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Sample records for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence

  1. Artificial urinary sphincter for post-prostatectomy incontinence: a review.

    PubMed

    James, Mary H; McCammon, Kurt A

    2014-06-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter remains the gold standard for treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. The AMS 800 (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN, USA) is the most commonly implanted artificial urinary sphincter. Having been on the market for almost 40 years, there is an abundance of literature regarding its use, but no recent review has been published. We reviewed the current literature regarding the indications, surgical principles, outcomes and complications of artificial urinary sphincter implantation for stress urinary incontinence after prostatectomy. A PubMed search was carried out for articles on the artificial urinary sphincter from 1995 to present. The review was centered on articles related to the use of the AMS 800 for stress urinary incontinence in males after prostatectomy. Relevant articles were reviewed. The majority of patients will achieve social continence (1 pad per day) after artificial urinary sphincter implantation; however, rates of total continence (no pad usage) are significantly lower. Patient satisfaction outcomes average greater than 80% in most series. Potential complications requiring reoperation include infection (0.5-10.6%) and urethral erosion (2.9-12%). Revision surgeries are most commonly as a result of urethral atrophy, which ranges from 1.6 to 11.4%. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier freedom from reoperation ranges from 50 to 79%, while the 10-year Kaplan-Meier freedom from mechanical failure is 64%. The artificial urinary sphincter is a reliable device with good outcomes. As expected with any prosthetic device, complications including mechanical failure, infection, erosion and recurrent incontinence remain significant concerns. Despite known complications, the patient satisfaction rates after artificial urinary sphincter implantation remain high. Appropriate patient counseling and adherence to surgical principles are imperative.

  2. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may begin around the time of menopause. Urgency urinary incontinence happens when people have a sudden need ... urinary incontinence is a mix of stress and urgency urinary incontinence. You may leak urine with a laugh ...

  3. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... urinary incontinence. Initial pilot studies have shown that acupuncture can provide some short-term benefit, but more ... Urology. 2013;190:113. Wang Y, et al. Acupuncture for stress urinary incontinence in adults. Cochrane Database ...

  4. Management of male urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Katie C.; Lucas, Malcolm G.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of male urinary incontinence seen is secondary to sphincter weakness following prostatic surgery. As there is a rising elderly population and increasing numbers of surgical interventions for prostate cancer, incidence of male incontinence is increasing. Hence, management of male incontinence has become a subject of increased interest for urologists. Various non-surgical and surgical approaches have been suggested for this devastating condition. Non-invasive therapies are suggested for early postoperative and mild incontinence. For surgical treatment the artificial urinary sphincter is still labeled the gold standard despite the introduction of several more minimally invasive treatments. However, as yet there is no consensus on the optimal timing and best modality for managing these men. Well designed, centrally funded clinical trials are required to establish which treatment modality to offer and when in the broad spectrum of male incontinence. This review focuses mainly on the management of post-prostatectomy incontinence since the management of other types varies little from the modalities of treatment in women. PMID:20877603

  5. [Urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Annette

    2010-01-01

    Incontinence is a common age-dependent and increasing problem in women that may mainly present as stress incontinence, overactive bladder, mixed incontinence or other forms. A thorough history, gynaecological and neurological examination and urinalysis as initial step will lead to the diagnosis and treatment. If midstream urine is difficult to receive, a catheter urine will be easy to obtain. Further investigations as urodynamics, cystoscopy and ultrasound may be required. As initial step, stress incontinence should be treated with physiotherapy and pelvic floor exercises, if not successful with operations as suburethral slings. Slings have good long-term success rates of approximately 85 % with a low morbidity and can even be inserted under local anaesthetic. The treatment of idiopathic overactive bladder consists of bladder training, a behavioural therapy, and mainly anticholinergics. Anticholinergics may cause side effects particularly in the elderly who are under several medications that may add anticholinergic effects as antidepressants, antibiotics or antihistaminics.

  6. Urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Norton, Peggy; Brubaker, Linda

    2006-01-07

    Urinary incontinence is common in women, but is under-reported and under-treated. Urine storage and emptying is a complex coordination between the bladder and urethra, and disturbances in the system due to childbirth, aging, or other medical conditions can lead to urinary incontinence. The two main types of incontinence in women, stress urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence, can be evaluated by history and simple clinical assessment available to most primary care physicians. There is a wide range of therapeutic options, but the recent proliferation of new drug treatments and surgical devices for urinary incontinence have had mixed results; direct-to-consumer advertising has increased public awareness of the problem of urinary incontinence, but many new products are being introduced without long-term assessment of their safety and efficacy.

  7. Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Home For Patients Search FAQs Surgery ... Incontinence FAQ166, July 2014 PDF Format Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Special Procedures What is stress urinary ...

  8. Urinary Incontinence in Women.

    PubMed

    Jay, J; Staskin, D

    1998-10-01

    Despite the prevalence of urinary incontinence, most affected women don't seek help, primarily because of embarrassment or because they are not aware that effective treatment is available. Failure to store urine may be caused by an abnormality in any component of the lower urinary tract. Common abnormalities are poor bladder compliance and bladder outlet failure. Patients who experience failure to empty can present with recurrent urinary tract infections, retention or incontinence. Using a symptom-based classification of incontinence, this would be referred to as overflow incontinence. Other possible categories of urinary incontinence are failure to store and empty and functional incontinence. A combination of a failure to store and empty is difficult to diagnose and treat clinically. Treatments are directed at the particular cause of incontinence and can include medical or surgical therapies.

  9. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Intrinsic sphincter deficiency repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Urine leakage that gets worse Pain where the injection was done Allergic reaction to the material Implant ...

  10. Female urinary incontinence and sexuality.

    PubMed

    Mota, Renato Lains

    2017-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females. This article is a review of both the concepts of female urinary incontinence and its impact on global and sexual quality of life. Nowadays, it is assumed that urinary incontinence, especially urge urinary incontinence, promotes anxiety and several self-esteem damages in women. The odour and the fear of incontinence during sexual intercourse affect female sexual function and this is related with the unpredictability and the chronicity of incontinence, namely urge urinary incontinence. Female urinary incontinence management involves conservative (pelvic floor muscle training), surgical and pharmacological treatment. Both conservative and surgical treatments have been studied about its benefit in urinary incontinence and also the impact among female sexual function. Unfortunately, there are sparse articles that evaluate the benefits of female sexual function with drug management of incontinence.

  11. Female urinary incontinence and sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Renato Lains

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females. This article is a review of both the concepts of female urinary incontinence and its impact on global and sexual quality of life. Nowadays, it is assumed that urinary incontinence, especially urge urinary incontinence, promotes anxiety and several self-esteem damages in women. The odour and the fear of incontinence during sexual intercourse affect female sexual function and this is related with the unpredictability and the chronicity of incontinence, namely urge urinary incontinence. Female urinary incontinence management involves conservative (pelvic floor muscle training), surgical and pharmacological treatment. Both conservative and surgical treatments have been studied about its benefit in urinary incontinence and also the impact among female sexual function. Unfortunately, there are sparse articles that evaluate the benefits of female sexual function with drug management of incontinence. PMID:28124522

  12. Urinary incontinence surgery - female - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000134.htm Urinary incontinence surgery - female - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... Dmochowski RR, Blaivas JM, Gormley EA, et al; Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Update Panel of the American ...

  13. [Conservative treatment of urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Soljanik, I; Schorsch, I; Stanislaus, P; Bauer, R; Mayer, M; Hocaoglu, Y; Becker, A; May, F

    2007-09-20

    Urinary incontinence can be treated with medicinal products in addition to active pelvic floor muscle training and electrostimulation. A local hormone therapy should be first discussed with the gynaecologist. The active substance duloxetine has been used for a few years for treating stress incontinence. Several older and newer active substances are available for treating irritable bladder and stress incontinence.

  14. Urinary incontinence. Noninvasive treatment options.

    PubMed

    Maloney, C; Cafiero, M R

    1999-06-01

    One in six women older than 45 experiences incontinence, but 31% of them never discuss their condition with anyone. A proactive approach on the part of all health care providers is needed to break this silence, particularly among clinicians who care for women. Urinary incontinence is classified as stress, urge, mixed, overflow or functional incontinence. Differential diagnosis of incontinence is essential to choosing appropriate treatment options. This article outlines noninvasive treatment options that are specific to diagnosis.

  15. Urinary Incontinence in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ouslander, Joseph G.

    1981-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common and distressing problem for elderly patients, their families and friends, and the health professionals who care for them. It is a heterogeneous condition, and appropriate management depends on a thorough evaluation and understanding of the multiple factors that can play a role in its cause and perpetuation. Identifying reversible causes of transient incontinence, and appropriate management of incontinence that is associated with acute illness, can be important in preventing the problem from becoming established. A thorough diagnostic evaluation of urinary incontinence in the elderly, and appropriate use of the different types of therapy, will greatly improve the management in these cases. The need and opportunities for research to improve the management of incontinent elderly persons should be considered by all those involved in caring for this population. PMID:7039134

  16. [Urinary incontinence and obesity].

    PubMed

    Legendre, G; Fritel, X; Capmas, P; Pourcelot, A-G; Fernandez, H

    2012-06-01

    Obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI) more than or equal to 30kg/m(2), promotes pelvic floor disorders such as urinary incontinence (UI) and genital prolapse. Datas from cohort studies found an association between high BMI and the onset of UI. This association seems to be predominant with for mixed UI and stress UI. For the urge UI and overactive bladder syndrome, the analysis of the literature found a weaker association. The weight is therefore the only modifiable risk factor. Thus, the weight loss by a hypocaloric diet associated with pelvic floor muscle training should be the front line treatment in the obese patient suffering from UI. Bariatric surgery can be discussed in the most obese patient, even if the risk/benefit balance should be weighed because of significant morbidity of this surgery. The results of sub urethral sling (by retropubic tension-free vaginal tape or transobturator sling) in obese patients appear to be equivalent to those obtained in patients of normal weight. Datas on per- and postoperative complications for suburethral slings are reassuring.

  17. Urinary incontinence - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help with my urinary incontinence? What are Kegel exercises? What can I do when I want ... tape Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Self catheterization - ...

  18. Urinary Incontinence: Management and Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, defined as the involuntary leakage of urine, is a common health problem in both women and men. Children may also suffer from this condition. Management and treatment of urinary incontinence depends primarily on the specific type of incontinence and the underlying problem causing the leakage for a given patient. Because…

  19. Risk of Urinary Incontinence Following Prostatectomy: The Role of Physical Activity and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Luly, Jason; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Andriole, Gerald L.; Kibel, Adam S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Urinary incontinence is one of the most commonly reported and distressing side effects of radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma. Several studies have suggested that symptoms may be worse in obese men but to our knowledge no research has addressed the joint effects of obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. We evaluated the association of obesity and lack of physical activity with urinary incontinence in a sample of men who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods Height and weight were abstracted from charts, and obesity was defined as body mass index 30 kg/m2 or greater. Men completed a questionnaire before surgery that included self-report of vigorous physical activity. Men who reported 1 hour or more per week of vigorous activities were considered physically active. Men reported their incontinence to the surgeon at their urology visits. Information on incontinence was abstracted from charts at 6 and 58 weeks after surgery. Results At 6 weeks after surgery 59% (405) of men were incontinent, defined as any pad use. At 58 weeks after surgery 22% (165) of men were incontinent. At 58 weeks incontinence was more prevalent in men who were obese and physically inactive (59% incontinent). Physical activity may offset some of the negative consequences of being obese because the prevalence of incontinence at 58 weeks was similar in the obese and active (25% incontinent), and nonbese and inactive (24% incontinent) men. The best outcomes were in men who were nonobese and physically active (16% incontinent). Men who were not obese and were active were 26% less likely to be incontinent than men who were obese and inactive (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.52–1.06). Conclusions Pre-prostatectomy physical activity and obesity may be important factors in post-prostatectomy continence levels. Interventions aimed at increasing physical activity and decreasing weight in patients with prostate cancer may improve quality of life by offsetting the negative side effects

  20. Discreet products for women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Evans, Debra

    It is estimated that 10 million women in the UK suffer with urinary incontinence (Hunskarr et al, 2004). Many women consider bladder weakness to be an inevitable consequence of childbirth or the menopause. Haslam (2004) reported on a telephone survey that examined whether women were aware of stress urinary incontinence, their attitude to it and the impact it had on their daily lives. In the UK, 505 women were interviewed, 206 of whom responded positively to a question about symptoms of stress urinary incontinence, giving a prevalence rate of 41 per cent. There is also evidence that most patients with urinary incontinence do not present to their doctors

  1. Urinary incontinence: is cesarean delivery protective?

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Ingrid

    2006-10-01

    About half of all women develop transient urinary incontinence during pregnancy. Three months postpartum, the prevalence and incidence rates of urinary incontinence are 9% to 31% and 7% to 15%, respectively. Antenatal incontinence increases the risk of postpartum incontinence, which in turn increases the risk of long-term persistent incontinence. After the first delivery, women delivered vaginally have two-fold more incontinence than those delivered by cesarean. The protective effect of cesarean on urinary incontinence may dissipate after further deliveries, decreases with age, and is not present in older women. Data are mixed about whether cesarean done before labor confers greater protection than cesarean done after labor. To understand the true impact of cesarean delivery on urinary incontinence, future studies must compare incontinence by planned (not actual) delivery modes, consider a woman's entire reproductive career, focus on leakage severe enough to be problematic, consider other bladder symptoms as well as incontinence, and take into account other risk factors, particularly antepartum urinary incontinence.

  2. [Female urinary incontinence: An update].

    PubMed

    González-Ruiz de León, C; Pérez-Haro, M L; Jalón-Monzón, A; García-Rodríguez, J

    2017-03-16

    The urinary incontinence is a highly prevalent symptom in the adult female population. It has important psychosocial and economic connotations, and affects the quality of life of these patients. As it is an under-diagnosed problem due to patients not always consulting for it, it is very important to keep this in mind and to provide an opportunistic screening from Primary Health Care. It is difficult to determine the costs of this, but it is estimated to be the 2% of the health budget. Because of all of this, it is very important to know how to make a correct diagnose of this condition, to determine the different types of incontinence, possible causes, and treatments available. The purpose of this review is to show the different diagnostic and therapeutic tools available, to show the Primary Health Care role in this condition, and when to refer to specialist care.

  3. Male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. 2: Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dorey, G

    The first part of this article (Dorey, 2000) described the subjective and objective assessment of men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This article will examine treatment protocols for stress incontinence, urge incontinence, post-prostatectomy incontinence, post-micturition dribble, overflow incontinence, reflex incontinence and functional incontinence. Pelvic floor muscle exercises, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, urge suppression techniques, and fluid intake are discussed. It is concluded that men with LUTS can benefit from conservative treatment.

  4. [Therapy for urinary incontinence in general practice].

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, A; Füsgen, I

    2009-08-01

    In national and international guidelines the general practitioner plays an important role in the diagnosis and first-line therapy for urinary incontinence. Nevertheless, there is a lack of data concerning details of the management of incontinence in primary care in Germany. Therefore a series of nationwide educational events for general practitioners and gynaecologists was used to perform a survey dealing with the situation of urinary incontinence in general practice. With 2530 questionnaires filled out and returned, this is the largest European survey on this subject. General practitioners declare in 57.3 % to be often involved with urinary incontinence. They usually question elderly patients about urinary incontinence (73.7 %) or those patients with diseases carrying the risk of developing urinary incontinence (64.9 %). Based on the diagnostic options in primary care, an incontinence anamnesis and urine evaluation are performed. A sonography or micturition diary was more infrequent in primary care in this survey. General practitioners most frequent refer the patient to a specialist (76.6 %) or prescribe the incontinence-type anticholinergic drugs (59.4 %) or absorbent products (45.4 %); duloxetine (27.3 %) is less frequently prescribed. The knowledge about urinary incontinence is gained in educational events (72.2 %); the course of studies was the source of incontinence skills for general practitioners only in 35 %. In conclusion, this survey gives a realistic view on the incontinence management in primary care in Germany. The majority of general practitioners are engaged in incontinence, perform basic diagnostic features and prescribe drugs or absorbent products. The course of (university medical school) studies as a source of skills to diagnose or to treat incontinence should be improved.

  5. Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... incontinence. Over time, the leakage may come back. Alternative Names ... Incontinence Update Panel of the American Urological Association Education and Research. Update of AUA guideline on the ...

  6. Obesity and female stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Osborn, David James; Strain, Matthew; Gomelsky, Alex; Rothschild, Jennifer; Dmochowski, Roger

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for stress urinary incontinence in the obese female patient and draw conclusions regarding the optimal treatment of this condition in this unique patient population. Obesity results in increased intra-abdominal pressure and this leads to weakening of the pelvic floor innervation and musculature. Weight loss through lifestyle modification and bariatric surgery improves stress urinary incontinence. Success of stress urinary incontinence surgery in obese women is similar to nonobese patients. Obese women should not be excluded from potentially curative surgery based on their body mass index (BMI) alone.

  7. Urinary Incontinence: Causes and Methods of Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the third of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. Here, the author introduces the types and physiology of urinary incontinence. The author also…

  8. New drug treatments for urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dudley; Cardozo, Linda

    2010-04-01

    Urinary incontinence remains a common and distressing condition affecting many women and is known to have a significant effect on quality of life (QoL). Whilst conservative and behavioural therapy are important in the management of women with both stress incontinence and overactive bladder (OAB) ultimately many may benefit from pharmacological therapy. Antimuscarinic drugs are the commonly used agents in the treatment of OAB although often compliance and persistence are affected by adverse effects. Consequently many newer agents remain under investigation. In addition duloxetine has recently been introduced for the management of women with stress incontinence and may offer an alternative to surgery in selected cases. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current and new developments in the management of women with urinary incontinence as well as reviewing the role of oestrogen therapy in relation to lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  9. [Stress urinary incontinence. Its surgical management].

    PubMed

    Neri Ruz, E S; Azcona Arteaga, F J

    1991-10-01

    Ninety eight patients with stress urinary incontinence treated surgically at Central Military Hospital, were studied. We analyzed the risk factors as age, weight, height, parity, menopause age, and previous medical and surgical procedures. They were divided in two groups. The Group I, vaginal approach, with 35 patients and Group II, retropubic surgery, with 63 patients. There were no differences both groups regarding age, weight, height, parity and menopausal age. The most frequent illness associated with stress urinary incontinence, was pelvic floor relaxation. The complications were 17.1% and 33.3%, respectively. The efficacy of Burch is procedure for the management of stress urinary incontinence, with a success rate of 84.1% versus 62.1% in the vaginal approach, was confirmed.

  10. Female Epispadias Presenting as Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Nusret; Zvizdic, Zlatan; Milišic, Emir; Karavdic, Kenan; Paddy, Dewan

    2017-01-01

    Isolated female epispadias without bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital anomaly affecting 1 in 484,000 females. The presenting features of female epispadias are urinary incontinence and abnormal anatomical features. A 6-year-old girl presented with primary urinary incontinence who on physical examination had a bifid clitoris and labia minora. The vagina and hymen were normal. Voiding cystourethrogram showed no reflux and a funnel shaped proximal urethra. With the diagnosis of isolated female epispadias, one-stage reconstruction of the urethra, bladder neck, labia minora and clitoris was performed.

  11. Female Epispadias Presenting as Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jonuzi, Asmir; Popovic, Nusret; Zvizdic, Zlatan; Milišic, Emir; Karavdic, Kenan; Paddy, Dewan

    2017-01-01

    Isolated female epispadias without bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital anomaly affecting 1 in 484,000 females. The presenting features of female epispadias are urinary incontinence and abnormal anatomical features. A 6-year-old girl presented with primary urinary incontinence who on physical examination had a bifid clitoris and labia minora. The vagina and hymen were normal. Voiding cystourethrogram showed no reflux and a funnel shaped proximal urethra. With the diagnosis of isolated female epispadias, one-stage reconstruction of the urethra, bladder neck, labia minora and clitoris was performed.

  12. The medical management of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Ahmed; Drake, Marcus J; Hashim, Hashim

    2010-01-15

    Urinary incontinence is the involuntary leakage of urine; it affects millions of people worldwide, causing significant detrimental effects on their quality of life. Direct expenses, such as containment products, long-term drug prescriptions and surgery, complemented by indirect costs, such as reduced employment productivity, result in overall expenditure running to billions of dollars. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) occurs on physical exertion, and results from weakness of the bladder outlet. Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) results from inability to resist a sudden compelling desire to pass urine, arising as a consequence of bladder dysfunction. Clinical evaluation clarifies the underlying mechanisms and excludes diseases causing similar symptoms. Urodynamic studies to measure bladder and abdominal pressures and deduce the bladder and outlet function are undertaken when invasive treatments are being considered or when the nature of the incontinence is not entirely clear. Initial management of SUI involves pelvic floor muscle exercise training; if insufficient symptom improvement results, surgical measures are needed. UUI treatment commences with advice on suitable fluid intake and measures to improve ability to defer voiding, followed by antimuscarinic drugs. Refractory UUI is a difficult problem, currently managed with a range of surgical interventions, including bladder injections of botulinum-A neurotoxin, augmentation cystoplasty and nerve stimulation methods. New treatment options are needed, because of the risk of impeding voiding function, resulting in urinary retention. Persistent leakage is controlled with containment products, such as pads, or collection devices, such as catheters.

  13. Urinary incontinence in the elderly. Drug treatment options.

    PubMed

    Chutka, D S; Takahashi, P Y

    1998-10-01

    Urinary incontinence is commonly seen in the elderly. It has multiple complications and is often the reason an elderly person is forced to abandon independent living and enter a nursing home. There are multiple causes of urinary incontinence: it is not a single entity or a specific diagnosis. In most patients, the incontinence can be placed into 1 of the following 4 categories: detrusor overactivity (urge incontinence), overflow incontinence, stress incontinence (outlet incompetence) or functional incontinence. To understand the pathophysiology of urinary incontinence, some knowledge of the urinary tract anatomy and physiology is required. It is also important to know how the anatomy and physiology changes in response to the aging process. Successful treatment depends on the specific cause of the incontinence. If incorrectly diagnosed, various treatments may actually worsen the incontinence or cause other problems. Since most elderly patients do not volunteer a problem of urinary incontinence, questions regarding the presence of symptoms must be asked. In most patients, the specific type of incontinence can be diagnosed with a thorough medical history and physical examination. Several simple and widely available laboratory tests may also be useful in the evaluation. Occasionally, urological consultation or urodynamic testing should be performed. Once correctly diagnosed, there are a large number of pharmacological as well as nonpharmacological treatments (behavioural, surgical) available. This article concentrates on the pharmacological therapies for patients with various types of urinary incontinence. Since most patients with urinary incontinence are elderly, they are more susceptible to the effects as well as the adverse effects of medications. This must be taken into account before any pharmacological therapy is initiated. Although many elderly patients believe their symptoms of urinary incontinence to be a part of growing old, urinary incontinence is never a

  14. Nonsurgical Treatment of Urinary Incontinence in Elderly Women.

    PubMed

    Parker, William P; Griebling, Tomas Lindor

    2015-11-01

    Urinary incontinence is a prevalent condition in elderly women with significant associated morbidity. Incontinence can by grouped into several types: stress incontinence, urgency incontinence, overflow incontinence, functional incontinence, and mixed urinary incontinence. Careful evaluation, including history and physical examination, is critical to making the correct diagnosis and guiding therapy. A variety of nonsurgical treatments, including behavioral therapies, pelvic floor muscle exercise, medications, and other treatments, are available; can be successful for many older women; and may preclude the need for surgery. Working closely with the patient, understanding her goals of care, and targeting treatments accordingly are essential for success.

  15. Selecting appropriate absorbent products to treat urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Payne, Drew

    2015-11-01

    Urinary incontinence can have a significant negative effect on a person's life, especially if left unmanaged and untreated. Continence assessment, often carried out by community nurses, is an important element in the management of a person's urinary incontinence, and so is the selection of appropriate absorbent incontinence pads. This article reviews: the causes and effects of urinary incontinence; how to derive the most appropriate information from a continence assessment; strategies for selecting incontinence pads for a person, on the basis of the results of the continence assessment; and some of the problems and risks associated with the use of incontinence pads.

  16. Cell Therapy for Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Hart, Melanie L; Izeta, Ander; Herrera-Imbroda, Bernardo; Amend, Bastian; Brinchmann, Jan E

    2015-08-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is the involuntary loss of urine and is a common condition in middle-aged and elderly women and men. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is caused by leakage of urine when coughing, sneezing, laughing, lifting, and exercise, even standing leads to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Other types of UI also exist such as urge incontinence (also called overactive bladder), which is a strong and unexpected sudden urge to urinate, mixed forms of UI that result in symptoms of both urge and stress incontinence, and functional incontinence caused by reduced mobility, cognitive impairment, or neuromuscular limitations that impair mobility or dexterity. However, for many SUI patients, there is significant loss of urethral sphincter muscle due to degeneration of tissue, the strain and trauma of pregnancy and childbirth, or injury acquired during surgery. Hence, for individuals with SUI, a cell-based therapeutic approach to regenerate the sphincter muscle offers the advantage of treating the cause rather than the symptoms. We discuss current clinically relevant cell therapy approaches for regeneration of the external urethral sphincter (striated muscle), internal urethral sphincter (smooth muscle), the neuromuscular synapse, and blood supply. The use of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells is a major step in the right direction, but they may not be enough for regeneration of all components of the urethral sphincter. Inclusion of other cell types or biomaterials may also be necessary to enhance integration and survival of the transplanted cells.

  17. Effects of bariatric surgery on urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bulbuller, Nurullah; Habibi, Mani; Yuksel, Mustafa; Ozener, Onur; Oruc, Mehmet Tahir; Oner, Osman Zekai; Kazak, Mehmet Altug

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is an important modifiable etiological factor associated with several diseases. There is strong evidence that urinary incontinence (UI) is positively correlated with body mass index (BMI). Aim One of the many benefits experienced by obese patients after bariatric surgery is decrease in UI. To investigate this correlation, we aimed to examine the effects of weight loss on UI in female patients who had undergone laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Materials and methods Obese female patients (n=120), ≥18 years of age, and planning to undergo LSG were included in this prospective study. We administered the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-UI-SF) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) to the patients prior to surgery and 6 months after the surgery. Using the collected data, we determined the incidence of UI and examined the relationship between the preoperative and postoperative BMI and UI values. Results The mean age of the patients was 39.19 (standard deviation [SD] =9.94) years and the mean preoperative BMI was 46.17 (SD =5.35). Of the 120 patients, 72 (60%) complained of UI preoperatively. Among these 72 patients, 23 (31.95%) described urge incontinence, 18 (25%) stress incontinence, and 31 (43.05%) mixed-type incontinence. At 6 months postoperatively, the percentage of excess weight loss was 70.33% (SD =14.84%). For all three UI subtypes, the 6-month postoperative ICIQ-UI-SF and IIQ-7 scores decreased significantly compared to the preoperative scores (P<0.05). Conclusion LSG results in a clinically significant improvement in most common types of UI, regardless of patient reproductive history, existence of comorbid conditions, and smoking status. PMID:28176911

  18. Male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. 1: Assessment.

    PubMed

    Dorey, G

    Male lower urinary tract symptoms include frequency, nocturia, urgency, urge incontinence, stress incontinence, post-micturition dribble and post-prostatectomy incontinence. All of these symptoms can be treated conservatively. In this article, the first of two parts, a detailed subjective and objective assessment is provided based on a Delphi study undertaken by the author. The objective assessment includes a digital rectal examination to assess the pelvic floor muscle strength in order to provide a patient-specific exercise programme. The diagnosis of stress incontinence, urge incontinence, post-prostatectomy incontinence, post-micturition dribble and functional incontinence is made from the assessment. Men with lower urinary tract symptoms need a detailed subjective and objective assessment before a diagnosis is made and individual treatment is planned.

  19. Surgical management of pediatric urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Dave, Sumit; Salle, Joao Luiz Pippi

    2013-08-01

    The surgical management of pediatric urinary incontinence secondary to neurogenic bladder and congenital anomalies is challenging, and continues to evolve with new surgical innovations. The goal of these surgical procedures is to achieve complete and socially acceptable urinary dryness, while preserving volitional voiding where possible, without causing damage to the upper tracts. This review focuses on recent studies and highlights the pros and cons of these advances, based on our experience. The short-term success in achieving urinary continence has to be tempered with the long-term implications of these reconstructive procedures, about which our knowledge is limited.

  20. Sacral Nerve Stimulation For Urinary Urge Incontinence, Urgency-Frequency, Urinary Retention, and Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness, safety, and cost of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) to treat urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence. Background: Condition and Target Population Urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence are prevalent, yet rarely discussed, conditions. They are rarely discussed because patients may be uncomfortable disclosing their symptoms to a health professional or may be unaware that there are treatment options for these conditions. Briefly, urge incontinence is an involuntary loss of urine upon a sudden urge. Urgency-frequency is an uncontrollable urge to void, which results in frequent, small-volume voids. People with urgency-frequency may or may not also experience chronic pelvic pain. Urinary retention refers to the inability to void despite having the urge to void. It can be caused by a hypocontractile detrusor (weak or no bladder muscle contraction) or obstruction due to urethral overactivity. Fecal incontinence is a loss of voluntary bowel control. The prevalence of urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, and urinary retention in the general population is 3.3% to 8.2%, and the prevalence of fecal incontinence is 1.4% to 1.9%. About three-quarters of these people will be successfully treated by behaviour and/or drug therapy. For those who do not respond to these therapies, the options for treatment are management with diapers or pads, or surgery. The surgical procedures are generally quite invasive, permanent, and are associated with complications. Pads and/or diapers are used throughout the course of treatment as different therapies are tried. Patients who respond successfully to treatment may still require pads or diapers, but to a lesser extent. The Technology Being Reviewed: Sacral Nerve Stimulation Sacral nerve stimulation is a procedure where a small device attached to an electrode is

  1. [Anatomic principles of urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Dorschner, W; Stolzenburg, J U; Neuhaus, J

    2001-05-01

    The morphological fundamentals of urinary continence are still subject to controversy. This was the reason for a renewed examination of the sphincter musculature of the lower urinary tract. This study included 50 male and 15 female autopsy specimens. The organs of the lower urinary tract including the neighboring organs had been removed in their entirety and histologically reprocessed en bloc as a complete series of sections. We were able to demonstrate that the internal sphincter or m. sphincter vesicae is represented as a circular, distinct structure which elliptically embraces the internal urethral orifice. Lamellas of the detrusor are not involved in the formation of the internal sphincter. In females and males, the external sphincter consists of a striated and a smooth muscular part (m. sphincter urethrae transversostriatus et glaber). In transverse sections, the muscle has a horseshoe shape. It is completely separated by connective tissue from the musculature of the pelvic floor. A deep transverse perineal muscle does not exist. The histological findings were used for the construction of a digital three-dimensional model of the anatomy of the lower urinary tract. Computer animations of the model with integrated original histologies were generated and stored as a computer video on a CD-ROM attached to this journal.

  2. The Challenge of Urinary Incontinence in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Worrall, Graham

    1989-01-01

    By 2021 Canada will have an enormous population older than 65 years of age. Before the wholesale introduction of programs for seniors with urinary incontinence, careful evaluation of present treatments and the extent to which they can usefully be applied in the community is necessary. We need more information about the diagnosis and treatment of urinary incontinence in the elderly and about both patient and caregiver compliance with treatment for urinary incontinence. There is a great need for research on the efficiency of programs targeted at the incontinent group and for community surveys to reassess the problem's long-term consequences. PMID:21249070

  3. Urinary incontinence in the bitch: an update.

    PubMed

    Reichler, I M; Hubler, M

    2014-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI), defined as the involuntary loss of urine during the filling phase of the bladder (Abrams et al. 2002), is a commonly seen problem in veterinary practice. Urinary sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) after spaying is the most common micturition disorder, and its medical treatment is normally successful, even though the underlying pathophysiological mechanism is not fully understood. Hormonal changes inducing structural and functional alterations in the bladder, as well as in the urethra composition, are discussed. To manage incontinent patients successfully, possible underlying abnormalities besides USMI should be ruled out. In the majority of cases, history, physical examination and simple tests including urinalysis and urine bacterial culture lead to a presumed aetiology. If USMI is the most likely cause, then the advantage of further diagnostic tests should be discussed with the owner before starting a trial therapy with alpha-adrenergic drugs. Potential side effects of this therapy have to be mentioned even though they rarely occur. It is important to thoroughly evaluate the success of the initial treatment. Its failure should lead to further diagnostic testing. Specialized clinical assessments may provide an aetiological diagnosis, and this could serve as a basis for discussing further treatment options. Surgical procedures, which may in rare cases cause irreversible side effects, may be instituted. If incontinence reoccurs after initial treatment was successfully performed, the diagnostic work-up including urinalysis should always be repeated. As results of urinalysis did not correlate well with results of bacterial culture, a urine culture is recommended (Comer and Ling 1981). Cystocentesis is the preferred method of urine collection (Bartges 2004). Equivocal results of quantitative cultures of urine samples obtained during midstream voiding or by catheterization require repeat collection by cystocentesis (Comer and Ling 1981).

