 0.003). Quality of life improved in both groups, without significant between-group differences. The anticholinergic group had a higher rate of dry mouth (46% vs. 31%, P = 0.02) but lower rates of catheter use at 2 months (0% vs. 5%, P = 0.01) and urinary tract infections (13% vs. 33%, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Oral anticholinergic therapy and onabotulinumtoxinA by injection were associated with similar reductions in the frequency of

  7. Olanzapine as a Cause of Urinary Incontinence: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, Lateef Olutoyin; Adegun, Patrick T; Tareo, Peter O

    2012-01-01

    Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic, is one of the most commonly used antipsychotics. Though olanzapine is commonly associated with endocrine side effects, it is generally well tolerated by most patients and is rarely associated with urinary incontinence. This report highlights the case of a 23 -year old male patient with schizophrenia who developed severe urinary incontinence following the use of olanzapine. No medications were given to relieve the incontinence contrary to some other studies where ephedrine was used. Olanzapine was changed to trifluoperazine, and the patient's condition improved within two days. Urinary incontinence, though uncommon, is an embarrassing side effect of olanzapine which could negatively affect drug compliance. As such, clinicians should enquire about it in order to improve the patient's health. PMID:23139697

  8. Risk factors for postpartum urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Lígia da Silva; Lúcio, Adélia; Lopes, Maria Helena Baena de Moraes

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the risk factors for postpartum urinary incontinence (UI) and its characteristics. This was a case-control study with 344 puerperal women (77 cases and 267 controls) with up to 90 days postpartum. In a single session, participants were given a questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical data and two others that assessed urine leakage, leakage situations, and type of UI. Stress UI was present in 45.5% of the women, incidents of urine leakage several times a day in 44.2%, of which 71.4% were in small amounts and 57.1% when coughing or sneezing. In 70.1% of cases, UI began during pregnancy and remained through the postpartum period. After running a binary logistic regression model, the following factors remained in the final model: UI during pregnancy (OR 12.82, CI 95% 6.94 - 23.81, p<0.0001), multiparity (OR 2.26, CI 95% 1.22 - 4.19, p=0.009), gestational age at birth greater or equal to 37 weeks (OR 2.52, CI 95% 1.16 - 5.46, p=0.02) and constipation (OR 1.94, CI 95% 1.05 - 5.46, p=0.035). Most often, UI first appeared during pregnancy and remained through the postpartum period. Urinary incontinence during pregnancy, multiparity, gestational age at birth greater or equal to 37 weeks, and constipation were presented as risk factors. In the studied group, stress UI was more frequent. Investigar os fatores de risco para a incontinência urinária (IU) no puerpério e as suas características. Trata-se de estudo caso-controle com 344 puérperas (77 casos e 267 controles), com até 90 dias pós-parto. Foi aplicado, em um único momento, um questionário para os dados sociodemográficos e clínicos, e dois outros para avaliar a perda urinária, situações de perda e o tipo de IU. Apresentaram IU de esforço 45,5%, perda urinária diversas vezes ao dia 44,2%, sendo 71,4% em pequena quantidade e 57,1% ao tossir ou espirrar. Em 70,1% dos casos a IU iniciou-se na gestação e permaneceu no puerpério. Ao ajustar-se um modelo de regressão logística bin

  9. Treatment Options for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Rovner, Eric S; Wein, Alan J

    2004-01-01

    Treatment options for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women are designed to prevent the involuntary loss of urine from the urethra during increases in intraabdominal pressure that occur during physical activity, coughing, or sneezing. Effective nonsurgical therapies include behavioral therapy (eg, bladder training, fluid and dietary modification) and drug therapy. Surgical therapy for this condition has existed for well over 100 years. Currently, approximately 200 different surgical procedures have been described. Because of the physiologic risks inherent in surgical procedures, the cost of hospitalization, and the loss of productivity during convalescence, surgeons continue to modify their techniques to improve efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness, and to minimize invasiveness. No single procedure or intervention is optimal for all patients. Having a variety of treatment options offers the possibility of tailoring therapy to the desires and needs of the individual patient. The key to an optimal therapeutic outcome is an accurate diagnosis combined with the selection of an appropriate intervention that is acceptable to the patient after balancing multiple factors. PMID:16985862

  10. Urinary incontinence and loneliness in Canadian seniors.

    PubMed

    Ramage-Morin, Pamela L; Gilmour, Heather

    2013-10-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI), a prevalent condition among seniors, can have substantial impacts on quality of life. Data from the 2008/2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging were used to examine the prevalence of UI, as well as the relationship between UI and loneliness in a sample of 16,369 people aged 65 or older. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify significant relationships, while adjusting for potential confounders. In 2008/2009, an estimated 512,000 seniors reported that they experienced UI. Women were more likely than men to have this complaint (14% versus 9%), as were older seniors. Those with UI were significantly more likely to be lonely than were those without the condition (OR=1.8, 95% CI: 1.5 to 2.0). This association persisted when socio-demographic, social and functional health factors were taken into account (OR=1.5, 95% CI: 1.3 to 1.7). This study highlights the prevalence of UI among Canadian seniors and its correlation with loneliness, which, itself, is associated with negative health outcomes. Further research is needed to establish exactly how UI has an impact on seniors' feelings of loneliness.

  11. Evaluation of the urinary microbiota of women with uncomplicated stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Thomas-White, Krystal J; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Rickey, Leslie; Lukacz, Emily S; Richter, Holly E; Moalli, Pamela; Zimmern, Philippe; Norton, Peggy; Kusek, John W; Wolfe, Alan J; Brubaker, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Female urinary microbiota are associated with urgency urinary incontinence and response to medication. The urinary microbiota of women with stress urinary incontinence has not been described. We sought to study the cross-sectional relationships between urinary microbiota features and demographic and clinical characteristics of women undergoing stress urinary incontinence surgery. Preoperative urine specimens were collected from women without urinary tract infection and were available from 197 women (174 voided, 23 catheterized) enrolled in a multicenter prospective randomized trial, the Value of Urodynamic Evaluation study. Demographic and clinical variables were obtained including stress and urgency urinary incontinence symptoms, menopausal status, and hormone use. The bacterial composition of the urine was qualitatively assessed by sequencing the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Phylogenetic relatedness and microbial alpha diversity were compared to demographics and symptoms using generalized estimating equation models. The majority of 197 urine samples (86%) had detectable bacterial DNA. Bacterial diversity was significantly associated with higher body mass index (P = .02); increased Medical, Epidemiologic, and Social Aspects of Aging urge index score (P = .04); and hormonal status (P < .001). No associations were detected with stress urinary incontinence symptoms. Increased diversity was also associated with a concomitant lower frequency of Lactobacillus in hormone-negative women. Women undergoing stress urinary incontinence surgery have detectable urinary microbiota. This cross-sectional analysis revealed that increased diversity of the microbiota was associated with urgency urinary incontinence symptoms, hormonal status, and body mass index. In contrast, the female urinary microbiota were not associated with stress urinary incontinence symptoms. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Genetic contributions to urgency urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Richter, Holly E; Whitehead, Nedra; Arya, Lily; Ridgeway, Beri; Allen-Brady, Kristina; Norton, Peggy; Sung, Vivian; Shepherd, Jonathan P; Komesu, Yuko; Gaddis, Nathan; Fraser, Matthew O; Tan-Kim, Jasmine; Meikle, Susan; Page, Grier P

    2015-06-01

    We identify genetic variants associated with urgency urinary incontinence in postmenopausal women. A 2-stage genome-wide association analysis was conducted to identify variants associated with urgency urinary incontinence. The WHI GARNET substudy with 4,894 genotyped post-reproductive white women was randomly split into independent discovery and replication cohorts. Genome-wide imputation was performed using IMPUTE2 with the 1000 Genomes ALL Phase I integrated variant set as a reference. Controls reported no urgency urinary incontinence at enrollment or followup. Cases reported monthly or greater urgency urinary incontinence and leaked sufficiently to wet/soak underpants/clothes. Logistic regression models were used to predict urgency urinary incontinence case vs control status based on genotype, assuming additive inheritance. Age, obesity, diabetes and depression were included in the models as covariates. Following quality control, 975,508 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 2,241 cases (discovery 1,102; replication 1,133) and 776 controls (discovery 405, replication 371) remained. Genotype imputation resulted in 9,077,347 single nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions with minor allele frequency greater than 0.01 available for analysis. Meta-analysis of the discovery and replication samples identified 6 loci on chromosomes 5, 10, 11, 12 and 18 associated with urgency urinary incontinence at p <10(-6). Of the loci 3 were within genes, the zinc finger protein 521 (ZFP521) gene on chromosome 18q11, the ADAMTS16 gene on chromosome 5p15 and the CIT gene on chromosome 12q24. The other 3 loci were intergenic. Although environmental factors also likely contribute, this first exploratory genome-wide association study for urgency urinary incontinence suggests that genetic variants in the ZFP521, CIT and ADAMTS16 genes might account for some of the observed heritability of the condition. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  13. Increasing costs of urinary incontinence among female Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Anger, Jennifer T; Saigal, Christopher S; Madison, Rodger; Joyce, Geoffrey; Litwin, Mark S

    2006-07-01

    We measured the financial burden of urinary incontinence in the United States from 1992 to 1998 among women 65 years old or older. We analyzed Medicare claims for 1992, 1995 and 1998 and estimated spending on the treatment of urinary incontinence. Total costs were stratified by type of service (inpatient, outpatient and emergency department). Costs of urinary incontinence among older women nearly doubled between 1992 and 1998 in nominal dollars, from $128 million to $234 million, primarily due to increases in physician office visits and ambulatory surgery. The cost of inpatient services increased only slightly during the period. The increase in total spending was due almost exclusively to the increase in the number of women treated for incontinence. After adjusting for inflation, per capita treatment costs decreased about 15% during the study. This shift from inpatient to outpatient care likely reflects the general shift of surgical procedures to the outpatient setting, as well as the advent of new minimally invasive incontinence procedures. In addition, increased awareness of incontinence and the marketing of new drugs for its treatment, specifically anticholinergic medication for overactive bladder symptoms, may have increased the number of office visits. While claims based Medicare expenditures are substantial, they do not include the costs of pads or medications and, therefore, underestimate the true financial burden of incontinence on the aging community.

  14. Is Alcohol Consumption Associated with Male Urinary Incontinence?

    PubMed

    Lee, Andy H; Hirayama, Fumi

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the association between alcohol consumption and urinary incontinence among Japanese men. Seven hundred men aged 40-75 years were recruited from the community in middle and southern Japan. A validated food frequency questionnaire was administered face-to-face to obtain information on dietary intake and habitual alcohol consumption. Urinary incontinence status was ascertained using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form. Among the 683 eligible male participants, 49 men (7.2%) experienced urine leakage for the past 2.6 years (standard deviation [SD] 1.9). Their prevalence of alcohol drinking (beer, sake, shochu, wine, whisky) was lower than others without the condition, even though the daily mean ethanol intakes were similar between the two groups, 31.8 g (SD 45.4) and 31.3 g (SD 41.9), respectively. Relative to non-drinkers, the adjusted odds of urinary incontinence were 0.43 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.96) for low ethanol intake, and up to 32 g per day and 0.53 (95% CI 0.22 to 1.28) for drinking, at most, one can (350 mL) of beer daily. However, higher levels of alcohol consumption had no significant benefit in reducing the incontinence risk. The findings suggested an inverse association between urinary incontinence and low alcohol consumption particularly beer in middle-aged and older Japanese men. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Diabetes, glycemic control, and urinary incontinence in women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Lefevre, Roger; Hacker, Michele R.; Golen, Toni H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To estimate the association between urinary incontinence and glycemic control in women ages 20 to 85. METHODS We included 7,270 women from the 2005–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, stratified into three groups of glycemic control defined by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c): i) those below the diagnostic threshold (HbA1c<6.5%), ii) those with relatively controlled diabetes (HbA1c 6.5–8.5%), and iii) those with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c>8.5%) to allow for a different relationship between glycemic control and urinary incontinence within each group. The primary outcomes were the presence of any, only stress, only urgency, and mixed urinary incontinence. We calculated adjusted risk ratios using Poisson regressions with robust variance estimates. RESULTS The survey-weighted prevalence was 52.9% for any, 27.2% for only stress, 9.9% for only urgency, and 15.8% for mixed urinary incontinence. Among women with relatively controlled diabetes, each one-unit increase in HbA1c was associated with a 13% (95% CI: 1.03–1.25) increase for any urinary incontinence and a 34% (95% CI 1.06–1.69) increase in risk for only stress incontinence but was not significantly associated with only urgency and mixed incontinence. Other risk factors included body mass index, hormone replacement therapy, smoking, and physical activity. CONCLUSIONS Worsening glycemic control is associated with an increased risk for stress incontinence for women with relatively controlled diabetes. For those either below the diagnostic threshold or with poorly controlled diabetes, the risk may be driven by other factors. Further prospective investigation of HbA1c as a modifiable risk factor may motivate measures to improve continence in women with diabetes. PMID:26313496

  16. Knowledge and understanding of urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Katherina; Hunter, Kathleen F.; Wagg, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate family physicians’ knowledge of, attitudes toward, and understanding of urinary incontinence (UI), as well as their perceptions of barriers to continence care, as a foundation for designing interventions to improve service provision for those in northern Alberta who suffer from UI. Design Descriptive survey using a standardized instrument. The survey instrument was completed either by telephone interview or on paper copy faxed back to the researchers, depending on participant preference. Setting Northern Alberta. Participants Random sample of family physicians (N = 158). Main outcome measures Physician knowledge of and attitudes toward UI, UI management practices, and barriers to providing UI care. Results Survey response rate was 10.6% (158 of 1488); 84.2% (133 of 158) of respondents practised in urban settings, 44.9% (71 of 158) had been in practice for fewer than 15 years, 24.1% (38 of 158) reported having no training in UI management since graduation, and 53.8% (85 of 158) reported that they proactively discussed UI with their patients. Overall, 70.0% of respondents felt fairly confident in managing UI. Most family physicians referred patients for specialist care, with few referrals to community services. Respondents thought that continence services were scarce, with long waiting times, and that such services were generally overstretched; they believed that although high-quality continence care was a personal priority, it was not a priority focus for their practice partnerships or networks. In terms of the highest ranked areas for improvement in UI management, increased awareness and understanding among physicians (ranked first by 28.5% of respondents), followed by dedicated incontinence clinics or nurses for referral (17.7%) and improving patient awareness and understanding (12.0%). Conclusion There continues to be considerable variation in knowledge about UI management and a relative overreliance on specialist care, despite

  17. [Pelvic floor rehabilitation for female urinary incontinence: mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Deffieux, X; Billecocq, S; Demoulin, G; Rivain, A-L; Trichot, C; Thubert, T

    2013-06-01

    To analyze the proven mechanisms of action of pelvic rehabilitation in women presenting with urinary incontinence. Review of literature (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Database) using following keywords: female; urinary incontinence; overactive bladder syndrome; stress urinary incontinence; bladder training; bladder diary; pelvic floor muscle training; pelvic floor rehabilitation; physiotherapy; cognitive therapies. Among 2906 articles (animal and anatomical studies have been excluded); 66 have been selected because they focused on the evaluation of the pathophysiological mechanisms of pelvic floor rehabilitation concerning female urinary incontinence. Studies on pelvic floor muscles training exercises showed a significant increase in the force of contraction of these muscles and it was correlated with improved scores of urinary incontinence and pad test (coefficient of correlation r ranged from 0.23 to 0.34) for women presenting with stress urinary incontinence. These studies have not observed an increase in the maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP) or correction of urethral hypermobility related with the improvement of incontinence after rehabilitation sessions. Studies concerning pelvic floor stimulation observed an increase in the force of contraction of pelvic floor muscles after rehabilitation and a decrease in the intensity of detrusor contractions without changing the MUCP. There is very little data on the precise mechanisms of action of biofeedback and cognitive behavioral therapy. In studies that objectively evaluated the mechanisms of action of pelvic rehabilitation, it was observed that pelvic floor muscles voluntary exercises and electrostimulation resulted an increase in force of contraction of these muscles without changing the MUCP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Anti-diuresis in the management of daytime urinary -incontinence.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D; Cardozo, L

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract dysfunction, whilst not life threatening conditions, remain an important cause of morbidity in women and are responsible for significant impairment of quality of life. Drug therapy is often used to treat women who complain of urgency and urge incontinence and has an emerging role in the management of stress urinary incontinence. However, bothersome side effects are known to affect compliance and therefore compromise efficacy, making longterm drug therapy unpopular. The principle aim of this thesis is to assess the role of antidiuresis in women complaining of daytime urinary incontinence and also to examine its role as a 'designer therapy' which women can choose to use as, or when, required. In addition both the patients' and clinicians' attitudes towards treatment have been studied to clarify the meaning of 'cure', and to determine treatment acceptability, overall outcome and patient satisfaction. In the first study the patients' concept of cure is explored as well as their expectations regarding treatment and outcome. The second study examines cure from the clinician's perspective in addition to reviewing outcome measures in the clinical and research settings. Finally in the third study the use of desmopressin in women complaining of daytime urinary incontinence is reported.

  19. Anti-diuresis in the management of daytime urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, D.; Cardozo, L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract dysfunction, whilst not life threatening conditions, remain an important cause of morbidity in women and are responsible for significant impairment of quality of life. Drug therapy is often used to treat women who complain of urgency and urge incontinence and has an emerging role in the management of stress urinary incontinence. However, bothersome side effects are known to affect compliance and therefore compromise efficacy, making longterm drug therapy unpopular. The principle aim of this thesis is to assess the role of antidiuresis in women complaining of daytime urinary incontinence and also to examine its role as a ‘designer therapy’ which women can choose to use as, or when, required. In addition both the patients’ and clinicians’ attitudes towards treatment have been studied to clarify the meaning of ‘cure’, and to determine treatment acceptability, overall outcome and patient satisfaction. In the first study the patients’ concept of cure is explored as well as their expectations regarding treatment and outcome. The second study examines cure from the clinician’s perspective in addition to reviewing outcome measures in the clinical and research settings. Finally in the third study the use of desmopressin in women complaining of daytime urinary incontinence is reported. PMID:25478070

  20. Taking Control: Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women What is UI? “Taking Control” (5-minute video) “ ... video in a new window) Are there other women like me? (8-minute video) Urinary incontinence happens ...

  1. Taking Control: Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women What is UI? “Taking Control” (5-minute video) “ ... video in a new window) Are there other women like me? (8-minute video) Urinary incontinence happens ...

  2. Urinary incontinence and nocturia in healthy schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, S

    1994-09-01

    A frequency/volume chart was used to investigate the micturition pattern of healthy schoolchildren, aged 7-15 years. Of 242 objectively and subjectively healthy children, incontinence was recorded by 36 (14.9%). Nocturnal enuresis, defined as at least one wet night in three months, occurred in 19 (7.9%) children and daytime incontinence occurred with the same frequency. Four girls had both symptoms. Twenty-seven (11.2%) children woke up to void during the night of the investigation but habitual nocturia was established for only 4.1%. There was no difference in the micturition pattern between continent and incontinent children, and there was no correlation between incontinence, nocturnal micturitions and recorded oral fluid intake. At a follow-up one year later, using a questionnaire administrated to the same children, a persistent high rate of incontinence confirmed the original findings.

  3. Women with Diabetes: Understanding Urinary Incontinence and Help Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Ashmi M.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Morrill, Michelle Y.; Schembri, Michael; Thom, David H.; Brown, Jeanette S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To examine the association of urinary incontinence by diabetes status and race and evaluate beliefs and help-seeking around incontinence in a population-based cohort of women with and without diabetes. Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 2,270 middle-aged and older racially/ethnically diverse women in Diabetes RRISK. Incontinence, help-seeking behavior, and beliefs were assessed by self-report questionnaires and in-person interviews. Incontinence characteristics of diabetics and non-diabetics were compared using univariate analysis and multivariate models. Results Women with diabetes reported weekly incontinence significantly more than women without diabetes (Weekly: 35.4% vs. 25.7%, respectively, p <0.001). Race prevalence patterns were similar (white and Latina women with the most prevalent incontinence and African-American and Asian women with the least) among women with and without diabetes. Less than 50% of women with diabetes discussed their incontinence with a doctor (42.2% vs. 55.5% (of women without diabetes) p <0.003). Women with diabetes were more likely than women without diabetes to report believing that incontinence is a rare condition (17% vs. 6%, respectively, p<0.001). Conclusions Incontinence is highly prevalent among women with diabetes. Race prevalence patterns are similar among women with and without diabetes. Understanding help-seeking behaviors are important to ensure appropriate care for patients. Physicians should be alert for urinary incontinence because it is often unrecognized and thereby under-treated among women with diabetes. PMID:20727547

  4. Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of Mixed Urinary Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Bilal; Laor, Leanna; Dunphy, Claire; Lee, Richard; Te, Alexis; Kaplan, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) is a common clinical problem in the community and hospital setting. The broad definition of the term makes it difficult to diagnose, as well as determine effective treatment strategies. There are no current guidelines recommended for physicians. The estimated prevalence of this condition is approximately 30% in all women with incontinence. It has also been suggested that patients with MUI report more bothersome symptoms than either stress or urge incontinence; approximately 32% of 40- to 64-year-olds with MUI report symptoms of depression. The authors examine the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of patients with MUI. PMID:27222643

  5. Review of current technologies for urinary incontinence: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Fader, M

    2003-01-01

    A wide range of continence products is available, and this paper focuses on products to prevent incontinence (such as urinals and commodes) and to contain or manage urinary incontinence (such as absorbent pads, penile sheaths and urethral catheters). Drawing on results from published clinical evaluations at the Continence Product Evaluation Network at UCL and at other centres, the strengths and limitations of the major categories of incontinence products currently on the market are reviewed. It is concluded that, although products for continence have improved considerably over the last 20 years, there is considerable scope for the designer and engineer to improve on current products.

  6. Efficacy of Physiotherapy for Urinary Incontinence following Prostate Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bakuła, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    The study enrolled 81 with urinary incontinence following radical prostate-only prostatectomy for prostatic carcinoma. The patients were divided into two groups. The patients in Group I were additionally subdivided into two subgroups with respect to the physiotherapeutic method used. The patients of subgroup IA received a rehabilitation program consisting of three parts. The patients of subgroup IB rehabilitation program consist of two parts. Group II, a control group, had reported for therapy for persistent urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy but had not entered therapy for personal reasons. For estimating the level of incontinence, a 1-hour and 24-hour urinary pad tests, the miction diary, and incontinence questionnaire were used, and for recording the measurements of pelvic floor muscles tension, the sEMG (surface electromyography) was applied. The therapy duration depended on the level of incontinence and it continued for not longer than 12 months. Superior continence outcomes were obtained in Group I versus Group II and the difference was statistically significant. The odds ratio for regaining continence was greater in the rehabilitated Group I and smaller in the group II without the rehabilitation. A comparison of continence outcomes revealed a statistically significant difference between Subgroups IA versus IB. The physiotherapeutic procedures applied on patients with urine incontinence after prostatectomy, for most of them, proved to be an effective way of acting, which is supported by the obtained results. PMID:24868546

  7. Usage results of a mobile app for managing urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Jeff; Zhang, Amy; Li, Rui; Wang, Xiao Hui

    2015-04-01

    Slight changes in urinary incontinence severity may be difficult to notice, so that even high functioning patients are unable to detect if urinary incontinence is improving or worsening. We describe a recently released free software app, iDry®, that enables individuals with urinary incontinence to document incontinence symptoms, view progress, evaluate effectiveness of interventions and report status to their health care provider. After 2 field trials, iDry was published as a free download from the Apple® App Store and was downloaded 1,231 times in the first 19 months. iDry also collects large quantities of anonymized usage data for research purposes. Data analysis shows that long-term users had significantly more severe urinary incontinence symptoms (p ≤ 0.01) than short-term users. Short-term users reduced pad use by 20% but long-term users' pad use remaining unchanged. Average leakage was reduced 14.6 mg per day for short-term vs 4.5 mg per day for long-term users, but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.93) due to high data variability (SD 611). There was no significant difference between long-term and short-term users in severity of self-reported stress and urge incontinence. Bladder training positively correlated with a reduction in pad use (p=0.03) and leakage amount (p=0.02). Overall our findings suggest that iDry is a useful, accessible and convenient tool to document urinary incontinence symptoms and improvement, but controlled studies are needed to assess its effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Incontinence Symptom Index-Pediatric: development and initial validation of a urinary incontinence instrument for the older pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Caleb P; Park, John M; Bloom, David A; Wan, Julian; Dunn, Rodney L; Wei, John T

    2007-10-01

    Although urinary incontinence is common in children, no validated pediatric instruments exist for measuring urinary incontinence symptoms and bother. We developed and validated a patient reported pediatric survey for urinary incontinence measurement. The Incontinence Symptom Index-Pediatric is an 11-item instrument comprising 2 domains, that is 1) impairment and 2) symptom severity, including subdomains for stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence, insensate urinary incontinence, nocturnal urinary incontinence and pad use. The survey was self-administered twice, 2 weeks apart, to boys and girls ages 11 to 17 years. Children completed the survey independently. Cases consisted of patients presenting to pediatric urology clinic with the chief complaint of urinary incontinence. Controls consisted of healthy children presenting for evaluation up at a general pediatric practice. Formal validation analysis was performed. A total of 19 subjects per arm completed at least 1 survey. Internal consistency was good with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.84 for the complete instrument. Item-scale correlations were greater than 0.60 for all except 1 item. Test-retest reliability was also good (r = 0.97, p <0.0001). Discriminative validity was good with a total severity scale score of 9.3 in wet children and 0.7 in controls (p <0.0001). Impairment scale scores differed by 2.2 points (p <0.0001). Mean scores differed significantly between subscales for all domains except pad use. The most dramatic difference was in the urge urinary incontinence domain, which differed by a mean of 3.6 points (p = 0.0002). This pilot study provides initial validation of a survey instrument for urinary incontinence in children and adolescents. This instrument can be used in children ages 11 to 17 years to objectively and reproducibly measure patient reported urinary incontinence.

  9. A newly designed deodorant pad for urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Fukui, J; Sakai, Y; Hosaka, K; Yamashita, T; Ogawa, A; Shirai, H

    1990-08-01

    The authors designed a new pad for urinary incontinence. It is composed of a cloth of acrylonitrile copper sulfide and another cloth of iron-phthalocyanine. In vitro experiments showed that acrylonitrile copper sulfide cloth inhibited the growth of most bacteria causing urinary tract infection, and that iron-phthalocyanine cloth effectively eliminated bad-smelling gases. The use of this pad relieved diaper-dermatitis and diminished offensive smells from feces and urine. This pad was well received by nurses and helpers taking care of incontinent elderly people.

  10. [Urinary incontinence induced by the antidepressants - case report].

    PubMed

    Krhut, J; Gärtner, M

    2015-01-01

    Case study of the patient with urinary incontinence induced by the antidepressant mirtazapin and the review of the related literature. Case Report. Department of Urology, University Hospital Ostrava-Poruba. A case of 55-years old patiens, who was reffered to the surgical treatment of the urinary incontinence. We found a major discrepancies during the evaluation that led us to suspect that this is not a common uncomplicated case of stress urinary incontinence. Based on the detailed history we identified the antidepressant mirtazapine as a likely causal factor. After discontinuing mirtazapin patient has achieved full control of the continence. Given that antidepressants affects adrenergic and dopaminergic regulatory mechanisms in the central nervous system, they may affect the lower urinary tract function. This work presents a case report where the disclosure of the less common cause of incontinence saved the patientoriginally proposed surgical treatment and allowed the effective restoration of the continence. We emphasize the need to consider the potential interaction of antidepressants with lower urinary tract function in daily practice.

  11. [Urodynamic studies in the child with urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Schwöbel, M; Bodmer, C

    1998-01-01

    Voiding disorders in children are frequent. To establish an exact anamnesis, it has to be distinguished between enuresis and incontinence and this may consequently already have a therapeutical effect. Enuresis is defined as a normal void occurring at an inappropriate time or place. Incontinence is an involuntary loss of urine and a pathological voiding habit, often in combination with urinary infections. The causes of an enuresis are always functional, the causes for incontinence may be organic or functional. Organic causes are neurogenic bladder dysfunctions or structural anomalies of the lower urinary tract. The functional causes are divided in urge incontinence, dysfunctional voiding, lazy bladder syndrome and stress incontinence. The most important screening examination in each child with voiding disorders is the uroflowmetry, in combination with an electromyography (EMG) of pelvic floor and abdominal muscles. For registration of the muscle activity, surface electrodes are used that only show muscle groups, but do not hurt on application. Cystometry, an invasive method, is used as a second step. The therapy of functional incontinence consists in bladder training, physiotherapy of the pelvic floor and biofeedback. Medicaments are given in second priority. The therapy of functional voiding disorders is only successful in cooperation with the child and its parents.

  12. Sacral nerve stimulation for urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness, safety, and cost of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) to treat urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence. CONDITION AND TARGET POPULATION Urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence are prevalent, yet rarely discussed, conditions. They are rarely discussed because patients may be uncomfortable disclosing their symptoms to a health professional or may be unaware that there are treatment options for these conditions. Briefly, urge incontinence is an involuntary loss of urine upon a sudden urge. Urgency-frequency is an uncontrollable urge to void, which results in frequent, small-volume voids. People with urgency-frequency may or may not also experience chronic pelvic pain. Urinary retention refers to the inability to void despite having the urge to void. It can be caused by a hypocontractile detrusor (weak or no bladder muscle contraction) or obstruction due to urethral overactivity. Fecal incontinence is a loss of voluntary bowel control. The prevalence of urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, and urinary retention in the general population is 3.3% to 8.2%, and the prevalence of fecal incontinence is 1.4% to 1.9%. About three-quarters of these people will be successfully treated by behaviour and/or drug therapy. For those who do not respond to these therapies, the options for treatment are management with diapers or pads, or surgery. The surgical procedures are generally quite invasive, permanent, and are associated with complications. Pads and/or diapers are used throughout the course of treatment as different therapies are tried. Patients who respond successfully to treatment may still require pads or diapers, but to a lesser extent. SACRAL NERVE STIMULATION Sacral nerve stimulation is a procedure where a small device attached to an electrode is implanted in the abdomen or buttock to stimulate the sacral nerves in an

  13. Nursing management of stress urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Jeanette

    Although urinary incontinence is not a subject spoken about in general conversation, it is a cause of concern for many people. Stress urinary incontinence is common, being reported by 16.8% of women (Hunskaar et al, 2002). In the past, women with stress urinary incontinence were often dismissed as having an inevitable problem resulting from childbirth and the hormonal changes associated with ageing. They were often made to feel that they just had to put up with the problem--this is no longer the case. Conservative therapy is advocated as the primary intervention for those suffering with stress urinary incontinence and nurses are ideally placed to be a source of information and help. Furthermore, nurses can develop their skills in order to encompass therapies to become more specialist and effective. In 2000, the Department of Health (DoH) issued guidance on establishing integrated continence services (DoH, 2000). This becomes mandatory for older people from April 2004 (DoH, 2001a).

  14. Staying Trim, Strong May Cut Risk of Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... in decreasing the odds of new or worsening stress type of urinary incontinence," she said. The study was published recently in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society . SOURCES: Anne Suskind, M.D., assistant professor of urology, University of California, San Francisco; Megan Schimpf, M.D., ...

  15. Assessment of the female patient with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Bates, Frankie

    2002-10-01

    Understanding the pelvic floor anatomy and all of its components is crucial when performing pelvic floor examination and assessing patients suffering from urinary incontinence. It is important for urology nurses to understand the pelvic floor, including the muscle, nerve, and fascia involved; external and internal examination of the vulva; and global assessment of the patient.

  16. [Urinary incontinence in the elderly can be treated].

    PubMed

    van Houten, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A recent survey on the use of drugs for incontinence in the elderly stated that only anticholinergic drugs used for urge incontinence have a slight positive effect on incontinence episodes. However, this does not mean that there are no potential treatments for incontinence in the frail elderly. The Dutch surveillance on problems in the care sector, the 'National prevalence survey of care problems' ('Landelijke prevalentiemeting zorgproblemen'), shows that between 2004 and 2014 the prevalence of urinary incontinence dropped from 76% to 49%. This fall in prevalence is due to the policies developed by institutions, and by training for nurses and physicians. Successful treatment begins with assessment of functionality (mobility and cognition), assessment of relevant multimorbidity and reconsideration of the use of drugs with an impact on continence. As a next step, bladder retraining and pelvic floor exercises may be used if the elderly person is able to perform these exercises independently. An anticholinergic drug can be tried as a last resort if there is urge incontinence and there are no contraindications.

  17. German version of the Pediatric Incontinence Questionnaire for urinary incontinence health related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Christian; Lehr, Dirk; Janhsen, Ellen; Steuber, Christian; Gäbel, Elisabeth; von Gontard, Alexander; Bachmann, Hannsjörg

    2009-10-01

    We translated and cross-culturally adapted the English version of the Pediatric Incontinence Questionnaire, and tested the reliability and validity of the German version. This cross-sectional study was done at 3 tertiary referral centers for childhood urinary incontinence. The self-reported and proxy English version was translated and cross-culturally adapted. From July 2007 to April 2008 we evaluated the German version in 91 boys and 54 girls with a mean +/- SD age of 9.3 +/- 2.2 years (range 6 to 18) with nonneurogenic urinary incontinence and in their parents. For concurrent criterion related validity, the German questionnaire scales were compared with those of the DCGM-10/-12. On reliability testing of the self-reported and proxy German versions Cronbach's alpha was 0.84 and 0.86, respectively. Interrater convergence between the self-reported and proxy versions showed an ICC of 0.81. Reproducibility was satisfactory for the self-reported and proxy versions (ICC 0.77, 95% CI 0.77-0.90 and 0.85, 95% CI 0.67-0.84, respectively). German version scores correlated with DCGM-10/-12 scores (self-report and proxy r = -0.71 and -0.69, respectively). Mean German version total scores were 23.0 in boys and 23.9 in girls. Except for a slight significant association between age and German version total score in the proxy version (p = 0.01), age, sex and incontinence type or severity (number of wet days/nights per 14 days) were not significantly associated with German version total scores. The German version of the Pediatric Incontinence Questionnaire is a valid and reliable outcome measure to assess health related quality of life in children and adolescents with urinary incontinence.

  18. The meanings of silence in Brazilian women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Higa, Rosângela; Chvatal, Vera Lucia Soares; de Moraes Lopes, Maria Helena Baena; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    We explored the meanings of silence for Brazilian women with urinary incontinence (UI). The sample consisted of 8 women, aged 30 to 45 years. Respondents worked as housekeepers or cleaning staff and were from lower social, economic, and educational strata. Their years of formal education varied from 0 to 8 years and they earned up to 4.5 times the Brazilian minimum wage, which is equivalent to US$900. A qualitative method using semistructured interviews was employed to gather data. Individual semistructured interviews were recorded and subsequently transcribed, including researchers' observations of subjects' nonverbal behaviors. The interviews began with the question: "Can you tell me about your experience with urinary incontinence?" Data were analyzed using a content analysis technique. Respondents avoided discussing UI and initially resisted labeling themselves as incontinent, but their nonverbal behaviors provided clues to the psychosocial distress caused by urinary leakage. Results suggest that respondents' underprivileged social, economic, and cultural situation may aggravate their limitations when expressing their feelings. We found that the women employed silence as a means to contain the psychosocial distress created by their UI, and that the silence itself should be interpreted as an expression of distress associated with UI. The silence of Brazilian women with UI is an essential element of communication about incontinence. We believe that the silence used by these women expresses the pain and anxiety they experienced, and it acts as an adaptive psychosocial mechanism.

  19. [Update on current care guidelines: urinary incontinence (female)].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Female urinary incontinence (UI) is divided into stress (SUI), urgency (UUI), mixed (MUI) and overflow incontinence (chronic retention). Advanced age, obesity and pregnancy are the most important risk factors. Standardised questionnaires are used in diagnosis. The pad test, cough stress test and bladder diary are objective tools. A gynaecological examination includes pelvic floor muscle palpation and residual urine measurement. Urodynamics, cystoscopy and ultrasonography are complementary tools. Guided pelvic floor-muscle training is the first-line therapy. UUI can be treated with anticholinergic medicines. If conservative treatments are ineffective, SUI and MUI can be treated surgically with mid-urethral slings (TVT TOT and TVT-0).

  20. [Enuresis and pediatric urinary incontinence : Diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Schultz-Lampel, D; Goepel, M; Reitz, A; Braun, P

    2016-12-01

    Differentiated non-invasive diagnostic procedures allow a discrimination between nocturnal enuresis and behavior-linked urinary incontinence in children with daytime symptoms, which are different entities of a pathological pediatric micturition syndrome. The article describes the diagnostic procedure as well as the therapeutic approach to all forms of micturition disorders in childhood. All behavioral, medical and biofeedback therapeutic methods according to the recently published S2k guidelines from the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) on enuresis and non-organic (functional) incontinence in children and adolescents are mentioned and discussed.

  1. The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in women studying nursing and related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Czerwińska-Opara, Wioletta Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a growing problem that affects millions of people worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women studying nursing. Respondents completed a questionnaire assessing urinary incontinence, severity of symptoms and quality of life. Short forms to assess symptoms of distress for urinary incontinence and quality of life: UDI-6 and IIQ-7 have been used. The study's conclusions are as follows: 1) among the 113 interviewed women, stress urinary incontinence (SUI) was observed in 25% of respondents; this prevalence is similar to the age-matched population; 2) among the triggering factors mentioned in stress urinary incontinence the most frequent were: coughing, laughing and sneezing; 3) moderate impact of incontinence on quality of life has been shown, but this effect was not statistically significant. PMID:26327826

  2. The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in women studying nursing and related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Opara, Józef; Czerwińska-Opara, Wioletta Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Urinary incontinence is a growing problem that affects millions of people worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women studying nursing. Respondents completed a questionnaire assessing urinary incontinence, severity of symptoms and quality of life. Short forms to assess symptoms of distress for urinary incontinence and quality of life: UDI-6 and IIQ-7 have been used. The study's conclusions are as follows: 1) among the 113 interviewed women, stress urinary incontinence (SUI) was observed in 25% of respondents; this prevalence is similar to the age-matched population; 2) among the triggering factors mentioned in stress urinary incontinence the most frequent were: coughing, laughing and sneezing; 3) moderate impact of incontinence on quality of life has been shown, but this effect was not statistically significant.

  3. [Causes and diagnosis of female urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Schorsch, I; Soljanik, I; Stanislaus, P; Bauer, R; Mayer, M; Hocaoglu, Y; Becker, A; May, F

    2007-09-20

    The primary cause of stress incontinence is birth traumata. However, obesity, asthma, chronic constipation or hard physical work can also overtax the pelvic floor and lead to injury of the connective tissue and a slackening of the ligamentous apparatus. Pelvic floor defects are initially diagnosed simply through a thorough urogynaecological examination. To predict the success of a surgical treatment, the functions can be tested by performing simulated operations.

  4. Psychocultural meanings of urinary incontinence in women: a review.

    PubMed

    Higa, Rosângela; Lopes, Maria Helena Baena de Mores; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify and analyze studies in health literature about the psychocultural meanings reported by women who experience urinary incontinence (UI). A bibliographical search was executed in the following databases: Lilacs, Medline, Pubmed and Medscape. The present review showed that studies note several meanings. The articles were grouped in three categories defined as significant: according to age experiences, cultural-religious experiences and experiences in self-care. The studies revealed that the degree of anguish and the range of the difficulties experienced are related both with age, ethnic group or religion and with the perception each individual has of her incontinence, which will lead to different levels of emotional disorders and to seeking (or not seeking) treatment. Besides, barriers regarding self-care are perceived. It is concluded that the UI may cause suffering and incontinent women have difficulties to deal with this problem.

  5. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in American Indian women from a South Dakota tribe.

    PubMed

    Fiegen, Michael M; Benson, Kevin D; Hanson, Jessica D; Prasek, Jennifer; Hansen, Keith A; VanEerden, Peter

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the prevalence and associated risk factors for urinary incontinence in a Northern Plains tribe of American Indian women. The Urogenital Distress Inventory-Short Form was used to assess urinary incontinence in a sample of American Indian women from one tribe. This was a cross-sectional convenience sampling of 234 eligible participants. Participant's ages ranged from 18 to 80 years. Stata/Se 9.1 software was used in statistical analysis. The overall prevalence of urinary stress incontinence was 15.4%, urgency incontinence 2.14%, and mixed incontinence 20.5%. Both stress and urgency incontinence was found to be low in this sample population. A reduced prevalence of stress and urgency incontinence is seen in our sample. Our study group showed a high prevalence of known risk factors associated with urinary incontinence. We intend to extend our study for further understanding of this patient population.

  6. Urinary incontinence products - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... sores. You have signs of infection (a burning sensation when you urinate, fever, or chills). Alternate Names Adult diapers; Disposable urinary collection devices References Mendez-Probst CE, Razvi H, Denstedt JD. Fundamental ...

  7. Is caffeine intake associated with urinary incontinence in Japanese adults?

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Fumi; Lee, Andy H

    2012-05-01

    To investigate whether caffeine intake is associated with urinary incontinence (UI) among Japanese adults. A total of 683 men and 298 women aged 40 to 75 years were recruited from the community in middle and southern Japan. A validated food frequency questionnaire was administered face-to-face to obtain information on dietary intake and habitual beverage consumption. Urinary incontinence status was ascertained using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form. Mean daily caffeine intake was found to be similar between incontinent subjects (men 120 mg, women 94 mg) and others without the condition (men 106 mg, women 103 mg), p=0.33 for men and p=0.44 for women. The slight increases in risk of UI at the highest level of caffeine intake were not significant after adjusting for confounding factors. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) were 1.36 (0.65 to 2.88) and 1.12 (0.57 to 2.22) for men and women, respectively. No association was evident between caffeine intake and UI in middle-aged and older Japanese adults. Further studies are required to confirm the effect of caffeine in the prevention of UI.

  8. Is Caffeine Intake Associated With Urinary Incontinence in Japanese Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Fumi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether caffeine intake is associated with urinary incontinence (UI) among Japanese adults. Methods A total of 683 men and 298 women aged 40 to 75 years were recruited from the community in middle and southern Japan. A validated food frequency questionnaire was administered face-to-face to obtain information on dietary intake and habitual beverage consumption. Urinary incontinence status was ascertained using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form. Results Mean daily caffeine intake was found to be similar between incontinent subjects (men 120 mg, women 94 mg) and others without the condition (men 106 mg, women 103 mg), p=0.33 for men and p=0.44 for women. The slight increases in risk of UI at the highest level of caffeine intake were not significant after adjusting for confounding factors. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) were 1.36 (0.65 to 2.88) and 1.12 (0.57 to 2.22) for men and women, respectively. Conclusions No association was evident between caffeine intake and UI in middle-aged and older Japanese adults. Further studies are required to confirm the effect of caffeine in the prevention of UI. PMID:22712048

  9. Urinary and Fecal Incontinence in Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Felix W.; Schnelle, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Urinary and fecal incontinence (UI, FI) are co-morbid conditions affecting over 50% of nursing home residents. Both forms of incontinence are risk factors for elderly persons to be placed in the nursing home, and such institutionalization itself is a risk factor for developing incontinence. Management should focus on identifying and treating underlying causes, such as detrusor instability, urinary tract infections, diet- or medication-induced diarrhea, constipation and fecal impaction. Despite appropriate management, residents may remain incontinent because of dementia and health or restraint-related immobility. Nursing homes lack the staff and financial resources to provide residents with sufficiently frequent toileting assistance (including prompted voiding). Use of special undergarments and absorbent pads is the usual practice. The article reviews the results of studies that have documented how prompted voiding programs can significantly reduce UI and FI, particularly if the intervention includes dietary and exercise components. Recent systematic anorectal testing of nursing home residents with FI has documented impaired sphincter function (risk factor for FI), decreased rectal sensation and sphincter dyssynergia (risk factor for constipation and impaction). The data suggest that the use of laxatives and stool softeners for prophylaxis against constipation and impaction related to underlying dyssynergia may have produced sufficient fluidity in the stool to predispose the residents with impaired sphincter function to manifest FI. Documentation of non-invasive and efficacious interventions by RCT and the labor costs of implementing these measures can lead to changes in how nursing home care is provided and funded. PMID:18794004

  10. Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome and stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Aniuliene, R; Aniulis, P

    2015-11-01

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is a disorder of development of the female genital tract, characterized by the absence of the upper portion of the vagina, an absent or hypoplastic uterus, and normal or hypoplastic fallopian tubes. Affected women may have associated urological or skeletal abnormalities. Case report. A 19-year-old female with MRKH syndrome, female genotype and phenotype, primary amenorrhoea and stress urinary incontinence was admitted to the outpatient department of the university hospital. The patient underwent tension free vaginal obturator tape (TVT-O) surgery for stress urinary incontinence. The patient's objective self-evaluation of the efficacy of treatment after 6 months was 60%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Transobturator slings for female stress urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana; Jesus, André; Carvalho, Maria; Carvalho, Giselda; Marques, João; Falcão, Francisco; Torgal, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: A incontinência urinária de esforço afeta 20 a 40% das mulheres. Os slings colocados sob a uretra média, aplicados por via transobturadora, são a terapêutica consensualmente aceite na atualidade. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a eficácia e possíveis complicações associadas à aplicação dos slings colocados por via transobturadora no tratamento da incontinência urinária de esforço. Material e Métodos: Avaliaram-se retrospetivamente 363 doentes submetidas a cirurgia de incontinência urinária de esforço por via transobturadora, nos Hospitais da Universidade de Coimbra do Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, no período de 1 Janeiro de 2008 a 1 Julho de 2010. Resultados: A média das idades das doentes foi de 56 anos [28-86]. Além da correção da incontinência urinária de esforço, em 13,5% das mulheres foi associada outra cirurgia vaginal. A maioria (95,3%) das mulheres apresentou hipermobilidade da uretra. Ocorreram complicações per-operatórias em 0,8%, complicações pós-operatórias imediatas em 5,2% e complicações pós-operatórias tardias em 15,7%. A taxa de sucesso global foi de 93,7%. A taxa de sucesso nas doentes com uretra fixa foi 77,8%, verificando-se melhores resultados (94,5%) naquelas com hipermobilidade da uretra (p = 0,02). A taxa de sucesso foi comparável nas doentes com e sem cirurgias vaginais associadas. Discussão: As técnicas transobturadoras têm taxas de sucesso elevadas, tendo-se tornado o tratamento de primeira linha para as doentes com IUE, independentemente se tratadas pela técnica outside-in (TOT®) ou pela inside-out (TVT-O®). Ambas as técnicas foram concebidas com o intuito de evitar a passagem no espaço retropúbico, reduzindo assim o número de complicações. Conclusão: As taxas de cura para as abordagens transobturadoras oscilam entre 80 e 95%. A taxa de cura aumenta quando o mecanismo responsável pela incontinência urinária de esforço é a hipermobilidade da uretra

  12. Urinary Incontinence Due to Urethral Coitus in a Multiparous Woman.

    PubMed

    Aksakal, Orhan Seyfi; Cavkaytar, Sabri; Guzel, Ali Irfan; Uzun, Canan; Doganay, Melike

    2015-01-01

    Urethral coitus in women with a normal vagina and introitus has very rarely been reported. We report the case of a 48-year-old gravida 5, para 5 woman with a history of urethral coitus complaining of urinary incontinence. To the best of our knowledge, our patient is the fifth reported case of urethral coitus with normal genitalia, and it might be accepted as the first reported case of urethral coitus in a multiparous woman.

  13. How do you define success in stress urinary incontinence treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmern, Philippe E.

    2012-01-01

    At present, there is no consensus on the best way to define treatment success in the context of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). There is, however, a recognition that it is important to include patient-reported outcomes among the core assessments. Going forward, there is a need to unite outcome reporting tools to be able to compare data across studies and perform meaningful meta-analyses. PMID:23092774

  14. [Treatment of urinary incontinence in epispadias at the beginning of the third millenium].

    PubMed

    Touili, Y; Chebil, M; Bacha, K; Hajri, M; Hassine, B; Ayed, M

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of urinary incontinence in epispadias is delicate. Urinary continence is generally obtained after onerous and repetitive surgery. Different publications show a variable results. After the study of the results of our series (nine cases) and the results published in the literature, we propose a clarification on the therapeutic modalities of urinary incontinence associated to this malformation.

  15. [Female stress urinary incontinence during pregnancy. A bibliographical review].

    PubMed

    Navarro García, Miguel Angel; De Carlos Alegre, Vanessa

    2009-10-01

    The authors have prepared a brief bibliographical review on female stress urinary incontinence during pregnancy. The high degree of incidence this disorder has and the introduction of the latest sanitary techniques combine to make necessary a profound review which aids medical professionals to realize the magnitude of this problem, as well as to diagnose and treat it effectively. Female stress urinary incontinence during pregnancy is an involuntary urine loss associated to the physical effort which an increase in abdominal pressure provokes. A literary review of articles related to this disorder leaves no doubt that among the risk factors which make a woman be predisposed to suffer female stress urinary incontinence, obstetric trauma as a consequence of pregnancy and birth is a main risk factor. The authors describe a couple of diagnostic tools, a ICIQ-SF questionnaire, and therapeutic tools, the pelvic floor muscle exercise program, whose effectiveness has been sufficiently demonstrated and may prove to have very beneficial clinical uses which can be applied in a nurse's office.

  16. Urinary Incontinence and Urosepsis due to Forgotten Ureteral Stent.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Diego Martin; Losada, Johanna Belén; Montiel, Francisco Castro; Lafos, Norberto

    2016-09-01

    Case report of a patient who, while being under study due to total urinary incontinence and multiple urinary tract infections, interoccurs with urosepsis due to a forgotten and encrusted double-J stent. An open surgery is performed with two surgical approaches, suprapubic and minimal lumbotomy, in which a nephrectomy of the atrophic kidney, a resection of the urether with a calcified double-J in its interior and a cystolithotomy were conducted with the resulting favorable resolution of the pathology.

  17. Teaching strategies for assessing and managing urinary incontinence in older adults.

    PubMed

    Bradway, Christine; Cacchione, Pamela

    2010-07-01

    Urinary incontinence is common and affects many aspects of older adults' lives; therefore, it is essential that nursing faculty include this content in classroom and clinical teaching situations. This article describes innovative strategies for teaching upper-level nursing students (e.g., junior and senior undergraduates) about urinary incontinence in older adults, specifically, the relevant anatomy and physiology of continence and associated pathophysiology of urinary incontinence, risk factors and consequences, definitions and types, and effective nursing assessment and management strategies.

  18. [Urinary incontinence - what can be done by the family doctor and when is the urologist needed?].

    PubMed

    Keller, Isabelle Sonja; Brachlow, Jan Frederic; Padevit, Christian; Kurz, Michael; John, Hubert

    2014-10-01

    About 15% of the women and 10% of the men past the age of 65 years suffer from urinary incontinence. In most cases, accurate history taking can help differentiate between urge incontinence, stress incontinence and overflow incontinence, and is essential in choosing the appropriate treatment. Initial diagnostic testing can be conducted by the general practitioner, especially tests to exclude urinary tract infections or to rule out an overactive bladder. Patient education on changes to fluid intake and voiding habits as well as advice on suitable incontinence products are important first steps in the management of urinary continence. Also, drug treatment can be initiated in general practice. Patients with refractory urinary incontinence, particularly those who did not respond to anticholinergic medication, should be referred to a urologist for further evaluation since there may be an underlying tumour or other disorder of the bladder that is causing the incontinence.

  19. Quality of Life of Women with Urinary Incontinence: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Bo Eun; Kim, Gi Yon; Roh, Young Sook; You, Mi Ae

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to review studies that have examined the quality of life of women with urinary incontinence. Materials and Methods A review was conducted that used the databases PubMED, Proquest, CINAHL, and Sciencedirect. Articles were included that were published in English between 2005 and 2010 the key words use were urinary incontinence, women, and quality of life. Results A total of 18 studies were identified, and the prevalence of urinary incontinence varied depending on the definition of incontinence used and the age of the population studied. The Incontinence Quality of Life (I-QoL), Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-short form (IIQ-7), and King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ) were the most commonly used instruments. Demographic, medical, physical, psychological, health, and intervention factors were reported as influencing factors on the quality of life of women with incontinence. Age, severity of urinary incontinence, type of urinary incontinence, number of urinary incontinence episodes, body weight, stress, and help-seeking behavior were statistically significant variables influencing quality of life. Conclusion Future studies are needed to identify factors related to quality of life among women with incontinence and to use validated instruments according to specific subjects. PMID:21179330

  20. Prevalence of urinary incontinence and its relation with sedentarism in Spain.

    PubMed

    Leirós-Rodríguez, R; Romo-Pérez, V; García-Soidán, J L

    2017-06-03

    To determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence in the elderly Spanish population of both sexes and identify a possible relationship between physical activity habits and the presence of urinary incontinence in the elderly. We used data from 8146 individuals older than 60 years (age range, 60-94 years), from which data from a 15-year cohort were obtained. Of these, 4745 (58.2%) were women and 3401 (41.8%) were men. We analysed the presence of urinary incontinence, physical activity habits and the influence of other variables such as sex, age, weight and body mass index. We detected a prevalence of urinary incontinence of 15% for the women and 11.6% for the men. Those with urinary incontinence had a greater average age, weight and body mass index than the healthy participants. At the same time, the patient group with incontinence showed more sedentary habits compared with the healthy participants. A strong relationship was observed between the body mass index and prevalence of urinary incontinence. Urinary incontinence was also related to attitudinal aspects such as physical inactivity, a behaviour that predisposes the elderly to developing incontinence. For the first time, we observed a reduction in the prevalence of incontinence compared with previous studies. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. The female urinary microbiome: a comparison of women with and without urgency urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Meghan M; Hilt, Evann E; Rosenfeld, Amy B; Zilliox, Michael J; Thomas-White, Krystal; Fok, Cynthia; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Schreckenberger, Paul C; Brubaker, Linda; Gai, Xiaowu; Wolfe, Alan J

    2014-07-08

    Bacterial DNA and live bacteria have been detected in human urine in the absence of clinical infection, challenging the prevailing dogma that urine is normally sterile. Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a poorly understood urinary condition characterized by symptoms that overlap urinary infection, including urinary urgency and increased frequency with urinary incontinence. The recent discovery of the urinary microbiome warrants investigation into whether bacteria contribute to UUI. In this study, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to classify bacterial DNA and expanded quantitative urine culture (EQUC) techniques to isolate live bacteria in urine collected by using a transurethral catheter from women with UUI and, in comparison, a cohort without UUI. For these cohorts, we demonstrated that the UUI and non-UUI urinary microbiomes differ by group based on both sequence and culture evidences. Compared to the non-UUI microbiome, sequencing experiments revealed that the UUI microbiome was composed of increased Gardnerella and decreased Lactobacillus. Nine genera (Actinobaculum, Actinomyces, Aerococcus, Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, Gardnerella, Oligella, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus) were more frequently cultured from the UUI cohort. Although Lactobacillus was isolated from both cohorts, distinctions existed at the species level, with Lactobacillus gasseri detected more frequently in the UUI cohort and Lactobacillus crispatus most frequently detected in controls. Combined, these data suggest that potentially important differences exist in the urinary microbiomes of women with and without UUI, which have strong implications in prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of UUI. Importance: New evidence indicates that the human urinary tract contains microbial communities; however, the role of these communities in urinary health remains to be elucidated. Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a highly prevalent yet poorly understood urinary condition characterized by

  2. An overview of urinary incontinence in adults: assessments and behavioral interventions.

    PubMed

    Beckman, N J

    1995-09-01

    Urinary incontinence affects millions of Americans. Often the goal of treatment is to improve the condition, prevent complications and provide comfort. Behavioral interventions can improve the condition in 54-75% of patients with urge and/or stress incontinence and can cure 12-16% of patients. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are in a unique position of both providing direct care to patients who experience these problems and educating other nurses about signs, symptoms and appropriate nursing interventions for urinary incontinence. The scope of the problem, costs of urinary incontinence and potential cost savings with treatment are discussed in this article. Acute and chronic urinary incontinence and the necessary assessments to be performed by the APN are reviewed. Bladder training, habit training, prompted voiding and pelvic muscle exercises are the behavioral interventions used with urinary incontinence. Adjunct therapy, including biofeedback, vaginal cones and electrical stimulation, also is discussed.

  3. New concept for treating female stress urinary incontinence with radiofrequency.

    PubMed

    Lordelo, Patrícia; Vilas Boas, Andrea; Sodré, Danielle; Lemos, Amanda; Tozetto, Sibele; Brasil, Cristina

    2017-06-14

    To evaluate the clinical response and adverse effects of radiofrequency on the urethral meatus in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women. This phase one study included ten women with Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI). The evaluation consisted of 1 hour Pad tests to quantify urine loss and to assess the degree of procedure satisfaction by using the Likert scale. To evaluate safety, we observed the number of referred side effects. Average age was 53.10 years±7.08 years. In assessing the final Pad Test, 70% showed a reduction and 30% a worsening of urinary loss. Using the Pad Test one month later, there was a reduction in all patients (p=0.028). The degree of satisfaction was 90% and no side effects have been observed. One patient reported burning sensation. The treatment of SUI with radiofrequency on the urethral meatus has no adverse effects, being a low risk method that reduces urinary loss in women. However, to increase the validity of the study, larger clinical trials are warranted. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  4. Future Directions of Research and Care for Urinary Incontinence: Findings from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Summit on Urinary Incontinence Clinical Research in Women.

    PubMed

    Chai, Toby C; Asfaw, Tirsit S; Baker, Jan E; Clarkson, Becky; Coleman, Pamela; Hoffstetter, Susan; Konkel, Kimberly; Lavender, Missy; Nair, Shailaja; Norton, Jenna; Subak, Leslee; Visco, Anthony; Star, Robert A; Bavendam, Tamara

    2017-07-01

    Female urinary incontinence is prevalent, costly and morbid. Participants in a NIDDK (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) sponsored summit reviewed findings from NIH (National Institutes of Health) funded clinical research on urinary incontinence in women and discussed the future of urinary incontinence research. The NIDDK convened the Summit on Urinary Incontinence Clinical Research in Women on March 14, 2014. Participants representing a broad range of clinical expertise reviewed completed NIH sponsored urinary incontinence related studies, including results from community based epidemiological studies such as the BACH (Boston Area Community Health) Survey and from randomized clinical trials such as PRIDE (Program to Reduce Incontinence by Diet and Exercise), and studies conducted by the Pelvic Floor Disorders Network and the Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network. BACH Survey results improved our understanding of precursors, incidence, prevalence and natural history of urinary incontinence in a diverse group of women. The Pelvic Floor Disorders Network study found that anticholinergic medications and onabotulinumtoxinA are efficacious for treating urge urinary incontinence, and Burch colposuspension and retropubic mid urethral polypropylene slings are efficacious for decreasing stress urinary incontinence following pelvic organ prolapse surgery in women with potential stress urinary incontinence. The Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network study found that fascial slings were better than colposuspension, and that retropubic and transobturator mid urethral polypropylene slings were equivalent for stress urinary incontinence. In patients with stress urinary incontinence a preoperative urodynamic study was noninferior to basic office examinations for surgical outcome. The addition of behavioral intervention did not allow female patients to discontinue antimuscarinics for urge urinary incontinence. PRIDE showed that modest weight

  5. Predicting urinary incontinence after surgery for pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Jelovsek, John E

    2016-10-01

    Many women choosing to have surgery for pelvic organ prolapse also choose to undergo continence surgery. This review focuses on available evidence that clinicians may use to counsel patients when choosing whether to perform continence surgery and how predictive analytic tools improve this decision-making process. Midurethral sling, Burch cystourethropexy and bladder neck sling are highly effective for the surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Trials demonstrate that continence surgery may be routinely performed to reduce the risk of postoperative incontinence in women undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse with or without preoperative stress urinary incontinence. Although these procedures are effective and well tolerated on average, media concerns, regulatory warnings and litigation reinforce the need for a balanced discussion regarding efficacy and potential adverse events directed at the individual patient during the preoperative visit. Advances in predictive analytics allow surgeons to quantitate individual risk using algorithms that tailor estimates for the individual patient and facilitate shared understanding of risks and benefits. These models are less prone to cognitive biases and frequently outperform experienced clinicians. This review discusses how predictive analytic tools can be used to improve decisions about continence surgery in the woman planning to undergo prolapse surgery.

  6. EAU guidelines on assessment and nonsurgical management of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Malcolm G; Bosch, Ruud J L; Burkhard, Fiona C; Cruz, Francisco; Madden, Thomas B; Nambiar, Arjun K; Neisius, Andreas; de Ridder, Dirk J M K; Tubaro, Andrea; Turner, William H; Pickard, Robert S

    2012-12-01

    The previous European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on urinary incontinence comprised a summary of sections of the 2009 International Consultation on Incontinence. A decision was made in 2010 to rewrite these guidelines based on an independent systematic review carried out by the EAU guidelines panel, using a sustainable methodology. We present a short version of the full guidelines on assessment, diagnosis, and nonsurgical treatment of urinary incontinence, with the aim of increasing their dissemination. Evidence appraisal included a pragmatic review of existing systematic reviews and independent new literature searches, based on Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome questions. Appraisal of papers was carried out by an international panel of experts, who also collaborated on a series of consensus discussions, to develop concise structured evidence summaries and action-based recommendations using a modified Oxford system. The full version of the guidelines is available online (http://www.uroweb.org/guidelines/online-guidelines/). The guidelines include algorithms that refer the reader back to the supporting evidence, and they are more immediately useable in daily clinical practice. These new guidelines present an up-to-date summary of the available evidence, together with clear clinical algorithms and action-based recommendations based on the best available evidence. Where such evidence does not exist, they present a consensus of expert opinion. Copyright © 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment of stress urinary incontinence with a generic transobturator tape.

    PubMed

    Abougamrah, Amgad; Ibrahim, Moustafa; Elsabaa, Haitham; Ellaithy, Mohamed; Sweed, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of using a generic tape tailored from type 1 monofilamentous, macroporous polypropylene mesh during transobturator tape (TOT) surgery. A prospective study was performed in a tertiary center in Cairo, Egypt, between July 2004 and December 2013. Women with stress urinary incontinence scheduled for TOT surgery using the outside-in technique were recruited. Monarc tape was used in all patients until November 2005, after which it was used for patients who could afford it only; generic tape was used in the other patients. The primary outcome measures were the objective and subjective cure rates. Overall, 431 women were included in analyses. After 5 years of follow-up, objective cure was achieved in 143 (94.1%) of 152 women who received Monarc tape and 249 (89.2%) of 279 who received the generic tape (P=0.135). Subjective cure was achieved in 121 (79.6%) women who received the Monarc tape and 236 (84.6%) women who received the generic tape (P=0.229). There were no significant between-group differences in postoperative urgency, de novo urgency, urge incontinence, voiding dysfunction, urinary retention, vaginal erosion, or the frequency of TOT-related reoperation or repeat anti-incontinence procedures. The TOT outside-in procedure can be easily, safely, and effectively performed in low-resource settings using a generic polypropylene tape. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Urological disorders in men: urinary incontinence and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan W; Miller, Mindi S

    2011-08-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are 2 common urogenital problems in men. UI is associated with involuntary leakage of urine and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) of urgency, frequency, and nocturia. Types of UI include functional, urge, stress, and overflow. Treatment for UI is based on the type of incontinence, patient-specific factors, and treatment preferences of both patients and health care providers. Options for the management of UI include environmental modifications, disposable incontinence products, pelvic floor exercises, pharmacotherapy, surgically implanted devices, and intermittent catheterization. BPH may be also associated with LUTS. Patient symptoms, assessed with a measurement tool such as the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUASI), serve as the basis for determining treatment. Management approaches for BPH include pharmacotherapy, surgery, and minimally invasive procedures. Anticholinergic drugs as well as α-receptor antagonists and 5-α reductase inhibitors, either alone or in combination, are effective and useful for LUTS unresponsive to traditional pharmacotherapy. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) can eliminate symptoms of BPH but is associated with relatively more complications than other available surgical and minimally invasive procedures.

  9. A warning detector for urinary incontinence for home health care.

    PubMed

    Tamura, T; Nakajima, K; Matsushita, T; Fujimoto, T; Shimooki, S; Nakano, T

    1995-01-01

    A telemetry system for monitoring urinary incontinence has been developed using two principles, temperature and impedance changes of a diaper. The system is composed of a pair of sensors, a transmitter, and a receiver. Temperature changes are monitored using thermistors, one in the center of the diaper and the other attached to the abdomen, and the temperature differences between them after urinary incontinence is detected. For the impedance method, two electroconductive cloths as electrodes placed in the diaper are used as sensors. Urine acts as a conductor to produce a current between the sensors. Clinical evaluation showed that both methods operate well; 13 of 17 incontinence episodes were detected using the temperature method and 32 of 35 with the impedance method. The misdetections were caused by faulty sensor arrangement for temperature measurement and by detection of exudates by the conductive sensors. These monitors may be used for the care of elderly people who use diapers for home health care, to save care time and help maintain hygiene.

  10. Risperidone-associated urinary incontinence in patients with autistic disorder with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Kumazaki, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Koichiro; Imasaka, Yasushi; Iwata, Kazuhiko; Tomoda, Akemi; Mimura, Masaru

    2014-10-01

    We report several cases in which patients with autistic disorder with mental retardation who received risperidone experienced urinary incontinence. We retrospectively investigated the medical records of patients housed in facilities for patients with autistic disorder with mental retardation. Those who had undergone a medical examination at a hospital in Tokyo from April 1999 to March 2009 were included in the study.Retrospective data were gathered including age, sex, IQ, birth weight, dosage of risperidone, urinary density, as well as existence of urinary and fecal incontinence. We divided the participants into those who did and did not experience urinary incontinence after taking risperidone and compared the 2 groups. Risperidone had been prescribed to 35 patients. In spite of the fact that no patient had a history of urinary incontinence, 14 patients experienced urinary incontinence after receiving risperidone. Moreover, 4 of these 14 patients also had fecal incontinence. Among the variables we examined, the only significant difference between groups was in sex, with significantly more women experiencing incontinence compared with men. When the dose of risperidone was reduced or the patients switched to other drugs, urinary incontinence of the patients improved.Hence, risperidone may have a casual relationship with urinary incontinence. Further research is needed to understand the pathophysiology of possible effect.

  11. Prevalence of urinary incontinence and associated risk factors in a cohort of nuns.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, Gunhilde M; Chin, Michelle; Glantz, Chris; Guzick, David

    2002-08-01

    To estimate the prevalence of urinary incontinence among a group of nulliparous nuns and to assess risk factors for developing incontinence. Information on symptoms of urinary incontinence, as well as medical history and demographic data were obtained from 149 nuns. The prevalence of urinary incontinence was determined, and a logistic regression model was used to estimate the impact of demographic and medical risk factors on the likelihood of incontinence. The mean (+/- standard deviation) age of our sample of nuns was 68 (+/-11.7). All but one were white, 96% were postmenopausal, and 25% were taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Their mean body mass index (BMI) was 27.3 +/- 5.6. According to their self-reported symptoms, half the nuns had urinary incontinence. Of these, 22 nuns (30%) had stress incontinence, 18 (24%) had urge incontinence, 26 (35%) had mixed incontinence, and 8 (11%) had urine loss unrelated to stress and urge. More than half the incontinent nuns used sanitary pads for protection. From univariate analyses, statistically significant risk factors for urinary incontinence included BMI, current HRT use, multiple urinary tract infections, hypertension, arthritis, depression, hysterectomy, and previous spinal surgery. From multivariate logistic regression, only BMI, multiple urinary tract infections, and depression remained statistically significant after adjusting for the other variables. The prevalence of incontinence in nulliparous, predominantly postmenopausal nuns is similar to rates reported in parous, postmenopausal women. Even in the absence of pelvic floor trauma from childbirth, urine loss is associated with symptoms of stress incontinence more often than with symptoms of urge incontinence.

  12. Evaluation of the prevalence of urinary incontinence in spayed female dogs: 566 cases (2003-2008).

    PubMed

    Forsee, Kara M; Davis, Garrett J; Mouat, Emily E; Salmeri, Katharine R; Bastian, Richard P

    2013-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence in spayed female dogs and categorize affected dogs by age at time of ovariohysterectomy, number of litters prior to ovariohysterectomy, body weight, treatment of affected dogs, and severity of incontinence and to determine associations among these variables. Retrospective case series. 566 ovariohysterectomized dogs. An attempt was made to contact owners of 912 dogs ovariohysterectomized between January 2003 and January 2008 to discuss presence or absence of urinary incontinence. The actual number of responders was 566. Those owners with incontinent pets received a questionnaire further assessing degree of incontinence, diagnostic testing, treatment, and history. The prevalence of acquired urinary incontinence was determined to be 5.12% (29/566 dogs) on the basis of results of phone surveys and questionnaires. There was no significant difference in the age at time of ovariohysterectomy between incontinent and continent groups. A significant association was found between body weight and incontinence, with incontinence rates higher among larger (≥ 15 kg [33.1 lb]) dogs. Larger dogs were approximately 7 times as likely (OR, 7.2 [95% confidence interval, 2.5 to 21.1]) to develop acquired urinary incontinence, compared with small dogs (< 15 kg). Although acquired urinary incontinence in female dogs is known to be associated with ovariohysterectomy, the prevalence in this study was low.

  13. The Burden of Urinary Incontinence and Urinary Bother Among Elderly Prostate Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Ryan P.; Marshall, Lynn M.; Wang, Patty Y.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Parsons, J. Kellogg

    2014-01-01

    Background Data describing urinary health in elderly, community-dwelling prostate cancer (PCa) survivors are limited. Objective To elucidate the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary bother, and incontinence in elderly PCa survivors compared with peers without PCa. Design, setting, and participants A cross-sectional analysis of 5990 participants in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Research Group, a cohort study of community-dwelling men ≥65 yr. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis We characterized urinary health using self-reported urinary incontinence and the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUA-SI). We compared urinary health measures according to type of PCa treatment in men with PCa and men without PCa using multivariate log-binomial regression to generate prevalence ratios (PRs). Results and limitations At baseline, 706 men (12%) reported a history of PCa, with a median time since diagnosis of 6.3 yr. Of these men, 426 (60%) reported urinary incontinence. In adjusted analyses, observation (PR: 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15–3.21; p = 0.01), surgery (PR: 4.68; 95% CI, 4.11–5.32; p < 0.0001), radiation therapy (PR: 1.64; 95% CI, 1.20– 2.23; p = 0.002), and androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) (PR: 2.01; 95% CI, 1.35–2.99; p = 0.0006) were each associated with daily incontinence. Daily incontinence risk increased with time since diagnosis independently of age. Observation (PR: 1.33; 95% CI, 1.00–1.78; p = 0.05), surgery (PR: 1.25; 95% CI, 1.10–1.42; p = 0.0008), and ADT (PR: 1.50; 95% CI, 1.26–1.79; p < 0.0001) were associated with increased AUA-SI bother scores. Cancer stage and use of adjuvant or salvage therapies were not available for analysis. Conclusions Compared with their peers without PCa, elderly PCa survivors had a two-fold to five-fold greater prevalence of urinary incontinence, which rose with increasing survivorship duration. Observation, surgery, and ADT were each associated with

  14. Associated Factors and the Impact of Fecal Incontinence in Women with Urge Urinary Incontinence: From the Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network’s BEDRI Study

    PubMed Central

    MARKLAND, Alayne D.; RICHTER, Holly E.; KENTON, Kimberly S.; WAI, Clifford; NAGER, Charles W.; KRAUS, Stephen R.; XU, Yan; TENNSTEDT, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To determine prevalence, risk factors, and impact on quality of life (QOL) that fecal incontinence (FI) symptoms have on women seeking treatment for urge urinary incontinence (UUI). Study Design Baseline sociodemographic, history, physical examination, and validated questionnaire data were analyzed in 307 women enrolled in the Behavior Enhances Drug Reduction of Incontinence (BEDRI) study for associations with FI. FI was defined as loss of liquid/solid stool occurring at least monthly. Multivariable logistic regression models compared women with FI and UUI to women with only UUI. Results Prevalence of monthly FI was 18%, liquid stool (12%) and solid stool (6%). In multivariable analysis, FI was associated with vaginal delivery, posterior vaginal wall prolapse, higher body mass index, and UUI symptoms. QOL was worse in women with FI/UUI than isolated UUI. Conclusion Women seeking treatment for UUI have high rates of monthly FI with a negative impact on QOL. PMID:19200939

  15. Incontinence medication response relates to the female urinary microbiota.

    PubMed

    Thomas-White, Krystal J; Hilt, Evann E; Fok, Cynthia; Pearce, Meghan M; Mueller, Elizabeth R; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Jacobs, Kristin; Zilliox, Michael J; Brincat, Cynthia; Price, Travis K; Kuffel, Gina; Schreckenberger, Paul; Gai, Xiaowu; Brubaker, Linda; Wolfe, Alan J

    2016-05-01

    Many adult women have resident urinary bacteria (urinary microbiome/microbiota). In adult women affected by urinary urgency incontinence (UUI), the etiologic and/or therapeutic role of the urinary microbiome/microbiota remains unknown. We hypothesized that microbiome/microbiota characteristics would relate to clinically relevant treatment response to UUI medication per os. Adult women initiating medication treatment orally for UUI and a comparator group of unaffected women were recruited in a tertiary care health-care system. All participants provided baseline clinical data and urine samples. Women with UUI were given 5 mg solifenacin, with potential dose escalation to 10 mg for inadequate UUI symptom control at 4 weeks. Additional data and urine samples were collected from women with UUI at 4 and 12 weeks. The samples were assessed using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing and enhanced quantitative urine culturing. The primary outcome was treatment response as measured by the validated Patient Global Symptom Control (PGSC) questionnaire. Clinically relevant UUI symptom control was defined as a 4 or 5 score on the PGSC. Diversity and composition of the urinary microbiome/microbiota of women with and without UUI differed at baseline. Women with UUI had more bacteria and a more diverse microbiome/microbiota. The clinical response to solifenacin in UUI participants was related to baseline microbiome/microbiota, with responders more likely to have fewer bacteria and a less diverse community at baseline. Nonresponders had a more diverse community that often included bacteria not typically found in responders. Knowledge of an individual's urinary microbiome/microbiota may help refine UUI treatment. Complementary tools, DNA sequencing, and expanded urine culture provide information about bacteria that appear to be related to UUI incontinence status and treatment response in this population of adult women.

  16. Regenerative medicine based applications to combat stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Hatim; Sharma, Arun K

    2013-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), as an isolated symptom, is not a life threatening condition. However, the fear of unexpected urine leakage contributes to a significant decline in quality of life parameters for afflicted patients. Compared to other forms of incontinence, SUI cannot be easily treated with pharmacotherapy since it is inherently an anatomic problem. Treatment options include the use of bio-injectable materials to enhance closing pressures, and the placement of slings to bolster fascial support to the urethra. However, histologic findings of degeneration in the incontinent urethral sphincter invite the use of tissues engineering strategies to regenerate structures that aid in promoting continence. In this review, we will assess the role of stem cells in restoring multiple anatomic and physiological aspects of the sphincter. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells and CD34+ cells have shown great promise to differentiate into muscular and vascular components, respectively. Evidence supporting the use of cytokines and growth factors such as hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and insulin-like growth factor further enhance the viability and direction of differentiation. Bridging the benefits of stem cells and growth factors involves the use of synthetic scaffolds like poly (1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) (POC) thin films. POC scaffolds are synthetic, elastomeric polymers that serve as substrates for cell growth, and upon degradation, release growth factors to the microenvironment in a controlled, predictable fashion. The combination of cellular, cytokine and scaffold elements aims to address the pathologic deficits to urinary incontinence, with a goal to improve patient symptoms and overall quality of life. PMID:24179600

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF QUALITY INDICATORS FOR WOMEN WITH URINARY INCONTINENCE

    PubMed Central

    Anger, Jennifer T.; Scott, Victoria C. S.; Kiyosaki, Krista; Khan, Aqsa A.; Weinberg, Avivah; Connor, Sarah E.; Roth, Carol P.; Wenger, Neil; Shekelle, Paul; Litwin, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS To develop a means to measure the quality of care provided to women treated for urinary incontinence (UI) through the development of quality-of-care indicators (QIs). METHODS We performed an extensive literature review to develop a set of potential quality indicators for the management of urinary incontinence. QIs were modeled after those previously described in the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) project. Nine experts ranked the indicators on a nine-point scale for both validity and feasibility. We analyzed preliminary rankings of each indicator using the RAND Appropriateness Method. A forum was then held in which each indicator was thoroughly discussed by the panelists as a group, after which the indicators were rated a second time individually using the same nine-point scale. RESULTS QIs were developed that addressed screening, diagnosis, work-up, and both non-surgical and surgical management. Areas of controversy included whether routine screening for incontinence should be performed, whether urodynamics should be performed before non-surgical management is initiated, and whether cystoscopy should be part of the pre-operative work-up of uncomplicated stress incontinence. Following the expert panel discussion, 27 of 40 potential indicators were determined to be valid for UI with a median score of at least seven on a nine-point scale. CONCLUSIONS We identified 27 quality indicators for the care of women with UI. Once these QIs are pilot-tested for feasibility, they will be applied on a larger scale to measure the quality of care provided to women with UI in the United States. PMID:24105879

  18. Caffeine Intake and Risk of Urinary Incontinence Progression Among Women

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Mary K.; Resnick, Neil M.; Grodstein, Francine

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association between long-term caffeine intake and risk of urinary incontinence (UI) progression over 2 years among women with moderate UI. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in 21,564 women with moderate UI enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study and Nurses’ Health Study II. Incontinence progression was identified from questionnaires during 2 years of follow-up. Baseline caffeine intake (ie, average intake during the past year) and change in caffeine intake during the 4 years prior to baseline were measured using food frequency questionnaires. Odds ratios (ORs) for incontinence progression according to caffeine intake were calculated for each cohort separately, and then for both cohorts combined. Results The percentage of women with UI progression was similar across categories of baseline level of caffeine intake and change in caffeine intake prior to baseline. For example, percentages were 21% versus 22% comparing 450 mg or more to less than 150 mg of caffeine per day (adjusted OR 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-1.08). Comparing women with increased caffeine intake to those with stable caffeine intake, percentages with progression were 22% versus 20% (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.95-1.22). Results were similar in separate analyses of urgency and stress UI. Conclusion Long-term caffeine intake over one year was not associated with risk of UI progression over 2 years among women with moderate incontinence, although we could not examine acute effects of caffeine. Improved understanding of the effect of caffeine on the bladder is needed to better advise women with incontinence about caffeine intake. PMID:22525905

  19. Caffeine intake and risk of urinary incontinence progression among women.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Mary K; Resnick, Neil M; Grodstein, Francine

    2012-05-01

    To estimate the association between long-term caffeine intake and risk of urinary incontinence (UI) progression over 2 years among women with moderate UI. We conducted a prospective cohort study in 21,564 women with moderate UI enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study and Nurses' Health Study II. Incontinence progression was identified from questionnaires during 2 years of follow-up. Baseline caffeine intake (ie, average intake during the previous year) and change in caffeine intake during the 4 years before baseline were measured using food frequency questionnaires. Odds ratios (ORs) for incontinence progression according to caffeine intake were calculated for each cohort separately, and then for both cohorts combined. The percentage of women with UI progression was similar across categories of baseline level of caffeine intake and change in caffeine intake before baseline. For example, percentages were 21% compared with 22% comparing 450 mg or more to less than 150 mg of caffeine per day (adjusted OR 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.70-1.08). Comparing women with increased caffeine intake to those with stable caffeine intake, percentages with progression were 22% compared with 20% (OR 1.08, 95% confidence interval 0.95-1.22). Results were similar in separate analyses of urge and stress UI. Long-term caffeine intake over 1 year was not associated with risk of UI progression over 2 years among women with moderate incontinence, although we could not examine acute effects of caffeine. Improved understanding of the effect of caffeine on the bladder is needed to better-advise women with incontinence about caffeine intake. II.

  20. Urinary incontinence in women: a comprehensive review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, P; Dmochowski, R

    2014-10-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) or involuntary leakage of urine is a distressing and serious health problem. It has a significant psychosocial and economic burden leading to significant quality of life issues. UI is more prevalent than most chronic diseases yet largely underreported. Aging and age-related changes in the bladder play a significant role in the development of UI. This in combination with cognitive dysfunction, functional impairment, pharmacotherapy, smoking, childbearing, obesity and coexisiting comorbidities worsen the condition. Due to the burden UI places on the individual, their family and society, it is important for providers to diagnose and have ready treatment options available. The three most common types of UI are stress urinary incontinence (SUI), urge urinary incontinence (UUI), or a combination of both, mixed urinary incontinence (MUI). This review describes the pathophysiology of incontinence; and diagnosis and treatment (conservative, pharmacological, and surgical therapies) of incontinence in women.

  1. [Prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence in female workers of hotels].

    PubMed

    Fontana, L; Falconi, G; Di Martino, T; Iavicoli, I

    2007-01-01

    The International Continence Society defines urinary incontinence (UI) as "a condition in which involuntary loss of urine is a social or hygienic problem and is objectively demonstrable". There are three different jorms of UI. stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence and mixed incontinence. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of UI in a group of female workers in the hotel sector. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence short form (ICIQ-UI Short Form) was administered to all female workers and data were collected about age, body mass index, number of vaginal and Caesarean delivery. Results showed a prevalence of UI widely bigger in the plans waitress than in video display terminal workers and suggest the hypothesis that manual handling of loads representing a possible occupational risk for UI.

  2. Stress Urinary Incontinence in Women With Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the prevalence and risk factors of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and the prevalence of intrinsic sphincter deficiency in women with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We conducted a retrospective study. Female patients with MS, followed for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) during a 15-year period were included. Demographic data, MS history, expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score at the urodynamic visit, obstetrical past, birth weight, LUTS, and urodynamic findings were collected. SUI was defined as incontinence during cough, or any effort. A maximum urethral closure pressure less than 30 cm H2O defined intrinsic sphincter deficiency. Results We included 363 women with a mean age of 46.7±10.8 years and a mean disease duration of 12.9±8.7 years. The incidence of relapsing remitting MS, a secondary progressive form, and a primary progressive form was 60.6%, 32.8%, and 6.6%, respectively. The prevalence of SUI was 31.4%. The prevalence of intrinsic sphincter deficiency was 1.4% and 0.8% of these patients had a SUI (P=0.300). In a multivariate analysis, women with a SUI had significantly higher birth weight (P=0.030), a pelvic organ prolapse (P=0.021), urgent urinary incontinence (P=0.006), a lower EDSS score (P=0.019), and a weaker containing effort (P<0.001). Conclusions The prevalence of SUI in women with MS was 31.4%. This symptom could affect the quality of life of women with MS. PMID:27706005

  3. A Graduate Nursing Curriculum for the Evaluation and Management of Urinary Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogalski, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Geriatric nurse practitioners should be educated in the evaluation and treatment of common geriatric syndromes like urinary incontinence. However, many advanced-practice nursing programs do not place an educational emphasis on urinary incontinence management. The purpose of this project is to provide information that supports the need for…

  4. Stigma and microaggressions experienced by older women with urinary incontinence: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Heintz, Phyllis A; DeMucha, Cheryl M; Deguzman, Maryann M; Softa, Ridhima

    2013-01-01

    This literature review investigated stigma and identified episodes of microaggressions experienced by women with urinary incontinence. Three significant themes were revealed: lack of disclosure from psychological distress, microaggressions resulting from stigma, and factors associated with the intersections of gender, race, and ethnicity. Nursing implications include earning and maintaining patient trust, and demonstrating sensitivity about urinary incontinence.

  5. A Graduate Nursing Curriculum for the Evaluation and Management of Urinary Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogalski, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Geriatric nurse practitioners should be educated in the evaluation and treatment of common geriatric syndromes like urinary incontinence. However, many advanced-practice nursing programs do not place an educational emphasis on urinary incontinence management. The purpose of this project is to provide information that supports the need for…

  6. Current Use of Injectable Agents for Female Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Herschorn, Sender

    2005-01-01

    Injectable materials of various types have been used for decades as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Their success stems from their ability to improve intrinsic sphincter function, and patients with hypermobility may benefit as well. Nevertheless, the ideal agent has yet to be discovered, and surgery still may be necessary after treatment in some patients. Results vary among the different materials used, and safety, durability, and cost-effectiveness are important areas of concern in which more research is needed. PMID:16985872

  7. The Female Urinary Microbiome: a Comparison of Women with and without Urgency Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Meghan M.; Hilt, Evann E.; Rosenfeld, Amy B.; Zilliox, Michael J.; Thomas-White, Krystal; Fok, Cynthia; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Schreckenberger, Paul C.; Brubaker, Linda

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial DNA and live bacteria have been detected in human urine in the absence of clinical infection, challenging the prevailing dogma that urine is normally sterile. Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a poorly understood urinary condition characterized by symptoms that overlap urinary infection, including urinary urgency and increased frequency with urinary incontinence. The recent discovery of the urinary microbiome warrants investigation into whether bacteria contribute to UUI. In this study, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to classify bacterial DNA and expanded quantitative urine culture (EQUC) techniques to isolate live bacteria in urine collected by using a transurethral catheter from women with UUI and, in comparison, a cohort without UUI. For these cohorts, we demonstrated that the UUI and non-UUI urinary microbiomes differ by group based on both sequence and culture evidences. Compared to the non-UUI microbiome, sequencing experiments revealed that the UUI microbiome was composed of increased Gardnerella and decreased Lactobacillus. Nine genera (Actinobaculum, Actinomyces, Aerococcus, Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, Gardnerella, Oligella, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus) were more frequently cultured from the UUI cohort. Although Lactobacillus was isolated from both cohorts, distinctions existed at the species level, with Lactobacillus gasseri detected more frequently in the UUI cohort and Lactobacillus crispatus most frequently detected in controls. Combined, these data suggest that potentially important differences exist in the urinary microbiomes of women with and without UUI, which have strong implications in prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of UUI. PMID:25006228

  8. Acupuncture for the treatment of urinary incontinence: A review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    PAIK, SUN-HO; HAN, SU-RYUN; KWON, OH-JUN; AHN, YOUNG-MIN; LEE, BYUNG-CHEOL; AHN, SE-YOUNG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of acupuncture on urinary incontinence and to discuss why these acupoints were selected. Seven databases were searched for any randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the use of acupuncture or acupressure as a treatment for urinary incontinence, and the Cochrane risk of bias tool was utilized to evaluate the risk of bias in each study. Four RCTs met all the inclusion criteria. The results from the selected RCTs failed to demonstrate any statistically significant improvements in urinary incontinence, although acupuncture or acupressure did exhibit favorable effects on overactive bladder symptoms and quality of life, in comparison with other conventional therapies. There have been limited results supporting acupuncture or acupressure as an effective treatment method for urinary incontinence; therefore, further RCTs are required to confirm the effectiveness of acupuncture or acupressure in the treatment of urinary incontinence. PMID:24137264

  9. Abdominal obesity is associated with stress urinary incontinence in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Han, Myung Ok; Lee, Nan Young; Park, Hye Soon

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between abdominal obesity and stress urinary incontinence in Korean women. Women aged 30 and over, who visited the Department of Family Medicine of Asan Medical Center were recruited to participate in this study. Anthropometric measurements including body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were taken, and associated factors of stress urinary incontinence was assessed by questionnaire. Stress urinary incontinence was significantly associated with physical work, vaginal delivery, and high waist circumference. In comparison with women in the lowest quartile of waist circumference, the odds ratios (OR) for stress urinary incontinence in women in the second, third, and fourth quartiles were increased significantly (1.79, 95% CI 1.07-2.98; 3.50, 95% CI 2.02-6.07; and 6.07, 95% CI 3.23-11.40, respectively). Our results indicate that high waist circumference may be a risk factor associated with stress urinary incontinence in women.

  10. Could Urinary Tract Infection Cause Female Stress Urinary Incontinence? A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Fatemeh; Motaghed, Zahra; Abbaszadeh, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the most common type of urinary incontinence (UI), is usually defined as leakage of urine during movement or activity which puts pressure on the bladder, such as coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting. It is reported in most countries that 15% to 40% of women struggle with SUI and its severe implications for daily life, including social interactions, sexuality, and psychological wellbeing. Objectives The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between urinary tract infection and the severity of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Patients and Methods This research was a cross-sectional study conducted in a public urology clinic in Tehran. The study population was all females with complaints of SUI who visited the clinic during 2014. We compared Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) in two groups of patients, with and without history of urinary tract infection (UTI). Results According to the findings of our study, the mean VLPP was 83.10 cm H2O in the group with UTI history, and 81.29 cm H2O in those without history of UTI. The difference in VLPP between the two groups was not significant (P < 0.05), even after controlling for confounding variables including age, body mass index, history of hysterectomy and number of deliveries. Conclusions Our study did not confirm a significant relationship between UTI and severity of SUI as measured by VLPP. A decisive opinion would require extensive future studies by prospective methods. PMID:26981500

  11. Traditional suburethral sling operations for urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Haroon; Bezerra, Carlos A; Bruschini, Homero; Cody, June D; Aluko, Patricia

    2017-07-26

    Stress urinary incontinence constitutes a significant health and economic burden to society. Traditional suburethral slings are one of the surgical operations used to treat women with symptoms of stress urinary incontinence. To determine the effects of traditional suburethral slings on stress or mixed incontinence in comparison with other management options. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register (searched 3 June 2010) and the reference lists of relevant articles. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials that included traditional suburethral slings for the treatment of stress or mixed urinary incontinence. At least three reviewers independently extracted data from included trials onto a standard form and assessed trial methodological quality. The data abstracted were relevant to predetermined outcome measures. Where appropriate, we calculated a summary statistic: a relative risk for dichotomous data and a weighted mean difference for continuous data. We included 26 trials involving 2284 women. The quality of evidence was moderate for most trials and there was generally short follow-up ranging from 6 to 24 months.One medium-sized trial compared traditional suburethral sling operations with oxybutynin in the treatment of women with mixed urinary incontinence. Surgery appeared to be more effective than drugs in treating participant-reported incontinence (n = 75, risk ratio (RR) 0.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08 to 0.43).One trial found that traditional slings were more effective than transurethral injectable treatment (RR for clinician-assessed incontinence within a year 0.21, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.21)Seven trials compared slings with open abdominal retropubic colposuspension. Participant-reported incontinence was lower with the slings after one year (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.90), but not when assessed by clinicians. Colposuspension, however, was associated with fewer peri-operative complications, shorter duration of use of indwelling catheter

  12. Stress Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Stress incontinence Overview Urinary incontinence is the unintentional loss of urine. Stress incontinence happens when physical movement or activity — such ... coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting — puts pressure (stress) on your bladder. Stress incontinence is not related ...

  13. Does pelvic floor muscle training abolish symptoms of urinary incontinence? A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Celiker Tosun, O; Kaya Mutlu, E; Ergenoglu, A M; Yeniel, A O; Tosun, G; Malkoc, M; Askar, N; Itil, I M

    2015-06-01

    To determine whether symptoms of urinary incontinence is reduced by pelvic floor muscle training, to determine whether urinary incontinence can be totally eliminated by strengthening the pelvic floor muscle to grade 5 on the Oxford scale. Prospective randomized controlled clinical trial. Outpatient urogynecology department. One hundred thirty cases with stress and mixed urinary incontinence. All participants were randomly allocated to the pelvic floor muscle training group or control group. A 12-week home based exercise program, prescribed individually, was performed by the pelvic floor muscle training group. Urinary incontinence symptoms (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7, Urogenital Distress Inventory-6, bladder diary, stop test and pad test) were assessed, and the pelvic floor muscle strength was measured for (PERFECT testing, perineometric and ultrasound) all participants before and after 12 weeks of treatment. The pelvic floor muscle training group had significant improvement in their symptoms of urinary incontinence (P=0.001) and an increase in pelvic floor muscle strength (P=0.001, by the dependent t test) compared with the control group. All the symptoms of urinary incontinence were significantly decreased in the patients that had reached pelvic floor muscle strength of grade 5 and continued the pelvic floor muscle training (P<0.05). The study demonstrated that pelvic floor muscle training is effective in reducing the symptoms of stress and mixed urinary incontinence and in increasing pelvic floor muscle strength. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. EAU guidelines on surgical treatment of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Malcolm G; Bosch, Ruud J L; Burkhard, Fiona C; Cruz, Francisco; Madden, Thomas B; Nambiar, Arjun K; Neisius, Andreas; de Ridder, Dirk J M K; Tubaro, Andrea; Turner, William H; Pickard, Robert S

    2012-12-01

    The European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on urinary incontinence published in March 2012 have been rewritten based on an independent systematic review carried out by the EAU guidelines panel using a sustainable methodology. We present a short version here of the full guidelines on the surgical treatment of patients with urinary incontinence, with the aim of dissemination to a wider audience. Evidence appraisal included a pragmatic review of existing systematic reviews and independent new literature searches based on Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome (PICO) questions. The appraisal of papers was carried out by an international panel of experts, who also collaborated in a series of consensus discussions, to develop concise structured evidence summaries and action-based recommendations using a modified Oxford system. The full version of the guidance is available online (www.uroweb.org/guidelines/online-guidelines/). The guidance includes algorithms that refer the reader back to the supporting evidence and have greater accessibility in daily clinical practice. Two original meta-analyses were carried out specifically for these guidelines and are included in this report. These new guidelines present an up-to-date summary of the available evidence, together with clear clinical algorithms and action-based recommendations based on the best available evidence. Where high-level evidence is lacking, they present a consensus of expert panel opinion. Copyright © 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. EAU guidelines on surgical treatment of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Lucas, M G; Bosch, R J L; Burkhard, F C; Cruz, F; Madden, T B; Nambiar, A K; Neisius, A; de Ridder, D J M K; Tubaro, A; Turner, W H; Pickard, R S

    2013-09-01

    The European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on urinary incontinence published in March 2012 have been rewritten based on an independent systematic review carried out by the EAU guidelines panel using a sustainable methodology. We present a short version here of the full guidelines on the surgical treatment of patients with urinary incontinence, with the aim of dissemination to a wider audience. Evidence appraisal included a pragmatic review of existing systematic reviews and independent new literature searches based on Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome (PICO) questions. The appraisal of papers was carried out by an international panel of experts, who also collaborated in a series of consensus discussions, to develop concise structured evidence summaries and action-based recommendations using a modified Oxford system. The full version of the guidance is available online (www.uroweb.org/guidelines/online-guidelines/). The guidance includes algorithms that refer the reader back to the supporting evidence and have greater accessibility in daily clinical practice. Two original meta-analyses were carried out specifically for these guidelines and are included in this report. These new guidelines present an up-to-date summary of the available evidence, together with clear clinical algorithms and action-based recommendations based on the best available evidence. Where high-level evidence is lacking, they present a consensus of expert panel opinion. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. [Treatment of urinary stress incontinence using a laparoscopic technique].

    PubMed

    Hernández Fernández, Carlos; de Palacio España, Andrés; Escribano Patiño, Gregorio; Díez Cordero, Jose María; Bielsa Carrillo, Alejandro

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate our own experience with laparoscopic bladder neck suspension. The laparoscopic procedure is performed by anchoring a mesh from the vagina to the ligament, thus creating tension. This technique has several characteristics that make it very attractive: it is easy to learn, operating times are short and it is a commonly indicated procedure. We present a series of 72 women with history of urinary stress incontinence to whom a laparoscopic bladder neck suspension was indicated. The procedure was completed in 69 patients, with a mean operative time of 40 minutes. Mean hospital stay was 1.6 days (Range 1 to 5 days). Continence rate was 82% after a median follow up of 31 months. 12 patients recurred after the operation, 7 of them recurred in the first 2 months and 5 had previous surgical history; this makes us think whether the technique was not adequately performed or the indication for treatment was not suitable. We believe that, although it is necessary a longer follow-up, laparoscopic bladder neck suspension can be considered a good alternative in the treatment of urinary stress incontinence.

  17. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part two: treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jimbo, Masahito; Heidelbaugh, Joel J.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. In this review article we address treatment of the various forms of incontinence with conservative treatments, medical therapy, devices and surgery. The US Preventive Services Task Force, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Conservative therapy with education, fluid and food management, weight loss, timed voiding and pelvic floor physical therapy are all simple office-based treatments for incontinence. Medical therapy for incontinence currently is only available for urgency incontinence in the form of anticholinergic medication. Condom catheters, penile clamps, urethral inserts and pessaries can be helpful in specific situations. Surgical therapies vary depending on the type of incontinence, but are typically offered if conservative measures fail. PMID:23904858

  18. Lifestyle interventions for the treatment of urinary incontinence in adults.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Mari; Williams, Kate; Wells, Mandy; McGrother, Catherine

    2015-12-02

    Low cost, non-invasive alterations in lifestyle are frequently recommended by healthcare professionals or those presenting with incontinence. However, such recommendations are rarely based on good evidence. The objective of the review was to determine the effectiveness of specific lifestyle interventions (i.e. weight loss; dietary changes; fluid intake; reduction in caffeinated, carbonated and alcoholic drinks; avoidance of constipation; stopping smoking; and physical activity) in the management of adult urinary incontinence. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and MEDLINE in process, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings (searched 3 July 2013), and the reference lists of relevant articles. We incorporated the results of these searches fully in the review. We undertook an updated search of the Specialised Register, which now includes searches of ClinicalTrials.gov and WHO ICTRP, on 27 October 2014; potentially eligible studies from this search are currently awaiting classification. Randomised and quasi-randomised studies of community-based lifestyle interventions compared with no treatment, other conservative therapies, or pharmacological interventions for the treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Two authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. We collected information on adverse effects from the trials. Data were combined in a meta-analysis when appropriate. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We included 11 trials in the review, involving a total of 5974 participants.Four trials involving 4701 women compared weight loss programmes with a control intervention. Low quality evidence from one trial suggested that more women following weight loss programmes reported improvement in symptoms of incontinence at six months (163/214 (76%) versus 49/90 (54

  19. Factors influencing the incidence and remission of urinary incontinence after hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, Katja Stenström; Ankardal, Maud; Lindkvist, Håkan; Milsom, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the influence of body mass index, smoking, and mode of delivery on the occurrence of urinary incontinence after hysterectomy are required to provide women with information about how these factors influence continence after a hysterectomy. The aim was to assess the impact of lifestyle factors such as body mass index, smoking, and delivery mode (vaginal/cesarean) on the incidence and remission of urinary incontinence after hysterectomy. This was a cohort study based on pre-, per-, and postoperative (1 year) data retrieved from the Swedish National Register for Gynecological Surgery on 16,182 hysterectomies performed because of a benign indication between 2006 and 2013. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify independent risk factors for de novo urinary incontinence and postoperative remission of urinary incontinence, presented as adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. De novo urinary incontinence was reported by 8.5%, remission of urinary incontinence by 13.3%, and residual urinary incontinence by 16.1% after the hysterectomy. A body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) (odds ratio, 1.63, 95% confidence interval, 1.37-1.94), having undergone a vaginal delivery (odds ratio, 1.40, 95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.86), the presence of daily urge without incontinence prior to surgery (odds ratio, 1.77, 95% confidence interval, 1.47-2.13), and a uterine weight <500 g (odds ratio, 2.46, 95% confidence interval, 1.96-3.09) were associated with an increased risk of de novo urinary incontinence. A uterine weight >300 g (odds ratio, 1.98, 95% confidence interval, 1.69-2.33), body mass index <25 kg/m(2) (odds ratio, 1.22, 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.47), prolapse (odds ratio, 2.25, 95% confidence interval, 1.60-3.18), or fibroids (odds ratio, 1.33, 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.62) as indication for surgery and the absence of daily urge without incontinence preoperatively (odds ratio, 1.51, 95% confidence interval, 1.29-1.76) were

  20. [Investigation of urinary incontinence in community dwelling women of Fuzhou city].

    PubMed

    Song, Yan-feng; Li, Ya-qin; Xu, Bo; Song, Jian; Hao, Lan

    2004-04-01

    The aim was to assess the prevalence of urinary incontinence in Gulou community dwelling women in Fuzhou China. One of the communities was selected at random and questionnaires were sent to women living there. After completed the questionnaires were collected and statistics software SPSS 10.0 was used for analysis. We sent 5871 questionnaires and collected 5392 ones. The response rate was 91.8%. The prevalence of urinary incontinence was 18.5%, while it was 51.1% in women who were 65 years or older, and the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI), urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and mix urinary incontinence (MUI) was 9.1%, 2.4%, and 7.0% respectively. Their structural proportion was 49%:13%:38%. In terms of the incidence of the disease, mild urinary incontinence was prominent. Among the surveyed women, 32.4% did not know where to consult a doctor for help, 45.5%went to urologists, and 22.1% went to gynecologists for help. Urinary incontinence is highly prevalent, especially among aged women. However, they seldom consult a doctor about their urinary leakage.

  1. The Association between Urinary Incontinence and Low Back Pain and Radiculopathy in Women

    PubMed Central

    Kaptan, Hulagu; Kulaksızoğlu, Haluk; Kasımcan, Ömür; Seçkin, Bedreddin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common dysfunction, affecting especially women of all ages. The terminology of low back pain (LBP) and radiculopathy (RP) may be misused interchangeably with each other. There are many reports of the association with LBP and incontinence but those involving compression of nerve root(as RP), has not been distinguished from isolated low back pain. This study was structured to analyse the association of UI, LBP and RP. METHODS: One hundred twenty patients were included in the study. Patients with spinal or urinary infection, tumour (spinal or others), cauda equine, pelvic operation, spinal trauma, spinal surgery, urogenital pathology were not accepted for this study. Age and weight of all patients were determined. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was utilised for assessment of loss of function and SEAPI incontinence index was used for urinary incontinence. All patients were examined for neurological pathology to differentiate between the LBP and RP by department of neurosurgery. Student t-test and Mann-Whitney-U tests were used for statistical significance. RESULTS: There was no statistical significance between low back pain with overall urinary incontinence (p = 0.131), urge (p = 0.103) or stress incontinence (p = 0.68), respectively. However; The statistical aspects were identified relationship between overall (p = 0.026) and urge (p = 0.001) urinary incontinence with radiculopathy. The association of urge incontinence and radiculopathy seems to show a more significant relationship. Yet there was no correlation between radiculopathy and stress incontinence (P = 0.062). CONCLUSION: Low back pain should not be regarded as a predisposing factor for urinary incontinence; however, radiculopathy has a statistically positive correlation between overall incontinence and urge incontinence. PMID:28028410

  2. Urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor disorders after radiation therapy in endometrial cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Segal, Saya; John, Gabriella; Sammel, Mary; Andy, Uduak Umoh; Chu, Christina; Arya, Lily A; Brown, Justin; Schmitz, Kathryn

    2017-03-18

    To investigate radiation therapy as a risk factor for urinary or fecal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and sexual dysfunction in endometrial cancer survivors. We performed a retrospective cohort study of endometrial cancer survivors. Data were collected using a mailed survey and the medical record. Validated questionnaires were used to generate rates of urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor disorders. The incidence rates of pelvic floor disorders were compared across groups with different exposures to radiation. Of the 149 endometrial cancer survivors, 41% received radiation therapy. Fifty-one percent of women reported urine leakage. The rates of urinary incontinence in women exposed and not exposed to vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) or whole-pelvis radiation were 48% and 58%, respectively (p=0.47). The incidence of fecal incontinence did not differ between groups, but the score for overall sexual function was significantly higher in women who did not undergo radiation therapy. On multivariable analysis, significant risk factors for urinary incontinence were age (AOR 1.06 95% CI 1.02, 1.10) and BMI (AOR 1.07 95% CI 1.02, 1.11), but treatment with radiation was not significantly associated with urinary incontinence, or fecal incontinence (p>0.05). Age, BMI, and radiation exposure were independent predictors of decreased sexual function score (p<0.01). Local or regional radiation is not associated with urinary or fecal incontinence, but may contribute to sexual dysfunction in endometrial cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training in treating urinary incontinence in women: A current review.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, E; Rubio-Arias, J A; Ávila-Gandía, V; Ramos-Campo, D J; López-Román, J

    2016-06-01

    To analyse the content of various published studies related to physical exercise and its effects on urinary incontinence and to determine the effectiveness of pelvic floor training programmes. We conducted a search in the databases of PubMed, CINAHL, the Cochrane Plus Library, The Cochrane Library, WOS and SPORTDiscus and a manual search in the Google Scholar metasearcher using the search descriptors for documents published in the last 10 years in Spanish or English. The documents needed to have an abstract or complete text on the treatment of urinary incontinence in female athletes and in women in general. We selected 3 full-text articles on treating urinary incontinence in female athletes and 6 full-text articles and 1 abstract on treating urinary incontinence in women in general. The 9 studies included in the review achieved positive results, i.e., there was improvement in the disease in all of the studies. Physical exercise, specifically pelvic floor muscle training programmes, has positive effects on urinary incontinence. This type of training has been shown to be an effective programme for treating urinary incontinence, especially stress urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Urinary incontinence and disability in community-dwelling women: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Greer, Joy A; Xu, Rengyi; Propert, Kathleen J; Arya, Lily A

    2015-08-01

    Disability, an individual's reduced capacity to perform physical tasks encountered in daily routine, is associated with urinary incontinence in the elderly. Our objective was to determine if urinary incontinence is associated with disability in community-dwelling women 40 years and older. Cross-sectional study among US women ≥40 years (n = 4,458) from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2005-2010. We estimated the age-stratified weighted prevalence and factors independently associated with disability (Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), mobility, and functional limitations) in women with and without urinary incontinence while controlling for confounders of the association between disability and urinary incontinence. The weighted prevalence of all disabilities was higher in women with urinary incontinence than women without urinary incontinence across most decades of life with the greatest difference in the prevalence of mobility disabilities: 40-49 years (12.1% vs. 7.0%), 50-59 years (17.0% vs. 9.2%), 60-69 years (28.3% vs. 19.8%), and 70+ years (43.8% vs. 33.0%, all P < 0.05). On multivariable analysis, after controlling for the confounding effect of age, co-morbidities, and income-poverty ratio, urinary incontinence was weakly associated with disabilities. The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of disabilities for urinary incontinence was ADL 1.96 (1.07, 3.58), IADL 1.18 (0.78, 1.78), mobility 1.26 (1.01, 1.56), and functional limitations 1.36 (1.07, 1.73). Urinary incontinence is weakly associated with disabilities and cannot be implicated as a cause of disability in community dwelling women. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Pelvic floor muscle training improves quality of life of women with urinary incontinence: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hiu Lan; Chan, Symphorosa Shing Chee; Law, Tracy Sze Man; Cheung, Rachel Yau Kar; Chung, Tony Kwok Hung

    2013-06-01

    Women suffering from urinary incontinence have impaired quality of life (QoL). Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) has been recommended to be the first-line treatment for them. This study evaluated the role of (PFMT) in women with urinary incontinence. All women suffering from urinary incontinence without pelvic organ prolapse who attended the urogynaecology unit of a university hospital from January 2009 to June 2010 were recruited. Urinary symptoms and impact on QoL were assessed using the Chinese validated Urogenital Distress Inventory short form (UDI-6) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire short form (IIQ-7) before and after PFMT. Urodynamic studies (UDS) were used to differentiate the diagnoses of urinary incontinence. Three hundred and seventy-two women, aged 52.3 ± 10.8 years and practised PFMT for 9.9 ± 7.3 months, completed the study. Over 65% recorded improvement in both UDI-6 and IIQ-7. Stratified for urodynamic diagnosis, stress incontinence group and those who had no UDS abnormality had significant improvement in their urinary symptoms and QoL after PFMT. UDI-6 and IIQ-7 also improved significantly after PFMT in groups where the clinical presentation was stress incontinence, overactive bladder symptoms or mixed urinary incontinence. Age was not associated with a significant difference in the response to PFMT. Pelvic floor muscle training appears to be an effective first-line intervention for improving urinary symptoms and QoL of women presenting with urinary incontinence. Future studies on long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness are also required. © 2013 The Authors ANZJOG © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  6. Urinary incontinence in community-dwelling older Mexican American and European American women.

    PubMed

    Markland, Alayne D; Gerety, Meghan B; Goode, Patricia S; Kraus, Stephen R; Cornell, John; Hazuda, Helen P

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to measure prevalence and correlates of urinary incontinence in community-dwelling Mexican American (MA) and European American (EA) women from a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a longitudinal cohort. Participants were MA and EA women, aged 65 years and older, in the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging (SALSA), of whom 421 (97.4%) responded to the question "How often do you have difficulty holding your urine until you can get to a toilet." Measurements included sociodemographic, functional, cognitive, psychosocial, and clinical status variables derived from bilingual interviews and performance-based tests. Urinary incontinence prevalence was 36.6% (n=154). MA women reported less incontinence than did EAs (29% versus 45%, p=0.001). In multivariable analyses in MA women, urinary incontinence correlated with the presence of fecal incontinence (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.1-14.0) and more dependency in activities of daily living (1.4, 1.1-1.8) after controlling for significant sociodemographic factors. In EA women, only age >75 (4.2, 1.4-12.4) was associated with urinary incontinence. MA women were less likely to report incontinence compared to EAs, despite MAs having increased number of children, less education, higher BMI, and more diabetes. Further research is needed to evaluate risk factors for urinary incontinence among MA women.

  7. Development of quality indicators for women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Anger, Jennifer T; Scott, Victoria C S; Kiyosaki, Krista; Khan, Aqsa A; Weinberg, Avivah; Connor, Sarah E; Roth, Carol P; Wenger, Neil; Shekelle, Paul; Litwin, Mark S

    2013-11-01

    To develop a means to measure the quality of care provided to women treated for urinary incontinence (UI) through the development of quality-of-care indicators (QIs). We performed an extensive literature review to develop a set of potential quality indicators for the management of UI. QIs were modeled after those previously described in the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) project. Nine experts ranked the indicators on a nine-point scale for both validity and feasibility. We analyzed preliminary rankings of each indicator using the RAND Appropriateness Method. A forum was then held in which each indicator was thoroughly discussed by the panelists as a group, after which the indicators were rated a second time individually using the same nine-point scale. QIs were developed that addressed screening, diagnosis, work-up, and both non-surgical and surgical management. Areas of controversy included whether routine screening for incontinence should be performed, whether urodynamics should be performed before non-surgical management is initiated, and whether cystoscopy should be part of the pre-operative work-up of uncomplicated stress incontinence. Following the expert panel discussion, 27 of 40 potential indicators were determined to be valid for UI with a median score of at least seven on a nine-point scale. We identified 27 quality indicators for the care of women with UI. Once these QIs are pilot-tested for feasibility, they will be applied on a larger scale to measure the quality of care provided to women with UI in the United States. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Markov chain decision model for urinary incontinence procedures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sameer; Ghildayal, Nidhi; Ghildayal, Neha

    2017-03-13

    Purpose Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common chronic health condition, a problem specifically among elderly women that impacts quality of life negatively. However, UI is usually viewed as likely result of old age, and as such is generally not evaluated or even managed appropriately. Many treatments are available to manage incontinence, such as bladder training and numerous surgical procedures such as Burch colposuspension and Sling for UI which have high success rates. The purpose of this paper is to analyze which of these popular surgical procedures for UI is effective. Design/methodology/approach This research employs randomized, prospective studies to obtain robust cost and utility data used in the Markov chain decision model for examining which of these surgical interventions is more effective in treating women with stress UI based on two measures: number of quality adjusted life years (QALY) and cost per QALY. Treeage Pro Healthcare software was employed in Markov decision analysis. Findings Results showed the Sling procedure is a more effective surgical intervention than the Burch. However, if a utility greater than certain utility value, for which both procedures are equally effective, is assigned to persistent incontinence, the Burch procedure is more effective than the Sling procedure. Originality/value This paper demonstrates the efficacy of a Markov chain decision modeling approach to study the comparative effectiveness analysis of available treatments for patients with UI, an important public health issue, widely prevalent among elderly women in developed and developing countries. This research also improves upon other analyses using a Markov chain decision modeling process to analyze various strategies for treating UI.