  4. High Costs of Urinary Incontinence Among Women Electing Surgery to Treat Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Subak, Leslee L.; Brubaker, Linda; Chai, Toby C.; Creasman, Jennifer M.; Diokno, Ananias C.; Goode, Patricia S.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Kusek, John W.; Leng, Wendy W.; Lukacz, Emily S.; Norton, Peggy; Tennstedt, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate costs for incontinence management, health-related quality of life, and willingness to pay for incontinence improvement in women electing surgery for stress urinary incontinence. METHODS A total of 655 incontinent women enrolled in the Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial, a randomized surgical trial. Baseline out-of-pocket costs for incontinence management were calculated by multiplying self-report of resources used (supplies, laundry, dry cleaning) by national resource costs ($2006). Health-related quality of life was estimated with the Health Utilities Index Mark 3. Participants estimated willingness to pay for 100% improvement in incontinence. Potential predictors of these outcomes were examined by using multivariable linear regression. RESULTS Mean age was 52±10 years, and mean number of weekly incontinence episodes was 22±21. Mean and median (25%, 75% interquartile range) estimated personal costs for incontinence management among all women were $14±$24 and $8 (interquartile range $3, $18) per week, and 617 (94%) women reported any cost. Costs increased significantly with incontinence frequency and mixed compared with stress incontinence. The mean and median Health Utilities Index Mark 3 scores were 0.73±0.25 and 0.84 (interquartile range 0.63, 0.92). Women were willing to pay a mean of $118±$132 per month for complete resolution of incontinence, and willingness to pay increased significantly with greater expected incontinence improvement, household income, and incontinent episode frequency. CONCLUSION Urinary incontinence is associated with substantial costs. Women spent nearly $750 per year out of pocket for incontinence management, had a significant decrement in quality of life, and were willing to pay nearly $1,400 per year for cure. PMID:18378749

  5. [A survey on urinary incontinence in the institutionalized elderly].

    PubMed

    Homma, Y; Takai, K; Takahashi, S; Higashihara, E; Aso, Y; Urushibara, A

    1992-08-01

    A survey on urinary incontinence in 161 (41 male, 120 female) institutionalized elderly was independently performed by urologists and attending nurses. Urinary incontinence was found in 107 cases (66%), with 76 cases (47%) suffering from severe leakage (more than 5 times a day and needs diaper). The prevalences of incontinence and severe leakage were 63% and 52% at geriatric hospitals, 59% and 29% at intermediate care centers and 78% and 63% at nursing homes, respectively. The risk factors for incontinence were consciousness disturbance, urinary urgency, impaired mobility and dementia, and those for severe leakage were apathy, loss of urinary sensation, dementia and impaired mobility. The type of incontinence was considered functional one in 81% of cases. The agreement of the incontinence type evaluated by urologists and that by nurses was found in 90% of incontinent cases. Incontinence was estimated "incurable" in 54% of cases by attending nurses. These observations indicate a high prevalence of severe and "incurable" incontinence in the institutionalized elderly, urgently warranting an effective remedy for the increasing aged society.

  6. Predictors of female urinary incontinence at midlife and beyond.

    PubMed

    Menezes, M; Pereira, M; Hextall, A

    2010-02-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is an important middle age health issue and approximately 20% of women over 40 years of age have problems with continence. Urinary incontinence poses a significant negative impact on social functioning and quality of life to many individuals. It is estimated that around three million people are regularly incontinent in the UK with a prevalence of about 40 per 1000 adults. There are various factors which can cause incontinence such as pregnancy, childbirth, obesity, menopause, or just inherent connective-tissue weakness. All of these factors can cause pathophysiology changes in the muscular and fascial structures of the pelvic floor and lead to pelvic support defects and possibly pelvic floor dysfunction. We aim with this review article to highlight predictors or predisposing factors of incontinence; in order to help clinicians during their decisions and put in place a policy of a preventive strategy to decrease the incontinence rate in the general population.

  7. Urinary incontinence in a vulnerable population: older women.

    PubMed

    Criner, J A

    2001-01-01

    Urinary incontinence creates a tremendous hardship on older women and results in social isolation, anxiety, low self-esteem, depression, and decreased life satisfaction. Stress, urge, overflow, and functional incontinence can be treated by behavioral methods, medications, or invasive techniques. The nurse should complete a health history before making an informed decision with the older women about the most appropriate treatment plan. There can be improved quality of life for women with incontinence if health care providers focus on this problem.

  8. Animal Models of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a common health problem significantly affecting the quality of life of women worldwide. Animal models that simulate SUI enable the assessment of the mechanism of risk factors for SUI in a controlled fashion, including childbirth injuries, and enable preclinical testing of new treatments and therapies for SUI. Animal models that simulate childbirth are presently being utilized to determine the mechanisms of the maternal injuries of childbirth that lead to SUI with the goal of developing prophylactic treatments. Methods of assessing SUI in animals that mimic diagnostic methods used clinically have been developed to evaluate the animal models. Use of these animal models to test innovative treatment strategies has the potential to improve clinical management of SUI. This chapter provides a review of the available animal models of SUI, as well as a review of the methods of assessing SUI in animal models, and potential treatments that have been tested on these models. PMID:21290221

  9. [Neurogenic urinary incontinence. Value of surgical management].

    PubMed

    Kutzenberger, J

    2008-06-01

    Damage to the CNS, the cauda equina, and the pelvic nerval structures causes neurogenic bladder dysfunction with neurogenic urinary incontinence (NUI). The definitive diagnosis of NUI is made with urodynamic examination methods. The most frequent cause of NUI is neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The treatment concept must take into account the physical and emotional restrictions. The treatment of NUI due to NDO is a domain of conservative therapy, i.e., mostly antimuscarinics and intermittent catheterization (IC). In about 30%, there is a good chance for therapy failures. An advancement in therapy is the injection of BTX-A into the detrusor. The missing drug approval is a disadvantage.Operative treatments are considered if conservative and minimally invasive therapies are unsuccessful. Sacral deafferentation (SDAF) and sacral anterior root stimulator implantation (SARSI) are available as organ-preserving techniques only for paraplegics with NDO and reflex urinary incontinence and neuromodulation for the other forms of NDO provided that a successful percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE) test has previously taken place. Augmentation cystoplasty is indicated if SDAF and neuromodulation cannot be used and the bladder wall is damaged irreversibly by fibrosis. Kidney function of at least 25% and acceptance of IC are prerequisites. Myectomy (autoaugmentation) has an indication similar to augmentation cystoplasty but there must not be any fibrosis. Bladder neck insufficiency (BNI) caused by paralysis or iatrogenically can be treated by the implantation of an alloplastic sphincter high at the bladder neck. A stable reservoir function is required. If not all methods are possible, the ileum conduit or the suprapubic bladder fistula can be the last resort.

  10. Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100110.htm Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - series— ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The vaginal opening lies just below the urethral opening, and ...

  11. Evaluation of a behavioral treatment for female urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Santacreu, Marta; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2011-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a medical, psychological, social, economic, and hygienic problem. Although it is difficult to state its prevalence, all authors agree that it is related to age and gender. This study aimed to carry out a urinary incontinence behavioral treatment in order to reduce urine leakages in 14 participants recruited from a senior center. The program consists of daily training of the pelvic floor muscles with a weekly control by a supervisor during a 2-month period and follow-up of results 2 months after the last control session. Urinary incontinence episodes were reduced by 75.67% after program completion. It appears that pelvic floor muscles training, carried out under controlled and constant supervision, significantly reduces urinary leakage. Moreover, maintaining this improvement after treatment depends on the continuation of the exercises as well as on the urinary leakage frequency baseline and the urinary leakage frequency during the last treatment session. PMID:21753868

  12. Glycemic Control and Urinary Incontinence in Women with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Andrew J.; Thai, Julie N.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Huang, Elbert S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Although many studies have shown that diabetes increases the risk for urinary incontinence, it is unclear whether poor glycemic control in women with diabetes is associated with incontinence. This study aims to determine the relationship between the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level and urinary incontinence in a large, diverse cohort of older women. Methods We examined 6026 older women who responded to a survey (62% response rate) and were enrolled in the Diabetes and Aging Study, an ethnically stratified random sample of patients with diabetes enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Our primary independent variable was the mean of all HbA1c measurements in the year preceding the survey. Outcomes included the presence/absence of incontinence and limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. We used modified Poisson regression and ordinal logistic regression models to account for age, race, body mass index, parity, diabetes treatment, duration of diabetes, and comorbidity. Results Sixty-five percent of women reported incontinence (mean age 59±10 years). After adjustment, HbA1c levels were not associated with the presence or absence of incontinence. However, among women reporting incontinence, HbA1c ≥9% was associated with more limitations due to incontinence than HbA1c <6% (adjusted odds ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval: 1.09–2.57). Conclusion In this cross-sectional analysis, HbA1c level is not associated with the presence or absence of incontinence. However, for women with incontinence, poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≥9%) is associated with more limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether improving glycemic control to HbA1c <9% leads to fewer limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. PMID:24032999

  13. Challenges of Conducting Multi-Center, Multi-Disciplinary Urinary Incontinence Clinical Trials: Experience of the Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network

    PubMed Central

    Steers, William; Richter, Holly; Nyberg, Leroy; Kusek, John; Kraus, Stephen; Dandrea, Kimberly; Chai, Toby; Brubaker, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Aims The Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network (UITN) was established in 2000 as a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional network by the National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) to investigate treatments for urinary incontinence in women. Methods Over 8 years this network composed of urologists, urogynecologists, geriatricians, behavioral psychologists, physical therapists, nurses, epidemiologists, social scientists and statisticians from nine academic sites and a Data Coordinating Center has been effective in designing and completing prospective randomized clinical trials for treatments of urinary incontinence in women. Results Two major clinical trials have been completed and a third has completed recruitment. The focus of the completed trials was a comparison of surgical methods to treat stress urinary incontinence whereas the third examined the potential benefit of combined behavioral intervention and antimuscarinic drug therapy to eliminate the need for long-term use of drug therapy alone to manage urge urinary incontinence. The scientific output of the network measured by abstracts, original papers and presentations demonstrates the productivity of the network. Conclusions Many unique challenges are posed by a multi-disciplinary team located at sites across the United States undertaking several clinical trials. This review presents some of the logistics, barriers, tactics, and strategies used to create this successful clinical trials network focused on urinary incontinence. PMID:19030190

  14. Olanzapine as a Cause of Urinary Incontinence: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, Lateef Olutoyin; Adegun, Patrick T; Tareo, Peter O

    2012-01-01

    Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic, is one of the most commonly used antipsychotics. Though olanzapine is commonly associated with endocrine side effects, it is generally well tolerated by most patients and is rarely associated with urinary incontinence. This report highlights the case of a 23 -year old male patient with schizophrenia who developed severe urinary incontinence following the use of olanzapine. No medications were given to relieve the incontinence contrary to some other studies where ephedrine was used. Olanzapine was changed to trifluoperazine, and the patient's condition improved within two days. Urinary incontinence, though uncommon, is an embarrassing side effect of olanzapine which could negatively affect drug compliance. As such, clinicians should enquire about it in order to improve the patient's health. PMID:23139697

  15. Knowledge and understanding of urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Katherina; Hunter, Kathleen F.; Wagg, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate family physicians’ knowledge of, attitudes toward, and understanding of urinary incontinence (UI), as well as their perceptions of barriers to continence care, as a foundation for designing interventions to improve service provision for those in northern Alberta who suffer from UI. Design Descriptive survey using a standardized instrument. The survey instrument was completed either by telephone interview or on paper copy faxed back to the researchers, depending on participant preference. Setting Northern Alberta. Participants Random sample of family physicians (N = 158). Main outcome measures Physician knowledge of and attitudes toward UI, UI management practices, and barriers to providing UI care. Results Survey response rate was 10.6% (158 of 1488); 84.2% (133 of 158) of respondents practised in urban settings, 44.9% (71 of 158) had been in practice for fewer than 15 years, 24.1% (38 of 158) reported having no training in UI management since graduation, and 53.8% (85 of 158) reported that they proactively discussed UI with their patients. Overall, 70.0% of respondents felt fairly confident in managing UI. Most family physicians referred patients for specialist care, with few referrals to community services. Respondents thought that continence services were scarce, with long waiting times, and that such services were generally overstretched; they believed that although high-quality continence care was a personal priority, it was not a priority focus for their practice partnerships or networks. In terms of the highest ranked areas for improvement in UI management, increased awareness and understanding among physicians (ranked first by 28.5% of respondents), followed by dedicated incontinence clinics or nurses for referral (17.7%) and improving patient awareness and understanding (12.0%). Conclusion There continues to be considerable variation in knowledge about UI management and a relative overreliance on specialist care, despite

  16. Anti-diuresis in the management of daytime urinary -incontinence.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D; Cardozo, L

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract dysfunction, whilst not life threatening conditions, remain an important cause of morbidity in women and are responsible for significant impairment of quality of life. Drug therapy is often used to treat women who complain of urgency and urge incontinence and has an emerging role in the management of stress urinary incontinence. However, bothersome side effects are known to affect compliance and therefore compromise efficacy, making longterm drug therapy unpopular. The principle aim of this thesis is to assess the role of antidiuresis in women complaining of daytime urinary incontinence and also to examine its role as a 'designer therapy' which women can choose to use as, or when, required. In addition both the patients' and clinicians' attitudes towards treatment have been studied to clarify the meaning of 'cure', and to determine treatment acceptability, overall outcome and patient satisfaction. In the first study the patients' concept of cure is explored as well as their expectations regarding treatment and outcome. The second study examines cure from the clinician's perspective in addition to reviewing outcome measures in the clinical and research settings. Finally in the third study the use of desmopressin in women complaining of daytime urinary incontinence is reported.

  17. Taking Control: Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women What is UI? “Taking Control” (5-minute video) “ ... video in a new window) Are there other women like me? (8-minute video) Urinary incontinence happens ...

  18. Women with Diabetes: Understanding Urinary Incontinence and Help Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Ashmi M.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Morrill, Michelle Y.; Schembri, Michael; Thom, David H.; Brown, Jeanette S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To examine the association of urinary incontinence by diabetes status and race and evaluate beliefs and help-seeking around incontinence in a population-based cohort of women with and without diabetes. Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 2,270 middle-aged and older racially/ethnically diverse women in Diabetes RRISK. Incontinence, help-seeking behavior, and beliefs were assessed by self-report questionnaires and in-person interviews. Incontinence characteristics of diabetics and non-diabetics were compared using univariate analysis and multivariate models. Results Women with diabetes reported weekly incontinence significantly more than women without diabetes (Weekly: 35.4% vs. 25.7%, respectively, p <0.001). Race prevalence patterns were similar (white and Latina women with the most prevalent incontinence and African-American and Asian women with the least) among women with and without diabetes. Less than 50% of women with diabetes discussed their incontinence with a doctor (42.2% vs. 55.5% (of women without diabetes) p <0.003). Women with diabetes were more likely than women without diabetes to report believing that incontinence is a rare condition (17% vs. 6%, respectively, p<0.001). Conclusions Incontinence is highly prevalent among women with diabetes. Race prevalence patterns are similar among women with and without diabetes. Understanding help-seeking behaviors are important to ensure appropriate care for patients. Physicians should be alert for urinary incontinence because it is often unrecognized and thereby under-treated among women with diabetes. PMID:20727547

  19. Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of Mixed Urinary Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Bilal; Laor, Leanna; Dunphy, Claire; Lee, Richard; Te, Alexis; Kaplan, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) is a common clinical problem in the community and hospital setting. The broad definition of the term makes it difficult to diagnose, as well as determine effective treatment strategies. There are no current guidelines recommended for physicians. The estimated prevalence of this condition is approximately 30% in all women with incontinence. It has also been suggested that patients with MUI report more bothersome symptoms than either stress or urge incontinence; approximately 32% of 40- to 64-year-olds with MUI report symptoms of depression. The authors examine the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of patients with MUI. PMID:27222643

  20. Review of current technologies for urinary incontinence: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Fader, M

    2003-01-01

    A wide range of continence products is available, and this paper focuses on products to prevent incontinence (such as urinals and commodes) and to contain or manage urinary incontinence (such as absorbent pads, penile sheaths and urethral catheters). Drawing on results from published clinical evaluations at the Continence Product Evaluation Network at UCL and at other centres, the strengths and limitations of the major categories of incontinence products currently on the market are reviewed. It is concluded that, although products for continence have improved considerably over the last 20 years, there is considerable scope for the designer and engineer to improve on current products.

  1. Efficacy of Physiotherapy for Urinary Incontinence following Prostate Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bakuła, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    The study enrolled 81 with urinary incontinence following radical prostate-only prostatectomy for prostatic carcinoma. The patients were divided into two groups. The patients in Group I were additionally subdivided into two subgroups with respect to the physiotherapeutic method used. The patients of subgroup IA received a rehabilitation program consisting of three parts. The patients of subgroup IB rehabilitation program consist of two parts. Group II, a control group, had reported for therapy for persistent urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy but had not entered therapy for personal reasons. For estimating the level of incontinence, a 1-hour and 24-hour urinary pad tests, the miction diary, and incontinence questionnaire were used, and for recording the measurements of pelvic floor muscles tension, the sEMG (surface electromyography) was applied. The therapy duration depended on the level of incontinence and it continued for not longer than 12 months. Superior continence outcomes were obtained in Group I versus Group II and the difference was statistically significant. The odds ratio for regaining continence was greater in the rehabilitated Group I and smaller in the group II without the rehabilitation. A comparison of continence outcomes revealed a statistically significant difference between Subgroups IA versus IB. The physiotherapeutic procedures applied on patients with urine incontinence after prostatectomy, for most of them, proved to be an effective way of acting, which is supported by the obtained results. PMID:24868546

  2. A newly designed deodorant pad for urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Fukui, J; Sakai, Y; Hosaka, K; Yamashita, T; Ogawa, A; Shirai, H

    1990-08-01

    The authors designed a new pad for urinary incontinence. It is composed of a cloth of acrylonitrile copper sulfide and another cloth of iron-phthalocyanine. In vitro experiments showed that acrylonitrile copper sulfide cloth inhibited the growth of most bacteria causing urinary tract infection, and that iron-phthalocyanine cloth effectively eliminated bad-smelling gases. The use of this pad relieved diaper-dermatitis and diminished offensive smells from feces and urine. This pad was well received by nurses and helpers taking care of incontinent elderly people.

  3. [Urodynamic studies in the child with urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Schwöbel, M; Bodmer, C

    1998-01-01

    Voiding disorders in children are frequent. To establish an exact anamnesis, it has to be distinguished between enuresis and incontinence and this may consequently already have a therapeutical effect. Enuresis is defined as a normal void occurring at an inappropriate time or place. Incontinence is an involuntary loss of urine and a pathological voiding habit, often in combination with urinary infections. The causes of an enuresis are always functional, the causes for incontinence may be organic or functional. Organic causes are neurogenic bladder dysfunctions or structural anomalies of the lower urinary tract. The functional causes are divided in urge incontinence, dysfunctional voiding, lazy bladder syndrome and stress incontinence. The most important screening examination in each child with voiding disorders is the uroflowmetry, in combination with an electromyography (EMG) of pelvic floor and abdominal muscles. For registration of the muscle activity, surface electrodes are used that only show muscle groups, but do not hurt on application. Cystometry, an invasive method, is used as a second step. The therapy of functional incontinence consists in bladder training, physiotherapy of the pelvic floor and biofeedback. Medicaments are given in second priority. The therapy of functional voiding disorders is only successful in cooperation with the child and its parents.

  4. Staying Trim, Strong May Cut Risk of Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... in decreasing the odds of new or worsening stress type of urinary incontinence," she said. The study was published recently in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society . SOURCES: Anne Suskind, M.D., assistant professor of urology, University of California, San Francisco; Megan Schimpf, M.D., ...

  5. Assessment of the female patient with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Bates, Frankie

    2002-10-01

    Understanding the pelvic floor anatomy and all of its components is crucial when performing pelvic floor examination and assessing patients suffering from urinary incontinence. It is important for urology nurses to understand the pelvic floor, including the muscle, nerve, and fascia involved; external and internal examination of the vulva; and global assessment of the patient.

  6. The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in women studying nursing and related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Opara, Józef; Czerwińska-Opara, Wioletta Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Urinary incontinence is a growing problem that affects millions of people worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women studying nursing. Respondents completed a questionnaire assessing urinary incontinence, severity of symptoms and quality of life. Short forms to assess symptoms of distress for urinary incontinence and quality of life: UDI-6 and IIQ-7 have been used. The study's conclusions are as follows: 1) among the 113 interviewed women, stress urinary incontinence (SUI) was observed in 25% of respondents; this prevalence is similar to the age-matched population; 2) among the triggering factors mentioned in stress urinary incontinence the most frequent were: coughing, laughing and sneezing; 3) moderate impact of incontinence on quality of life has been shown, but this effect was not statistically significant.

  7. The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in women studying nursing and related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Czerwińska-Opara, Wioletta Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a growing problem that affects millions of people worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women studying nursing. Respondents completed a questionnaire assessing urinary incontinence, severity of symptoms and quality of life. Short forms to assess symptoms of distress for urinary incontinence and quality of life: UDI-6 and IIQ-7 have been used. The study's conclusions are as follows: 1) among the 113 interviewed women, stress urinary incontinence (SUI) was observed in 25% of respondents; this prevalence is similar to the age-matched population; 2) among the triggering factors mentioned in stress urinary incontinence the most frequent were: coughing, laughing and sneezing; 3) moderate impact of incontinence on quality of life has been shown, but this effect was not statistically significant. PMID:26327826

  8. [Update on current care guidelines: urinary incontinence (female)].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Female urinary incontinence (UI) is divided into stress (SUI), urgency (UUI), mixed (MUI) and overflow incontinence (chronic retention). Advanced age, obesity and pregnancy are the most important risk factors. Standardised questionnaires are used in diagnosis. The pad test, cough stress test and bladder diary are objective tools. A gynaecological examination includes pelvic floor muscle palpation and residual urine measurement. Urodynamics, cystoscopy and ultrasonography are complementary tools. Guided pelvic floor-muscle training is the first-line therapy. UUI can be treated with anticholinergic medicines. If conservative treatments are ineffective, SUI and MUI can be treated surgically with mid-urethral slings (TVT TOT and TVT-0).

  9. [Enuresis and pediatric urinary incontinence : Diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Schultz-Lampel, D; Goepel, M; Reitz, A; Braun, P

    2016-12-01

    Differentiated non-invasive diagnostic procedures allow a discrimination between nocturnal enuresis and behavior-linked urinary incontinence in children with daytime symptoms, which are different entities of a pathological pediatric micturition syndrome. The article describes the diagnostic procedure as well as the therapeutic approach to all forms of micturition disorders in childhood. All behavioral, medical and biofeedback therapeutic methods according to the recently published S2k guidelines from the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) on enuresis and non-organic (functional) incontinence in children and adolescents are mentioned and discussed.

  10. [Causes and diagnosis of female urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Schorsch, I; Soljanik, I; Stanislaus, P; Bauer, R; Mayer, M; Hocaoglu, Y; Becker, A; May, F

    2007-09-20

    The primary cause of stress incontinence is birth traumata. However, obesity, asthma, chronic constipation or hard physical work can also overtax the pelvic floor and lead to injury of the connective tissue and a slackening of the ligamentous apparatus. Pelvic floor defects are initially diagnosed simply through a thorough urogynaecological examination. To predict the success of a surgical treatment, the functions can be tested by performing simulated operations.

  11. Urinary and Fecal Incontinence in Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Felix W.; Schnelle, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Urinary and fecal incontinence (UI, FI) are co-morbid conditions affecting over 50% of nursing home residents. Both forms of incontinence are risk factors for elderly persons to be placed in the nursing home, and such institutionalization itself is a risk factor for developing incontinence. Management should focus on identifying and treating underlying causes, such as detrusor instability, urinary tract infections, diet- or medication-induced diarrhea, constipation and fecal impaction. Despite appropriate management, residents may remain incontinent because of dementia and health or restraint-related immobility. Nursing homes lack the staff and financial resources to provide residents with sufficiently frequent toileting assistance (including prompted voiding). Use of special undergarments and absorbent pads is the usual practice. The article reviews the results of studies that have documented how prompted voiding programs can significantly reduce UI and FI, particularly if the intervention includes dietary and exercise components. Recent systematic anorectal testing of nursing home residents with FI has documented impaired sphincter function (risk factor for FI), decreased rectal sensation and sphincter dyssynergia (risk factor for constipation and impaction). The data suggest that the use of laxatives and stool softeners for prophylaxis against constipation and impaction related to underlying dyssynergia may have produced sufficient fluidity in the stool to predispose the residents with impaired sphincter function to manifest FI. Documentation of non-invasive and efficacious interventions by RCT and the labor costs of implementing these measures can lead to changes in how nursing home care is provided and funded. PMID:18794004

  12. Urinary incontinence products - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... sores. You have signs of infection (a burning sensation when you urinate, fever, or chills). Alternate Names Adult diapers; Disposable urinary collection devices References Mendez-Probst CE, Razvi H, Denstedt JD. Fundamental ...

  13. [Treatment of urinary incontinence in epispadias at the beginning of the third millenium].

    PubMed

    Touili, Y; Chebil, M; Bacha, K; Hajri, M; Hassine, B; Ayed, M

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of urinary incontinence in epispadias is delicate. Urinary continence is generally obtained after onerous and repetitive surgery. Different publications show a variable results. After the study of the results of our series (nine cases) and the results published in the literature, we propose a clarification on the therapeutic modalities of urinary incontinence associated to this malformation.

  14. [Transobturator slings for female stress urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana; Jesus, André; Carvalho, Maria; Carvalho, Giselda; Marques, João; Falcão, Francisco; Torgal, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: A incontinência urinária de esforço afeta 20 a 40% das mulheres. Os slings colocados sob a uretra média, aplicados por via transobturadora, são a terapêutica consensualmente aceite na atualidade. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a eficácia e possíveis complicações associadas à aplicação dos slings colocados por via transobturadora no tratamento da incontinência urinária de esforço. Material e Métodos: Avaliaram-se retrospetivamente 363 doentes submetidas a cirurgia de incontinência urinária de esforço por via transobturadora, nos Hospitais da Universidade de Coimbra do Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, no período de 1 Janeiro de 2008 a 1 Julho de 2010. Resultados: A média das idades das doentes foi de 56 anos [28-86]. Além da correção da incontinência urinária de esforço, em 13,5% das mulheres foi associada outra cirurgia vaginal. A maioria (95,3%) das mulheres apresentou hipermobilidade da uretra. Ocorreram complicações per-operatórias em 0,8%, complicações pós-operatórias imediatas em 5,2% e complicações pós-operatórias tardias em 15,7%. A taxa de sucesso global foi de 93,7%. A taxa de sucesso nas doentes com uretra fixa foi 77,8%, verificando-se melhores resultados (94,5%) naquelas com hipermobilidade da uretra (p = 0,02). A taxa de sucesso foi comparável nas doentes com e sem cirurgias vaginais associadas. Discussão: As técnicas transobturadoras têm taxas de sucesso elevadas, tendo-se tornado o tratamento de primeira linha para as doentes com IUE, independentemente se tratadas pela técnica outside-in (TOT®) ou pela inside-out (TVT-O®). Ambas as técnicas foram concebidas com o intuito de evitar a passagem no espaço retropúbico, reduzindo assim o número de complicações. Conclusão: As taxas de cura para as abordagens transobturadoras oscilam entre 80 e 95%. A taxa de cura aumenta quando o mecanismo responsável pela incontinência urinária de esforço é a hipermobilidade da uretra

  15. [Female stress urinary incontinence during pregnancy. A bibliographical review].

    PubMed

    Navarro García, Miguel Angel; De Carlos Alegre, Vanessa

    2009-10-01

    The authors have prepared a brief bibliographical review on female stress urinary incontinence during pregnancy. The high degree of incidence this disorder has and the introduction of the latest sanitary techniques combine to make necessary a profound review which aids medical professionals to realize the magnitude of this problem, as well as to diagnose and treat it effectively. Female stress urinary incontinence during pregnancy is an involuntary urine loss associated to the physical effort which an increase in abdominal pressure provokes. A literary review of articles related to this disorder leaves no doubt that among the risk factors which make a woman be predisposed to suffer female stress urinary incontinence, obstetric trauma as a consequence of pregnancy and birth is a main risk factor. The authors describe a couple of diagnostic tools, a ICIQ-SF questionnaire, and therapeutic tools, the pelvic floor muscle exercise program, whose effectiveness has been sufficiently demonstrated and may prove to have very beneficial clinical uses which can be applied in a nurse's office.

  16. Urinary Incontinence and Urosepsis due to Forgotten Ureteral Stent.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Diego Martin; Losada, Johanna Belén; Montiel, Francisco Castro; Lafos, Norberto

    2016-09-01

    Case report of a patient who, while being under study due to total urinary incontinence and multiple urinary tract infections, interoccurs with urosepsis due to a forgotten and encrusted double-J stent. An open surgery is performed with two surgical approaches, suprapubic and minimal lumbotomy, in which a nephrectomy of the atrophic kidney, a resection of the urether with a calcified double-J in its interior and a cystolithotomy were conducted with the resulting favorable resolution of the pathology.

  17. Teaching strategies for assessing and managing urinary incontinence in older adults.

    PubMed

    Bradway, Christine; Cacchione, Pamela

    2010-07-01

    Urinary incontinence is common and affects many aspects of older adults' lives; therefore, it is essential that nursing faculty include this content in classroom and clinical teaching situations. This article describes innovative strategies for teaching upper-level nursing students (e.g., junior and senior undergraduates) about urinary incontinence in older adults, specifically, the relevant anatomy and physiology of continence and associated pathophysiology of urinary incontinence, risk factors and consequences, definitions and types, and effective nursing assessment and management strategies.

  18. [Urinary incontinence - what can be done by the family doctor and when is the urologist needed?].

    PubMed

    Keller, Isabelle Sonja; Brachlow, Jan Frederic; Padevit, Christian; Kurz, Michael; John, Hubert

    2014-10-01

    About 15% of the women and 10% of the men past the age of 65 years suffer from urinary incontinence. In most cases, accurate history taking can help differentiate between urge incontinence, stress incontinence and overflow incontinence, and is essential in choosing the appropriate treatment. Initial diagnostic testing can be conducted by the general practitioner, especially tests to exclude urinary tract infections or to rule out an overactive bladder. Patient education on changes to fluid intake and voiding habits as well as advice on suitable incontinence products are important first steps in the management of urinary continence. Also, drug treatment can be initiated in general practice. Patients with refractory urinary incontinence, particularly those who did not respond to anticholinergic medication, should be referred to a urologist for further evaluation since there may be an underlying tumour or other disorder of the bladder that is causing the incontinence.

  19. The female urinary microbiome: a comparison of women with and without urgency urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Meghan M; Hilt, Evann E; Rosenfeld, Amy B; Zilliox, Michael J; Thomas-White, Krystal; Fok, Cynthia; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Schreckenberger, Paul C; Brubaker, Linda; Gai, Xiaowu; Wolfe, Alan J

    2014-07-08

    Bacterial DNA and live bacteria have been detected in human urine in the absence of clinical infection, challenging the prevailing dogma that urine is normally sterile. Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a poorly understood urinary condition characterized by symptoms that overlap urinary infection, including urinary urgency and increased frequency with urinary incontinence. The recent discovery of the urinary microbiome warrants investigation into whether bacteria contribute to UUI. In this study, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to classify bacterial DNA and expanded quantitative urine culture (EQUC) techniques to isolate live bacteria in urine collected by using a transurethral catheter from women with UUI and, in comparison, a cohort without UUI. For these cohorts, we demonstrated that the UUI and non-UUI urinary microbiomes differ by group based on both sequence and culture evidences. Compared to the non-UUI microbiome, sequencing experiments revealed that the UUI microbiome was composed of increased Gardnerella and decreased Lactobacillus. Nine genera (Actinobaculum, Actinomyces, Aerococcus, Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, Gardnerella, Oligella, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus) were more frequently cultured from the UUI cohort. Although Lactobacillus was isolated from both cohorts, distinctions existed at the species level, with Lactobacillus gasseri detected more frequently in the UUI cohort and Lactobacillus crispatus most frequently detected in controls. Combined, these data suggest that potentially important differences exist in the urinary microbiomes of women with and without UUI, which have strong implications in prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of UUI. Importance: New evidence indicates that the human urinary tract contains microbial communities; however, the role of these communities in urinary health remains to be elucidated. Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a highly prevalent yet poorly understood urinary condition characterized by

  20. Risperidone-associated urinary incontinence in patients with autistic disorder with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Kumazaki, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Koichiro; Imasaka, Yasushi; Iwata, Kazuhiko; Tomoda, Akemi; Mimura, Masaru

    2014-10-01

    We report several cases in which patients with autistic disorder with mental retardation who received risperidone experienced urinary incontinence. We retrospectively investigated the medical records of patients housed in facilities for patients with autistic disorder with mental retardation. Those who had undergone a medical examination at a hospital in Tokyo from April 1999 to March 2009 were included in the study.Retrospective data were gathered including age, sex, IQ, birth weight, dosage of risperidone, urinary density, as well as existence of urinary and fecal incontinence. We divided the participants into those who did and did not experience urinary incontinence after taking risperidone and compared the 2 groups. Risperidone had been prescribed to 35 patients. In spite of the fact that no patient had a history of urinary incontinence, 14 patients experienced urinary incontinence after receiving risperidone. Moreover, 4 of these 14 patients also had fecal incontinence. Among the variables we examined, the only significant difference between groups was in sex, with significantly more women experiencing incontinence compared with men. When the dose of risperidone was reduced or the patients switched to other drugs, urinary incontinence of the patients improved.Hence, risperidone may have a casual relationship with urinary incontinence. Further research is needed to understand the pathophysiology of possible effect.

  1. Urological disorders in men: urinary incontinence and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan W; Miller, Mindi S

    2011-08-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are 2 common urogenital problems in men. UI is associated with involuntary leakage of urine and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) of urgency, frequency, and nocturia. Types of UI include functional, urge, stress, and overflow. Treatment for UI is based on the type of incontinence, patient-specific factors, and treatment preferences of both patients and health care providers. Options for the management of UI include environmental modifications, disposable incontinence products, pelvic floor exercises, pharmacotherapy, surgically implanted devices, and intermittent catheterization. BPH may be also associated with LUTS. Patient symptoms, assessed with a measurement tool such as the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUASI), serve as the basis for determining treatment. Management approaches for BPH include pharmacotherapy, surgery, and minimally invasive procedures. Anticholinergic drugs as well as α-receptor antagonists and 5-α reductase inhibitors, either alone or in combination, are effective and useful for LUTS unresponsive to traditional pharmacotherapy. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) can eliminate symptoms of BPH but is associated with relatively more complications than other available surgical and minimally invasive procedures.

  2. A warning detector for urinary incontinence for home health care.

    PubMed

    Tamura, T; Nakajima, K; Matsushita, T; Fujimoto, T; Shimooki, S; Nakano, T

    1995-01-01

    A telemetry system for monitoring urinary incontinence has been developed using two principles, temperature and impedance changes of a diaper. The system is composed of a pair of sensors, a transmitter, and a receiver. Temperature changes are monitored using thermistors, one in the center of the diaper and the other attached to the abdomen, and the temperature differences between them after urinary incontinence is detected. For the impedance method, two electroconductive cloths as electrodes placed in the diaper are used as sensors. Urine acts as a conductor to produce a current between the sensors. Clinical evaluation showed that both methods operate well; 13 of 17 incontinence episodes were detected using the temperature method and 32 of 35 with the impedance method. The misdetections were caused by faulty sensor arrangement for temperature measurement and by detection of exudates by the conductive sensors. These monitors may be used for the care of elderly people who use diapers for home health care, to save care time and help maintain hygiene.

  3. Associated Factors and the Impact of Fecal Incontinence in Women with Urge Urinary Incontinence: From the Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network’s BEDRI Study

    PubMed Central

    MARKLAND, Alayne D.; RICHTER, Holly E.; KENTON, Kimberly S.; WAI, Clifford; NAGER, Charles W.; KRAUS, Stephen R.; XU, Yan; TENNSTEDT, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To determine prevalence, risk factors, and impact on quality of life (QOL) that fecal incontinence (FI) symptoms have on women seeking treatment for urge urinary incontinence (UUI). Study Design Baseline sociodemographic, history, physical examination, and validated questionnaire data were analyzed in 307 women enrolled in the Behavior Enhances Drug Reduction of Incontinence (BEDRI) study for associations with FI. FI was defined as loss of liquid/solid stool occurring at least monthly. Multivariable logistic regression models compared women with FI and UUI to women with only UUI. Results Prevalence of monthly FI was 18%, liquid stool (12%) and solid stool (6%). In multivariable analysis, FI was associated with vaginal delivery, posterior vaginal wall prolapse, higher body mass index, and UUI symptoms. QOL was worse in women with FI/UUI than isolated UUI. Conclusion Women seeking treatment for UUI have high rates of monthly FI with a negative impact on QOL. PMID:19200939

  4. The Burden of Urinary Incontinence and Urinary Bother Among Elderly Prostate Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Ryan P.; Marshall, Lynn M.; Wang, Patty Y.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Parsons, J. Kellogg

    2014-01-01

    Background Data describing urinary health in elderly, community-dwelling prostate cancer (PCa) survivors are limited. Objective To elucidate the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary bother, and incontinence in elderly PCa survivors compared with peers without PCa. Design, setting, and participants A cross-sectional analysis of 5990 participants in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Research Group, a cohort study of community-dwelling men ≥65 yr. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis We characterized urinary health using self-reported urinary incontinence and the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUA-SI). We compared urinary health measures according to type of PCa treatment in men with PCa and men without PCa using multivariate log-binomial regression to generate prevalence ratios (PRs). Results and limitations At baseline, 706 men (12%) reported a history of PCa, with a median time since diagnosis of 6.3 yr. Of these men, 426 (60%) reported urinary incontinence. In adjusted analyses, observation (PR: 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15–3.21; p = 0.01), surgery (PR: 4.68; 95% CI, 4.11–5.32; p < 0.0001), radiation therapy (PR: 1.64; 95% CI, 1.20– 2.23; p = 0.002), and androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) (PR: 2.01; 95% CI, 1.35–2.99; p = 0.0006) were each associated with daily incontinence. Daily incontinence risk increased with time since diagnosis independently of age. Observation (PR: 1.33; 95% CI, 1.00–1.78; p = 0.05), surgery (PR: 1.25; 95% CI, 1.10–1.42; p = 0.0008), and ADT (PR: 1.50; 95% CI, 1.26–1.79; p < 0.0001) were associated with increased AUA-SI bother scores. Cancer stage and use of adjuvant or salvage therapies were not available for analysis. Conclusions Compared with their peers without PCa, elderly PCa survivors had a two-fold to five-fold greater prevalence of urinary incontinence, which rose with increasing survivorship duration. Observation, surgery, and ADT were each associated with

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF QUALITY INDICATORS FOR WOMEN WITH URINARY INCONTINENCE

    PubMed Central

    Anger, Jennifer T.; Scott, Victoria C. S.; Kiyosaki, Krista; Khan, Aqsa A.; Weinberg, Avivah; Connor, Sarah E.; Roth, Carol P.; Wenger, Neil; Shekelle, Paul; Litwin, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS To develop a means to measure the quality of care provided to women treated for urinary incontinence (UI) through the development of quality-of-care indicators (QIs). METHODS We performed an extensive literature review to develop a set of potential quality indicators for the management of urinary incontinence. QIs were modeled after those previously described in the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) project. Nine experts ranked the indicators on a nine-point scale for both validity and feasibility. We analyzed preliminary rankings of each indicator using the RAND Appropriateness Method. A forum was then held in which each indicator was thoroughly discussed by the panelists as a group, after which the indicators were rated a second time individually using the same nine-point scale. RESULTS QIs were developed that addressed screening, diagnosis, work-up, and both non-surgical and surgical management. Areas of controversy included whether routine screening for incontinence should be performed, whether urodynamics should be performed before non-surgical management is initiated, and whether cystoscopy should be part of the pre-operative work-up of uncomplicated stress incontinence. Following the expert panel discussion, 27 of 40 potential indicators were determined to be valid for UI with a median score of at least seven on a nine-point scale. CONCLUSIONS We identified 27 quality indicators for the care of women with UI. Once these QIs are pilot-tested for feasibility, they will be applied on a larger scale to measure the quality of care provided to women with UI in the United States. PMID:24105879

  6. Regenerative medicine based applications to combat stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Hatim; Sharma, Arun K

    2013-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), as an isolated symptom, is not a life threatening condition. However, the fear of unexpected urine leakage contributes to a significant decline in quality of life parameters for afflicted patients. Compared to other forms of incontinence, SUI cannot be easily treated with pharmacotherapy since it is inherently an anatomic problem. Treatment options include the use of bio-injectable materials to enhance closing pressures, and the placement of slings to bolster fascial support to the urethra. However, histologic findings of degeneration in the incontinent urethral sphincter invite the use of tissues engineering strategies to regenerate structures that aid in promoting continence. In this review, we will assess the role of stem cells in restoring multiple anatomic and physiological aspects of the sphincter. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells and CD34+ cells have shown great promise to differentiate into muscular and vascular components, respectively. Evidence supporting the use of cytokines and growth factors such as hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and insulin-like growth factor further enhance the viability and direction of differentiation. Bridging the benefits of stem cells and growth factors involves the use of synthetic scaffolds like poly (1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) (POC) thin films. POC scaffolds are synthetic, elastomeric polymers that serve as substrates for cell growth, and upon degradation, release growth factors to the microenvironment in a controlled, predictable fashion. The combination of cellular, cytokine and scaffold elements aims to address the pathologic deficits to urinary incontinence, with a goal to improve patient symptoms and overall quality of life. PMID:24179600

  7. Caffeine Intake and Risk of Urinary Incontinence Progression Among Women

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Mary K.; Resnick, Neil M.; Grodstein, Francine

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association between long-term caffeine intake and risk of urinary incontinence (UI) progression over 2 years among women with moderate UI. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in 21,564 women with moderate UI enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study and Nurses’ Health Study II. Incontinence progression was identified from questionnaires during 2 years of follow-up. Baseline caffeine intake (ie, average intake during the past year) and change in caffeine intake during the 4 years prior to baseline were measured using food frequency questionnaires. Odds ratios (ORs) for incontinence progression according to caffeine intake were calculated for each cohort separately, and then for both cohorts combined. Results The percentage of women with UI progression was similar across categories of baseline level of caffeine intake and change in caffeine intake prior to baseline. For example, percentages were 21% versus 22% comparing 450 mg or more to less than 150 mg of caffeine per day (adjusted OR 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-1.08). Comparing women with increased caffeine intake to those with stable caffeine intake, percentages with progression were 22% versus 20% (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.95-1.22). Results were similar in separate analyses of urgency and stress UI. Conclusion Long-term caffeine intake over one year was not associated with risk of UI progression over 2 years among women with moderate incontinence, although we could not examine acute effects of caffeine. Improved understanding of the effect of caffeine on the bladder is needed to better advise women with incontinence about caffeine intake. PMID:22525905

  8. [Prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence in female workers of hotels].

    PubMed

    Fontana, L; Falconi, G; Di Martino, T; Iavicoli, I

    2007-01-01

    The International Continence Society defines urinary incontinence (UI) as "a condition in which involuntary loss of urine is a social or hygienic problem and is objectively demonstrable". There are three different jorms of UI. stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence and mixed incontinence. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of UI in a group of female workers in the hotel sector. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence short form (ICIQ-UI Short Form) was administered to all female workers and data were collected about age, body mass index, number of vaginal and Caesarean delivery. Results showed a prevalence of UI widely bigger in the plans waitress than in video display terminal workers and suggest the hypothesis that manual handling of loads representing a possible occupational risk for UI.

  9. Urinary incontinence in women: a comprehensive review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, P; Dmochowski, R

    2014-10-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) or involuntary leakage of urine is a distressing and serious health problem. It has a significant psychosocial and economic burden leading to significant quality of life issues. UI is more prevalent than most chronic diseases yet largely underreported. Aging and age-related changes in the bladder play a significant role in the development of UI. This in combination with cognitive dysfunction, functional impairment, pharmacotherapy, smoking, childbearing, obesity and coexisiting comorbidities worsen the condition. Due to the burden UI places on the individual, their family and society, it is important for providers to diagnose and have ready treatment options available. The three most common types of UI are stress urinary incontinence (SUI), urge urinary incontinence (UUI), or a combination of both, mixed urinary incontinence (MUI). This review describes the pathophysiology of incontinence; and diagnosis and treatment (conservative, pharmacological, and surgical therapies) of incontinence in women.

  10. Stigma and microaggressions experienced by older women with urinary incontinence: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Heintz, Phyllis A; DeMucha, Cheryl M; Deguzman, Maryann M; Softa, Ridhima

    2013-01-01

    This literature review investigated stigma and identified episodes of microaggressions experienced by women with urinary incontinence. Three significant themes were revealed: lack of disclosure from psychological distress, microaggressions resulting from stigma, and factors associated with the intersections of gender, race, and ethnicity. Nursing implications include earning and maintaining patient trust, and demonstrating sensitivity about urinary incontinence.

  11. A Graduate Nursing Curriculum for the Evaluation and Management of Urinary Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogalski, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Geriatric nurse practitioners should be educated in the evaluation and treatment of common geriatric syndromes like urinary incontinence. However, many advanced-practice nursing programs do not place an educational emphasis on urinary incontinence management. The purpose of this project is to provide information that supports the need for…

  12. Stress Urinary Incontinence in Women With Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the prevalence and risk factors of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and the prevalence of intrinsic sphincter deficiency in women with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We conducted a retrospective study. Female patients with MS, followed for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) during a 15-year period were included. Demographic data, MS history, expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score at the urodynamic visit, obstetrical past, birth weight, LUTS, and urodynamic findings were collected. SUI was defined as incontinence during cough, or any effort. A maximum urethral closure pressure less than 30 cm H2O defined intrinsic sphincter deficiency. Results We included 363 women with a mean age of 46.7±10.8 years and a mean disease duration of 12.9±8.7 years. The incidence of relapsing remitting MS, a secondary progressive form, and a primary progressive form was 60.6%, 32.8%, and 6.6%, respectively. The prevalence of SUI was 31.4%. The prevalence of intrinsic sphincter deficiency was 1.4% and 0.8% of these patients had a SUI (P=0.300). In a multivariate analysis, women with a SUI had significantly higher birth weight (P=0.030), a pelvic organ prolapse (P=0.021), urgent urinary incontinence (P=0.006), a lower EDSS score (P=0.019), and a weaker containing effort (P<0.001). Conclusions The prevalence of SUI in women with MS was 31.4%. This symptom could affect the quality of life of women with MS. PMID:27706005

  13. Acupuncture for the treatment of urinary incontinence: A review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    PAIK, SUN-HO; HAN, SU-RYUN; KWON, OH-JUN; AHN, YOUNG-MIN; LEE, BYUNG-CHEOL; AHN, SE-YOUNG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of acupuncture on urinary incontinence and to discuss why these acupoints were selected. Seven databases were searched for any randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the use of acupuncture or acupressure as a treatment for urinary incontinence, and the Cochrane risk of bias tool was utilized to evaluate the risk of bias in each study. Four RCTs met all the inclusion criteria. The results from the selected RCTs failed to demonstrate any statistically significant improvements in urinary incontinence, although acupuncture or acupressure did exhibit favorable effects on overactive bladder symptoms and quality of life, in comparison with other conventional therapies. There have been limited results supporting acupuncture or acupressure as an effective treatment method for urinary incontinence; therefore, further RCTs are required to confirm the effectiveness of acupuncture or acupressure in the treatment of urinary incontinence. PMID:24137264

  14. Abdominal obesity is associated with stress urinary incontinence in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Han, Myung Ok; Lee, Nan Young; Park, Hye Soon

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between abdominal obesity and stress urinary incontinence in Korean women. Women aged 30 and over, who visited the Department of Family Medicine of Asan Medical Center were recruited to participate in this study. Anthropometric measurements including body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were taken, and associated factors of stress urinary incontinence was assessed by questionnaire. Stress urinary incontinence was significantly associated with physical work, vaginal delivery, and high waist circumference. In comparison with women in the lowest quartile of waist circumference, the odds ratios (OR) for stress urinary incontinence in women in the second, third, and fourth quartiles were increased significantly (1.79, 95% CI 1.07-2.98; 3.50, 95% CI 2.02-6.07; and 6.07, 95% CI 3.23-11.40, respectively). Our results indicate that high waist circumference may be a risk factor associated with stress urinary incontinence in women.

  15. The Female Urinary Microbiome: a Comparison of Women with and without Urgency Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Meghan M.; Hilt, Evann E.; Rosenfeld, Amy B.; Zilliox, Michael J.; Thomas-White, Krystal; Fok, Cynthia; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Schreckenberger, Paul C.; Brubaker, Linda

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial DNA and live bacteria have been detected in human urine in the absence of clinical infection, challenging the prevailing dogma that urine is normally sterile. Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a poorly understood urinary condition characterized by symptoms that overlap urinary infection, including urinary urgency and increased frequency with urinary incontinence. The recent discovery of the urinary microbiome warrants investigation into whether bacteria contribute to UUI. In this study, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to classify bacterial DNA and expanded quantitative urine culture (EQUC) techniques to isolate live bacteria in urine collected by using a transurethral catheter from women with UUI and, in comparison, a cohort without UUI. For these cohorts, we demonstrated that the UUI and non-UUI urinary microbiomes differ by group based on both sequence and culture evidences. Compared to the non-UUI microbiome, sequencing experiments revealed that the UUI microbiome was composed of increased Gardnerella and decreased Lactobacillus. Nine genera (Actinobaculum, Actinomyces, Aerococcus, Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, Gardnerella, Oligella, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus) were more frequently cultured from the UUI cohort. Although Lactobacillus was isolated from both cohorts, distinctions existed at the species level, with Lactobacillus gasseri detected more frequently in the UUI cohort and Lactobacillus crispatus most frequently detected in controls. Combined, these data suggest that potentially important differences exist in the urinary microbiomes of women with and without UUI, which have strong implications in prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of UUI. PMID:25006228

  16. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part two: treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jimbo, Masahito; Heidelbaugh, Joel J.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. In this review article we address treatment of the various forms of incontinence with conservative treatments, medical therapy, devices and surgery. The US Preventive Services Task Force, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Conservative therapy with education, fluid and food management, weight loss, timed voiding and pelvic floor physical therapy are all simple office-based treatments for incontinence. Medical therapy for incontinence currently is only available for urgency incontinence in the form of anticholinergic medication. Condom catheters, penile clamps, urethral inserts and pessaries can be helpful in specific situations. Surgical therapies vary depending on the type of incontinence, but are typically offered if conservative measures fail. PMID:23904858

  17. The Association between Urinary Incontinence and Low Back Pain and Radiculopathy in Women

    PubMed Central

    Kaptan, Hulagu; Kulaksızoğlu, Haluk; Kasımcan, Ömür; Seçkin, Bedreddin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common dysfunction, affecting especially women of all ages. The terminology of low back pain (LBP) and radiculopathy (RP) may be misused interchangeably with each other. There are many reports of the association with LBP and incontinence but those involving compression of nerve root(as RP), has not been distinguished from isolated low back pain. This study was structured to analyse the association of UI, LBP and RP. METHODS: One hundred twenty patients were included in the study. Patients with spinal or urinary infection, tumour (spinal or others), cauda equine, pelvic operation, spinal trauma, spinal surgery, urogenital pathology were not accepted for this study. Age and weight of all patients were determined. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was utilised for assessment of loss of function and SEAPI incontinence index was used for urinary incontinence. All patients were examined for neurological pathology to differentiate between the LBP and RP by department of neurosurgery. Student t-test and Mann-Whitney-U tests were used for statistical significance. RESULTS: There was no statistical significance between low back pain with overall urinary incontinence (p = 0.131), urge (p = 0.103) or stress incontinence (p = 0.68), respectively. However; The statistical aspects were identified relationship between overall (p = 0.026) and urge (p = 0.001) urinary incontinence with radiculopathy. The association of urge incontinence and radiculopathy seems to show a more significant relationship. Yet there was no correlation between radiculopathy and stress incontinence (P = 0.062). CONCLUSION: Low back pain should not be regarded as a predisposing factor for urinary incontinence; however, radiculopathy has a statistically positive correlation between overall incontinence and urge incontinence. PMID:28028410

  18. Portrait representation of postmenopausal women's experiences of living with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Pakgohar, Minoo; Hamid, Tengku-Aizan; Ibrahim, Rahimah; Vahid-Dastjerdi, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the meaning of the experiences of community-dwelling postmenopausal women who were born and grew up in a Muslim country when drawing a picture about their lived experiences of urinary incontinence. Hermeneutic phenomenology underpinned the study's interpretive research approach. In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted in two sessions with nine postmenopausal women. The participants were asked to draw a picture about their lived experiences of urinary incontinence in a self-portrait. Three themes emerged to illuminate the meaning of urinary incontinence, including "disruption of normal functioning," "self-imposed restrictions," and "feeling of despair." Discussion of these themes was presented, and practice and research implications were suggested.

  19. Revisiting the O complex: urinary incontinence, delirium and polypharmacy in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, D B

    1997-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, delirium and polypharmacy are common, challenging problems encountered in elderly patients. Review of the literature shows that these conditions are interrelated. For example, polypharmacy can lead to delirium, which, in turn, can lead to urinary incontinence. The drugs prescribed for urinary incontinence can precipitate delirium or contribute to polypharmacy. The underlying causes for these problems in elderly patients are frequently complex, and management in turn must often be multifactorial. The occurrence of these problems should lead to careful evaluation followed by thoughtful, responsive treatment. Brief updates are given with recommendations for management directed at primary care physicians. PMID:9347778

  20. Markov chain decision model for urinary incontinence procedures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sameer; Ghildayal, Nidhi; Ghildayal, Neha

    2017-03-13

    Purpose Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common chronic health condition, a problem specifically among elderly women that impacts quality of life negatively. However, UI is usually viewed as likely result of old age, and as such is generally not evaluated or even managed appropriately. Many treatments are available to manage incontinence, such as bladder training and numerous surgical procedures such as Burch colposuspension and Sling for UI which have high success rates. The purpose of this paper is to analyze which of these popular surgical procedures for UI is effective. Design/methodology/approach This research employs randomized, prospective studies to obtain robust cost and utility data used in the Markov chain decision model for examining which of these surgical interventions is more effective in treating women with stress UI based on two measures: number of quality adjusted life years (QALY) and cost per QALY. Treeage Pro Healthcare software was employed in Markov decision analysis. Findings Results showed the Sling procedure is a more effective surgical intervention than the Burch. However, if a utility greater than certain utility value, for which both procedures are equally effective, is assigned to persistent incontinence, the Burch procedure is more effective than the Sling procedure. Originality/value This paper demonstrates the efficacy of a Markov chain decision modeling approach to study the comparative effectiveness analysis of available treatments for patients with UI, an important public health issue, widely prevalent among elderly women in developed and developing countries. This research also improves upon other analyses using a Markov chain decision modeling process to analyze various strategies for treating UI.

  1. [First case of sacral neuromodulation for treatment of urinary and fecal incontinence in Mexico. Case report.].

    PubMed

    Sucar-Romero, S; Decanini-Terán, C; Ruiz-Galindo, G H

    2009-01-01

    Sacral neuromodulation is a new treatment for urinary and fecal incontinence that has demonstrated good therapeutic results. This treatment modality has shown not only to reduce urinary dysfunction symptoms and urinary and fecal incontinence but improve quality of life scores as well. We present a 73 years old female patient with severe fecal and urinary incontinence with major quality of life impact. She was referred after failure of different surgical and conservative therapeutic approaches. Her evaluation met inclusion criteria for sacral neuromodulation treatment. Acute sacral nerve evaluation (PNE) proved to be therapeutic in the patient as measured by at least a 50 percent improvement in her symptoms so a permanent implant (Medtronic InterStim System) was placed. After the implant there was a significant improvement in urinary and fecal functional scores. Fecal Incontinence Severity Index improved from 34 to 8 and Urinary Sandvik's Severity Index from very severe urinary incontinence to minor urinary incontinence after the placement of the implant. Using standard quality of life questionnaires, she improved in the areas of lifestyle,coping and behavior and her experience with depression and self-perception.

  2. Urinary incontinence among patients with arthritis--a neglected disability.

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Stokes, L; Frank, A O

    1992-01-01

    Urinary tract pathology may be no more common in patients with arthritis than among the general population, but its impact may be enhanced by disability. In this survey of 247 patients, as many as 38% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 47% of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and even 34% of patients with soft tissue rheumatism (STR) reported difficulty controlling their urine, confirming that incontinence is a widespread and often under-reported problem. More detailed enquiry in a sample of 90 patients with OA or RA did not suggest specific urinary tract pathology related to the underlying arthritis. Those who reported problems with urinary control were more disabled, and took longer to get to the toilet in their own environment than those without control problems. Twenty-seven per cent of patients felt that their problems would be solved by provision of a downstairs toilet. Timing of tasks performed by patients within their home is suggested as a method for assessing functional ability which encompasses both patient disability and environmental factors. PMID:1629846

  3. [A questionnaire survey on urinary incontinence and urinary disturbances in the institutionalized elderly with senile dementia].

    PubMed

    Otani, N; Kumamoto, Y; Tsukamoto, T; Yokoo, A; Urasawa, K; Kawaharada, M

    1994-09-01

    We carried out a questionnaire survey concerning urinary disturbances, among nursing home patients. The answers were obtained from 1,038 elderly including 355 males and 683 females. Ages, spanned 50-99, with an average age of 79.1. Of the 1,038 respondents which we obtained through our survey for management of urination, 35.8% of the total said that they are able to urinate without incontinence. Those able to urinate with incontinence accounted for 23.6% of the total. However, 40% of all patients required an adult diaper throughout the day to control their urinary functions. Patients suffering from neurological disorders accounted for 70% of respondents, and a correlation was seen between the extent of dementia and ADL, and excretory control. Urinary functioning in both men and women was found to grow increasingly difficult with age, and medical problems involving urinary difficulty appear to increase with the advance of the aging process. The representative groups for this survey were limited to elderly people in nursing homes, many of whom suffer from neurological disorders such as cerebral infarction. It was found that both male and female patients experience a variety of urinary disturbances.

  4. The Pathophysiology of Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cundiff, Geoffrey W

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a historical perspective on the evolution of theories regarding the pathophysiology of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The progression of these theories has followed the development of the diagnostic technologies that have provided insight into different aspects of urethral dysfunction. The earliest theories tied SUI to anatomic failure of urethral support. Recognition that anatomic failure impacted the interplay of intra-abdominal pressure and the bladder and urethra led to theories focused on the dynamic interaction between the bladder and urethral pressures. Investigators then began to recognize the importance of urethral sphincteric dysfunction. More recently, investigators have attempted to combine the anatomic and functional etiologies into a consolidated theory. These efforts point to a multi-factorial etiology of SUI. Continuing research has provided new insight into the neurophysiology of urethral function, opening new avenues for tailoring therapy for SUI. PMID:16985860

  5. The science behind biomaterials in female stress urinary incontinence surgery.

    PubMed

    Amrute, Kaytan V; Badlani, Gopal H

    2009-01-18

    Female stress urinary incontinence, while not life threatening, can present with various social and economic implications. Biomaterials, primarily synthetic, are often utilized to augment surgical correction. Repair with biomaterials involves midurethral support to function against weakened connective tissue caused by injury, abnormal collagen metabolism, or genetic predisposition. Even though efficacy rates are high, the potential for complications, such as erosion, are great without comprehension of inherent characteristics of each graft material. Low-weight, macroporous, monofilament synthetic grafts and noncross-linked biologic grafts are examples of biomaterials that implant reasonably well with host tissue. This paper reviews the justification for biomaterial use, host reaction, and the various parameters of natural and synthetic grafts.

  6. Urinary Incontinence Management Costs are Reduced Following Burch or Sling Surgery for Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Subak, Leslee L.; Goode, Patricia S.; Brubaker, Linda; Kusek, John W.; Schembri, Mr. Michael; Lukacz, Emily S.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Chai, Toby C.; Norton, Peggy; Tennstedt, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effect of Burch and fascial sling surgery on out-of-pocket urinary incontinence (UI) management costs at 24 months post-operatively and identify predictors of change in cost among women enrolled in a randomized trial comparing these procedures. Methods Resources used for UI management (supplies, laundry, dry cleaning) were self-reported by 491 women at baseline and 24 months post-surgery and total out-of-pocket costs for UI management (in 2012 US dollars) were estimated. Data from the two surgical groups were combined to examine change in cost for UI management over 24 months. Univariate and bivariate changes in cost were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Predictors of change in cost were examined using multivariate mixed models. Results At baseline mean (±SD) age of participants was 53±10 years, and frequency of weekly UI episodes was 23±21. Weekly UI episodes decreased by 86% at 24 months (P<0.001). Mean weekly cost was $16.60±$27 (median $9.39) at baseline and $4.57±$15 (median $0.10) at 24 months (P<0.001), a decrease of 72%. In multivariate analyses, cost decreased by $3.38±$0.77 per week for each decrease of 1 UI episode per day (P<0.001) and was strongly associated with greater improvement in UDI and IIQ scores (P<0.001) and decreased 24-hour pad weight (P<0.02). Conclusion Following Burch or fascial sling surgery, UI management cost at 24 months decreased by 72% ($625 per woman per year) and was strongly associated with decreasing UI frequency. Reduced out-of-pocket expenses may be a benefit of these established urinary incontinence procedures. PMID:24631433

  7. An unusual case of urinary incontinence in an intersex West Highland white terrier.

    PubMed

    Connery, Neil A; Spotswood, Tim

    2012-11-01

    A 5-year-old neutered female West Highland white terrier dog was presented with a history of congenital urinary incontinence that had become refractory to medical management. Complex urogenital anomalies including urethrovestibular and vestibuloperineal fistulae with low vulvar position along with a penoclitoris were present. Vaginectomy with perineal urethral reconstruction resolved the incontinence.

  8. Urinary Incontinence and Levels of Regular Physical Exercise in Young Women.

    PubMed

    Da Roza, T; Brandão, S; Mascarenhas, T; Jorge, R N; Duarte, J A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different levels of regular physical exercise on the frequency of urinary incontinence in young nulliparous women from the northern region of Portugal. Participants (n=386) self-reported demographic variables, frequency, and time spent practicing organized exercise per week, as well as completed the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form. The level of exercise was calculated based on the time (in minutes) usually spent per week in organized exercise. 19.9% of Portuguese nulliparous women reported incontinence symptoms. Considering the distribution of urinary incontinence among the different quartiles of organized exercise, women from the 4(th)quartile (those who train for competitive purposes) demonstrated highest relative frequency (p=0.000) and a 2.53 greater relative risk to develop (95% CIs,1.3-2.7) incontinence compared to women from the 1(st) quartile (inactive). Women who practice exercise for recreational purposes (2(nd) and 3(rd) quartiles) did not show significant differences in the urinary incontinence prevalence and relative risk of developing it compared to women from the 1(st) quartile. The results showed that women participating in organized exercise involving high volume training for competition are potentially at risk of developing urinary incontinence, although organized exercise undertaken without the intent to compete seems to be safe for maintaining urinary continence.

  9. Clinical profile of elderly urinary incontinence in Singapore: a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Lee, K S; Chan, C J; Merriman, A; Tan, E C; Osborn, V

    1991-11-01

    The prevalence of urinary incontinence in the elderly aged 65 years and above was found to be 4.6% (42 out of a total of 919 respondents), in a community-based study in Singapore. Urinary incontinence was defined as leakage of urine on at least two occasions in the previous one month. The clinical profile of 30 out of the 42 (71%) subjects were studied. There was equal distribution of male and female subjects. Eighteen (60%) of the subjects were below 75 years of age. Twenty-five (83.3%) subjects had severe incontinence. Twenty-four (80%) had the incontinence for more than one year. Despite the high percentage of patients with severe incontinence, only nine (30%) used some form of aid. Incontinence in our very old (75 years and above) was not related to frailty or physical dependence. Seven of the subjects (23.3%) were found to have functional incontinence associated with cognitive impairment. These patients were unable to indicate their toilet needs. They also had associated physical disability as well as double incontinence, and their carers were under stress. Ten of the subjects had pure urge incontinence. Seven of them had an underlying central nervous system disorder, suggesting that destrusor hyperreflexia may be the underlying cause for urinary incontinence in this group. All except one in this group had more than one possible precipitating factor for their incontinence. Eleven subjects had symptoms suggestive of outlet obstruction, although only two were found to have proven outlet obstruction. None of the female subjects had pure stress incontinence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Prevalence and Trends of Urinary Incontinence in Adults in the United States, 2001 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Markland, Alayne D.; Richter, Holly E.; Fwu, Chyng-Wen; Eggers, Paul; Kusek, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We estimate trends in the prevalence of urinary incontinence in the adult population of the United States from 2001 through 2008 before and after adjusting for other potential associated factors. Materials and Methods We analyzed data on 17,850 adults 20 years old or older who participated in the 2001 to 2008 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Any urinary incontinence was defined as a positive response to questions on urine leakage during physical activity, before reaching the toilet and during nonphysical activity. During this period changes in demographic and clinical factors associated with urinary incontinence included age, race/ethnicity, obesity, diabetes and chronic medical conditions (prostate disease in men). Age standardized prevalence estimates and prevalence ORs of urinary incontinence trends were determined using adjusted multivariate models with appropriate sampling weights. Results The age standardized prevalence of urinary incontinence in the combined surveys was 51.1% in women and 13.9% in men. Prevalence in women increased from 49.5% in 2001 to 2002, to 53.4% in 2007 to 2008 (Ptrend = 0.01) and in men from 11.5% to 15.1%, respectively (Ptrend = 0.01). In women increased prevalence was partially explained by differences in age, race/ethnicity, obesity, diabetes and select chronic diseases across the survey periods. After adjustment the prevalence OR for 2007 to 2008 vs 2001 to 2002 decreased from 1.22 (95% CI 1.03–1.45) to 1.16 (95% CI 0.99–1.37). in men adjustment for potentially associated factors did not explain the increasing prevalence of urinary incontinence. Conclusions The age standardized prevalence of urinary incontinence increased in men and women from 2001 through 2008. Decreasing obesity and diabetes may lessen the burden of urinary incontinence, especially in women. PMID:21684555

  11. A study of transobturator tape in stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Mayekar, Rahul Vishwanath; Bhosale, Archana Anilkumar; Kandhari, Khushboo Vikram; Nandanwar, Yogeshwar Sadashiv; Shaikh, Sadaf Sadique

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is commonly encountered in gynecological practice. Nowadays, midurethral sling surgeries in the form of transobturator tape (TOT) surgery are recommended in its treatment. Aims and Objectives: To assess the outcome and patient satisfaction of TOT surgery in the treatment of SUI. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken for patients of SUI who underwent TOT surgery by the outside in method and followed up for 5 years. The patients were assessed clinically and by the Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) preoperatively and at postoperative day 3, discharge and 3 months follow-up. Results: Successful surgical treatment with TOT was seen in all patients at the time of discharge. There was no recurrence of SUI seen up to 1 year, but at 5-year follow-up two patients had a recurrence of SUI on examination though they did not complain of SUI. Urinary retention, tape extrusion, and groin stitch infection were the commonly seen complications following surgery. On subjective assessment, 61 patients were completely satisfied at day 3, and all patients were completely satisfied at discharge and 3 months follow-up as per the PGI-I score. Conclusion: TOT gives an excellent outcome in the treatment of SUI. PMID:28216921

  12. Promoting social continence: products and devices in the management of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Lekan-Rutledge, Deborah; Doughty, Dorothy; Moore, Katherine N; Wooldridge, Leslie

    2003-12-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a prevalent problem occurring in men and women across the lifespan. Technologic innovations have provided individuals with incontinence and caregivers with an array of options for achieving social continence. Even when UI cannot be completely cured, it can always be managed with products, skin care regimens, occlusive or drainage devices and toileting equipment to ensure optimal skin integrity, odorless urine containment, social independence, comfort, and freedom of movement. Various products, devices, and equipment available to help incontinent individuals preserve independence and quality of life and manage incontinence are described.