  9. Urinary incontinence among patients with arthritis--a neglected disability.

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Stokes, L; Frank, A O

    1992-01-01

    Urinary tract pathology may be no more common in patients with arthritis than among the general population, but its impact may be enhanced by disability. In this survey of 247 patients, as many as 38% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 47% of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and even 34% of patients with soft tissue rheumatism (STR) reported difficulty controlling their urine, confirming that incontinence is a widespread and often under-reported problem. More detailed enquiry in a sample of 90 patients with OA or RA did not suggest specific urinary tract pathology related to the underlying arthritis. Those who reported problems with urinary control were more disabled, and took longer to get to the toilet in their own environment than those without control problems. Twenty-seven per cent of patients felt that their problems would be solved by provision of a downstairs toilet. Timing of tasks performed by patients within their home is suggested as a method for assessing functional ability which encompasses both patient disability and environmental factors. PMID:1629846

  10. Portrait representation of postmenopausal women's experiences of living with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Pakgohar, Minoo; Hamid, Tengku-Aizan; Ibrahim, Rahimah; Vahid-Dastjerdi, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the meaning of the experiences of community-dwelling postmenopausal women who were born and grew up in a Muslim country when drawing a picture about their lived experiences of urinary incontinence. Hermeneutic phenomenology underpinned the study's interpretive research approach. In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted in two sessions with nine postmenopausal women. The participants were asked to draw a picture about their lived experiences of urinary incontinence in a self-portrait. Three themes emerged to illuminate the meaning of urinary incontinence, including "disruption of normal functioning," "self-imposed restrictions," and "feeling of despair." Discussion of these themes was presented, and practice and research implications were suggested.

  11. Revisiting the O complex: urinary incontinence, delirium and polypharmacy in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, D B

    1997-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, delirium and polypharmacy are common, challenging problems encountered in elderly patients. Review of the literature shows that these conditions are interrelated. For example, polypharmacy can lead to delirium, which, in turn, can lead to urinary incontinence. The drugs prescribed for urinary incontinence can precipitate delirium or contribute to polypharmacy. The underlying causes for these problems in elderly patients are frequently complex, and management in turn must often be multifactorial. The occurrence of these problems should lead to careful evaluation followed by thoughtful, responsive treatment. Brief updates are given with recommendations for management directed at primary care physicians. PMID:9347778

  12. [A questionnaire survey on urinary incontinence and urinary disturbances in the institutionalized elderly with senile dementia].

    PubMed

    Otani, N; Kumamoto, Y; Tsukamoto, T; Yokoo, A; Urasawa, K; Kawaharada, M

    1994-09-01

    We carried out a questionnaire survey concerning urinary disturbances, among nursing home patients. The answers were obtained from 1,038 elderly including 355 males and 683 females. Ages, spanned 50-99, with an average age of 79.1. Of the 1,038 respondents which we obtained through our survey for management of urination, 35.8% of the total said that they are able to urinate without incontinence. Those able to urinate with incontinence accounted for 23.6% of the total. However, 40% of all patients required an adult diaper throughout the day to control their urinary functions. Patients suffering from neurological disorders accounted for 70% of respondents, and a correlation was seen between the extent of dementia and ADL, and excretory control. Urinary functioning in both men and women was found to grow increasingly difficult with age, and medical problems involving urinary difficulty appear to increase with the advance of the aging process. The representative groups for this survey were limited to elderly people in nursing homes, many of whom suffer from neurological disorders such as cerebral infarction. It was found that both male and female patients experience a variety of urinary disturbances.

  13. [First case of sacral neuromodulation for treatment of urinary and fecal incontinence in Mexico. Case report.].

    PubMed

    Sucar-Romero, S; Decanini-Terán, C; Ruiz-Galindo, G H

    2009-01-01

    Sacral neuromodulation is a new treatment for urinary and fecal incontinence that has demonstrated good therapeutic results. This treatment modality has shown not only to reduce urinary dysfunction symptoms and urinary and fecal incontinence but improve quality of life scores as well. We present a 73 years old female patient with severe fecal and urinary incontinence with major quality of life impact. She was referred after failure of different surgical and conservative therapeutic approaches. Her evaluation met inclusion criteria for sacral neuromodulation treatment. Acute sacral nerve evaluation (PNE) proved to be therapeutic in the patient as measured by at least a 50 percent improvement in her symptoms so a permanent implant (Medtronic InterStim System) was placed. After the implant there was a significant improvement in urinary and fecal functional scores. Fecal Incontinence Severity Index improved from 34 to 8 and Urinary Sandvik's Severity Index from very severe urinary incontinence to minor urinary incontinence after the placement of the implant. Using standard quality of life questionnaires, she improved in the areas of lifestyle,coping and behavior and her experience with depression and self-perception.

  14. [Telerehabilitation to treat stress urinary incontinence. Pilot study].

    PubMed

    Carrión Pérez, Francisca; Rodríguez Moreno, María Sofía; Carnerero Córdoba, Lidia; Romero Garrido, Marina C; Quintana Tirado, Laura; García Montes, Inmaculada

    2015-05-21

    We aimed to test a new telerehabilitation device for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in order to make an initial assessment of its effectiveness. Randomized, controlled pilot study. experimental group (10 patients): pelvic floor muscle training, device training and home treatment with it; control group (9 patients): conventional rehabilitation treatment. Outcome measures (baseline and 3 months) overall and specific quality of life: International Consultation Incontinence Questionnaire and King's Health Questionnaire, bladder diary, perineometry, satisfaction with the program and degree of compliance. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. There was no statistically significant difference for any outcome measures between groups at the end of the follow-up. The change in perineometry values at baseline and after the intervention was significant in the experimental group (23.06 to 32.00, P=.011). No group in this study had any serious adverse effects. The tested device is safe and well accepted. Although there is some evidence of its efficacy in the rehabilitation treatment of SUI, larger trials are needed to appropriately evaluate the potential advantages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. The Pathophysiology of Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cundiff, Geoffrey W

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a historical perspective on the evolution of theories regarding the pathophysiology of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The progression of these theories has followed the development of the diagnostic technologies that have provided insight into different aspects of urethral dysfunction. The earliest theories tied SUI to anatomic failure of urethral support. Recognition that anatomic failure impacted the interplay of intra-abdominal pressure and the bladder and urethra led to theories focused on the dynamic interaction between the bladder and urethral pressures. Investigators then began to recognize the importance of urethral sphincteric dysfunction. More recently, investigators have attempted to combine the anatomic and functional etiologies into a consolidated theory. These efforts point to a multi-factorial etiology of SUI. Continuing research has provided new insight into the neurophysiology of urethral function, opening new avenues for tailoring therapy for SUI. PMID:16985860

  16. The science behind biomaterials in female stress urinary incontinence surgery.

    PubMed

    Amrute, Kaytan V; Badlani, Gopal H

    2009-01-18

    Female stress urinary incontinence, while not life threatening, can present with various social and economic implications. Biomaterials, primarily synthetic, are often utilized to augment surgical correction. Repair with biomaterials involves midurethral support to function against weakened connective tissue caused by injury, abnormal collagen metabolism, or genetic predisposition. Even though efficacy rates are high, the potential for complications, such as erosion, are great without comprehension of inherent characteristics of each graft material. Low-weight, macroporous, monofilament synthetic grafts and noncross-linked biologic grafts are examples of biomaterials that implant reasonably well with host tissue. This paper reviews the justification for biomaterial use, host reaction, and the various parameters of natural and synthetic grafts.

  17. Urinary Incontinence Management Costs are Reduced Following Burch or Sling Surgery for Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Subak, Leslee L.; Goode, Patricia S.; Brubaker, Linda; Kusek, John W.; Schembri, Mr. Michael; Lukacz, Emily S.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Chai, Toby C.; Norton, Peggy; Tennstedt, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effect of Burch and fascial sling surgery on out-of-pocket urinary incontinence (UI) management costs at 24 months post-operatively and identify predictors of change in cost among women enrolled in a randomized trial comparing these procedures. Methods Resources used for UI management (supplies, laundry, dry cleaning) were self-reported by 491 women at baseline and 24 months post-surgery and total out-of-pocket costs for UI management (in 2012 US dollars) were estimated. Data from the two surgical groups were combined to examine change in cost for UI management over 24 months. Univariate and bivariate changes in cost were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Predictors of change in cost were examined using multivariate mixed models. Results At baseline mean (±SD) age of participants was 53±10 years, and frequency of weekly UI episodes was 23±21. Weekly UI episodes decreased by 86% at 24 months (P<0.001). Mean weekly cost was $16.60±$27 (median $9.39) at baseline and $4.57±$15 (median $0.10) at 24 months (P<0.001), a decrease of 72%. In multivariate analyses, cost decreased by $3.38±$0.77 per week for each decrease of 1 UI episode per day (P<0.001) and was strongly associated with greater improvement in UDI and IIQ scores (P<0.001) and decreased 24-hour pad weight (P<0.02). Conclusion Following Burch or fascial sling surgery, UI management cost at 24 months decreased by 72% ($625 per woman per year) and was strongly associated with decreasing UI frequency. Reduced out-of-pocket expenses may be a benefit of these established urinary incontinence procedures. PMID:24631433

  18. Novel minimally invasive laser treatment of urinary incontinence in women

    PubMed Central

    Ogrinc, Urška B.; Senčar, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common disorder that affects women of various ages and impacts all aspects of life. Our aim was to evaluate the non‐invasive erbium:yttrium‐aluminum‐garnet (Er:YAG) laser that exploits its thermal effect and has been used in reconstructive and rejuvenation surgery as a potential treatment strategy for stress UI (SUI) and mixed UI (MUI). Study Design/Materials and Methods We included 175 women (aged 49.7 ± 10 years) with newly diagnosed SUI (66% of women) and MUI (34%), respectively. Patients were clinically examined and classified by incontinence types (SUI and MUI) and grades (mild, moderate, severe, and very severe) using International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire (ICIQ) and assessing Incontinence Severity Index (ISI). Using Er:YAG laser, we performed on average 2.5 ± 0.5 procedures in each woman separated by a 2 month period. At each session, clinical examination was performed, ICIQ and ISI assessed and treatment discomfort measured with visual analog system (VAS) pain scale, and adverse effects and patients’ satisfaction were followed. Follow‐ups were performed at 2, 6, and 12 months after the treatment. Results After the treatment, ISI decreased for 2.6 ± 1.0 points in patients diagnosed with mild UI before the treatment, for 3.6 ± 1.4 points in those with moderate UI, for 5.7 ± 1.8 points in those with severe UI and for 8.4 ± 2.6 in those with very severe UI (P < 0.001, paired samples t‐test). Altogether, in 77% patients diagnosed with SUI, a significant improvement was found after treatment, while only 34% of women with MUI exhibited no UI at one year follow‐up. Age did not affect the outcome. No major adverse effects were noticed in either group. Conclusion The results of our study, have shown that new non‐invasive Er:YAG laser could be regarded as a promising additional treatment strategy for SUI with at least one year lasting

  19. Novel minimally invasive laser treatment of urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Ogrinc, Urška B; Senčar, Sabina; Lenasi, Helena

    2015-11-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common disorder that affects women of various ages and impacts all aspects of life. Our aim was to evaluate the non-invasive erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser that exploits its thermal effect and has been used in reconstructive and rejuvenation surgery as a potential treatment strategy for stress UI (SUI) and mixed UI (MUI). We included 175 women (aged 49.7 ± 10 years) with newly diagnosed SUI (66% of women) and MUI (34%), respectively. Patients were clinically examined and classified by incontinence types (SUI and MUI) and grades (mild, moderate, severe, and very severe) using International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire (ICIQ) and assessing Incontinence Severity Index (ISI). Using Er:YAG laser, we performed on average 2.5 ± 0.5 procedures in each woman separated by a 2 month period. At each session, clinical examination was performed, ICIQ and ISI assessed and treatment discomfort measured with visual analog system (VAS) pain scale, and adverse effects and patients' satisfaction were followed. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 6, and 12 months after the treatment. After the treatment, ISI decreased for 2.6 ± 1.0 points in patients diagnosed with mild UI before the treatment, for 3.6 ± 1.4 points in those with moderate UI, for 5.7 ± 1.8 points in those with severe UI and for 8.4 ± 2.6 in those with very severe UI (P < 0.001, paired samples t-test). Altogether, in 77% patients diagnosed with SUI, a significant improvement was found after treatment, while only 34% of women with MUI exhibited no UI at one year follow-up. Age did not affect the outcome. No major adverse effects were noticed in either group. The results of our study, have shown that new non-invasive Er:YAG laser could be regarded as a promising additional treatment strategy for SUI with at least one year lasting positive effects. On the other hand, it does not seem appropriate for treating MUI. © 2015 Wiley

  20. An unusual case of urinary incontinence in an intersex West Highland white terrier.

    PubMed

    Connery, Neil A; Spotswood, Tim

    2012-11-01

    A 5-year-old neutered female West Highland white terrier dog was presented with a history of congenital urinary incontinence that had become refractory to medical management. Complex urogenital anomalies including urethrovestibular and vestibuloperineal fistulae with low vulvar position along with a penoclitoris were present. Vaginectomy with perineal urethral reconstruction resolved the incontinence.

  1. Magnetic stimulation for stress urinary incontinence: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lim, Renly; Liong, Men Long; Leong, Wing Seng; Khan, Nurzalina Abdul Karim; Yuen, Kah Hay

    2015-06-21

    There is currently a lack of randomized, sham-controlled trials that are adequately powered, using validated outcomes, to allow for firm recommendations on the use of magnetic stimulation for stress urinary incontinence. We report a protocol of a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled parallel-group trial to evaluate the efficacy of magnetic stimulation for stress urinary incontinence. One hundred twenty subjects with stress urinary incontinence will be randomized in a 1:1 allocation to either active or sham magnetic stimulation using computer-generated, permuted blocks of variable sizes. Subjects will receive 2 sessions of magnetic stimulation per week for 8 weeks (16 sessions total). The primary outcome is the improvement in severity of involuntary urine loss based on the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence Short Form at the end of treatment sessions compared with baseline. Secondary outcomes include cure, stress urinary incontinence-related symptoms (incontinence episode frequency, urine loss in 1-hour pad test, pelvic floor muscle strength) and health-related quality of life (Patient Global Impression of Improvement, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life and EQ-5D). The safety of magnetic stimulation will also be assessed. Besides evaluation of clinical treatment effectiveness, cost-effectiveness analysis using patient-reported outcomes will be performed. This trial is designed to provide pending outcome information on this non-invasive treatment option. We intend to acknowledge the existing flaws in previous clinical trials and determine conclusively whether magnetic stimulation is effective for stress urinary incontinence. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01924728. Date of Registration: 14 August 2013.

  2. The minimum important difference for the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form in women with stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Sirls, Larry T; Tennstedt, Sharon; Brubaker, Linda; Kim, Hae-Young; Nygaard, Ingrid; Rahn, David D; Shepherd, Jonathan; Richter, Holly E

    2015-02-01

    Minimum important difference (MID) estimates the minimum degree of change in an instrument's score that correlates with a patient's subjective sense of improvement. We aimed to determine the MID for the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF) using both anchor based and distribution based methods derived using data from the Trial of Midurethral Slings (TOMUS). Instruments for the anchor-based analyses included the urogenital distress inventory (UDI), incontinence impact questionnaire (IIQ), patient global impression of improvement (PGI-I), incontinence episodes (IE) on 7-day bladder diary, and satisfaction with surgical results. After confirming moderate correlation (r ≥ 0.3) of ICIQ-UI SF and each anchor, MIDs were determined by calculating the difference between the mean instrument scores for individuals with the smallest amount of improvement and with no change. The distribution-based method of MID assessment was applied using effect sizes of 0.2 and 0.5 SD (small to medium effects). Triangulation was used to examine these multiple MID values in order to converge on a small range of values. Anchor-based MIDs range from -4.5 to -5.7 at 12 months and from -3.1 to 4.3 at 24 months. Distribution-based MID values were lower. Triangulation analysis supports a MID of -5 at 12 months and -4 at 24 months. The recommended MIDs for ICIQ-UI SF are -5 at 12 months and -4 at 24 months. In surgical patients, ICIQ-UI SF score changes that meet these thresholds can be considered clinically meaningful. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Minimum Important Difference for the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Urinary Incontinence Short Form in Women with Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Sirls, Larry T.; Tennstedt, Sharon; Brubaker, Linda; Kim, Hae-Young; Nygaard, Ingrid; Rahn, David D.; Shepherd, Jonathan; Richter, Holly E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Minimum important difference (MID) estimates the minimum degree of change in an instrument's score that correlates with a patient's subjective sense of improvement. We aimed to determine the MID for the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF) using both anchor based and distribution based methods derived using data from the Trial of Midurethral Slings (TOMUS). Materials and Methods Instruments for the anchor-based analyses included the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI), Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ), Patient Global Impression of improvement (PGI-I), incontinence episodes (IE) on 7-day bladder diary and satisfaction with surgical results. After confirming moderate correlation (r ≥0.3) of ICIQ-UI SF and each anchor, MIDs were determined by calculating the difference between the mean instrument scores for individuals with the smallest amount of improvement and with no change. The distribution-based method of MID assessment was applied using effect sizes of 0.2 and 0.5 SD (small to medium effects). Triangulation was used to examine these multiple MID values in order to converge on a small range of values. Results Anchor-based MIDs range from -4.5 to -5.7 at 12 months and from -3.1 to 4.3 at 24 months. Distribution-based MID values were lower. Triangulation analysis supports a MID of -5 at 12 months and -4 at 24 months. Conclusion The recommended MIDs for ICIQ-UI SF are -5 at 12 months and -4 at 24 months. In surgical patients, ICIQ-UI SF score changes that meet these thresholds can be considered clinically meaningful. PMID:24273137

  4. The Effect of Pelvic Muscle Exercises on Urinary Incontinency and Self-Esteem of Elderly Females With Stress Urinary Incontinency, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Talebizadeh, Malihe; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Millions of women are afflicted with stress urinary incontinence. Urinary incontinence is mentioned as one of the geriatric syndromes, together with pressure ulcers, functional decline, falls, and low self-esteem. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of pelvic muscle exercises on urinary incontinency and self- esteem of elderly females with stress urinary incontinency in Shiraz, Iran, 2013. Material and Method: In this interventional study, 50 old females aged 60-74 years were chosen among the members of Jahandidegan center, and they were asked to sign the informed consent form and complete the demographic questionnaire. Then, Quid questionnaire was used for choosing the type of incontinence in the elderly females. Next, the participants completed the ICIQ and self-esteem questionnaires. Then, they were randomly assigned to case and control groups. Each participant took part in 8 training classes. Finally, the subjects filled the ICIQ and self-esteem questionnaires before and 2 months after the intervention. Result: The results is shown that after the intervention, ICIQ score has a significant difference between the two groups (P=0.001). Also, after the treatment, self-esteem average scores of studied unit indicated a significant statistical difference in experimental group. In other words, the training sessions improved the score of self-esteem in the experimental group (P<0.001) versus control group (P=0.08). Conclusion: Pelvic muscle exercises were an empowerment mechanism for incontinent women in improving their quality of life and self-esteem, so recommended that such these exercising programs be used in elderly health care centers as a factor to improve health promotion of elderlies ’that are suffering from urinary incontinence. PMID:25716389

  5. Urinary Incontinence and Levels of Regular Physical Exercise in Young Women.

    PubMed

    Da Roza, T; Brandão, S; Mascarenhas, T; Jorge, R N; Duarte, J A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different levels of regular physical exercise on the frequency of urinary incontinence in young nulliparous women from the northern region of Portugal. Participants (n=386) self-reported demographic variables, frequency, and time spent practicing organized exercise per week, as well as completed the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form. The level of exercise was calculated based on the time (in minutes) usually spent per week in organized exercise. 19.9% of Portuguese nulliparous women reported incontinence symptoms. Considering the distribution of urinary incontinence among the different quartiles of organized exercise, women from the 4(th)quartile (those who train for competitive purposes) demonstrated highest relative frequency (p=0.000) and a 2.53 greater relative risk to develop (95% CIs,1.3-2.7) incontinence compared to women from the 1(st) quartile (inactive). Women who practice exercise for recreational purposes (2(nd) and 3(rd) quartiles) did not show significant differences in the urinary incontinence prevalence and relative risk of developing it compared to women from the 1(st) quartile. The results showed that women participating in organized exercise involving high volume training for competition are potentially at risk of developing urinary incontinence, although organized exercise undertaken without the intent to compete seems to be safe for maintaining urinary continence.

  6. Treatment of urinary incontinence in women in general practice: observational study.

    PubMed

    Seim, A; Sivertsen, B; Eriksen, B C; Hunskaar, S

    1996-06-08

    To examine what is attainable when treating urinary incontinence in women in general practice. Observational study with 12 months' follow up. Interview and clinical examination before, during, and after treatment of women seeking help for urinary incontinence in general practice. General practice in the rural district of Rissa, Norway. 105 women aged 20 or more with urinary incontinence. Treatment with pelvic floor exercises, electrostimulation, oestrogen, anticholinergic drugs, bladder training, and protective pads. Subjective and objective measures of urinary incontinence; number of patients referred to a specialist. After 12 months' follow up 70% (69/99) of the women were cured or much better; the mean score on a 100 mm visual analogue scale decreased from 37 to 20 mm; and the proportion of women who were greatly bothered by their incontinence decreased by 62%. 20% (20/98) of women became continent, and the percentage of women with severe incontinence decreased from 64% (63/99) to 28% (27/98). Mean leakage per 24 hours measured by a pad test decreased from 28 g at the start of treatment to 13 g after 12 months. The number of light weight pads or sanitary towels decreased from 1.6 to 0.6 a day. In all, 17/105 (16%) patients were referred to a specialist. Urinary incontinence in women can be effectively managed in general practice with fairly simple treatment. Most women will be satisfied with the results.

  7. A study of transobturator tape in stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Mayekar, Rahul Vishwanath; Bhosale, Archana Anilkumar; Kandhari, Khushboo Vikram; Nandanwar, Yogeshwar Sadashiv; Shaikh, Sadaf Sadique

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is commonly encountered in gynecological practice. Nowadays, midurethral sling surgeries in the form of transobturator tape (TOT) surgery are recommended in its treatment. Aims and Objectives: To assess the outcome and patient satisfaction of TOT surgery in the treatment of SUI. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken for patients of SUI who underwent TOT surgery by the outside in method and followed up for 5 years. The patients were assessed clinically and by the Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) preoperatively and at postoperative day 3, discharge and 3 months follow-up. Results: Successful surgical treatment with TOT was seen in all patients at the time of discharge. There was no recurrence of SUI seen up to 1 year, but at 5-year follow-up two patients had a recurrence of SUI on examination though they did not complain of SUI. Urinary retention, tape extrusion, and groin stitch infection were the commonly seen complications following surgery. On subjective assessment, 61 patients were completely satisfied at day 3, and all patients were completely satisfied at discharge and 3 months follow-up as per the PGI-I score. Conclusion: TOT gives an excellent outcome in the treatment of SUI. PMID:28216921

  8. Prevalence and Trends of Urinary Incontinence in Adults in the United States, 2001 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Markland, Alayne D.; Richter, Holly E.; Fwu, Chyng-Wen; Eggers, Paul; Kusek, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We estimate trends in the prevalence of urinary incontinence in the adult population of the United States from 2001 through 2008 before and after adjusting for other potential associated factors. Materials and Methods We analyzed data on 17,850 adults 20 years old or older who participated in the 2001 to 2008 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Any urinary incontinence was defined as a positive response to questions on urine leakage during physical activity, before reaching the toilet and during nonphysical activity. During this period changes in demographic and clinical factors associated with urinary incontinence included age, race/ethnicity, obesity, diabetes and chronic medical conditions (prostate disease in men). Age standardized prevalence estimates and prevalence ORs of urinary incontinence trends were determined using adjusted multivariate models with appropriate sampling weights. Results The age standardized prevalence of urinary incontinence in the combined surveys was 51.1% in women and 13.9% in men. Prevalence in women increased from 49.5% in 2001 to 2002, to 53.4% in 2007 to 2008 (Ptrend = 0.01) and in men from 11.5% to 15.1%, respectively (Ptrend = 0.01). In women increased prevalence was partially explained by differences in age, race/ethnicity, obesity, diabetes and select chronic diseases across the survey periods. After adjustment the prevalence OR for 2007 to 2008 vs 2001 to 2002 decreased from 1.22 (95% CI 1.03–1.45) to 1.16 (95% CI 0.99–1.37). in men adjustment for potentially associated factors did not explain the increasing prevalence of urinary incontinence. Conclusions The age standardized prevalence of urinary incontinence increased in men and women from 2001 through 2008. Decreasing obesity and diabetes may lessen the burden of urinary incontinence, especially in women. PMID:21684555

  9. Clinical profile of elderly urinary incontinence in Singapore: a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Lee, K S; Chan, C J; Merriman, A; Tan, E C; Osborn, V

    1991-11-01

    The prevalence of urinary incontinence in the elderly aged 65 years and above was found to be 4.6% (42 out of a total of 919 respondents), in a community-based study in Singapore. Urinary incontinence was defined as leakage of urine on at least two occasions in the previous one month. The clinical profile of 30 out of the 42 (71%) subjects were studied. There was equal distribution of male and female subjects. Eighteen (60%) of the subjects were below 75 years of age. Twenty-five (83.3%) subjects had severe incontinence. Twenty-four (80%) had the incontinence for more than one year. Despite the high percentage of patients with severe incontinence, only nine (30%) used some form of aid. Incontinence in our very old (75 years and above) was not related to frailty or physical dependence. Seven of the subjects (23.3%) were found to have functional incontinence associated with cognitive impairment. These patients were unable to indicate their toilet needs. They also had associated physical disability as well as double incontinence, and their carers were under stress. Ten of the subjects had pure urge incontinence. Seven of them had an underlying central nervous system disorder, suggesting that destrusor hyperreflexia may be the underlying cause for urinary incontinence in this group. All except one in this group had more than one possible precipitating factor for their incontinence. Eleven subjects had symptoms suggestive of outlet obstruction, although only two were found to have proven outlet obstruction. None of the female subjects had pure stress incontinence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Systematic screening for urinary incontinence in older women: Who could benefit from it?

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Els; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Meijerink, Marije; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Dekker, Janny H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify women who are suffering from urinary incontinence but do not consult a physician and to identify reasons for this. Design Survey study as part of a randomized controlled trial that investigates the effects of a standardized assessment and evidence-based treatment on urinary incontinence in older women, the URINO project. Setting Female patients from general practices in the Northern part of the Netherlands. Patients A total of 225 women of 55 years and older suffering from urinary incontinence. Main outcome measures Number of patients with urinary incontinence who are not registered by their GP as suffering from this, factors associated with help-seeking behaviour, and reasons for not seeking help. Results Of the 225 patients, 143 (64%) were not registered by their GP as suffering from urinary incontinence. These women were more often younger and had lower levels of distress due to their urogynaecological symptoms. The most common reason for not consulting a GP was that patients considered their symptoms not to be serious enough. Conclusion The prevalence of older women with urinary incontinence who do not seek help is high. Help-seeking behaviour is associated with increasing age and higher levels of distress caused by the symptoms. Younger patients more often hesitate to consult their GP if they perceive their symptoms to be relatively mild. PMID:22324458

  11. Prevalence and risk factors for urinary and fecal incontinence four months after vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Baydock, Sandra A; Flood, Catherine; Schulz, Jane A; MacDonald, Dianna; Esau, Deborah; Jones, Sandra; Hiltz, Craig B

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for urinary and fecal incontinence four months after vaginal delivery. All patients who had vaginal deliveries at a tertiary care hospital over a three-month period were approached during their postpartum hospital stay regarding participation in the study. Participants underwent a telephone interview at four months after their delivery to determine the presence and type of any incontinence. Of 632 patients, 145 (23%) had stress incontinence, 77 (12%) had urge incontinence, 181 (29%) had any urinary incontinence and 23 (4%) had fecal incontinence. In univariate analysis, stress incontinence was found to be increased in patients>or=30 years of age (26.2%) compared with patients<30 years of age (19.3%) (RR 1.4; 95% CI 1.0-1.8, P=0.05). Urge incontinence was increased in patients who had a forceps delivery (21%) compared with no forceps delivery (9%) (RR 2.2; 95% CI 1.4-3.6, P=0.005), an episiotomy (32.4%) compared with no episiotomy (18.7%) (RR 1.9; 95% CI 1.2-2.9, P<0.01) and a longer second stage of labour (108 min vs. 77 min, P=0.01). The prevalence of any urinary incontinence was increased with forceps delivery (15.5%) compared with no forceps delivery (8.7%) (RR 1.5; 95% CI 1.1-2.1, P=0.01) and maternal age of >or=30 years (34.1%) compared to <30 years (23.5%) (RR 1.5; 95% CI 1.1-1.9, P=0.003). In multivariate analysis, the two variables that remained significant for any urinary incontinence were maternal age>or=30 years (P<0.01) and forceps delivery (P<0.01). There were no identified risk factors for fecal incontinence. Urinary incontinence is common in women at four months post partum. Fecal incontinence is less common. Maternal age and forceps assisted delivery were risk factors for urinary incontinence.

  12. Promoting social continence: products and devices in the management of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Lekan-Rutledge, Deborah; Doughty, Dorothy; Moore, Katherine N; Wooldridge, Leslie

    2003-12-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a prevalent problem occurring in men and women across the lifespan. Technologic innovations have provided individuals with incontinence and caregivers with an array of options for achieving social continence. Even when UI cannot be completely cured, it can always be managed with products, skin care regimens, occlusive or drainage devices and toileting equipment to ensure optimal skin integrity, odorless urine containment, social independence, comfort, and freedom of movement. Various products, devices, and equipment available to help incontinent individuals preserve independence and quality of life and manage incontinence are described.

  13. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Augusto Cesar Soares; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; Azevedo, Daniela Castelo; Carvalho, Lélia Maria de Almeida; Fernandes, Mariana Ribeiro; Avelar, Sandra de Oliveira Sapori; Horta, Maria da Glória Cruvinel; Kelles, Silvana Márcia Bruschi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5). The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years), was 44% (n=40). The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years). Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7%) resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3%) additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1%) underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%). Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%). In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices. PMID:28124538

  14. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Santos, Augusto Cesar Soares Dos; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; Azevedo, Daniela Castelo; Carvalho, Lélia Maria de Almeida; Fernandes, Mariana Ribeiro; Avelar, Sandra de Oliveira Sapori; Horta, Maria Glória Cruvinel; Kelles, Silvana Márcia Bruschi

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5). The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years), was 44% (n=40). The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years). Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7%) resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3%) additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1%) underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%). Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%). In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices.

  15. Correlates of urinary incontinence in community-dwelling older Latinos.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ariana L; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Anger, Jennifer T; Mangione, Carol M; Trejo, Laura; Rodríguez, Larissa V; Sarkisian, Catherine A

    2010-06-01

    The prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) has varied in the literature and is reflective of the definition and sampling methodologies used, as well as the age, ethnicity, and sex being studied. The aim of the current study was to measure the prevalence and correlates of UI in a sample of 572 older Latinos participating in Caminemos, a trial of a behavioral intervention to increase walking. Participants completed an in-person survey and physical performance measures. UI was measured using the International Consultation on Incontinence item: "How often do you leak urine?" Potential correlates of UI included sociodemographic variables, body mass index, smoking, physical activity, medical comorbidity, physical performance, activity of daily living (ADL) impairment, use of assistive ambulatory devices, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and depressive symptoms. The prevalence of UI in this sample was 26.9%. Women were more likely to report UI, as were those who were less physically active; used assistive ambulatory devices; and had depressive symptoms, greater medical comorbidity, worse physical performance, greater ADL impairment, worse cognitive function, and lower HRQoL. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that medical comorbidity was independently associated with higher rates of UI (odds ratio (OR)=1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.30-2.12), whereas better cognitive function (OR=0.73, 95% CI=0.57-0.93) and higher weighted physical activity scores (OR=0.77, 95% CI=0.60-0.98) were independently associated with lower rates of UI. UI is highly prevalent but not ubiquitous among community-residing older Latinos, suggesting that UI is not an inevitable consequence of aging. Future studies should examine whether interventions that decrease comorbidity and cognitive decline and increase physical activity improve continence status.

  16. Assessing the severity of urinary incontinence in women by weighing perineal pads.

    PubMed

    Sutherst, J; Brown, M; Shawer, M

    1981-05-23

    50 women with normal urinary control and 100 women with urinary incontinence wore a series of preweighed sanitary towels for 1 h. The pads were weighed again after use. Mean pad weight increase was less than 1 g/h in normal women and 12.2 g/h in women with incontinence. In each case the pad-weighing test provided information about the severity and the pattern of incontinence which was not easy to obtain either from patient interview or from clinical examination.

  17. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part one: diagnosis and testing

    PubMed Central

    Heidelbaugh, Joel J.; Jimbo, Masahito

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. This review article addresses its prevalence, risk factors, cost, the various types of incontinence, as well as how to diagnose them. The US Preventive Services Task Force, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Incontinence is a common problem with a high societal cost. It is frequently underreported by patients so it is appropriate for primary-care providers to screen all women and older men during visits. A thorough history and physical examination combined with easy office-based tests can often yield a clear diagnosis and rule out other transient illnesses contributing to the incontinence. Specialist referral is occasionally needed in specific situations before embarking on a treatment plan. PMID:23904857

  18. [FlowSecure artificial urinary sphincter for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    García-Montes, Fernando

    2009-12-01

    To diffuse the concept and implantation surgical technique of a new prosthesis for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence, the Flow Secure artificial urinary sphincter. The prosthesis is a single silicone piece filled with saline solution which has the following parts: (1) Pressure regulation reservoir, (2) assistance reservoir for stress situations, (3) control pump with self-sealant port and (4) a cuff. One of the main characteristics is the self-sealant port enables pressure adjustment depending of the clinical needs of the patient as many times as necessary. The surgical technique is simple and the level of continence achieved excellent. The only complication inherent to the Flow Secure design is perforation of the cuff during the act of pressurization, but it has been corrected by designing a new control pump which can not be punctured. Self limited scrotal edema/hematoma are frequent; they can be avoided minimizing the time of trocar use. The remainder complications are common with the AMS 800 and other implantable prosthesis. Despite midterm good results, we need to wait for a greater number of patients with the Flow Secure sphincter and longer follow up to determine the definitive role of this prosthesis for the treatment of urinary incontinence.

  19. Urinary incontinence in nulliparous women aged 25-64 years: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Al-Mukhtar Othman, Jwan; Åkervall, Sigvard; Milsom, Ian; Gyhagen, Maria

    2017-02-01

    A systematic survey of pelvic floor disorders in nulliparous women has not been presented previously. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence parameters in a large cohort of nonpregnant, nulliparous women, and thereby construct a reference group for comparisons with parous women. This postal and World Wide Web-based questionnaire survey was conducted in 2014. The study population was identified from the Total Population Register in Sweden and comprised women who had not given birth and were aged 25-64 years. Four independent age-stratified, random samples comprising 20,000 women were obtained from the total number of eligible nullipara (n = 625,810). A 40-item questionnaire about pelvic floor symptoms, its severity, and its consequences were used. Age-dependent differences for various aspects of urinary incontinence were analyzed with the youngest group (25-34 years) serving as reference. Crude and body mass index-adjusted prevalence and its 95% confidence limits were calculated for each 10-year category. The response rate was 52% and the number of study participants was 9197. Urinary incontinence increased >5-fold from 9.7% in the youngest women with a body mass index <25 kg/m(2) to 48.4% among the oldest women with a body mass index ≥35 kg/m(2). The prevalence of bothersome urinary incontinence almost tripled from 2.8-7.9% among all nulliparas. The proportion with bothersome urinary incontinence among incontinent women increased from 24.4% in the youngest age group to 32.3% in the age group 55-64 years. Nocturia ≥2/night increased 4-fold to 17.0% and leakage ≥1/wk increased 3-fold to 12.8% among the oldest women. Mixed urinary incontinence increased from 22.9-40.9% among the oldest 0-para with incontinence, whereas stress urinary incontinence decreased inversely from 43.6-33.0%. In the total cohort surgical treatment for urinary incontinence occurred in 3 per thousand. Almost every aspect of urinary incontinence

  20. Behavioural Interventions for Urinary Incontinence in Community-Dwelling Seniors

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Executive Summary In early August 2007, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began work on the Aging in the Community project, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding healthy aging in the community. The Health System Strategy Division at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care subsequently asked the secretariat to provide an evidentiary platform for the ministry’s newly released Aging at Home Strategy. After a broad literature review and consultation with experts, the secretariat identified 4 key areas that strongly predict an elderly person’s transition from independent community living to a long-term care home. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these 4 areas: falls and fall-related injuries, urinary incontinence, dementia, and social isolation. For the first area, falls and fall-related injuries, an economic model is described in a separate report. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html, to review these titles within the Aging in the Community series. Aging in the Community: Summary of Evidence-Based Analyses Prevention of Falls and Fall-Related Injuries in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis Behavioural Interventions for Urinary Incontinence in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis Caregiver- and Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia: An Evidence-Based Analysis Social Isolation in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis The Falls/Fractures Economic Model in Ontario Residents Aged 65 Years and Over (FEMOR) Objective To assess the effectiveness of behavioural interventions for the treatment and management of urinary incontinence (UI) in community-dwelling seniors. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Urinary incontinence defined as “the complaint of any involuntary leakage of urine” was identified as 1 of the key predictors in a senior’s transition from independent

  1. Laparoscopic implantation of artificial urinary sphincter: An option for treating recurrent female urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Baldissera-Aradas, J V; Rodríguez-Villamil, L; González-Rodríguez, I; Gil-Ugarteburu, R; Fernández-Pello-Montes, S; Mosquera-Madera, J

    2016-01-01

    The failure rate for anti-incontinence surgery ranges from 5% to 80%. There is not actual consensus on the use of artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) as treatment for recurrent urinary incontinence in women. Several authors have shown that AUS can be useful, if the intrinsic sphincteric deficiency is checked. We present the first case in Spain, to our knowledge, of laparoscopic implantation of AUS as treatment for female recurrent urinary incontinence. Under general anaesthesia, patient was placed in supine decubitus with slight Trendelenburg, access to the vagina was verified. Through a transperitoneal pelvic laparoscopic approach, Retzius space was opened and then the laterovaginal spaces up to the endopelvic fascia. To facilitate the dissection of the bladder neck, we inserted a swab into the vagina, performing simultaneous traction and countertraction manoeuvres. As an access port for the AUS, we widened the incision of the lower trocar. We adjusted the periurethral cuff and then placed the reservoir and the pump in the laterovesical space and the labia majora of the vulva, respectively. Lastly, we connected the 3 AUS elements and peritoneum was closed to isolate AUS from the intestine. The surgical time was 92min, the estimated blood loss was <100cc(3) and the hospital stay was 48h. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The AUS was activated at 6 weeks. At 24 months, patient managed the AUS adequately and total continence was achieved. Laparoscopic implantation of AUS is a feasible technique. Transvaginal traction and countertraction manoeuvres can prevent intraoperative lesions. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Multicenter Analysis of Patient Reported Outcomes Following Artificial Urinary Sphincter Placement for Male Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Wingate, Jonathan T; Erickson, Bradley A; Murphy, Gregory; Smith, Thomas G; Breyer, Benjamin N; Voelzke, Bryan B

    2017-09-27

    Patient-centered data regarding functional and quality of life improvements after AUS placement is lacking. We analyzed the degree of benefit from AUS placement utilizing the ISI, a validated patient reported outcome measure assessing severity and bother of urinary incontinence and the IIQ-7, a validated patient reported outcome measure assessing the impact and emotional distress of urinary incontinence. We performed a retrospective review from four participating centers in the Trauma and Urologic Reconstruction Network of Surgeons. Data were available for 51 and 45 patients who underwent AUS placement and had preoperative and postoperative ISI and IIQ-7 data, respectively. Mean age was 64.8 years. The median time from surgery to follow-up questionnaires was 8.5 months. Among the ISI, the median preoperative severity and bother scores were 24 (IQR 20, 28.5) and 6 (IQR 4, 7), respectively. The median postoperative severity and bother scores were 10 (IQR 4.5, 17) and 1 (IQR 0, 3), respectively. Improvement for each item of the ISI questionnaire was statistically significant.Among the IIQ-7, the median preoperative impact and distress scores were 9 (IQR 6, 13) and 4 (2, 6), respectively. The median postoperative impact and distress scores were 3 (IQR 0, 7) and 0 (IQR 0, 3). Improvement for each item of the IIQ-7 questionnaire was statistically significant. AUS implantation significantly reduces the severity and bother of stress urinary incontinence symptoms. Longer follow up and development of a PROM targeting male SUI is needed. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Managing therapeutic competition in patients with heart failure, lower urinary tract symptoms and incontinence.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Johnell, Kristina

    2014-02-01

    Up to 50% of heart failure patients suffer from lower urinary tract symptoms. Urinary incontinence has been associated with worse functional status in patients with heart failure, occurring three times more frequently in patients with New York Heart Association Class III and IV symptoms compared with those with milder disease. The association between heart failure and urinary symptoms may be directly attributable to worsening heart failure pathophysiology; however, medications used to treat heart failure may also indirectly provoke or exacerbate urinary symptoms. This type of drug-disease interaction, in which the treatment for heart failure precipitates incontinence, and removal of medications to relieve incontinence worsens heart failure, can be termed therapeutic competition. The mechanisms by which heart failure medication such as diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and β-blockers aggravate lower urinary tract symptoms are discussed. Initiation of a prescribing cascade, whereby antimuscarinic agents or β3-agonists are added to treat symptoms of urinary urgency and incontinence, is best avoided. Recommendations and practical tips are provided that outline more judicious management of heart failure patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Compelling strategies to improve urinary outcomes include titrating diuretics, switching ACE inhibitors, treating lower urinary tract infections, appropriate fluid management, daily weighing, and uptake of pelvic floor muscle exercises.

  4. All Incontinence is Not Created Equal: Impact of Urinary and Fecal Incontinence on Quality of Life in Adults with Spina Bifida.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Konrad M; Cain, Mark P; Whittam, Benjamin; Kaefer, Martin; Rink, Richard C; Misseri, Rosalia

    2017-03-01

    We previously reported that the self-reported amount of urinary incontinence is the main predictor of lower health related quality of life in adults with spina bifida. In this study we sought to determine the impact of fecal incontinence on health related quality of life after correcting for urinary incontinence. An international sample of adults with spina bifida was surveyed online in 2013 to 2014. We evaluated fecal incontinence in the last 4 weeks using clean intervals (less than 1 day, 1 to 6 days, 1 week or longer, or no fecal incontinence), amount (a lot, medium, a little or none), number of protective undergarments worn daily and similar variables for urinary incontinence. Validated instruments were used, including QUALAS-A (Quality of Life Assessment in Spina bifida for Adults) for spina bifida specific health related quality of life and the generic WHOQOL-BREF (WHO Quality of Life, short form). Linear regression was used (all outcomes 0 to 100). Mean age of the 518 participants was 32 years and 33.0% were male. Overall, 55.4% of participants had fecal incontinence, 76.3% had urinary incontinence and 46.9% had both types. On multivariate analysis fecal incontinence was associated with lower bowel and bladder health related quality of life across all amounts (-16.2 for a lot, -20.9 for medium and -18.5 for little vs none, p <0.0001) but clean intervals were not significant (-4.0 to -3.4, p ≥0.18). Conversely, health related quality of life was lower with increased amounts of urinary incontinence (-27.6 for a lot, -18.3 for medium and -13.4 for little vs none, p <0.0001). Dry intervals less than 4 hours were not associated with lower health related quality of life (-4.6, p = 0.053) but the use of undergarments was associated with it (-7.5 to -7.4, p ≤0.01). Fecal incontinence and urinary incontinence were associated with lower WHOQOL-BREF scores. Fecal incontinence and urinary incontinence are independent predictors of lower health related quality of

  5. What are the probable predictors of urinary incontinence during pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Demircan, Nejat; Özmen, Ülkü; Köktürk, Fürüzan; Küçük, Hamdi; Ata, Şevket; Harma, Müge; Arıkan, İnan İlker

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The frequency, predisposing factors and impact of urinary incontinence (UI) on quality of life (QoL) during pregnancy were investigated. Materials and Method. A preliminary cross-sectional survey was studied among pregnant women between January and July of 2014. A total of 132 pregnant women were recruited using a questionnaire form for sociodemographic features, the Turkish version of the International Consultation on Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), for the characteristics of UI and Wagner's Quality of Life scale to assess impact on QoL. p < 0.05 was set significant. Results.Urinary incontinence was present in 56 out of 132 pregnant women (42.4%, UI-present group): mean age, 26.7 ± 5.4y(p = 0.780); median height, 160 cm (min-max: 153-176, p = 0.037); median BMI, 28.7 kg/m(2)(min-max: 22.4-50.0, p = 0.881); urine leakage occurred per week once (n = 18, 32.1%), twice or thrice (n = 8, 14.3%); per day few times (n = 14, 25%), once (n = 5, 8.9%) and always (n = 8, 14.3%) with mainly a small amount of urine leakage (n = 33, 58.9%) or a moderate (n = 4, 7.1%). There were statistically significant relationships between QoL scores and frequency of UI (p = 0.002) or amount of leakage (p = 0.002). Impact on QoL scores ranged from mild (n = 33, 58.9%), moderate (n = 4, 7.1%) to severe (n = 4, 7.1%) levels in daily life. UI impacted the daily life activities of women by making them less likely to undertake activities outside their homes (23.2%), by affecting their working performance and friendships (8.9%), their daily home activities (7.1%), their general health status (12.5%), their sexual relations (12.5%), by making them more nervous or anxious (10.7%) and by the need to wear pads or protectors (25%). ANOVA, Tukey, and Tamhane tests as the minimal important difference model yielded significant relevance between statistical analyses and clinical outcomes by using standard deviations (p = 0.001, 0.001 and 0.005 respectively). The following features favored

  6. What are the probable predictors of urinary incontinence during pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Ülkü; Köktürk, Fürüzan; Küçük, Hamdi; Ata, Şevket; Harma, Müge; Arıkan, İnan İlker

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The frequency, predisposing factors and impact of urinary incontinence (UI) on quality of life (QoL) during pregnancy were investigated. Materials and Method. A preliminary cross-sectional survey was studied among pregnant women between January and July of 2014. A total of 132 pregnant women were recruited using a questionnaire form for sociodemographic features, the Turkish version of the International Consultation on Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), for the characteristics of UI and Wagner’s Quality of Life scale to assess impact on QoL. p < 0.05 was set significant. Results.Urinary incontinence was present in 56 out of 132 pregnant women (42.4%, UI-present group): mean age, 26.7 ± 5.4y(p = 0.780); median height, 160 cm (min–max: 153–176, p = 0.037); median BMI, 28.7 kg/m2(min–max: 22.4–50.0, p = 0.881); urine leakage occurred per week once (n = 18, 32.1%), twice or thrice (n = 8, 14.3%); per day few times (n = 14, 25%), once (n = 5, 8.9%) and always (n = 8, 14.3%) with mainly a small amount of urine leakage (n = 33, 58.9%) or a moderate (n = 4, 7.1%). There were statistically significant relationships between QoL scores and frequency of UI (p = 0.002) or amount of leakage (p = 0.002). Impact on QoL scores ranged from mild (n = 33, 58.9%), moderate (n = 4, 7.1%) to severe (n = 4, 7.1%) levels in daily life. UI impacted the daily life activities of women by making them less likely to undertake activities outside their homes (23.2%), by affecting their working performance and friendships (8.9%), their daily home activities (7.1%), their general health status (12.5%), their sexual relations (12.5%), by making them more nervous or anxious (10.7%) and by the need to wear pads or protectors (25%). ANOVA, Tukey, and Tamhane tests as the minimal important difference model yielded significant relevance between statistical analyses and clinical outcomes by using standard deviations (p = 0.001, 0.001 and 0.005 respectively). The following features

  7. Physiotherapy for Women with Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderi, Fariba; Oskouei, Ali E.

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This review article is designed to expose physiotherapists to a physiotherapy assessment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and the treatment and possibly preventive roles that they might play for women with SUI. Specifically, the goal of this article is to provide an understanding of pelvic floor muscle function and the implications that this function has for physiotherapy treatment by reviewing articles published in this area. [Methods] A range of databases was searched to identify articles that address physiotherapy for SUI, including the Cochrane Library, Medline, and CINAHL. [Results] According to the articles identified in our databases research, greater improvements in SUI occur when women receive a supervised exercise program of at least three months. The effectiveness of physiotherapy treatment is increased if the exercise program is based on some principles, such as intensity, duration, resembling functional task, and the position in which the exercise for pelvic floor muscles is performed. Biofeedback and electrical stimulation may also be clinically useful and acceptable modalities for some women with SUI. [Conclusion] We concluded that the plan for physiotherapy care should be individualized for each patient and include standard physiotherapy interventions. PMID:25276044

  8. Preventing urinary incontinence during pregnancy and postpartum: a review.

    PubMed

    Wesnes, Stian Langeland; Lose, Gunnar

    2013-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common condition in association with pregnancy. Incident UI in pregnancy or postpartum are significant risk factors for UI later in life. Epidemiological studies on UI during pregnancy and postpartum list numerous variables associated with UI. For women, the main focus is on pelvic floor muscle training to prevent UI. However, several other modifiable risk factors are likely to contribute to prevention of UI during pregnancy and postpartum. This review investigated modifiable risk factors for UI during pregnancy and postpartum and also reviewed randomized controlled trials on prevention of UI in association with pregnancy. Systematic searches for publications until September 2012 on prevention of UI during pregnancy and postpartum were performed. Based on available evidence, the following recommendations to prevent UI during pregnancy and postpartum were made: women should be advised not to smoke before or during pregnancy (grade B), aim at normal weight before pregnancy (grade B), and aim at regaining prepregnancy weight postpartum (grade B). Occasional low-intensity training should be advocated (grade B), and constipation should be avoided during pregnancy (grade B) and postpartum (grade C). Women should be advised to perform pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy and postpartum (grade A) and to use perineal warm packs during delivery (grade B). Cesarean section to prevent UI cannot be recommended (grade D). If lifestyle recommendations are addressed in association with pregnancy, incidence of UI during pregnancy and postpartum is likely to decrease.

  9. Stress urinary incontinence in women: Current and emerging therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Shamout, Samer; Campeau, Lysanne

    2017-06-01

    Surgical management of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is most commonly achieved by midurethral synthetic sling (MUS) insertion as a first-line surgical option. A great deal of research continues to evolve new management strategies to reach an optimal balance of high efficacy and minimal adverse events. This expert opinion review provides a brief and comprehensive discussion of recent advances and ongoing research in the management of SUI, with an emphasis on single-incision mini-slings, vaginal laser treatment, and cell-based therapy. It is based on data obtained from numerous published meta-analyses and original studies identified through literature search. Single-incision mini-slings appear equally effective initially compared with standard MUS (retropubic or transobturator) for the treatment of female SUI; however, this efficacy lacks durability evidence beyond one-year followup. There is a lack of sufficient clinical evidence to currently confirm long-term safety and effectiveness of cell-therapy and non-ablative vaginal laser therapy, besides suggestion of apparent initial safety. There are still significant challenges to overcome before widespread clinical practice of the latter two modalities. Future research should be aimed at identifying groups of patients who might benefit from these minimally invasive therapeutic options.

  10. A Wireless Self-Powered Urinary Incontinence Sensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ami; Utsunomiya, Fumiyasu; Douseki, Takakuni

    A self-powered urinary incontinence sensor system consisting of a urine-activated coin battery and a wireless transmitter has been developed as an application for wireless biosensor networks. The urine-activated battery makes possible both the sensing of urine leakage and self-powered operation. An intermittent power-supply circuit that uses an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) with a small internal resistance suppresses the supply voltage drop due to the large internal resistance of the battery. This circuit and a 1-V surface acoustic wave (SAW) oscillator reduce the power dissipation of a wireless transmitter. The SAW oscillator quickly responds to the on-off control of the power supply, which is suitable for intermittent operation. To verify the effectiveness of the circuit scheme, the authors fabricated a prototype sensor system. When the volume of urine is 0.2 ml, the battery outputs a voltage of over 1.3 V; and the sensor system can transmit signals over a distance of 5 m.

  11. Weight loss to treat urinary incontinence in overweight and obese women.

    PubMed

    Subak, Leslee L; Wing, Rena; West, Delia Smith; Franklin, Frank; Vittinghoff, Eric; Creasman, Jennifer M; Richter, Holly E; Myers, Deborah; Burgio, Kathryn L; Gorin, Amy A; Macer, Judith; Kusek, John W; Grady, Deborah

    2009-01-29

    Obesity is an established and modifiable risk factor for urinary incontinence, but conclusive evidence for a beneficial effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence is lacking. We randomly assigned 338 overweight and obese women with at least 10 urinary-incontinence episodes per week to an intensive 6-month weight-loss program that included diet, exercise, and behavior modification (226 patients) or to a structured education program (112 patients). The mean (+/-SD) age of the participants was 53+/-11 years. The body-mass index (BMI) (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) and the weekly number of incontinence episodes as recorded in a 7-day diary of voiding were similar in the intervention group and the control group at baseline (BMI, 36+/-6 and 36+/-5, respectively; incontinence episodes, 24+/-18 and 24+/-16, respectively). The women in the intervention group had a mean weight loss of 8.0% (7.8 kg), as compared with 1.6% (1.5 kg) in the control group (P<0.001). After 6 months, the mean weekly number of incontinence episodes decreased by 47% in the intervention group, as compared with 28% in the control group (P=0.01). As compared with the control group, the intervention group had a greater decrease in the frequency of stress-incontinence episodes (P=0.02), but not of urge-incontinence episodes (P=0.14). A higher proportion of the intervention group than of the control group had a clinically relevant reduction of 70% or more in the frequency of all incontinence episodes (P<0.001), stress-incontinence episodes (P=0.009), and urge-incontinence episodes (P=0.04). A 6-month behavioral intervention targeting weight loss reduced the frequency of self-reported urinary-incontinence episodes among overweight and obese women as compared with a control group. A decrease in urinary incontinence may be another benefit among the extensive health improvements associated with moderate weight reduction. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00091988.) 2009

  12. Central control of micturition in women: Brain-bladder pathways in continence and urgency urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Arya, Nisha G; Weissbart, Steven J

    2017-04-01

    Urinary incontinence disproportionately affects women. Anatomical textbooks typically describe continence mechanisms in women in the context of the pelvic floor support of the urinary bladder and the urethral sphincters. However, the urinary bladder and urethral sphincters are under the central control of the brain through a complex network of neurons that allow storage of urine followed by voiding when socially appropriate. Recent studies suggest that the most common type of urinary incontinence in women, urgency urinary incontinence, involves significant dysfunction of the central control of micturition. In this paper, we review the anatomy and functional connectivity of the nervous system structures involved in the control of micturition. Clinical application of this anatomy in the context of urgency urinary incontinence is also discussed. Understanding the anatomy of the neural structures that control continence will allow clinicians to better understand the underlying pathology of urge incontinence and consider new ways of treating this distressing condition. Clin. Anat. 30:373-384, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Occurrence rates and predictors of lower urinary tract symptoms and incontinence in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Simeone, C; Moroni, A; Pettenò, A; Antonelli, A; Zani, D; Orizio, C; Cosciani Cunico, S

    2010-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and incontinence in female athletes and to determine the etiological factors. An anonymous self-questionnaire was collected from 623 casual female athletes aged 18 to 56 years, who were involved in 12 different sports. The surveys were distributed by hand to the athletes, during their sports fitness tests, in a sports center. We investigated the relationship between urinary disorders and factors such as age, body mass index (BMI), parity, duration of physical exercise, and type of sport. The prevalence of LUTS was 54.7%, and 30% for urinary incontinence. Changes in urinary frequency were detected in 91 (14.6%) women. Prevalence of dysuria was 13.3%, urinary straining was present in 173 (27.8%) athletes, whereas urinary urgency had an estimated prevalence of 37.2% with 232 athletes suffering from this disorder. Urgency was very common in volleyball players, as was dysuria among hockey and basketball players, whereas straining mainly affected aerobic participants and cyclists. Long training hours and competitive practices were correlated with the onset of LUTS. High-impact sports were more frequently associated with incontinence, while low-impact sports with LUTS. The sport with the main number of incontinent people was football. Urge incontinence affected a lot of athletes, mainly cyclists and football players. Stress incontinence was more frequent in hockey and volleyball players. LUTS and incontinence are prevalent in female athletes. In many cases, the disorders were present only during sports activities. In this sample, the presence of urinary disorders did not seem to be a barrier during sports or exercise.