  13. Systematic screening for urinary incontinence in older women: Who could benefit from it?

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Els; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Meijerink, Marije; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Dekker, Janny H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify women who are suffering from urinary incontinence but do not consult a physician and to identify reasons for this. Design Survey study as part of a randomized controlled trial that investigates the effects of a standardized assessment and evidence-based treatment on urinary incontinence in older women, the URINO project. Setting Female patients from general practices in the Northern part of the Netherlands. Patients A total of 225 women of 55 years and older suffering from urinary incontinence. Main outcome measures Number of patients with urinary incontinence who are not registered by their GP as suffering from this, factors associated with help-seeking behaviour, and reasons for not seeking help. Results Of the 225 patients, 143 (64%) were not registered by their GP as suffering from urinary incontinence. These women were more often younger and had lower levels of distress due to their urogynaecological symptoms. The most common reason for not consulting a GP was that patients considered their symptoms not to be serious enough. Conclusion The prevalence of older women with urinary incontinence who do not seek help is high. Help-seeking behaviour is associated with increasing age and higher levels of distress caused by the symptoms. Younger patients more often hesitate to consult their GP if they perceive their symptoms to be relatively mild. PMID:22324458

  14. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Augusto Cesar Soares; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; Azevedo, Daniela Castelo; Carvalho, Lélia Maria de Almeida; Fernandes, Mariana Ribeiro; Avelar, Sandra de Oliveira Sapori; Horta, Maria da Glória Cruvinel; Kelles, Silvana Márcia Bruschi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5). The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years), was 44% (n=40). The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years). Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7%) resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3%) additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1%) underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%). Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%). In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices. PMID:28124538

  15. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Santos, Augusto Cesar Soares Dos; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; Azevedo, Daniela Castelo; Carvalho, Lélia Maria de Almeida; Fernandes, Mariana Ribeiro; Avelar, Sandra de Oliveira Sapori; Horta, Maria Glória Cruvinel; Kelles, Silvana Márcia Bruschi

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5). The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years), was 44% (n=40). The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years). Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7%) resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3%) additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1%) underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%). Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%). In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices.

  16. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part one: diagnosis and testing

    PubMed Central

    Heidelbaugh, Joel J.; Jimbo, Masahito

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. This review article addresses its prevalence, risk factors, cost, the various types of incontinence, as well as how to diagnose them. The US Preventive Services Task Force, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Incontinence is a common problem with a high societal cost. It is frequently underreported by patients so it is appropriate for primary-care providers to screen all women and older men during visits. A thorough history and physical examination combined with easy office-based tests can often yield a clear diagnosis and rule out other transient illnesses contributing to the incontinence. Specialist referral is occasionally needed in specific situations before embarking on a treatment plan. PMID:23904857

  17. External incontinence devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... devices; Urinary incontinence - devices; Fecal incontinence - devices; Stool incontinence - devices ... of these different products are listed below. FECAL INCONTINENCE DEVICES There are many types of products for managing long-term diarrhea or fecal incontinence . ...

  18. Managing therapeutic competition in patients with heart failure, lower urinary tract symptoms and incontinence.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Johnell, Kristina

    2014-02-01

    Up to 50% of heart failure patients suffer from lower urinary tract symptoms. Urinary incontinence has been associated with worse functional status in patients with heart failure, occurring three times more frequently in patients with New York Heart Association Class III and IV symptoms compared with those with milder disease. The association between heart failure and urinary symptoms may be directly attributable to worsening heart failure pathophysiology; however, medications used to treat heart failure may also indirectly provoke or exacerbate urinary symptoms. This type of drug-disease interaction, in which the treatment for heart failure precipitates incontinence, and removal of medications to relieve incontinence worsens heart failure, can be termed therapeutic competition. The mechanisms by which heart failure medication such as diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and β-blockers aggravate lower urinary tract symptoms are discussed. Initiation of a prescribing cascade, whereby antimuscarinic agents or β3-agonists are added to treat symptoms of urinary urgency and incontinence, is best avoided. Recommendations and practical tips are provided that outline more judicious management of heart failure patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Compelling strategies to improve urinary outcomes include titrating diuretics, switching ACE inhibitors, treating lower urinary tract infections, appropriate fluid management, daily weighing, and uptake of pelvic floor muscle exercises.

  19. What are the probable predictors of urinary incontinence during pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Ülkü; Köktürk, Fürüzan; Küçük, Hamdi; Ata, Şevket; Harma, Müge; Arıkan, İnan İlker

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The frequency, predisposing factors and impact of urinary incontinence (UI) on quality of life (QoL) during pregnancy were investigated. Materials and Method. A preliminary cross-sectional survey was studied among pregnant women between January and July of 2014. A total of 132 pregnant women were recruited using a questionnaire form for sociodemographic features, the Turkish version of the International Consultation on Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), for the characteristics of UI and Wagner’s Quality of Life scale to assess impact on QoL. p < 0.05 was set significant. Results.Urinary incontinence was present in 56 out of 132 pregnant women (42.4%, UI-present group): mean age, 26.7 ± 5.4y(p = 0.780); median height, 160 cm (min–max: 153–176, p = 0.037); median BMI, 28.7 kg/m2(min–max: 22.4–50.0, p = 0.881); urine leakage occurred per week once (n = 18, 32.1%), twice or thrice (n = 8, 14.3%); per day few times (n = 14, 25%), once (n = 5, 8.9%) and always (n = 8, 14.3%) with mainly a small amount of urine leakage (n = 33, 58.9%) or a moderate (n = 4, 7.1%). There were statistically significant relationships between QoL scores and frequency of UI (p = 0.002) or amount of leakage (p = 0.002). Impact on QoL scores ranged from mild (n = 33, 58.9%), moderate (n = 4, 7.1%) to severe (n = 4, 7.1%) levels in daily life. UI impacted the daily life activities of women by making them less likely to undertake activities outside their homes (23.2%), by affecting their working performance and friendships (8.9%), their daily home activities (7.1%), their general health status (12.5%), their sexual relations (12.5%), by making them more nervous or anxious (10.7%) and by the need to wear pads or protectors (25%). ANOVA, Tukey, and Tamhane tests as the minimal important difference model yielded significant relevance between statistical analyses and clinical outcomes by using standard deviations (p = 0.001, 0.001 and 0.005 respectively). The following features

  20. What are the probable predictors of urinary incontinence during pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Demircan, Nejat; Özmen, Ülkü; Köktürk, Fürüzan; Küçük, Hamdi; Ata, Şevket; Harma, Müge; Arıkan, İnan İlker

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The frequency, predisposing factors and impact of urinary incontinence (UI) on quality of life (QoL) during pregnancy were investigated. Materials and Method. A preliminary cross-sectional survey was studied among pregnant women between January and July of 2014. A total of 132 pregnant women were recruited using a questionnaire form for sociodemographic features, the Turkish version of the International Consultation on Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), for the characteristics of UI and Wagner's Quality of Life scale to assess impact on QoL. p < 0.05 was set significant. Results.Urinary incontinence was present in 56 out of 132 pregnant women (42.4%, UI-present group): mean age, 26.7 ± 5.4y(p = 0.780); median height, 160 cm (min-max: 153-176, p = 0.037); median BMI, 28.7 kg/m(2)(min-max: 22.4-50.0, p = 0.881); urine leakage occurred per week once (n = 18, 32.1%), twice or thrice (n = 8, 14.3%); per day few times (n = 14, 25%), once (n = 5, 8.9%) and always (n = 8, 14.3%) with mainly a small amount of urine leakage (n = 33, 58.9%) or a moderate (n = 4, 7.1%). There were statistically significant relationships between QoL scores and frequency of UI (p = 0.002) or amount of leakage (p = 0.002). Impact on QoL scores ranged from mild (n = 33, 58.9%), moderate (n = 4, 7.1%) to severe (n = 4, 7.1%) levels in daily life. UI impacted the daily life activities of women by making them less likely to undertake activities outside their homes (23.2%), by affecting their working performance and friendships (8.9%), their daily home activities (7.1%), their general health status (12.5%), their sexual relations (12.5%), by making them more nervous or anxious (10.7%) and by the need to wear pads or protectors (25%). ANOVA, Tukey, and Tamhane tests as the minimal important difference model yielded significant relevance between statistical analyses and clinical outcomes by using standard deviations (p = 0.001, 0.001 and 0.005 respectively). The following features favored

  1. The incidence of urinary incontinence across Asian, black, and white women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    TOWNSEND, Mary K.; CURHAN, Gary C.; RESNICK, Neil M.; GRODSTEIN, Francine

    2009-01-01

    Objective We calculated incidence rates of urinary incontinence by incontinence frequency and type over 4 years in Asian, black, and white women in the United States. Study Design Prospective analyses included 76,724 participants aged 37–79 years in the Nurses’ Health Study cohorts with no incontinence at baseline. Results The 4-year incidence of incontinence at least monthly was higher in white women (7.3/100 person-years) compared with Asian (5.7/100 person-years, p=0.003) and black women (4.8/100 person-years, p<0.001). The incidence of at least weekly stress incontinence was significantly lower in black compared with white women (0.1 versus 0.8 per 100 person-years, p<0.001). The difference between black and white women in the incidence of any incontinence and stress incontinence remained significant after adjusting for known risk factors (p<0.001 for both). Conclusions Urinary incontinence incidence differs by race. Studies to confirm these results and better understand underlying mechanisms are needed. PMID:20042169

  2. Treatment of stress urinary incontinence by ginsenoside Rh2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Lin, Yu-Ning; Chen, Wen-Chi; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chen, Huey-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a common disorder in middle-aged women and the elderly. Although surgical treatment of SUI has progressed, there are no effective pharmacological therapies without a side effect. We studied the effect of ginsenoside Rh2 against SUI. Here, we studied the effect of ginsenoside Rh2 on the contractile force of the urethra and blood vessels in an ex vivo organ bath assay. We further investigated the mechanisms and effects of Rh2 in cell culture and animal models. Ginsenoside Rh2 dose-dependently reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in RAW 264.7 cells. In the vaginal distension (VD)-induced SUI mouse model, ginsenoside Rh2 significantly reversed the VD-induced SUI physical signs and reduced blood pressure. The modulation of several SUI-related proteins, including myosin, survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, α-adrenergic receptor 1a (AdR1a), and superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD3), may play some crucial roles in the therapeutic approaches against SUI. In conclusion, the ginsenoside Rh2 may offer therapeutic potential against SUI.

  3. A Wireless Self-Powered Urinary Incontinence Sensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ami; Utsunomiya, Fumiyasu; Douseki, Takakuni

    A self-powered urinary incontinence sensor system consisting of a urine-activated coin battery and a wireless transmitter has been developed as an application for wireless biosensor networks. The urine-activated battery makes possible both the sensing of urine leakage and self-powered operation. An intermittent power-supply circuit that uses an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) with a small internal resistance suppresses the supply voltage drop due to the large internal resistance of the battery. This circuit and a 1-V surface acoustic wave (SAW) oscillator reduce the power dissipation of a wireless transmitter. The SAW oscillator quickly responds to the on-off control of the power supply, which is suitable for intermittent operation. To verify the effectiveness of the circuit scheme, the authors fabricated a prototype sensor system. When the volume of urine is 0.2 ml, the battery outputs a voltage of over 1.3 V; and the sensor system can transmit signals over a distance of 5 m.

  4. Preventing urinary incontinence during pregnancy and postpartum: a review.

    PubMed

    Wesnes, Stian Langeland; Lose, Gunnar

    2013-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common condition in association with pregnancy. Incident UI in pregnancy or postpartum are significant risk factors for UI later in life. Epidemiological studies on UI during pregnancy and postpartum list numerous variables associated with UI. For women, the main focus is on pelvic floor muscle training to prevent UI. However, several other modifiable risk factors are likely to contribute to prevention of UI during pregnancy and postpartum. This review investigated modifiable risk factors for UI during pregnancy and postpartum and also reviewed randomized controlled trials on prevention of UI in association with pregnancy. Systematic searches for publications until September 2012 on prevention of UI during pregnancy and postpartum were performed. Based on available evidence, the following recommendations to prevent UI during pregnancy and postpartum were made: women should be advised not to smoke before or during pregnancy (grade B), aim at normal weight before pregnancy (grade B), and aim at regaining prepregnancy weight postpartum (grade B). Occasional low-intensity training should be advocated (grade B), and constipation should be avoided during pregnancy (grade B) and postpartum (grade C). Women should be advised to perform pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy and postpartum (grade A) and to use perineal warm packs during delivery (grade B). Cesarean section to prevent UI cannot be recommended (grade D). If lifestyle recommendations are addressed in association with pregnancy, incidence of UI during pregnancy and postpartum is likely to decrease.

  5. Outcomes of Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence in the Older Woman

    PubMed Central

    Ellington, David R.; Erekson, Elisabeth A.; Richter, Holly E.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis As population demographics continue to evolve, specifics on age-related outcomes of stress urinary incontinence interventions will be critical to patient counseling and management planning. Understanding medical factors unique to older woman and their lower urinary tract condition will allow caregivers to optimize surgical outcomes, both physical and functional, and minimize complications within this population. PMID:26476111

  6. Does the Urinary Microbiome Play a Role in Urgency Urinary Incontinence and Its Severity?

    PubMed Central

    Karstens, Lisa; Asquith, Mark; Davin, Sean; Stauffer, Patrick; Fair, Damien; Gregory, W. Thomas; Rosenbaum, James T.; McWeeney, Shannon K.; Nardos, Rahel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Traditionally, the urinary tract has been thought to be sterile in the absence of a clinically identifiable infection. However, recent evidence suggests that the urinary tract harbors a variety of bacterial species, known collectively as the urinary microbiome, even when clinical cultures are negative. Whether these bacteria promote urinary health or contribute to urinary tract disease remains unknown. Emerging evidence indicates that a shift in the urinary microbiome may play an important role in urgency urinary incontinence (UUI). The goal of this prospective pilot study was to determine how the urinary microbiome is different between women with and without UUI. We also sought to identify if characteristics of the urinary microbiome are associated with UUI severity. Methods: We collected urine from clinically well-characterized women with UUI (n = 10) and normal bladder function (n = 10) using a transurethral catheter to avoid bacterial contamination from external tissue. To characterize the resident microbial community, we amplified the bacterial 16S rRNA gene by PCR and performed sequencing using Illumina MiSeq. Sequences were processed using the workflow package QIIME. We identified bacteria that had differential relative abundance between UUI and controls using DESeq2 to fit generalized linear models based on the negative binomial distribution. We also identified relationships between the diversity of the urinary microbiome and severity of UUI symptoms with Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: We successfully extracted and sequenced bacterial DNA from 95% of the urine samples and identified that there is a polymicrobial community in the female bladder in both healthy controls and women with UUI. We found the relative abundance of 14 bacteria significantly differed between control and UUI samples. Furthermore, we established that an increase in UUI symptom severity is associated with a decrease in microbial diversity in women with UUI

  7. [Urinary stress incontinence in the female: comparison of incontinence theories and new tension-free surgical procedures].

    PubMed

    Perucchini, D; Fink, D

    2002-01-01

    Urethral sphincter competence involves a complicated inter action of many factors which act in concert. Stress incontinence occurs due to damage to the urethral support and loss or deterioration of urethral sphincter function as a consequence of delivery or aging. Recent research indicates that a more integrated, comprehensive view regarding the different structures, both inside and outside the urethra, is needed to explain the mechanism of incontinence. According to the theories of de Lancey, urinary stress incontinence is caused by defects in the supporting tissues that both actively and passively stabilize the urethra in its correct anatomical position. The integral theory of Petros and Ulmstein explains how laxity in the vagina or its supporting ligaments may cause stress incontinence favored by laxity in the ligamentous insertion points of the vagina. Colposuspension procedures have dominated incontinence surgery for the last 50 years. The introduction of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure was a real innovation that has challenged our understanding of the continence mechanism and taught us the importance of the midurethra. Different modifications of the tension-free procedures have been introduced recently and are discussed in this paper.

  8. Urinary incontinence in the aged, Part 2: Management strategies.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, P; Fuentevilla-Clifton, A

    1992-06-01

    Treatments for urge incontinence associated with uninhibited bladder contractions include medications with anticholinergic and smooth muscle relaxant properties as well as habit training, bladder retraining, contingency therapy, and biofeedback. Pelvic floor (Kegel) exercises improve stress incontinence in 60 to 90% of female patients. For patients who fail to improve with pelvic floor exercises, a combination of an alpha-adrenergic agent and conjugated estrogen is recommended. Surgery is particularly effective in elderly women with significant pelvic prolapse. Management of overflow incontinence requires surgery or intermittent/chronic catheterization. Functional incontinence may be improved with correction of the underlying disorder and availability of a motivated caregiver.

  9. Effects of coffee and tea consumption on urinary incontinence in female twins

    PubMed Central

    Tettamanti, G; Altman, D; Pedersen, NL; Bellocco, R; Milsom, I; Iliadou, AN

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effect of coffee and tea consumption on symptoms of urinary incontinence. Design Population based study Setting The Swedish Twin Register Population In 2005, all twins born between 1959–1985 in Sweden (n = 42 852) were invited to participate in a web-based survey to screen for common complex diseases and common exposures. The present study was limited to female twins with information about at least one urinary symptoms and coffee and tea consumption (n = 14 031). Main outcome measure The association between coffe and tea consumption and urinary incontinence, as well as, nocturia was estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Women with a high coffee intake were at lower risk of any urinary incontinence (OR 0.78, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.64-0.98) compared to women not drinking coffee. Coffee intake and incontinence subtypes showed no significant associations whereas high tea consumption was specifically associated with a risk for overactive bladder (OR 1.34, 95% CI 11.07-1.67) and nocturia (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.38). Results from co-twin control analysis suggested that the associations observed in logistic regression were mainly due to familial effects. Conclusions This study suggests that coffee and tea consumption has a limited effect on urinary incontinence symptoms. Familial and genetic effects may have confounded the associations observed in previous studies. PMID:21401855

  10. Patients with Urinary Incontinence Appear More Likely to Develop Upper Urinary Tract Stones: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study with 8-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hsiao-Jen; Lin, Alex Tong-Long; Lin, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate associations between primary urinary incontinence and development of upper urinary tract stones in a nationwide population in Taiwan. Data of 1,777 adults with primary urinary incontinence and 26,655 controls (groups A, B, and C) without urinary incontinence at study inception were retrieved from the National Health Insurance System database in Taiwan and were analyzed retrospectively. No enrolled subjects had previous diagnosis of upper urinary tract stones or spinal cord injury. All subjects were followed through end of 2009, with a minimum follow-up of 8 years. A greater percentage of study subjects (334/1777, 18.8%) developed upper urinary tract stones than that of control groups A (865/8885, 9.7%) and B (888/8885, 10%), and C (930/8885, 10.5%) (all p-values < 0.0001). Urinary incontinence was associated with significantly increased risk of developing urinary tract stones (HR 1.99, 95% CI, 1.70–2.34, p < 0.001). Age and metabolic syndrome status were both associated with developing upper urinary tract stones (both p-values < 0.0001). After adjusting for metabolic syndrome, regression analysis showed that urinary incontinence was still associated with a significantly increased risk of developing upper urinary tract stones (HR 1.99, 95% CI = 1.76–2.26, p < 0.0001). Long-term follow-up of Taiwanese patients with primary urinary incontinence suggests that urinary incontinence is associated with a significantly increased risk of developing upper urinary tract stones. Study findings suggest that physicians treating patients with urinary incontinence should give attention to early detection of upper urinary tract stones. PMID:27536881

  11. Urinary incontinence: economic burden and new choices in pharmaceutical treatment.

    PubMed

    Levy, Richard; Muller, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    In the year 2000, an estimated 17 million community-dwelling adults in the United States had daily urinary incontinence (UI), and an additional 33 million suffered from the overlapping condition, overactive bladder. Estimates of the total annual cost of these conditions range up to 32 billion US dollar; the largest components are management costs and the expenses associated with nursing home admissions attributable to UI. In most cases, patients with UI can be treated with pharmaceutical agents, in addition to behavioral therapy. Until recently, pharmaceutical therapy for UI has been limited, especially because the adverse effects of available agents resulted in poor adherence to treatment regimens. Recent innovations in molecular design and new dosage forms of UI medications offer the promise of fewer and less severe adverse effects and, thus, better treatment outcomes for patients. Additionally, the availability of multiple agents within a therapeutic class offers health care providers a spectrum of choices with which to personalize treatment for each individual patient. New pharmacologic treatment options for UI have the potential to allow greater independence for older persons who reside at home and to delay or avoid the costs of admission to long-term care facilities. Alternate dosage forms, which include patches and sustained-release formulations, may benefit patients who have difficulty chewing, swallowing, or remembering to take medications. Although these newer products are generally more expensive than older forms of therapy, they typically have more favorable cost-effectiveness ratios. Access to these new medications for patients enrolled in public and private health care plans may help to reduce the economic and social burden of UI care.

  12. Effects of urinary incontinence on psychosocial outcomes in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Grzeda, Mariusz T; Heron, Jon; von Gontard, Alexander; Joinson, Carol

    2016-12-10

    To examine whether daytime wetting and bedwetting urinary incontinence (UI) in childhood and adolescence are associated with psychosocial problems in adolescence. We used data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children to examine the association between trajectories of UI from 4 to 9 years and self-reported psychosocial problems in adolescence (13-14 years) including depressive symptoms, peer victimisation, poor self-image and school experiences (negative perception of school and teachers, problems with peer relationships). Sample sizes ranged from 5162 (perception of teachers) to 5887 (self-image). We also examined associations between self-reported UI at 14 years and psychosocial problems. Relative to normative development, adolescents who experienced delayed development of bladder control had poorer self-image [standardised mean difference = 0.18 (95% CI 0.04, 0.32)], more negative perceptions of school [0.18 (0.02, 0.34)] and more problems with peer relationships at school [0.25 (0.10, 0.40)]. Persistent wetting (bedwetting with daytime wetting) in childhood was associated with increased problems with peer relationships in adolescence [0.19 (0.03, 0.34)]. The strongest associations between adolescent UI and psychosocial problems were found for daytime wetting (reference = no UI at 14 years): depressive symptoms [OR = 3.04 (95% CI 1.91-4.84)], peer victimisation [2.14 (1.48-3.10)], poor self-image (t = -8.49, p < 0.001) and problems with peer relationships (t = -4.69, p < 0.001). Children with delayed development of bladder control and persistent wetting have increased psychosocial problems in adolescence. Adolescents with UI reported a range of psychosocial problems and clinicians should be aware that they might require support from psychological services.

  13. Management of female urinary incontinence: A survey of urogynaecologists' view on the NICE guideline.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, A; Monga, A; Duckett, J

    2016-05-01

    We conducted a survey to obtain the opinions of urogynaecologists regarding the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence or NICE 2013 urinary incontinence guideline and whether it would change their current practice. A closed format questionnaire was sent electronically to all members of the British Society of Urogynaecology or BSUG between January and March 2014. There were three major areas of disagreement. First, 70.2% of respondents disagreed that a multidisciplinary team review was necessary before invasive treatment for urinary incontinence. Second, 53.8% of respondents disagreed that preoperative urodynamic studies were not required in stress urinary incontinence diagnosed clinically. Third, 58.6% of respondents disagreed that oxybutynin, tolterodine and darifenacin should be used as first-line drug therapy for overactive bladder. The questionnaire demonstrates that there are significant concerns leading to more than a third of respondents not altering their current practice in line with the entire guideline.

  14. Etiopathogenesis, diagnostics and history of surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jovan, Hadži-Djokić; Uroš, Babić; Aleksandar, Argirović; Miodrag, Aćimović; Milan, Radovanović; Bogomir, Milojević; Tomisla, Pejčić; Zoran, Džamić

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence represents involuntary urine leakage into the urethra. This pathological condition represents a major medical, social and hygienic problem. The paper presents risk factors for development of the disorder, as well as diagnostic methods applied in evaluation of the female patients. Chronological review of diverse surgical techniques used in treatment of stress urinary incontinence reported in the published scientific papers is also presented. Review of the literature data was also performed. Sling procedures with application of suburethral loops have been used since the beginning of the last century in treatment of this disorder. Surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence is applied when conservative treatment fails to give any effects according to strictly defined indications. During the last 100 years, surgical techniques have undergone different improvements and the results have also been significantly improved.

  15. Symptoms of Combined Prolapse and Urinary Incontinence in Large Surgical Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, L.; Rickey, L.; Xu, Y.; Markland, A.; Lemack, G.; Ghetti, C.; Kahn, M.; Nagaraju, P.; Norton, P.; Chang, T. D.; Stoddard, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To estimate whether prolapse severity is a major contributor to urinary incontinence severity, as measured by validated incontinence questionnaires. Methods We analyzed data from two large female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) surgical cohorts: the Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial (SISTEr) study (N=655) and the subsequent Trial of Mid-Urethral Slings (TOMUS) study (N=597). All participants completed a standardized baseline assessment including validated measures of symptom severity, quality of life, objective measures of urine loss [Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI), Medical, Epidemiologic, and Social Aspects of Aging questionnaire (MESA), Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ) and pad test], as well as the Pelvic Organ Prolapse – Quantification (POP-Q) assessment. Groups were compared using the χ2 test (categorical measures) or the one-way analysis of variance (continuous measures). Statistical significance was defined at p-value <0.05. Results The SISTEr and TOMUS samples were similar for many variables including age (52 vs. 53 years, respectively), nulliparity (9 vs. 12%), prior UI surgery (14 vs. 13%), and prior hysterectomy (31 vs 28%), but other differences necessitated separate analysis of the two cohorts. There was not a statistically significant difference in UDI scores according to prolapse stage in either study population. Patients with prior surgery for POP and SUI had more incontinence symptoms and were more bothered by their UI, regardless of prolapse stage. Conclusions Prolapse stage is not strongly or consistently associated with incontinence severity in women who select surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Prior POP and UI surgery is associated with worse UI severity and bother. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00064662 and NCT00325039. PMID:20093904

  16. Role of antimuscarinics in the treatment of nonneurogenic daytime urinary incontinence in children.

    PubMed

    Nijman, Rien J M

    2004-03-01

    Idiopathic or "functional" urinary incontinence in children--incontinence with no known neurologic or anatomic cause--may take the form of urge incontinence, the most common type of incontinence, which is characterized by detrusor overactivity during the filling phase, or dysfunctional voiding. The latter may be classified as staccato voiding (periodic bursts of pelvic floor activity with prolonged voiding and, in some cases, residual urine), interrupted voiding (insufficient bladder emptying, infrequent voiding with several phases of micturition), or "lazy bladder" syndrome (infrequent voiding and large bladder capacity). The etiology of functional incontinence is unknown. Theories include genetic predisposition, recurrent urinary tract infections, immaturity or too-early toilet training, and sexual abuse. A severe form of urge incontinence, nonneurogenic neurogenic (Hinman) bladder, may be the end stage of dysfunctional voiding, but an occult neurologic component should also be considered. Diagnostic procedures recommended for children with urinary incontinence include careful history taking, a voiding diary, and physical examination to identify symptoms and to minimize the need for invasive procedures. Treatments include behavioral modification, biofeedback, antibiotics, anticholinergics, counseling, and neuromodulation. The antimuscarinics oxybutynin and tolterodine are, at present, the most commonly used drugs to treat incontinence. Common side effects with these agents (ie, reduced saliva production and worsening constipation) can be severe and can cause up to 10% of children using oxybutynin to discontinue treatment. Current evidence suggests that tolterodine may have a more favorable safety profile than oxybutynin. In addition, new antimuscarinics in the pipeline, eg, darifenacin and solifenacin, are expected to possess more favorable safety and tolerability profiles and may therefore help to alleviate these limitations.

  17. Urinary Incontinence due to Overactive Detrusor Muscle: A Rare Side Effect of Venlafaxine

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vithyalakshmi; Gunasekar, Palanikumar; Kumar, Suneel; Alsakaf, Imad

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of reemergence of urinary incontinence (UI) in a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) after starting treatment with venlafaxine who was stabilized on tamsulosin and finasteride for about 6 years. A 66-year-old Caucasian male with prior history of major depressive disorder developed UI within a week of starting venlafaxine 75 mg per day. He described symptoms in the form of involuntary leakage of urine both during the day and at night. His symptoms of UI resolved after stopping the venlafaxine. To the best of our knowledge, there are only four case reports of venlafaxine induced urinary incontinence which have been published. PMID:26491599

  18. Hidden female urinary incontinence in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics in Turkey: what are the determinants of bothersome urinary incontinence and help-seeking behavior?

    PubMed

    Cetinel, Bulent; Demirkesen, Oktay; Tarcan, Tufan; Yalcin, Onay; Kocak, Taner; Senocak, Mustafa; Itil, Ismail

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of female urinary incontinence (UI) and risk factors of bothersomeness and help-seeking behavior of hidden female UI in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics. This multicentric and cross-sectional study was conducted as a part of the Turkish Overactive Bladder Study. Female patients (n = 5,565) who were referred with complaints other than UI and overactive bladder symptoms were surveyed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF) with supplementation of five more questions. The crude prevalence of UI was found to be 35.7%. The prevalence of frequent and severe incontinence was 8.2 and 6.8%, respectively. The mean age of incontinent patients was significantly higher (p < 0.001). The prevalence of stress, urge, and mixed UI was 39.8, 24.8, and 28.9%, respectively. More than half (53%) of incontinent patients were not bothered by UI, and only 12% of incontinent patients had previously sought medical help for their problem. Frequency, severity, and type of UI were independent factors for predicting bothersome UI, while only bothersomeness increased help-seeking behavior. The ICIQ-SF score of 8 has been found to be the best cutoff value to delineate the bothersome UI. Although the crude prevalence of female UI was found to be high, bothersome UI was not so common. The majority of incontinent female patients did not seek medical help. Frequency, severity, and mixed type of UI were found to be the determinants of bothersome UI for which the ICIQ-SF cutoff score of 8 was obtained.

  19. Bladder Control Problems: Medications for Treating Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... used correctly, topical estrogen therapy typically doesn't cause side effects. However, to treat incontinence, topical estrogen is usually paired with another medication or therapy — which may cause side effects. How it works Imipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. ...

  20. Vaginal vs. transabdominal ultrasonography in the evaluation of female urinary tract anatomy, stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organs static disturbances.

    PubMed

    Jolić, V; Gilja, I

    1997-01-01

    In this multicentric prospective and randomized study we compared the results obtained by application of a vaginal ultrasound probe in the vaginal introitus to those obtained by the transabdominal one. 66 examined patients were separated in five groups according to the history and gynaecological investigation. Stress urinary incontinence was urodynamically proved. After analysing the results obtained by those methods we conclude that the transabdominal method gives more useful data for stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organs static disturbances (SUI and POSD) diagnosing, but the introital application of the vaginal probe is also very useful for analysing the urethrovesical junction (UVJ) position comparing of its mobility in rest and maximal strain positions. We have found that a posterior vesicourethral angle less than 75 degrees measured by the endovaginal probe was a reliable proof of the cystocele. The results were comparable to clinical status and transabdominal sonography of the moderately full bladder. Transabdominal and endovaginal methods give rather complementary than competition data which are very useful in diagnosing of the POSD, SUI and UVJ position and degree of its mobility. For that reason both techniques may precisely discover and document the presence of anatomic stress urinary incontinence causative defects aiding in the selection of patients suitable for operative therapy of stress urinary incontinence and for their postoperative follow-up.

  1. [Incontinence].

    PubMed

    Rueda López, J; Muñoz Bueno, A M; Guerrero Palmero, A; Segovia Gómez, T

    2007-12-01

    Incontinence presents an additional problem for a bedridden patient, among other reasons because incontinence increases the risk of perineal dermatitis. Recently evaluation scales have been drawn up which permit evaluating the effects incontinence provokes on the integrity of the skin and new products have been developed which act as non-irritating barriers and which permit professionals to visually inspect the affected area. These new products increase the arsenal of already known products and tools such as bed pans, catheters, etc. which professionals have at their disposal to control incontinence.

  2. [Surgical management of urinary and fecal incontinence in neurological sphincter disorders of children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Lemelle, J L; Barthelme, H; Schmitt, M

    1999-01-01

    The management of urinary and fecal incontinence in children and adolescents with neurogenic disorders related to congenital or acquired conditions was frequently considered to be of secondary importance compared with orthopaedic complications. The improvement of artificial urinary sphincter and continent urinary diversion techniques allowed to establish for each case an individual plan considering overall, abilities and voiding dysfunction as well as renal complications. Antegrade colonic enema has greatly improved the quality of life of children with fecal incontinence or intractable constipation. Surgical management requires a large contribution by the patients and their closest relatives and complete information about goals, advantages and obligations of surgical management. Surgical principles for bladder augmentation, bladder neck reconstruction and continent urinary diversion are presented and discussed according to data in the recent literature and the author's clinical experience.

  3. Assessment of sexual functions in partners of women with complaints of urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Keles, Muzaffer Oguz; Caliskan, Selahattin; Gokce, Ali Murat; Gunes, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: Investigation of the erectile functions in partners of women with urinary incontinence problems. Materials and Methods: Sexually active female patients over the age of 18 years with complaints of urinary incontinence (n=30) (Group-1), and without urinary incontinence (n=30) (Group-2, controls) were included this study. Evaluation of the patients were done at Erzincan Mengücek Gazi Training and Research Hospital's urology outpatient clinic between June 2012 and January 2013. Partners of group-1 and group-2 were asked to fill in the 5-item International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire, and then the scores of the two groups were compared for statistically significant differences. Results: Among the partners of the group-1 patients, 15 (50%) had mild erectile dysfunction (ED), 11 (36.6%) had moderate ED, 1 (3.4%) had severe ED, and erectile function was normal in the remaining 3 (10%). Among the partners of group-2 patients, 15 (50%) had mild ED, 7 had moderate ED, 1 (3.4%) had severe ED, and 7 (23.3%) had normal erectile function. Compared to the spouses of group-2 patients, ED was more prevalent among the spouses of group-1 patients. Conclusion: Erectile function in the partners of women with urinary incontinence may be adversely affected by the UI of their partners. PMID:27532113

  4. The use of synthetic materials in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kądziołka, Przemysław; Stanek, Anna M.; Szymanowski, Krzysztof; Wilczak, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a very serious problem which has been noticed by the WHO. This difficult medical condition poses a serious problem as it affects c.a. 20% of the female population and it increases up to 35% in the group of females over 60 years of age. Since there is no single standard surgical procedure which could solve this problem, numerous synthetic materials are used for the operations. It seems that the materials are effective as they improve the condition of women suffering from stress urinary incontinence. Unfortunately these materials have their shortcomings which might lead to certain post-operative complications. Stress urinary incontinence is a disease which affects the social life of the patients. It has a high percentage of recurrence and causes the patient substantial difficulties with keeping high standards of personal hygiene which is consequence makes it impossible to fulfill their social roles. The etiology of this disease is complex and calls for a cross-disciplinary approach to the problem. As there are no standardized or unanimous treatment methods of stress urinary incontinence, numerous sources based on the clinical experience of many medical centers suggest performing TVT and TOT procedures as the most effective treatment methods. The efficacy of the TOT procedure is about 90.8%. PMID:27582680

  5. Behavioral Intervention to Eliminate Socially Mediated Urinary Incontinence in a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricciardi, Joseph N.; Luiselli, James K.