  14. Urinary tract infection: a cohort of older people with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Melo, Laís Samara de; Ercole, Flávia Falci; Oliveira, Danilo Ulisses de; Pinto, Tatiana Saraiva; Victoriano, Mariana Avendanha; Alcoforado, Carla Lúcia Goulart Constant

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate epidemiological aspects of urinary tract infection in older patients with urinary incontinence living in long-term care institutions in Belo Horizonte. Method: Concurrent cohort held from April 1st to October 1st, 2015. The study was conducted in two long-term care institutions in the city of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, with 84 incontinent older people. Cumulative incidence of urinary tract infection was 19% (95% CI: 7.83-23.19) and the incidence density was 3.6 cases/100 people-month of follow-up period. The variables Bacteriuria and Institution presented statistical association with the occurrence of urinary tract infection. It is observed that the incidence of urinary tract infection in the study was smaller than in other similar international and national studies, however this is an important world health problem for the older population, with impact on mortality of these individuals. Avaliar aspectos epidemiológicos da infecção do trato urinário em pacientes idosos com incontinência urinária, residentes em instituições de longa permanência, de Belo Horizonte. Coorte concorrente realizada no período de 01 de abril a 01 de outubro de 2015. O estudo foi realizado em duas instituições de longa permanência, na cidade de Belo Horizonte, MG, com 84 idosos incontinentes. A incidência acumulada de infecção do trato urinário foi de 19% (IC 95%: 7,83-23,19) e a densidade de incidência foi de 3,6 casos/100 pessoas-mês de seguimento. As variáveis Bacteriúria e Instituição apresentaram associação estatística com a ocorrência de infecção do trato urinário. Observa-se que a incidência de infecção do trato urinário no estudo foi menor que em outros estudos nacionais e internacionais semelhantes, no entanto trata-se de um importante problema de saúde mundial para os idosos, com impacto na mortalidade desses indivíduos.

  15. Does the Urinary Microbiome Play a Role in Urgency Urinary Incontinence and Its Severity?

    PubMed

    Karstens, Lisa; Asquith, Mark; Davin, Sean; Stauffer, Patrick; Fair, Damien; Gregory, W Thomas; Rosenbaum, James T; McWeeney, Shannon K; Nardos, Rahel

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the urinary tract has been thought to be sterile in the absence of a clinically identifiable infection. However, recent evidence suggests that the urinary tract harbors a variety of bacterial species, known collectively as the urinary microbiome, even when clinical cultures are negative. Whether these bacteria promote urinary health or contribute to urinary tract disease remains unknown. Emerging evidence indicates that a shift in the urinary microbiome may play an important role in urgency urinary incontinence (UUI). The goal of this prospective pilot study was to determine how the urinary microbiome is different between women with and without UUI. We also sought to identify if characteristics of the urinary microbiome are associated with UUI severity. We collected urine from clinically well-characterized women with UUI (n = 10) and normal bladder function (n = 10) using a transurethral catheter to avoid bacterial contamination from external tissue. To characterize the resident microbial community, we amplified the bacterial 16S rRNA gene by PCR and performed sequencing using Illumina MiSeq. Sequences were processed using the workflow package QIIME. We identified bacteria that had differential relative abundance between UUI and controls using DESeq2 to fit generalized linear models based on the negative binomial distribution. We also identified relationships between the diversity of the urinary microbiome and severity of UUI symptoms with Pearson's correlation coefficient. We successfully extracted and sequenced bacterial DNA from 95% of the urine samples and identified that there is a polymicrobial community in the female bladder in both healthy controls and women with UUI. We found the relative abundance of 14 bacteria significantly differed between control and UUI samples. Furthermore, we established that an increase in UUI symptom severity is associated with a decrease in microbial diversity in women with UUI. Our study provides further

  16. Does the Urinary Microbiome Play a Role in Urgency Urinary Incontinence and Its Severity?

    PubMed Central

    Karstens, Lisa; Asquith, Mark; Davin, Sean; Stauffer, Patrick; Fair, Damien; Gregory, W. Thomas; Rosenbaum, James T.; McWeeney, Shannon K.; Nardos, Rahel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Traditionally, the urinary tract has been thought to be sterile in the absence of a clinically identifiable infection. However, recent evidence suggests that the urinary tract harbors a variety of bacterial species, known collectively as the urinary microbiome, even when clinical cultures are negative. Whether these bacteria promote urinary health or contribute to urinary tract disease remains unknown. Emerging evidence indicates that a shift in the urinary microbiome may play an important role in urgency urinary incontinence (UUI). The goal of this prospective pilot study was to determine how the urinary microbiome is different between women with and without UUI. We also sought to identify if characteristics of the urinary microbiome are associated with UUI severity. Methods: We collected urine from clinically well-characterized women with UUI (n = 10) and normal bladder function (n = 10) using a transurethral catheter to avoid bacterial contamination from external tissue. To characterize the resident microbial community, we amplified the bacterial 16S rRNA gene by PCR and performed sequencing using Illumina MiSeq. Sequences were processed using the workflow package QIIME. We identified bacteria that had differential relative abundance between UUI and controls using DESeq2 to fit generalized linear models based on the negative binomial distribution. We also identified relationships between the diversity of the urinary microbiome and severity of UUI symptoms with Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: We successfully extracted and sequenced bacterial DNA from 95% of the urine samples and identified that there is a polymicrobial community in the female bladder in both healthy controls and women with UUI. We found the relative abundance of 14 bacteria significantly differed between control and UUI samples. Furthermore, we established that an increase in UUI symptom severity is associated with a decrease in microbial diversity in women with UUI

  17. Outcomes of Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence in the Older Woman

    PubMed Central

    Ellington, David R.; Erekson, Elisabeth A.; Richter, Holly E.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis As population demographics continue to evolve, specifics on age-related outcomes of stress urinary incontinence interventions will be critical to patient counseling and management planning. Understanding medical factors unique to older woman and their lower urinary tract condition will allow caregivers to optimize surgical outcomes, both physical and functional, and minimize complications within this population. PMID:26476111

  18. The incidence of urinary incontinence across Asian, black, and white women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    TOWNSEND, Mary K.; CURHAN, Gary C.; RESNICK, Neil M.; GRODSTEIN, Francine

    2009-01-01

    Objective We calculated incidence rates of urinary incontinence by incontinence frequency and type over 4 years in Asian, black, and white women in the United States. Study Design Prospective analyses included 76,724 participants aged 37–79 years in the Nurses’ Health Study cohorts with no incontinence at baseline. Results The 4-year incidence of incontinence at least monthly was higher in white women (7.3/100 person-years) compared with Asian (5.7/100 person-years, p=0.003) and black women (4.8/100 person-years, p<0.001). The incidence of at least weekly stress incontinence was significantly lower in black compared with white women (0.1 versus 0.8 per 100 person-years, p<0.001). The difference between black and white women in the incidence of any incontinence and stress incontinence remained significant after adjusting for known risk factors (p<0.001 for both). Conclusions Urinary incontinence incidence differs by race. Studies to confirm these results and better understand underlying mechanisms are needed. PMID:20042169

  19. Device Survival after Primary Implantation of an Artificial Urinary Sphincter for Male Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Yafi, Faysal A; DeLay, Kenneth J; Stewart, Carrie; Chiang, Jason; Sangkum, Premsant; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2017-03-01

    The AMS 800™ artificial urinary sphincter remains the gold standard for the surgical management of male stress urinary incontinence. We reviewed artificial urinary sphincter device survival after primary implantation. Retrospective data were collected from the AMS 800 patient information form database. Since 1972, 77,512 patient information forms for primary artificial urinary sphincter implantation have been completed in the United States. Following exclusion of procedures performed in children and females, and those labeled with an unknown surgical technique, 27,096 artificial urinary sphincter cases were included in the analysis. Collected variables included patient age, surgical approach, number of cuffs and surgeon volume. Measured outcomes included device explantation, device revision, component revision and time to each event. Artificial urinary sphincter insertion was performed by low volume implanters in 22,165 (82.6%) cases. The approach was perineal in 18,373 cases (67.8%) and a tandem cuff was used in 2,224 cases (8.2%). Overall 5,723 cases required revision or explantation (21.1%). Younger age and penoscrotal approach were associated with higher device explantation and revision rates, while the use of a tandem cuff was associated with higher explantation rates. On multivariate analysis younger age, penoscrotal approach and use of a tandem cuff but not surgeon volume were significant factors associated with device explantation and component revision. These data provide a general overview of artificial urinary sphincter device survival and may serve urologists when counseling patients. Younger age, penoscrotal approach and use of a tandem cuff may be associated with inferior outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrating yoga therapy in the management of urinary incontinence: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vinchurkar, Suhas Ashok; Arankalle, Dhananjay Vijay

    2015-04-01

    A 63-year-old overweight female prediagnosed of stress urinary incontinence presented with exacerbated events of urine leakage. She was advised a residential lifestyle and behavioral program, primarily consisting of a monitored yoga therapy module, apart from her ongoing anticholinergic medicine, for 21 days. Assessments were based on a frequency volume chart, a bladder diary for the entire duration of treatment, and the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form questionnaire on the days of admission and discharge. A total of 1.9 kg of weight loss was observed during her stay. Usage of pad, as reported in her diary, reduced from 3 to 1 per day. Her International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form score reduced from 16 to 9, indicating better continence. She expressed subjective well-being and confidence in her social interactions. This is probably the first case report demonstrating feasibility of integration of yoga therapy in the management of urinary incontinence. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. [Prevalence of urinary and anal incontinence in women from metropolitan area of Guadalajara].

    PubMed

    Martínez Espinoza, Claudia Josefina; Flores Carreras, Oscar; García de Alba García, Javier E; Velázquez Castellanos, Patricia Inés; González Ruiz, María Isabel; Márquez Allegre, René

    2006-06-01

    Female urinary and anal incontinence are common entities in pelvic floor dysfunction. The most frequently age affected range from 45 to 69 years. Previous studies performed in the United States report a prevalence of 24-62% for urinary incontinence and 3-60% for anal incontinence. To determine the prevalence of these disorders in the Guadalajara metropolitan area because we do not know it. A transversal and various stage study was performed recollecting blocks first, then houses, finally interviewing women and applying a structured questionnaire with somatometric and social-demographic data and also clinical-pathological antecedents. The data obtained was registered and processed first manually then using Excel and Epi-Info software. The group of women interviewed (n = 352) were between 15-85 years. The majority were married, housewives, 33% with grammar school, 23% finished high school, 25% professionists and 19% did not finish school; with an average of three pregnancies and with a body mass index (BMI) positive for overweight and obesity. The prevalence for urinary incontinence was 27.8% and anal incontinence of 3.4%. These are results compatible with those reported in the United States. Women living in Guadalajara have the same behavior that European and American women about prevalence of urinary incontinence. We recommend the performance of this type of studies in other states of this country in order to enrich the present information.

  2. Low-Dose Intravaginal Estriol and Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation in Post-Menopausal Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Daniele; Saldutto, Pietro; Galica, Vikiela; Pace, Gianna; Biferi, Daniela; Paradiso Galatioto, Giuseppe; Vicentini, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and electrical stimulation (ES) are conservative models of therapy for treating female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The presence of estradiol receptors in the lower urinary tract advances the case for estradiol therapy in SUI. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of the combination of pelvic floor rehabilitation and intravaginal estriol (IE) on SUI treatment in postmenopausal women. Sixty-two women with SUI were randomized to PFMT, ES and biofeedback (Group 1) or the same treatment plus 1 mg IE (Group 2) for 6 months. Patients were evaluated with medical history, pelvic examination, urodynamics, 24-hour pad test. Urinary incontinence was evaluated using the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire on urinary incontinence short form and quality of life using the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-Short Form. Two patients were lost at follow-up and one discontinued the study. Mean urine leakage at the 24-hour pad test dropped from 42.3 ± 20.2 g/die to 31.5 ± 14.2 g/die in Group 1 and from 48.3 ± 19.8 g/die to 22.3 ± 10.1 g/die in Group 2. Symptoms scores and incontinence status were statistically significant better in Group 2 when compared to Group 1. IE added to PFMT, ES and BF is a safe and efficacious first-line therapy in postmenopausal women with SUI. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Lifetime physical activity and female stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M; Bardsley, Tyler; Egger, Marlene J

    2015-07-01

    We sought to estimate whether moderate/severe stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in middle-aged women is associated with overall lifetime physical activity (including leisure, household, outdoor, and occupational), as well as lifetime leisure (recreational), lifetime strenuous, and strenuous activity during the teen years. Recruitment for this case-control study was conducted in primary-care-level family medicine and gynecology clinics. A total of 1538 enrolled women ages 39-65 years underwent a Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification examination to assess vaginal support. Based on Incontinence Severity Index scores, cases had moderate/severe and controls had no/mild SUI. We excluded 349 with vaginal descent at/below the hymen (pelvic organ prolapse), 194 who did not return questionnaires, and 110 with insufficient activity data for analysis. In all, 213 cases were frequency matched 1:1 by age group to controls. Physical activity was measured using the Lifetime Physical Activity Questionnaire, in which women recall activity from menarche to present. We created separate multivariable logistic regression models for activity measures. SUI odds increased slightly with overall lifetime activity (odds ratio [OR], 1.20 per 70 additional metabolic equivalent of task-h/wk; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.41), and were not associated with lifetime strenuous activity (OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.99-1.25). In quintile analysis of lifetime leisure activity, which demonstrated a nonlinear pattern, all quintiles incurred about half the odds of SUI compared to reference (second quintile; P = .009). Greater strenuous activity in teen years modestly increased SUI odds (OR, 1.37 per 7 additional h/wk; 95% CI, 1.09-1.71); OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.15-2.66 in sensitivity analysis adjusting for measurement error. The predicted probability of SUI rose linearly in women exceeding 7.5 hours of strenuous activity/wk during teen years. Teen strenuous activity had a similar effect on SUI odds when

  4. [Urinary stress incontinence in the female: comparison of incontinence theories and new tension-free surgical procedures].

    PubMed

    Perucchini, D; Fink, D

    2002-01-01

    Urethral sphincter competence involves a complicated inter action of many factors which act in concert. Stress incontinence occurs due to damage to the urethral support and loss or deterioration of urethral sphincter function as a consequence of delivery or aging. Recent research indicates that a more integrated, comprehensive view regarding the different structures, both inside and outside the urethra, is needed to explain the mechanism of incontinence. According to the theories of de Lancey, urinary stress incontinence is caused by defects in the supporting tissues that both actively and passively stabilize the urethra in its correct anatomical position. The integral theory of Petros and Ulmstein explains how laxity in the vagina or its supporting ligaments may cause stress incontinence favored by laxity in the ligamentous insertion points of the vagina. Colposuspension procedures have dominated incontinence surgery for the last 50 years. The introduction of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure was a real innovation that has challenged our understanding of the continence mechanism and taught us the importance of the midurethra. Different modifications of the tension-free procedures have been introduced recently and are discussed in this paper.

  5. Urinary incontinence in the aged, Part 2: Management strategies.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, P; Fuentevilla-Clifton, A

    1992-06-01

    Treatments for urge incontinence associated with uninhibited bladder contractions include medications with anticholinergic and smooth muscle relaxant properties as well as habit training, bladder retraining, contingency therapy, and biofeedback. Pelvic floor (Kegel) exercises improve stress incontinence in 60 to 90% of female patients. For patients who fail to improve with pelvic floor exercises, a combination of an alpha-adrenergic agent and conjugated estrogen is recommended. Surgery is particularly effective in elderly women with significant pelvic prolapse. Management of overflow incontinence requires surgery or intermittent/chronic catheterization. Functional incontinence may be improved with correction of the underlying disorder and availability of a motivated caregiver.

  6. Correlation of bladder wall thickness and treatment success in types of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Akselim, Burak; Doğanay, Melike; Özcan, Nilay; Akselim, Sinem; Cavkaytar, Sabri

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between mean bladder wall thickness (BWT) and treatment success in patients diagnosed with urinary incontinence, based on urodynamic test results. In this prospective study, patient urinary incontinence type was identified using urodynamic tests. Patients (N = 125) were categorized into three groups: urodynamic stress incontinence (SUI), detrusor over-activity (DO) and mixed urinary incontinence. Measurements from the bladder dome, anterior wall and trigone were averaged to calculate BWT. Student's t test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare pre-treatment BWT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine optimal cut-off values for BWT to predict treatment success. Mean pre-treatment BWT significantly differed between success and non-success groups for each urinary incontinence type (p value for the SUI, DO and MUI groups was 0.043, 0.001 and 0.002 respectively). Using ROC curves to anticipate the treatment success, a threshold was calculated for mean pre-treatment BWT; 5.05 mm for SUI (sensitivity 74 %, specificity 66 %, positive predictive value [PPV] 85 %, negative predictive value [NPV] 50 %), 4.98 mm for DO (sensitivity 73 %, specificity 92 %, PPV 95 %, NPV 63 %) and 5.31 mm for mixed type (sensitivity 88 %, specificity 73 %, PPV 79 %, NPV 85 %). The study results suggest a significant relationship between the pre-treatment BWT and the success of urinary incontinence treatment. The mean BWT may be used as a benchmark in assessing the responsiveness to treatment of urinary incontinence types.

  7. Effects of coffee and tea consumption on urinary incontinence in female twins

    PubMed Central

    Tettamanti, G; Altman, D; Pedersen, NL; Bellocco, R; Milsom, I; Iliadou, AN

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effect of coffee and tea consumption on symptoms of urinary incontinence. Design Population based study Setting The Swedish Twin Register Population In 2005, all twins born between 1959–1985 in Sweden (n = 42 852) were invited to participate in a web-based survey to screen for common complex diseases and common exposures. The present study was limited to female twins with information about at least one urinary symptoms and coffee and tea consumption (n = 14 031). Main outcome measure The association between coffe and tea consumption and urinary incontinence, as well as, nocturia was estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Women with a high coffee intake were at lower risk of any urinary incontinence (OR 0.78, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.64-0.98) compared to women not drinking coffee. Coffee intake and incontinence subtypes showed no significant associations whereas high tea consumption was specifically associated with a risk for overactive bladder (OR 1.34, 95% CI 11.07-1.67) and nocturia (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.38). Results from co-twin control analysis suggested that the associations observed in logistic regression were mainly due to familial effects. Conclusions This study suggests that coffee and tea consumption has a limited effect on urinary incontinence symptoms. Familial and genetic effects may have confounded the associations observed in previous studies. PMID:21401855

  8. Role of perineal sonography in the evaluation of patients with stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Sendag, Fatih; Vidinli, Halit; Kazandi, Mert; Itil, Ismail M; Askar, Niyazi; Vidinli, Berna; Pourbagher, Ali

    2003-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of perineal sonography in diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence. Thirty patients with stress urinary incontinence and 17 age-matched control patients were included in the study. Perineal sonography was carried out in both groups to evaluate the role of this technique in the diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence. By using the posterior edge of the symphysis pubis as a reference point, posterior urethra-vesical angle (beta angle) and the angle between the vertical axis and urethral axis(alpha angle) were measured at rest and on straining. Bladder neck mobility was evaluated only at the cephalocaudal plane by measuring the desensus diameter. Posterior urethro-vesical angle (beta angle) was found to be significantly different between the study and control groups both at rest and on straining (P < 0.05). The angle between the vertical axis and urethral axis (alpha angle) was found to be significantly different between study and control groups only on straining (P < 0.05). Cephalocaudal distance (desensus diameter) was longer in patients with stress urinary incontinence (P < 0.05). Perineal sonography has an important role in diagnosing patients with stress urinary incontinence.

  9. Urinary Incontinence of Women in a Nationwide Study in Sri Lanka: Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Pathiraja, Ramya; Prathapan, Shamini; Goonawardena, Sampatha

    2017-05-23

    Urinary incontinence, be stress incontinence or urge incontinence or a mixed type incontinence affects women of all ages. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence in Sri Lanka. A community based cross-sectional study was performed in Sri Lanka. The age group of the women in Sri Lanka was categorized into 3 age groups: Less than or equal to 35 years, 36 to 50 years of age and more than or equal to 51 years of age. A sample size of 675 women was obtained from each age category obtaining a total sample of 2025 from Sri Lanka. An interviewer-administered questionnaire consisting of two parts; Socio demographic factors, Medical and Obstetric History, and the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ), was used for data collection. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed. The Prevalence of women with only stress incontinence was 10%, with urge incontinence was 15.6% and with stress and urge incontinence was 29.9%. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that the age groups of 36 - 50 years (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.56 - 2.63) and 51 years and above (OR = 2.61; 95% CI= 1.95 - 3.48), Living in one of the districts in Sri Lanka (OR = 4.58; 95% CI = 3.35 - 6.27) and having given birth to multiple children (OR = 1.1; 95% CI = 1.02 - 1.21), diabetes mellitus (OR = 1.97; 95% CI = 1.19 - 3.23), and respiratory diseases (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.48 - 3.19 ) showed a significant risk in the regression analysis. The risk factor, mostly modifiable, if prevented early, could help to reduce the symptoms of urinary incontinence.

  10. Prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence and its influence on the quality of life of Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Reiko; Murakami, Kyoko; Iwamoto, Mieko; Tanaka, Mayumi; Saita, Nahoko; Abe, Yoshie

    2008-06-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem as women age. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence and their impact on the quality of life of working Japanese women. In this cross-sectional study, 975 women completed the Urogenital Distress Inventory-6, the Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey, and the King's Health Questionnaire. Their mean age was 47.6 years and the reported prevalence of stress, urge, and mixed urinary incontinence symptoms during the past month was 19.3%, 4.2%, and 7.8%, respectively. The prevalence rate of all the three types of incontinence increased with age and Body Mass Index. There was no significant difference in the questionnaire subscale scores of the SF-36 Health Survey and the King's Health Questionnaire between these types and those without urinary incontinence. However, in relation to the SF-36 scores, we found that urge urinary incontinence had more effect on women than stress urinary incontinence. There was a high prevalence of urinary incontinence in the participants. The results emphasize the need for women to be provided with education programs about incontinence and to perform preventive exercises.

  11. Urinary incontinence: economic burden and new choices in pharmaceutical treatment.

    PubMed

    Levy, Richard; Muller, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    In the year 2000, an estimated 17 million community-dwelling adults in the United States had daily urinary incontinence (UI), and an additional 33 million suffered from the overlapping condition, overactive bladder. Estimates of the total annual cost of these conditions range up to 32 billion US dollar; the largest components are management costs and the expenses associated with nursing home admissions attributable to UI. In most cases, patients with UI can be treated with pharmaceutical agents, in addition to behavioral therapy. Until recently, pharmaceutical therapy for UI has been limited, especially because the adverse effects of available agents resulted in poor adherence to treatment regimens. Recent innovations in molecular design and new dosage forms of UI medications offer the promise of fewer and less severe adverse effects and, thus, better treatment outcomes for patients. Additionally, the availability of multiple agents within a therapeutic class offers health care providers a spectrum of choices with which to personalize treatment for each individual patient. New pharmacologic treatment options for UI have the potential to allow greater independence for older persons who reside at home and to delay or avoid the costs of admission to long-term care facilities. Alternate dosage forms, which include patches and sustained-release formulations, may benefit patients who have difficulty chewing, swallowing, or remembering to take medications. Although these newer products are generally more expensive than older forms of therapy, they typically have more favorable cost-effectiveness ratios. Access to these new medications for patients enrolled in public and private health care plans may help to reduce the economic and social burden of UI care.

  12. Effects of urinary incontinence on psychosocial outcomes in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Grzeda, Mariusz T; Heron, Jon; von Gontard, Alexander; Joinson, Carol

    2016-12-10

    To examine whether daytime wetting and bedwetting urinary incontinence (UI) in childhood and adolescence are associated with psychosocial problems in adolescence. We used data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children to examine the association between trajectories of UI from 4 to 9 years and self-reported psychosocial problems in adolescence (13-14 years) including depressive symptoms, peer victimisation, poor self-image and school experiences (negative perception of school and teachers, problems with peer relationships). Sample sizes ranged from 5162 (perception of teachers) to 5887 (self-image). We also examined associations between self-reported UI at 14 years and psychosocial problems. Relative to normative development, adolescents who experienced delayed development of bladder control had poorer self-image [standardised mean difference = 0.18 (95% CI 0.04, 0.32)], more negative perceptions of school [0.18 (0.02, 0.34)] and more problems with peer relationships at school [0.25 (0.10, 0.40)]. Persistent wetting (bedwetting with daytime wetting) in childhood was associated with increased problems with peer relationships in adolescence [0.19 (0.03, 0.34)]. The strongest associations between adolescent UI and psychosocial problems were found for daytime wetting (reference = no UI at 14 years): depressive symptoms [OR = 3.04 (95% CI 1.91-4.84)], peer victimisation [2.14 (1.48-3.10)], poor self-image (t = -8.49, p < 0.001) and problems with peer relationships (t = -4.69, p < 0.001). Children with delayed development of bladder control and persistent wetting have increased psychosocial problems in adolescence. Adolescents with UI reported a range of psychosocial problems and clinicians should be aware that they might require support from psychological services.

  13. Prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence in Fuzhou Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan-feng; Zhang, Wen-ju; Song, Jian; Xu, Bo

    2005-06-05

    We randomly sampled a healthy community to evaluate the prevalence and associated risk factors of urinary incontinence. The survey was performed in Fuzhou, China. Of women over twenty years of age in the city, 3.0% were randomly selected and 4684 evaluated by Bristol Female Urinary Tract Symptoms Questionnaire. Of the women in Fuzhou, 19.0% had urinary incontinence. The prevalence of stress incontinence, urge incontinence and mixed incontinence was 16.6% (n = 777), 10.0% (n = 468), 7.7% (n = 360) respectively. The prevalence of the three types of urinary incontinence increased significantly with age (P < 0.01). In multiple logistic models, age (OR, 1.3, 95% CI, 1.1-1.4), vaginal delivery (3.0, 1.9-4.7), parity > 2 (2.1, 1.5-2.9), hypertension (2.7, 1.4-5.6), constipation (2.6, 1.8-3.8), alcohol consumption (4.7, 1.1-20.2), episiotomy (1.7, 1.4-2.0), higher body mass index (BMI, 1.8, 1.5-2.2) and unskilled worker (0.7, 0.5-0.8) were potential risk factors for stress incontinence. Urge incontinence was associated with age (OR, 1.3, 95% CI, 0.9-1.3), menopause (1.6, 1.1-2.4), Caesarean delivery (0.2, 0.1-0.5), parity > 2 (2.6, 1.8-3.8), constipation (2.3, 1.4-3.7), foetal birthweight (1.7, 1.1-2.4), episiotomy (1.4, 1.1-1.8), higher BMI (1.5, 1.2-2.0) and unskilled worker (0.7, 0.5-0.9). The prevalence of urinary incontinence and its subtypes in Chinese women is lower than that of occidental women. In China, age, vaginal delivery, parity, hypertension, constipation, alcohol consumption, episiotomy, higher BMI are potential risk factors for stress incontinence. Urge incontinence is associated with age, menopause, Caesarean delivery, parity, constipation, foetal birthweight, episiotomy, higher body mass index.

  14. Patients with Urinary Incontinence Appear More Likely to Develop Upper Urinary Tract Stones: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study with 8-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hsiao-Jen; Lin, Alex Tong-Long; Lin, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate associations between primary urinary incontinence and development of upper urinary tract stones in a nationwide population in Taiwan. Data of 1,777 adults with primary urinary incontinence and 26,655 controls (groups A, B, and C) without urinary incontinence at study inception were retrieved from the National Health Insurance System database in Taiwan and were analyzed retrospectively. No enrolled subjects had previous diagnosis of upper urinary tract stones or spinal cord injury. All subjects were followed through end of 2009, with a minimum follow-up of 8 years. A greater percentage of study subjects (334/1777, 18.8%) developed upper urinary tract stones than that of control groups A (865/8885, 9.7%) and B (888/8885, 10%), and C (930/8885, 10.5%) (all p-values < 0.0001). Urinary incontinence was associated with significantly increased risk of developing urinary tract stones (HR 1.99, 95% CI, 1.70–2.34, p < 0.001). Age and metabolic syndrome status were both associated with developing upper urinary tract stones (both p-values < 0.0001). After adjusting for metabolic syndrome, regression analysis showed that urinary incontinence was still associated with a significantly increased risk of developing upper urinary tract stones (HR 1.99, 95% CI = 1.76–2.26, p < 0.0001). Long-term follow-up of Taiwanese patients with primary urinary incontinence suggests that urinary incontinence is associated with a significantly increased risk of developing upper urinary tract stones. Study findings suggest that physicians treating patients with urinary incontinence should give attention to early detection of upper urinary tract stones. PMID:27536881

  15. Urinary Incontinence and Psychosocial Factors Associated With Intimate Relationship Satisfaction Among Midlife Women.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Lori; Meize-Grochowski, Robin

    To explore associations among symptoms of urinary incontinence, severity of symptoms, and measures of psychosocial health that may be assessed during a well-woman screening examination and the possible contribution of these variables to the relationship satisfaction of partnered midlife women living with urinary incontinence. Exploratory correlational design using self-report questionnaires. Community recruitment by posted fliers, advertisements, and social media. Partnered women, ages 45 to 65 years, with urinary incontinence (N = 57). Self-report measures of severity of incontinence symptoms, relationship satisfaction, self-concept/emotional health (self-esteem, body image, depression, anxiety), and relationship factors (sexual quality of life, incontinence-related communication). Data were analyzed using Spearman rho correlation with an exploration of the contribution of study factors to relationship satisfaction through standard multiple regression. The severity of urinary incontinence symptoms had no significant correlation with scores on relationship satisfaction or psychosocial health. Measures of self-concept/emotional health and relationship factors were significantly correlated with each other (rs = .40-.75, p < .01) and with relationship satisfaction (rs = .35-.71, p < .05). Preliminary exploration of the contribution of study factors to relationship satisfaction through exploratory regression analysis showed unique contributions from sexual quality of life (18.7%, p < .001) and depression (8.7%, p = .004). Midlife women with urinary incontinence, regardless of symptom severity, might benefit from screening for poorer sexual quality of life and mild depression symptoms because these two study factors significantly contributed to poorer intimate relationship satisfaction among this study's participants. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of urinary incontinence in women in general practice: observational study.

    PubMed Central

    Seim, A.; Sivertsen, B.; Eriksen, B. C.; Hunskaar, S.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine what is attainable when treating urinary incontinence in women in general practice. DESIGN--Observational study with 12 months' follow up. Interview and clinical examination before, during, and after treatment of women seeking help for urinary incontinence in general practice. SETTING--General practice in the rural district of Rissa, Norway. SUBJECTS--105 women aged 20 or more with urinary incontinence. INTERVENTIONS--Treatment with pelvic floor exercises, electrostimulation, oestrogen, anticholinergic drugs, bladder training, and protective pads. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Subjective and objective measures of urinary incontinence; number of patients referred to a specialist. RESULTS--After 12 months' follow up 70% (69/99) of the women were cured or much better; the mean score on a 100 mm visual analogue scale decreased from 37 to 20 mm; and the proportion of women who were greatly bothered by their incontinence decreased by 62%. 20% (20/98) of women became continent, and the percentage of women with severe incontinence decreased from 64% (63/99) to 28% (27/98). Mean leakage per 24 hours measured by a pad test decreased from 28 g at the start of treatment to 13 g after 12 months. The number of light weight pads or sanitary towels decreased from 1.6 to 0.6 a day. In all, 17/105 (16%) patients were referred to a specialist. CONCLUSIONS--Urinary incontinence in women can be effectively managed in general practice with fairly simple treatment. Most women will be satisfied with the results. PMID:8664627

  17. Etiopathogenesis, diagnostics and history of surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jovan, Hadži-Djokić; Uroš, Babić; Aleksandar, Argirović; Miodrag, Aćimović; Milan, Radovanović; Bogomir, Milojević; Tomisla, Pejčić; Zoran, Džamić

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence represents involuntary urine leakage into the urethra. This pathological condition represents a major medical, social and hygienic problem. The paper presents risk factors for development of the disorder, as well as diagnostic methods applied in evaluation of the female patients. Chronological review of diverse surgical techniques used in treatment of stress urinary incontinence reported in the published scientific papers is also presented. Review of the literature data was also performed. Sling procedures with application of suburethral loops have been used since the beginning of the last century in treatment of this disorder. Surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence is applied when conservative treatment fails to give any effects according to strictly defined indications. During the last 100 years, surgical techniques have undergone different improvements and the results have also been significantly improved.

  18. Management of female urinary incontinence: A survey of urogynaecologists' view on the NICE guideline.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, A; Monga, A; Duckett, J

    2016-05-01

    We conducted a survey to obtain the opinions of urogynaecologists regarding the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence or NICE 2013 urinary incontinence guideline and whether it would change their current practice. A closed format questionnaire was sent electronically to all members of the British Society of Urogynaecology or BSUG between January and March 2014. There were three major areas of disagreement. First, 70.2% of respondents disagreed that a multidisciplinary team review was necessary before invasive treatment for urinary incontinence. Second, 53.8% of respondents disagreed that preoperative urodynamic studies were not required in stress urinary incontinence diagnosed clinically. Third, 58.6% of respondents disagreed that oxybutynin, tolterodine and darifenacin should be used as first-line drug therapy for overactive bladder. The questionnaire demonstrates that there are significant concerns leading to more than a third of respondents not altering their current practice in line with the entire guideline.

  19. Urodynamic approach to female urinary incontinence refractory to treatment with anticholinergics.

    PubMed

    Naranjo-Ortiz, Cristina; Clemente-Ramos, Luis Miguel; Salinas-Casado, Jesús; Méndez-Rubio, Santigo

    2012-12-01

    The administration of empirical anticholinergic treatment is widespread in women with urinary incontinence and has produced varied results. The objective of our paper is to determine the effectiveness of anticholinergics for the treatment of female urinary incontinence and to determine by urodynamics the possible causes that may explain the resistance to anticholinergics to obtain urodynamic predictors of success or failure. We evaluated 182 women over 14 years of age with urinary incontinence that had previously been treated with anticholinergics for at least three months. The patients underwent a complete medical history including clinical history, physical examination, and urodynamic and lower urinary tract video-radiologic studies. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 17.0 for Windows. Clinical therapeutic efficacy was demonstrated in 39.6% of cases. Cystometric bladder capacity was decreased in 89.2%of patients that did not improve clinically with anticholinergics (p=0.01). Detrusor overactivity was urodynamically demonstrated in 51% of cases (p=0.05) among patients without clinical improvement with anticholinergic treatment. This hyperactivity was demonstrated during early bladder filling (<100ml). Urodynamic stress urinary incontinence (SUI) was demonstrated in 26.5% of patients without clinical improvement after treatment (p=0.04). Lower urinary tract obstruction was urodynamically demonstrated in 20.6% of patients with no clinical improvement (p=0.05). Urodynamic data did not demonstrate a relationship between detrusor overactivity, a high-grade cystocele ( 37.4% of total), and irregular bladder morphology (11.5% of total). It is important to conduct urodynamic study before starting anticholinergic treatment of females with urinary incontinence to identify therapeutic data of poor prognosis, such as SUI and lower urinary tract obstruction, thus optimizing the therapeutic efficacy of anticholinergics.

  20. [Guidelines concerning urinary incontinence in elderly: construction and validation of GRAPPPA algorithm].

    PubMed

    Amarenco, G; Gamé, X; Petit, A-C; Fatton, B; Jeandel, C; Robain, G; Scheiber-Nogueira, C; Vetel, J-M; Mares, P

    2014-03-01

    Provide guidelines presented as an algorithm for practical evaluation and first line therapy of urinary incontinence in elderly. Guidelines using formalized consensus guidelines method. These guidelines have been validated by a group of 40 experts quoting proposals, subsequently reviewed by an independent group of multidisciplinary experts (urologist, general practitioner, neurologist, gynecologist, geriatrist, specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation). By means of 3 rounds of interrogation of the expert panel, GRAPPPA algorithm was constructed. This algorithm take in account both evaluation and first line therapeutic options in the different type of incontinences observed in this population (urge, stress and mixed incontinence). Initial evaluation consists to track down urinary retention (and subsequently fecal stool impaction, use of anticholinergic or morphinic drugs), urinary tract infection and cognitive impairment. Haematuria, bladder-pelvic pain, history of radiotherapy or recent pelvic surgery, lead to refer the patient to a specialized unit. First line therapy is in all the cases pelvic floor training, use of local oestrogenotherapy and dietetic measures. In urge incontinence, anticholinergic drugs may be used. Implementation of this algorithm may promote best practice in management of urinary incontinence in elderly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Caffeine intake, and the risk of stress, urgency and mixed urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jura, Ying H; Townsend, Mary K; Curhan, Gary C; Resnick, Neil M; Grodstein, Francine

    2011-05-01

    Although caffeine consumption is common and generally believed to affect bladder function, little is known about caffeine intake and incident urinary incontinence. We performed a prospective cohort study in 65,176 women 37 to 79 years old without incontinence in the Nurses' Health Study and the Nurses' Health Study II. Incident incontinence was identified from questionnaires during 4 years of followup. Caffeine intake was measured using food frequency questionnaires administered before incontinence development. The multivariate adjusted relative risk of the relation between caffeine intake and incontinence risk as well as attributable risk were calculated. Caffeine was not associated with incontinence monthly or more. However, there was a modest, significantly increased risk of incontinence at least weekly in women with the highest (greater than 450 mg) vs the lowest (less than 150 mg) daily intake (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06-1.34) and a significant trend of increasing risk with increasing intake (p for trend = 0.01). This risk appeared focused on incident urgency incontinence (greater than 450 vs less than 150 mg daily, RR 1.34, 95% CI 1.00-1.80, p for trend = 0.05) but not on stress or mixed incontinence (p for trend = 0.75 and 0.19, respectively). The attributable risk of urgency incontinence associated with high caffeine intake was 25%. Findings suggest that high but not lower caffeine intake is associated with a modest increase in the incidence of frequent urgency incontinence. A fourth of the cases with the highest caffeine consumption would be eliminated if high caffeine intake were eliminated. Confirmation of these findings in other studies is needed before recommendations can be made. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Caffeine intake and risk of stress, urgency, and mixed urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Jura, Ying H.; Townsend, Mary K.; Curhan, Gary C.; Resnick, Neil M.; Grodstein, Francine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Although caffeine consumption is common, and is generally believed to affect bladder function, little is known regarding caffeine intake and incident urinary incontinence. Materials and Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 65,176 women without incontinence, aged 37–79 years, in the Nurses’ Health Studies. Incident incontinence was identified from questionnaires, during 4 years of follow-up. Caffeine intake was measured using food frequency questionnaires administered prior to incontinence development. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks for the relation between caffeine intake and incontinence risk were calculated, as well as attributable risks. Results Caffeine was not associated with incontinence monthly or more, but there was a modest, significantly increased risk of incontinence at least weekly among women with the highest versus the lowest intake (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.34, comparing >450 vs. <150 mg/day) and a significant trend of increasing risk with increasing intake (p-value for trend=0.01). This risk appeared focused in incident urgency incontinence (RR 1.34, 95% CI 1.00–1.80 comparing >450 vs. <150 mg/day, p-value for trend=0.05), but not stress or mixed incontinence (p-values for trend=0.75 and 0.19, respectively). The attributable risk for urgency incontinence associated with high caffeine intake was 25%. Conclusions Our findings suggest that high caffeine intake, but not lower levels, is associated with a modest increase in incidence of frequent urgency incontinence; one-quarter of these cases among women with the highest level of caffeine consumption might be eliminated if high caffeine intake was eliminated. Confirmation of these findings in other studies is needed before recommendations can be made. PMID:21420114

  3. Urinary incontinence in bitches under primary veterinary care in England: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, D G; Riddell, A; Church, D B; Owen, L; Brodbelt, D C; Hall, J L

    2017-09-07

    To estimate prevalence and demographic risk factors for urinary incontinence in bitches under primary veterinary care in England. The study population included all bitches within the VetCompass database from September 1, 2009 to July 7, 2013. Electronic patient records were searched for urinary incontinence cases and additional demographic and clinical information was extracted. Of 100,397 bitches attending 119 clinics in England, an estimated 3108 were diagnosed with urinary incontinence. The prevalence of urinary incontinence was 3·14% (95% confidence intervals: 2·97 to 3·33). Medical therapy was prescribed to 45·6% cases. Predisposed breeds included the Irish setter (odds ratio: 8·09; 95% confidence intervals: 3·15 to 20·80; P< 0·001) and Dobermann (odds ratio: 7·98; 95% confidence intervals: 4·38 to 14·54; P< 0·001). Increased odds of a diagnosis of urinary incontinence were associated with: (1) weight at or above the mean adult bodyweight for the breed (odds ratio: 1·31; 95% confidence intervals: 1·12 to 1·54; P< 0·001), (2) age 9 to 12 years (odds ratio: 3·86; 95% confidence intervals: 2·86 to 5·20, P< 0·001), (3) neuter status (odds ratio: 2·23; 95% confidence intervals: 1·52 to 3·25, P< 0·001) and (4) being insured (odds ratio: 1·59; 95% confidence intervals: 1·34 to 1·88, P< 0·001). Clinical Impact: Urinary incontinence affects just over 3% of bitches overall but affects more than 15% of bitches in high-risk breeds including the Irish setter, Dobermann, bearded collie, rough collie and Dalmatian. These results provide an evidence base for clinicians to enhance clinical recommendations on neutering and weight control, especially in high-risk breeds. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  4. Discrepancies in perception of urinary incontinence between patient and physician after robotic radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Ryeol; Kim, Hong Wook; Lee, Jae Won; Jeong, Woo Ju; Rha, Koon Ho; Kim, Jang Hwan

    2010-11-01

    Reported incidence of urinary incontinence after a radical prostatectomy (RP) varies between studies. This may be due not only to the definition of incontinence applied, but also how the information is acquired. We investigated the differences in perception of post robot-assisted laparoscopic RP (RALP) urinary incontinence acquired through doctor interviews and patient-reported questionnaires. Of 238 consecutive men who underwent RALP by a single surgeon between July 2005 and February 2008, we evaluated 66 men using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ) at various time points after surgery. Each patient's ICIQ results were considered to be the patient's perceptions of urinary incontinence. The physician at the same time directly interviewed the patients about the number of pads used and considered complete continence to be equivalent to the use of no pads or safety liners. Of the 66 patients, the physician reported that 34 (51.5%) had obtained complete continence. However, analysis of the questionnaires of these 34 patients revealed that only 5 (14.7%) patients reported that they never leaked during the past 4 weeks. Most patients (11 patients, 32.4%) who did not use any pad did in fact reported leakage of a small or moderate amount of urine about once a day. Our results indicate that there are discrepancies in the perception of urinary incontinence between doctor and patient after RALP. Nonuse of pads is not equivalent to obtaining complete urinary continence. Therefore, the number of pads used is not a good measure to determine the status of complete urinary continence.

  5. Urinary Incontinence due to Overactive Detrusor Muscle: A Rare Side Effect of Venlafaxine

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vithyalakshmi; Gunasekar, Palanikumar; Kumar, Suneel; Alsakaf, Imad

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of reemergence of urinary incontinence (UI) in a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) after starting treatment with venlafaxine who was stabilized on tamsulosin and finasteride for about 6 years. A 66-year-old Caucasian male with prior history of major depressive disorder developed UI within a week of starting venlafaxine 75 mg per day. He described symptoms in the form of involuntary leakage of urine both during the day and at night. His symptoms of UI resolved after stopping the venlafaxine. To the best of our knowledge, there are only four case reports of venlafaxine induced urinary incontinence which have been published. PMID:26491599

  6. Symptoms of Combined Prolapse and Urinary Incontinence in Large Surgical Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, L.; Rickey, L.; Xu, Y.; Markland, A.; Lemack, G.; Ghetti, C.; Kahn, M.; Nagaraju, P.; Norton, P.; Chang, T. D.; Stoddard, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To estimate whether prolapse severity is a major contributor to urinary incontinence severity, as measured by validated incontinence questionnaires. Methods We analyzed data from two large female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) surgical cohorts: the Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial (SISTEr) study (N=655) and the subsequent Trial of Mid-Urethral Slings (TOMUS) study (N=597). All participants completed a standardized baseline assessment including validated measures of symptom severity, quality of life, objective measures of urine loss [Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI), Medical, Epidemiologic, and Social Aspects of Aging questionnaire (MESA), Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ) and pad test], as well as the Pelvic Organ Prolapse – Quantification (POP-Q) assessment. Groups were compared using the χ2 test (categorical measures) or the one-way analysis of variance (continuous measures). Statistical significance was defined at p-value <0.05. Results The SISTEr and TOMUS samples were similar for many variables including age (52 vs. 53 years, respectively), nulliparity (9 vs. 12%), prior UI surgery (14 vs. 13%), and prior hysterectomy (31 vs 28%), but other differences necessitated separate analysis of the two cohorts. There was not a statistically significant difference in UDI scores according to prolapse stage in either study population. Patients with prior surgery for POP and SUI had more incontinence symptoms and were more bothered by their UI, regardless of prolapse stage. Conclusions Prolapse stage is not strongly or consistently associated with incontinence severity in women who select surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Prior POP and UI surgery is associated with worse UI severity and bother. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00064662 and NCT00325039. PMID:20093904

  7. Role of antimuscarinics in the treatment of nonneurogenic daytime urinary incontinence in children.

    PubMed

    Nijman, Rien J M

    2004-03-01

    Idiopathic or "functional" urinary incontinence in children--incontinence with no known neurologic or anatomic cause--may take the form of urge incontinence, the most common type of incontinence, which is characterized by detrusor overactivity during the filling phase, or dysfunctional voiding. The latter may be classified as staccato voiding (periodic bursts of pelvic floor activity with prolonged voiding and, in some cases, residual urine), interrupted voiding (insufficient bladder emptying, infrequent voiding with several phases of micturition), or "lazy bladder" syndrome (infrequent voiding and large bladder capacity). The etiology of functional incontinence is unknown. Theories include genetic predisposition, recurrent urinary tract infections, immaturity or too-early toilet training, and sexual abuse. A severe form of urge incontinence, nonneurogenic neurogenic (Hinman) bladder, may be the end stage of dysfunctional voiding, but an occult neurologic component should also be considered. Diagnostic procedures recommended for children with urinary incontinence include careful history taking, a voiding diary, and physical examination to identify symptoms and to minimize the need for invasive procedures. Treatments include behavioral modification, biofeedback, antibiotics, anticholinergics, counseling, and neuromodulation. The antimuscarinics oxybutynin and tolterodine are, at present, the most commonly used drugs to treat incontinence. Common side effects with these agents (ie, reduced saliva production and worsening constipation) can be severe and can cause up to 10% of children using oxybutynin to discontinue treatment. Current evidence suggests that tolterodine may have a more favorable safety profile than oxybutynin. In addition, new antimuscarinics in the pipeline, eg, darifenacin and solifenacin, are expected to possess more favorable safety and tolerability profiles and may therefore help to alleviate these limitations.

  8. Associated factors to urinary incontinence in women undergoing urodynamic testing.

    PubMed

    Silva, Juliana Cristina Pereira da; Soler, Zaida Aurora Sperli Geraldes; DominguesWysocki, Anneliese

    2017-04-03

    Analyzing factors associated with urinary incontinence (UI) among women submitted to urodynamic testing. A cross-sectional study of 150 women attended at a urological center. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistics. White women (79.3%), overweight (45.3%), menopausal (53.3%), who drink coffee (82.7%), sedentary (65.3%), who had vaginal birth (51.4%), with episiotomy (80%), and who underwent the Kristeller maneuver (69%). 60.7% had Urethral Hypermobility (UH). A statistical association was found between: weight change and UH (p = 0.024); menopause, Intrinsic Sphincter Deficiency (ISD) and Detrusor Instability (DI) (p = 0.001); gynecological surgery, ISD and DI (p = 0.014); hysterectomy and all types of UI (p = 0.040); physical activity and mixed UI (p = 0.014). Interventions and guidance on preventing UI and strengthening pelvic muscles should be directed at women who present weight changes, who are sedentary menopausal women, and those who have undergone hysterectomy or other gynecological surgery. Studies on pelvic strengthening methods are needed in order to take into account the profile of the needs presented by women. Analisar os fatores associados à Incontinência Urinária (IU) entre mulheres submetidas a estudo urodinâmico. Estudo transversal realizado com 150 mulheres atendidas em um centro urológico. Os dados foram analisados por meio de estatística uni e multivariada. Mulheres brancas (79,3%), com sobrepeso (45,3%), na menopausa (53,3%), que ingeriam café (82,7%), sedentárias (65,3%), que fizeram parto normal (51,4%), com episiotomia (80%), que sofreram Manobra de Kristeller (69%). 60,7% apresentavam HipermobilidadeUretral (HU).Houve associação estatística entre: mudança de peso e HU (p=0,024); menopausa,Deficiência Esfincteriana Intrínseca (DEI) e Instabilidade Detrusora (ID) (p=0,001); cirurgia ginecológica, DEI e ID (p=0,014); histerectomia etodos os tipos de IU (p=0,040); realização de atividade física eIU mista

  9. A group-based yoga therapy intervention for urinary incontinence in women: a pilot randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alison J; Jenny, Hillary E; Chesney, Margaret A; Schembri, Michael; Subak, Leslee L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a group-based yoga therapy intervention for middle-aged and older women with urinary incontinence. We conducted a pilot randomized trial of ambulatory women aged 40 years and older with stress, urgency, or mixed-type incontinence. Women were randomized to a 6-week yoga therapy program (n = 10) consisting of twice weekly group classes and once weekly home practice or a wait-list control group (n = 9). All participants also received written pamphlets about standard behavioral self-management strategies for incontinence. Changes in incontinence were assessed with 7-day voiding diaries. The mean (SD) age was 61.4 (8.2) years, and the mean baseline frequency of incontinence was 2.5 (1.3) episodes/d. After 6 weeks, the total incontinence frequency decreased by 70% (1.8 [0.9] fewer episodes/d) in the yoga therapy versus 13% (0.3 [1.7] fewer episodes/d) in the control group (P = 0.049). Participants in the yoga therapy group also reported an average of 71% decrease in stress incontinence frequency (0.7 [0.8] fewer episodes/d) compared with a 25% increase in controls (0.2 [1.1] more episodes/d) (P = 0.039). No significant differences in reduction in urgency incontinence were detected between the yoga therapy versus control groups (1.0 [1.0] versus 0.5 [0.5] fewer episodes/d; P = 0.20). All women starting the yoga therapy program completed at least 90% of the group classes and practice sessions. Two participants in each group reported adverse events unrelated to the intervention. Findings provide preliminary evidence to support the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a group-based yoga therapy intervention to improve urinary incontinence in women.

  10. A Group-Based Yoga Therapy Intervention for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alison J.; Jenny, Hillary E.; Chesney, Margaret A.; Schembri, Michael; Subak, Leslee L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a group-based yoga therapy intervention for middle-aged and older women with urinary incontinence. Methods We conducted a pilot randomized trial of ambulatory women aged 40 years and older with stress, urgency, or mixed-type incontinence. Women were randomized to a 6-week yoga therapy program (N=10) consisting of twice weekly group classes and once weekly home practice or a waitlist control group (N=9). All participants also received written pamphlets about standard behavioral self-management strategies for incontinence. Changes in incontinence were assessed by 7-day voiding diaries. Results Mean (±SD) age was 61.4 (±8.2) years, and mean baseline frequency of incontinence was 2.5 (±1.3) episodes/day. After 6 weeks, total incontinence frequency decreased by 66% (1.8 [±0.9] fewer episodes/day) in the yoga therapy versus 13% (0.3 [±1.7] fewer episodes/day) in the control group (P=0.049). Participants in the yoga therapy group also reported an average 85% decrease in stress incontinence frequency (0.7 [±0.8] fewer episodes/day) compared to a 25% increase in controls (0.2 [± 1.1] more episodes/day) (P=0.039). No significant differences in reduction in urgency incontinence were detected between the yoga therapy versus control groups (1.0 [±1.0] versus 0.5 [±0.5] fewer episodes/day, P=0.20). All women starting the yoga therapy program completed at least 90% of group classes and practice sessions. Two participants in each group reported adverse events unrelated to the intervention. Conclusions Findings provide preliminary evidence to support the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a group-based yoga therapy intervention to improve urinary incontinence in women. PMID:24763156

  11. Hidden female urinary incontinence in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics in Turkey: what are the determinants of bothersome urinary incontinence and help-seeking behavior?

    PubMed

    Cetinel, Bulent; Demirkesen, Oktay; Tarcan, Tufan; Yalcin, Onay; Kocak, Taner; Senocak, Mustafa; Itil, Ismail

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of female urinary incontinence (UI) and risk factors of bothersomeness and help-seeking behavior of hidden female UI in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics. This multicentric and cross-sectional study was conducted as a part of the Turkish Overactive Bladder Study. Female patients (n = 5,565) who were referred with complaints other than UI and overactive bladder symptoms were surveyed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF) with supplementation of five more questions. The crude prevalence of UI was found to be 35.7%. The prevalence of frequent and severe incontinence was 8.2 and 6.8%, respectively. The mean age of incontinent patients was significantly higher (p < 0.001). The prevalence of stress, urge, and mixed UI was 39.8, 24.8, and 28.9%, respectively. More than half (53%) of incontinent patients were not bothered by UI, and only 12% of incontinent patients had previously sought medical help for their problem. Frequency, severity, and type of UI were independent factors for predicting bothersome UI, while only bothersomeness increased help-seeking behavior. The ICIQ-SF score of 8 has been found to be the best cutoff value to delineate the bothersome UI. Although the crude prevalence of female UI was found to be high, bothersome UI was not so common. The majority of incontinent female patients did not seek medical help. Frequency, severity, and mixed type of UI were found to be the determinants of bothersome UI for which the ICIQ-SF cutoff score of 8 was obtained.

  12. Vaginal vs. transabdominal ultrasonography in the evaluation of female urinary tract anatomy, stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organs static disturbances.

    PubMed

    Jolić, V; Gilja, I

    1997-01-01

    In this multicentric prospective and randomized study we compared the results obtained by application of a vaginal ultrasound probe in the vaginal introitus to those obtained by the transabdominal one. 66 examined patients were separated in five groups according to the history and gynaecological investigation. Stress urinary incontinence was urodynamically proved. After analysing the results obtained by those methods we conclude that the transabdominal method gives more useful data for stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organs static disturbances (SUI and POSD) diagnosing, but the introital application of the vaginal probe is also very useful for analysing the urethrovesical junction (UVJ) position comparing of its mobility in rest and maximal strain positions. We have found that a posterior vesicourethral angle less than 75 degrees measured by the endovaginal probe was a reliable proof of the cystocele. The results were comparable to clinical status and transabdominal sonography of the moderately full bladder. Transabdominal and endovaginal methods give rather complementary than competition data which are very useful in diagnosing of the POSD, SUI and UVJ position and degree of its mobility. For that reason both techniques may precisely discover and document the presence of anatomic stress urinary incontinence causative defects aiding in the selection of patients suitable for operative therapy of stress urinary incontinence and for their postoperative follow-up.

  13. Conservative management of post-surgical urinary incontinence in an adolescent using applied kinesiology: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, Scott C; Rosner, Anthony L

    2011-06-01

    This case report describes the successful treatment of an adolescent female suffering daily stress and occasional total urinary incontinence with applied kinesiology methods and chiropractic manipulative therapy. A 13-year-old female developed unpredictable urinary incontinence and right hip pain immediately following emergency open appendectomy surgery. The patient was forced to wear an incontinence pad throughout the day and night for 10 months because of unpredictable urinary incontinence. ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION: Chiropractic and applied kinesiology (AK) methods - a multi-modal diagnostic technique that utilizes manual muscle tests (MMT) for the detection of musculoskeletal impairments and specific AK techniques for correction of identified issues - were utilized to diagnose and treat this patient for muscle impairments in the lumbar spine and pelvis. Patient experienced a rapid resolution of her urinary incontinence and hip pain. A six-year follow-up confirmed complete resolution of symptoms. In this case, utilization of MMT allowed for the identification of several inhibited muscles. Utilizing the appropriate corrective techniques improved the strength of these muscles and resulted in their being graded as facilitated. Symptoms of urinary incontinence and hip pain resolved with this diagnostic and treatment approach. AK methods were useful for the discovery of a number of apparent causative factors underlying this patient's urinary incontinence and hip pain. Treatment for these pelvic-floor muscle and joint abnormalities resulted in rapid, long-lasting resolution of her urinary incontinence and hip pain.

  14. Correlation between urodynamic tests, history and clinical findings in treatment of women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Borges, João Bosco Ramos; Guarisi, Telma; Camargo, Ana Carolina Marchesini de; Borges, Pítia Cárita de Godoy

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of urodynamic test in diagnosis of urinary incontinence, comparing detailed data of history and physical examination, and some easy- to-apply clinical tests. A cross-sectional retrospective study was carried out by reviewing the medical charts of 55 patients with complaint of loss of urine, seen at the Urogynecology Service of Women's Health Outpatient Clinic of Hospital Universitário de Jundiaí, between October 2006 and March 2007. The patients answered a specific questionnaire involving the epidemiological and physical examination variables considered in this study. They were submitted to physical examination and urodynamic tests. The complaint of loss of urine upon exertion, either isolated or associated with urge incontinence, was confirmed by urodynamic tests in most women, and only 4 of 49 symptomatic women had negative results. The clinical sign was present in 35 patients (63.6%), and 46 patients (83.6%) had the exertion component in the urodynamic test. The exertion component was observed in 10 (18%) out of 15 patients without symptoms (30%). The positive and negative predictive values of the clinical sign for diagnosis of any type of urinary incontinence in this studied group were 97.1 and 26.7%, respectively. As for the clinical complaint of urinary loss upon exertion, the positive and negative predictive values for any type of urinary incontinence were 92 and 40%, respectively. For the clinical complaint of urge incontinence, the positive and negative predictive values of 92.5 and 23.1%, respectively. It was concluded that the urodynamic evaluation is an important instrument to evaluate the severity of incontinence, although it was not necessary to diagnose loss of urine. The finding of urinary loss during physical examination had low sensitivity and specificity in diagnosis of the type of loss of urine. Urodynamic tests had better performance in demonstrating urinary incontinence in patients with

  15. Factors impacting self-care for urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Milne, Jill L; Moore, Katherine N

    2006-02-01

    Behavioral strategies such as pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME), bladder retraining, and dietary modifications are generally considered to be the first line of treatment for urinary incontinence (UI). Yet little is understood about the client's abilities/motivation to manage their UI in the home setting. Self-care, the ability of clients to act on their own behalf to achieve and maintain health, is a fundamental component of these strategies. Despite the frequently chronic nature of UI, there is growing evidence that such maintenance of behavioral therapies is sporadic at best. The purpose of this study was to enhance understanding of self-care strategies that individuals with UI employ, the perceived benefits of these strategies, the factors that influence their self-care choices, and the factors that impede or facilitate maintenance of behavioral therapies. In this qualitative descriptive study, individual and focus group interviews with community-dwelling participants were conducted to enhance understanding regarding the participants' management of UI at home and why they maintain certain strategies and not others. Data were collected via loosely constructed individual (n=25) and focus group (n=3) interviews to facilitate open discussion of participants' perceptions. Thirty-eight individuals (33 women and 5 men) participated in the study. Analysis of data resulted in a major category of self-care strategies related to UI that was further subcategorized into factors that facilitated PFME and barriers to PFME performance. Factors that facilitated PFME included: (a) realistic goals and expectation, (b) positive affirmation, (c) follow up, and (d) maintaining an exercise routine. Barriers noted were: (a) insufficient information, (b) characteristics of the exercises, (c) competing interests, (d) financial cost, and (e) minor psychosocial impact. This study described the self-care strategies that participants with UI had initiated and maintained and additionally

  16. Prevalence, incidence and correlates of urinary incontinence in healthy, middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Burgio, K L; Matthews, K A; Engel, B T

    1991-11-01

    The prevalence, incidence and correlates of urinary incontinence were studied in a community-based sample of 541 healthy, middle-aged women 42 to 50 years old. Participants were evaluated on 2 occasions approximately 3 years apart. Of the participants 58% reported urine loss at some time and 30.7% reported incontinence on a regular basis at least once per month. During 3 years the cumulative incidence of regular incontinence in previously continent women was 8.0%. Among those with regular incontinence 64.9% said the volume of loss was 1 or 2 drops, while 35.1% reported that they needed to change their garments. Only 25.5% of the patients had sought treatment. Continence status was significantly related to body mass index and race but not to patient age, parity, caffeine or alcohol intake, smoking, physical activity, prior gynecological surgery or several psychological variables. The results indicate that urinary incontinence is common among middle-aged women. That few seek treatment suggests a need for more information about women's attitudes toward incontinence and more attention to this problem by health care providers.

  17. [Efficacy, tolerance and acceptability of Incontex in spayed bitches with urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Burgherr, T; Reichler, I; Hung, L; Hubler, M; Arnold, S

    2007-07-01

    A clinical study about efficacy and acceptance of Incontex in spayed bitches with urinary incontinence was performed. In a randomised, double-blinded study the efficacy and acceptance of Incontex (Dr. E. Gräub AG, Bern, Schweiz) in bitches with urethral sphincter incompetence due to spaying was evaluated under field conditions. The active ingredient of the Incontex Syrup is phenylpropanolamine (PPA), an alpha1-adrenergic agonist. The study was performed using 24 spayed, incontinent bitches. Over a first period of treatment of 30 days the bitches received either Incontex, at 1.5 mg/kg twice per day, or a placebo. In the second period of 30 days all 24 bitches were treated with Incontex at the recommended dose. Any changes in the incontinence compared with the situation before the study were evaluated. Of 24 bitches 21 (88%) became continent and in 2 bitches (8%) urinary incontinence improved. In only 1 bitch (4%) the medication did have no effect. Five bitches (21%) showed side effects. The acceptance of Incontex was good. Incontex can be recommended as an efficient and well-tolerated medication for the treatment of bitches with urinary incontinence after spaying. The oral application of 1.5mg/kg BW phenylpropanolamine twice daily has been approved.

  18. Is there an urban-rural-gradient in patients with urinary incontinence?

    PubMed

    Wille, Sebastian; Katarzyna, Kawa; Ahrens, Ulrike; Eminaga, Okyaz; Engelmann, Udo; Jenny, Paas

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the responses to the same questionnaire differ between women living in a large city and women living in a rural area. We evaluated the medical records of 88 patients living in the large city of Cologne and of 86 patients living in Brühl and its surrounding rural regions. The responses on the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF) of 88 patients who suffer from urinary incontinence and live in a large city were compared to the responses 86 patients who live the rural region of Brühl. In addition, ages, frequency of micturition, use of pads, prior and desired treatment were compared. Limitations of this study include its retrospective study design and the absence of sociodemographic data. Furthermore, the use of a pad test could objectify the extent of incontinence. On average, patients from Cologne used of 6.2 pads and patients from Brühl used 3 pads. Patients from the large city scored 14 out of 21 points on the ICIQ-SF, and women from Brühl scored 11 out of 21 points. This difference was significant. Patients from Cologne had received medicinal treatment or physical therapy significantly more often. The results suggest that urinary incontinence is perceived as a greater impairment by patients residing in (large) cities compared to patients residing in rural areas. An urban-rural gradient in patients with urinary incontinence can be described.

  19. [Surgical management of urinary and fecal incontinence in neurological sphincter disorders of children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Lemelle, J L; Barthelme, H; Schmitt, M

    1999-01-01

    The management of urinary and fecal incontinence in children and adolescents with neurogenic disorders related to congenital or acquired conditions was frequently considered to be of secondary importance compared with orthopaedic complications. The improvement of artificial urinary sphincter and continent urinary diversion techniques allowed to establish for each case an individual plan considering overall, abilities and voiding dysfunction as well as renal complications. Antegrade colonic enema has greatly improved the quality of life of children with fecal incontinence or intractable constipation. Surgical management requires a large contribution by the patients and their closest relatives and complete information about goals, advantages and obligations of surgical management. Surgical principles for bladder augmentation, bladder neck reconstruction and continent urinary diversion are presented and discussed according to data in the recent literature and the author's clinical experience.

  20. [Incontinence].

    PubMed

    Rueda López, J; Muñoz Bueno, A M; Guerrero Palmero, A; Segovia Gómez, T

    2007-12-01

    Incontinence presents an additional problem for a bedridden patient, among other reasons because incontinence increases the risk of perineal dermatitis. Recently evaluation scales have been drawn up which permit evaluating the effects incontinence provokes on the integrity of the skin and new products have been developed which act as non-irritating barriers and which permit professionals to visually inspect the affected area. These new products increase the arsenal of already known products and tools such as bed pans, catheters, etc. which professionals have at their disposal to control incontinence.

  1. Pelvic Floor Biofeedback via a Smart Phone App for Treatment Of Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Starr, Julie A; Drobnis, Erma Z; Cornelius, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    Biofeedback can be useful for treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Many women have difficulty isolating their pelvic floor muscles and adhering to a daily exercise regimen. This case study highlights a woman's experience using PeriCoach, a home biofeedback device that assists women in strengthening their pelvic floor muscles through Bluetooth technology using a smartphone.

  2. Assessment of sexual functions in partners of women with complaints of urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Keles, Muzaffer Oguz; Caliskan, Selahattin; Gokce, Ali Murat; Gunes, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: Investigation of the erectile functions in partners of women with urinary incontinence problems. Materials and Methods: Sexually active female patients over the age of 18 years with complaints of urinary incontinence (n=30) (Group-1), and without urinary incontinence (n=30) (Group-2, controls) were included this study. Evaluation of the patients were done at Erzincan Mengücek Gazi Training and Research Hospital's urology outpatient clinic between June 2012 and January 2013. Partners of group-1 and group-2 were asked to fill in the 5-item International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire, and then the scores of the two groups were compared for statistically significant differences. Results: Among the partners of the group-1 patients, 15 (50%) had mild erectile dysfunction (ED), 11 (36.6%) had moderate ED, 1 (3.4%) had severe ED, and erectile function was normal in the remaining 3 (10%). Among the partners of group-2 patients, 15 (50%) had mild ED, 7 had moderate ED, 1 (3.4%) had severe ED, and 7 (23.3%) had normal erectile function. Compared to the spouses of group-2 patients, ED was more prevalent among the spouses of group-1 patients. Conclusion: Erectile function in the partners of women with urinary incontinence may be adversely affected by the UI of their partners. PMID:27532113

  3. The use of synthetic materials in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kądziołka, Przemysław; Stanek, Anna M.; Szymanowski, Krzysztof; Wilczak, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a very serious problem which has been noticed by the WHO. This difficult medical condition poses a serious problem as it affects c.a. 20% of the female population and it increases up to 35% in the group of females over 60 years of age. Since there is no single standard surgical procedure which could solve this problem, numerous synthetic materials are used for the operations. It seems that the materials are effective as they improve the condition of women suffering from stress urinary incontinence. Unfortunately these materials have their shortcomings which might lead to certain post-operative complications. Stress urinary incontinence is a disease which affects the social life of the patients. It has a high percentage of recurrence and causes the patient substantial difficulties with keeping high standards of personal hygiene which is consequence makes it impossible to fulfill their social roles. The etiology of this disease is complex and calls for a cross-disciplinary approach to the problem. As there are no standardized or unanimous treatment methods of stress urinary incontinence, numerous sources based on the clinical experience of many medical centers suggest performing TVT and TOT procedures as the most effective treatment methods. The efficacy of the TOT procedure is about 90.8%. PMID:27582680

  4. Behavioral Intervention to Eliminate Socially Mediated Urinary Incontinence in a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricciardi, Joseph N.; Luiselli, James K.

    2003-01-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old boy with autism who demonstrated urinary incontinence that appeared to be maintained by social contingencies (adult attention and escape from activity "demands"). Although he wet himself frequently, he also used the bathroom appropriately and made many self-initiated toileting requests. Intervention was…

  5. School Nurse Interventions in Managing Functional Urinary Incontinence in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Charisse L.

    2010-01-01

    Uncomplicated urinary incontinence (UI) in school-age children is a prevalent yet underrecognized problem that has remained in the shadow of other concerns commonly perceived as more prominent or urgent. There is good evidence that functional UI in children can be treated and managed effectively. When there is no structural or neurologic…

  6. Orgasm-associated urinary incontinence and sexual life after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Andreas E; Carlsson, Stefan; Johansson, Eva; Jonsson, Martin N; Adding, Christofer; Nyberg, Tommy; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, N Peter

    2011-09-01

    Involuntary release of urine during sexual climax, orgasm-associated urinary incontinence, occurs frequently after radical prostatectomy. We know little about its prevalence and its effect on sexual satisfaction. To determine the prevalence of orgasm-associated incontinence after radical prostatectomy and its effect on sexual satisfaction. Consecutive series, follow-up at one point in calendar time of men having undergone radical prostatectomy (open surgery or robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery) at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, 2002-2006. Of the 1,411 eligible men, 1,288 (91%) men completed a study-specific questionnaire. Prevalence rate of orgasm-associated incontinence. Of the 1,288 men providing information, 691 were sexually active. Altogether, 268 men reported orgasm-associated urinary incontinence, of whom 230 (86%) were otherwise continent. When comparing them with the 422 not reporting the symptom but being sexually active, we found a prevalence ratio (with 95% confidence interval) of 1.5 (1.2-1.8) for not being able to satisfy the partner, 2.1 (1.1-3.5) for avoiding sexual activity because of fear of failing, 1.5 (1.1-2.1) for low orgasmic satisfaction, and 1.4 (1.2-1.7) for having sexual intercourse infrequently. Prevalence ratios increase in prostate-cancer survivors with a higher frequency of orgasm-associated urinary incontinence. We found orgasm-associated urinary incontinence to occur among a fifth of prostate cancer survivors having undergone radical prostatectomy, most of whom are continent when not engaged in sexual activity. The symptom was associated with several aspects of sexual life. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  7. Urgency urinary incontinence and the interoceptive network: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Ketai, Loren H; Komesu, Yuko M; Dodd, Andrew B; Rogers, Rebecca G; Ling, Josef M; Mayer, Andrew R

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of urgency urinary incontinence has focused on pharmacologically treating detrusor overactivity. Recent recognition that altered perception of internal stimuli (interoception) plays a role in urgency urinary incontinence suggests that exploration of abnormalities of brain function in this disorder could lead to better understanding of urgency incontinence and its treatment. We sought to: (1) evaluate the relationship between bladder filling, perceived urgency, and activation at brain sites within the interoceptive network in urgency urinary incontinence; (2) identify coactivation of other brain networks that could affect interoception during bladder filling in urgency incontinence; and (3) demonstrate interaction between these sites prior to bladder filling by evaluating their resting-state connectivity. We performed an observational cohort study using functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare brain function in 53 women with urgency urinary incontinence and 20 controls. Whole-brain voxelwise analyses of covariance were performed to examine differences in functional brain activation between groups during a task consisting of bladder filling, hold (static volume), and withdrawal phases. The task was performed at 3 previously established levels of baseline bladder volume, the highest exceeding strong desire to void volume. All women continuously rated their urge on a 0- to 10-point Likert scale throughout the task and a mixed measures analysis of variance was used to test for differences in urge ratings. Empirically derived regions of interest from analysis of activation during the task were used as seeds for examining group differences in resting-state functional connectivity. In both urgency urinary incontinent participants and controls, changes in urge ratings were greatest during bladder filling initiated from a high baseline bladder volume and urgency incontinent participants' rating changes were greater than controls. During this bladder

  8. Systematic review of the management of incontinence and promotion of continence in older people in care homes: descriptive studies with urinary incontinence as primary focus

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Brenda; Flanagan, Lisa; Jack, Barbara; Barrett, James; Chung, Alan; Shaw, Christine; Williams, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Aim This is a review of descriptive studies with incontinence as the primary focus in older people in care homes. Background Incontinence is prevalent among residents of care home populations. Data sources MEDLINE and CINAHL were searched from 1996 to 2007 using the highly sensitive search strings of the Cochrane Incontinence Review Group for urinary and faecal incontinence including all research designs. Search strings were modified to enhance selectiveness for care homes and older people and exclude studies involving surgical or pharmacological interventions. Searching of reference sections from identified studies was also used to supplement electronic searches. The Cochrane Library was searched for relevant systematic reviews to locate relevant studies from those included or excluded from reviews. The search was limited to English-language publications. Methods A systematic review of studies on the management of incontinence, promotion of continence or maintenance of continence in care homes was conducted in 2007–2009. This is a report of descriptive studies. Results Ten studies were identified that reported on prevalence and incidence of incontinence (urinary with or without faecal), policies, assessment, documentation, management or economic evaluation of its management. Use of incontinence pads and toileting programmes comprised the most common management approaches used. No studies were identified that attempted to maintain continence of residents in care homes. Conclusions Studies on maintaining continence and identifying components of toileting programmes that are successful in managing or preventing incontinence and promoting continence in residents of care home populations along with their economic evaluation are warranted. PMID:21105895

  9. Assessment of symptoms of urinary incontinence in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Montezuma, Thais; Antônio, Flávia Ignácio; de Sá Rosa e Silva, Ana Carolina Japur; de Sá, Marcos Felipe Silva; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The pelvic floor muscles are sensitive to androgens, and due to hyperandrogenism, women with polycystic ovary syndrome can have increased mass in these muscles compared to controls. The aim of this study is to compare reports of urine leakage and quality of life between women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome. METHODS: One hundred thirteen 18- to 40-year-old nulliparous women with polycystic ovary syndrome or without the disease (controls) were recruited at the University Hospital of School Medicine of São Paulo University at Ribeirão Preto City, Brazil. The subjects were not taking any hormonal medication, had not undergone previous pelvic surgery and did not exercise their pelvic floor muscles. The women were divided into the following four groups: I- polycystic ovary syndrome with normal body mass index (n = 18), II- polycystic ovary syndrome with body mass index ≥25 (n = 32), III- controls with normal body mass index (n = 29), and IV- controls with Body Mass Index ≥25 (n = 34). Quality of life was evaluated using the SF-36 questionnaire, and the subjects with urinary complaints also completed the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form to evaluate the severity of their urinary incontinence. RESULTS: The replies to the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form revealed a significant difference in urinary function between groups, with 24% of the subjects in group IV reporting urinary incontinence. The mean scores for the SF-36 questionnaire revealed that group II had the lowest quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: The control obese group (IV) reported a higher prevalence of urinary incontinence. There was no difference in the reported frequency of urine loss between the polycystic ovary syndrome and control groups with normal body mass index or between the polycystic ovary syndrome and control groups with body mass index ≥25. PMID:22086521

  10. Application of EQ-5D-5L questionnaire in patients suffering from urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gordillo, M A; Collado-Mateo, D; Olivares, P R; Adsuar, J C

    2016-09-01

    Urinary incontinence is associated with reduced quality of life and given the high prevalence of people with this condition, it could be useful to know the impact of having urinary incontinence on physical, psychological and social aspects. The Spanish value set of EQ-5D was used to assign single scores to the EQ-5D-5L health states. EQ-5D-5L is a health-related quality of life questionnaire, which allows assessing health status. The aim of this study was to provide normative values of EQ-5D-5L in a population sample with urinary incontinence. Cross-sectional study. A total of 965 people with urinary incontinence (297 men and 668 women) were included in this study. EQ-5D-5L index, VAS and health status are showed in the current study considering gender, age group, region, marital status, smoking status, net monthly incomes of household and educational level. Higher prevalence was observed in women (69.22%) compared with men (30.78%). Mean (SD) EQ-5D-5L utility index and VAS score were 0.58 (0.40) and 53.91 (22.16), respectively, for overall population. The 16.1% (155 people) reported perfect health status (11111). The utility equivalent to set values 55555 was not reported by anyone. This study provides normative values of EQ-5D-5L in a Spanish population sample with urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence of urinary incontinence in community dwelling men: a cross sectional nationwide epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    Diokno, Ananias C; Estanol, Maria Victoria C; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Awad; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies on urinary incontinence (UI) in adult men of all ages are scarce. We aim to describe the UI phenomenon among community dwelling adult males in the United States (US). We analyzed data from male respondents to a 14-item mailed UI symptoms questionnaire to the National Family Opinion (NFO) World Group Panel of 45,000 households matching the US 2000 census population on five key demographic elements. A total of 29,903 households responded, of which 21,590 were male heads of household (mean age 50 +/-15.2 years old). A total of 2,059 men (12.7%) reported symptoms of UI during the last 30 days. Symptoms of urge urinary incontinence (UUI), stress urinary incontinence (SUI), mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) symptoms, and other types of urinary incontinence (OUI) symptoms, were reported by 44.6%, 24.5%, 18.8%, and 12.3%, respectively. Among those with UI symptoms, the proportion of UUI and MUI symptoms increases with age while SUI symptoms decrease as age increases. Of those with UI symptoms, 44% consulted a physician of whom 57% did so within 6 months of the onset of symptoms. Treatments reported included absorbent pads (48%), prescription medication (30%), surgical procedure (18%), and intermittent catheterization (4%). Almost 1 in 10 males reported symptoms of UI. The UI prevalence rate increases with age and UUI symptoms is the most prevalent type reported. Less than half of men with UI symptoms sought professional help and half of them did so within 6 months of onset of UI symptoms.

  12. Female urinary incontinence health information quality on the Internet: a multilingual evaluation.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, Ishani; Abouassaly, Robert; Dwyer, Peter; Bolton, Damien M; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The quality of Internet information on female urinary incontinence is considered variable. No comprehensive analysis exists to support this. We compared the quality of current Internet information for common layperson terminology on female urinary incontinence across four Western languages and a comparative analysis of website sponsors. World Health Organization Health on the Net (HON) principles may be applied to websites using an automated toolbar function. We used the Google search engine; 10,200 websites were identified using keywords related to female urinary incontinence and treatments in English, French, German and Spanish. The first 150 websites in each language had HON principles examined, whilst a further analysis of site sponsorship was undertaken. The total number of websites for each term is variable. "Female sling surgery" had the most websites with approximately 18 million, whereas "colposuspension" had the least with only 159,890 websites. Regardless of language, very few female urinary incontinence websites were HON accredited (p < 0.0001). Linguistically, French (18%) and English (16%) had the greatest percentage of HON-accredited sites. Tertiles (thirds) of the first 150 websites returned the higher percentage of HON-accredited websites (p < 0.0001). Websites were largely sponsored by physicians/surgeons. The lack of validation of most female urinary incontinence websites should be appreciated by clinicians. Additionally, discrepancies exist in the quality and number of websites across conditions, languages and also between medical and alternative terms. Clinicians should participate in and encourage the development of informative, ethical and reliable health websites on the Internet and direct patients to them.

  13. Influence of self-perceived incontinence severity on quality of life and sexual function in women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Paick, Jae-Seung; Cho, Min Chul; Oh, Seung-June; Kim, Soo Woong; Ku, Ja Hyeon

    2007-01-01

    We examined the impact of patient-perceived incontinence severity (PPIS) on health-related quality of life (QoL) and sexual function in women with urinary incontinence (UI). Patients were recruited from clinic practices at one hospital. Between May 2004 and June 2006, 353 women 27-79 years old (mean 55.7) underwent detailed evaluations. To obtain health-related QoL and sexual function assessments, the patients were asked to fill the questionnaires including the incontinence quality of life (I-QoL) and female sexual function index (FSFI). Patients were categorized into the three groups according to the PPIS; 'mild,' 'moderate,' and 'severe.' Among groups, the duration of symptoms, rate of mixed UI, mean number of treatment visits over the past year, rate of UI associated without any activity, and Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) was significantly different (P < 0.05). The I-QoL total score and subscale scores deteriorated significantly as the PPIS increased (P < 0.001). Of the six domains in the FSFI questionnaire, four domains, namely, 'arousal' (P = 0.026), 'lubrication' (P = 0.012), 'orgasm' (P = 0.017), and 'pain' (P = 0.037) as well as the FSFI total score (P = 0.004) were significantly different among the groups. Our findings suggest that PPIS significantly influences health-related QoL and sexual function, and that strategies for assessing PPIS should be incorporated for assessing patients with UI. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Some Observations on the Surgical Treatment of Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Millin, Terence

    1939-01-01

    Types: A. Essential. B. Paradoxical. C. False. D. True. True incontinence.—A. Congenital: (a) Developmental abnormalities. (b) Malformations of nervous system. B. Acquired: (a) Local abnormalities. (b) False passages. (c) Disturbance of innervation. Anatomy of sphincteric mechanism in male and female. Diagnosis: Need for careful investigation including cysto-urethroscopy, cysto-urethrography, and cysto-manometry. Treatment: A. Physiotherapy. B. Direct surgical repair. C. Surgical diversion of urine. Types of true incontinence amenable to direct surgical repair: A. Epispadias. B. Aberrant ureteric ostia. C. Fistulæ. D. Congenital or acquired defective sphincteric mechanism. Operative treatment of vesico-vaginal fistulæ. Transvesical operation for cure of congenitally defective sphincteric mechanism—report of seven cases. Stress incontinence.—Value of urethrograms to ascertain nature of defect. Operative treatment. Incontinence following prostatic surgery.—Types of operation advocated. New operative procedure utilizing ribbon catgut with demonstrative moving picture. ImagesFig. 1, Fig. 2, Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:19991939

  15. Bridging the Gap: Determinants of Undiagnosed or Untreated Urinary Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    DURALDE, Erin R.; WALTER, Louise C.; VAN DEN EEDEN, Stephen K.; NAKAGAWA, Sanae; SUBAK, Leslee L.; BROWN, Jeanette S.; THOM, David H.; HUANG, Alison J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Over a third of middle-aged or older women suffer from urinary incontinence, but less than half undergo evaluation or treatment for this burdensome condition. With national organizations now including assessment of incontinence as a quality performance measure, providers and healthcare organizations have a growing incentive to identify and engage these women who are undiagnosed and untreated. Objective We sought to identify clinical and sociodemographic determinants of patient-provider discussion and treatment of incontinence among ethnically diverse, community-dwelling women. Study Design We conducted an observational cohort study from 2003-2012 of 969 women 40 years and older enrolled in a Northern California integrated healthcare delivery system, who reported at least weekly incontinence. Clinical severity, type, treatment, and discussion of incontinence were assessed by structured questionnaires. Multivariable regression evaluated predictors of discussion and treatment. Results Mean age of the 969 participants was 59.9 (±9.7) years, and 55% were racial/ethnic minorities (171 Black, 233 Latina, 133 Asian or Native American). Fifty-five percent reported discussing their incontinence with a healthcare provider, 36% within one year of symptom onset, and with only 3% indicating that their provider initiated the discussion. Over half (52%) reported being at least moderately bothered by their incontinence. Of these women, 324 (65%) discussed their incontinence with a clinician, with 200 (40%) doing so within 1 year of symptom onset. In multivariable analysis, women were less likely to have discussed their incontinence if they had a household income <$30,000/year versus ≥$120,000/year (AOR=0.49, CI=0.28-0.86), or were diabetic (AOR=0.71, CI=0.51-0.99). They were more likely to have discussed incontinence if they had clinically severe incontinence (AOR=3.09, CI=1.89-5.07), depression (AOR=1.71, CI=1.20-2.44), pelvic organ prolapse (AOR= 1.98, CI=1

  16. Association between urinary incontinence and depressive symptoms in overweight and obese women.

    PubMed

    Sung, Vivian W; West, Delia S; Hernandez, Alexandra L; Wheeler, Thomas L; Myers, Deborah L; Subak, Leslee L

    2009-05-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the association between urinary incontinence (UI) and depressive symptoms. The study was a cross-sectional study of 338 incontinent and overweight women at baseline in the Program to Reduce Incontinence by Diet and Exercise trial. Depressive symptoms were defined as a Beck Depression Inventory score of 10 or greater. UI frequency was determined by a 7-day voiding diary. Symptom bother and quality of life were determined using the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI) and the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ). Multivariable regression was used to estimate the association between UI and depressive symptoms. Women with depressive symptoms (n = 101) reported a higher mean number of UI episodes per week (28 vs 23; P = .005) and higher (worse) mean scores on the UDI (176 vs 162; P = .02) and IIQ (136 vs 97; P < .001) compared with women without depressive symptoms. The risk of having depressive symptoms increased with each 7-episode increase in UI per week (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.21), each 50-point increase in UDI (AOR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.01-1.60), and each 50-point increase in IIQ (AOR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.22-1.71). Urinary incontinence frequency, symptom bother, and quality of life are independently associated with depressive symptoms in overweight and obese women.

  17. [Towards early functional treatment of urinary incontinence after prostatectomy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Moulonguet, A; Verges, J; Delmas, V

    1981-01-01

    The authors report their striking experience of the effectiveness of early functional treatment of urinary incontinence after prostatectomy. This experience is based upon 50 cases collected over a period of 10 years. Treatment is based upon stimulation of the perineal musculature by faradic current, ano-perineal exercises, and mictional rehabilitation. Results, in 50 cases, showed a marked improvement in 43 (86%), including 15 complete cures (30%). Such a favourable result was obtained with six weeks' treatment. It would appear that the result is all the better when treatment is started earlier, whether in a case of arrhythmic incontinence dominated by urgency, or isolated nocturnal incontinence. The results, once acquired, generally persist. A relapse of incontinence often responds adequately to a new series of sessions of functional treatment. It would appear that the mode of action of this functional therapy is based upon a decrease in bladder instability, and an increase in urethra resistance. The authors show that, with their treatment, improvements and cures in urinary incontinence after prostatectomy occur much earlier with the aid of functional treatment than spontaneously. Thus, treatment is worthwhile undertaking.

  18. Association between urinary incontinence and depressive symptoms in overweight and obese women

    PubMed Central

    SUNG, Vivian W.; WEST, Delia S.; HERNANDEZ, Alexandra L.; WHEELER, Thomas L.; MYERS, Deborah L.; SUBAK, Leslee L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Determine the association between urinary incontinence (UI) and depressive symptoms. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study of 338 incontinent and overweight women at baseline in the Program to Reduce Incontinence by Diet and Exercise trial. Depressive symptoms were defined as a Beck Depression Inventory score ≥ 10. UI frequency was determined by 7-day voiding diary. Symptom bother and quality of life were determined using the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI) and the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ). Multivariable regression was used to estimate the association between UI and depressive symptoms. RESULTS Women with depressive symptoms (N=101) reported a higher mean number of UI episodes per week (28 vs. 23, P=.005) and higher (worse) mean scores on the UDI (176 vs. 162, P=.02) and IIQ (136 vs. 97, P<.001) compared to women without depressive symptoms. The risk of having depressive symptoms increased with each 7-episode increase in UI per week (AOR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01–1.21), each 50-point increase in UDI (AOR 1.27, 95% CI 1.01–1.60) and each 50-point increase in IIQ (AOR 1.44, 95% CI 1.22–1.71). CONCLUSIONS Urinary incontinence frequency, symptom bother, and quality of life are independently associated with depressive symptoms in overweight and obese women. PMID:19236869

  19. Urinary incontinence in women treated by ischemic compression over the bladder area: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hains, Guy; Hains, François; Descarreaux, Martin; Bussières, André

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if ischemic compression therapy over the bladder area results in clinically important changes among female patients with stress and mixed (stress and urge) incontinence. Methods One group of patients (n = 24) received ischemic compression therapy directed over the bladder area (experimental group). The control group (n = 9) received ischemic compression therapy directed toward structures of the hip joint. Changes in urinary incontinence symptoms were monitored using a 2-part questionnaire: the urogenital distress inventory and the incontinence impact questionnaire. Patients' perceived amelioration (improvement) was quantified using a scale divided from 0% to 100%. Results Mean scores for the first questionnaire (urogenital distress inventory + incontinence impact questionnaire, 19 questions) were 23.3 vs 25.3 at baseline and 10.2 vs 22.2 after 15 treatments for the experimental and control group, respectively. The experimental group scores were 6.9 at 30 days after the last treatment and 11.3 at the 6-month follow-up. The perceived percentages of amelioration after 15 treatments were 69% vs 32% for the experimental and control group, respectively. The experimental group scores were 73% at 30 days after the last treatment and 60% at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusions In this study, ischemic compression directed toward elicited trigger points over bladder area was found to be an effective treatment of patients presenting symptoms of urinary incontinence. Improvement in symptoms was still present in follow-up at 6 months. PMID:19674707

  20. Female Functional Constipation Is Associated with Overactive Bladder Symptoms and Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Masuomi; Sakai, Gen; Funakoshi, Shinsuke; Komatsuda, Akari; Ito, Yujiro; Nagata, Hirohiko; Tsukada, Nobuhiro; Nakamura, So

    2017-01-01

    This noninterventional cross-sectional study aims to assess the association between functional constipation (FC) and urinary symptoms in female patients with no treatment for urination and defecation. The Rome III criteria for evaluation of defecation, Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS) for evaluation of urinary symptoms, and clinical features were investigated in 145 female patients. Latent FC and moderate to severe overactive bladder (OAB) were defined on the basis of positivity for two or more of the Rome III criteria and an OABSS ≥ 6 with OABSS Q3 ≥ 2, respectively. In 60 latent FC patients, the OABSS was higher (5.0 versus 3.2, p = 0.001), and concurrent moderate to severe OAB symptoms and OAB with urinary incontinence were more frequent than those in 85 nonlatent FC patients (33.3 versus 10.6%, p = 0.001, and 31.7 versus 7.1%, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that moderate to severe OAB symptoms were a significant associated factor of latent FC (odds ratio (OR) = 4.125, p = 0.005), while latent FC was the only associated factor of moderate to severe OAB and OAB with urinary incontinence (OR = 4.227, p = 0.005 and OR = 4.753, p = 0.004). In conclusion, moderate to severe OAB symptoms are correlated with FC. Moreover, FC is related to moderate to severe OAB symptoms and to OAB with urinary incontinence. PMID:28337444

  1. Sexual function before and after non-surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Victoria L.; Whitcomb, Emily; Weidner, Alison C.; Nygaard, Ingrid; Brubaker, Linda; Bradley, Catherine S.; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R.; Schaffer, Joseph; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Zhang, Min; Richter, Holly E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives (1) to describe sexual function in women seeking treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI); (2) to compare the impact on sexual function of three SUI treatments; and (3) to investigate whether non-surgical treatment of SUI is associated with improved sexual function. Methods Women with SUI were randomized to continence pessary, behavioral therapy (pelvic floor muscle training and continence strategies), or combination therapy. Sexual function was assessed at baseline and 3-months using short forms of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse-Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire (PISQ-12) and the Personal Experiences Questionnaire (SPEQ). Successful treatment of SUI was assessed with a patient global impression of improvement. ANOVA was used to compare scores between groups. Results At baseline, sexual function was worse among women with mixed incontinence compared to those with pure SUI. After therapy, successful treatment of SUI was associated with greater improvement in PISQ-12 score (2.26 ± 3.24 versus 0.48 ± 3.76, p=0.0007), greater improvement in incontinence with sexual activity (0.45 ± 0.84 versus 0.01 ± 0.71, p=0.0002), and greater reduction in restriction in sexual activity related to fear of incontinence (0.32 ± 0.76 versus −0.06 ± 0.78, p=0.0008). Among those successfully treated for SUI, improvement in continence during sexual activity was greater in both the combined therapy group (p=0.019) and the behavioral group (p=0.02) compared to the pessary group. Conclusions Successful non-surgical treatment of SUI is associated with improvements in incontinence-specific measures of sexual function. Behavioral therapy may be preferred to pessary for treatment of SUI among women whose incontinence interferes with sexual function. PMID:21572534

  2. Factors Associated With Quality Of Life In Women Undergoing Surgery For Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Sirls, Larry T.; Tennstedt, Sharon; Albo, Mike; Chai, Toby; Kenton, Kim; Huang, Liyuan; Stoddard, Anne M; Arisco, Amy; Gormley, E. Ann

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the association of clinicodemographic factors with urinary incontinence (UI) related quality of life (QoL) in women having surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and to compare the incontinence-specific IIQ (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire) and the ICIQ (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire). Secondary objectives evaluated the contributions of incontinence severity and sexual function to QoL. Materials and Methods Baseline data from 597 women in the Trial of Mid Urethral Slings (TOMUS). Correlates of QoL tested included health status and history, type, severity and bother of UI, and sexual function. Results Lower QoL by both the IIQ and ICIQ included younger age, higher BMI, more SUI symptoms, and more severe and bothersome UI symptoms. Each measure identified factors associated with lower QoL not identified by the other (IIQ; Hispanic ethnicity, poor health status and more urge UI symptoms, and ICIQ; prior UI treatment and more UI episodes per day). Sexually active women had similar QoL but also increased incontinence episodes (IIQ and ICIQ) and more sexual dysfunction (IIQ only). Conclusion In women planning SUI surgery, QoL is associated with non-UI factors as well as with the type, severity and degree of bother from UI symptoms. Many factors are associated with QoL as measured by both IIQ and ICIQ. However more non-UI factors were associated with QoL when measured by the IIQ than by the ICIQ. More than one scale may be needed to evaluate QoL after SUI treatment. PMID:20952014

  3. Do Physical Therapy Interventions Affect Urinary Incontinence and Quality of Life in People with Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Monica; Melnick, Marsha; Allen, Diane D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) presents with many debilitating symptoms, including urinary incontinence (UI), that physical therapy (PT) may address; UI is widely prevalent, but PT management of symptoms lacks consensus. A meta-analysis of long-term nonsurgical and nonpharmaceutical treatment options may supply this deficiency. We analyzed the current evidence for effectiveness of PT to decrease UI and improve quality of life (QOL) in people with MS. Methods: An electronic search conducted through November 26, 2013, included the following search terms: incontinence, bladder dysfunction, urinary incontinence, multiple sclerosis, MS, physical therapy, physiotherapy, therapy, and rehabilitation. Criteria for inclusion were as follows: MS diagnosis, intervention involved PT for UI or bladder dysfunction, outcomes assessed QOL or UI, and at least a 4 of 10 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale or a 2b level of evidence. Outcomes were combined across studies, and effect sizes are depicted in forest plots. Results: Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Between-group analysis revealed statistically significant differences in incontinence episodes and QOL, but did not reach significance for functional control mechanisms (eg, electromyography data on strength of contraction, relaxation, and endurance). Incontinence leakage episodes and QOL participation improved within groups. Conclusions: Meta-analysis indicates support for PT for minimizing incontinence compared with pretreatment and affecting incontinence and QOL more than control in people with MS. Protocols were heterogeneous regarding duration and type of PT intervention and were applied in different types of MS. Further research may reveal the most effective combination and variety of PT interventions for people with MS. PMID:26300703

  4. Association of Urinary Tract Infection in Married Women Presenting with Urinary Incontinence in a Hospital based Population

    PubMed Central

    Eswara, Shilpalakshmiprasad; Yesudhason, Bineshlal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urinary incontinence (UI) is increasingly recognized as a significant health problem, which remains a hygienic as well as social problem. Women have higher risk of developing incontinence in their lifetime compared with men. Urinary tract infection can increase the incidence of incontinence. Present study was undertaken to assess the association of UTI in married women who presented with UI. Aim The present study was aimed to identify the patients (married women) with complaints of UI and determining its association with UTI; and to identify the causative organism for the UTI along with its antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. Materials and Methods This is a cross-sectional, non-randomized study of 107 married women with UI, who attended outpatient department in our hospital. Mid-stream urine (MSU) samples were collected from these patients with positive history of incontinence. Screening of urine for significant bacteriuria and culture to identify the etiological agents were performed followed by evaluation of their antimicrobial susceptibility profiles using Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Results Overall 25.2% of patients with incontinence had a positive urine culture. History of UTI was elicited in around 38.3% of patients, among which 15% had positive urine culture and 10.3% of the patients who did not have a history had positive culture. Escherichia coli was the commonest causative organism (66.6) causing UTI, followed by Enterococcus spp. (22.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.4%) and Proteus mirabilis (3.7%). The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern for Escherichia coli showed high sensitivity to Nitrofurantoin (94.4%) and high resistance to Ampicillin (94.4%). Conclusion Our study revealed one in every four incontinent patients had UTI and almost half of them suffered from previous episodes of UTI. Thus appropriate correction of the existing UTI can help in the treatment of UI. PMID:27134871

  5. [Sub-urethral sling in the treatment of female urinary incontinence: which? how?].

    PubMed

    Debodinance, P; Hermieu, J-F

    2010-10-01

    Review of the literature that formed the basis for drafting the guideline on the sub-uretral sling in the first-line surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence. Medline database query since the introduction of TVT on the questions of various chapters and sub-chapters of the present article. The use of tapes made of polypropylene monofilament exclusively, knitted, is recommended to the exclusion of any other material. Regarding the choice of procedure, the objective cure rate of transobturator and retro-pubic routes cannot be evaluated clearly because of vague evaluation criteria from one study to another. Without adequate clinical trials proving their efficacy and safety, the mini-bands can so far be recommended to treat female stress urinary incontinence. Moderate overweight does not affect the results of laying tape. In patients with severe obesity, surgery to correct obesity is even better than surgery for incontinence. Age is not a contra-indication. If the patient is young and nulliparous, it is reasonable to advise her to postpone surgery after her last pregnancy. In case of multiparous patient, the risk of vaginal delivery does not seem sufficient to suggest a cesarean section. To conclude, sub-urethral slings are the first-line surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder syndrome: current options and new targets for management.

    PubMed

    Elser, Denise M

    2012-05-01

    In the United States, office visits for women seeking treatment for urinary incontinence more than doubled between 1994 and 2000, from 1845 per 100 000 women. This review article addresses treatment options for 2 common types of incontinence in women: stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and detrusor overactivity (DO), commonly referred to as urge urinary incontinence (UUI). In the past, those with SUI typically faced limited treatment options, such as Kegel exercises, pessaries, or major surgery (Burch or Marshall-Marchetti-Krantz operations). However, treatment options for women also included anticholinergic medications, behavioral therapy, and implantable neuromodulation. In recent years, more options have become available. For women with SUI, a variety of minimally invasive synthetic midurethral sling approaches (eg, retropubic, transobturator, and single incision) and office-based procedures (eg, periurethral injection of bulking agents and radiofrequency collagen denaturation [Renessa®; Novasys Medical]) are now offered. More outpatient options will hopefully be available soon, including an inflatable, free-floating balloon to act as a shock absorber, and injection of muscle-derived stem cells into the periurethral tissue. Women with UUI now have targeted options, such as posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) and intravesical injections of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox®; Allergan, Inc.), in addition to nonoral systemic medications.

  7. Prevalence of urinary incontinence among community-dwelling adults receiving home care.

    PubMed

    Du Moulin, M F M T; Hamers, J P H; Ambergen, A W; Janssen, M A P; Halfens, R J G

    2008-12-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2005 to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with urinary incontinence (UI) in adults receiving home care. Of the 2,866 patients surveyed, 46% suffered from UI; 6.5% had stress, 16.6% had urge, 9% had mixed, and 17.6% had functional incontinence. No diagnosis regarding type of UI had been established in 50.2%. Factors associated with UI were advanced age, higher body mass index, and impaired mobility. UI is prevalent in older persons receiving home care, but the lack of diagnosis of type of UI in half of the participants surveyed impedes management of UI.

  8. Effectiveness of a pelvic floor muscle exercise program on urinary incontinence following childbirth.

    PubMed

    Haddow, Gaby; Watts, Robin; Robertson, Jeanette

    2005-05-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Objectives  The primary objective of this review was to determine, from the available evidence, the effectiveness of an antenatal and/or a post-natal program of pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) compared with usual care on preventing, reducing or resolving the incidence and severity of stress incontinence, urge incontinence or mixed stress and urge urinary incontinence following childbirth. Secondary objectives were included to examine the effectiveness of a PFME program on pelvic floor muscle strength and on encouraging adherence to an exercising program. TYPES OF STUDIES: Randomised controlled trials and non-randomised controlled trials were included in the review if, in relation to urinary incontinence, and/or adherence to a PFME program, and/or pelvic floor muscle strength, the following had been explored: • antenatal PFME compared with usual care; • post-natal PFME compared with usual care; • a PFME program compared with usual care. Usual care is commonly used to describe the care women normally receive from health professionals in the antenatal and/or post-natal period. In some cases usual care includes a standard information package given to all women attending the health service and in others it is advice about performing PFME. Participants included women who experienced a spontaneous onset of labour and who subsequently delivered at more than 20 weeks gestation either vaginally, both spontaneous and assisted, or by non-elective caesarean section. • women who delivered by elective caesarean section; • women experiencing post-partum overflow urinary incontinence. 1 Pelvic floor muscle exercises. 2 PFME instruction and a PFME program's components, such as educational materials, feedback (including biofeedback, e.g. information about strength of pelvic floor muscle contractions by various means) and number of PFME. • electrical stimulation of pelvic floor muscles; • vaginal cones; or • other adjunct therapies. In studies

  9. [Epidemiology and treatment for urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women].

    PubMed

    Starczewski, Andrzej; Brodowska, Agnieszka; Brodowski, Jacek

    2008-07-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is defined as uncontrolled urine leakage through an urethra. At present, the following types of UI can be specified: stress incontinence (SI), urge incontinence (UI), mixed incontinence (MI), overflow incontinence (OI) in which the bladder becomes too full because it cannot be fully emptied, and functional incontinence (FI). Incontinence is one of the most common chronic diseases in women and is found in 17-60% of the whole population. In most patients, SI is combined with pelvic organ prolapse. The basic risk factors mentioned as contributing to these two conditions are obstetrical past and gynaecological history and atrophic changes in the urogenital area. There are also a number of diseases related to the increase in intra-abdominal pressure, such as obesity chronic constipation and diseases associated with persistent cough. Other factors leading to pelvic organ prolapse include hard physical work, some professional sports, connective tissue disorders, neuropathy and disturbed innervation of the pelvic floor. To deal with stress incontinence (SI), conservative and surgical treatment is employed. In the first degree intensity, it is mainly physiotherapy, electrical stimulation of the pelvic floor muscles, lifestyle modification and reduction of body mass. When the SI symptoms are more severe, surgical treatment is usually preferred. From among many methods, these presently used are Burch and sling operations. On the other hand, surgical treatment for pelvic organ prolapse involves colpoperineoplasty with the use of polypropylene mesh (Prolift), colporrhaphy by double TOT approach method, median colporrhaphy, Cooper's ligament or sacrospinous ligament colpopexy, and attachment of the uterus to the sacrum. The results of surgical treatment depend on co-occurrence of risk factors, the surgical method chosen, the lapse of time from the surgery and the type of the applied biomedical material.

  10. Prevalence of commonly prescribed medications potentially contributing to urinary symptoms in a cohort of older patients seeking care for incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several medication classes may contribute to urinary symptoms in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of use of these medications in a clinical cohort of incontinent patients. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 390 new patients aged 60 years and older seeking care for incontinence in specialized outpatient geriatric incontinence clinics in Quebec, Canada. The use of oral estrogens, alpha-blocking agents, benzodiazepines, antidepressants, antipsychotics, ACE inhibitors, loop diuretics, NSAIDs, narcotics and calcium channel blockers was recorded from each patient’s medication profile. Lower urinary tract symptoms and the severity of incontinence were measured using standardized questionnaires including the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire. The type of incontinence was determined clinically by a physician specialized in incontinence. Co-morbidities were ascertained by self-report. Logistic regression analyses were used to detect factors associated with medication use, as well as relationships between specific medication classes and the type and severity of urinary symptoms. Results The prevalence of medications potentially contributing to lower urinary tract symptoms was 60.5%. Calcium channel blockers (21.8%), benzodiazepines (17.4%), other centrally active agents (16.4%), ACE inhibitors (14.4%) and estrogens (12.8%) were most frequently consumed. Only polypharmacy (OR = 4.9, 95% CI = 3.1-7.9), was associated with medication use contributing to incontinence in analyses adjusted for age, sex, and multimorbidity. No associations were detected between specific medication classes and the type or severity of urinary symptoms in this cohort. Conclusion The prevalence of use of medications potentially causing urinary symptoms is high among incontinent older adults. More research is needed to determine whether de-prescribing these medications results in improved urinary symptoms

  11. [Design of a lithium-ion battery recharging circuit used in wireless electrical stimulation apparatus for urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-yuan; Hu, Chao; Yao, Yong; Wang, Hai-bin

    2008-09-01

    We introduce in this paper a novel design of the lithium-ion battery automatically-charging circuit used in portable wireless electronic stimulation therapeutic apparatus for urinary incontinence, including its working principles, structure and characteristic.

  12. Effect of pregnancy and delivery on urinary incontinence after the midurethral sling procedure.

    PubMed

    Cavkaytar, Sabri; Kokanali, Mahmut Kuntay; Ozer, Irfan; Erkilinc, Selcuk; Aksakal, Orhan Seyfi; Doganay, Melike

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the continence status and to reveal the optimal delivery mode of women who had an infant after application of a midurethral sling to treat stress urinary incontinence. Between January 2007 and January 2013, 12 women who delivered an infant after application of a midurethral sling were detected and demographic data, type of MUS, interval between MUS and delivery, mode of delivery, birth weight of the newborn, complications during pregnancy, and continence status after delivery were collected. Between 2000 and 2014, in 14 articles listed in Pubmed, the data of 54 patients who had delivered after successful midurethral sling application were included. Postpartum recurrence of urinary incontinence was evaluated according to delivery type in 54 patients. Mean age of 12 patients at the time of MUS was 33.1 ± 4.3 years old and the interval between MUS procedure and pregnancy was 30.2 ± 14.2 months. Four patients had a transvaginal tape (TVT; 33.3%) and 8 had transobturator tape (TOT) procedure (66.7%) and mean follow-up after MUS surgery was 52 ± 12.3 months. Seven women had cesarean section (CS; 58.3%) and 5 women delivered vaginally (41.7%). Nine women were continent during pregnancy (75%) and 10 were continent after delivery (83.3%). Among 54 women who were included in the review, 28 underwent CS (51.9%), 26 women delivered vaginally (48.1%), and 11 women had postpartum incontinence (20.3%). In the case of postpartum urinary incontinence, there was no statistically significant difference between the CS and vaginal delivery groups (14.3 vs 26.9% respectively, p = 0.32). In logistic regression, incontinence during pregnancy was a risk factor for postpartum incontinence (OR:5.5; 95% CI: 1.1-27.6, p = 0.036). Risk of postpartum SUI recurrence in women who underwent application of midurethral slings seems to be similar independent of delivery mode and incontinence during pregnancy may be a risk factor for postpartum incontinence.

  13. Evaluating the results of stress urinary incontinence surgery with objective and subjective outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Diez-Itza, I; Espuña-Pons, M

    2014-09-01

    To assess the outcomes of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) surgery using objective and subjective measures in women with pure SUI and mixed urinary incontinence (MUI). The degree of correlation between the different outcome measures was also evaluated for both groups. A multicentre prospective cohort study of women who underwent surgery for SUI. A standardized cough stress test was used as the objective outcome measure, and specific items of the Epidemiology of Prolapse and Incontinence Questionnaire were used as the subjective outcome measure. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF) and the Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) questionnaires were used for global assessment. Kappa test was used to measure the degree of correlation between the outcome measures. The participants were categorized into two groups before surgery: pure SUI (n=116) and MUI (n=161). Six months after surgery, the cure rate of the SUI component was high in both groups according to the objective and subjective outcome measures. Global assessment showed lower cure rates. The degree of agreement between objective and subjective outcome measures was moderate (kappa 0.541, p<0.001) for women with pure SUI, and fair (kappa 0.377, p<0.001) for women with MUI. Correlation between the change in ICIQ-UI SF score (pre to post surgery) and the degree of satisfaction (PGI-I) was significant (p<0.01) for both the pure SUI group (0.43) and the MUI group (0.48). Both objective and subjective cure rates are high for women with pure SUI and MUI following SUI surgery in Spain. The degree of agreement between different outcome measures varies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Value of pudendal nerve stimulation for predicting the stress urinary incontinence following pelvic prolapse surgery].

    PubMed

    Wang, A P; Song, J; Lyu, X L; Chen, L M; Zhong, X L; Song, Y F

    2016-06-25

    To seek the predictive value of pudendal nerve function that need preventive anti-incontinence surgery at the same time following pelvic prolapse surgery in severe pelvic organ prolapse (POP) patients. Seventy women completed this study from January 2014 to June 2015 in Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command, dividing into four groups: POP with or without coexisting occult stress urinary incontinence (OSUI) in preoperation, women with persistent stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in postoperation, women without SUI in postoperation. The pudendal nerve function in preoperation was measured by using Solar Urodynamic Neuro Module, including pudendal nerve terminal motor latency (PNTML), and amplitude. There were statistical significance on bilateral PNTML between POP coexisting OSUI group and only severe POP group [(2.62±0.23) versus (2.40±0.26) ms in right of PNTML, (2.55± 0.21) versus (2.37 ±0.30) ms in left of PNTML; all P<0.05], but no statistical significance on bilateral amplitude (P>0.05). Compared de novo SUI group with POP group in postoperation, de novo SUI group's right of PNTML was significantly increased [(2.74±0.16) versus (2.47±0.26) ms; P< 0.05]; and the right of PNTML was extending 2.5 standard deviation at least compared with the health's [(2.10±0.20) ms]. The PNTML of pudendal nerve of POP coexisting OSUI is severe than only severe POP, the velocity of nerve conduction is slowing, and PNTML extension has a predictive value for postoperative urinary incontinence. When the right of PNTML of preoperative POP increased by at least 2.5 standard deviations than health's, the risk of SUI postoperative strongly increased, and a anti-incontinence surgery at the same time following pelvic prolapse surgery should be adviced.