    2003-01-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old boy with autism who demonstrated urinary incontinence that appeared to be maintained by social contingencies (adult attention and escape from activity "demands"). Although he wet himself frequently, he also used the bathroom appropriately and made many self-initiated toileting requests. Intervention was…

  6. School Nurse Interventions in Managing Functional Urinary Incontinence in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Charisse L.

    2010-01-01

    Uncomplicated urinary incontinence (UI) in school-age children is a prevalent yet underrecognized problem that has remained in the shadow of other concerns commonly perceived as more prominent or urgent. There is good evidence that functional UI in children can be treated and managed effectively. When there is no structural or neurologic…

  7. Systematic review of the management of incontinence and promotion of continence in older people in care homes: descriptive studies with urinary incontinence as primary focus

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Brenda; Flanagan, Lisa; Jack, Barbara; Barrett, James; Chung, Alan; Shaw, Christine; Williams, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Aim This is a review of descriptive studies with incontinence as the primary focus in older people in care homes. Background Incontinence is prevalent among residents of care home populations. Data sources MEDLINE and CINAHL were searched from 1996 to 2007 using the highly sensitive search strings of the Cochrane Incontinence Review Group for urinary and faecal incontinence including all research designs. Search strings were modified to enhance selectiveness for care homes and older people and exclude studies involving surgical or pharmacological interventions. Searching of reference sections from identified studies was also used to supplement electronic searches. The Cochrane Library was searched for relevant systematic reviews to locate relevant studies from those included or excluded from reviews. The search was limited to English-language publications. Methods A systematic review of studies on the management of incontinence, promotion of continence or maintenance of continence in care homes was conducted in 2007–2009. This is a report of descriptive studies. Results Ten studies were identified that reported on prevalence and incidence of incontinence (urinary with or without faecal), policies, assessment, documentation, management or economic evaluation of its management. Use of incontinence pads and toileting programmes comprised the most common management approaches used. No studies were identified that attempted to maintain continence of residents in care homes. Conclusions Studies on maintaining continence and identifying components of toileting programmes that are successful in managing or preventing incontinence and promoting continence in residents of care home populations along with their economic evaluation are warranted. PMID:21105895

  8. Assessment of symptoms of urinary incontinence in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Montezuma, Thais; Antônio, Flávia Ignácio; de Sá Rosa e Silva, Ana Carolina Japur; de Sá, Marcos Felipe Silva; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The pelvic floor muscles are sensitive to androgens, and due to hyperandrogenism, women with polycystic ovary syndrome can have increased mass in these muscles compared to controls. The aim of this study is to compare reports of urine leakage and quality of life between women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome. METHODS: One hundred thirteen 18- to 40-year-old nulliparous women with polycystic ovary syndrome or without the disease (controls) were recruited at the University Hospital of School Medicine of São Paulo University at Ribeirão Preto City, Brazil. The subjects were not taking any hormonal medication, had not undergone previous pelvic surgery and did not exercise their pelvic floor muscles. The women were divided into the following four groups: I- polycystic ovary syndrome with normal body mass index (n = 18), II- polycystic ovary syndrome with body mass index ≥25 (n = 32), III- controls with normal body mass index (n = 29), and IV- controls with Body Mass Index ≥25 (n = 34). Quality of life was evaluated using the SF-36 questionnaire, and the subjects with urinary complaints also completed the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form to evaluate the severity of their urinary incontinence. RESULTS: The replies to the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form revealed a significant difference in urinary function between groups, with 24% of the subjects in group IV reporting urinary incontinence. The mean scores for the SF-36 questionnaire revealed that group II had the lowest quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: The control obese group (IV) reported a higher prevalence of urinary incontinence. There was no difference in the reported frequency of urine loss between the polycystic ovary syndrome and control groups with normal body mass index or between the polycystic ovary syndrome and control groups with body mass index ≥25. PMID:22086521

  9. Bridging the Gap: Determinants of Undiagnosed or Untreated Urinary Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    DURALDE, Erin R.; WALTER, Louise C.; VAN DEN EEDEN, Stephen K.; NAKAGAWA, Sanae; SUBAK, Leslee L.; BROWN, Jeanette S.; THOM, David H.; HUANG, Alison J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Over a third of middle-aged or older women suffer from urinary incontinence, but less than half undergo evaluation or treatment for this burdensome condition. With national organizations now including assessment of incontinence as a quality performance measure, providers and healthcare organizations have a growing incentive to identify and engage these women who are undiagnosed and untreated. Objective We sought to identify clinical and sociodemographic determinants of patient-provider discussion and treatment of incontinence among ethnically diverse, community-dwelling women. Study Design We conducted an observational cohort study from 2003-2012 of 969 women 40 years and older enrolled in a Northern California integrated healthcare delivery system, who reported at least weekly incontinence. Clinical severity, type, treatment, and discussion of incontinence were assessed by structured questionnaires. Multivariable regression evaluated predictors of discussion and treatment. Results Mean age of the 969 participants was 59.9 (±9.7) years, and 55% were racial/ethnic minorities (171 Black, 233 Latina, 133 Asian or Native American). Fifty-five percent reported discussing their incontinence with a healthcare provider, 36% within one year of symptom onset, and with only 3% indicating that their provider initiated the discussion. Over half (52%) reported being at least moderately bothered by their incontinence. Of these women, 324 (65%) discussed their incontinence with a clinician, with 200 (40%) doing so within 1 year of symptom onset. In multivariable analysis, women were less likely to have discussed their incontinence if they had a household income <$30,000/year versus ≥$120,000/year (AOR=0.49, CI=0.28-0.86), or were diabetic (AOR=0.71, CI=0.51-0.99). They were more likely to have discussed incontinence if they had clinically severe incontinence (AOR=3.09, CI=1.89-5.07), depression (AOR=1.71, CI=1.20-2.44), pelvic organ prolapse (AOR= 1.98, CI=1

  10. Some Observations on the Surgical Treatment of Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Millin, Terence

    1939-01-01

    Types: A. Essential. B. Paradoxical. C. False. D. True. True incontinence.—A. Congenital: (a) Developmental abnormalities. (b) Malformations of nervous system. B. Acquired: (a) Local abnormalities. (b) False passages. (c) Disturbance of innervation. Anatomy of sphincteric mechanism in male and female. Diagnosis: Need for careful investigation including cysto-urethroscopy, cysto-urethrography, and cysto-manometry. Treatment: A. Physiotherapy. B. Direct surgical repair. C. Surgical diversion of urine. Types of true incontinence amenable to direct surgical repair: A. Epispadias. B. Aberrant ureteric ostia. C. Fistulæ. D. Congenital or acquired defective sphincteric mechanism. Operative treatment of vesico-vaginal fistulæ. Transvesical operation for cure of congenitally defective sphincteric mechanism—report of seven cases. Stress incontinence.—Value of urethrograms to ascertain nature of defect. Operative treatment. Incontinence following prostatic surgery.—Types of operation advocated. New operative procedure utilizing ribbon catgut with demonstrative moving picture. ImagesFig. 1, Fig. 2, Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:19991939

  11. Association between urinary incontinence and depressive symptoms in overweight and obese women

    PubMed Central

    SUNG, Vivian W.; WEST, Delia S.; HERNANDEZ, Alexandra L.; WHEELER, Thomas L.; MYERS, Deborah L.; SUBAK, Leslee L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Determine the association between urinary incontinence (UI) and depressive symptoms. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study of 338 incontinent and overweight women at baseline in the Program to Reduce Incontinence by Diet and Exercise trial. Depressive symptoms were defined as a Beck Depression Inventory score ≥ 10. UI frequency was determined by 7-day voiding diary. Symptom bother and quality of life were determined using the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI) and the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ). Multivariable regression was used to estimate the association between UI and depressive symptoms. RESULTS Women with depressive symptoms (N=101) reported a higher mean number of UI episodes per week (28 vs. 23, P=.005) and higher (worse) mean scores on the UDI (176 vs. 162, P=.02) and IIQ (136 vs. 97, P<.001) compared to women without depressive symptoms. The risk of having depressive symptoms increased with each 7-episode increase in UI per week (AOR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01–1.21), each 50-point increase in UDI (AOR 1.27, 95% CI 1.01–1.60) and each 50-point increase in IIQ (AOR 1.44, 95% CI 1.22–1.71). CONCLUSIONS Urinary incontinence frequency, symptom bother, and quality of life are independently associated with depressive symptoms in overweight and obese women. PMID:19236869

  12. [Towards early functional treatment of urinary incontinence after prostatectomy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Moulonguet, A; Verges, J; Delmas, V

    1981-01-01

    The authors report their striking experience of the effectiveness of early functional treatment of urinary incontinence after prostatectomy. This experience is based upon 50 cases collected over a period of 10 years. Treatment is based upon stimulation of the perineal musculature by faradic current, ano-perineal exercises, and mictional rehabilitation. Results, in 50 cases, showed a marked improvement in 43 (86%), including 15 complete cures (30%). Such a favourable result was obtained with six weeks' treatment. It would appear that the result is all the better when treatment is started earlier, whether in a case of arrhythmic incontinence dominated by urgency, or isolated nocturnal incontinence. The results, once acquired, generally persist. A relapse of incontinence often responds adequately to a new series of sessions of functional treatment. It would appear that the mode of action of this functional therapy is based upon a decrease in bladder instability, and an increase in urethra resistance. The authors show that, with their treatment, improvements and cures in urinary incontinence after prostatectomy occur much earlier with the aid of functional treatment than spontaneously. Thus, treatment is worthwhile undertaking.

  13. Urinary incontinence in women treated by ischemic compression over the bladder area: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hains, Guy; Hains, François; Descarreaux, Martin; Bussières, André

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if ischemic compression therapy over the bladder area results in clinically important changes among female patients with stress and mixed (stress and urge) incontinence. Methods One group of patients (n = 24) received ischemic compression therapy directed over the bladder area (experimental group). The control group (n = 9) received ischemic compression therapy directed toward structures of the hip joint. Changes in urinary incontinence symptoms were monitored using a 2-part questionnaire: the urogenital distress inventory and the incontinence impact questionnaire. Patients' perceived amelioration (improvement) was quantified using a scale divided from 0% to 100%. Results Mean scores for the first questionnaire (urogenital distress inventory + incontinence impact questionnaire, 19 questions) were 23.3 vs 25.3 at baseline and 10.2 vs 22.2 after 15 treatments for the experimental and control group, respectively. The experimental group scores were 6.9 at 30 days after the last treatment and 11.3 at the 6-month follow-up. The perceived percentages of amelioration after 15 treatments were 69% vs 32% for the experimental and control group, respectively. The experimental group scores were 73% at 30 days after the last treatment and 60% at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusions In this study, ischemic compression directed toward elicited trigger points over bladder area was found to be an effective treatment of patients presenting symptoms of urinary incontinence. Improvement in symptoms was still present in follow-up at 6 months. PMID:19674707

  14. Sexual function before and after non-surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Victoria L.; Whitcomb, Emily; Weidner, Alison C.; Nygaard, Ingrid; Brubaker, Linda; Bradley, Catherine S.; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R.; Schaffer, Joseph; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Zhang, Min; Richter, Holly E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives (1) to describe sexual function in women seeking treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI); (2) to compare the impact on sexual function of three SUI treatments; and (3) to investigate whether non-surgical treatment of SUI is associated with improved sexual function. Methods Women with SUI were randomized to continence pessary, behavioral therapy (pelvic floor muscle training and continence strategies), or combination therapy. Sexual function was assessed at baseline and 3-months using short forms of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse-Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire (PISQ-12) and the Personal Experiences Questionnaire (SPEQ). Successful treatment of SUI was assessed with a patient global impression of improvement. ANOVA was used to compare scores between groups. Results At baseline, sexual function was worse among women with mixed incontinence compared to those with pure SUI. After therapy, successful treatment of SUI was associated with greater improvement in PISQ-12 score (2.26 ± 3.24 versus 0.48 ± 3.76, p=0.0007), greater improvement in incontinence with sexual activity (0.45 ± 0.84 versus 0.01 ± 0.71, p=0.0002), and greater reduction in restriction in sexual activity related to fear of incontinence (0.32 ± 0.76 versus −0.06 ± 0.78, p=0.0008). Among those successfully treated for SUI, improvement in continence during sexual activity was greater in both the combined therapy group (p=0.019) and the behavioral group (p=0.02) compared to the pessary group. Conclusions Successful non-surgical treatment of SUI is associated with improvements in incontinence-specific measures of sexual function. Behavioral therapy may be preferred to pessary for treatment of SUI among women whose incontinence interferes with sexual function. PMID:21572534

  15. Factors Associated With Quality Of Life In Women Undergoing Surgery For Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Sirls, Larry T.; Tennstedt, Sharon; Albo, Mike; Chai, Toby; Kenton, Kim; Huang, Liyuan; Stoddard, Anne M; Arisco, Amy; Gormley, E. Ann

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the association of clinicodemographic factors with urinary incontinence (UI) related quality of life (QoL) in women having surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and to compare the incontinence-specific IIQ (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire) and the ICIQ (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire). Secondary objectives evaluated the contributions of incontinence severity and sexual function to QoL. Materials and Methods Baseline data from 597 women in the Trial of Mid Urethral Slings (TOMUS). Correlates of QoL tested included health status and history, type, severity and bother of UI, and sexual function. Results Lower QoL by both the IIQ and ICIQ included younger age, higher BMI, more SUI symptoms, and more severe and bothersome UI symptoms. Each measure identified factors associated with lower QoL not identified by the other (IIQ; Hispanic ethnicity, poor health status and more urge UI symptoms, and ICIQ; prior UI treatment and more UI episodes per day). Sexually active women had similar QoL but also increased incontinence episodes (IIQ and ICIQ) and more sexual dysfunction (IIQ only). Conclusion In women planning SUI surgery, QoL is associated with non-UI factors as well as with the type, severity and degree of bother from UI symptoms. Many factors are associated with QoL as measured by both IIQ and ICIQ. However more non-UI factors were associated with QoL when measured by the IIQ than by the ICIQ. More than one scale may be needed to evaluate QoL after SUI treatment. PMID:20952014

  16. Do Physical Therapy Interventions Affect Urinary Incontinence and Quality of Life in People with Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Monica; Melnick, Marsha; Allen, Diane D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) presents with many debilitating symptoms, including urinary incontinence (UI), that physical therapy (PT) may address; UI is widely prevalent, but PT management of symptoms lacks consensus. A meta-analysis of long-term nonsurgical and nonpharmaceutical treatment options may supply this deficiency. We analyzed the current evidence for effectiveness of PT to decrease UI and improve quality of life (QOL) in people with MS. Methods: An electronic search conducted through November 26, 2013, included the following search terms: incontinence, bladder dysfunction, urinary incontinence, multiple sclerosis, MS, physical therapy, physiotherapy, therapy, and rehabilitation. Criteria for inclusion were as follows: MS diagnosis, intervention involved PT for UI or bladder dysfunction, outcomes assessed QOL or UI, and at least a 4 of 10 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale or a 2b level of evidence. Outcomes were combined across studies, and effect sizes are depicted in forest plots. Results: Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Between-group analysis revealed statistically significant differences in incontinence episodes and QOL, but did not reach significance for functional control mechanisms (eg, electromyography data on strength of contraction, relaxation, and endurance). Incontinence leakage episodes and QOL participation improved within groups. Conclusions: Meta-analysis indicates support for PT for minimizing incontinence compared with pretreatment and affecting incontinence and QOL more than control in people with MS. Protocols were heterogeneous regarding duration and type of PT intervention and were applied in different types of MS. Further research may reveal the most effective combination and variety of PT interventions for people with MS. PMID:26300703

  17. Female Functional Constipation Is Associated with Overactive Bladder Symptoms and Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Masuomi; Sakai, Gen; Funakoshi, Shinsuke; Komatsuda, Akari; Ito, Yujiro; Nagata, Hirohiko; Tsukada, Nobuhiro; Nakamura, So

    2017-01-01

    This noninterventional cross-sectional study aims to assess the association between functional constipation (FC) and urinary symptoms in female patients with no treatment for urination and defecation. The Rome III criteria for evaluation of defecation, Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS) for evaluation of urinary symptoms, and clinical features were investigated in 145 female patients. Latent FC and moderate to severe overactive bladder (OAB) were defined on the basis of positivity for two or more of the Rome III criteria and an OABSS ≥ 6 with OABSS Q3 ≥ 2, respectively. In 60 latent FC patients, the OABSS was higher (5.0 versus 3.2, p = 0.001), and concurrent moderate to severe OAB symptoms and OAB with urinary incontinence were more frequent than those in 85 nonlatent FC patients (33.3 versus 10.6%, p = 0.001, and 31.7 versus 7.1%, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that moderate to severe OAB symptoms were a significant associated factor of latent FC (odds ratio (OR) = 4.125, p = 0.005), while latent FC was the only associated factor of moderate to severe OAB and OAB with urinary incontinence (OR = 4.227, p = 0.005 and OR = 4.753, p = 0.004). In conclusion, moderate to severe OAB symptoms are correlated with FC. Moreover, FC is related to moderate to severe OAB symptoms and to OAB with urinary incontinence. PMID:28337444

  18. Association of Urinary Tract Infection in Married Women Presenting with Urinary Incontinence in a Hospital based Population

    PubMed Central

    Eswara, Shilpalakshmiprasad; Yesudhason, Bineshlal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urinary incontinence (UI) is increasingly recognized as a significant health problem, which remains a hygienic as well as social problem. Women have higher risk of developing incontinence in their lifetime compared with men. Urinary tract infection can increase the incidence of incontinence. Present study was undertaken to assess the association of UTI in married women who presented with UI. Aim The present study was aimed to identify the patients (married women) with complaints of UI and determining its association with UTI; and to identify the causative organism for the UTI along with its antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. Materials and Methods This is a cross-sectional, non-randomized study of 107 married women with UI, who attended outpatient department in our hospital. Mid-stream urine (MSU) samples were collected from these patients with positive history of incontinence. Screening of urine for significant bacteriuria and culture to identify the etiological agents were performed followed by evaluation of their antimicrobial susceptibility profiles using Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Results Overall 25.2% of patients with incontinence had a positive urine culture. History of UTI was elicited in around 38.3% of patients, among which 15% had positive urine culture and 10.3% of the patients who did not have a history had positive culture. Escherichia coli was the commonest causative organism (66.6) causing UTI, followed by Enterococcus spp. (22.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.4%) and Proteus mirabilis (3.7%). The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern for Escherichia coli showed high sensitivity to Nitrofurantoin (94.4%) and high resistance to Ampicillin (94.4%). Conclusion Our study revealed one in every four incontinent patients had UTI and almost half of them suffered from previous episodes of UTI. Thus appropriate correction of the existing UTI can help in the treatment of UI. PMID:27134871

  19. Stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder syndrome: current options and new targets for management.

    PubMed

    Elser, Denise M

    2012-05-01

    In the United States, office visits for women seeking treatment for urinary incontinence more than doubled between 1994 and 2000, from 1845 per 100 000 women. This review article addresses treatment options for 2 common types of incontinence in women: stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and detrusor overactivity (DO), commonly referred to as urge urinary incontinence (UUI). In the past, those with SUI typically faced limited treatment options, such as Kegel exercises, pessaries, or major surgery (Burch or Marshall-Marchetti-Krantz operations). However, treatment options for women also included anticholinergic medications, behavioral therapy, and implantable neuromodulation. In recent years, more options have become available. For women with SUI, a variety of minimally invasive synthetic midurethral sling approaches (eg, retropubic, transobturator, and single incision) and office-based procedures (eg, periurethral injection of bulking agents and radiofrequency collagen denaturation [Renessa®; Novasys Medical]) are now offered. More outpatient options will hopefully be available soon, including an inflatable, free-floating balloon to act as a shock absorber, and injection of muscle-derived stem cells into the periurethral tissue. Women with UUI now have targeted options, such as posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) and intravesical injections of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox®; Allergan, Inc.), in addition to nonoral systemic medications.

  20. Prevalence of urinary incontinence among community-dwelling adults receiving home care.

    PubMed

    Du Moulin, M F M T; Hamers, J P H; Ambergen, A W; Janssen, M A P; Halfens, R J G

    2008-12-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2005 to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with urinary incontinence (UI) in adults receiving home care. Of the 2,866 patients surveyed, 46% suffered from UI; 6.5% had stress, 16.6% had urge, 9% had mixed, and 17.6% had functional incontinence. No diagnosis regarding type of UI had been established in 50.2%. Factors associated with UI were advanced age, higher body mass index, and impaired mobility. UI is prevalent in older persons receiving home care, but the lack of diagnosis of type of UI in half of the participants surveyed impedes management of UI.

  1. [Epidemiology and treatment for urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women].

    PubMed

    Starczewski, Andrzej; Brodowska, Agnieszka; Brodowski, Jacek

    2008-07-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is defined as uncontrolled urine leakage through an urethra. At present, the following types of UI can be specified: stress incontinence (SI), urge incontinence (UI), mixed incontinence (MI), overflow incontinence (OI) in which the bladder becomes too full because it cannot be fully emptied, and functional incontinence (FI). Incontinence is one of the most common chronic diseases in women and is found in 17-60% of the whole population. In most patients, SI is combined with pelvic organ prolapse. The basic risk factors mentioned as contributing to these two conditions are obstetrical past and gynaecological history and atrophic changes in the urogenital area. There are also a number of diseases related to the increase in intra-abdominal pressure, such as obesity chronic constipation and diseases associated with persistent cough. Other factors leading to pelvic organ prolapse include hard physical work, some professional sports, connective tissue disorders, neuropathy and disturbed innervation of the pelvic floor. To deal with stress incontinence (SI), conservative and surgical treatment is employed. In the first degree intensity, it is mainly physiotherapy, electrical stimulation of the pelvic floor muscles, lifestyle modification and reduction of body mass. When the SI symptoms are more severe, surgical treatment is usually preferred. From among many methods, these presently used are Burch and sling operations. On the other hand, surgical treatment for pelvic organ prolapse involves colpoperineoplasty with the use of polypropylene mesh (Prolift), colporrhaphy by double TOT approach method, median colporrhaphy, Cooper's ligament or sacrospinous ligament colpopexy, and attachment of the uterus to the sacrum. The results of surgical treatment depend on co-occurrence of risk factors, the surgical method chosen, the lapse of time from the surgery and the type of the applied biomedical material.

  2. Prevalence of commonly prescribed medications potentially contributing to urinary symptoms in a cohort of older patients seeking care for incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several medication classes may contribute to urinary symptoms in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of use of these medications in a clinical cohort of incontinent patients. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 390 new patients aged 60 years and older seeking care for incontinence in specialized outpatient geriatric incontinence clinics in Quebec, Canada. The use of oral estrogens, alpha-blocking agents, benzodiazepines, antidepressants, antipsychotics, ACE inhibitors, loop diuretics, NSAIDs, narcotics and calcium channel blockers was recorded from each patient’s medication profile. Lower urinary tract symptoms and the severity of incontinence were measured using standardized questionnaires including the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire. The type of incontinence was determined clinically by a physician specialized in incontinence. Co-morbidities were ascertained by self-report. Logistic regression analyses were used to detect factors associated with medication use, as well as relationships between specific medication classes and the type and severity of urinary symptoms. Results The prevalence of medications potentially contributing to lower urinary tract symptoms was 60.5%. Calcium channel blockers (21.8%), benzodiazepines (17.4%), other centrally active agents (16.4%), ACE inhibitors (14.4%) and estrogens (12.8%) were most frequently consumed. Only polypharmacy (OR = 4.9, 95% CI = 3.1-7.9), was associated with medication use contributing to incontinence in analyses adjusted for age, sex, and multimorbidity. No associations were detected between specific medication classes and the type or severity of urinary symptoms in this cohort. Conclusion The prevalence of use of medications potentially causing urinary symptoms is high among incontinent older adults. More research is needed to determine whether de-prescribing these medications results in improved urinary symptoms

  3. Effect of belly dancing on urinary incontinence-related muscles and vaginal pressure in middle-aged women

    PubMed Central

    An, So-Young; Kim, Seung-Suk; Han, Gunsoo

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effect of belly dancing on the urinary incontinence-related muscles and vaginal pressure in middle-aged women to provide fundamental data for establishing an effective training program focusing on mitigating and preventing urinary incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects included 24 middle-aged women, who have been diagnosed with urinary incontinence. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, viz. the experimental group (N=12) and control group (N=12). The experimental group underwent a belly dancing program focusing on pelvis moves. [Results] In the experimental group, the urinary incontinence-related muscle strength and vaginal pressure were increased, while the control group showed no significant change. [Conclusion] Belly dancing focusing on pelvis moves had a positive effect on the urinary incontinence-related muscle strength and vaginal pressure, suggesting that a recreational dance program focusing on pelvic exercise can be used to prevent and relieve the symptoms of urinary incontinence as a non-surgical treatment. PMID:28356615

  4. The artificial urinary sphincter and male sling for postprostatectomy incontinence: Which patient should get which procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Dobberfuhl, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the most efficacious treatment for postprostatectomy incontinence. The ideal surgical approach depends on a variety of patient factors including history of prior incontinence surgery or radiation treatment, bladder contractility, severity of leakage, and patient expectations. Most patients choose to avoid a mechanical device, opting for the male sling over the artificial urinary sphincter. The modern male sling has continued to evolve with respect to device design and surgical technique. Various types of slings address sphincteric incompetence via different mechanisms of action. The recommended surgery, however, must be individualized to the patient based on degree of incontinence, detrusor contractility, and urethral compliance. A thorough urodynamic evaluation is indicated for the majority of patients, and the recommendation for an artificial urinary sphincter, a transobturator sling, or a quadratic sling will depend on urodynamic findings and the patient's particular preference. As advancements in this field evolve, and our understanding of the pathophysiology of incontinence and mechanisms of various devices improves, we expect to see continued evolution in device design. PMID:26966721

  5. Vaginal Calculus in a Woman With Mixed Urinary Incontinence and Vaginal Mesh Exposure.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, William D; Rabban, Joseph T; Korn, Abner P

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal calculi are extremely rare and are most commonly encountered in the setting of an urethrovaginal or vesicovaginal fistula. We present a case of a 72-year-old woman with mixed urinary incontinence and vaginal mesh exposure incidentally found to have a large vaginal calculus. We removed the calculus surgically and analyzed the components. Results demonstrated the presence of ammonium-magnesium phosphate hexahydrate and carbonate apatite.

  6. [Acupoints selection rules analysis of ancient acupuncture for urinary incontinence based on data mining technology].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tan, Zhigao; Cao, Juanshu; Gong, Houwu; Qin, Zuoai; Zhong, Feng; Cao, Yue; Wei, Yanrong

    2015-12-01

    Based on ancient literature of acupuncture in Canon of Chinese Medicine (4th edition), the articles regarding acupuncture for urinary incontinence were retrieved and collected to establish a database. By Weka data mining software, the multi-level association rules analysis method was applied to analyze the acupoints selection characteristics and rules of ancient acupuncture for treatment of urinary incontinence. Totally 356 articles of acupuncture for urinary incontinence were collected, involving 41 acupoints with a total frequency of 364. As a result, (1) the acupoints in the yin-meridian of hand and foot were highly valued, as the frequency of acupoints in yin-meridians was 2.6 times than that in yang-meridians, and the frequency of acupoints selected was the most in the liver meridian of foot-jueyin; (2) the acupoints in bladder meridian of foot-taiyang were also highly valued, and among three yang-meridians of foot, the frequency of acupoints in the bladder meridian of foot-taiyang was 54, accounting for 65.85% (54/82); (3) more acupoints selected were located in the lower limbs and abdomen; (4) specific acupoints in above meridians were mostly selected, presenting 73.2% (30/41) to the ratio of number and 79.4% (289/364) to the frequency, respectively; (5) Zhongji (CV 3), the front-mu point of bladder meridian, was seldom selected in the ancient acupuncture literature, which was different from modern literature reports. The results show that urinary incontinence belongs to external genitalia diseases, which should be treated from yin, indicating more yin-meridians be used and special acupoints be focused on. It is essential to focus inheritance and innovation in TCM clinical treatment, and applying data mining technology to ancient literature of acupuncture could provide classic theory basis for TCM clinical treatment.

  7. Jacquet erosive diaper dermatitis in a young girl with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Hara, M; Watanabe, M; Tagami, H

    1991-06-01

    We report a case of Jacquet erosive diaper dermatitis (dermatitis syphiloides posterosiva) in a 9-year-old girl suffering from urinary incontinence due to an ectopic opening of a left double ureter into the vaginal vestibule. The toilet paper that she used as an absorbent was thought to be one of the factors causing the eruption. The lesions cleared with topical application of a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory ointment and zinc oxide ointment, in conjunction with the use of sanitary napkins.

  8. Erbium: YAG Laser Incision of Urethral Structures for Treatment of Urinary Incontinence After Prostate Cancer Spray

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    devoted to in vivo animal studies comparing the wound healingafter Erbium and Holmium laser incision of the urethra and bladder neck. Further...urinary incontinence. Conventional treatments for stricture (including balloon dilation, cold knife incision, electrocautery, and Holmium laser incision...urethral tissue with a thermal damage zone of only 10-20 µm. This thermal damage zone was much less than that of the Holmium laser which produced 300 µm of

  9. Urinary incontinence and risk of functional decline in older women: data from the Norwegian HUNT-study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The main objective of the present study was to determine whether UI is an independent predictor of ADL decline and IADL decline in elderly women. We also aimed to find out whether incontinent subjects were at higher risk of needing help from formal home care or home nursing care during 11 year follow-up. Methods A prospective cohort study conducted as part of the North-Trøndelag Health Study 2 and 3. Women aged 70–80 years when participating in the HUNT 2 study, who also participated in the HUNT 3 study, were included in this study. Analyses on self-reported urinary incontinence at baseline and functional decline during a11-year period were performed for incontinent and continent subjects. Results Baseline prevalence of urinary incontinence was 24%. At on average eleven year follow up, logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between incontinence and decline in activities of daily living (ADL) (OR =2.37, 95% CI =1.01-5.58) (P=0.04). No association between urinary incontinence and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) in incontinent women compared with continent women was found (OR=1.18, CI=.75-1.86) (P=.46). Data were adjusted for ADL, IADL and co morbid conditions at baseline. No significant differences in need of more help from formal home care and home nursing care between continent and incontinent women were found after 11 years of follow-up. Conclusions Urinary incontinence is an important factor associated with functional decline in women aged 70–80 years living in their own homes. At eleven years of follow up, no significant differences in need of more help from formal home care and home nursing care between continent and incontinent women were found. PMID:23678851

  10. Acupuncture for urinary incontinence after stroke: a protocol for systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongren; Yu, Nannan; Yue, Jinhuan; Zhang, Qinhong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study, which will include randomised controlled trials (RCTs), is to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for patients with stroke and urinary incontinence. Methods and analysis RCTs will be searched electronically in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to present. Manual retrieval will also be conducted. RCTs will be included if acupuncture was evaluated as the sole or adjunct treatment for patients with stroke and urinary incontinence. The primary outcome will be measured by using the pad-weighing test. The secondary outcomes will include urination diary, bladder capacity, clinical symptom scores, the number of patients healed completely in trial follow-up period and adverse events. The study selection, data extraction and evaluation of study quality will be performed independently by two researchers. The methodological quality of the included trials will be assessed by using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) checklist. Dissemination This systematic review will assess the current evidence of acupuncture treatment for patients with stroke and urinary incontinence. The findings of this study will be published through a peer-reviewed journal and presented at a relevant conference. Trial registration number CRD42014015611. PMID:26908510

  11. Path analysis for adherence to pelvic floor muscle exercise among women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Yueh; Tzeng, Ya-Ling

    2009-06-01

    This study developed and tested the accuracy of a model designed to predict adherence to a pelvic floor muscle exercise regimen by Taiwanese women with urinary incontinence. The sample was composed of 106 women treated for urinary incontinence at urban hospitals in central and northern Taiwan from April 2000 to March 2003. All participants had practiced prescribed pelvic floor muscle exercises for at least 6 weeks at the time they completed study measures, which included adherence to pelvic floor muscle exercise, self-efficacy for the exercise, knowledge of the exercise, attitudes toward the exercise, dyadic cohesion, perceived benefits of the exercise, and severity of urine loss. After stepwise multiple regression analysis, a path analysis was conducted, with significant paths retained as modifiers. Self-efficacy for pelvic floor muscle exercise strongly and directly affected adherence to the exercise regimen. Attitudes toward the exercise, dyadic cohesion, and perceived benefits of the exercise affected adherence when mediated by self-efficacy for pelvic floor muscle exercise. Severity of urine loss also directly affected adherence. Exercise knowledge affected neither self-efficacy nor adherence. The model fit the data and accounted for 40% of adherence variance. Findings affirm the significant role of self-efficacy in predicting adherence to pelvic floor muscle exercise. Thus, self-efficacy for exercise can be an indicator for nurses to tailor exercise-training programs for women with urinary incontinence. Nurses can use the study findings to develop interventions to increase women's adherence to the exercise.