  15. Effect of belly dancing on urinary incontinence-related muscles and vaginal pressure in middle-aged women

    PubMed Central

    An, So-Young; Kim, Seung-Suk; Han, Gunsoo

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effect of belly dancing on the urinary incontinence-related muscles and vaginal pressure in middle-aged women to provide fundamental data for establishing an effective training program focusing on mitigating and preventing urinary incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects included 24 middle-aged women, who have been diagnosed with urinary incontinence. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, viz. the experimental group (N=12) and control group (N=12). The experimental group underwent a belly dancing program focusing on pelvis moves. [Results] In the experimental group, the urinary incontinence-related muscle strength and vaginal pressure were increased, while the control group showed no significant change. [Conclusion] Belly dancing focusing on pelvis moves had a positive effect on the urinary incontinence-related muscle strength and vaginal pressure, suggesting that a recreational dance program focusing on pelvic exercise can be used to prevent and relieve the symptoms of urinary incontinence as a non-surgical treatment. PMID:28356615

  16. The artificial urinary sphincter and male sling for postprostatectomy incontinence: Which patient should get which procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Dobberfuhl, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the most efficacious treatment for postprostatectomy incontinence. The ideal surgical approach depends on a variety of patient factors including history of prior incontinence surgery or radiation treatment, bladder contractility, severity of leakage, and patient expectations. Most patients choose to avoid a mechanical device, opting for the male sling over the artificial urinary sphincter. The modern male sling has continued to evolve with respect to device design and surgical technique. Various types of slings address sphincteric incompetence via different mechanisms of action. The recommended surgery, however, must be individualized to the patient based on degree of incontinence, detrusor contractility, and urethral compliance. A thorough urodynamic evaluation is indicated for the majority of patients, and the recommendation for an artificial urinary sphincter, a transobturator sling, or a quadratic sling will depend on urodynamic findings and the patient's particular preference. As advancements in this field evolve, and our understanding of the pathophysiology of incontinence and mechanisms of various devices improves, we expect to see continued evolution in device design. PMID:26966721

  17. [Treatment of Urinary incontinence associated with genital prolapse: Clinical practrice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Cortesse, A; Cardot, V; Basset, V; Le Normand, L; Donon, L

    2016-07-01

    Prolapse and urinary incontinence are frequently associated. Patente (or proven) stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is defined by a leakage of urine that occurs with coughing or Valsalva, in the absence of any prolapse reduction manipulation. Masked urinary incontinence results in leakage of urine occurring during reduction of prolapse during the clinical examination in a patient who does not describe incontinence symptoms at baseline. The purpose of this chapter is to consider on the issue of systematic support or not of urinary incontinence, patent or hidden, during the cure of pelvic organs prolapse by abdominal or vaginal approach. This work is based on an systematic review of the literature (PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library, Cochrane database of systematic reviews, EMBASE) for meta-analyzes, randomized trials, registries, literature reviews, controlled studies and major not controlled studies, published on the subject. Its implementation has followed the methodology of the HAS on the recommendations for clinical practice, with a scientific argument (with the level of evidence, NP) and a recommendation grade (A, B, C, and professional agreement). In case of patent IUE, concomitant treatment of prolapse and SUI reduces the risk of postoperative SUI. However, the isolated treatment of prolapse can treat up to 30% of preoperative SUI. Concomitant treatment of SUI exposed to a specific overactive bladder and dysuria morbidity. The presence of a hidden IUE represents a risk of postoperative SUI, but there is no clinical or urodynamic test to predict individually the risk of postoperative SUI. Moreover, the isolated treatment of prolapse can treat up to 60% of the masked SUI. Concomitant treatment of the hidden IUE therefore exposes again to overtreatment and a specific overactive bladder and dysuria morbidity. In case of overt or hidden urinary incontinence, concomitant treatment of SUI and prolapse reduces the risk of postoperative SUI but exposes to a specific

  18. Erbium: YAG Laser Incision of Urethral Structures for Treatment of Urinary Incontinence After Prostate Cancer Spray

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    devoted to in vivo animal studies comparing the wound healingafter Erbium and Holmium laser incision of the urethra and bladder neck. Further...urinary incontinence. Conventional treatments for stricture (including balloon dilation, cold knife incision, electrocautery, and Holmium laser incision...urethral tissue with a thermal damage zone of only 10-20 µm. This thermal damage zone was much less than that of the Holmium laser which produced 300 µm of

  19. [Acupoints selection rules analysis of ancient acupuncture for urinary incontinence based on data mining technology].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tan, Zhigao; Cao, Juanshu; Gong, Houwu; Qin, Zuoai; Zhong, Feng; Cao, Yue; Wei, Yanrong

    2015-12-01

    Based on ancient literature of acupuncture in Canon of Chinese Medicine (4th edition), the articles regarding acupuncture for urinary incontinence were retrieved and collected to establish a database. By Weka data mining software, the multi-level association rules analysis method was applied to analyze the acupoints selection characteristics and rules of ancient acupuncture for treatment of urinary incontinence. Totally 356 articles of acupuncture for urinary incontinence were collected, involving 41 acupoints with a total frequency of 364. As a result, (1) the acupoints in the yin-meridian of hand and foot were highly valued, as the frequency of acupoints in yin-meridians was 2.6 times than that in yang-meridians, and the frequency of acupoints selected was the most in the liver meridian of foot-jueyin; (2) the acupoints in bladder meridian of foot-taiyang were also highly valued, and among three yang-meridians of foot, the frequency of acupoints in the bladder meridian of foot-taiyang was 54, accounting for 65.85% (54/82); (3) more acupoints selected were located in the lower limbs and abdomen; (4) specific acupoints in above meridians were mostly selected, presenting 73.2% (30/41) to the ratio of number and 79.4% (289/364) to the frequency, respectively; (5) Zhongji (CV 3), the front-mu point of bladder meridian, was seldom selected in the ancient acupuncture literature, which was different from modern literature reports. The results show that urinary incontinence belongs to external genitalia diseases, which should be treated from yin, indicating more yin-meridians be used and special acupoints be focused on. It is essential to focus inheritance and innovation in TCM clinical treatment, and applying data mining technology to ancient literature of acupuncture could provide classic theory basis for TCM clinical treatment.

  20. Bariatric surgery improves urinary incontinence but not anorectal function in obese women.

    PubMed

    Scozzari, Gitana; Rebecchi, Fabrizio; Giaccone, Claudio; Chiaro, Paolo; Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Morino, Mario

    2013-07-01

    While the association between obesity and urinary incontinence (UI) in women has been clearly documented, the relationship with anal incontinence (AI) is less well defined; moreover, while bariatric surgery has been shown to improve UI, its effect on AI is still unclear. A total of 32 obese women were studied by means of PFDI-20 and PFIQ-7 questionnaires and anorectal manometry before and after bariatric surgery and compared with 71 non-obese women. Obese women showed worse overall questionnaire results (OR 5.18 for PFDI-20 and 2.66 for PFIQ-7). Whereas obese women showed worse results for urinary sub-items and a higher urge UI incidence (43.8 vs 18.3 %, p = 0.013), they did not show worsening in colorecto-anal symptoms. Post-operatively, median PFDI-20 total score did not change (24.2 vs 26.6, p = ns), while there was an improvement in urinary score (14.6 vs 8.3, p < 0.001); median PFIQ-7 improved (4.8 vs 0.0, p = 0.044), but while the urinary score improved (2.4 vs 0.0, p = 0.033), the colorecto-anal score did not change significantly. Although after surgery urge UI decreased from 43.8 to 15.6 % (p = 0.029), the incidence of any AI increased from 28.1 to 40.6 % (p = ns) and flatus incontinence increased from 18.8 to 37.5 % (p = ns). Anorectal manometry did not show significant changes after surgery. Obese women had worse questionnaire results, but while showing a higher incidence of UI, they did not experience anorectal function worsening. After bariatric surgery, there was a slight improvement in PFD symptoms related to UI, but anorectal function did not change significantly and flatus incontinence increased.

  1. Jacquet erosive diaper dermatitis in a young girl with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Hara, M; Watanabe, M; Tagami, H

    1991-06-01

    We report a case of Jacquet erosive diaper dermatitis (dermatitis syphiloides posterosiva) in a 9-year-old girl suffering from urinary incontinence due to an ectopic opening of a left double ureter into the vaginal vestibule. The toilet paper that she used as an absorbent was thought to be one of the factors causing the eruption. The lesions cleared with topical application of a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory ointment and zinc oxide ointment, in conjunction with the use of sanitary napkins.

  2. Vaginal Calculus in a Woman With Mixed Urinary Incontinence and Vaginal Mesh Exposure.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, William D; Rabban, Joseph T; Korn, Abner P

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal calculi are extremely rare and are most commonly encountered in the setting of an urethrovaginal or vesicovaginal fistula. We present a case of a 72-year-old woman with mixed urinary incontinence and vaginal mesh exposure incidentally found to have a large vaginal calculus. We removed the calculus surgically and analyzed the components. Results demonstrated the presence of ammonium-magnesium phosphate hexahydrate and carbonate apatite.

  3. Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence in Neurological Patients With an Injectable Elastomer Prosthesis: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Citeri, Marco; Zanollo, Lucia; Guerrer, Chiara; Rizzato, Luigi; Frediani, Luca; Iselin, Christophe; Spinelli, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Many treatment options for stress urinary incontinence are difficult to apply to neurological patients. Urolastic is a new agent that is primarily indicated for women with mild stress urinary incontinence or men after prostate surgery. In this report, we present a series of 5 cases describing the first use of Urolastic to treat neurological patients. All patients were evaluated with a voiding diary and the use of auxiliary devices as the main indicators of continence. The median operative time was 30.8 minutes, and no complications were observed. Of the 5 patients, 4 reported improved incontinence: 2 switched from diapers to small pads, while the other 2 patients were able to discontinue urinary condom use. The only instance of treatment failure occurred in a patient with a low-compliance bladder. The advantages of this procedure appear to include a soft-cuff effect, reversibility, and minimal invasiveness. However, a future randomized study would be necessary to validate this treatment option. PMID:28361514

  4. Selected determinants of quality of life in women with urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Szymona-Pałkowska, Katarzyna; Kraczkowski, Janusz J.; Janowski, Konrad; Steuden, Stanisława; Adamczuk, Jolanta; Robak, Jacek M.; Bakalczuk, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is one of the most common diseases in women. It involves uncontrolled leaking of urine through the urethra. UI incidence depends on age and in certain age groups it can affect up to 60% of the female population. The symptoms can be persistent and due to their embarrassing nature they can lead to significant deterioration of quality of life and psychological functioning. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the quality of life and selected aspects of functioning. Seventy female outpatients of a public clinic in Nałęczów, Poland, were examined, and the following methods were used: the Urinary Incontinence Life Quality Scale (Szymona-Pałkowska, Kraczkowski), Disease-Related Appraisal Scale (Janowski, Steuden), Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (Endler, Parker), Disease-Related Social Support Scale (Brachowicz, Janowski, Sadowska), and the Knowledge Appraisal Scale for Urinary Incontinence (Szymona-Pałkowska, Kraczkowski). The obtained results suggest that the strongest predictors for the quality of life with UI would be: perception of the disease as an injustice and a challenge (a reverse relationship) and an avoidance-oriented style of coping with stress through companionship seeking (a positive relationship). The duration of the disease and the level of related knowledge proved to be crucial in the analysis of one dimension, i.e. distance to the symptoms. PMID:26327835

  5. Path analysis for adherence to pelvic floor muscle exercise among women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Yueh; Tzeng, Ya-Ling

    2009-06-01

    This study developed and tested the accuracy of a model designed to predict adherence to a pelvic floor muscle exercise regimen by Taiwanese women with urinary incontinence. The sample was composed of 106 women treated for urinary incontinence at urban hospitals in central and northern Taiwan from April 2000 to March 2003. All participants had practiced prescribed pelvic floor muscle exercises for at least 6 weeks at the time they completed study measures, which included adherence to pelvic floor muscle exercise, self-efficacy for the exercise, knowledge of the exercise, attitudes toward the exercise, dyadic cohesion, perceived benefits of the exercise, and severity of urine loss. After stepwise multiple regression analysis, a path analysis was conducted, with significant paths retained as modifiers. Self-efficacy for pelvic floor muscle exercise strongly and directly affected adherence to the exercise regimen. Attitudes toward the exercise, dyadic cohesion, and perceived benefits of the exercise affected adherence when mediated by self-efficacy for pelvic floor muscle exercise. Severity of urine loss also directly affected adherence. Exercise knowledge affected neither self-efficacy nor adherence. The model fit the data and accounted for 40% of adherence variance. Findings affirm the significant role of self-efficacy in predicting adherence to pelvic floor muscle exercise. Thus, self-efficacy for exercise can be an indicator for nurses to tailor exercise-training programs for women with urinary incontinence. Nurses can use the study findings to develop interventions to increase women's adherence to the exercise.

  6. A new bulking agent (polyacrylamide hydrogel) for treating stress urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Lose, Gunnar; Mouritsen, Lone; Nielsen, John Bugge

    2006-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a transurethral injection with polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAHG) for treating stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women. The study comprised 17 women with pure SUI and eight with mixed incontinence (age range 35-84 years). Between November 2001 and November 2003, the women were injected into the urethral wall with a PAHG (Aquamid, Contura International A/S, Denmark), a homogenous, highly biocompatible, atoxic, nonresorbable sterile watery gel consisting of approximately 2.5% cross-linked polyacrylamide and 97.5% nonpyrogenic water. The women were followed prospectively (assessed at 1, 3 and 12 months after treatment) and their clinical outcome documented. Four women did not complete the study, and of the remainder, eight (38%) were subjectively dry and a further nine (43%) improved. Objectively, urine leakage/24 h was decreased by 93% and the number of incontinence episodes by 87%. Quality-of-life measures improved significantly in all domains other than general health perception. There were no significant changes of urodynamic variables. Treatment-related adverse events were recorded in 16 women. Urinary tract infection (10 cases) and urinary retention (five cases) were most common. There were no injection site reactions. PAGH seems to be a promising new bulking agent for the treatment of SUI.

  7. Acupuncture for urinary incontinence after stroke: a protocol for systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongren; Yu, Nannan; Yue, Jinhuan; Zhang, Qinhong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study, which will include randomised controlled trials (RCTs), is to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for patients with stroke and urinary incontinence. Methods and analysis RCTs will be searched electronically in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to present. Manual retrieval will also be conducted. RCTs will be included if acupuncture was evaluated as the sole or adjunct treatment for patients with stroke and urinary incontinence. The primary outcome will be measured by using the pad-weighing test. The secondary outcomes will include urination diary, bladder capacity, clinical symptom scores, the number of patients healed completely in trial follow-up period and adverse events. The study selection, data extraction and evaluation of study quality will be performed independently by two researchers. The methodological quality of the included trials will be assessed by using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) checklist. Dissemination This systematic review will assess the current evidence of acupuncture treatment for patients with stroke and urinary incontinence. The findings of this study will be published through a peer-reviewed journal and presented at a relevant conference. Trial registration number CRD42014015611. PMID:26908510

  8. [Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses for testing validity and reliability of the Chinese language questionnaire for urinary incontinence diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Li, C Y; Zhu, L; Lang, J H; Xu, T; Shi, X W

    2016-05-25

    To translate questionnaire for urinary incontinence diagnosis (QUID) into Chinese and to test its reliability and validity. The English version of QUID was translated into Chinese. The clinaical data of 95 patinents with urinary incontinence who were test by urinary dynamic study in Peking Union Medical College Hospital from May 2014 to May 2015 were analyzed prospectively. The reliability of QUID was evaluated by completing QUID twice. The validity of QUID was evaluated by the standard of urinary dynamic study. Internal consistency (Cronbach α) of the items that pertained to stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and to urge urinary incontinence (UUI) were 0.91 and 0.89, respectively. Test-retest reliability (Kappa) was 0.795 and criterion validity (Kappa) was 0.62. Sensitivity and specificity were 83% (43/52) and 86% (37/43), respectively, for SUI, and 72% (13/18) and 86% (66/77), respectively, for UUI. QUID has good reliability and validity. It could be used in Chinese urinary incontinence women.

  9. [Effectiveness of liberal vs. conservative episiotomy in vaginal delivery with reference to preventing urinary and fecal incontinence: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Schlömer, Gabriele; Gross, Mechthild; Meyer, Gabriele

    2003-01-01

    Episiotomy is the most common surgical intervention in the world. In Europe the rate of episiotomy is approximately 30% (23). Reasons for this intervention are the reduction of risk for tears and incontinence. To assess the effects of restricted episiotomy in the prevention of urinary and faecal incontinence. Medline search for 1990-7/2002, Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 2002), GEROLIT and SOMED and the Internet. RCTs analysing restrictive or non-restrictive episiotomy were included if they had comprehensive randomisation, follow-up and exclusion of selection bias. Cohort studies were assessed to evaluate the risk of developing faecal incontinence. If possible, data were pooled. Included were all pregnant women with vaginal delivery. Intervention/exposition: Restrictive vs. liberal episiotomy (median, lateral or mediolateral). Incontinence rate (urine and stool) 3 months and 3 years post partum. All included randomised controlled studies met the criteria above, one randomised controlled study used blinded assessment of outcome parameter. Lots of follow-up was 33% (after 3 years). Cohort studies partly were retrospective. 2 randomised controlled studies measuring urinary incontinence were included. The rate for episiotomy was 60% in the intervention group with liberal episiotomy and 27% in the restricted group. No difference could be found in groups measuring urinary incontinence (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.83-1.20). Only two included cohort studies measured the effect of episiotomy on faecal incontinence. The chance of developing faecal incontinence in association with episiotomy was more than threefold (OR = 3.64, 95% CI 2.15-6.14). Restrictive episiotomy neither effects the development of urinary incontinence of post partum women (RR 0.98 95%, CI 0.83-1.20) three months and three years after vaginal delivery, nor the risk for trauma. Women without episiotomy suffer significantly less from faecal incontinence (OR = 3.6). Further investigation is required to measure the effect

  10. Urinary incontinence and risk of functional decline in older women: data from the Norwegian HUNT-study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The main objective of the present study was to determine whether UI is an independent predictor of ADL decline and IADL decline in elderly women. We also aimed to find out whether incontinent subjects were at higher risk of needing help from formal home care or home nursing care during 11 year follow-up. Methods A prospective cohort study conducted as part of the North-Trøndelag Health Study 2 and 3. Women aged 70–80 years when participating in the HUNT 2 study, who also participated in the HUNT 3 study, were included in this study. Analyses on self-reported urinary incontinence at baseline and functional decline during a11-year period were performed for incontinent and continent subjects. Results Baseline prevalence of urinary incontinence was 24%. At on average eleven year follow up, logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between incontinence and decline in activities of daily living (ADL) (OR =2.37, 95% CI =1.01-5.58) (P=0.04). No association between urinary incontinence and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) in incontinent women compared with continent women was found (OR=1.18, CI=.75-1.86) (P=.46). Data were adjusted for ADL, IADL and co morbid conditions at baseline. No significant differences in need of more help from formal home care and home nursing care between continent and incontinent women were found after 11 years of follow-up. Conclusions Urinary incontinence is an important factor associated with functional decline in women aged 70–80 years living in their own homes. At eleven years of follow up, no significant differences in need of more help from formal home care and home nursing care between continent and incontinent women were found. PMID:23678851

  11. Lower Urinary Tract Urological Abnormalities and Urodynamic Findings of Physiological Urinary Incontinence Versus Non-mono Symptomatic Nocturnal Enuresis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although 98% of children attain daytime bladder control by three years of age, urinary incontinence is regarded physiological up to the fifth year of life. Objectives: This study aimed to assess whether lower urinary tract urological abnormalities and abnormal urodynamic findings are infrequent in children with physiological urinary incontinence in contrast to those with non-monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (NMNE). Patients and Methods: During a three-year period (2007-2009), 66 neurologically normal children including 51 children (34 girls, 17 boys) older than five years of age with NMNE and intermittent daytime incontinence, and 15 children with physiological urinary incontinence (eight girls and seven boys) aged four to five years of age without any known urological abnormalities were enrolled in the study. Patients with neurologic deficits or known urological anomalies were excluded from the study. Kidney-bladder ultrasonography, voiding cystourethrography (VCUG), and urodynamic studies were performed to evaluate the anatomy of urinary tract and bladder function. Results: Urinary tract infection was found in 23 (34.8%) children, 17 (33.3%) and 6 (40%) patients with NMNE and physiological urinary incontinence, respectively. Out of 48 patients who underwent VCUG, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was found in seven and eight children younger and older than five years of age, respectively. Abnormal urodynamic findings were reported in 5 (62.5%) of eight children younger than five-year-old, and 14 (63.6%) of 22 patients older than 5-year-old. Conclusions: VUR might be more frequent in children with physiological urinary incontinence than the normal population, and might be as common as NMNE with intermittent daytime incontinence. PMID:24783173

  12. [Analysis of complications of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure for surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Broś, Magdalena; Czajkowski, Krzysztof; Kornacki, Piotr

    2003-09-01

    The most common types of urinary incontinence in women are stress, urge and mixed incontinence. Stress urinary incontinence may be caused by an urethral hypermobility and internal sphincter deficiency (ISD). There are over 100 different surgical procedure for the treatment of female stress incontinence. Tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) is a new anti-incontinence surgical technique which was first described by Ulmsten in 1996. The aim of the study was to evaluate the complications of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) for the surgical treatment of female stress incontinence. The study group was consisted of 162 women, aged 32-84. All patients had a basic evaluation that included a history, frequency/volume chart, questionnaire of micturition (self-made), physical examination, stress test, Bonney test, urinalysis and bacterial culture of urine. Women with mixed urinary incontinence and who underwent surgical treatment of SUI in the past had been done urodynamic investigation. The operation was carried out under epidural, subarachnoid and general anesthesia. The TVT procedure was performed as described by Ulmsten. The follow-up was done after 1 day, 1 and 3 and 6 months since the operation. Among complications related to the procedure were 11 cases of cystotomy, 5 cases of urinary retention requiring four days catheterization, 3 cases of bleeding from the vagina, 14 cases of detrusor instability de novo. In 4 cases occurred postoperative obstinate pain. In 4 cases occurred recurrent urinary tract infection. None complication required invasive treatment. No evidence of defect healing or rejection of the tape was found. We conclude that the TVT procedure is safe method of the surgical treatment of urinary stress incontinence associated with a low complications.

  13. Systematic review of the management of incontinence and promotion of continence in older people in care homes: descriptive studies with urinary incontinence as primary focus.

    PubMed

    Roe, Brenda; Flanagan, Lisa; Jack, Barbara; Barrett, James; Chung, Alan; Shaw, Christine; Williams, Kate

    2011-02-01

    This is a review of descriptive studies with incontinence as the primary focus in older people in care homes. Incontinence is prevalent among residents of care home populations. MEDLINE and CINAHL were searched from 1996 to 2007 using the highly sensitive search strings of the Cochrane Incontinence Review Group for urinary and faecal incontinence including all research designs. Search strings were modified to enhance selectiveness for care homes and older people and exclude studies involving surgical or pharmacological interventions. Searching of reference sections from identified studies was also used to supplement electronic searches. The Cochrane Library was searched for relevant systematic reviews to locate relevant studies from those included or excluded from reviews. The search was limited to English-language publications. A systematic review of studies on the management of incontinence, promotion of continence or maintenance of continence in care homes was conducted in 2007-2009. This is a report of descriptive studies. Results. Ten studies were identified that reported on prevalence and incidence of incontinence (urinary with or without faecal), policies, assessment, documentation, management or economic evaluation of its management. Use of incontinence pads and toileting programmes comprised the most common management approaches used. No studies were identified that attempted to maintain continence of residents in care homes. Studies on maintaining continence and identifying components of toileting programmes that are successful in managing or preventing incontinence and promoting continence in residents of care home populations along with their economic evaluation are warranted. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Urinary Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction After Robotic Versus Open Radical Prostatectomy: A Prospective, Controlled, Nonrandomised Trial.

    PubMed

    Haglind, Eva; Carlsson, Stefan; Stranne, Johan; Wallerstedt, Anna; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Thorsteinsdottir, Thordis; Lagerkvist, Mikael; Damber, Jan-Erik; Bjartell, Anders; Hugosson, Jonas; Wiklund, Peter; Steineck, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) has become widely used without high-grade evidence of superiority regarding long-term clinical outcomes compared with open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP), the gold standard. To compare patient-reported urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction 12 mo after RALP or RRP. This was a prospective, controlled, nonrandomised trial of patients undergoing prostatectomy in 14 centres using RALP or RRP. Clinical-record forms and validated patient questionnaires at baseline and 12 mo after surgery were collected. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with logistic regression and adjusted for possible confounders. The primary end point was urinary incontinence (change of pad less than once in 24h vs one time or more per 24h) at 12 mo. Secondary end points were erectile dysfunction at 12 mo and positive surgical margins. Of 2625 eligible men, 2431 (93%) could be evaluated for the primary end point. At 12 mo after RALP, 366 men (21.3%) were incontinent, as were 144 (20.2%) after RRP. The adjusted OR was 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87-1.34). Erectile dysfunction was observed in 1200 men (70.4%) 12 mo after RALP and 531 (74.7%) after RRP. The adjusted OR was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.66-0.98). The frequency of positive surgical margins did not differ significantly between groups: 21.8% in the RALP group and 20.9% in the RRP group (adjusted OR: 1.09; 95% CI, 0.87-1.35). The nonrandomised design is a limitation. In a Swedish setting, RALP for prostate cancer was modestly beneficial in preserving erectile function compared with RRP, without a statistically significant difference regarding urinary incontinence or surgical margins. We compared patient-reported urinary incontinence after prostatectomy with two types of surgical technique. There was no statistically significant improvement in the rate of urinary leakage, but there was a small improvement regarding erectile function after robot-assisted operation. Copyright

  15. The Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence Diagnosis (QUID): Validity and Responsiveness to Change in Women Undergoing Non-Surgical Therapies for Treatment of Stress Predominant Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Catherine S.; Rahn, David D.; Nygaard, Ingrid E.; Barber, Matthew D.; Nager, Charles W.; Kenton, Kimberly S.; Siddiqui, Nazema Y.; Abel, Robert B.; Spino, Cathie; Richter, Holly E.

    2009-01-01

    Aims The Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence Diagnosis (QUID), a 6-item urinary incontinence (UI) symptom questionnaire, was developed and validated to distinguish stress and urge UI. This study’s objective was to evaluate QUID validity and responsiveness when used as a clinical trial outcome measure. Methods Participants enrolled in a multi-center trial of non-surgical therapy (continence pessary, pelvic floor muscle training or combined) for stress-predominant UI completed baseline and 3-month diaries, the Urinary Distress Inventory (UDI) and QUID. Data from all treatment groups were pooled. QUID internal consistency (Cronbach’s α) and convergent/discriminant validity (Pearson correlations) were evaluated. Responsiveness to change was assessed with 3-month score outcomes and distribution-based measurements. Results 444 women (mean age 50) were enrolled with stress (N=200) and mixed (N=244) UI; 344 had 3-month data. Baseline QUID Stress and Urge scores (both scaled 0-15, larger values indicating worse UI) were 8.4 ± 3.2 and 4.5 ± 3.3, respectively. Internal consistency of QUID Total, Stress and Urge scores was 0.75, 0.64 and 0.87, respectively. QUID Stress scores correlated moderately with UDI-Stress scores (r=0.68, p<0.0001) and diary stress UI episodes (r=0.41, p<0.0001). QUID Urge scores correlated moderately with UDI-Irritative scores (r=0.68, p<0.0001) and diary urge UI episodes (r=0.45, p<0.0001). 3-month QUID Stress and Urge scores improved (4.1 ± 3.4 and 2.2 ± 2.7, both p<0.0001). QUID Stress score Effect Size (1.3) and Standardized Response Mean (1.2) suggested a large change after therapy. Conclusion The QUID has acceptable psychometric characteristics and may be used as a UI outcome measure in clinical trials. PMID:19787711

  16. A short form of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12).

    PubMed

    Rogers, Rebecca G; Coates, Kimberly W; Kammerer-Doak, Dorothy; Khalsa, Satkirin; Qualls, Clifford

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop the short form of a condition-specific, reliable, validated and self-administered instrument to evaluate sexual function in women with pelvic organ prolapse and/or urinary incontinence. The Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire -12 (PISQ-12) was developed from the data of 99 of 182 women surveyed to create the long form (PISQ-31). An additional 46 patients were recruited for further validation. All subsets regression analysis identified 12 items likely to predict PISQ-31 scores. Short form scores underwent correlation analysis with long form, Incontinence Impact Questionnaire - 7 (IIQ-7), Sexual History Form -12 (SHF-12) and Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) scores. Test-retest reliability was checked with a subset of 20 patients. All subsets regression analysis with R>0.92 identified 12 items that predicted PISQ-31 scores. Short form scores were highly correlated with long form scores ( R=0.75-0.95). Correlations of the PISQ-12 with SHF-12 ( R=-0.66 and -0.68) and IIQ-7 ( R=-0.38 and -0.54) scores were similar to correlation of the PISQ-31 with these other measures. Reliability was moderate to high, with weighted kappa values from 0.56 to 0.93. PISQ-12 scores were lower in patients with low sexual function as measured on the SHF-12 ( P <0.001), and lower in women with depression as measured on the SQ ( P <0.001). The PISQ-12 is a validated and reliable short form that evaluates sexual function in women with urinary incontinence and/or pelvic organ prolapse and predicts PISQ-31 scores. It is able to distinguish women with poor sexual function as measured on the SHF-12.

  17. Caffeine intake and its association with urinary incontinence in United States men: results from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2005-2006 and 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Davis, Nicole J; Vaughan, Camille P; Johnson, Theodore M; Goode, Patricia S; Burgio, Kathryn L; Redden, David T; Markland, Alayne D

    2013-06-01

    Epidemiological studies in women have revealed an association between caffeine intake and urinary incontinence, although evidence among men is limited. Therefore, we evaluated the association between caffeine intake and urinary incontinence in United States men. Data were used from male NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys) 2005-2006 and 2007-2008 participants. Urinary incontinence was defined using a standard questionnaire with Incontinence Severity Index scores 3 or greater categorized as moderate to severe. Structured dietary recall was used to determine caffeine consumption (mg per day), water intake (gm per day) and total dietary moisture (gm per day). Stepwise multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the association between caffeine intake at or above the 75th and 90th percentiles and moderate to severe urinary incontinence, controlling for potential confounders, urinary incontinence risk factors and prostate conditions in men age 40 years or older. Of the 5,297 men 3,960 (75%) were 20 years old or older with complete data. Among these men the prevalence of any urinary incontinence was 12.9% and moderate to severe urinary incontinence was 4.4%. Mean caffeine intake was 169 mg per day. Caffeine intake at the upper 75th percentile (234 mg or more daily) and 90th percentile (392 mg or more per day) was significantly associated with having moderate to severe urinary incontinence (1.72, 95% 1.18-2.49 and 2.08, 95% 1.15-3.77, respectively). In addition, after adjusting for prostate conditions, the effect size for the association between caffeine intake and moderate to severe urinary incontinence remained. Caffeine consumption equivalent to approximately 2 cups of coffee daily (250 mg) is significantly associated with moderate to severe urinary incontinence in United States men. Our findings support the further study of caffeine modification in men with urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association

  18. [Correlation between complaints of stress urinary incontinence and the one-hour pad test in postmenopausal women].

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Maria Thereza; Micussi, Barbosa Cabral; Soares, Elvira Maria Mafaldo; Lemos, Telma Maria Araújo Moura; Brito, Tereza Neuma de Souza; Silva, João Batista da; Maranhão, Técia Maria de Oliveira

    2011-02-01

    to correlate complaints of stress urinary incontinence and the results of a one-hour pad test in pre- and postmenopausal women. cross-sectional study conducted on 60 postmenopausal volunteers divided into two groups: one consisting of 34 women with involuntary loss of urine due to stress incontinence and the other consisting of 26 women without involuntary loss of urine. A control group of 15 premenopausal women with normal menstrual cycles and no urinary complaints was also used. All women underwent clinical and laboratory analysis as well as the one-hour pad test. Patients were considered to be incontinent when sanitary pad weight post-test was more than 1 g. Data were submitted to descriptive statistics, parametric ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey test and Pearson's correlation. all postmenopausal women presented with stress urinary incontinence during the pad test, both those with urinary loss (4 g) and with no previous loss (3.5 g). A strong correlation was observed between urinary loss and time since menopause (r=0.8; p<0.01) and body mass index (r=0.7; p=0.01). Premenopausal women were continent during the pad test (0.4 g). the results of the one-hour pad test showed that all postmenopausal women exhibited stress urinary incontinence, including those without urine loss on effort. Urine loss was correlated with time since menopause and body mass index.

  19. Association of urinary incontinence with impaired functional status among older people living in a long-term care setting.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Aih-Fung; Huang, Mei-Huang; Hsu, Mei-Hsiu; Liu, Ju-Ling; Chiu, Jui-Fang

    2015-03-01

    To examine the association between functional status and urinary incontinence. A total of 27 participants with urinary incontinence and 50 participants without urinary incontinence were analyzed at a long-term care setting in Pingtung County, Taiwan, in 2011. The recruitment criteria were age older than 65 years, ability to communicate with the researcher, agreement to participate in the present study and potential ability to complete at least one measurement of functional status. Urinary incontinence was defined as urine leakage at least once a week during the past 4 weeks, whereas functional status was assessed by the body composition (body mass index and waist circumference), upper body strength (grasp test), lower body strength (30-s and 5-times chair stand test), upper body flexibility (back scratch test), lower body flexibility (chair sit-and-reach test) and agility/dynamic balance (8-ft up-and-go test). In univariate analyses, performances on the tests of 5-time chair stand, 30-s chair stand, 8-ft up-and-go, chair sit-and-reach, and grasp were significantly different between the participants with and without urinary incontinence (all P < 0.05). However, after multiple logistical regression adjusting sex, age and chronic illnesses, just two tests, 8-ft up-and-go and chair sit-and-reach, were independent predictors of urinary incontinence. Poor performance on the tests of 8-ft up-and-go and chair sit-and-reach were the predominated risk factors of urinary incontinence. Further studies regarding how to improve the functional status, especially focusing on the function of the lower body, might be required in order to enhance continence care. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  20. Efficacy of Electrical Pudendal Nerve Stimulation versus Transvaginal Electrical Stimulation in Treating Female Idiopathic Urgency Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyou; Lv, Jianwei; Feng, Xiaoming; Lv, Tingting

    2017-06-01

    We compared the efficacy of electrical pudendal nerve stimulation vs transvaginal electrical stimulation to treat female idiopathic urgency urinary incontinence. A total of 120 female patients with idiopathic urgency urinary incontinence refractory to medication were randomized at a ratio of 2:1 to group 1 of 80 patients and group 2 of 40. Groups 1 and 2 were treated with electrical pudendal nerve stimulation and transvaginal electrical stimulation, respectively. To perform electrical pudendal nerve stimulation long acupuncture needles were deeply inserted into 4 sacrococcygeal points and electrified to stimulate pudendal nerves. Outcome measures were the 24-hour pad test and a questionnaire to measure the severity of symptoms and quality of life in women with urgency urinary incontinence. The median severity of symptoms and quality of life score on the urgency urinary incontinence questionnaire (urgency urinary incontinence total score) was 13 (range 7 to 18.75) in group 1 and 11 (range 8 to 16) in group 2 before treatment, which decreased to 2 (range 0 to 6.75) in group 1 and 6.5 (range 3.25 to 10.75) in group 2 (both p <0.01) after the completion of treatment. At the end of treatment in group 1 complete symptom resolution was noted in 34 patients (42.5%), with a 50% or greater symptom improvement rate in 70.1%. In group 2 complete symptom resolution was noted in 1 patient (2.5%) with a 50% or greater symptom improvement rate in 45.0%. The posttreatment urgency urinary incontinence total score was lower and the therapeutic effect was better in group 1 than in group 2 (both p <0.01). Electrical pudendal nerve stimulation is more effective than transvaginal electrical stimulation in treating drug refractory, female idiopathic urgency urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Urinary incontinence and quality of life of women living in nursing homes in the Mediterranean region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Göral Türkcü, Sinem; Kukulu, Kamile

    2017-06-06

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of urinary incontinence (UI) on the quality of life of women living in nursing homes in the Mediterranean region of Turkey. The study was conducted on 95 women living in nursing homes in the Mediterranean region. Data were collected from a questionnaire on sociodemographic characteristics, the Urinary Incontinence Quality of Life Scale, the Index of Activities of Daily Living, and the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form. The quality of life of women who did not consider UI a health problem was significantly higher than that of those who considered otherwise. Mixed UI was the most common UI type among the women living in nursing homes, with a rate of 31.7%. According to the overall mean scores on the Urinary Incontinence Quality of Life Scale, quality of life was the most affected among women who had nocturnal incontinence. Quality of life was affected from most to least by the mixed type, stress type, and urge type of incontinence. Early diagnosis and treatment of UI could be improved if health professionals, who have a unique role in changing the perception of society, offered training to women experiencing incontinence. Identifying this problem and determining and preventing the risk factors are important for enhancing women's quality of life. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  2. Predicting help-seeking intention of women with urinary incontinence in Jinan, China: a theory of planned behaviour model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen; Wang, Kefang; Sun, Tao; Xu, Dongjuan; Palmer, Mary H

    2015-02-01

    To develop and test a predictive model of women's help-seeking intention for urinary incontinence that was developed using the theory of planned behaviour and to identify factors that influenced women's help-seeking intention. Urinary incontinence is a chronic progressive condition if left untreated, but few women seek help from healthcare providers. Reasons for not seeking help have been studied in Western countries while relatively little information is available from mainland China. Questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey was performed in this study. From May-October 2011, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with a representative sample of 346 incontinent women from three communities in Jinan using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were collected via a self-administered pencil-and-paper survey that consisted of a multi-item questionnaire. Predictive model estimation was performed using structural equation model. The resultant model demonstrated that incontinent women's help-seeking intention could be predicted by their perceived self-efficacy and perceived social impact from urine loss. Perceived self-efficacy was the negative predictor, while the perceived social impact was the positive one. Overall, the predictive model explained 36% of the variance for incontinent women's help-seeking intention. The theory of planned behaviour can be used to predict help-seeking intention in women who have urinary incontinence. Community nurses should increase patients' help-seeking intention by addressing perceived social impact and perceived self-efficacy in managing incontinent symptoms. Our findings suggest that high perceived self-efficacy in dealing with incontinent symptoms could hinder incontinent women from seeking help from healthcare providers. The strong social impact women perceived, however, facilitates intention to seek help. Nurses should understand and address these factors through education and evidence-based practices to increase help

  3. Modifiers of Response to Treatment With Fesoterodine for Urgency-Predominant Urinary Incontinence in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, William D; Huang, Alison J; Schembri, Michael; Rogers, Rebecca G; Richter, Holly; Myers, Deborah L; Kraus, Stephen R; Johnson, Karen C; Hess, Rachel; Gregory, Tomas; Bradley, Catherine S; Arya, Lily; Brown, Janette S; Subak, Leslee L

    The aim of this study was to identify clinical and demographic characteristics that moderate response to treatment with fesoterodine among women with a diagnosis of urgency-predominant urinary incontinence. A multicenter, double-blinded, 12-week randomized controlled trial of pharmacologic therapy for urgency-predominant urinary incontinence in community-dwelling women diagnosed by the 3-item Incontinence Questionnaire (3IQ) was previously performed. Participants (N = 645) were randomized to fesoterodine therapy (4-8 mg daily; n = 322) or placebo (n = 323). Urinary incontinence was assessed by 3-day voiding diaries. In this secondary analysis, a "responder" was defined as reduction of 50% or greater in overall incontinence episode frequency compared with baseline. Clinical and demographic characteristics that may moderate treatment response were assessed by testing for interaction between characteristics and intervention in logit models of responders, adjusting for clinical site. Participants' ages were a mean of 56 (SD, 14) years, 68% were white race, and they had a mean of 3.9 (SD, 3.0) urgency incontinence episodes per day. There were no baseline differences in demographic, clinical, or incontinence characteristics between treatment and placebo groups or between responders and nonresponders. There was an increase in the proportion of responders to fesoterodine with increasing age (P = 0.04) and parity (0.04) and among married women (P = 0.03), but no effect modification was observed by race/ethnicity, body mass index, education, employment status, or alcohol or tobacco use. In ambulatory women with urgency-predominant urinary incontinence, older age, being married, and higher parity significantly moderated and potentiated the effects of pharmacologic therapy on incontinence frequency. This study identifies certain populations who may have increased responsiveness to treatment with antimuscarinic therapy and may be used to inform and guide future therapy.

  4. The efficacy and safety of urethral injection therapy for urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Priscila Katsumi; Locali, Rafael Fagionato; Pacetta, Aparecida Maria; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Haddad, Jorge Milhem

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different bulking agents for treating urinary incontinence in women, a systematic review including only randomized controlled trials was performed. The subjects were women with urinary incontinence. The primary outcomes were clinical and urodynamic parameters. The results were presented as a weighted mean difference for non-continuous variables and as relative risk for continuous variables, both with 95% confidence intervals. Initially, 942 studies were identified. However, only fourteen eligible trials fulfilled the prerequisites. Altogether, the review included 1814 patients in trials of eight different types of bulking agents, and all studies were described and analyzed. The measured outcomes were evaluated using a large variety of instruments. The most common complications of the bulking agents were urinary retention and urinary tract infection. Additionally, there were certain major complications, such as one case of death after use of autologous fat. However, the lack of adequate studies, the heterogeneous populations studied, the wide variety of materials used and the lack of long-term follow-up limit guidance of practice. To determine which substance is the most suitable, there is a need for more randomized clinical trials that compare existing bulking agents based on standardized clinical outcomes. PMID:26934239

  5. Coital Urinary Incontinence Induced by Impairment of the Dorsal Nerve of the Clitoris in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Yolanda; Juárez, Raúl; Medel, Alfonso; Corona-Quintanilla, Dora Luz; Pacheco, Pablo; Juárez, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    We determined the effect of chronic bilateral neurectomy of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris on urinary parameters and sexual behavior of conscious female rats. A total of 18 anesthetized virgin female Wistar rats were used in this study, including 11 that underwent bilateral neurectomy of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris and 7 that underwent sham surgery. Urinary parameters were determined in awake animals preoperatively, and 3 and 10 days postoperatively. Sexual behavior was tested 14 days postoperatively to determine whether the females expelled urine during sexual encounters. After male ejaculation the females were anesthetized with urethane to record external urethral sphincter electromyogram activity in response to clitoris, perigenital skin and vaginal stimulation. Neurectomy was corroborated anatomically. Sham surgery did not significantly modify urinary parameter values. However, bilateral neurectomy of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris significantly increased voiding frequency and voiding duration (p <0.05). It did not significantly affect the flow rate, voided volume or voiding interval. Of females that underwent bilateral neurectomy of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris 67% expelled urine just after male ejaculation. These results suggest that the pudendal nerve is an important neural pathway in the convergence and crosstalk of female urogenital neural circuits, and genital deafferentation may be a causal factor of coital urinary incontinence. Rats with bilateral transection of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris may serve as an animal model of coital incontinence. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk of urinary incontinence following post-brachytherapy transurethral resection of the prostate and correlation with clinical and treatment parameters.

    PubMed

    Mock, Stephen; Leapman, Michael; Stock, Richard G; Hall, Simon J; Stone, Nelson Neal

    2013-11-01

    We assess the risk of urinary incontinence after transurethral prostate resection in patients previously treated with prostate brachytherapy. A total of 2,495 patients underwent brachytherapy with or without external beam radiation therapy for the diagnosis of prostate cancer between June 1990 and December 2009. Patients who underwent transurethral prostate resection before implantation were excluded from study. Overall 79 patients (3.3%) underwent channel transurethral resection of the prostate due to urinary retention or refractory obstructive urinary symptoms. Correlation analyses were performed using the chi-square (Pearson) test. Estimates for time to urinary incontinence were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method with comparisons using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard rates. Median followup after implantation was 7.2 years. Median time to first transurethral prostate resection after implantation was 14.8 months. Of the 79 patients who underwent transurethral prostate resection after implantation 20 (25.3%) had urinary incontinence compared with 3.1% of those who underwent implantation only (OR 10.4, 95% CI 6-18, p<0.001). Of the 15 patients who required more than 1 transurethral prostate resection, urinary incontinence developed in 8 (53%) compared with 19% of patients who underwent only 1 resection (OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.5-16, p=0.006). Exclusion of patients who underwent multiple transurethral prostate resections still demonstrated significant differences (18.8% vs 3.1%, OR 7.1, 95% CI 3.6-13.9, p<0.001). Median time from last transurethral prostate resection to urinary incontinence was 24 months. On linear regression analysis, hormone use and transurethral prostate resection after implantation were associated with urinary incontinence (p<0.05). There was no correlation between the timing of transurethral prostate resection after implantation and the risk of incontinence. Urinary incontinence developed in 25.3% of patients who underwent

  7. The Artificial Urinary Sphincter is Superior to a Secondary Transobturator Male Sling in Cases of a Primary Sling Failure.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Divya; Zhang, Haijing; Gupta, Shubham; Selph, John P; Belsante, Michael J; Lentz, Aaron C; Webster, George D; Peterson, Andrew C

    2015-10-01

    We compared continence outcomes in patients with post-prostatectomy stress urinary incontinence treated with a salvage artificial urinary sphincter vs a secondary transobturator sling. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients undergoing salvage procedures after sling failure from 2006 to 2012. Postoperative success was defined as the use of 0 or 1 pad, a negative stress test and pad weight less than 8 gm per day. We performed the Wilcoxon test and used a Cox regression model and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. A total of 61 men presenting with sling failure were included in study, of whom 32 went directly to an artificial urinary sphincter and 29 received a secondary sling. Of the artificial urinary sphincter cohort 47% underwent prior external beam radiation therapy vs 17% of the secondary sling cohort (p = 0.01). Average preoperative 24 hour pad weight and pad number were higher in the artificial urinary sphincter cohort. Median followup in artificial urinary sphincter and secondary sling cases was 4.5 (IQR 4-12) and 4 months (IQR 1-5), respectively. Overall treatment failure was seen in 55% of patients (16 of 29) with a secondary sling vs 6% (2 of 32) with an artificial urinary sphincter (unadjusted HR 7, 95% CI 2-32 and adjusted HR 6, 95% CI 1-31). In this cohort of patients with post-prostatectomy stress urinary incontinence and a failed primary sling those who underwent a secondary sling procedure were up to 6 times more likely to have persistent incontinence vs those who underwent artificial urinary sphincter placement. These data are useful for counseling patients and planning surgery. We currently recommend placement of an artificial urinary sphincter for patients in whom an initial sling has failed. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. OnabotulinumtoxinA vs Sacral Neuromodulation on Refractory Urgency Urinary Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Cindy L.; Richter, Holly E.; Menefee, Shawn A.; Komesu, Yuko M.; Arya, Lily A.; Gregory, W. Thomas; Myers, Deborah L.; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Vasavada, Sandip; Nolen, Tracy L.; Wallace, Dennis; Meikle, Susan F.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Women with refractory urgency urinary incontinence are treated with sacral neuromodulation and onabotulinumtoxinA with limited comparative information. OBJECTIVE To assess whether onabotulinumtoxinA is superior to sacral neuromodulation in controlling refractory episodes of urgency urinary incontinence. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Multicenter open-label randomized trial (February 2012–January 2015) at 9 US medical centers involving 381 women with refractory urgency urinary incontinence. INTERVENTIONS Cystoscopic intradetrusor injection of 200 U of onabotulinumtoxinA (n = 192) or sacral neuromodulation (n = 189). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome, change from baseline mean number of daily urgency urinary incontinence episodes over 6 months, was measured with monthly 3-day diaries. Secondary outcomes included change from baseline in urinary symptom scores in the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire Short Form (SF); range, 0–100, higher scores indicating worse symptoms; Overactive Bladder Satisfaction questionnaire; range, 0–100; includes 5 subscales, higher scores indicating better satisfaction; and adverse events. RESULTS Of the 364 women (mean [SD] age, 63.0 [11.6] years) in the intention-to-treat population, 190 women in the onabotulinumtoxinA group had a greater reduction in 6-month mean number of episodes of urgency incontinence per day than did the 174 in the sacral neuromodulation group (−3.9 vs −3.3 episodes per day; mean difference, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.13 to 1.14; P = .01). Participants treated with onabotulinumtoxinA showed greater improvement in the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire SF for symptom bother (−46.7 vs −38.6; mean difference, 8.1; 95% CI, 3.0 to 13.3; P = .002); treatment satisfaction (67.7 vs 59.8; mean difference, 7.8; 95% CI, 1.6 to 14.1; P = .01) and treatment endorsement (78.1 vs 67.6; mean difference; 10.4, 95% CI, 4.3 to 16.5; P < .001) than treatment with sacral neuromodulation. There were no differences

  9. Urodynamic Changes Associated with Successful Stress Urinary Incontinence Surgery: Is a Little Tension a Good Thing?

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Stephen R.; Lemack, Gary E.; Sirls, Larry; Chai, Toby C.; Brubaker, Linda; Albo, Michael; Leng, Wendy W.; Lloyd, L. Keith; Norton, Peggy; Litman, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to identify urodynamic changes that correlate with successful outcomes after stress urinary incontinence (SUI) surgery. Methods 655 women were randomized to Burch colposuspension or autologous fascial sling as part of the multi-center Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial. Preoperatively and 24 months after surgery, participants underwent standardized urodynamic testing which included non-invasive uroflowmetry, cystometrogram and pressure flow studies. Changes in urodynamic parameters were correlated to a successful outcome, defined a priori as: 1) negative pad test, 2) no urinary incontinence on 3-day diary, 3) negative cough and valsalva stress test, 4) no self-reported SUI symptoms on the Medical, Epidemiological and Social Aspects of Aging Questionnaire and 5) no retreatment for SUI. Results Subjects who met criteria for surgical success showed a greater relative increase in mean Pdet@Qmax (baseline vs 24 months) than women who were considered surgical failures (p = 0.008). While a trend suggested an association between greater increases in bladder outlet obstruction index and outcome success, this was not statistically significant. Other urodynamic variables such as maximum uroflow, bladder compliance, and the presence of preoperative or de novo detrusor overactivity did not differ with respect to outcome status. Conclusions Successful outcomes in both surgical groups (Burch and sling) were associated with higher voiding pressures relative to preoperative baseline values. However, concomitant changes in other urodynamic voiding parameters were not significantly associated with outcome. PMID:21996108

  10. The impact of pelvic organ prolapse on sexual function in women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Begüm; White, Terry; Urwitz-Lane, Rebecca; Minaglia, Steven

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) on sexual function in women with urinary incontinence (UI). In this retrospective, case-cohort study, we reviewed the medical records of all women evaluated for UI between March and November 2003. All patients completed the short forms of the Urogenital Distress Inventory, Incontinence Impact Questionnaire, and Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire. Women with stage two or greater POP, as determined by the pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POPQ) system, were compared to women with stage 0 or 1 POP. Sixty-nine women with POP and 47 women without POP were included. Patient demographics did not differ between the two groups. Women with POP were significantly more likely to report absence of libido (53% versus 30%, P=0.02), lack of sexual excitement during intercourse (46% versus 27%, P=0.05), and that they rarely experienced orgasm during intercourse (49% versus 30%, P=0.05). In conclusion, women with POP in addition to UI are more likely to report decreased libido, decreased sexual excitement, and difficulty achieving orgasm during intercourse when compared to women with UI alone.

  11. Sexual function in women with and without urinary incontinence and/or pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G R; Villarreal, A; Kammerer-Doak, D; Qualls, C

    2001-01-01

    The sexual function of women with and without urinary incontinence and/or pelvic organ prolapse (UI/POP) was compared using a condition-specific validated questionnaire, the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ). Eighty-three women with UI/POP and 56 without agreed to participate. PISQ scores were significantly lower among women with UI/POP than in those without (P = 0.003). No differences in the stages of sexual excitement were noted between groups. The frequency of intercourse was less with UI/POP than without (P= 0.04). Women with UI/POP restricted sexual activity for fear of losing urine more frequently than did those without (P = 0.005). No differences were reported in patients' or partners' sexual satisfaction. This study found that women with UI/POP have poorer sexual functioning than those without, as measured by the PISQ, and report less frequent sexual activity. In addition, women with UI/POP are more likely to restrict sexual activity for fear of incontinence, although they report similar levels of satisfaction with their sexual relationships as do women without UI/POP.

  12. PATIENT EXPECTATIONS DID NOT PREDICT OUTCOME OF DRUG AND BEHAVIORAL TREATMENT OF URGENCY URINARY INCONTINENCE

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Mary P; DuBeau, Catherine E.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Johnson, Harry W.; Rahn, David D.; Mallett, Veronica; Stoddard, Anne M.; Zyczynski, Halina M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether expectations of treatment outcomes in women participating in a drug and behavioral treatment trial for urge urinary incontinence are related to patient factors, demographics, health-related locus of control and treatment outcomes. Methods Baseline assessments included expectations (improvement in bladder condition, time to improvement in bladder condition, and duration of improvement) and the multidimensional health locus of control (MHLC) scale. Outcomes were measured by patient global impression of improvement (PGI-I) at the end of active treatment (10 weeks) and 8 months after trial start. Results At baseline among 173 subjects, 114 (66%) believed their incontinence would get ‘very much better,’ 94 (55%) expected improvement by one month, and 111 (66%) expected improvement would last the rest of their lives.. There were no significant associations between baseline expectations or MHLC with PGI-I at 10 weeks or 8 months. Conclusions Expectations of treatment outcome and MHLC did not predict eventual patient-reported treatment outcome in this sample of women with urge-predominant urinary incontinence participating in a trial of drug and behavioral therapy. PMID:22453106

  13. Polyacrylamide hydrogel (bulkamid®) in female patients of 80 or more years with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Vecchioli-Scaldazza, Carlo Vecchioli-Scaldazza; Smaali, C; Morosetti, Carolina; Azizi, Berouz; Giannubilo, Willy; Ferrara, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of polyacrylamide hydrogel (Bulkamid®) in injection therapy for urinary incontinence in women of 80 or more years. Twenty consecutive women mean age 84.5 (range 80-87) with stress or mixed urinary incontinence were enrolled in this prospective study. All subjects were evaluated at baseline and re-evaluated 7 days, 6,12,18 and 24 months after treatment. A detailed clinical evaluation, physical examination, daily pad count, urodynamic investigation and evaluation of urethral mobility by trans-labial ultrasound were performed. A statistically significant decrease in the number of pads was observed in the follow-up (p = 0.0002 after 24 months). Physical examination showed a statistically significant lack or reduced lost of urine with stress test (p = 0.0163 after 24 months). Urodynamic findings showed an increase of Valsalva leak point pressure, maximum urethral closure pressure and functional length. Maximum flow and post void residual were respectively observed to be significantly reduced and increased only after 7 days from injection therapy. Quality of life (QoL) assessed with the Incontinence Impact questionnaire short form (IIQ-7) showed a statistically significant improvement (p = 0.0001 after 24 months). Patient satisfaction assessed with the Visual Analogue Scale and Patient Global Impression of Improvement questionnaire respectively produced evaluation of ″satisfied″ and "much improved" even after 24 months. Polyacrylamide hydrogel (Bulkamid®) is an effective treatment with low morbility in patients of 80 or more years.