  12. Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence in Neurological Patients With an Injectable Elastomer Prosthesis: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Citeri, Marco; Zanollo, Lucia; Guerrer, Chiara; Rizzato, Luigi; Frediani, Luca; Iselin, Christophe; Spinelli, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Many treatment options for stress urinary incontinence are difficult to apply to neurological patients. Urolastic is a new agent that is primarily indicated for women with mild stress urinary incontinence or men after prostate surgery. In this report, we present a series of 5 cases describing the first use of Urolastic to treat neurological patients. All patients were evaluated with a voiding diary and the use of auxiliary devices as the main indicators of continence. The median operative time was 30.8 minutes, and no complications were observed. Of the 5 patients, 4 reported improved incontinence: 2 switched from diapers to small pads, while the other 2 patients were able to discontinue urinary condom use. The only instance of treatment failure occurred in a patient with a low-compliance bladder. The advantages of this procedure appear to include a soft-cuff effect, reversibility, and minimal invasiveness. However, a future randomized study would be necessary to validate this treatment option. PMID:28361514

  13. Selected determinants of quality of life in women with urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Szymona-Pałkowska, Katarzyna; Kraczkowski, Janusz J.; Janowski, Konrad; Steuden, Stanisława; Adamczuk, Jolanta; Robak, Jacek M.; Bakalczuk, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is one of the most common diseases in women. It involves uncontrolled leaking of urine through the urethra. UI incidence depends on age and in certain age groups it can affect up to 60% of the female population. The symptoms can be persistent and due to their embarrassing nature they can lead to significant deterioration of quality of life and psychological functioning. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the quality of life and selected aspects of functioning. Seventy female outpatients of a public clinic in Nałęczów, Poland, were examined, and the following methods were used: the Urinary Incontinence Life Quality Scale (Szymona-Pałkowska, Kraczkowski), Disease-Related Appraisal Scale (Janowski, Steuden), Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (Endler, Parker), Disease-Related Social Support Scale (Brachowicz, Janowski, Sadowska), and the Knowledge Appraisal Scale for Urinary Incontinence (Szymona-Pałkowska, Kraczkowski). The obtained results suggest that the strongest predictors for the quality of life with UI would be: perception of the disease as an injustice and a challenge (a reverse relationship) and an avoidance-oriented style of coping with stress through companionship seeking (a positive relationship). The duration of the disease and the level of related knowledge proved to be crucial in the analysis of one dimension, i.e. distance to the symptoms. PMID:26327835

  14. Does menopausal status impact urinary continence outcomes following abdominal sacrocolpopexy without anti-incontinence procedures in continent women?

    PubMed Central

    Inan, Abdurrahman Hamdi; Toz, Emrah; Beyan, Emrah; Gurbuz, Tutku; Ozcan, Aykut; Oner, Oznur

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the impact of menopausal status on urinary continence following abdominal sacrocolpopexy (ASC) without an anti-incontinence procedure in continent women. Methods: We conducted a clinical follow-up study of 137 patients diagnosed with stage 3 or higher pelvic organ prolapse (POP) without urinary incontinence between January 2012 and December 2014. Patients were provided with detailed a priori information pertaining to the abdominal sacrocolpopexy procedure and were invited to attend follow-up visits at 1, 3, 12, and 24 months. Follow-up visits included a gynecological examination, cough test, and validated Urinary Distress Inventory-6 (UDI-6) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7 (IIQ-7) questionnaires. Results: The mean follow-up time for the cohort was 16.5±3.45 months. The study group was divided according to menopausal status: premenopausal (Group-1) and postmenopausal women (Group-II). Anatomical recurrence was not detected during the follow-up period in either group, but de novo stress urinary incontinence was seen in 15 of 53 (28.3%) Group-I patients and in 6 of 84 (7.1%; p < 0.01) Group-II patients. Conclusions: The risk of de novo stress urinary incontinence in postmenopausal women after ASC is low. However, premenopausal patients have a higher incidence of de novo stress incontinence which affect quality of life. PMID:27648027

  15. Lower Urinary Tract Urological Abnormalities and Urodynamic Findings of Physiological Urinary Incontinence Versus Non-mono Symptomatic Nocturnal Enuresis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although 98% of children attain daytime bladder control by three years of age, urinary incontinence is regarded physiological up to the fifth year of life. Objectives: This study aimed to assess whether lower urinary tract urological abnormalities and abnormal urodynamic findings are infrequent in children with physiological urinary incontinence in contrast to those with non-monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (NMNE). Patients and Methods: During a three-year period (2007-2009), 66 neurologically normal children including 51 children (34 girls, 17 boys) older than five years of age with NMNE and intermittent daytime incontinence, and 15 children with physiological urinary incontinence (eight girls and seven boys) aged four to five years of age without any known urological abnormalities were enrolled in the study. Patients with neurologic deficits or known urological anomalies were excluded from the study. Kidney-bladder ultrasonography, voiding cystourethrography (VCUG), and urodynamic studies were performed to evaluate the anatomy of urinary tract and bladder function. Results: Urinary tract infection was found in 23 (34.8%) children, 17 (33.3%) and 6 (40%) patients with NMNE and physiological urinary incontinence, respectively. Out of 48 patients who underwent VCUG, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was found in seven and eight children younger and older than five years of age, respectively. Abnormal urodynamic findings were reported in 5 (62.5%) of eight children younger than five-year-old, and 14 (63.6%) of 22 patients older than 5-year-old. Conclusions: VUR might be more frequent in children with physiological urinary incontinence than the normal population, and might be as common as NMNE with intermittent daytime incontinence. PMID:24783173

  16. A short form of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12).

    PubMed

    Rogers, Rebecca G; Coates, Kimberly W; Kammerer-Doak, Dorothy; Khalsa, Satkirin; Qualls, Clifford

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop the short form of a condition-specific, reliable, validated and self-administered instrument to evaluate sexual function in women with pelvic organ prolapse and/or urinary incontinence. The Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire -12 (PISQ-12) was developed from the data of 99 of 182 women surveyed to create the long form (PISQ-31). An additional 46 patients were recruited for further validation. All subsets regression analysis identified 12 items likely to predict PISQ-31 scores. Short form scores underwent correlation analysis with long form, Incontinence Impact Questionnaire - 7 (IIQ-7), Sexual History Form -12 (SHF-12) and Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) scores. Test-retest reliability was checked with a subset of 20 patients. All subsets regression analysis with R>0.92 identified 12 items that predicted PISQ-31 scores. Short form scores were highly correlated with long form scores ( R=0.75-0.95). Correlations of the PISQ-12 with SHF-12 ( R=-0.66 and -0.68) and IIQ-7 ( R=-0.38 and -0.54) scores were similar to correlation of the PISQ-31 with these other measures. Reliability was moderate to high, with weighted kappa values from 0.56 to 0.93. PISQ-12 scores were lower in patients with low sexual function as measured on the SHF-12 ( P <0.001), and lower in women with depression as measured on the SQ ( P <0.001). The PISQ-12 is a validated and reliable short form that evaluates sexual function in women with urinary incontinence and/or pelvic organ prolapse and predicts PISQ-31 scores. It is able to distinguish women with poor sexual function as measured on the SHF-12.

  17. The Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence Diagnosis (QUID): Validity and Responsiveness to Change in Women Undergoing Non-Surgical Therapies for Treatment of Stress Predominant Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Catherine S.; Rahn, David D.; Nygaard, Ingrid E.; Barber, Matthew D.; Nager, Charles W.; Kenton, Kimberly S.; Siddiqui, Nazema Y.; Abel, Robert B.; Spino, Cathie; Richter, Holly E.

    2009-01-01

    Aims The Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence Diagnosis (QUID), a 6-item urinary incontinence (UI) symptom questionnaire, was developed and validated to distinguish stress and urge UI. This study’s objective was to evaluate QUID validity and responsiveness when used as a clinical trial outcome measure. Methods Participants enrolled in a multi-center trial of non-surgical therapy (continence pessary, pelvic floor muscle training or combined) for stress-predominant UI completed baseline and 3-month diaries, the Urinary Distress Inventory (UDI) and QUID. Data from all treatment groups were pooled. QUID internal consistency (Cronbach’s α) and convergent/discriminant validity (Pearson correlations) were evaluated. Responsiveness to change was assessed with 3-month score outcomes and distribution-based measurements. Results 444 women (mean age 50) were enrolled with stress (N=200) and mixed (N=244) UI; 344 had 3-month data. Baseline QUID Stress and Urge scores (both scaled 0-15, larger values indicating worse UI) were 8.4 ± 3.2 and 4.5 ± 3.3, respectively. Internal consistency of QUID Total, Stress and Urge scores was 0.75, 0.64 and 0.87, respectively. QUID Stress scores correlated moderately with UDI-Stress scores (r=0.68, p<0.0001) and diary stress UI episodes (r=0.41, p<0.0001). QUID Urge scores correlated moderately with UDI-Irritative scores (r=0.68, p<0.0001) and diary urge UI episodes (r=0.45, p<0.0001). 3-month QUID Stress and Urge scores improved (4.1 ± 3.4 and 2.2 ± 2.7, both p<0.0001). QUID Stress score Effect Size (1.3) and Standardized Response Mean (1.2) suggested a large change after therapy. Conclusion The QUID has acceptable psychometric characteristics and may be used as a UI outcome measure in clinical trials. PMID:19787711

  18. The efficacy and safety of urethral injection therapy for urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Priscila Katsumi; Locali, Rafael Fagionato; Pacetta, Aparecida Maria; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Haddad, Jorge Milhem

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different bulking agents for treating urinary incontinence in women, a systematic review including only randomized controlled trials was performed. The subjects were women with urinary incontinence. The primary outcomes were clinical and urodynamic parameters. The results were presented as a weighted mean difference for non-continuous variables and as relative risk for continuous variables, both with 95% confidence intervals. Initially, 942 studies were identified. However, only fourteen eligible trials fulfilled the prerequisites. Altogether, the review included 1814 patients in trials of eight different types of bulking agents, and all studies were described and analyzed. The measured outcomes were evaluated using a large variety of instruments. The most common complications of the bulking agents were urinary retention and urinary tract infection. Additionally, there were certain major complications, such as one case of death after use of autologous fat. However, the lack of adequate studies, the heterogeneous populations studied, the wide variety of materials used and the lack of long-term follow-up limit guidance of practice. To determine which substance is the most suitable, there is a need for more randomized clinical trials that compare existing bulking agents based on standardized clinical outcomes. PMID:26934239

  19. Two-Year Outcomes After Sacrocolpopexy With and Without Burch to Prevent Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Linda; Nygaard, Ingrid; Richter, Holly E.; Visco, Anthony; Weber, Anne M.; Cundiff, Geoffrey W.; Fine, Paul; Ghetti, Chiara; Brown, Morton B.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To report anatomic and functional outcomes 2 years after sacrocolpopexy in stress-continent women with or without prophylactic Burch colposuspension. METHODS In the Colpopexy and Urinary Reduction Efforts (CARE) trial, stress-continent women undergoing sacrocolpopexy were randomized to receive or not receive a Burch colposuspension. Outcomes included urinary symptoms, other pelvic symptoms, and pelvic support. Standardized pelvic organ prolapse quantification examinations and validated outcome measures including the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire were completed before surgery and at several postoperative intervals, including at 2 years. RESULTS This analysis is based on 302 of 322 randomized participants. Most were Caucasian (94%), with a mean age of 62±10 years (mean±standard deviation). Two years after surgery, 32.0% and 45.2% of women in the Burch and control groups, respectively, met the stress incontinence endpoint (presence of symptoms or positive cough stress test or interval treatment for stress incontinence, P=.026). The apex was well supported (point C within 2 cm of total vaginal length) in 95% of women, and this was not affected by concomitant Burch (P=.18). There was a trend toward fewer urgency symptoms in the Burch group (32.0% versus 44.5% no Burch, P=.085). Twenty participants experienced mesh or suture erosions. CONCLUSION The early advantage of prophylactic Burch colposuspension for stress incontinence that was seen at 3 months remains at 2 years. Apical anatomic success rates are high and not affected by concomitant Burch. PMID:18591307

  20. PATIENT EXPECTATIONS DID NOT PREDICT OUTCOME OF DRUG AND BEHAVIORAL TREATMENT OF URGENCY URINARY INCONTINENCE

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Mary P; DuBeau, Catherine E.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Johnson, Harry W.; Rahn, David D.; Mallett, Veronica; Stoddard, Anne M.; Zyczynski, Halina M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether expectations of treatment outcomes in women participating in a drug and behavioral treatment trial for urge urinary incontinence are related to patient factors, demographics, health-related locus of control and treatment outcomes. Methods Baseline assessments included expectations (improvement in bladder condition, time to improvement in bladder condition, and duration of improvement) and the multidimensional health locus of control (MHLC) scale. Outcomes were measured by patient global impression of improvement (PGI-I) at the end of active treatment (10 weeks) and 8 months after trial start. Results At baseline among 173 subjects, 114 (66%) believed their incontinence would get ‘very much better,’ 94 (55%) expected improvement by one month, and 111 (66%) expected improvement would last the rest of their lives.. There were no significant associations between baseline expectations or MHLC with PGI-I at 10 weeks or 8 months. Conclusions Expectations of treatment outcome and MHLC did not predict eventual patient-reported treatment outcome in this sample of women with urge-predominant urinary incontinence participating in a trial of drug and behavioral therapy. PMID:22453106

  1. Urodynamic Characterization of Obese Women with Urinary Incontinence Undergoing a Weight Loss Program

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Holly E.; Creasman, Jennifer M.; Myers, Deborah L.; Wheeler, Thomas L.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Subak, Leslee L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to describe urodynamic characteristics of overweight or obese women with urinary incontinence and explore the relationship between urodynamic parameters, body mass index (BMI), and abdominal circumference (AC). Materials & Methods One hundred ten women underwent a standardized cough stress test and urodynamic study. Results 86% of women had urodynamic stress incontinence and 15% detrusor overactivity. Intraabdominal pressure (Pabd) at maximum cystometric capacity (MCC) increased 0.4 cm H2O per kg/m2 unit of BMI (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.0,0.7, p=0.04) and 0.4 cm H2O per 2 cm increase in AC (CI: 0.2, 0.7, p<0.01). Intravesical pressure (Pves) at MCC increased 0.4 cm H2O per 2 cm increase in AC (CI: 0.0, 0.8, p=0.05), but was not associated with BMI (p=0.18). Conclusion BMI and AC had a stronger association with Pabd than with Pves, suggesting a possible mechanism for the association between obesity and urinary incontinence. PMID:18679560

  2. The impact of pelvic organ prolapse on sexual function in women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Begüm; White, Terry; Urwitz-Lane, Rebecca; Minaglia, Steven

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) on sexual function in women with urinary incontinence (UI). In this retrospective, case-cohort study, we reviewed the medical records of all women evaluated for UI between March and November 2003. All patients completed the short forms of the Urogenital Distress Inventory, Incontinence Impact Questionnaire, and Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire. Women with stage two or greater POP, as determined by the pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POPQ) system, were compared to women with stage 0 or 1 POP. Sixty-nine women with POP and 47 women without POP were included. Patient demographics did not differ between the two groups. Women with POP were significantly more likely to report absence of libido (53% versus 30%, P=0.02), lack of sexual excitement during intercourse (46% versus 27%, P=0.05), and that they rarely experienced orgasm during intercourse (49% versus 30%, P=0.05). In conclusion, women with POP in addition to UI are more likely to report decreased libido, decreased sexual excitement, and difficulty achieving orgasm during intercourse when compared to women with UI alone.

  3. Sexual function in women with and without urinary incontinence and/or pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G R; Villarreal, A; Kammerer-Doak, D; Qualls, C

    2001-01-01

    The sexual function of women with and without urinary incontinence and/or pelvic organ prolapse (UI/POP) was compared using a condition-specific validated questionnaire, the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ). Eighty-three women with UI/POP and 56 without agreed to participate. PISQ scores were significantly lower among women with UI/POP than in those without (P = 0.003). No differences in the stages of sexual excitement were noted between groups. The frequency of intercourse was less with UI/POP than without (P= 0.04). Women with UI/POP restricted sexual activity for fear of losing urine more frequently than did those without (P = 0.005). No differences were reported in patients' or partners' sexual satisfaction. This study found that women with UI/POP have poorer sexual functioning than those without, as measured by the PISQ, and report less frequent sexual activity. In addition, women with UI/POP are more likely to restrict sexual activity for fear of incontinence, although they report similar levels of satisfaction with their sexual relationships as do women without UI/POP.

  4. Urodynamic Changes Associated with Successful Stress Urinary Incontinence Surgery: Is a Little Tension a Good Thing?

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Stephen R.; Lemack, Gary E.; Sirls, Larry; Chai, Toby C.; Brubaker, Linda; Albo, Michael; Leng, Wendy W.; Lloyd, L. Keith; Norton, Peggy; Litman, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to identify urodynamic changes that correlate with successful outcomes after stress urinary incontinence (SUI) surgery. Methods 655 women were randomized to Burch colposuspension or autologous fascial sling as part of the multi-center Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial. Preoperatively and 24 months after surgery, participants underwent standardized urodynamic testing which included non-invasive uroflowmetry, cystometrogram and pressure flow studies. Changes in urodynamic parameters were correlated to a successful outcome, defined a priori as: 1) negative pad test, 2) no urinary incontinence on 3-day diary, 3) negative cough and valsalva stress test, 4) no self-reported SUI symptoms on the Medical, Epidemiological and Social Aspects of Aging Questionnaire and 5) no retreatment for SUI. Results Subjects who met criteria for surgical success showed a greater relative increase in mean Pdet@Qmax (baseline vs 24 months) than women who were considered surgical failures (p = 0.008). While a trend suggested an association between greater increases in bladder outlet obstruction index and outcome success, this was not statistically significant. Other urodynamic variables such as maximum uroflow, bladder compliance, and the presence of preoperative or de novo detrusor overactivity did not differ with respect to outcome status. Conclusions Successful outcomes in both surgical groups (Burch and sling) were associated with higher voiding pressures relative to preoperative baseline values. However, concomitant changes in other urodynamic voiding parameters were not significantly associated with outcome. PMID:21996108

  5. Behavioural treatment of urinary incontinence and encopresis in children with learning disabilities: transfer of stimulus control.

    PubMed

    Smith, L; Smith, P; Lee, S K

    2000-04-01

    Urinary and faecal incontinence present a considerable problem in people with learning disabilities, despite the general effectiveness of behavioural techniques in continence training. Children with learning disabilities and obsessional behaviour may be particularly resistant to toilet training, even where relatively cognitively able, and often despite a substantial degree of control over their eliminatory functions. Their resistance may be more appropriately regarded as a challenging behaviour and their incontinence better explained by factors other than a simple failure to learn. A 'stimulus-control' hypothesis proposes that the child's nappy (diaper)/potty/underwear has developed strong stimulus control over the elimination response. This report describes three case studies in which treatment-resistant children, aged between 8 and 12 years, with mild or moderate learning disabilities, were successfully treated for nappy-dependent nocturnal encopresis or diurnal urinary incontinence. The children were routine case referrals for whom previous attempts to train bowel or bladder control had failed. Behavioural techniques, such as 'shaping' (gradually increasing the proximity to the toilet), 'fading' (reducing the presence of the nappy), and rewards for eliminating, effected successful transfer of stimulus control over elimination from nappy to toilet. Treatment times varied, depending on the degree of the child's obsession and resistance to change.

  6. A Comparative Evaluation of Suburethral and Transobturator Sling in 209 Cases with Stress Urinary Incontinence in 8 years

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Prakash; D’Costa, Sylvia; Shirkande, Preeti; Kumar, Shilpi; Patil, Mangala

    2009-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the outcome of suburethral and transobturator sling in treatment of female stress urinary incontinence in 209 cases from 2002 to 2010. The criteria evaluated were success, failure, complications, operating time, ease of the procedure, availability and cost effectivity of the sling. Design and Setting: A retrospective comparative study was carried out at a tertiary referral centre for female urinary incontinence. Material and Methods: A total of 209 patients (females from 27 to 79 years of age) with proven stress urinary incontinence were treated by suburethral transvaginal tape (TVT) type of slings in 101 cases and transobturator Monarc type of sling in 108 cases at the National Institute of Endoscopic Surgery and Urinary Incontinence Center, Mumbai, India, from March 2002 to June 2010. The maximum follow up was for 8 years. Results: The TVT type of slings had higher complication rate like needle entering the bladder, retention of urine necessitating to cut the tape in the center and had a success rate of 94.5% compared to Monarc/Trivedi obturator tape (TrOT) type of sling with outside-in technique, which had a negligible complication (less than 1%), pain in groin or leg movement that reduced in 6 weeks and a success rate of 95%. Specially, the Indian design Trivedi’s stress urinary incontinence tape (TSUIT) and TrOT with reusable needles, the cost was only 15–20% of the international brands. PMID:22442522

  7. [Guidelines for rehabilitation management of non-neurological urinary incontinence in women].

    PubMed

    Leriche, B; Conquy, S

    2010-02-01

    Pelvic floor rehabilitation is prescribed as first-line treatment for women with stress urinary incontinence, particularly in cases of urinary incontinence with no first-degree uterine prolapse, with poor-quality perineal testing results or inverted perineal command. Prescription of 15 sessions should suffice to evaluate the possibilities of improving the incontinence. The sessions can be continued if the patient feels she is progressing but has not reached sufficient results. With no progression despite properly conducted rehabilitation, the question of whether to continue the physical therapy arises. Currently, therapists determine the number of sessions. They are better apt to know whether sessions should be pursued and should relay a report to the prescribing physician. This type of rehabilitation is within the domain of physical therapists. Midwives can be responsible for postpartum rehabilitation. On the other hand, the importance of the patient's role in the results and their maintenance is well known. Occasionally a few sessions some time after the initial sessions can serve to verify the acquisitions and motivate the patient in her personal contribution to this rehabilitation. The work of the physical therapist cannot be substituted with Keat-type home electrostimulation. The physical therapist plays an important role in the overall management of this condition. Currently, in absence of demonstrated efficacy, self-administration of electrostimulation is not recommended. In urge incontinence, the rehabilitation approach will be used concomitantly with prescription of anticholergics with behavioral therapy and bladder biofeedback work. In addition, low-frequency electrostimulation can be done during the session. Starting with 10-12 sessions is sufficient. In all cases, rehabilitation should take a multidisciplinary approach and be integrated into a medical and/or surgical management plan.

  8. The University of Michigan Incontinence Symptom Index (M-ISI): a Clinical Measure for Type, Severity, and Bother related to Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Suskind, Anne M.; Dunn, Rodney L.; Morgan, Daniel M.; DeLancey, John O.L.; McGuire, Edward J.; Wei, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To develop a clinically relevant, easy to use, and validated instrument for assessing severity and bother related to urinary incontinence. Methods Survey items were piloted and refined following psychometric principles in five separate patient cohorts. Patient and expert endorsement of items, factor analyses, Spearman rank correlations and response distributions were employed for item selection. Formal reliability and validity evaluation were conducted for the final questionnaire items. Results Expert physicians and patient focus groups confirmed face and content validity for the measure. A 10-item measure called the Michigan Incontinence Symptom Index (M-ISI) was developed with two domains: a Total M-ISI Domain consisting of subdomains for stress urinary incontinence, urgency urinary incontinence, and pad use, and a Bother Domain. High construct validity was demonstrated with a Cronbach’s alpha for the Total M-ISI Domain (items 1–8) of 0.90 and for the Bother Domain (items 9–10) of 0.82. Cronbach’s alpha for the subdomains were all > 0.85. Construct validity, convergent and divergent validity, internal discriminant validity, and predictive validity were all robust. The minimally important difference for the measure was determined to be 4 points (out of 32) for the Total M-ISI Severity Domain, and 1–2 points (out of 8–12) for the individual subdomains. Conclusions The M-ISI is a parsimonious measure that has established reliability and validity on several levels and complements current clinical evaluative methods for patients with urinary incontinence. PMID:23945994

  9. Muscle-Derived Cells for Treatment of Iatrogenic Sphincter Damage and Urinary Incontinence in Men

    PubMed Central

    Gerullis, H.; Eimer, C.; Georgas, E.; Homburger, M.; El-Baz, A. G.; Wishahi, M.; Borós, M.; Ecke, T. H.; Otto, T.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of injection of autologous muscle-derived cells into the urinary sphincter for treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence in men and to characterize the injected cells prior to transplantation. Methods. 222 male patients with stress urinary incontinence and sphincter damage after uroloical procedures were treated with transurethral injection of autologous muscle-derived cells. The transplanted cells were investigated after cultivation and prior to application by immunocytochemistry using different markers of myogenic differentiation. Feasibility and functionality assessment was achieved with a follow-up of at least 12 months. Results. Follow-up was at least 12 months. Of the 222 treated patients, 120 responded to therapy of whom 26 patients (12%) were continent, and 94 patients (42%) showed improvement. In 102 (46%) patients, the therapy was ineffective. Clinical improvement was observed on average 4.7 months after transplantation and continued in all improved patients. The cells injected into the sphincter were at least ~50% of myogenic origin and representative for early stages of muscle cell differentiation. Conclusions. Transurethral injection of muscle-derived cells into the damaged urethral sphincter of male patients is a safe procedure. Transplanted cells represent different phases of myogenic differentiation. PMID:22919359

  10. Size Does Not Make the Difference: 3D/4D Transperineal Sonographic Measurements of the Female Urethra in the Assessment of Urinary Incontinence Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Pecks, Ulrich; Stickeler, Elmar; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objective was to evaluate the usefulness of transperineal ultrasound in the assessment of the urethral length and urethral lumen by 3D/4D transperineal sonography to discriminate between female patients with subtypes of urinary incontinence. Methods. A total of 150 female patients underwent an examination because of urinary incontinence. 41 patients were diagnosed with urgency urinary incontinence (OAB), 67 patients were diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and 42 patients were in the control group (CTRL). Three diameters of the urethral lumen (proximal (U1), medial (U2), and distal (U3)) and the urethral length were measured. By the assessment of the urethral lumen, the presence of the urethral funneling was evaluated. Results. We found a significant difference in the urethral length and urethral lumen U2 of OAB and SUI versus CTRL. The urethral length was significantly greater (P < 0.05) and the urethral lumen was significantly wider (P < 0.05) in the patients with urinary incontinence. The incidence of the urethral funneling was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the study groups with urinary incontinence than in the control group. Conclusions. Our results have shown the urethral changes obtained by ultrasound in patients with urinary incontinence, but they are still insufficient to distinguish between subtypes of urinary incontinence. PMID:27990423

  11. A 10-Year Follow-Up of Urinary and Fecal Incontinence among the Oldest Old in the Community: The Canadian Study of Health and Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostbye,Truls; Seim, Arnfinn; Krause, Katrina M.; Feightner, John; Hachinski, Vladimir; Sykes, Elizabeth; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2004-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is common in the elderly. The epidemiology of fecal and double (urinary and fecal) incontinence is less known. The Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA) is a national study of elderly living in the community at baseline (n = 8,949) and interviewed in 1991-1992, 1996, and 2001. Using data from the CSHA, we report the…

  12. The potential role of stem cells in the treatment of urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Voiding dysfunction encompasses a wide range of urologic disorders including stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder that have a detrimental impact on the quality of life of millions of men and women worldwide. In recent years, we have greatly expanded our understanding of the pathophysiology of these clinical conditions. However, current gold standard therapies often provide symptomatic relief without targeting the underlying etiology of disease development. Recently, the use of stem cells to halt disease progression and reverse underlying pathology has emerged as a promising method to restore normal voiding function. Stem cells are classically thought to aid in tissue repair via their ability for multilineage differentiation and self-renewal. They may also exert a therapeutic effect via the secretion of bioactive factors that direct other stem and progenitor cells to the area of injury, and that also possess antiapoptotic, antiscarring, neovascularization, and immunomodulatory properties. Local injections of mesenchymal, muscle-derived, and adipose-derived stem cells have all yielded successful outcomes in animal models of mechanical, nerve, or external urethral sphincter injury in stress urinary incontinence. Similarly, direct injection of mesenchymal and adipose-derived stem cells into the bladder in animal models of bladder overactivity have demonstrated efficacy. Early clinical trials using stem cells for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in both male and female patients have also achieved promising functional results with minimal adverse effects. Although many challenges remain to be addressed prior to the clinical implementation of this technology, novel stem-cell-based therapies are an exciting potential therapy for voiding dysfunction. PMID:25642292

  13. Coping with stress and quality of life in women with stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Adamczuk, Jolanta; Szymona-Pałkowska, Katarzyna; Robak, Jacek Marcin; Rykowska-Górnik, Katarzyna; Steuden, Stanisława

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary incontinence (UI) involves uncontrolled leakage of urine through the urethra as a result of damage to its sphincter muscle and a disturbed function of the urogenital diaphragm within the pelvis minor. The symptoms of UI radically impair psychological, somatic, and social functioning. The aim of each disease stress coping process is to reduce the impact of harmful agents as well as the acquisition of necessary preventive measures in order to combat the disorder. Aim of the study was to assess the relationship between coping styles used when dealing with stress associated with disease and the quality of life. Material and methods The study was carried out at an outpatients’ clinic located in the Lublin Province (eastern Poland), covering 150 women with diagnosed stress urinary incontinence, aged between 32 and 79. The following methods were used: (a) Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (Endler, Parker) to assess coping styles, (b) CASP-19 scale (Higgins, Hyde, Wiggins, Blade) to measure the overall quality of life, and (c) Urinary Incontinence Life Quality Scale (Szymona-Pałkowska, Kraczkowski). Results The preferred style in the studied group of women was Task-Oriented Coping. This style is associated with a low score on the Independence from Symptoms scale and low Control, being simultaneously correlated with Autonomy and Self-Realisation. Emotion-Oriented Coping is associated with low psychological, physical and social well-being, as well as with little independence from the disease symptoms, little pleasure and self-realisation, but it gives a sense of internal control. Avoidance-Oriented Coping does not significantly correlate with any of the Overall Quality of Life dimensions. Conclusions Women suffering from UI tend to try to solve their problem by means of cognitive transformation. In their situation, clinging to the problem turns out to be a depressing factor and entails a lower quality of their life. PMID:26528106

  14. Vaginal cone use in passive and active phases in patients with stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Jorge Milhem; Ribeiro, Ricardo Muniz; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Abrão, Maurício Simões; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate vaginal cone therapy in two phases, passive and active, in women with stress urinary incontinence. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, São Paulo University, Brazil. Twenty-four women with a clinical and urodynamic diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence were treated with vaginal cones in a passive phase (without voluntary contractions of the pelvic floor) and an active phase (with voluntary contractions), each of which lasted three months. Clinical complaints, a functional evaluation of the pelvic floor, a pad test, and bladder neck mobility were analyzed before and after each phase. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients completed the treatment. The reduction in absolute risk with the pad test was 0.38 (p<0.034) at the end of the passive phase and 0.67 (p<0.0001) at the end of the active phase. The reduction in absolute risk with the pelvic floor evaluation was 0.62 (p<0.0001) at the end of the passive phase and 0.77 (p<0.0001) at the end of the active phase. The reduction in absolute risk of bladder neck mobility was 0.38 (p<0.0089) at the end of the passive phase and 0.52 (p<0.0005) at the end of the active phase. Complete reversal of symptomatology was observed in 12 (57.1%) patients, and satisfaction was expressed by 19 (90.4%). CONCLUSION: Using vaginal cones in the passive phase, as other researchers did, was effective. Inclusion of the active phase led to additional improvement in all of the study parameters evaluated in women with stress urinary incontinence. Randomized studies are needed, however, to confirm these results. PMID:21789381

  15. MR imaging of the female urethra and supporting ligaments in assessment of urinary incontinence: spectrum of abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Macura, Katarzyna J; Genadry, Rene R; Bluemke, David A

    2006-01-01

    The traditional methods for evaluation of urinary incontinence in women include urodynamics, cystourethroscopy, cystourethrography, and ultrasonography. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has not played a major role in the assessment of women with urinary incontinence. However, high-resolution MR imaging allows detailed visualization of the urethral sphincter and supporting ligaments in women and may contribute to the diagnosis and staging of sphincteric incompetence related to intrinsic sphincter deficiency or urethral hypermobility. Both the anatomy and the function of the female urethra can be depicted on MR images. The spectrum of abnormalities detected at MR imaging in women with stress urinary incontinence are classified as (a) findings related to the urethral sphincter deficiency and (b) defects of the urethral support ligaments and urethral hypermobility. These abnormalities include a small urethral sphincter, funneling at the bladder neck, distortion of the urethral support ligaments, cystocele, an asymmetric pubococcygeus muscle, abnormal shape of the vagina, enlargement of the retropubic space, and an increased vesicourethral angle.