  14. Stress urinary incontinence is highly prevalent in recreationally active women attending gyms or exercise classes.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Sally; Watson, Taryn; Thompson, Judith; Briffa, Kathy

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in recreationally active women attending gyms or exercise classes. Data were collected on the frequency and severity of incontinence and the prevalence of SUI risk factors; screening for PFM dysfunction in a fitness appraisal; symptom modification strategies; knowledge of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) exercises and the Pelvic Floor First (PFF) initiative. Three hundred and sixty-one women aged 18-83 who attended exercise classes or gyms in Western Australia were surveyed. Nearly half (49.3 %) of participants reported SUI, the majority of whom slight or moderate leakage. Ninety-six per cent reported at least one SUI risk factor, with the mean being 2.7 (SD = 1.4). Almost all women surveyed had heard of PFM exercises (97.2 %), but only 15.2 % of participants were screened for PFM dysfunction in a fitness appraisal. Forty-three per cent reported that a fitness instructor cued PFM activation during a workout. Less than 1 in 10 (9.7 %) of the women surveyed had heard about the PFF initiative. Urinary incontinence is common in women attending gyms or exercise classes, but is rarely screened for. More education is required to encourage fitness leaders to screen exercise participants and to provide PFM-'friendly" modifications.

  15. Two-Year Outcomes After Sacrocolpopexy With and Without Burch to Prevent Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Linda; Nygaard, Ingrid; Richter, Holly E.; Visco, Anthony; Weber, Anne M.; Cundiff, Geoffrey W.; Fine, Paul; Ghetti, Chiara; Brown, Morton B.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To report anatomic and functional outcomes 2 years after sacrocolpopexy in stress-continent women with or without prophylactic Burch colposuspension. METHODS In the Colpopexy and Urinary Reduction Efforts (CARE) trial, stress-continent women undergoing sacrocolpopexy were randomized to receive or not receive a Burch colposuspension. Outcomes included urinary symptoms, other pelvic symptoms, and pelvic support. Standardized pelvic organ prolapse quantification examinations and validated outcome measures including the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire were completed before surgery and at several postoperative intervals, including at 2 years. RESULTS This analysis is based on 302 of 322 randomized participants. Most were Caucasian (94%), with a mean age of 62±10 years (mean±standard deviation). Two years after surgery, 32.0% and 45.2% of women in the Burch and control groups, respectively, met the stress incontinence endpoint (presence of symptoms or positive cough stress test or interval treatment for stress incontinence, P=.026). The apex was well supported (point C within 2 cm of total vaginal length) in 95% of women, and this was not affected by concomitant Burch (P=.18). There was a trend toward fewer urgency symptoms in the Burch group (32.0% versus 44.5% no Burch, P=.085). Twenty participants experienced mesh or suture erosions. CONCLUSION The early advantage of prophylactic Burch colposuspension for stress incontinence that was seen at 3 months remains at 2 years. Apical anatomic success rates are high and not affected by concomitant Burch. PMID:18591307

  16. Urodynamic Characterization of Obese Women with Urinary Incontinence Undergoing a Weight Loss Program

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Holly E.; Creasman, Jennifer M.; Myers, Deborah L.; Wheeler, Thomas L.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Subak, Leslee L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to describe urodynamic characteristics of overweight or obese women with urinary incontinence and explore the relationship between urodynamic parameters, body mass index (BMI), and abdominal circumference (AC). Materials & Methods One hundred ten women underwent a standardized cough stress test and urodynamic study. Results 86% of women had urodynamic stress incontinence and 15% detrusor overactivity. Intraabdominal pressure (Pabd) at maximum cystometric capacity (MCC) increased 0.4 cm H2O per kg/m2 unit of BMI (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.0,0.7, p=0.04) and 0.4 cm H2O per 2 cm increase in AC (CI: 0.2, 0.7, p<0.01). Intravesical pressure (Pves) at MCC increased 0.4 cm H2O per 2 cm increase in AC (CI: 0.0, 0.8, p=0.05), but was not associated with BMI (p=0.18). Conclusion BMI and AC had a stronger association with Pabd than with Pves, suggesting a possible mechanism for the association between obesity and urinary incontinence. PMID:18679560

  17. Behavioural treatment of urinary incontinence and encopresis in children with learning disabilities: transfer of stimulus control.

    PubMed

    Smith, L; Smith, P; Lee, S K

    2000-04-01

    Urinary and faecal incontinence present a considerable problem in people with learning disabilities, despite the general effectiveness of behavioural techniques in continence training. Children with learning disabilities and obsessional behaviour may be particularly resistant to toilet training, even where relatively cognitively able, and often despite a substantial degree of control over their eliminatory functions. Their resistance may be more appropriately regarded as a challenging behaviour and their incontinence better explained by factors other than a simple failure to learn. A 'stimulus-control' hypothesis proposes that the child's nappy (diaper)/potty/underwear has developed strong stimulus control over the elimination response. This report describes three case studies in which treatment-resistant children, aged between 8 and 12 years, with mild or moderate learning disabilities, were successfully treated for nappy-dependent nocturnal encopresis or diurnal urinary incontinence. The children were routine case referrals for whom previous attempts to train bowel or bladder control had failed. Behavioural techniques, such as 'shaping' (gradually increasing the proximity to the toilet), 'fading' (reducing the presence of the nappy), and rewards for eliminating, effected successful transfer of stimulus control over elimination from nappy to toilet. Treatment times varied, depending on the degree of the child's obsession and resistance to change.

  18. Mobile App for Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, Malin; Lindholm, Lars; Samuelsson, Eva

    2017-05-08

    Mobile apps can increase access to care, facilitate self-management, and improve adherence to treatment. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) affects 10-35% of women and, currently, an app with instructions for pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is available as first-line treatment. A previous randomized controlled study demonstrated that the app benefitted symptom severity and quality of life (QoL); in this study we investigate the cost-effectiveness of the app. The objective of this study was to evaluate the health economy of the app for treating SUI. This deterministic cost-utility analysis, with a 1-year societal perspective, compared the app treatment with no treatment. Health economic data were collected alongside a randomized controlled trial performed in Sweden from March 2013 to October 2014. This study included 123 community-dwelling women participants of 18 years and above, with stress urinary incontinence ≥1 time per week. Participants were self-assessed with validated questionnaires and 2-day leakage diaries, and then randomized to 3 months of treatment (app group, n=62) or no treatment (controls, n=61). The app focused on pelvic floor muscle training, prescribed 3 times daily. We continuously registered treatment delivery costs. Data were collected on each participant's training time, incontinence aids, and laundry at baseline and at a 3-month follow-up. We measured quality of life with the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire on Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Quality of Life, and calculated the quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. Data from the 3-month follow-up were extrapolated to 1 year for the calculations. Our main outcome was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios compared between app and control groups. One-way and multiway sensitivity analyses were performed. The mean age of participants was 44.7 years (SD 9.4). Annual costs were €547.0 for the app group and €482.4 for the control group. Annual

  19. [Prevalence of urinary incontinence in pregnant women with prenatal care at the National Institute of Perinatology Isidro Espinosa de los Reyes].

    PubMed

    Gorbea Chávez, Viridiana; Navarro Salomón, Kristian; Escobar del Barco, Laura; Rodríguez Colorado, Silvia

    2011-09-01

    Urinary incontinence during pregnancy is relatively frequent and is seen in some cases as a normal event. Several authors estimate a prevalence of urinary incontinence during pregnancy of 58.1%. To determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence in women at the National Institute of Perinatology Isidro Espinosa de los Reyes from March to May 2008. We also assessed the type, severity and frequency of involuntary loss of urine. longitudinal study to determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence before and during pregnancy, by quarter, type, frequency and severity. The prevalence of urinary incontinence during pregnancy was 58.2% and before pregnancy was 34.7%. The odds ratio for the association of multiparity and incontinence before pregnancy was 1.7 (95% CI 1.2-2.5) and 2.0 (95% CI 1.4-2.9) to manifest during pregnancy. Patients under 26 years have an odds ratio for urinary incontinence of 0.67 (95% CI 0.4-0.9). The prevalence of urinary incontinence increases during pregnancy, multiparity is a risk factor for urinary incontinence and age under 26 is a protective factor.

  20. Risk Factors for Transient Urinary Incontinence after Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jong Kil; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Lee, Dong Hoon; Han, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Jeong Zoo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the factors associated with the occurrence of and recovery from transient urinary incontinence (TUI) after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP). Materials and Methods From March 2009 to December 2012, 391 consecutive patients treated with HoLEP for benign prostatic hyperplasia were enrolled. Information regarding age, prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score, Overactive Bladder Symptom Score, peak urinary flow rate, postvoid residual urine, and operation time was collected. TUI was defined as a patient complaint of urine leakage, regardless of type. Logistic regression was used to investigate the factors associated with the occurrence of TUI, and the Kaplan-Meier test was used to analyze the TUI recovery period. Results TUI after HoLEP occurred in 65 patients (16.6%), 52 patients of whom (80.0%) showed recovery within three months. Stress and urge urinary incontinence and postvoid dribbling occurred in 16 patients (4.1%), 29 patients (7.4%), and 33 patients (8.4%), respectively. Age (odds ratio [OR]=3.494; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.565~7.803; p=0.002) and total operation time (OR=3.849; 95% CI=1.613~9.185; p=0.002) were factors that significantly affected the occurrence of TUI. Conclusions TUI, defined as any type of urine leakage, occurred after HoLEP in some patients, most of whom recovered within three months. Stress urinary incontinence occurred in only 4% of patients after HoLEP. Age and total operation time were associated with the occurrence of postoperative TUI. PMID:26331125

  1. Risk Factors for Transient Urinary Incontinence after Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jong Kil; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Lee, Dong Hoon; Han, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Park, Sung-Woo

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the factors associated with the occurrence of and recovery from transient urinary incontinence (TUI) after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP). From March 2009 to December 2012, 391 consecutive patients treated with HoLEP for benign prostatic hyperplasia were enrolled. Information regarding age, prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score, Overactive Bladder Symptom Score, peak urinary flow rate, postvoid residual urine, and operation time was collected. TUI was defined as a patient complaint of urine leakage, regardless of type. Logistic regression was used to investigate the factors associated with the occurrence of TUI, and the Kaplan-Meier test was used to analyze the TUI recovery period. TUI after HoLEP occurred in 65 patients (16.6%), 52 patients of whom (80.0%) showed recovery within three months. Stress and urge urinary incontinence and postvoid dribbling occurred in 16 patients (4.1%), 29 patients (7.4%), and 33 patients (8.4%), respectively. Age (odds ratio [OR]=3.494; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.565~7.803; p=0.002) and total operation time (OR=3.849; 95% CI=1.613~9.185; p=0.002) were factors that significantly affected the occurrence of TUI. TUI, defined as any type of urine leakage, occurred after HoLEP in some patients, most of whom recovered within three months. Stress urinary incontinence occurred in only 4% of patients after HoLEP. Age and total operation time were associated with the occurrence of postoperative TUI.

  2. A Comparative Evaluation of Suburethral and Transobturator Sling in 209 Cases with Stress Urinary Incontinence in 8 years

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Prakash; D’Costa, Sylvia; Shirkande, Preeti; Kumar, Shilpi; Patil, Mangala

    2009-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the outcome of suburethral and transobturator sling in treatment of female stress urinary incontinence in 209 cases from 2002 to 2010. The criteria evaluated were success, failure, complications, operating time, ease of the procedure, availability and cost effectivity of the sling. Design and Setting: A retrospective comparative study was carried out at a tertiary referral centre for female urinary incontinence. Material and Methods: A total of 209 patients (females from 27 to 79 years of age) with proven stress urinary incontinence were treated by suburethral transvaginal tape (TVT) type of slings in 101 cases and transobturator Monarc type of sling in 108 cases at the National Institute of Endoscopic Surgery and Urinary Incontinence Center, Mumbai, India, from March 2002 to June 2010. The maximum follow up was for 8 years. Results: The TVT type of slings had higher complication rate like needle entering the bladder, retention of urine necessitating to cut the tape in the center and had a success rate of 94.5% compared to Monarc/Trivedi obturator tape (TrOT) type of sling with outside-in technique, which had a negligible complication (less than 1%), pain in groin or leg movement that reduced in 6 weeks and a success rate of 95%. Specially, the Indian design Trivedi’s stress urinary incontinence tape (TSUIT) and TrOT with reusable needles, the cost was only 15–20% of the international brands. PMID:22442522

  3. Specific obstetrical risk factors for urinary versus anal incontinence 4 years after first delivery.

    PubMed

    Fritel, X; Khoshnood, B; Fauconnier, A

    2013-09-01

    Delivery can be complicated by urinary or anal incontinence (UI or AI). We hypothesized that the mechanisms of injury may differ for UI and AI. Hence, obstetrical risk factors may be specific for different types of incontinence. Data on maternal characteristics were collected at first delivery. Data on incontinence were obtained by a questionnaire completed by 627 women 4 years after first delivery. UI was defined by "Do you have involuntary loss of urine" and AI by "Do you have involuntary loss of flatus or stool". A multinomial logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess risk factors for UI only, AI only, and UI+AI. Twenty-two percent of women reported UI only, 6.5% AI only, and 6.5% both. Risk factors associated with UI only were age (at first delivery)≥ 30 (OR 2.27 [95% CI 1.47-3.49]), pre-existing UI (6.44 [2.19-19.0]) and pregnancy UI (3.64 [2.25-5.91]). Risk factors associated with AI only were length of the second active stage> 20minutes (2.86 [1.15-7.13]) and third degree perineal tear (20.9 [1.73-252]). Significant predictors of UI+AI were age ≥ 30 (2.65 [1.29-5.46]), no epidural (4.29 [1.65-11.1]), third degree perineal tear (20.0 [1.28-314]), and UI before pregnancy (32.9 [9.00-120]). Cesarean delivery was not significantly associated with UI, AI, or UI+AI, although for all three outcomes, the adjusted odds ratios were substantially less than one. We found specific associations between obstetrical risk factors and urinary versus anal incontinence 4 years after first delivery. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the underlying mechanisms of injury differ for UI and AI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. [Guidelines for rehabilitation management of non-neurological urinary incontinence in women].

    PubMed

    Leriche, B; Conquy, S

    2010-02-01

    Pelvic floor rehabilitation is prescribed as first-line treatment for women with stress urinary incontinence, particularly in cases of urinary incontinence with no first-degree uterine prolapse, with poor-quality perineal testing results or inverted perineal command. Prescription of 15 sessions should suffice to evaluate the possibilities of improving the incontinence. The sessions can be continued if the patient feels she is progressing but has not reached sufficient results. With no progression despite properly conducted rehabilitation, the question of whether to continue the physical therapy arises. Currently, therapists determine the number of sessions. They are better apt to know whether sessions should be pursued and should relay a report to the prescribing physician. This type of rehabilitation is within the domain of physical therapists. Midwives can be responsible for postpartum rehabilitation. On the other hand, the importance of the patient's role in the results and their maintenance is well known. Occasionally a few sessions some time after the initial sessions can serve to verify the acquisitions and motivate the patient in her personal contribution to this rehabilitation. The work of the physical therapist cannot be substituted with Keat-type home electrostimulation. The physical therapist plays an important role in the overall management of this condition. Currently, in absence of demonstrated efficacy, self-administration of electrostimulation is not recommended. In urge incontinence, the rehabilitation approach will be used concomitantly with prescription of anticholergics with behavioral therapy and bladder biofeedback work. In addition, low-frequency electrostimulation can be done during the session. Starting with 10-12 sessions is sufficient. In all cases, rehabilitation should take a multidisciplinary approach and be integrated into a medical and/or surgical management plan.

  5. The University of Michigan Incontinence Symptom Index (M-ISI): a Clinical Measure for Type, Severity, and Bother related to Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Suskind, Anne M.; Dunn, Rodney L.; Morgan, Daniel M.; DeLancey, John O.L.; McGuire, Edward J.; Wei, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To develop a clinically relevant, easy to use, and validated instrument for assessing severity and bother related to urinary incontinence. Methods Survey items were piloted and refined following psychometric principles in five separate patient cohorts. Patient and expert endorsement of items, factor analyses, Spearman rank correlations and response distributions were employed for item selection. Formal reliability and validity evaluation were conducted for the final questionnaire items. Results Expert physicians and patient focus groups confirmed face and content validity for the measure. A 10-item measure called the Michigan Incontinence Symptom Index (M-ISI) was developed with two domains: a Total M-ISI Domain consisting of subdomains for stress urinary incontinence, urgency urinary incontinence, and pad use, and a Bother Domain. High construct validity was demonstrated with a Cronbach’s alpha for the Total M-ISI Domain (items 1–8) of 0.90 and for the Bother Domain (items 9–10) of 0.82. Cronbach’s alpha for the subdomains were all > 0.85. Construct validity, convergent and divergent validity, internal discriminant validity, and predictive validity were all robust. The minimally important difference for the measure was determined to be 4 points (out of 32) for the Total M-ISI Severity Domain, and 1–2 points (out of 8–12) for the individual subdomains. Conclusions The M-ISI is a parsimonious measure that has established reliability and validity on several levels and complements current clinical evaluative methods for patients with urinary incontinence. PMID:23945994

  6. Urinary incontinence and perineal muscle function in physically active and sedentary elderly women.

    PubMed

    Virtuoso, Janeisa F; Mazo, Giovana Z; Menezes, Enaiane C

    2011-01-01

    To identify the presence of urinary incontinence and compare perineal muscle function among physically active and sedentary older women. The sample consisted of 39 elderly women, 28 of whom got regular physical activity (AG) and 11 did not (SG). We collected data on risk factors for pelvic floor weakness and the presence of urinary incontinence (UI). The evaluation of perineal function was performed using PERFECT and perineometry. The data were processed with descriptive (simple frequencies, percentages, measures of position and dispersion) and inferential statistics (Chi-square or Fisher Exact Test, when necessary, and Mann-Whitney) with a significance level of 5%. There was a higher mean age (p=0.04) in AG. The occurrence of UI in the sample was 56.4%. Urge UI was associated with SG (p=0.022). All PERFECT variables were higher in AG than SG, with significant differences for the variables "repetitions" (p=0.008) and "fast" (p=0.022). Perineometry revealed that fast twitch fibers (p=0.008) and slow twitch fibers (p=0.05) were higher in the AG. AG had better pelvic floor muscle function. However, the prevalence of UI was higher in this group, which suggested the influence of age on the urinary continence mechanism.

  7. Muscle-Derived Cells for Treatment of Iatrogenic Sphincter Damage and Urinary Incontinence in Men

    PubMed Central

    Gerullis, H.; Eimer, C.; Georgas, E.; Homburger, M.; El-Baz, A. G.; Wishahi, M.; Borós, M.; Ecke, T. H.; Otto, T.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of injection of autologous muscle-derived cells into the urinary sphincter for treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence in men and to characterize the injected cells prior to transplantation. Methods. 222 male patients with stress urinary incontinence and sphincter damage after uroloical procedures were treated with transurethral injection of autologous muscle-derived cells. The transplanted cells were investigated after cultivation and prior to application by immunocytochemistry using different markers of myogenic differentiation. Feasibility and functionality assessment was achieved with a follow-up of at least 12 months. Results. Follow-up was at least 12 months. Of the 222 treated patients, 120 responded to therapy of whom 26 patients (12%) were continent, and 94 patients (42%) showed improvement. In 102 (46%) patients, the therapy was ineffective. Clinical improvement was observed on average 4.7 months after transplantation and continued in all improved patients. The cells injected into the sphincter were at least ~50% of myogenic origin and representative for early stages of muscle cell differentiation. Conclusions. Transurethral injection of muscle-derived cells into the damaged urethral sphincter of male patients is a safe procedure. Transplanted cells represent different phases of myogenic differentiation. PMID:22919359

  8. Pharmacologic treatment for urgency-predominant urinary incontinence in women diagnosed using a simplified algorithm: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alison J.; Hess, Rachel; Arya, Lily A.; Richter, Holly E.; Subak, Leslee L.; Bradley, Catherine S.; Rogers, Rebecca G.; Myers, Deborah L.; Johnson, Karen C.; Gregory, W. Thomas; Kraus, Stephen R.; Schembri, Michael; Brown, Jeanette S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes associated with the initiation of treatment for urgency-predominant incontinence in women diagnosed by a simple 3-item questionnaire. Study Design We conducted a multicenter, double-blinded, 12-week randomized trial of pharmacologic therapy for urgency-predominant incontinence in ambulatory women diagnosed by the simple 3-item questionnaire. Participants (N = 645) were assigned randomly to fesoterodine therapy (4-8 mg daily) or placebo. Urinary incontinence was assessed with the use of voiding diaries; postvoid residual volume was measured after treatment. Results After 12 weeks, women who had been assigned randomly to fesoterodine therapy reported 0.9 fewer urgency and 1.0 fewer total incontinence episodes/day, compared with placebo (P ≤ .001). Four serious adverse events occurred in each group, none of which was related to treatment. No participant had postvoid residual volume of ≥250 mL after treatment. Conclusion Among ambulatory women with urgency-predominant incontinence diagnosed with a simple 3-item questionnaire, pharmacologic therapy resulted in a moderate decrease in incontinence frequency without increasing significant urinary retention or serious adverse events, which provides support for a streamlined algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of female urgency-predominant incontinence. PMID:22542122

  9. Vaginal cone use in passive and active phases in patients with stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Jorge Milhem; Ribeiro, Ricardo Muniz; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Abrão, Maurício Simões; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate vaginal cone therapy in two phases, passive and active, in women with stress urinary incontinence. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, São Paulo University, Brazil. Twenty-four women with a clinical and urodynamic diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence were treated with vaginal cones in a passive phase (without voluntary contractions of the pelvic floor) and an active phase (with voluntary contractions), each of which lasted three months. Clinical complaints, a functional evaluation of the pelvic floor, a pad test, and bladder neck mobility were analyzed before and after each phase. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients completed the treatment. The reduction in absolute risk with the pad test was 0.38 (p<0.034) at the end of the passive phase and 0.67 (p<0.0001) at the end of the active phase. The reduction in absolute risk with the pelvic floor evaluation was 0.62 (p<0.0001) at the end of the passive phase and 0.77 (p<0.0001) at the end of the active phase. The reduction in absolute risk of bladder neck mobility was 0.38 (p<0.0089) at the end of the passive phase and 0.52 (p<0.0005) at the end of the active phase. Complete reversal of symptomatology was observed in 12 (57.1%) patients, and satisfaction was expressed by 19 (90.4%). CONCLUSION: Using vaginal cones in the passive phase, as other researchers did, was effective. Inclusion of the active phase led to additional improvement in all of the study parameters evaluated in women with stress urinary incontinence. Randomized studies are needed, however, to confirm these results. PMID:21789381

  10. Coping with stress and quality of life in women with stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Adamczuk, Jolanta; Szymona-Pałkowska, Katarzyna; Robak, Jacek Marcin; Rykowska-Górnik, Katarzyna; Steuden, Stanisława

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary incontinence (UI) involves uncontrolled leakage of urine through the urethra as a result of damage to its sphincter muscle and a disturbed function of the urogenital diaphragm within the pelvis minor. The symptoms of UI radically impair psychological, somatic, and social functioning. The aim of each disease stress coping process is to reduce the impact of harmful agents as well as the acquisition of necessary preventive measures in order to combat the disorder. Aim of the study was to assess the relationship between coping styles used when dealing with stress associated with disease and the quality of life. Material and methods The study was carried out at an outpatients’ clinic located in the Lublin Province (eastern Poland), covering 150 women with diagnosed stress urinary incontinence, aged between 32 and 79. The following methods were used: (a) Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (Endler, Parker) to assess coping styles, (b) CASP-19 scale (Higgins, Hyde, Wiggins, Blade) to measure the overall quality of life, and (c) Urinary Incontinence Life Quality Scale (Szymona-Pałkowska, Kraczkowski). Results The preferred style in the studied group of women was Task-Oriented Coping. This style is associated with a low score on the Independence from Symptoms scale and low Control, being simultaneously correlated with Autonomy and Self-Realisation. Emotion-Oriented Coping is associated with low psychological, physical and social well-being, as well as with little independence from the disease symptoms, little pleasure and self-realisation, but it gives a sense of internal control. Avoidance-Oriented Coping does not significantly correlate with any of the Overall Quality of Life dimensions. Conclusions Women suffering from UI tend to try to solve their problem by means of cognitive transformation. In their situation, clinging to the problem turns out to be a depressing factor and entails a lower quality of their life. PMID:26528106

  11. Urinary incontinence incidence: quantitative meta-analysis of factors that explain variation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Walter F; Hirsh, Annemarie G; Kirchner, H Lester; Clarke, Deseraé N; Litchtenfeld, Marc J; Minassian, Vatché A

    2014-04-01

    We sought to explain variation in female age specific incidence rates for urinary incontinence using published, population based studies. We performed an extensive MEDLINE® review of published, population based studies of the female urinary incontinence incidence rate from 1966 to 2011 using a combination of symptom and epidemiological search terms. A total of 18 reports described 17 unique incidence studies. We abstracted the features of each study (eg sample size, followup, etc) along with detailed data on 109 age specific incidence rates (ie new cases per 1,000 person-years). Because the Nurses' Health Study had unique demographics and was dominant in sample size, analyses were completed with and without this study. Weighted (ie square root of sample size) linear regression was used to determine factors (ie age, source population, race, frequency score, etc) explaining variance among age specific incidence rates. Age and case definition accounted for 60% of the variation in incidence rates among studies. The age specific incidence was less than 2/1,000 person-years before age 40 years and it increased thereafter. For a given age group incidence rates varied as much as sixfold across studies, a finding that was largely explained by variation in case definition. The case definition accounts for substantial variation in urinary incontinence incidence estimates. Developing standards for reporting would provide a foundation for policy guidance and understanding etiology. We recommend that quantitative frequency criteria (eg 2 times or more per month) be reported vs vague thresholds (eg sometimes or often). Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The potential role of stem cells in the treatment of urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Voiding dysfunction encompasses a wide range of urologic disorders including stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder that have a detrimental impact on the quality of life of millions of men and women worldwide. In recent years, we have greatly expanded our understanding of the pathophysiology of these clinical conditions. However, current gold standard therapies often provide symptomatic relief without targeting the underlying etiology of disease development. Recently, the use of stem cells to halt disease progression and reverse underlying pathology has emerged as a promising method to restore normal voiding function. Stem cells are classically thought to aid in tissue repair via their ability for multilineage differentiation and self-renewal. They may also exert a therapeutic effect via the secretion of bioactive factors that direct other stem and progenitor cells to the area of injury, and that also possess antiapoptotic, antiscarring, neovascularization, and immunomodulatory properties. Local injections of mesenchymal, muscle-derived, and adipose-derived stem cells have all yielded successful outcomes in animal models of mechanical, nerve, or external urethral sphincter injury in stress urinary incontinence. Similarly, direct injection of mesenchymal and adipose-derived stem cells into the bladder in animal models of bladder overactivity have demonstrated efficacy. Early clinical trials using stem cells for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in both male and female patients have also achieved promising functional results with minimal adverse effects. Although many challenges remain to be addressed prior to the clinical implementation of this technology, novel stem-cell-based therapies are an exciting potential therapy for voiding dysfunction. PMID:25642292

  13. Female urinary incontinence and artificial urinary sphincter: study of efficacy and risk factors for failure and complications.

    PubMed

    Vayleux, Bertrand; Rigaud, Jérôme; Luyckx, François; Karam, Georges; Glémain, Pascal; Bouchot, Olivier; Le Normand, Loïc

    2011-06-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) has become a commonly used therapy for severe urinary incontinence (UI) due to intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD). To evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and risk factors for failure and complications of AUS implantation in women with nonneurologic UI. From May 1987 to December 2009, 215 women with ISD were treated by AUS implantation, with a mean age of 62.8 yr and a mean follow-up of 6 yr (standard deviation: 5.6 yr). Previous surgical procedures to treat incontinence had been performed in 88.8% of the patients. Urodynamic assessment was required. Patients using only 0 or 1 pad at the end of follow-up were considered continent. The patient's level of satisfaction was evaluated by a global analogue scale and clinical interview. All women had AUS implantation. Patients were evaluated for continence rate, risk factors for failures, and complications. At the end of follow-up, 158 patients (73.5%) were continent, and 170 (79%) were satisfied. The redo rate was 15.3% after a mean interval of 8.47 yr for the first redo procedure. Fifteen explantations (7%) were performed. The only risk factor for intraoperative complications (10.7%) was smoking (p<0.004). Six patients (2.8%) were lost to follow-up. AUS failed to treat incontinence in 51 patients (23.7%) due to defective manipulation in 27.4% of the cases. On multivariate analysis, risk factors for failure were age >70 yr (odds ratio [OR]: 2.46), a history of the Burch procedure (OR: 2.28), or pelvic radiotherapy (OR: 4.37) (p<0.05). The place for this safe and long-lasting effective technique in the treatment of UI due to recurrent sphincter deficiency is confirmed. Screening for these risk factors should allow better patient selection. Copyright © 2011 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. OnabotulinumtoxinA in urinary incontinence: Prospective Study of a Case Series.

    PubMed

    Martín-Martínez, A; Fernández-Mederos, A; García-Hernández, J Á

    2017-09-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of a single intravesical injection of onabotulinumtoxinA (OnaBTA) for treating urge urinary incontinence (UUI) in women. We performed a prospective case-series study of consecutive patients with refractory UUI treated with an intravesical injection of OnaBTA. The patients were administered 100 units of OnaBTA injected into the bladder wall following 4 weeks of flushing with anticholinergic agents or beta 3 agonists. The urodynamic and clinical endpoints were evaluated before and 6 months after the injection of OnaBTA. The primary study endpoint was the number of episodes of urinary leakage. A total of 204 of the 210 selected patients conducted a valid visit 6 months after the therapeutic application. At 6 months of treatment with OnaBTA, 110 (53.9%) patients remained continent and were considered a success. However, 57 (27.9%) patients experienced one episode of urinary leakage per day, and 37 (18.2%) had 2 or more. In terms of the urodynamic parameters, we observed the following changes: increase in maximum bladder capacity (P<.0001) and reduced maximum pressure of the detrusor (P<.0001). In terms of the safety profile, 8 (3.9%) patients had self-limiting haematuria during the procedure, which resolved spontaneously, and 9 (4.4%) patients had acute urinary retention that required intermittent catheterisation. This study supports the use of OnabotulinumtoxinA in patients with urge urinary incontinence that does not respond to medical treatment. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. MR imaging of the female urethra and supporting ligaments in assessment of urinary incontinence: spectrum of abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Macura, Katarzyna J; Genadry, Rene R; Bluemke, David A

    2006-01-01

    The traditional methods for evaluation of urinary incontinence in women include urodynamics, cystourethroscopy, cystourethrography, and ultrasonography. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has not played a major role in the assessment of women with urinary incontinence. However, high-resolution MR imaging allows detailed visualization of the urethral sphincter and supporting ligaments in women and may contribute to the diagnosis and staging of sphincteric incompetence related to intrinsic sphincter deficiency or urethral hypermobility. Both the anatomy and the function of the female urethra can be depicted on MR images. The spectrum of abnormalities detected at MR imaging in women with stress urinary incontinence are classified as (a) findings related to the urethral sphincter deficiency and (b) defects of the urethral support ligaments and urethral hypermobility. These abnormalities include a small urethral sphincter, funneling at the bladder neck, distortion of the urethral support ligaments, cystocele, an asymmetric pubococcygeus muscle, abnormal shape of the vagina, enlargement of the retropubic space, and an increased vesicourethral angle.

  16. Size Does Not Make the Difference: 3D/4D Transperineal Sonographic Measurements of the Female Urethra in the Assessment of Urinary Incontinence Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Pecks, Ulrich; Stickeler, Elmar; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objective was to evaluate the usefulness of transperineal ultrasound in the assessment of the urethral length and urethral lumen by 3D/4D transperineal sonography to discriminate between female patients with subtypes of urinary incontinence. Methods. A total of 150 female patients underwent an examination because of urinary incontinence. 41 patients were diagnosed with urgency urinary incontinence (OAB), 67 patients were diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and 42 patients were in the control group (CTRL). Three diameters of the urethral lumen (proximal (U1), medial (U2), and distal (U3)) and the urethral length were measured. By the assessment of the urethral lumen, the presence of the urethral funneling was evaluated. Results. We found a significant difference in the urethral length and urethral lumen U2 of OAB and SUI versus CTRL. The urethral length was significantly greater (P < 0.05) and the urethral lumen was significantly wider (P < 0.05) in the patients with urinary incontinence. The incidence of the urethral funneling was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the study groups with urinary incontinence than in the control group. Conclusions. Our results have shown the urethral changes obtained by ultrasound in patients with urinary incontinence, but they are still insufficient to distinguish between subtypes of urinary incontinence. PMID:27990423

  17. A 10-Year Follow-Up of Urinary and Fecal Incontinence among the Oldest Old in the Community: The Canadian Study of Health and Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostbye,Truls; Seim, Arnfinn; Krause, Katrina M.; Feightner, John; Hachinski, Vladimir; Sykes, Elizabeth; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2004-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is common in the elderly. The epidemiology of fecal and double (urinary and fecal) incontinence is less known. The Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA) is a national study of elderly living in the community at baseline (n = 8,949) and interviewed in 1991-1992, 1996, and 2001. Using data from the CSHA, we report the…

  18. Association of urinary and anal incontinence with measures of pelvic floor muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Oversand, S H; Atan, I K; Shek, K L; Dietz, H P

    2016-05-01

    To assess the association between clinical and sonographic measures of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function and symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence (AI). This was a retrospective study of women seen at a tertiary urogynecological unit. All women had undergone a standardized interview, clinical examination including Modified Oxford Scale (MOS) grading, urodynamic testing and four-dimensional translabial ultrasound (TLUS). Cranioventral shift of the bladder neck (BN) and reduction in the hiatal anteroposterior (AP) diameter were measured using ultrasound volumes acquired on maximal PFM contraction, blinded against all clinical data. Data from 726 women with a mean age of 56 ± 13.7 (range, 18-88) years and a mean body mass index of 29 ± 6.1 (range, 17-55) kg/m(2) were analyzed. Stress (SI) and urge (UI) urinary incontinence were reported by 73% and 72%, respectively, and 13% had AI. Mean MOS grade was 2.4 ± 1.1 (range, 0-5). Mean cranioventral BN shift on TLUS was 7.1 ± 4.4 (range, 0.3-25.3) mm; mean reduction in AP hiatal diameter was 8.6 ± 4.8 (range, 0.3-31.3) mm. On univariate analysis, neither MOS nor TLUS measures were strongly associated with symptoms of urinary incontinence or AI; associations were non-significant except for BN displacement/SI (7.3 mm vs 6.5 mm; P = 0.028), BN displacement/UI (6.85 vs 7.75; P = 0.019), hiatal AP diameter/AI (9.6 mm vs 8.5 mm; P = 0.047) and MOS/SI (2.42 vs 2.19; P = 0.013). In this large retrospective study we did not find any strong associations between sonographic or palpatory measures of PFM function and symptoms of urinary incontinence or AI. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Non-ablative erbium YAG laser for the treatment of type III stress urinary incontinence (intrinsic sphincter deficiency).

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Adrian; Brandi, Hugo

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to determine the safety and efficacy of a new non-ablative erbium YAG laser procedure for the treatment of type III stress urinary incontinence (intrinsic sphincter deficiency) in women. Twenty-two patients with a Valsalva leak point pressure less than 60 cm H2O were recruited and treated with a non-ablative erbium laser delivering low fluence pulses inside the whole length of the urethra through a specially designed cannula. Treatment consisted of two treatment sessions with a 3-week interval in-between. Therapeutic efficacy, as assessed by a questionnaire addressing quality of life during urinary incontinence and the 1-h pad test, was measured at 3 and 6 months after the procedure. Both methods of assessment showed similar levels of improvement in terms of incontinence severity and improvement in quality of life. All patients tolerated the therapy well and adverse effects were mild and transient. The results of this pilot study showed significant improvement of type III stress urinary incontinence. Despite the limitations of this study, being small patient number and short follow-up, this non-ablative intraurethral erbium YAG laser procedure seems to be a safe and efficacious alternative for patients with type III stress urinary incontinence. More controlled studies should be performed to confirm this data and to evaluate the long-term effects.

  20. Characteristics Associated With Treatment Response in Women Undergoing OnabotulinumtoxinA and Sacral Neuromodulation for Refractory Urgency Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Richter, HE; Amundsen, CL; Erickson, SW; Jelovsek, JE; Komesu, Y; Chermansky, C; Harvie, H; Albo, M; Myers, D; Gregory, WT; Wallace, D

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To identify clinical and demographic characteristics associated with onabotulinumtoxinA and sacral neuromodulation treatment response in women with refractory urgency urinary incontinence. Material and Methods Data were analyzed from the Refractory Overactive Bladder: Sacral Neuromodulation vs Botulinum Toxin Assessment trial. Baseline participant characteristics and clinical variables associated with two definitions of treatment response: 1) reduction in mean daily urgency incontinence episodes over 6 months 2) ≥50% decrease in urgency incontinence episodes across 6 months were identified. Linear and logistic regression models were fit to estimate mean reductions in incontinence episodes and adjusted odds ratios for incidence of ≥50% decrease with 95% confidence intervals, respectively. Results For both treatments, a greater reduction in mean daily urgency incontinence episodes was associated with higher Health Utility Index scores (P=0.002) and higher baseline incontinence episodes (P<0.001). Increased age was associated with less reduction in incontinence episodes (P<0.001). Increasing body mass index (aOR 0.82 per 5 points, 95% CI 0.70, 0.96) was associated with reduced achievement of ≥50% decrease in incontinence episodes after both treatments. Greater age (aOR 0.44 per 10 years, 95% CI 0.30, 0.65) and higher functional comorbidity index (aOR 0.84 per point, 95% CI 0.71, 0.99) were associated with reduced achievement of ≥50% decrease in urgency incontinence episodes in the onabotulinuntoxinA group only (P=0.016; P=0.031, respectively). Conclusion Increasing age, body mass index, and functional comorbidity are negatively associated with treatment response while greater incontinence frequency and health utility is associated with a greater response to third line treatments for refractory urgency incontinence. PMID:28501541

  1. New Paradigms for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research in Electronic Medical Records: An Example of Detecting Urinary Incontinence Following Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Tamang, Suzanne; Blayney, Douglas; Brooks, Jim; Shah, Nigam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: National initiatives to develop quality metrics emphasize the need to include patient-centered outcomes. Patient-centered outcomes are complex, require documentation of patient communications, and have not been routinely collected by healthcare providers. The widespread implementation of electronic medical records (EHR) offers opportunities to assess patient-centered outcomes within the routine healthcare delivery system. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility and accuracy of identifying patient centered outcomes within the EHR. Methods: Data from patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing prostatectomy were used to develop and test algorithms to accurately identify patient-centered outcomes in post-operative EHRs – we used urinary incontinence as the use case. Standard data mining techniques were used to extract and annotate free text and structured data to assess urinary incontinence recorded within the EHRs. Results A total 5,349 prostate cancer patients were identified in our EHR-system between 1998–2013. Among these EHRs, 30.3% had a text mention of urinary incontinence within 90 days post-operative compared to less than 1.0% with a structured data field for urinary incontinence (i.e. ICD-9 code). Our workflow had good precision and recall for urinary incontinence (positive predictive value: 0.73 and sensitivity: 0.84). Discussion. Our data indicate that important patient-centered outcomes, such as urinary incontinence, are being captured in EHRs as free text and highlight the long-standing importance of accurate clinician documentation. Standard data mining algorithms can accurately and efficiently identify these outcomes in existing EHRs; the complete assessment of these outcomes is essential to move practice into the patient-centered realm of healthcare. PMID:27347492

  2. The impact of fecal and urinary incontinence on quality of life 6 months after childbirth

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Victoria L.; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Fitzgerald, Mary Pat; Borello-France, Diane; Janz, Nancy K.; Fine, Paul M.; Whitehead, William; Brown, Morton B.; Weber, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of postpartum fecal incontinence (FI) and urinary incontinence (UI) on quality of life (QOL). Study Design Seven hundred fifty-nine primiparous women in the Childbirth and Pelvic Symptoms study were interviewed 6 months postpartum. FI and UI were assessed with validated questionnaires. We measured QOL with SF-12 summary scores, health utility index score (a measure of self-rated overall health), and the modified Manchester Health Questionnaire. Results Women with FI had worse self-rated health utility index scores (85.1 ± 9.8 vs 88.0 ± 11.6, P = .02) and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) mental summary scores (46.8 ± 9.2 vs 51.1 ± 8.7, P < .0001) than women without FI or flatal incontinence. Women with UI had worse SF-12 mental summary scores (48.3 ± 9.8 vs 51.6 ± 7.8, P < .01) and self-rated health utility index scores (84.1 ± 12.5 vs 88.7 ± 10.1, P < .01) than women without UI. Women with both FI and UI had the lowest SF-12 mental summary scores (44.5 ± 9.0). Conclusion Six months after delivery, women experiencing FI or UI reported negative effects on health-related QOL. FI and UI together have a greater impact than either condition alone. PMID:18060960

  3. Risk factors for mesh erosion after vaginal sling procedures for urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Kokanali, M K; Doğanay, M; Aksakal, O; Cavkaytar, S; Topçu, H O; Özer, İ

    2014-06-01

    To identify risk factors for mesh erosion in women undergoing vaginal sling procedures for urinary incontinence with synthetic meshes, and to estimate the incidence of mesh erosion after these procedures. Retrospective study of women who underwent vaginal sling procedures between January 2007 and January 2013. In total, 1439 consecutive women with stress urinary incontinence were investigated. Five hundred and sixty-six (39.3%) women underwent a tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure and 873 (60.7%) women underwent a transobturator tape (TOT) procedure. All procedures were performed using meshes of the same type and size. Women who experienced mesh erosion were defined as cases, and women who were not re-admitted or identified with mesh erosion during the study period were defined as controls. Demographics, operative techniques and outcomes were taken from medical records. Multivariate regression identified the odds of mesh erosion. Sixty-one of 1439 (4.2%) women were found to have mesh erosion in the postoperative period: 41 (67.2%) after TOT procedures and 20 (32.8%) after TVT procedures. The rate of mesh erosion was 4.7% in the TOT group and 3.5% in the TVT group, and this difference was significant (p<0.05). Mean age, body mass index, current smoking, menopausal status and diabetes mellitus were significantly higher among cases than controls. Univariate analysis showed that length of vaginal incision >2 cm, recurrent vaginal incision for postoperative complications, and previous pelvic organ prolapse or incontinence surgery were significant risk factors for erosion. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that older age, diabetes mellitus, current smoking, length of vaginal incision >2 cm, recurrent vaginal incision for postoperative complications, and previous pelvic organ prolapse or incontinence surgery were independent risk factors for mesh erosion. Mesh erosion following vaginal sling procedures is a frustrating complication with relatively low incidence. It

  4. The Impact of Central Obesity on Storage Luts and Urinary Incontinence After Prostatic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gacci, Mauro; Sebastianelli, Arcangelo; Salvi, Matteo; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Tubaro, Andrea; Gravas, Stavros; Moncada, Ignacio; Serni, Sergio; Maggi, Mario; Vignozzi, Linda

    2016-09-01

    In the developed and developing countries, the overall prevalence of central obesity in the elderly men is growing. In addition, the progressive aging of male population increased the possibilities of coexisting morbidities associated with obesity such as lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic enlargement (BPE) or to prostate cancer (PCa) needing primary treatment, including radical prostatectomy (RP), which can further adversely affect the quality of life. Simple and radical prostatectomy are the most common surgical procedures in urologic unit all over the world for BPE and PCa, respectively. After both interventions, patients can present bothering storage LUTS that can worsen all the other clinical outcomes. Preset study will review the role of central obesity as a risk factor for storage LUTS or urinary incontinence, after prostatic surgery for BPE or PCa.

  5. Artificial urinary sphincter implantation in women with stress urinary incontinence: preliminary comparison of robot-assisted and open approaches.

    PubMed

    Peyronnet, Benoit; Vincendeau, Sébastien; Tondut, Lauranne; Bensalah, Karim; Damphousse, Mireille; Manunta, Andréa

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to compare outcomes of open and robot-assisted artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation in female patients. The charts of all female patients who underwent an AUS implantation between 2008 and 2014 in a single center were retrospectively reviewed. From 2008 to 2012, AUS were implanted using an open approach and from 2013 to 2014 using a robot-assisted approach. Perioperative and functional parameters were compared between groups. The primary endpoint was continence status. Twenty-four women were assessed: 16 in the open group and eight in the robot-assisted group. Three patients had neurogenic stress urinary incontinence. Most patients had undergone previous procedures for urinary incontinence (15 in the open group and seven in the robotic group). Mean operative time was similar in both groups (214 vs. 211 min; p = 0.90). Postoperative complicationsrate was lower in the robot-assisted group (25 vs. 75 %; p = 0.02). There was a trend toward a lower intraoperative complication rate (37.5 vs. 62.5 %; p = 0.25), decreased blood loss (17 ml vs. 275 ml; p = 0.22), and shorter length of stay (3.5 vs. 9.3 days; p = 0.09) in the robot-assisted group. Continence rates were comparable in both groups (75 vs. 68.8 %; p = 0.75). Three AUS explantations were needed in the open group (18.8 %) compared with one in the robot-assisted group (12.5 %; p = 0.70). In female patients, the robot-assisted approach compared with open AUS implantation could decrease intraoperative and postoperative complication rates, length of hospital stay, and blood loss.

  6. [Perineal electrical stimulation and rehabilitation in urinary incontinence and other symptoms of non-neurologic origin].

    PubMed

    Perrigot, M; Pichon, B; Peskine, A; Vassilev, K

    2008-07-01

    A literature survey of 106 articles shows that standard electrostimulation is an effective treatment of urinary incontinence and urinary disorders with bladder instability. Bladder inhibition is obtained by applying an alternating current at a frequency of between 5 and 25Hz and with a pulse width of between 0.2 and 0.5ms. In 19 articles (including three randomized, placebo-controlled studies), good results were achieved in 60 to 90% of cases, depending on the exact method (i.e. chronic or acute stimulation). Standard electrostimulation is also efficient in stress urinary incontinence. Urethral closure is obtained by applying a 50Hz alternating current with, again, a pulse width of between 0.2 and 0.5ms. In 21 articles (including two randomized, placebo-controlled studies), good results were achieved in 47.5 to 77% of cases. Treatments combining perineal rehabilitation (behavioural education, muscle improvement and biofeed-back) and electrostimulation are reported by 10 authors, with good results in 70 to 80% of cases after 10 to 12 sessions. According to 14 studies, neuromodulation is also an efficient treatment for complex urinary disorders, urgency, pollakiuria and dysuria. The recommended stimulation parameters are a frequency of 10 to 15Hz and a pulse width of 210ms. Good results were found in 34 to 94% of cases (with between 60 and 75% in an international, multicenter study). The overall results different from one study to another because of the need to harmonize stimulation parameters, choice of the study population and treatment follow-up with self-training programs and therapeutic education.

  7. Predictors of Treatment Failure 24 Months After Surgery For Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Holly E.; Diokno, Ananias; Kenton, Kimberly; Norton, Peggy; Albo, Michael; Kraus, Stephen; Moalli, Pamela; Chai, Toby C.; Zimmern, Philippe; Litman, Heather; Tennstedt, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Identify baseline demographic and clinical factors associated with treatment failure after surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Materials & Methods Data were obtained from 655 women randomized to Burch colposuspension or autologous rectus sling. Of those, 543 (83%) had stress failure status assessed at 24 months (269 Burch, 274 sling). Stress failure (n=261) was defined by any of the following: self-report of SUI by the Medical, Epidemiological, and Social Aspects of Aging (MESA) questionnaire, positive stress test, or re-treatment for SUI. Non-stress failure (n=66) was defined as positive 24-hr pad test (>15 ml) or any incontinent episodes by 3-day voiding diary with none of the three criteria for stress failure. Subjects not meeting any failure criteria were considered a treatment success (n=185). Adjusting for surgical treatment group and clinical site, logistic regression models were developed to predict the probability of treatment failure. Results Severity of urge incontinence symptoms (p=0.041), prolapse stage (p=0.013), and being post-menopausal without hormone therapy (p=0.023) were significant predictors for stress failure. Odds of non-stress failure quadrupled for every 10-point increase in MESA urge score (OR:3.93, CI:1.45,10.65) and decreased over 2 times for every 10-point increase in stress score (OR:0.36, CI:0.16,0.84). The associations of risk factors and failure remained similar regardless of surgical group. Conclusion Two years after surgery, risk factors for stress failure are similar after Burch and sling procedures and include greater baseline urge incontinence symptoms, more advanced prolapse, and menopausal not on HRT. Higher urge scores predicted failure by non stress-specific outcomes. PMID:18206917

  8. Long-term Efficacy and Safety of Questionnaire-based Initiation of Urgency Urinary Incontinence Treatment

    PubMed Central

    HESS, Rachel; HUANG, Alison J.; RICHTER, Holly E.; GHETTI, Chiara C.; SUNG, Vivian W.; BARRETT-CONNOR, Elizabeth; GREGORY, W. Thomas; PINKERTON, JoAnn V.; BRADLEY, Catherine S.; KRAUS, Stephen R.; ROGERS, Rebecca G.; SUBAK, Leslee L.; JOHNSON, Karen C.; ARYA, Lily A.; SCHEMBRI, Michael; BROWN, Jeanette S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the longer-term efficacy and safety of initiating treatment for urgency-predominant urinary incontinence (UUI) in women diagnosed using a simple questionnaire rather than an extensive evaluation. Study Design Women completing a 12-week randomized controlled trial of fesoterodine therapy for UUI diagnosed by questionnaire were invited to participate in a 9-month open label continuation study. UUI and voiding episodes were collected using voiding diaries. Participant satisfaction was measured by questionnaire. Safety was assessed by measurement of post void residual volume and adverse event monitoring; if necessary, women underwent specialist evaluation. Longitudinal changes in UUI and voiding episodes were evaluated using linear mixed models adjusting for baseline. Results Of the 567 women completing the randomized trial, 498 (87.8%) took at least one dose of medication during this open label study. Compared to the enrollment visit in the randomized trial, fesoterodine was associated with a reduction in total incontinence episodes/day and urgency incontinence episodes/day at the end of the open label study [adjusted mean (standard error (SE)) 4.6 (0.12) to 1.2 (0.13) and 3.9 (0.11) to 0.9 (0.11) respectively, p-value<.0001 for both]. Most women were satisfied with treatment (89%, 92%, and 93% at 3, 6, and 9 months). Twenty-six women experienced 28 serious adverse events, one of which was considered possibly treatment-related. Twenty-two women had specialist evaluation: 5 women’s incontinence was misclassified by the 3IQ; none experienced harm due to misclassification. Conclusions Using a simple validated questionnaire to diagnose and initiate treatment for UUI in community dwelling women is safe and effective, allowing timely treatment by primary care practitioners. PMID:23659987

  9. Long-term results of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) for the treatment of female urinary stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Chêne, G; Amblard, J; Tardieu, A S; Escalona, J R; Viallon, A; Fatton, B; Jacquetin, B

    2007-09-01

    Prospective evaluation of outcome and complications over a 5-year period post-treatment of urinary stress incontinence by TVT, and comparison of our results with the reference studies. About 94 patients were treated for urinary stress incontinence only by one TVT procedure (single surgical procedure), between April 1997 and December 1998; 68% of patients presented pure urinary stress incontinence and 32% mixed incontinence. We found also a 25.5% rate of sphincter deficiency (UCP < 20 cm H(2)O) in this cohort. Patients were evaluated after 5 years: 52 complete evaluations (clinical, flow measurement with measurement of post-mictional residue, 24h PAD-test, quality of life questionnaire), 30 complete telephone interviews, 12 lost to follow-up (2 patients deceased). About 87% of the patients had a 5-year follow-up. The success rate was 79.2% overall (84.5% for the pure urinary stress incontinence and 67% for the mixed incontinence cases), and 72.2% for the cases of associated sphincter deficiency. We had only a 13% rate of patients lost to follow-up. More than half of the urinary urgency cases were treated successfully, however with a less satisfactory outcome in cases of bladder instability. The urodynamic exploration appeared to reveal that TVT caused dysuria: 52% of patients had a maximum flowrate below 15 ml/s, but the quality of life was improved, with a 95% rate of satisfaction without functional problems. We observed no late complications such as vaginal erosion or rejection of the prolene; the de novo syndrome was rare, with 8.5% of urinary frequency, 6% of urinary urgency and only 5.7% of invalidating dysuria. We saw no cases of pelvic floor disease after TVT treatment. Our casuistry results are comparable with the reference studies by Scandinavian authors, Rezapour and Ulmsten, confirming the long-term success of the TVT procedure. Concerning the apparently elevated rates of post-TVT dysuria found by urodynamic exploration, a distinction has to be drawn

  10. A urinary incontinence continuing education online course for community health nurses in South Korea.

    PubMed

    De Gagne, Jennie C; Park, Sunah; So, Aeyoung; Wu, Bei; Palmer, Mary H; McConnell, Eleanor S

    2015-04-01

    Although urinary incontinence is prevalent among older women living in rural Korea, a lack of awareness and education exists in this population and among health professionals. Geographic isolation and limited resources also contribute to having few educational offerings for rural nurses. The authors' aim was to develop an online continuing education course on continence care for community health nurses and to examine its effectiveness. A one-group, pretest-posttest design was used to detect changes in knowledge and attitudes after taking the online education course. Participant satisfaction was also measured at the end of the training. A significant improvement in knowledge and attitudes toward continence care was noted. More than 95% of participants responded that they would recommend the online program to other health care providers and indicated the program would be helpful regarding continence care in their practice. The continuing education online course is a feasible strategy to support rural community health nurses' learning to improve knowledge and attitudes toward urinary incontinence management and care. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. [Postoperative evaluation of different surgical procedures in genuine stress urinary incontinence: a retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colorado, S; Pérez-Soriano, P; Alvarez-Mercado, R L; Herbert, A; Kunhardt-Rasch, J

    1996-06-01

    An evaluation of the surgical treatment for stress and mixed urinary incontinence and pelvic relaxation. One-year follow-up, was done. A retrospective study with 144 files from the surgeries performed between February 1993 and June 1994, at the Clínica de Urología Ginecológica del Instituto Nacional de Perinatología. We excluded 37 files because of incomplete information. The age, parity, hormonal stage, preoperative diagnosis by urodynamic studies, surgical treatments and one-year follow-up were analyzed. The mean age was 45.5 years. Pereyra procedure was performed in 53, Burch procedure in 47, anterior colporrhaphy in 5, and sling procedure in 2 patients. The incidence of complications was similar between the different groups. Resumption of spontaneous postsurgical voiding was delayed in the Pereyra group. The Burch urethropexy and Pereyra procedures were equally effective, with no statistical differences observed. Burch vaginal suspension was not more effective for the correction of urinary stress incontinence than Pereyra procedure.

  12. Sacral nerve stimulation: a promising therapy for fecal and urinary incontinence and constipation in children.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Jason P; Nacion, Kristine M; Deans, Katherine J; Minneci, Peter C; Levitt, Marc A; Mousa, Hayat M; Alpert, Seth A; Teich, Steven

    2015-10-01

    This study describes our series of children with bowel and bladder dysfunction (BDD) treated with sacral nerve stimulation in order to begin to identify characteristics associated with better outcomes and guide future therapies. Between May 2012 and February 2014, 29 patients were evaluated before and after sacral nerve stimulator (SNS) placement. A prospective data registry was developed that contains clinical information and patient-reported measures: Fecal Incontinence Qualify of Life Scale, Fecal Incontinence Severity Scale, PedsQL Gastrointestinal Symptom Scale, and Vancouver DES Symptom Scale. The median age of patients was 12.1 (interquartile range: 9.4, 14.3) years and the median follow-up period was 17.7 (12.9, 36.4) weeks. 93% had GI complaints and 65.5% had urinary symptoms while 7% had urologic symptoms only. The most common etiologies of BBD were idiopathic (66%) and imperforate anus (27%). Five patients required reoperation due to a complication with battery placement. Six of 11 patients (55%) with a pre-SNS cecostomy tube no longer require an antegrade bowel regimen as they now have voluntary bowel movements. Ten of eleven patients (91%) no longer require anticholinergic medications for bladder overactivity after receiving SNS. Significant improvements have been demonstrated in all four patient-reported instruments for the overall cohort. Early results have demonstrated improvements in both GI and urinary function after SNS placement in pediatric patients with bowel and bladder dysfunction. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Effects of a magnetic field on pelvic floor muscle function in women with stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Jonathan; Robertson, Jack R; Elia, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic fields have been found to affect neuromuscular function. To study the effect of a magnetic field on measurements of urethral function in women with stress urinary incontinence. Observational comparative study. Consecutive patients in a continence center. Twenty-six consecutive women with diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). History and physical examination, neurologic exam, urethrocystoscopy, urodynamic testing with water-filling cystometry, urethral profilometry at rest, during coughing, and during coughing while performing a levator ani contraction (knack maneuver). The same urodynamic procedures were performed again after the subjects were asked to step on specifically designed magnets (magnetic cushion device). Two-tailed student t test. Urethral pressure at rest, during coughing, and during coughing while performing a levator ani contraction. Mean age was 58.3 years (range: 36-81), mean parity 2.8 (range: 0-8). The urodynamic parameters measured without and with the use of the magnetic cushion device were not found to be different except for the knack maneuver. The pressure in the urethra during the knack maneuver while the subjects were stepping on the magnetic device was significantly higher than the 1 obtained without the magnetic field. In our patient population, a magnetic field increases the efficacy of voluntary levator ani contractions.

  14. Innovative treatment modalities for urinary incontinence: a European survey identifying experience and attitude of healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Arnoud W; Dicker, Maarten F A; Opmeer, Brent C; Angles, Sonia S; Raatikainen, Kaisa E; Alonso, Joan F; Tăut, Diana; Airaksinen, Olavi; Cardozo, Linda D; Roovers, Jan-Paul W R

    2017-04-21

    Urinary incontinence is a common condition in women, with a reported prevalence ranging from 25% to 51%. Of these women, an estimated 38% suffer from stress urinary incontinence (SUI). A European research consortium is investigating an innovative system based on information and communication technology for the conservative treatment of women with SUI. When introducing a new intervention, implementation barriers arise and need to be identified. Therefore, we investigated healthcare providers' experience with and attitude towards innovative care options. We performed an online survey to assess (1) the characteristics and practice of healthcare providers, (2) current protocols for SUI, (3) current use of biofeedback, and (4) knowledge about serious gaming. The survey was sent to members of professional societies in Europe (EUGA), UK (BSUG) and The Netherlands (DPFS). Of 341 questionnaires analyzed (response rate between 18% and 30%), 64% of the respondents had access to a protocol for the treatment of SUI, and 31% used biofeedback when treating patients with SUI. However, 92% considered that biofeedback has a clear or probable added value, and 97% of those who did not use biofeedback would change their practice if research evidence supported its use. Finally, 89% of respondents indicated that they had no experience of serious gaming, but 92% considered that it could be useful. Although inexperienced, European urogynecologists and physical therapists welcome innovative treatment options for the conservative treatment of SUI such as portable wireless biofeedback and serious gaming. Scientific evidence is considered a prerequisite to incorporate such innovations into clinical practice.

  15. Patient-reported outcome of solifenacin treatment among women experiencing urinary urgency and urgency incontinence.

    PubMed

    But, Igor; Orešković, Slavko; Bratuš, Dejan; Šprem-Goldštajn, Marina; Hlebič, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate treatment success and tolerability of solifenacin among women with urinary urgency (UU) and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI). In a prospective, observational, multicenter pilot study in Slovenia and Croatia, 100 women with UU and UUI were enrolled between January 2011 and July 2011. Patients received 5mg of solifenacin once daily for 12 weeks and completed a 3-day bladder diary, urgency questionnaire, Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI), and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ). Overall, 91 women completed 12 weeks of treatment. Severity, frequency, and bother of UU significantly had decreased at weeks 4 and 12 (P<0.001). Improvement in UU led to an improvement in mean IIQ score: a reduction in UU frequency had the greatest impact (P=0.006). The mean treatment success rate was 74.2% (by visual analog score) and was closely related to the mean change in irritative UDI score (r=0.39; P<0.001). Treatment success was greatest for patient perception of intensity of urgency scale (PPIUS; P=0.003), UU bother (P=0.017), and micturition frequency (P<0.026). Dry mouth occurred in 35.2% of women at 4 weeks, and 27.7% at week 12. Solifenacin treatment was effective and well-tolerated among women with UU and UUI. All overactive bladder symptoms had improved by week 12. © 2013.

  16. A 4-year-old boy presenting with persistent urinary incontinence: Questions.

    PubMed

    Keenswijk, Werner; Walle, Johan Vande

    2017-05-01

    A 4-year-old boy was referred to the nephrologist with daytime urinary incontinence and suspicion of an overactive bladder. At the age of 17 months he had been referred to the pediatric endocrinologist because of polyuria and polydipsia in order to exclude diabetes insipidus. Repeated water deprivation tests and a magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain were normal. Diabetes insipidus was excluded, and primary polydipsia was thought to be most likely since diabetes mellitus also had been excluded. At the current presentation, he drank up to 3 L a day and quite often had wet diapers. He also seemed to pass stools infrequently and with difficulty. Curiously his grandmother had similar symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia since childhood and had been diagnosed with primary polydipsia. The physical examination of our pediatric patient was normal. In the differential diagnosis we included diabetes insipidus but also contemplated other possibilities, such as nephronophthisis, tubulopathies and hypercalciuria. Laboratory results including urinalysis and an ultrasound of the kidney did not show any abnormalities, making a tubulopathy or hypercalciuria unlikely. A desmopressin test by the intravenous route came back completely normal, pointing to another cause than diabetes insipidus. Genetic testing for the nephronophthisis came back negative but was positive for a missense mutation in the AVPR2 gene (p.Arg104Cys) associated with partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. He was started on daily desmopressin. Within 3 days the urinary incontinence resolved as did the polyuria and faecal incontinence. His grandmother was referred to the geneticist and eventually the adult nephrologist. This case highlights the importance of being thorough when confronted with a difficult diagnosis. It also emphasizes that a test result does not necessarily equate to the presence or absence of a condition since the test with 100 % sensitivity and specificity has yet to be discovered.

  17. Urinary Incontinence as a Predictor of Death: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bardini, Claire; Combescure, Christophe; Dällenbach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between urinary incontinence (UI) and increased mortality remains controversial. The objective of our study was to evaluate if this association exists. Methods We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies comparing death rates among patients suffering from UI to those without incontinence. We searched in Medline, Embase and the Cochrane library using specific keywords. Studies exploring the post-stroke period were excluded. Hazard ratios (HR) were pooled using models with random effects. We stratified UI by gender and by UI severity and pooled all models with adjustment for confounding variables. Results Thirty-eight studies were retrieved. When compared to non-urinary incontinent participants, UI was associated with an increase in mortality with pooled non adjusted HR of 2.22 (95%CI 1.77–2.78). The risk increased with UI severity: 1.24 (95%CI: 0.79–1.97) for light, 1.71 (95%CI: 1.26–2.31) for moderate, and 2.72 (95%CI: 1.90–3.87) for severe UI respectively. When pooling adjusted measures of association, the resulting HR was 1.27 (95%CI: 1.13–1.42) and increased progressively for light, moderate and severe UI: 1.07 (95%CI: 0.79–1.44), 1.25 (95%CI: 0.99–1.58), and 1.47 (95%CI: 1.03–2.10) respectively. There was no difference between genders. Conclusion UI is a predictor of higher mortality in the general and particularly in the geriatric population. The association increases with the severity of UI and persists when pooling models adjusted for confounders. It is unclear if this association is causative or just reflects an impaired general health condition. As in most meta-analyses of observational studies, methodological issues should be considered when interpreting results. PMID:27410965

  18. The Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12): validation of the Dutch version.

    PubMed

    't Hoen, Lisette A; Utomo, Elaine; Steensma, Anneke B; Blok, Bertil F M; Korfage, Ida J

    2015-09-01

    To establish the reliability and validity of the Dutch version of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12) in women with pelvic floor dysfunction. The PISQ-12 was translated into Dutch following a standardized translation process. A group of 124 women involved in a heterosexual relationship who had had symptoms of urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence and/or pelvic organ prolapse for at least 3 months were eligible for inclusion. A reference group was used for assessment of discriminative ability. Data were analyzed for internal consistency, reproducibility, construct validity, responsiveness, and interpretability. An alteration was made to item 12 and was corrected for during the analysis. The patient group comprised 70 of the 124 eligible women, and the reference group comprised 208 women from a panel representative of the Dutch female population. The Dutch PISQ-12 showed an adequate internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.57 - 0.69, increasing with correction for item 12 to 0.69 - 0.75, for the reference and patient group, respectively. Scores in the patient group were lower (32.6 ± 6.9) than in the reference group (36.3 ± 4.8; p = 0.0001), indicating a lower sexual function in the patient group and good discriminative ability. Reproducibility was excellent with an intraclass correlation coefficient for agreement of 0.93 (0.88 - 0.96). A positive correlation was found with the Short Form-12 Health Survey (SF-12) measure representing good criterion validity. Due to the small number of patients who had received treatment at the 6-month follow-up, no significant responsiveness could be established. This study showed that the Dutch version of the PISQ-12 has good validity and reliability. The PISQ-12 will enable Dutch physicians to evaluate sexual dysfunction in women with pelvic floor disorders.

  19. Conservative chiropractic management of urinary incontinence using applied kinesiology: a retrospective case-series report

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Scott C.; Rosner, Anthony L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe the chiropractic management of 21 patients with daily stress and occasional total urinary incontinence (UI). Clinical Features Twenty-one case files of patients 13 to 90 years of age with UI from a chiropractic clinic were reviewed. The patients had a 4-month to 49-year history of UI and associated muscle dysfunction and low back and/or pelvic pain. Eighteen wore an incontinence pad throughout the day and night at the time of their appointments because of unpredictable UI. Intervention and Outcome Patients were evaluated for muscle impairments in the lumbar spine, pelvis, and pelvic floor and low back and/or hip pain. Positive manual muscle test results of the pelvis, lumbar spine muscles, and pelvic floor muscles were the most common findings. Lumbosacral dysfunction was found in 13 of the cases with pain provocation tests (applied kinesiology sensorimotor challenge); in 8 cases, this sensorimotor challenge was absent. Chiropractic manipulative therapy and soft tissue treatment addressed the soft tissue and articular dysfunctions. Chiropractic manipulative therapy involved high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation; Cox flexion distraction manipulation; and/or use of a percussion instrument for the treatment of myofascial trigger points. Urinary incontinence symptoms resolved in 10 patients, considerably improved in 7 cases, and slightly improved in 4 cases. Periodic follow-up examinations for the past 6 years, and no less than 2 years, indicate that for each participant in this case-series report, the improvements of UI remained stable. Conclusion The patients reported in this retrospective case series showed improvement in UI symptoms that persisted over time. PMID:22942842

  20. Conservative chiropractic management of urinary incontinence using applied kinesiology: a retrospective case-series report.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, Scott C; Rosner, Anthony L

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this case series is to describe the chiropractic management of 21 patients with daily stress and occasional total urinary incontinence (UI). Twenty-one case files of patients 13 to 90 years of age with UI from a chiropractic clinic were reviewed. The patients had a 4-month to 49-year history of UI and associated muscle dysfunction and low back and/or pelvic pain. Eighteen wore an incontinence pad throughout the day and night at the time of their appointments because of unpredictable UI. Patients were evaluated for muscle impairments in the lumbar spine, pelvis, and pelvic floor and low back and/or hip pain. Positive manual muscle test results of the pelvis, lumbar spine muscles, and pelvic floor muscles were the most common findings. Lumbosacral dysfunction was found in 13 of the cases with pain provocation tests (applied kinesiology sensorimotor challenge); in 8 cases, this sensorimotor challenge was absent. Chiropractic manipulative therapy and soft tissue treatment addressed the soft tissue and articular dysfunctions. Chiropractic manipulative therapy involved high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation; Cox flexion distraction manipulation; and/or use of a percussion instrument for the treatment of myofascial trigger points. Urinary incontinence symptoms resolved in 10 patients, considerably improved in 7 cases, and slightly improved in 4 cases. Periodic follow-up examinations for the past 6 years, and no less than 2 years, indicate that for each participant in this case-series report, the improvements of UI remained stable. The patients reported in this retrospective case series showed improvement in UI symptoms that persisted over time.

  1. Obesity and smoking: are they modulators of cough intravesical peak pressure in stress urinary incontinence?

    PubMed

    Fuganti, Paulo Emilio; Gowdy, John Michael; Santiago, Nilton Cesar

    2011-01-01

    SUI (Stress Urinary Incontinence) results from sudden increases in intravesical peak pressures exceeding urethral resistance leading to involuntary urine loss. Obesity and smoking are well established reversible risk factors for SUI and may alter intravesical peak pressures. BMI, smoking status, and other clinical factors were studied to determine their relationship to CIPP (maximal Intravesical Peak Pressures generated by Cough) in SUI complaining women. Three hundred nineteen women complaining of SUI were evaluated with medical history and urodynamics. Age, parity, comorbidities, previous surgery, BMI and history of smoking were obtained. The maximal intravesical peak pressures generated by cough (CIPP) and cough leak point pressure (CLPP) were acquired. Univariate and multivariate analysis were conducted. Current smokers and former smokers had similar CIPP (170cmH₂O and 170cmH₂O; p = 0.5, respectively); Those individuals who had never smoked had significantly lower CIPP (140cmH₂O; p = 0.000 and p = 0.009 respectively). BMI was directly related to CIPP (r = 0.41; p = 0.000). Vaginal deliveries (r = -0.15, p = 0.08) and diabetes (r = 0.15, p = 0.016) were also directly related to CIPP on univariate analysis. Only smoking status (p = 0.000) and BMI (p = 0.000) were independently significantly related to CIPP on multivariate analysis. Obesity and smoking showed increased CIPP (maximal Intravesical Peak Pressures generated by Cough). While reduced BMI is related to lower CIPP, smoking cessation does not appear to diminish CIPP. These findings suggest that weight loss may reduce incontinence by CIPP modulation. However, the benefits of smoking cessation without additional lifestyle modification, may have no benefit to improve urinary incontinence.

  2. Development of a wearable microwave bladder monitor for the management and treatment of urinary incontinence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krewer, F.; Morgan, F.; Jones, E.; Glavin, M.; O'Halloran, M.

    2014-05-01

    Urinary incontinence is defined as the inability to stop the flow of urine from the bladder. In the US alone, the annual societal cost of incontinence-related care is estimated at 12.6 billion dollars. Clinicians agree that those suffering from urinary incontinence would greatly benefit from a wearable system that could continually monitor the bladder, providing continuous feedback to the patient. While existing ultrasound-based solutions are highly accurate, they are severely limited by form-factor, battery size, cost and ease of use. In this study the authors propose an alternative bladder-state sensing system, based on Ultra Wideband (UWB) Radar. As part of an initial proof-of-concept, the authors developed one of the first dielectrically and anatomically-representative Finite Difference Time Domain models of the pelvis. These models (one male and one female) are derived from Magnetic Resonance images provided by the IT'IS Foundation. These IT'IS models provide the foundation upon which an anatomically-plausible bladder growth model was constructed. The authors employed accurate multi-pole Debye models to simulate the dielectric properties of each of the pelvic tissues. Two-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulations were completed for a range of bladder volumes. Relevant features were extracted from the FDTD-derived signals using Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and then classified using a k-Nearest-Neighbour and Support Vector Machine algorithms (incorporating the Leave-one-out cross-validation approach). Additionally the authors investigated the effects of signal fidelity, noise and antenna movement relative to the target as potential sources of error. The results of this initial study provide strong motivation for further research into this timely application, particularly in the context of an ageing population.

  3. National audit of continence care for older people: management of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Wagg, Adrian; Potter, Jonathan; Peel, Penny; Irwin, Penny; Lowe, Derek; Pearson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    the Department of Health report 'Good practice in continence services' highlights the need for proper assessment and management of urinary incontinence. The National Service Framework for Older People required service providers to establish integrated continence services by April 2004. A national audit was conducted to assess the quality of continence care for older people and whether these requirements have been met. the audit studied incontinent individuals of 65 years and over. Each site returned data on organisational structure and the process of 20 patients' care. Data were submitted via the internet, and all were anonymous. the national audit was conducted across England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Data on the care of patients/residents with bladder problems were returned by 141/326 (43%) of primary care trusts (PCT), by 159/196 (81%) of secondary care trusts (involving 198 hospitals) and by 29/309 (9%) of invited care homes. In all 58% of PCT, 48% of hospitals and 74% of care homes reported that integrated continence services existed in their area. Whilst basic provision of care appeared to be in place, the audit identified deficiencies in the organisation of services, and in the assessment and management of urinary incontinence in the elderly. the results of this audit indicate that the requirement for integrated continence services has not yet been met. Assessment and care by professionals directly looking after the older person were often lacking. There is an urgent need to re-establish the fundamentals of continence care into the practice of medical and nursing staff and action needs to be taken with regard to the establishment of truly integrated, quality services in this neglected area of practice.

  4. Recurrence rate of stress urinary incontinence in females with initial cure after transobturator tape procedure at 3-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Taeyong; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Kim, Hyung Suk; Lee, Jeong Woo; Bae, Jungbum

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess recurrence rates of urinary incontinence in women with initial cure after transobturator tape (TOT) procedure at 3-year follow-up. Materials and Methods Between June 2006 and May 2013, a total of 402 consecutive patients underwent the TOT procedure for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) at Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital. Of the 402 patients, 223 had sufficient medical records for analysis. Therefore, they were followed-up for 3 years postoperatively. Patient characteristics, urinary symptoms, physical examination, and urodynamic parameters were evaluated. The primary end point of “cure” was defined as the absence of any complaint of urinary leakage without needing pads for usual activities. Results Of the 223 patients, 196 patients (87.9%) were initially cured within 6 months postoperatively. Of the 196 patients, 70 (35.7%) had recurrent urinary incontinence at 3 years postoperatively, 51 (26.0%) had SUI, 16 (8.2%) had urgency urinary incontinence, and 3 (1.5%) had mixed urinary incontinence. In univariate analysis, preoperative urinary obstructive symptom was found to significant contributor to the recurrence of urinary incontinence at 3-year postoperatively (p=0.004). Conclusions In our study, 35.7% of the women with initial cure after TOT experienced the recurrence of urinary leakage during the 3-year follow-up. The cure rate of TOT was decreased as time went by, although the initial cure rate was high. PMID:28097269

  5. Obesity with Comorbid Stress Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Narrative Review to Inform Dietetics Practice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Barbara; Shorter, Barbara; Isoldi, Kathy Keenan; Moldwin, Robert M

    2017-06-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a common problem among women; clinical treatment guidelines include weight reduction as a strategy for controlling urinary leakage. The purpose of this review was to gather evidence on the association between obesity and SUI and to ascertain whether there are any special considerations for implementing medical nutrition therapy with community-dwelling, obese, adult females with comorbid SUI. Five key findings emerged: epidemiologic studies consistently report statistically significant associations between obesity and SUI, randomized control trials found that weight loss appears to ameliorate SUI symptoms, the SUI-activity link may affect weight management, there is a potential interplay between SUI and the obesity-sleep connection, and dietary components are associated with the exacerbation of urinary symptoms. The pathogenesis of SUI and obesity-related contributions to urinary leakage is included in the introductory discussion. Lastly, insights on special considerations for implementing nutrition interventions with this population are offered. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Economic burden of urgency urinary incontinence in the United States: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Karin S; Wein, Alan; Nicholson, Sean; Kvasz, Marion; Chen, Chieh-I; Milsom, Ian

    2014-02-01

    The International Continence Society (ICS) identifies several urinary incontinence (UI) subtypes: urgency urinary incontinence (UUI), stress UI (SUI), and mixed UI (MUI). UUI is a common symptom of overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome. Based on the current ICS definition of OAB, all patients with UUI have OAB, whereas not all patients with OAB have UUI. Because UUI is a chronic condition that is expected to increase in prevalence as the population of elderly individuals grows, it is important to understand its economic burden on society and patients and its cost components.  To summarize the published English language medical literature on estimates of the economic burden of UUI in the United States from a societal and patient perspective, including direct costs (diagnosis, treatment, routine care [including incontinence pads], and UUI-associated comorbidities/complications); indirect costs (lost wages by patients and caregivers and lost work productivity due to absenteeism and presenteeism); and intangible costs (pain, suffering, and decreased health-related quality of life).  A PubMed search of the literature for articles on the economic burden of UUI in the United States was conducted using the search terms (urgency urinary incontinence OR urge incontinence OR mixed incontinence OR overactive bladder) AND (burden OR cost OR economic) AND (United States), with limits for English language, publication from 1991 to 2011, humans, and adults (19+ years). Only primary articles of non-neurogenic UUI in the United States were retained.  Seven studies were identified that included data on the economic burden of UUI in the United States from a societal and patient perspective. Although estimates of the total economic burden of UUI include direct, indirect, and intangible costs, none of the 7 U.S. studies included all of these cost components. Furthermore, the costs of UUI often could not be fully extracted from the costs of OAB, which include patients with and without UUI

  7. Conservative Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence In Women: A 10-Year (2004-2013) Scoping Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Louise; Andersen, Elizabeth; Reekie, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a serious threat to the well-being of women world-wide. In this scoping review of the literature, we examined the most prominent research foci between the years 2004 and 2013. In this article, conservative treat-ment is operationalized as any non-surgical or non-pharmacological treatment modalities that could be carried out by specially trained nurses, physiotherapists, or physicians to treat stress urinary incontinence in women. The two most frequently described or systematically investigated treatment options identified in our review were 1) strengthening pelvic floor muscles with pelvic floor muscle training, including biofeedback and weighted vaginal cones; and 2) the use of intravaginal support devices, such as incontinence pessaries. Other treatment modalities were also explored in the literature review, such as intraurethral devices, behavioral and lifestyle interventions, products, and alternative therapies, such as acupuncture and acupressure. However, the focus of this article is on the two most frequently described options.

  8. Proceedings of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases International Symposium on Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence in Women.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeanette S; Nyberg, Leroy M; Kusek, John W; Burgio, Kathryn L; Diokno, Ananias C; Foldspang, Anders; Fultz, Nancy H; Herzog, A Regula; Hunskaar, Steinar; Milsom, Ian; Nygaard, Ingrid; Subak, Leslee L; Thom, David H

    2003-06-01

    The Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence: Current Databases and Future Collaborations Symposium included an international group of 29 investigators from 10 countries. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the current understanding and knowledge gaps of prevalence, incidence, associated risk factors, and treatment outcomes for incontinence in women. During the symposium, investigators identified existing large databases and ongoing studies that provide substantive information on specific incontinence research questions. The investigators were able to form an international collaborative research working group and identify potential collaborative projects to further research on the epidemiology of urinary incontinence and bladder dysfunction.

  9. Association of overactive bladder and stress urinary incontinence in rats with pudendal nerve ligation injury.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Akira; Kita, Masafumi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Egawa, Shin; Chancellor, Michael B; de Groat, William C; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) also suffer from urgency incontinence, which is one of the major symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome. Pudendal nerve injury has been recognized as a possible cause for both SUI and OAB. Therefore, we investigated the effects of pudendal nerve ligation (PNL) on bladder function and urinary continence in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Conscious cystometry with or without capsaicin pretreatment (125 mg/kg sc), leak point pressures (LPPs), contractile responses of bladder muscle strips to carbachol or phenylephrine, and levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) protein and mRNA in the bladder were compared in sham and PNL rats 4 wk after the injury. Urinary frequency detected by a reduction in intercontraction intervals and voided volume was observed in PNL rats compared with sham rats, but it was not seen in PNL rats with capsaicin pretreatment that desensitizes C-fiber-afferent pathways. LPPs in PNL rats were significantly decreased compared with sham rats. The contractile responses of detrusor muscle strips to phenylephrine, but not to carbachol, were significantly increased in PNL rats. The levels of NGF protein and mRNA in the bladder of PNL rats were significantly increased compared with sham rats. These results suggest that pudendal nerve neuropathy induced by PNL may be one of the potential risk factors for OAB, as well as SUI. Somato-visceral cross sensitization between somatic (pudendal) and visceral (bladder) sensory pathways that increases NGF expression and alpha(1)-adrenoceptor-mediated contractility in the bladder may be involved in this pathophysiological mechanism.

  10. A Pilot Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Electroacupuncture for Women with Pure Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanfang; Liu, Baoyan; Wu, Jiani; Du, Ruosang; Liu, Xiaoxu; Yu, Jinna; Liu, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is a potential conservative therapy for women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). There is limited evidence to support its effectiveness due to the poor quality of existing studies. Methods We performed a pilot randomized, controlled trial to preliminarily assess the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) in women with pure SUI. A total of 80 women with pure SUI were randomly assigned to receive EA with deep needling at BL33 and BL35 (n = 40) or sham EA with non-penetrating needling at sham acupoints (n = 40) three sessions per week for 6 weeks. The women were followed for 24 weeks. The primary outcome was the change from baseline in the amount of urine leakage measured by a 1-hour pad test after 6 weeks. The secondary outcomes included the 72-hour incontinence episode frequency (IEF), International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF) score, and patient self-evaluation of therapeutic effect. Adverse events (AEs) were monitored throughout the trial. Results The median decrease from baseline of urine leakage measured by the 1-hour pad test was 2.5 g [interquartile range (IQR): 1.80–14.6 in the EA group, which was greater than the median decrease of 0.05 g (IQR: -2.80–+0.50) in the sham EA group after 6 weeks (p<0.01). The differences between groups in the decrease from baseline of 72-hour IEF became statistically significant at week 30 with a median decrease of 3.25 g (IQR: 1.25–5.69) in the EA group, and a median decrease of 1.00 g (IQR: -0.69–+2.88) in the sham EA group (p = 0.01). The participants in the EA group showed greater decreases in ICIQ-SF score and higher ratings in the help they received from the treatment than those in the sham EA group at weeks 6,18 and 30 (all p<0.05). No obvious AEs were observed in either group. Conclusion EA may effectively and safely relieve urinary incontinence symptoms and improve quality of life in women with pure SUI. EA demonstrated more than a placebo effect. Since

  11. [Risk factors for failure after transobturator vaginal tape for urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Gómez, M F; Gómez-García, A; Padilla-Fernández, B; García-Criado, F J; Silva-Abuín, J M; Mirón-Canelo, J A; Urrutia-Avisrror, M

    2011-09-01

    To identify risk factors leading to treatment failure in a sample of 302 women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) treated by transobturator vaginal tape (TOT) with a medium follow-up of 4 years (range 1-6). A population based cohort study with prospectively data from 302 women, aged 41-81 years underwent TOT between April 2003-November 2010. Data were collected by validated questionnaire on urinary incontinence, the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form (ICIQ-SF), and clinical data-records. Continence was achieved in 262 (Group A) and 40 continued with incontinence (Group B). We investigated the relationship between age, SUI evolution time, type and number of childbirths (eutocic, dystocic, nulliparous, multiparous status) and medical and/or surgical backgrounds. The ICIQ-SF questionnaire was used to describe whether the surgery outcomes were successful or not. Group A were younger (p=0.0001), had less SUI evolution time (p=0.017); more eutocic childbirths (p=0.000018). Group B had more dystocic childbirth (p=0.022), previous tension free vaginal tape (TVT) or TOT (p=0.03.), antidepressant-anxiolytic drugs (p=0.003), antihypertensive drugs (p=0.0005), type 1 diabetes (p=0.02), arterial hypertension (p=0.0007), respiratory diseases (p=0.025). Differences were not found with regard to nulliparous (p=0.701), multiparous status (p=0.42), obesity (p=0.18), intestinal disorders (p=0.59), oophorectomy (p=0.19), caesarean (p=0.17), prolapse surgery (p=0.29), hysterectomy (p=0.57), allergies (p=0.48), arthritis (p=0.22), arthrosis (p=0.44), depression (p=0.74), type 2 diabetes (p=0.44), smoking patterns (p=0.28), fibromyalgia (p=0.47). Elderly women, with long evolution SUI, dystocic delivery, previous TVT or TOT appear as independent risk factors associated to TOT failure. These factors may make the indication of another surgical approach recommendable. Copyright © 2011 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence, impact on the quality of life and pathophysiological determinants of nocturia in urinary incontinent women.

    PubMed

    Massolt, Elske T; Wooning, Marianne M; Stijnen, Theo; Vierhout, Mark E

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of nocturia in incontinent women in a urogynaecologic practice and its association with the quality of life and to estimate the prevalences of the pathophysiological categories among nocturics. From 1 January 2002, all patients with complaints of urinary incontinence were analysed according to a specific protocol: multichannel urodynamic testing, a 1-h International Incontinence Society (ICS) pad test and a 3-day frequency-volume (FV) chart. From 1 June 2002, subjects had to fill in a standardised quality of life questionnaire as well. Nocturia was defined as two or more micturitions per night calculated from the FV chart. Evaluable FV charts were received from 111 patients, and 72 patients completed the questionnaires correctly. The overall prevalence of nocturia was 48.6% (confidence interval: 43.9-53.3%). Nocturia had a negative impact on several aspects of the quality of life. The maximum voided volume was significantly (p=0.005) less in nocturics. The 24-h frequency was higher in nocturics (p=0.001). Nocturics lost more urine during the pad test (p=0.039). The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the greater the proportion of 24-h urine excreted at night, the greater the odds of having nocturia and that the lesser the maximum voided volume, the greater the odds of having nocturia. The majority (92.7%) of the nocturics can be classified into one of the responsible pathophysiologic categories: nocturnal polyuria in 51.2%, a low functional bladder capacity in 14.6%, a combination of both in 9.8%, polyuria in 4.9% and a combination of polyuria and nocturnal polyuria in 12.2% of the cases. Nocturia is a frequent symptom among urinary incontinent patients, with a negative impact on several aspects of the quality of life. With a FV chart, nocturics can be classified into one of the responsible pathophysiologic categories in the majority (92.7%) of the cases.

  13. What is new in the evaluation and treatment of urinary incontinence? Best articles from the past year.

    PubMed

    Kenton, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    This month, we focus on current research in urinary incontinence. Dr. Kenton discusses four recent publications, and each is concluded with a "bottom line" that is the take-home message. The complete reference for each can be found in on this page, along with direct links to the abstracts.

  14. Treatment of female stress urinary incontinence using suburethral slings: comparative, retrospective, observational study of two surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Castroviejo-Royo, F; Martinez-Sagarra-Oceja, J M; Marina-García-Tuñón, C; Conde-Redondo, C; Rodríguez-Toves, L A; González-Tejero, C

    2013-10-01

    The treatment of female stress urinary incontinence has undergone a revolution in recent years due the emergence on the market of suburethral slings. The aim of this study is to compare two surgical techniques for treating stress urinary incontinence: Monarc™ (transobturator suburethral sling) and MiniArc(®) (single-incision suburethral mini-sling). Comparative, retrospective, observational study from January 2005 to December 2011 on 317 women diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence. Of these, 214 were treated with the Monarc™ transobturator suburethral sling, and 103 were treated with the MiniArc(®) mini-sling. The results were treated with SPSS v.15 software, and the statistical significance was P≤.005. The two patients groups were homogeneous in terms of age, number of births, presence of urgency urinary incontinence and prior hysterectomy. There were significant differences in hospital stay, surgical time and early complications in favour of the MiniArc(®), technique, but overall there were no significant differences in the late complications. Some 84% of the patients treated with the Monarc™ transobturator sling were cured compared with the 72% of patients in whom we implanted a MiniArc(®), a difference that was statistically significant. We need to perform more high-quality, prospective and randomised studies with larger numbers of patients and longer follow-up times to confirm or disprove the difference that we found in the success rate for the Monarc™ transobturator suburethral sling. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Two-Year Outcomes After Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence in Older Compared to Younger Women

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Patricia S.; Brubaker, Linda; Zyczynski, Halina; Stoddard, Anne M.; Dandreo, Kimberly J.; Norton, Peggy A.

    2008-01-01

    Precis Women 65 years and older have similar perioperative adverse events and length of stay, but lower subjective and objective cure rates after stress incontinence surgery than younger women. Objective To estimate if perioperative and postoperative outcomes after Burch colposuspension or pubovaginal sling for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) differed with age. Methods This study was a prospective secondary analysis of the Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial. Baseline characteristics, adverse events, and 2-year outcomes of women at least 65 years old were compared to those younger than 65 utilizing chi-square and t-tests. Multivariable analyses were performed, including age and outcomes that differed between age groups on univariable analysis, adjusting for variables that differed by age group at baseline and by surgical treatment group. Results Six-hundred fifty-five women were included in analyses of perioperative events and 520 for 2-year outcomes. Mean age (±SD) was 69.7(±3.7) years in the older group and 49.4(±8.2) in the younger group. Older women had slightly longer time to normal activities (50 versus 42 days, p=0.05), but there was no difference in time to normal voiding (14 versus 11 days, p=0.42). Older women were more likely to have a positive stress test at follow-up (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.70-7.97, p=.001), less subjective improvement in stress (8 point lesser decrease, 95%CI: 1.5-14.1, p=0.02), and urge incontinence (7 point lesser decrease, 95% CI 1.5-12.2, p=0.01) by the Medical and Epidemiologic Social Aspects of Aging questionnaire, and were more likely to undergo surgical retreatment for SUI (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.30-11.48). Perioperative adverse events and length of stay did not differ between groups. Conclusion Older women undergoing surgery for stress incontinence can expect to do as well as younger women with respect to perioperative outcomes, but experience 2-year outcomes that are worse. Clinical Trial Registration Clinical

  16. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of symptom triage is to decide when, and where, you should seek care when you have symptoms. Symptom triage does not replace a physician evaluation or make ...

  17. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... increasing your volume of urine. They include: Alcohol Caffeine Decaffeinated tea and coffee Carbonated drinks Artificial sweeteners ... need to cut back on or avoid alcohol, caffeine or acidic foods. Reducing liquid consumption, losing weight ...

  18. Urinary incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate in men Nervous system conditions, such as multiple sclerosis or stroke Nerve or muscle damage after radiation ... Instructions Indwelling catheter care Kegel exercises - self-care Multiple sclerosis - discharge Prostate resection - minimally invasive - discharge Radical prostatectomy - ...

  19. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... replacement has been shown to cause worsening UI. Caffeine and alcohol — Drinks with caffeine, such as coffee or soda, cause the bladder ... helpful: Alcoholic beverages Carbonated beverages (with or without caffeine) Coffee or tea (with or without caffeine) Other ...

  20. The effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation therapy in patients with urinary incontinence resistant to initial medical treatment or biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Tugtepe, H; Thomas, D T; Ergun, R; Kalyoncu, A; Kaynak, A; Kastarli, C; Dagli, T E

    2015-06-01

    While there are many options for children with treatment refractory urinary incontinence, there is no single accepted method. This study's aim was to prospectively evaluate the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in children with urinary incontinence resistant to standard medical, urological therapy and/or biofeedback. This study was performed at a university hospital. For inclusion, patients >5 years of age first underwent evaluation with urinary ultrasonography, uroflow-electromyogram and voiding diaries. Treatment with biofeedback, alpha adrenergic blockers, anticholinergics and/or urotherapy was commenced according to uroflow-EMG and voiding diary findings. Patients with partial or no response to this standard therapy were then included in this study, performed between April 2012 and February 2014. Patients with anatomical or neurological causes for urinary incontinence were excluded. TENS was performed on S3 dermatome, every day for 3 months. Each session lasted 20 min with a frequency of 10 Hz and generated pulse of 350 μs. Intensity was determined by the child's sensitivity threshold. Medical treatment and urological therapy was continued during TENS. Uroflow parameters (voiding volume as percentage of expected bladder capacity, Qmax, Qave, flow and voiding time, postvoiding residual urine) and urinary system symptoms (presence of urinary tract infection, frequency, urge incontinence, fractionated voiding and constipation) were compared immediately before commencement and immediately after the completion of 3 months of TENS. Twenty-seven patients were included in this study (4 males, 23 females). Patients' average age was 7.2 years, 11 had overactive bladder and 16 had dysfunctional voiding. Comparison of urinary system symptoms and uroflow parameters before and after TENS are shown in Table. After 3 months of TENS; a statistically significant decrease was observed in the number of patients with frequency, urge incontinence, urinary tract

  1. Urinary incontinence and vaginal squeeze pressure two years post-cesarean delivery in primiparous women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Angélica Mércia Pascon; Dias, Adriano; Marini, Gabriela; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Witkin, Steven; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of urinary incontinence and associated vaginal squeeze pressure in primiparous women with and without previous gestational diabetes mellitus two years post-cesarean delivery. METHODS: Primiparous women who delivered by cesarean two years previously were interviewed about the delivery and the occurrence of incontinence. Incontinence was reported by the women and vaginal pressure evaluated by a Perina perineometer. Sixty-three women with gestational diabetes and 98 women without the disease were screened for incontinence and vaginal pressure. Multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate the independent effects of gestational diabetes. RESULTS: The prevalence of gestational incontinence was higher among women with gestational diabetes during their pregnancies (50.8% vs. 31.6%) and two years after a cesarean (44.8% vs. 18.4%). Decreased vaginal pressure was also significantly higher among women with gestational diabetes (53.9% vs. 37.8%). Maternal weight gain and newborn weight were risk factors for decreased vaginal pressure. Maternal age, gestational incontinence and decreased vaginal pressure were risk factors for incontinence two years after a cesarean. In a multivariate logistic model, gestational diabetes was an independent risk factor for gestational incontinence. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of incontinence and decreased vaginal pressure two years post-cesarean were elevated among women with gestational diabetes compared to women who were normoglycemic during pregnancy. We confirmed an association between gestational diabetes mellitus and a subsequent decrease of vaginal pressure two years post-cesarean. These results may warrant more comprehensive prospective and translational studies. PMID:21915481

  2. Implementation of an image guided intensity-modulated protocol for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy: planning data and acute toxicity outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chua, Benjamin; Min, Myo; Wood, Maree; Edwards, Sarah; Hoffmann, Matthew; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2013-08-01

    There is substantial interest in implementation of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) in the post-prostatectomy setting. We describe our implementation of IG-IMRT, and examine how often published organ-at-risk (OAR) constraints were met. Furthermore, we evaluate the incidence of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities when patients were treated according to our protocol. Patients were eligible if they received post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT). Planning data were collected prospectively, and toxicity assessments were collected before, during and after treatment. Seventy-five eligible patients received either 64 Gy (19%) or 66 Gy (81%) in a single phase to the prostate bed. Suggested rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy < 60% and V60Gy < 40% were met in 64 (85%) and 75 (100%) patients, respectively. IMRT-specific rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy < 35% and V65Gy < 17% were achieved in 5 (7%) and 57 (76%) of patients. Bladder dose-constraint (V50Gy < 50%) was met in 58 (77%) patients. Two patients (3%) experienced new grade 3 genitourinary toxicity and one patient (1%) experienced new grade 3 gastroinestinal toxicity. All grade 3 toxicities had improved by 3-month review. Overall deterioration in urinary and gastrointestinal symptoms occurred in 33 (44%) and 35 (47%) of patients respectively. We report on our implementation of PPRT which takes into account nationally adopted guidelines, with a margin reduction supported by use of daily image guidance. Non-IMRT OAR constraints were met in most cases. IMRT-specific constraints were less often achieved despite margin reductions, suggesting the need for review of guidelines. Severe toxicity was rare, and most patients did not experience deterioration in urinary or bowel function attributable to radiotherapy. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  3. Trajectories of urinary incontinence in childhood and bladder and bowel symptoms in adolescence: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Jon; Grzeda, Mariusz T; von Gontard, Alexander; Wright, Anne; Joinson, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To identify different patterns (trajectories) of childhood urinary incontinence and examine which patterns are associated with bladder and bowel symptoms in adolescence. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting General community. Participants The starting sample included 8751 children (4507 men and 4244 women) with parent-reported data on frequency of bedwetting and daytime wetting for at least three of five time points (4½, 5½, 6½, 7½ and 9½ years—hereafter referred to as 4–9 years). Study children provided data on a range of bladder and bowel symptoms at age 14 (data available for 5899 participants). Outcome measures Self-reported bladder and bowel symptoms at 14 years including daytime wetting, bedwetting, nocturia, urgency, frequent urination, low voided volume, voiding postponement, passing hard stools and low stool frequency. Results We extracted 5 trajectories of urinary incontinence from 4 to 9 years using longitudinal latent class analysis: (1) normative development of daytime and night-time bladder control (63.0% of the sample), (2) delayed attainment of bladder control (8.6%), (3) bedwetting alone (no daytime wetting) (15.6%), (4) daytime wetting alone (no bedwetting) (5.8%) and (5) persistent wetting (bedwetting with daytime wetting to age 9) (7.0%). The persistent wetting class generally showed the strongest associations with the adolescent bladder and bowel symptoms: OR for bedwetting at 14 years=23.5, 95% CI (15.1 to 36.5), daytime wetting (6.98 (4.50 to 10.8)), nocturia (2.39 (1.79 to 3.20)), urgency (2.10 (1.44 to 3.07)) and passing hard stools (2.64 (1.63 to 4.27)) (reference category=normative development). The association with adolescent bedwetting was weaker for children with bedwetting alone (3.69 (2.21 to 6.17)). Conclusions Trajectories of childhood urinary incontinence are differentially associated with adolescent bladder and bowel symptoms. Children exhibiting persistent bedwetting with daytime wetting had the

  4. Mobile app for treatment of stress urinary incontinence: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Asklund, Ina; Nyström, Emma; Sjöström, Malin; Umefjord, Göran; Stenlund, Hans; Samuelsson, Eva

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of a mobile app treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women. Randomized controlled trial, conducted 2013-2014 in Sweden. Community-dwelling adult women with ≥1 SUI episode/week recruited through our website and randomized to app treatment (n = 62) or control group (postponed treatment, n = 61). One participant from each group was lost to follow-up. Intervention was the mobile app Tät(®) with a treatment program focused on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), and information about SUI and lifestyle factors. Primary outcomes, 3 months after randomization: symptom severity (International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence Short Form [ICIQ-UI SF]); and condition-specific quality of life (ICIQ Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life [ICIQ-LUTSqol]). One hundred and twenty-three women were included (mean age 44.7), with moderate/severe SUI (97.5%, 120/123), mean ICIQ-UI SF score 11.1 (SD 2.8) and mean ICIQ-LUTSqol score 34.4 (SD 6.1) at baseline. At follow-up, the app group reported improvements in symptom severity (mean ICIQ-UI SF score reduction: 3.9, 95% confidence interval 3.0-4.7) and condition-specific quality of life (mean ICIQ-LUTSqol score reduction: 4.8, 3.4-6.2) and the groups were significantly different (mean ICIQ-UI SF score difference: -3.2, -4.3to -2.1; mean ICIQ-LUTSqol score difference: -4.6, -7.8 to -1.4). In the app group, 98.4% (60/61) performed PFMT at follow-up, and 41.0% (25/61) performed it daily. The mobile app treatment was effective for women with SUI and yielded clinically relevant improvements. This app may increase access to first-line treatment and adherence to PFMT. © 2016 The Authors. Neurourology and Urodynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Clinical course of a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence symptoms followed at a tertiary center.

    PubMed

    Lebl, Adrienne; Fagundes, Simone Nascimento; Koch, Vera Hermina Kalika

    2016-01-01

    To characterize a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence followed-up in a tertiary center. Retrospective analysis of 50 medical records of children who had attained bladder control or minimum age of 5 years, using a structured protocol that included lower urinary tract dysfunction symptoms, comorbidities, associated manifestations, physical examination, voiding diary, complementary tests, therapeutic options, and clinical outcome, in accordance with the 2006 and 2014 International Children's Continence Society standardizations. Female patients represented 86.0% of this sample. Mean age was 7.9 years and mean follow-up was 4.7 years. Urgency (56.0%), urgency incontinence (56.0%), urinary retention (8.0%), nocturnal enuresis (70.0%), urinary tract infections (62.0%), constipation (62.0%), and fecal incontinence (16.0%) were the most prevalent symptoms and comorbidities. Ultrasound examinations showed alterations in 53.0% of the cases; the urodynamic study showed alterations in 94.7%. At the last follow-up, 32.0% of patients persisted with urinary incontinence. When assessing the diagnostic methods, 85% concordance was observed between the predictive diagnosis of overactive bladder attained through medical history plus non-invasive exams and the diagnosis of detrusor overactivity achieved through the invasive urodynamic study. This subgroup of patients with clinical characteristics of an overactive bladder, with no history of urinary tract infection, and normal urinary tract ultrasound and uroflowmetry, could start treatment without invasive studies even at a tertiary center. Approximately one-third of the patients treated at the tertiary level remained refractory to treatment. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Early Hypofractionated Salvage Radiotherapy for Post-Prostatectomy Biochemical Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kruser, Tim J.; Jarrard, David F.; Graf, Andrew K.; Hedican, Sean P.; Paolone, David R.; Wegenke, John D.; Liu, Glenn; Geye, Heather M.; Ritter, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Post-prostatectomy adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy, when using standard fractionation, requires 6.5–8 weeks of treatment. We report on the safety and efficacy of an expedited radiotherapy course for salvage prostate radiotherapy. Methods A total of 108 consecutive patients were treated with salvage radiation therapy to 65 Gy in 26 fractions of 2.5 Gy. Median follow-up was 32.4 months. Median pre-salvage PSA was 0.44 (0.05–9.50). Eighteen patients (17%) received androgen deprivation following surgery or concurrently with radiation. Results The actuarial freedom from biochemical failure for the entire group at 4 years was 67% +/− 5.3%. An identical 67% control rate was seen at 5 years for the first 50 enrolled patients whose median followup was longer at 43 months. One acute grade 3 GU toxicity occurred, with no acute grade 3 GI and no late grade 3 toxicities observed. On univariate analysis, higher Gleason score (p=0.006), PSA doubling time ≤ 12 months (p=0.03), perineural invasion (p=0.06), and negative margins (p=0.06) showed association with unsuccessful salvage. On multivariate analysis, higher Gleason score (p=0.057) and negative margins (p=0.088) retained an association with biochemical failure. Conclusions Hypofractionated radiotherapy (65 Gy in 2.5 Gy fractions in about 5 weeks) reduces the length of treatment by from 1–1/2 to 3 weeks relative to other treatment schedules commonly employed, produces low rates of loxicity, and demonstrates encouraging efficacy at 4 – 5 years. Hypofractionation may provide a convenient, resource efficient and well-tolerated salvage approach for the estimated 20–35,000 US men per year experiencing biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy. PMID:21656740

  7. Urodynamic characterization of obese women with urinary incontinence undergoing a weight loss program: the Program to Reduce Incontinence by Diet and Exercise (PRIDE) trial.

    PubMed

    Richter, Holly E; Creasman, Jennifer M; Myers, Deborah L; Wheeler, Thomas L; Burgio, Kathryn L; Subak, Leslee L

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe urodynamic characteristics of overweight or obese women with urinary incontinence and explore the relationship between urodynamic parameters, body mass index (BMI), and abdominal circumference (AC). One hundred ten women underwent a standardized cough stress test and urodynamic study. Eighty-six percent of women had urodynamic stress incontinence and 15% detrusor overactivity. Intra-abdominal pressure (Pabd) at maximum cystometric capacity (MCC) increased 0.4 cm H(2)O per kg/m(2) unit of BMI (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.0,0.7, p = 0.04) and 0.4 cm H(2)O per 2 cm increase in AC (CI = 0.2, 0.7, p < 0.01). Intravesical pressure (Pves) at MCC increased 0.4 cm H(2)O per 2 cm increase in AC (CI = 0.0, 0.8, p = 0.05) but was not associated with BMI (p = 0.18). BMI and AC had a stronger association with Pabd than with Pves, suggesting a possible mechanism for the association between obesity and urinary incontinence.

  8. Cystolithiasis in women as a distant complication after minimal invasive treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Michał; Kliś, Rafał; Różański, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a condition of social dimension which generally pertains to women of various age. The only effective treatments of SUI are surgical procedures. The use of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) ensures low invasiveness but also carries the risk of complications. One of the complications may be migration of the tape into the urinary bladder creating conditions for urinary stones. There is a number of treatment methods for cystolithiasis, among them the optical lithotripter, ultrasound and pneumatic probes, and recently, the holmium laser. Material and methods From January 2009 to February 2010, six women suffering from bladder stones were treated at our department. All patients had previously undergone SUI procedures and over time, thread or tape had penetrated into the urinary bladder. The stone diameters were in the range of 1.6 cm–3.5 cm. Lithotripsy was performed with the use of an 80 W holmium YAG laser as an endoscopic procedure: beam frequency length of 2100 nm and applied energy was in the range of 0.2–3.5 J. Results The urinary bladder stones were disintegrated and suctioned out. During the same procedure, the threads or tape from the SUI procedure were excised from the bladder. All patients were discharged from the hospital in good general condition after two days. Conclusions The holmium laser is an effective treatment for patients with bladder stone complications after SUI procedures when threads or tape have migrated and penetrated the bladder wall. The procedure is straightforward and safe for patients. PMID:25247087

  9. Factors associated with postpartum urinary/anal incontinence in primiparous women in Quebec.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Marie; Pasquier, Jean-Charles; Fraser, William; Lepire, Edith

    2007-03-01

    To identify the factors associated with urinary incontinence (UI), anal incontinence (AI), and combined UI and AI (UI/AI) in primiparous women in Quebec at six months postpartum. A questionnaire was mailed to 2492 primiparous women at six months postpartum to collect data on incontinence status, sociodemographic characteristics, elimination habits, lifestyle, and severity index scales. Obstetric characteristics were obtained via Quebec's Med-Echo databank. Pearson chi-square, t test, analysis of variance, univariate regression, and stepwise modelling techniques were used for data analysis. The prevalence of UI in responders was 29.6%, of AI, 20.6%, and of combined UI/AI, 10.4%. Significant adjusted odds ratios were (1) for UI, English spoken (2.04 [95% confidence intervals 1.13-3.69]) and shoulder dystocia (2.90 [1.09-7.69]); (2) for AI, age > 35 years (2.13 [1.12-4.03]), duration of second stage of labour (1.67 [1.11-2.51]), and third or fourth degree tears (4.00 [2.32-6.89]); and (3) for UI and AI, age (2.00 [1.04-3.83]), English spoken (2.55 [1.25-5.19]), shoulder dystocia (4.91 [1.76-13.71]), instrumental delivery (2.28 [1.30-3.99]), third or fourth degree tears (3.58 [1.95-6.57]), and episiotomy (2.24 [1.162-4.33]). Caesarean section was associated with less UI (0.45 [0.28-0.72]), and smoking was associated with less AI (0.38 [0.19-0.76]). Combined UI/AI is associated with several obstetrical factors. The association of UI and AI is observed more frequently after complicated delivery (requiring the application of forceps) or involving perineal damage and episiotomy. As most of the identified factors are modifiable, a preventive treatment policy is advisable.

  10. Prevalence of Urinary Incontinence and Its Association with Body Mass Index among Women in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    López, Magdalena; Vargas, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective Urinary incontinence (UI) affects the quality of life of millions of women world-wide. Prevalence estimates for UI range from 10% to 40%, but information on young and mid-life women, especially among Hispanics, is limited. This study estimated UI prevalence and its association with body mass index (BMI) in a population-based sample of 276 female residents of Bayamón, Puerto Rico (PR) aged 21–64 years. Methods A cluster sampling design was employed. Women were interviewed to gather data on sociodemographic, clinical, gynecologic, and UI characteristics. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the study sample. Bivariate analyses of factors potentially associated with UI and BMI were conducted using generalized linear models (GLM). Multivariate GLM was used to determine the covariate adjusted association between BMI and UI. Results The prevalence of UI was 34.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 29.4–40.6%). Among women with UI, stress incontinence was most frequent (46.8%), followed by mixed (41.5%) and urge incontinence (11.7%). More than 45% of participants were either overweight (25 kg/m2 ≤ BMI ≤ 29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). The adjusted analysis revealed that women with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 had 1.96 (p = 0.06) times the probability of having UI compared to women with a BMI < 25 kg/m2. Conclusions UI is a public health problem among this population, and obesity marginally increases the possibility of having this condition. Public health efforts should focus on reducing obesity in PR, in order to have an impact on UI morbidity. PMID:19788409

  11. Standardized pelvic floor exercises improve stress urinary incontinence in women with intrinsic sphincter deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Corinne; Zipponi, Ingrid; Baumann, Marc U; Radlinger, Lorenz; Mueller, Michael D; Kuhn, Annette

    2016-08-01

    Pelvic floor rehabilitation is the conservative therapy of choice for women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The success rate of surgical procedures in SUI patients with intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD) is low. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of a standardized physiotherapy on patients with SUI and normotonic urethra and ISD. In this study, 64 patients with ISD and 69 patients with normotonic urethra were enrolled. Maximum urethral pressure (MUCP) >20 cm H2 O was considered as normotonic urethral pressure. Before and after physiotherapy MUCP was measured and cough testing was performed. Additionally, patient reported outcome was assessed using the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ). For statistical analyses Excel 2010 (Microsoft Inc; Redmond, Washington) and SPSS 20 (SPSS Inc; Chicago, Illinois) for Windows were used. Power calculation was based on the primary endpoint incontinence impact and general health. For power calculation, GraphPad Statmate version 2.00 for Windows was used. Sixty-four patients with ISD and 69 patients with normotonic urethra were included in the study. In SUI patients with normotonic and hypotonic urethra KHQ-scores regarding the primary endpoins "general health" and "incontinence impact" significantly improved following standardized physiotherapy. In both groups MUCP increased after physiotherapy. In SUI patients with ISD standardized physiotherapy resulted in a decreased incidence of a positive cough test. Standardized physiotherapy should be offered to patients with SUI and ISD. Long-term results are subject to future studies. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:711-716, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Trocar-assisted sling suspension for stress urinary incontinence: three-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chyi-Long; Yen, Chih-Feng; Wang, Chin-Jung; Lee, Pei-Shan; Chiu, Hsiao-Chen

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate 3-year outcomes of trocar-assisted sling suspension (TASS) for genuine stress incontinence. Retrospective review (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). University-based, tertiary-level center for endoscopic surgery. One hundred forty women with genuine stress incontinence with bladder neck hypermobility. After standard surgery preparation and general endotracheal anesthesia, TASS was performed. The periurethral space and thicker parts of the pubocervical fascia were opened from the vagina. A 0.5-cm incision was made on both sides of the lower abdomen and was measured 4-cm lateral to the linea album and 2-3-cm above the pubic bone. A trocar was used to penetrate the incision site to the space of Retzius. A 2-cm x 30-cm folded polypropylene mesh was placed inside the vagina and was then pulled out of the trocar sheath by a laparoscopic forceps. All patients completed the procedures without exception. The average blood loss was less than 50 mL (range 10-200 mL). The operative time ranged from 20 to 90 minutes with a mean time of 32 +/- 12 minutes. Eleven patients had voiding difficulty. Six of them voided well after intermittent self-catheterization performed 28 days postoperatively. Seven patients had poor healing of the anterior vaginal wall; therefore, removal of mesh and wound repair were performed. One patient suffered from a retroperitoneal hematoma, and one patient had an intraoperative bladder injury. The overall complication rate was 14.3%. During 12-36 months of follow-up, 134 of 140 patients (95.7%) were satisfied with the surgery. Based on the results of our pilot study, TASS is quite feasible as a method of treatment for stress urinary incontinence. The surgery is not difficult to perform when compared with Burch colposuspension. Moreover, it encompasses the simplicity and effectiveness of tension-free vaginal tape surgery. In addition, TASS also can correct lateral wall defects such as cystocele.

  13. The associatio