  16. New Paradigms for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research in Electronic Medical Records: An Example of Detecting Urinary Incontinence Following Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Tamang, Suzanne; Blayney, Douglas; Brooks, Jim; Shah, Nigam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: National initiatives to develop quality metrics emphasize the need to include patient-centered outcomes. Patient-centered outcomes are complex, require documentation of patient communications, and have not been routinely collected by healthcare providers. The widespread implementation of electronic medical records (EHR) offers opportunities to assess patient-centered outcomes within the routine healthcare delivery system. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility and accuracy of identifying patient centered outcomes within the EHR. Methods: Data from patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing prostatectomy were used to develop and test algorithms to accurately identify patient-centered outcomes in post-operative EHRs – we used urinary incontinence as the use case. Standard data mining techniques were used to extract and annotate free text and structured data to assess urinary incontinence recorded within the EHRs. Results A total 5,349 prostate cancer patients were identified in our EHR-system between 1998–2013. Among these EHRs, 30.3% had a text mention of urinary incontinence within 90 days post-operative compared to less than 1.0% with a structured data field for urinary incontinence (i.e. ICD-9 code). Our workflow had good precision and recall for urinary incontinence (positive predictive value: 0.73 and sensitivity: 0.84). Discussion. Our data indicate that important patient-centered outcomes, such as urinary incontinence, are being captured in EHRs as free text and highlight the long-standing importance of accurate clinician documentation. Standard data mining algorithms can accurately and efficiently identify these outcomes in existing EHRs; the complete assessment of these outcomes is essential to move practice into the patient-centered realm of healthcare. PMID:27347492

  17. The impact of fecal and urinary incontinence on quality of life 6 months after childbirth

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Victoria L.; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Fitzgerald, Mary Pat; Borello-France, Diane; Janz, Nancy K.; Fine, Paul M.; Whitehead, William; Brown, Morton B.; Weber, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of postpartum fecal incontinence (FI) and urinary incontinence (UI) on quality of life (QOL). Study Design Seven hundred fifty-nine primiparous women in the Childbirth and Pelvic Symptoms study were interviewed 6 months postpartum. FI and UI were assessed with validated questionnaires. We measured QOL with SF-12 summary scores, health utility index score (a measure of self-rated overall health), and the modified Manchester Health Questionnaire. Results Women with FI had worse self-rated health utility index scores (85.1 ± 9.8 vs 88.0 ± 11.6, P = .02) and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) mental summary scores (46.8 ± 9.2 vs 51.1 ± 8.7, P < .0001) than women without FI or flatal incontinence. Women with UI had worse SF-12 mental summary scores (48.3 ± 9.8 vs 51.6 ± 7.8, P < .01) and self-rated health utility index scores (84.1 ± 12.5 vs 88.7 ± 10.1, P < .01) than women without UI. Women with both FI and UI had the lowest SF-12 mental summary scores (44.5 ± 9.0). Conclusion Six months after delivery, women experiencing FI or UI reported negative effects on health-related QOL. FI and UI together have a greater impact than either condition alone. PMID:18060960

  18. Race and Ethnicity Do Not Contribute to Differences in Pre-operative Urinary Incontinence Severity or Symptom Bother In Women Undergoing Stress Incontinence Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Stephen R.; Markland, Alayne; Chai, Toby C.; Stoddard, Anne; FitzGerald, Mary Pat; Leng, Wendy; Mallett, Veronica; Tennstedt, Sharon L.

    2007-01-01

    Aims To determine whether race/ethnicity affects urinary incontinence (UI) severity and bother, in women undergoing surgery for stress incontinence. Methods We used baseline data from participants in the Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy trial. UI severity was measured by the number of leakage episodes during a 3-day urinary diary and by urodynamic evaluation. UI bother was measured using the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI). Race/ethnicity classification was based on self report. Results Of the 654 women, 72(11%) were Hispanic, 480(73%) non-Hispanic White, 44 (6.7%) non-Hispanic Black and 58 (8.9%) ‘Other’. No differences were seen in any UI severity measures. Non-Hispanic Whites had lowest UDI scores on bivariate analysis, explained by socioeconomic status, BMI and age on multivariate analysis. Conclusion Factors other than racial/ethnic differences underlie variations in UI symptoms and bother in this group of women seeking surgery for stress incontinence. PMID:17618773

  19. The Impact of Central Obesity on Storage Luts and Urinary Incontinence After Prostatic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gacci, Mauro; Sebastianelli, Arcangelo; Salvi, Matteo; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Tubaro, Andrea; Gravas, Stavros; Moncada, Ignacio; Serni, Sergio; Maggi, Mario; Vignozzi, Linda

    2016-09-01

    In the developed and developing countries, the overall prevalence of central obesity in the elderly men is growing. In addition, the progressive aging of male population increased the possibilities of coexisting morbidities associated with obesity such as lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic enlargement (BPE) or to prostate cancer (PCa) needing primary treatment, including radical prostatectomy (RP), which can further adversely affect the quality of life. Simple and radical prostatectomy are the most common surgical procedures in urologic unit all over the world for BPE and PCa, respectively. After both interventions, patients can present bothering storage LUTS that can worsen all the other clinical outcomes. Preset study will review the role of central obesity as a risk factor for storage LUTS or urinary incontinence, after prostatic surgery for BPE or PCa.

  20. Predictors of Success and Satisfaction of Nonsurgical Therapy for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Joseph; Nager, Charles W.; Xiang, Fang; Borello-France, Diane; Bradley, Catherine S.; Wu, Jennifer M.; Mueller, Elizabeth; Norton, Peggy; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R.; Zyczynski, Halina; Richter, Holly E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify factors that may predict success and satisfaction in women undergoing nonsurgical therapy for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics of women participating in a multicenter randomized trial of pessary, behavioral, or combined therapy for SUI were evaluated for potential predictors of success and satisfaction. Success and satisfaction outcomes were assessed at 3 months and included the Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I), stress incontinence subscale of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI), and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ). Logistic regression was performed to identify predictors, adjusting for treatment and other important clinical covariates. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR), 95% confidence intervals (CI), and associated P-values are presented. Results Four hundred forty-six women were randomized. College education or higher and no previous UI surgery predicted success based on the stress subscale of the PFDI (AOR=1.61, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.55; p=0.04; AOR=3.15, 95% CI 1.04 to 9.53; p=0.04, respectively). Menopausal status predicted success using the PGI-I (AOR=2.52 postmenopausal vs premenopausal, 95% CI 1.29 to 4.95; AOR=1.32 unsure menopausal status vs pre-menopausal, 95% CI 0.65 to 2.66; p=0.03 across all three groups). Less than 14 incontinence episodes per week predicted satisfaction with the PSQ (AOR=1.97, 1.21 to 3.19; p=0.01). These predictors did not differ across the three treatment groups. Conclusions Menopause, higher education, no previous UI surgery and lower incontinence frequency were found to be predictors of success and satisfaction with nonsurgical therapy for SUI. This information may help better align provider and patient expectations with nonsurgical treatment outcomes. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00270998. PMID:22914396

  1. [Perineal electrical stimulation and rehabilitation in urinary incontinence and other symptoms of non-neurologic origin].

    PubMed

    Perrigot, M; Pichon, B; Peskine, A; Vassilev, K

    2008-07-01

    A literature survey of 106 articles shows that standard electrostimulation is an effective treatment of urinary incontinence and urinary disorders with bladder instability. Bladder inhibition is obtained by applying an alternating current at a frequency of between 5 and 25Hz and with a pulse width of between 0.2 and 0.5ms. In 19 articles (including three randomized, placebo-controlled studies), good results were achieved in 60 to 90% of cases, depending on the exact method (i.e. chronic or acute stimulation). Standard electrostimulation is also efficient in stress urinary incontinence. Urethral closure is obtained by applying a 50Hz alternating current with, again, a pulse width of between 0.2 and 0.5ms. In 21 articles (including two randomized, placebo-controlled studies), good results were achieved in 47.5 to 77% of cases. Treatments combining perineal rehabilitation (behavioural education, muscle improvement and biofeed-back) and electrostimulation are reported by 10 authors, with good results in 70 to 80% of cases after 10 to 12 sessions. According to 14 studies, neuromodulation is also an efficient treatment for complex urinary disorders, urgency, pollakiuria and dysuria. The recommended stimulation parameters are a frequency of 10 to 15Hz and a pulse width of 210ms. Good results were found in 34 to 94% of cases (with between 60 and 75% in an international, multicenter study). The overall results different from one study to another because of the need to harmonize stimulation parameters, choice of the study population and treatment follow-up with self-training programs and therapeutic education.

  2. [Postoperative evaluation of different surgical procedures in genuine stress urinary incontinence: a retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colorado, S; Pérez-Soriano, P; Alvarez-Mercado, R L; Herbert, A; Kunhardt-Rasch, J

    1996-06-01

    An evaluation of the surgical treatment for stress and mixed urinary incontinence and pelvic relaxation. One-year follow-up, was done. A retrospective study with 144 files from the surgeries performed between February 1993 and June 1994, at the Clínica de Urología Ginecológica del Instituto Nacional de Perinatología. We excluded 37 files because of incomplete information. The age, parity, hormonal stage, preoperative diagnosis by urodynamic studies, surgical treatments and one-year follow-up were analyzed. The mean age was 45.5 years. Pereyra procedure was performed in 53, Burch procedure in 47, anterior colporrhaphy in 5, and sling procedure in 2 patients. The incidence of complications was similar between the different groups. Resumption of spontaneous postsurgical voiding was delayed in the Pereyra group. The Burch urethropexy and Pereyra procedures were equally effective, with no statistical differences observed. Burch vaginal suspension was not more effective for the correction of urinary stress incontinence than Pereyra procedure.

  3. Development of a wearable microwave bladder monitor for the management and treatment of urinary incontinence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krewer, F.; Morgan, F.; Jones, E.; Glavin, M.; O'Halloran, M.

    2014-05-01

    Urinary incontinence is defined as the inability to stop the flow of urine from the bladder. In the US alone, the annual societal cost of incontinence-related care is estimated at 12.6 billion dollars. Clinicians agree that those suffering from urinary incontinence would greatly benefit from a wearable system that could continually monitor the bladder, providing continuous feedback to the patient. While existing ultrasound-based solutions are highly accurate, they are severely limited by form-factor, battery size, cost and ease of use. In this study the authors propose an alternative bladder-state sensing system, based on Ultra Wideband (UWB) Radar. As part of an initial proof-of-concept, the authors developed one of the first dielectrically and anatomically-representative Finite Difference Time Domain models of the pelvis. These models (one male and one female) are derived from Magnetic Resonance images provided by the IT'IS Foundation. These IT'IS models provide the foundation upon which an anatomically-plausible bladder growth model was constructed. The authors employed accurate multi-pole Debye models to simulate the dielectric properties of each of the pelvic tissues. Two-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulations were completed for a range of bladder volumes. Relevant features were extracted from the FDTD-derived signals using Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and then classified using a k-Nearest-Neighbour and Support Vector Machine algorithms (incorporating the Leave-one-out cross-validation approach). Additionally the authors investigated the effects of signal fidelity, noise and antenna movement relative to the target as potential sources of error. The results of this initial study provide strong motivation for further research into this timely application, particularly in the context of an ageing population.

  4. Conservative chiropractic management of urinary incontinence using applied kinesiology: a retrospective case-series report

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Scott C.; Rosner, Anthony L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe the chiropractic management of 21 patients with daily stress and occasional total urinary incontinence (UI). Clinical Features Twenty-one case files of patients 13 to 90 years of age with UI from a chiropractic clinic were reviewed. The patients had a 4-month to 49-year history of UI and associated muscle dysfunction and low back and/or pelvic pain. Eighteen wore an incontinence pad throughout the day and night at the time of their appointments because of unpredictable UI. Intervention and Outcome Patients were evaluated for muscle impairments in the lumbar spine, pelvis, and pelvic floor and low back and/or hip pain. Positive manual muscle test results of the pelvis, lumbar spine muscles, and pelvic floor muscles were the most common findings. Lumbosacral dysfunction was found in 13 of the cases with pain provocation tests (applied kinesiology sensorimotor challenge); in 8 cases, this sensorimotor challenge was absent. Chiropractic manipulative therapy and soft tissue treatment addressed the soft tissue and articular dysfunctions. Chiropractic manipulative therapy involved high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation; Cox flexion distraction manipulation; and/or use of a percussion instrument for the treatment of myofascial trigger points. Urinary incontinence symptoms resolved in 10 patients, considerably improved in 7 cases, and slightly improved in 4 cases. Periodic follow-up examinations for the past 6 years, and no less than 2 years, indicate that for each participant in this case-series report, the improvements of UI remained stable. Conclusion The patients reported in this retrospective case series showed improvement in UI symptoms that persisted over time. PMID:22942842

  5. Urinary Incontinence as a Predictor of Death: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bardini, Claire; Combescure, Christophe; Dällenbach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between urinary incontinence (UI) and increased mortality remains controversial. The objective of our study was to evaluate if this association exists. Methods We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies comparing death rates among patients suffering from UI to those without incontinence. We searched in Medline, Embase and the Cochrane library using specific keywords. Studies exploring the post-stroke period were excluded. Hazard ratios (HR) were pooled using models with random effects. We stratified UI by gender and by UI severity and pooled all models with adjustment for confounding variables. Results Thirty-eight studies were retrieved. When compared to non-urinary incontinent participants, UI was associated with an increase in mortality with pooled non adjusted HR of 2.22 (95%CI 1.77–2.78). The risk increased with UI severity: 1.24 (95%CI: 0.79–1.97) for light, 1.71 (95%CI: 1.26–2.31) for moderate, and 2.72 (95%CI: 1.90–3.87) for severe UI respectively. When pooling adjusted measures of association, the resulting HR was 1.27 (95%CI: 1.13–1.42) and increased progressively for light, moderate and severe UI: 1.07 (95%CI: 0.79–1.44), 1.25 (95%CI: 0.99–1.58), and 1.47 (95%CI: 1.03–2.10) respectively. There was no difference between genders. Conclusion UI is a predictor of higher mortality in the general and particularly in the geriatric population. The association increases with the severity of UI and persists when pooling models adjusted for confounders. It is unclear if this association is causative or just reflects an impaired general health condition. As in most meta-analyses of observational studies, methodological issues should be considered when interpreting results. PMID:27410965

  6. Recurrence rate of stress urinary incontinence in females with initial cure after transobturator tape procedure at 3-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Taeyong; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Kim, Hyung Suk; Lee, Jeong Woo; Bae, Jungbum

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess recurrence rates of urinary incontinence in women with initial cure after transobturator tape (TOT) procedure at 3-year follow-up. Materials and Methods Between June 2006 and May 2013, a total of 402 consecutive patients underwent the TOT procedure for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) at Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital. Of the 402 patients, 223 had sufficient medical records for analysis. Therefore, they were followed-up for 3 years postoperatively. Patient characteristics, urinary symptoms, physical examination, and urodynamic parameters were evaluated. The primary end point of “cure” was defined as the absence of any complaint of urinary leakage without needing pads for usual activities. Results Of the 223 patients, 196 patients (87.9%) were initially cured within 6 months postoperatively. Of the 196 patients, 70 (35.7%) had recurrent urinary incontinence at 3 years postoperatively, 51 (26.0%) had SUI, 16 (8.2%) had urgency urinary incontinence, and 3 (1.5%) had mixed urinary incontinence. In univariate analysis, preoperative urinary obstructive symptom was found to significant contributor to the recurrence of urinary incontinence at 3-year postoperatively (p=0.004). Conclusions In our study, 35.7% of the women with initial cure after TOT experienced the recurrence of urinary leakage during the 3-year follow-up. The cure rate of TOT was decreased as time went by, although the initial cure rate was high. PMID:28097269

  7. Proceedings of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases International Symposium on Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence in Women.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeanette S; Nyberg, Leroy M; Kusek, John W; Burgio, Kathryn L; Diokno, Ananias C; Foldspang, Anders; Fultz, Nancy H; Herzog, A Regula; Hunskaar, Steinar; Milsom, Ian; Nygaard, Ingrid; Subak, Leslee L; Thom, David H

    2003-06-01

    The Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence: Current Databases and Future Collaborations Symposium included an international group of 29 investigators from 10 countries. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the current understanding and knowledge gaps of prevalence, incidence, associated risk factors, and treatment outcomes for incontinence in women. During the symposium, investigators identified existing large databases and ongoing studies that provide substantive information on specific incontinence research questions. The investigators were able to form an international collaborative research working group and identify potential collaborative projects to further research on the epidemiology of urinary incontinence and bladder dysfunction.

  8. Conservative Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence In Women: A 10-Year (2004-2013) Scoping Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Louise; Andersen, Elizabeth; Reekie, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a serious threat to the well-being of women world-wide. In this scoping review of the literature, we examined the most prominent research foci between the years 2004 and 2013. In this article, conservative treat-ment is operationalized as any non-surgical or non-pharmacological treatment modalities that could be carried out by specially trained nurses, physiotherapists, or physicians to treat stress urinary incontinence in women. The two most frequently described or systematically investigated treatment options identified in our review were 1) strengthening pelvic floor muscles with pelvic floor muscle training, including biofeedback and weighted vaginal cones; and 2) the use of intravaginal support devices, such as incontinence pessaries. Other treatment modalities were also explored in the literature review, such as intraurethral devices, behavioral and lifestyle interventions, products, and alternative therapies, such as acupuncture and acupressure. However, the focus of this article is on the two most frequently described options.

  9. What is new in the evaluation and treatment of urinary incontinence? Best articles from the past year.

    PubMed

    Kenton, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    This month, we focus on current research in urinary incontinence. Dr. Kenton discusses four recent publications, and each is concluded with a "bottom line" that is the take-home message. The complete reference for each can be found in on this page, along with direct links to the abstracts.

  10. Association of overactive bladder and stress urinary incontinence in rats with pudendal nerve ligation injury.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Akira; Kita, Masafumi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Egawa, Shin; Chancellor, Michael B; de Groat, William C; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) also suffer from urgency incontinence, which is one of the major symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome. Pudendal nerve injury has been recognized as a possible cause for both SUI and OAB. Therefore, we investigated the effects of pudendal nerve ligation (PNL) on bladder function and urinary continence in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Conscious cystometry with or without capsaicin pretreatment (125 mg/kg sc), leak point pressures (LPPs), contractile responses of bladder muscle strips to carbachol or phenylephrine, and levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) protein and mRNA in the bladder were compared in sham and PNL rats 4 wk after the injury. Urinary frequency detected by a reduction in intercontraction intervals and voided volume was observed in PNL rats compared with sham rats, but it was not seen in PNL rats with capsaicin pretreatment that desensitizes C-fiber-afferent pathways. LPPs in PNL rats were significantly decreased compared with sham rats. The contractile responses of detrusor muscle strips to phenylephrine, but not to carbachol, were significantly increased in PNL rats. The levels of NGF protein and mRNA in the bladder of PNL rats were significantly increased compared with sham rats. These results suggest that pudendal nerve neuropathy induced by PNL may be one of the potential risk factors for OAB, as well as SUI. Somato-visceral cross sensitization between somatic (pudendal) and visceral (bladder) sensory pathways that increases NGF expression and alpha(1)-adrenoceptor-mediated contractility in the bladder may be involved in this pathophysiological mechanism.

  11. A Pilot Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Electroacupuncture for Women with Pure Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanfang; Liu, Baoyan; Wu, Jiani; Du, Ruosang; Liu, Xiaoxu; Yu, Jinna; Liu, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is a potential conservative therapy for women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). There is limited evidence to support its effectiveness due to the poor quality of existing studies. Methods We performed a pilot randomized, controlled trial to preliminarily assess the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) in women with pure SUI. A total of 80 women with pure SUI were randomly assigned to receive EA with deep needling at BL33 and BL35 (n = 40) or sham EA with non-penetrating needling at sham acupoints (n = 40) three sessions per week for 6 weeks. The women were followed for 24 weeks. The primary outcome was the change from baseline in the amount of urine leakage measured by a 1-hour pad test after 6 weeks. The secondary outcomes included the 72-hour incontinence episode frequency (IEF), International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF) score, and patient self-evaluation of therapeutic effect. Adverse events (AEs) were monitored throughout the trial. Results The median decrease from baseline of urine leakage measured by the 1-hour pad test was 2.5 g [interquartile range (IQR): 1.80–14.6 in the EA group, which was greater than the median decrease of 0.05 g (IQR: -2.80–+0.50) in the sham EA group after 6 weeks (p<0.01). The differences between groups in the decrease from baseline of 72-hour IEF became statistically significant at week 30 with a median decrease of 3.25 g (IQR: 1.25–5.69) in the EA group, and a median decrease of 1.00 g (IQR: -0.69–+2.88) in the sham EA group (p = 0.01). The participants in the EA group showed greater decreases in ICIQ-SF score and higher ratings in the help they received from the treatment than those in the sham EA group at weeks 6,18 and 30 (all p<0.05). No obvious AEs were observed in either group. Conclusion EA may effectively and safely relieve urinary incontinence symptoms and improve quality of life in women with pure SUI. EA demonstrated more than a placebo effect. Since

  12. Two-Year Outcomes After Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence in Older Compared to Younger Women

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Patricia S.; Brubaker, Linda; Zyczynski, Halina; Stoddard, Anne M.; Dandreo, Kimberly J.; Norton, Peggy A.

    2008-01-01

    Precis Women 65 years and older have similar perioperative adverse events and length of stay, but lower subjective and objective cure rates after stress incontinence surgery than younger women. Objective To estimate if perioperative and postoperative outcomes after Burch colposuspension or pubovaginal sling for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) differed with age. Methods This study was a prospective secondary analysis of the Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial. Baseline characteristics, adverse events, and 2-year outcomes of women at least 65 years old were compared to those younger than 65 utilizing chi-square and t-tests. Multivariable analyses were performed, including age and outcomes that differed between age groups on univariable analysis, adjusting for variables that differed by age group at baseline and by surgical treatment group. Results Six-hundred fifty-five women were included in analyses of perioperative events and 520 for 2-year outcomes. Mean age (±SD) was 69.7(±3.7) years in the older group and 49.4(±8.2) in the younger group. Older women had slightly longer time to normal activities (50 versus 42 days, p=0.05), but there was no difference in time to normal voiding (14 versus 11 days, p=0.42). Older women were more likely to have a positive stress test at follow-up (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.70-7.97, p=.001), less subjective improvement in stress (8 point lesser decrease, 95%CI: 1.5-14.1, p=0.02), and urge incontinence (7 point lesser decrease, 95% CI 1.5-12.2, p=0.01) by the Medical and Epidemiologic Social Aspects of Aging questionnaire, and were more likely to undergo surgical retreatment for SUI (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.30-11.48). Perioperative adverse events and length of stay did not differ between groups. Conclusion Older women undergoing surgery for stress incontinence can expect to do as well as younger women with respect to perioperative outcomes, but experience 2-year outcomes that are worse. Clinical Trial Registration Clinical

  13. Urinary incontinence and vaginal squeeze pressure two years post-cesarean delivery in primiparous women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Angélica Mércia Pascon; Dias, Adriano; Marini, Gabriela; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Witkin, Steven; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of urinary incontinence and associated vaginal squeeze pressure in primiparous women with and without previous gestational diabetes mellitus two years post-cesarean delivery. METHODS: Primiparous women who delivered by cesarean two years previously were interviewed about the delivery and the occurrence of incontinence. Incontinence was reported by the women and vaginal pressure evaluated by a Perina perineometer. Sixty-three women with gestational diabetes and 98 women without the disease were screened for incontinence and vaginal pressure. Multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate the independent effects of gestational diabetes. RESULTS: The prevalence of gestational incontinence was higher among women with gestational diabetes during their pregnancies (50.8% vs. 31.6%) and two years after a cesarean (44.8% vs. 18.4%). Decreased vaginal pressure was also significantly higher among women with gestational diabetes (53.9% vs. 37.8%). Maternal weight gain and newborn weight were risk factors for decreased vaginal pressure. Maternal age, gestational incontinence and decreased vaginal pressure were risk factors for incontinence two years after a cesarean. In a multivariate logistic model, gestational diabetes was an independent risk factor for gestational incontinence. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of incontinence and decreased vaginal pressure two years post-cesarean were elevated among women with gestational diabetes compared to women who were normoglycemic during pregnancy. We confirmed an association between gestational diabetes mellitus and a subsequent decrease of vaginal pressure two years post-cesarean. These results may warrant more comprehensive prospective and translational studies. PMID:21915481

  14. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... replacement has been shown to cause worsening UI. Caffeine and alcohol — Drinks with caffeine, such as coffee or soda, cause the bladder ... helpful: Alcoholic beverages Carbonated beverages (with or without caffeine) Coffee or tea (with or without caffeine) Other ...

  15. Urinary incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate in men Nervous system conditions, such as multiple sclerosis or stroke Nerve or muscle damage after radiation ... Instructions Indwelling catheter care Kegel exercises - self-care Multiple sclerosis - discharge Prostate resection - minimally invasive - discharge Radical prostatectomy - ...

  16. Trajectories of urinary incontinence in childhood and bladder and bowel symptoms in adolescence: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Jon; Grzeda, Mariusz T; von Gontard, Alexander; Wright, Anne; Joinson, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To identify different patterns (trajectories) of childhood urinary incontinence and examine which patterns are associated with bladder and bowel symptoms in adolescence. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting General community. Participants The starting sample included 8751 children (4507 men and 4244 women) with parent-reported data on frequency of bedwetting and daytime wetting for at least three of five time points (4½, 5½, 6½, 7½ and 9½ years—hereafter referred to as 4–9 years). Study children provided data on a range of bladder and bowel symptoms at age 14 (data available for 5899 participants). Outcome measures Self-reported bladder and bowel symptoms at 14 years including daytime wetting, bedwetting, nocturia, urgency, frequent urination, low voided volume, voiding postponement, passing hard stools and low stool frequency. Results We extracted 5 trajectories of urinary incontinence from 4 to 9 years using longitudinal latent class analysis: (1) normative development of daytime and night-time bladder control (63.0% of the sample), (2) delayed attainment of bladder control (8.6%), (3) bedwetting alone (no daytime wetting) (15.6%), (4) daytime wetting alone (no bedwetting) (5.8%) and (5) persistent wetting (bedwetting with daytime wetting to age 9) (7.0%). The persistent wetting class generally showed the strongest associations with the adolescent bladder and bowel symptoms: OR for bedwetting at 14 years=23.5, 95% CI (15.1 to 36.5), daytime wetting (6.98 (4.50 to 10.8)), nocturia (2.39 (1.79 to 3.20)), urgency (2.10 (1.44 to 3.07)) and passing hard stools (2.64 (1.63 to 4.27)) (reference category=normative development). The association with adolescent bedwetting was weaker for children with bedwetting alone (3.69 (2.21 to 6.17)). Conclusions Trajectories of childhood urinary incontinence are differentially associated with adolescent bladder and bowel symptoms. Children exhibiting persistent bedwetting with daytime wetting had the

  17. The efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture for women with pure stress urinary incontinence: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although available evidence relating to its effectiveness is weak, acupuncture is used as an alternative therapy for stress urinary incontinence. We report a protocol of a randomized controlled trial using electroacupuncture (the passing of a weak current between inserted acupuncture needles) to treat women with pure stress urinary incontinence. Methods/Design This is a large-scale multicenter subject-blinded randomized controlled trial. A total of 500 women with pure stress urinary incontinence will be randomly assigned to two groups: a treatment group and a control group. The treatment group will receive electroacupuncture with deep needling at acupuncture points BL33 and BL35. The control group will receive sham electroacupuncture with non-penetrating needling at sham locations for the acupuncture points of BL33 and BL35. Participants will be given three sessions a week for 6 weeks. A 24-week-long follow-up will be conducted. The primary outcome will be the change in amount of urine leakage at the sixth week from a baseline measured by a 1-h pad test. The secondary outcomes include: the 72-h incontinence episode frequency based on a 72-h bladder diary; the score of International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form; the degree of urinary incontinence based on a 72-h bladder diary; self-assessment of the therapeutic effect; weekly consumption of pads; application of other treatments for stress urinary incontinence; and subgroup analysis stratified by incontinence severity. The safety of electroacupuncture will also be assessed. Discussion This trial will help to identify whether electroacupuncture is effective for stress urinary incontinence, and, if so, whether it is a therapeutic effect rather than a placebo effect. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT01784172 PMID:24079823

  18. The association between urinary and fecal incontinence and social isolation in older women

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Sallis O.; Dick, Madeline A.; McPencow, Alexandra M.; Martin, Deanna K.; Ciarleglio, Maria M.; Erekson, Elisabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the association between social isolation and urinary incontinence (UI) and fecal incontinence (FI) in older women. Methods We conducted a secondary database analysis of the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP) for women aged 57 to 85 years old. Our primary outcome was self-report of often feeling isolated. We explored self-report of daily UI and weekly FI. Two logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between often feeling isolated and 1) daily UI and 2) weekly fecal incontinence. Results A total of 1,412 women were included in our analysis. Daily UI was reported by 12.5% (177/1,412) of community-dwelling older women. More women with daily UI reported often feeling isolated (6.6%, 95% CI [1.3–11.9] vs. 2.6%, 95% [1.7–3.5], p=.04) compared with women without daily UI. Women with daily UI had 3.0 (95% CI 1.1, 7.6) increased odds of often feeling isolated after adjusting for depressive symptoms, age, race, education, and overall health. Weekly FI was reported by 2.9% (41/1,412) of women. Weekly FI and often feeling isolated were associated on univariable analysis (Crude Odds Ratio(OR) = 4.6 (95% CI 1.4, 15.1). However after adjusting for depressive symptoms, age, race, education, and overall health the association between weekly FI and often feeling isolated was not significant (Adjusted OR=0.65 (95% CI 0.1, 5.3, p=0.65)). Conclusion After adjusting for confounders, daily UI was significantly associated with often feeling isolated. Weekly FI was not found to be associated with often feeling isolated on multivariable logistic regression. PMID:23159696

  19. Prevalence of Urinary Incontinence and Its Association with Body Mass Index among Women in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    López, Magdalena; Vargas, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective Urinary incontinence (UI) affects the quality of life of millions of women world-wide. Prevalence estimates for UI range from 10% to 40%, but information on young and mid-life women, especially among Hispanics, is limited. This study estimated UI prevalence and its association with body mass index (BMI) in a population-based sample of 276 female residents of Bayamón, Puerto Rico (PR) aged 21–64 years. Methods A cluster sampling design was employed. Women were interviewed to gather data on sociodemographic, clinical, gynecologic, and UI characteristics. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the study sample. Bivariate analyses of factors potentially associated with UI and BMI were conducted using generalized linear models (GLM). Multivariate GLM was used to determine the covariate adjusted association between BMI and UI. Results The prevalence of UI was 34.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 29.4–40.6%). Among women with UI, stress incontinence was most frequent (46.8%), followed by mixed (41.5%) and urge incontinence (11.7%). More than 45% of participants were either overweight (25 kg/m2 ≤ BMI ≤ 29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). The adjusted analysis revealed that women with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 had 1.96 (p = 0.06) times the probability of having UI compared to women with a BMI < 25 kg/m2. Conclusions UI is a public health problem among this population, and obesity marginally increases the possibility of having this condition. Public health efforts should focus on reducing obesity in PR, in order to have an impact on UI morbidity. PMID:19788409

  20. Cystolithiasis in women as a distant complication after minimal invasive treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Michał; Kliś, Rafał; Różański, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a condition of social dimension which generally pertains to women of various age. The only effective treatments of SUI are surgical procedures. The use of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) ensures low invasiveness but also carries the risk of complications. One of the complications may be migration of the tape into the urinary bladder creating conditions for urinary stones. There is a number of treatment methods for cystolithiasis, among them the optical lithotripter, ultrasound and pneumatic probes, and recently, the holmium laser. Material and methods From January 2009 to February 2010, six women suffering from bladder stones were treated at our department. All patients had previously undergone SUI procedures and over time, thread or tape had penetrated into the urinary bladder. The stone diameters were in the range of 1.6 cm–3.5 cm. Lithotripsy was performed with the use of an 80 W holmium YAG laser as an endoscopic procedure: beam frequency length of 2100 nm and applied energy was in the range of 0.2–3.5 J. Results The urinary bladder stones were disintegrated and suctioned out. During the same procedure, the threads or tape from the SUI procedure were excised from the bladder. All patients were discharged from the hospital in good general condition after two days. Conclusions The holmium laser is an effective treatment for patients with bladder stone complications after SUI procedures when threads or tape have migrated and penetrated the bladder wall. The procedure is straightforward and safe for patients. PMID:25247087

  1. An exploratory study for bladder dysfunction in atypical antipsychotic-emergent urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Preeti; Gupta, Anupam; Reddi, V. Senthil Kumar; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This is an exploratory study, which aimed to analyze urodynamic findings in patients who are on atypical antipsychotics and present with urinary incontinence (UI) in order to understand the mechanisms of antipsychotic-emergent UI. Patients and Methods: Eight patients (34 ± 7.6 years; five males and three females) diagnosed with schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders, who were on risperidone, olanzapine, or clozapine monotherapy and having UI were recruited. Urodynamic study was performed in all patients. Results: Six out of eight (75%) patients had abnormal urodynamic findings. Three of them had detrusor overactivity (DO) without detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD); two had DO with DSD; and one had hypoactive detrusor with nonrelaxing sphincter during void phase. The common urinary symptoms were urgency, enuresis, and straining to void urine. Significant postvoid residual urine was found in two patients. Conclusion: The evidence of bladder dysfunction in atypical antipsychotic-emergent UI is similar to that present in patients with neurological disorders. Urinary complaints in patients on antipsychotics thus need to be evaluated and managed systematically using the protocol followed for neurological conditions. PMID:28197002

  2. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in the treatment of patients with poststroke urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhui-feng; Liu, Yi; Hu, Guang-hui; Liu, Huan; Xu, Yun-fei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the therapeutic effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on poststroke urinary incontinence (UI). Patients and methods Sixty-one patients with poststroke UI were enrolled at the Neurology Department in the Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital of Tongji University between January 2010–January 2011 and were divided into treatment and control groups (n=32 and n=29, respectively). TENS was applied to the treatment group, while the control group received basic therapy. The therapeutic group completed the whole set of TENS therapy with a treatment frequency of 30 minutes once a day for 60 days. The positive electrode was placed on the second lumbar spinous process, and the negative electrodes were inside the middle and lower third of the junction between the posterior superior iliac spine and ischia node. The overactive bladder symptom score, Barthel Index, and urodynamics examination were estimated before and after therapy in both groups. Results The daily micturition, nocturia, urgent urination, and urge UI in the treatment group significantly improved compared to the control group (P<0.05). The patients in the treatment group were superior in the self-care ability of daily living and also had an advantage over the indexes on maximum cystometry volume, flow rate, and the pressure of detrusor in the end of the filling phase. Conclusion TENS improved incontinence symptoms, enhanced the quality of life, and decreased adverse effects; hence, it is recommended in treating poststroke UI. PMID:24904204

  3. Concomitant repair of stress urinary incontinence with proximal urethrovaginal fistula: Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Chodisetti, Subbarao; Boddepalli, Yogesh; Kota, Malakonda Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Proximal urethrovaginal fistula (UVF) located close to the bladder neck may cause extensive sphincter damage and is usually associated with continuous incontinence, which may mask the associated stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Simultaneous correction of SUI avoids a second surgery for SUI, which needs dissection in ischemic fields and carries a high risk of failure. The aim of this study is to describe our technique of concomitant repair of SUI with proximal UVF and our results. Methods: Between July 2010 and August 2014, 14 patients underwent UVF repair in Jackknife position by the interposition of a Martius flap and simultaneous correction of SUI by modified McGuire pubovaginal autologous fascial sling. The procedure was carried out a minimum of 3 months of presentation and after detailed preoperative evaluation. Results: After a mean follow-up of 28 months, all 14 patients were continent. None of the patients developed recurrence of the UVF. Two patients presented with retention immediately after catheter removal and clean intermittent catheterization training was given to both of them. Two patients became pregnant during the follow-up period and were advised cesarean section near term. Conclusions: Repair of proximal UVF and correction of SUI can be performed in the same session to avoid the operation in an ischemic field. PMID:27555683

  4. Football practice and urinary incontinence: Relation between morphology, function and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Roza, Thuane Da; Brandão, Sofia; Oliveira, Dulce; Mascarenhas, Teresa; Parente, Marco; Duarte, José Alberto; Jorge, Renato Natal

    2015-06-25

    Current evidence points to a high prevalence of urinary incontinence among female athletes. In this context, this study aims to assess if structural and biomechanical characteristics of the pubovisceral muscles may lead to urine leakage. Clinical and demographic data were collected, as well as pelvic Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Furthermore, computational models were built to verify if they were able to reproduce similar biomechanical muscle response as the one measured by dynamic imaging during active contraction by means of the percent error. Compared to the continent ones (n=7), incontinent athletes (n=5) evidenced thicker pubovisceral muscles at the level of the midvagina (p=0.019 and p=0.028 for the right and left sides, respectively). However, there were no differences neither in the strength of contraction in the Oxford Scale or in the displacement of the pelvic floor muscles during simulation of voluntary contraction, which suggests that urine leakage may be related with alterations in the intrafusal fibers than just the result of thicker muscles. Additionally, we found similar values of displacement retrieved from dynamic images and numerical models (6.42 ± 0.36 mm vs. 6.10 ± 0.47 mm; p=0.130), with a percent error ranging from 1.47% to 17.20%. However, further refinements in the mechanical properties of the striated skeletal fibers of the pelvic floor muscles and the inclusion of pelvic organs, fascia and ligaments would reproduce more realistically the pelvic cavity.

  5. [Clinical study of the timed voiding schedule for urinary incontinence in demented elders].

    PubMed

    Kunikata, S; Park, Y C; Kurita, T; Hashimoto, K; Uchida, A; Esa, A

    1993-07-01

    Fourty-one demented elderly patients who had been diapered because of urinary incontinence in Hanwa-Senboku Hospital were treated with the one-week timed voiding schedule. Finally 14 patients (34%) became dry, and free from diapers for more than 1 week after the treatment. With regard to their cystometrogram findings, 10 (67%) of 15 patients having normoactive detrusor function, 3 (14%) of 21 patients having overactive detrusor function and 1 (20%) of 5 patients having underactive detrusor function became free from diapers after the treatment. Therefore a patient with normoactive detrusor function is thought to be a good candidate for the timed voiding schedule. Regardless of their detrusor function, those who showed good responsiveness to the treatment had better activities in daily life (better than D in the Katz index) and small amount of residual urine (less than 80 ml), indicating that not only the detrusor function but also both activities in daily life and the amount of residual urine are the important factors to reestablish voiding behavior in demented elderly patients. The timed voiding schedule is thought to be a useful method to treat incontinence in demented elderly patients, and should be tried first of all, although intermittent catheterization and/or other alternatives would be necessary for those with a large amount of residual urine with poor activities in daily life.

  6. What is the best surgical intervention for stress urinary incontinence in the very young and very old? An International Consultation on Incontinence Research Society update.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dudley; Castro-Diaz, David; Giarenis, Ilias; Toozs-Hobson, Philip; Anding, Ralf; Burton, Claire; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number of continence procedures are being performed in women of all ages. An overview of the existing literature and consensus regarding surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the young and the old was presented and discussed at the International Consultation on Incontinence Research Society Think Tank. This manuscript reflects the Think Tank's summary and opinion. Despite the increasing number of continence procedures, there are relatively few data to guide management in the very young and the very old. When considering continence surgery in the young, long-term efficacy and safety are paramount, and the future effects of pregnancy and childbirth need to be carefully considered. Conversely, in the elderly, minimally invasive procedures with low morbidity are important, especially in the frail elderly who may have significant co-morbidities. Further research including prospective randomised trials, cohort studies and national registries, should help guide our management in these two challenging groups of patients.

  7. Reproducibility of ultrasonic measurements of pelvic floor structures in women suffering from urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Ditza; Dvir, Zeevi; Golomb, Jacob; Beer-Gabel, Marc

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the reproducibility of ultrasound (US) findings relating to pelvic floor muscle in women with urinary incontinence (UI). Eighteen women with UI were examined twice by the same examiners over an interval of 1 month. The US findings comprised of (1) distance between bladder neck and symphysis pubis (BN/SP) at rest, during contraction, and while performing the Valsalva maneuver and (2) distance between anorectal angle and symphysis pubis (AR-SP) during the same conditions. Statistical analysis included test-retest correlations (ICC(3,K)), and the assessment of measurement error and smallest real difference (SRD) for change. BN-SP and AR-SP exhibited high ICCs. The lowest SRD values related to the AR-SP variables (10-19%). US-based measures of the bladder neck and the anorectal angle, distance, and displacement seem to offer reasonable clinical reproducibility.

  8. Social and cultural construction of urinary incontinence among Korean American elderly women.

    PubMed

    Kang, Youngmi; Crogan, Neva L

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the social and cultural constructions that influence help-seeking for urinary incontinence (UI) among Korean American elderly women. Many Korean American elder women do not perceive UI as a problem worthy of attention. The reason may lie in its social and cultural construction. The social construction is rooted in the collectivist nature of Korean culture, which makes UI a family, rather than an individual, problem. The cultural construction is related to Confucianism, which directs conceptions about ageism, shame, and fatalism. This article will help the gerontological nurse to better understand Korean American elderly women's sociocultural background related to UI care and could lead to appropriate family centered interventions to manage or treat UI in this population.

  9. Urinary incontinence due to the presence of necrotic adult Schistosoma haematobium parasite in the bladder following travel to Egypt.

    PubMed

    Papoutsoglou, N; Tappe, D; Demmer, P; Kocot, A; Riedmiller, H

    2012-07-01

    A case of seronegative urinary Schistosomiasis is reported in a 68-year-old Caucasian male presenting with urgency of micturition and incontinence several months after bathing in a chlorinated pool of a first class hotel in Egypt. The symptoms were initiated by a necrotic adult Schistosoma haematobium parasite found in the urinary bladder following a cystoscopic examination. The purpose of this report is to describe this probable and uncommon source of Schistosomiasis, to demonstrate that Schistosoma parasites can also be found in the urinary bladder and to emphasize the importance of travel history.

  10. Single-Incision Slings (SIS) – a New Option for the Surgical Treatment of Female Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, G.; Albrich, S.; Skala, C.; Laterza, R.; Kölbl, H.

    2012-01-01

    The new development of single-incision slings (SIS) for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence offers comparable results with only minimal side effects and will find wide acceptance in modern incontinence surgery. This mini-sling is inserted over a single vaginal incision and fixed on both sides to the pelvic wall tissue with special anchors, without passing through the groin and avoiding a blind tape passage. Compared with the established sub-urethral tapes, there are comparable success rates with fewer complications. Randomised prospective studies are needed to evaluate whether, in the long run, the benefits of the single incision technique can be correlated with satisfying continence results. PMID:25284829

  11. [Treatment of urinary incontinence of neurologic origin in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Mollard, P; Meunier, P; Berard, C; Henriet, M

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of urinary incontinence of neurological origin in children are discussed. The etiology of the neurological changes is mainly congenital (myelomeningocele, sacral agenesis and hidden dysraphism) other causes such as myelitis, radiculitis or cord injuries being very rarely observed. Two fundamental elements can be evaluated by radiologic and urodynamic investigations of the lower urinary tract: the capacity for compliance of the detrusor muscle and the degree of cervico-urethral resistance. The presence of a cervico-urethral obstruction is no longer an indication for its removal but, on the contrary, a factor that can be retained to assist continence. Intermittent use of self-catheterization enables the obstruction to be used to obtain continence (dryness) and makes the obstruction innocuous, since it enables emptying of the bladder. Of 50 patients (26 girls and 24 boys) treated in this way, 11 were not seen again, but the other 39 are still being followed up after an average of 50 months. This method of bladder emptying maintains the integrity of the upper urinary tract when this was normal previously and improves uretero-pyelo-caliceal distension. Uretero-vesical reimplantation can prevent reflux. Of these 39 children, 23 are continent during the day and 13 among them during the night also. A colocystoplasty was performed in 3 cases to enlarge the bladder capacity. The use of a catheter is well accepted by the girls and young boys but less so by the male adolescents. In the absence of a cervico-urethral obstruction it is impossible to relieve incontinence by re-education, and only three solutions exist: high cutaneous diversion continent cystostomy and artificial sphincter. The high diversion operation should be used as a last resort only. The continent cystostomy uses an appendix isolated on its mesothelium an opening on the abdominal wall and into the bladder in a long anti-reflux tunnel. Catheterization is by a catheter which

  12. Urinary Incontinence Symptoms and Impact on Quality of Life in Patients Seeking Outpatient Physical Therapy Services

    PubMed Central

    Alappattu, Meryl; Neville, Cynthia; Beneciuk, Jason; Bishop, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine the frequency and types of urinary incontinence (UI) in patients seeking outpatient physical therapy for neuro-musculoskeletal conditions. Design Retrospective cross-sectional analysis. Patients A convenience sample of patients that positively responded to a UI screening question were included in this study. Methods Data were collected for age, sex, and primary treatment condition classified into one of the following (i.e. urinary dysfunction; fecal dysfunction; pelvic pain; spine; neurological disorders; or extremity disorders); UI type (i.e. mixed, urge, stress, or insensible); UI symptom severity; and quality of life impact. Main Outcome Measures Frequency of UI type, symptom severity, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) impact, and pad use were compared between treatment groups. Results The mean age of the sample (n=599) was 49.8 years (SD=18.5) and 94.7% were female. The urinary dysfunction group comprised 44.2% of the total sample, followed by the spine group with 25.7%, and pelvic pain with 17.2%. The urinary dysfunction group scored significantly higher on UI symptom severity and impact on quality of life compared to the pelvic pain and spine groups, but not compared to the extremity disorders, fecal dysfunction, or neurological disorders group. Conclusion These preliminary data indicate that UI is a condition afflicting many individuals who present to outpatient physical therapy beyond those seeking care for UI. We recommend using a simple screening measure for UI and its impact on HRQoL as part of a routine initial evaluation in outpatient physical therapy settings. PMID:26863987

  13. Considering benefits and harms of duloxetine for treatment of stress urinary incontinence: a meta-analysis of clinical study reports

    PubMed Central

    Maund, Emma; Guski, Louise Schow; Gøtzsche, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Medicines Agency makes clinical study reports publicly available and publishes reasons for not approving applications for marketing authorization. Duloxetine has been approved in Europe for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women. The reported adverse effects of duloxetine include mental health problems and suicidality. We obtained clinical study reports from the European Medicines Agency concerning use of this drug for stress urinary incontinence. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis of 4 randomized placebo-controlled trials of duloxetine (involving a total of 1913 patients) submitted to the European Medicines Agency for marketing approval for the indication of stress urinary incontinence in women. We used data from the clinical study reports (totalling 6870 pages and including individual patient data) to assess benefits (including frequency of incontinence and changes in quality-of-life scores, such as Patient Global Impression of Improvement rating) and harms (both general harms, including discontinuation because of adverse events, and harms related to suicidality, violent behaviour and their potential precursors, such as akathisia and activation [stimulating effects such as insomnia, anxiety and agitation]). RESULTS: Duloxetine was significantly better than placebo in terms of percentage change in weekly incontinence episodes (mean difference −13.56%, 95% confidence interval [CI] −21.59% to −5.53%) and change in Incontinence Quality of Life total score (mean difference 3.24, 95% CI 2.00 to 4.48). However, the effect sizes were small, and a sensitivity analysis (with removal of one trial) showed that the number needed to treat for a Patient Global Impression of Improvement rating of “much better or very much better” was 8 (95% CI 6 to 13). The numbers needed to harm were 7 (95% CI 6 to 8) for discontinuing because of an adverse event and 7 (95% CI 6 to 9) for experiencing an activation event. No suicidality

  14. First experience with the ATOMS® implant, a new treatment option for male urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Cansino, Jose Ramón; Portilla, María Alejandra; Rodriguez, Simón Claudio; Hidalgo, Luis; De la Peña, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Urinary incontinence (UI) is defined as any complaint of involuntary urine leakage. A description is provided of our experience with the ATOMS® (Adjustable Transobturator Male System. Agency for Medical Innovations. A.M.I.) adjustable implant in patients with mild to moderate UI. Material and methods A retrospective study was made of the data referring to 13 patients treated with this adjustable system. Demographic and personal data were collected along with information on the etiology, severity, characteristics, duration of UI, complementary tests, surgery times, complications and results obtained. Results The full continence (no use of pad) recovery rate at the close of the study was 12/13 (92.3%). Three cases required a single filling during the mean 16 months of follow–up (range 4–32; median 14 months). A complication in the form of perineal hematoma was resolved with conservative treatment and a case of urinary retention was resolved by placing a bladder catheter for the duration of one week. Three patients experienced perineal–scrotal dysesthesias that disappeared spontaneously in the first three months. Conclusions The described adjustable continence system has been found to be very effective in males with mild to moderate UI. In our experience, the ATOMS® implant offers excellent results over the middle term with a very low rate of complications that were easily resolved in all cases. PMID:25667760

  15. Comparison of Perineal Sonographically Measured and Functional Urodynamic Urethral Length in Female Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Janetzki, Nadine; Kennes, Lieven; Stickeler, Elmar; Serno, Julia; Behrendt, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To detect the anatomical insufficiency of the urethra and to propose perineal ultrasound as a useful, noninvasive tool for the evaluation of incontinence, we compared the anatomical length of the urethra with the urodynamic functional urethral length. We also compared the urethral length between continent and incontinent females. Methods. 149 female patients were enrolled and divided into four groups (stress, urge, or mixed incontinence; control). Sonographically measured urethral length (SUL) and urodynamic functional urethral length (FUL) were analyzed statistically. Standardized and internationally validated incontinence questionnaire ICIQ-SF results were compared between each patient group. Results. Perineal SUL was significantly longer in incontinent compared to continent patients (p < 0.0001). Pairwise comparison of each incontinent type (stress, urge, or mixed incontinence) with the control group showed also a significant difference (p < 0.05). FUL was significantly shorter in incontinent patients than in the control group (p = 0.0112). But pairwise comparison showed only a significant difference for the stress incontinence group compared with the control group (p = 0.0084) and not for the urge or mixed incontinent group. No clear correlation between SUL, FUL, and ICIQ-SF score was found. Conclusions. SUL measured by noninvasive perineal ultrasound is a suitable parameter in the assessment of female incontinence, since incontinent women show a significantly elongated urethra as a sign of tissue insufficiency, independent of the type of incontinence. PMID:27819004

  16. Stress urinary incontinence animal models as a tool to study cell-based regenerative therapies targeting the urethral sphincter.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Imbroda, Bernardo; Lara, María F; Izeta, Ander; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Hart, Melanie L

    2015-03-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a major health problem causing a significant social and economic impact affecting more than 200million people (women and men) worldwide. Over the past few years researchers have been investigating cell therapy as a promising approach for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) since such an approach may improve the function of a weakened sphincter. Currently, a diverse collection of SUI animal models is available. We describe the features of the different models of SUI/urethral dysfunction and the pros and cons of these animal models in regard to cell therapy applications. We also discuss different cell therapy approaches and cell types tested in preclinical animal models. Finally, we propose new research approaches and perspectives to ensure the use of cellular therapy becomes a real treatment option for SUI.

  17. Low serum Insulin Like Growth Factor - 1 in patients with Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Emin; Otunctemur, Alper; Sahin, Suleyman; Ozcan, Levent; Dursun, Murat; Polat, Emrecan; Tulubas, Feti; Cekmen, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: SUI, involuntary loss of urine, occurs when intra abdominal pressure exceeds urethral pressure in women. Recent animal study has shown that there are therapeutic effects of Insulin-like growth factors (IGF-1) on stress urinary incontinence in rats with simulated childbirth trauma. IGF-1 is an important mediator of cell growth, differentiation and transformation in various tissues and stimulates fibroblast proliferation and enhances collagen synthesis. The purpose of the current study was to determine the association between IGF-1 levels and SUI. Materials and Methods: All patients were evaluated for SUI and divided into two groups: 116 women with SUI and 76 women without SUI. Diagnosis of SUI was based on the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQSF). Levels of IGF-1 were measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The relationship between IGF-1 levels and SUI in patients was evaluated statisticaly. Results: The mean age of patients wiyh SUI was 49.9±8.6 and 48.7±7.8 in control group. Plasma IGF-1 levels were significantly lower in SUI than in control group (106.5±26.4 and 133.3±37.1ng/mL, respectively, P <0.001). Body mass indexes were higher in women with SUI than women without SUI. Conclusion: In this study lower serum IGF-1 levels were found to be associated with SUI. Serum IGF-1 level appears to be a specific predictor of SUI, and it may be used in early prediction of SUI in female population. PMID:27564291

  18. Can an individualized and comprehensive care strategy improve urinary incontinence (UI) among nursing home residents?

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukiko; Nagata, Kumiko; Tanaka, Tomoe; Kuwano, Koichi; Endo, Hidetoshi; Otani, Tetsuya; Nakazawa, Minato; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is one of the most common and distressing conditions among nursing home residents. Although scheduled care is usually provided for them, incontinence care should be individualized regarding going to the toilet, changing diapers, and taking food and water. We have developed an individualized and comprehensive care strategy to address the problem. We conducted an intervention study that involved training chiefs of staffs, who in turn trained other staffs, and encouraging residents. A total of 153 elderly subjects selected from 1290 residents in 17 nursing homes were eligible to receive our individualized and comprehensive care. The goals of the care strategy were (i) to complete meal intake; (ii) to take fluids up to 1500 ml/day; (iii) to urinate in a toilet; (iv) to spend over 6h out of bed; and (v) to reduce time spent in wet diapers. We explained the aims of our strategy to the chiefs of staff of each nursing home and instructed them to encourage residents to take an active part in our individualized and comprehensive care strategy for 12 weeks. For 3 days before and after that period, we assessed the changes in fluid volume intake, time spent in wet diapers, size of diaper pads, and urination habits. The result was that fluid volume intake significantly increased (p<0.001) while time spent in wet diapers decreased (p<0.001). The number of residents wearing diapers decreased as did the size of pads during the day (p=0.0017). The proportion of residents using diapers at night was reduced and those using toilets at night increased (p=0.007). This study suggests that such an individualized and comprehensive care strategy can offer a measurable improvement in UI care.

  19. Pelvic artery embolization in the management of pelvic arterial bleeding following midurethral sling surgery for stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-Ji; Kim, Jun-Bum; Park, So-Yun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Chung-Hoon; Kang, Byung-Moon

    2016-01-01

    The transobturator tape (TOT) method is the recent minimally invasive midurethral sling surgery. The TOT method was invented to reduce complication rate of surgical technique for female stress urinary incontinence. Pelvic bleeding following TOT procedure, although extremely rare, could be occurred. We presented three cases which treat pelvic arterial bleeding after midurethral sling (TOT and tension-free vaginal tape Secur) surgery via pelvic artery embolization. Therefore we report our cases with brief review of the literature. PMID:27004210

  20. Evaluation of a birth preparation program on lumbopelvic pain, urinary incontinence, anxiety and exercise: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antenatal preparation programmes are recommended worldwide to promote a healthy pregnancy and greater autonomy during labor and delivery, prevent physical discomfort and high levels of anxiety. The objective of this study was to evaluate effectiveness and safety of a birth preparation programme to minimize lumbopelvic pain, urinary incontinence, anxiety, and increase physical activity during pregnancy as well as to compare its effects on perinatal outcomes comparing two groups of nulliparous women. Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 197 low risk nulliparous women aged 16 to 40 years, with gestational age ≥ 18 weeks. Participants were randomly allocated to participate in a birth preparation programme (BPP; n=97) or a control group (CG; n=100). The intervention was performed on the days of prenatal visits, and consisted of physical exercises, educational activities and instructions on exercises to be performed at home. The control group followed a routine of prenatal care. Primary outcomes were urinary incontinence, lumbopelvic pain, physical activity, and anxiety. Secondary outcomes were perinatal variables. Results The risk of urinary incontinence in BPP participants was significantly lower at 30 weeks of pregnancy (BPP 42.7%, CG 62.2%; relative risk [RR] 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-0.93) and at 36 weeks of pregnancy (BPP 41.2%, CG 68.4%; RR 0.60; 95%CI 0.45-0.81). Participation in the BPP encouraged women to exercise during pregnancy (p=0.009). No difference was found between the groups regarding to anxiety level, lumbopelvic pain, type or duration of delivery and weight or vitality of the newborn infant. Conclusions The BPP was effective in controlling urinary incontinence and to encourage the women to exercise during pregnancy with no adverse effects to pregnant women or the fetuses. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov, (NCT01155804) PMID:23895188

  1. Towards a Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: Application of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Regeneration of the Sphincter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Hart, Melanie L.; Stallkamp, Jan; Klünder, Mario; Ederer, Michael; Sawodny, Oliver; Vaegler, Martin; Amend, Bastian; Sievert, Karl D.; Stenzl, Arnulf

    2014-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a significant social, medical, and economic problem. It is caused, at least in part, by degeneration of the sphincter muscle controlling the tightness of the urinary bladder. This muscular degeneration is characterized by a loss of muscle cells and a surplus of a fibrous connective tissue. In Western countries approximately 15% of all females and 10% of males are affected. The incidence is significantly higher among senior citizens, and more than 25% of the elderly suffer from incontinence. When other therapies, such as physical exercise, pharmacological intervention, or electrophysiological stimulation of the sphincter fail to improve the patient’s conditions, a cell-based therapy may improve the function of the sphincter muscle. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge on stem cells suitable for therapy of urinary incontinence: mesenchymal stromal cells, urine-derived stem cells, and muscle-derived satellite cells. In addition, we report on ways to improve techniques for surgical navigation, injection of cells in the sphincter muscle, sensors for evaluation of post-treatment therapeutic outcome, and perspectives derived from recent pre-clinical studies. PMID:26237258

  2. Medium-term results of Mini-arc for urinary stress incontinence in ambulatory patients under local anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Almog; Nasra, Rasha; Shachar, Inbar Ben; Braun, Naama Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the medium-term outcome and patient's satisfaction after Single-incision mini-sling (SIMS) procedure done under local anesthesia in ambulatory set up for patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Materials and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study, including all patients submitted to SIMS procedure for SUI with MiniArc (AMS, U.S.A) without concomitant surgery between January 2011 and March 2013. Patients were followed up during 12 months after surgery and once a year subsequently. Telephone interviews were conducted to evaluate patient satisfaction. Outcome masseurs included: SUI cure rate, urinary urge incontinence (UUI) cure rate in patients with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI), intra and post-operative complications and patient satisfaction. Results Ninety-three patients were included with mean follow-up of 23 months. Fifty percent had MUI with predominant SUI. The cure rates of SUI (objective and subjective) were 89%. UUI was cured in 40% of patients. No major complications occur, neither voiding obstruction or groin pain. Telephone interviews conducted after 26 months on average revealed high satisfaction rate from the procedure (8.8 out of 10) and from the local anesthesia. Visual analog scale (VAS) rating was low during and after the procedure (2.38 and 2.69 respectively). Conclusions The SIMS procedure is safe and highly effective for SUI and it can be performed successfully under local anesthesia in an ambulatory setup. PMID:27813384

  3. Making sense of urodynamic studies for women with urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse: a urogynecology perspective.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, James L

    2012-08-01

    The support for routine urodynamic testing in the management of women with urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse is eroding. The reasons for this change largely reflect the growing evidence that urodynamic testing in this context renders little additional information over basic office assessment. The clinical features of urodynamic testing and its diagnostic and prognostic precision and accuracy are all problematic. As our understanding of female lower urinary tract dysfunction improves, the inadequacy of urodynamic testing to meaningfully improve patient and clinician decision making has become more apparent.

  4. [A study of endogenous-exogenous factors in urinary incontinence and home care nursing of the elderly at home].

    PubMed

    Kamei, T F; Simanouchi, S; Hayashi, M

    1996-01-01

    The present study was made not only to clarify endogenous factors (physical and psychological factor of the subjects) and exogenous factors (caregiver residential environment, social assistance) in the urinary incontinence of elderly persons at home undergoing public visiting nursing, both by sexes and by age-groups [65-74 years (young old), 75-84 years (middle old), more than 85 years (old old)], but also to examine nursing care problems at home. The subjects were 252 elderly persons > 65 years (46.8% of all subjects), who were detected for urinary incontinence by incontinence screening examination from among 538 subjects (224 males, 314 females), who underwent visiting nursing by Public Health Centers, and the health and welfare department of intra-metropolitan S Ward from April 1992 to August 1994. The screening examination was made via visiting interview and hearing by Public Health Nurses in charge, about items for examination such as disease, treatment, degree of independency for ADL, residence, utilization of social resources. nursing burden sensation, etc. The analysis was made comparatively by age-groups and by sexes, as mentioned above. The following information was obtained; 1) In terms of the incidence of urinary incontinence, female subjects showed higher incidence for higher age-grade (36.5%, for YO group, 45.1% for MO group and 61.4% for OO group), and male subjects showed higher incidence than female subjects (56.8% for YO group, 54.4% for MO group and 74.5% for OO group). 2) A few subjects were found within 3 months of the onset of urinary incontinence. Incontinence-favorite time zone was predominantly the midnight zone of 0-6 o'clock a.m. (23.5-52.2%). Care approach by caregiver was predominantly "use of diaper" (52.2-90.2%) and "use of diaper even with micturition" represented 30-50%. 3) Endogenous factors involved onset of cerebrovascular disease or dementia, narrow range of ADL, symptoms such as numbness and pain, bedsores, constipation, low

  5. The effect of parity on pelvic floor muscle strength and quality of life in women with urinary incontinence: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Özdemır, Özlem Çınar; Bakar, Yesim; Özengın, Nuriye; Duran, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activity after vaginal birth, and the effect of parity on PFM strength and quality of life (QoL) in women with urinary incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] Patients (n=241) who gave birth vaginally and experienced urinary incontinence were divided into three groups: group 1 consisted of women having 1–3 children, group 2 consisted of women having 4–6 children, and group 3 consisted of women having more than 6 children. All patients underwent detailed examination of the PFM. The Turkish version of the self-administered Incontinence Quality of Life Instrument (I-QoL) questionnaire was used to evaluate the effects of stress urinary incontinence on participants’ QoL. [Results] Comparison of PFM strengths showed a significant intergroup difference. Group 1 showed significantly higher PFM strength scores than those of groups 2 and 3. I-QoL scores related to stress incontinence showed a significant intergroup difference. As number of deliveries increased, quality of life decreased. Comparison of PFM strengths and I-QoL scores related to stress incontinence showed a significant intergroup difference. [Conclusion] Increasing the awareness of PFM training in women will reduce potential postpartum incontinence due to a weak PFM strength; and will increase quality of life. PMID:26311939

  6. The use of synthetic sub-urethral slings in the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Feifer, Andrew; Corcos, Jacques

    2007-09-01

    We set out to review the existing literature regarding the use of synthetic suburethral sling products for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence. Products currently implanted are examined and scrutinized, and evidence regarding their efficacy and complication rates is noted. Additionally, specifics of presently utilized synthetic materials, including construction method and biocompatibility, are explored and directly correlated to currently marketed products. This investigation was undertaken with the use of the Medline database. Studies pertaining to synthetic or surgical mesh, as well as each specific suburethral sling product, are included. Our findings and ultimately our recommendations stem from the preponderance of evidence supporting the continued use of knitted, macroporous polypropelene mesh slings. Several existing marketed products detailed in the study fit this description. Specific reference is made to recent reports of vaginal erosions and deep space infections related to several specific products. A cautionary note is also made regarding the implantation of transobturator sling products currently marketed without the necessary pre-market testing, potentially placing the public at risk. From the currently available literature on biomaterials, it seems clear that knitted macroporous polypropylene is the material of choice for suburethral implantation. With respect to the means and techniques by which these mesh materials are suburethrally implanted, the surgeon's choice often dictates which method is used, but recent experience has demonstrated that the transobturator approach can be equally as effective as the traditional tension-free vaginal tape, with less-associated morbidity. Ongoing randomized controlled trials will further clarify and distinguish between methods.

  7. Intensive lifestyle intervention reduces urinary incontinence in overweight/obese men with Type 2 diabetes: Results from the look AHEAD trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: We determined the effect of an intensive lifestyle intervention on the prevalence, incidence and resolution of bothersome nocturia, increased daytime urinary voiding and urinary incontinence in overweight/obese men with type 2 diabetes after 1 year in the Look AHEAD trial. Materials and Me...

  8. Condition Specific Quality of Life 24 Months After Retropubic and Transobturator Sling Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Sirls, Larry T.; Tennstedt, Sharon; Lukacz, Emily; Rickey, Leslie; Kraus, Stephen R.; Markland, Alayne D.; Kenton, Kimberly; Moalli, Pam; Hsu, Yvonne; Huang, Liyuan; Stoddard, Anne M

    2014-01-01

    Aims To compare quality of life (QoL) and factors associated with QoL change after retropubic (RMUS) and transobturator (TMUS) midurethral slings using the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire, (IIQ) and the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ). Methods Five hundred ninety seven women in a multicenter randomized trial of RMUS vs. TMUS were examined. The IIQ and ICIQ were obtained at baseline, 12 and 24 months. Repeated measures analysis of variance tested for differences by treatment group over time. Multivariable analysis identified factors associated with QoL change at 12 months post- operative, controlling for treatment group and baseline QoL. Results Improvement in IIQ was associated with: treatment success, younger age, improvement in stress incontinence (SUI) symptom severity and bother (all p < 0.05). Improvement in ICIQ was associated with treatment success, younger age, improvement in SUI symptom severity and bother, lower body mass index and no re-operation (all p < 0.05). Improvement of the IIQ was stable over time (p =0.35) for both treatment groups (p=0.66) whereas the ICIQ showed a small but clinically insignificant decline (p=0.03) in both treatment groups (p=0.51). Conclusions Postoperative QOL was improved after RMUS and TMUS. Measures of QOL functioned similarly, although more surgically modifiable urinary incontinence factors predicted improvement with the IIQ. PMID:22983273

  9. Anticholinergic Versus Botulinum Toxin A Comparison Trial for the Treatment of Bothersome Urge Urinary Incontinence: ABC Trial

    PubMed Central

    Visco, Anthony G.; Brubaker, Linda; Richter, Holly E.; Nygaard, Ingrid; Paraiso, Marie Fidela; Menefee, Shawn A.; Schaffer, Joseph; Wei, John; Chai, Toby; Janz, Nancy; Spino, Cathie; Meikle, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This trial compares the change in urgency urinary incontinence episodes over 6 months, tolerability and cost effectiveness between women receiving daily anticholinergic therapy plus a single intra-detrusor injection of saline versus a single intra-detrusor injection of 100 unit of botulinum toxin A plus daily oral placebo tablets. We present the rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial, Anticholinergic versus Botulinum Toxin, Comparison Trial for the Treatment of Bothersome Urge Urinary Incontinence: ABC Trial, conducted by the NICHD-funded Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. We discuss the innovative nature of this trial and the challenges related to choice of patient population, maintaining masking, cost-effectiveness, ethical considerations, measuring adherence, and placebo development and testing. Enrollment began in April, 2010. 242 participants will be randomized and primary outcome data analysis is anticipated to begin in mid 2012. Several challenges in the trial design are discussed. Randomization to placebo intradetrusor injections may limit recruitment, potentially impacting generalizability. Other challenges included the heavy marketing of drugs for overactive bladder which could impact recruitment of drug naïve women. In addition, anticholinergic medications often cause dry mouth, making masking difficult. Finally, adverse reporting of transient urinary retention is challenging as there is no standardized definition; yet this is the most common adverse event following intradetrusor botulinum toxin injection. The ABC trial will help women with urgency urinary incontinence balance efficacy, side effects and cost of anticholinergic medication versus botulinum toxin intradetrusor injection. The results have the potential to fundamentally change the therapeutic approach to this condition. PMID:22008247

  10. Female stress urinary incontinence: standard techniques revisited and critical evaluation of innovative techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Cornelia; de Riese, Werner T. W.

    2003-06-01

    Objectives: The treatment of female urinary incontinence (UI) is a growing health care concern in our aging society. Publications of recent innovations and modifications are creating expectations. This brief review provides some insight and structure regarding indications and expected outcomes for the different approaches. Materials: Data extraction is part of a Medline data base search, which was performed for "female stress incontinence" from 1960 until 2000. Additional literature search was performed to cover 2001 and 2002. Outcome data were extracted. Results: (1) INJECTION OF BULKING AGENTS (collagen, synthetic agents): The indication for mucosal coaptation was more clearly defined and in the majority of articles limited to ISD. (2) OPEN COLPOSUSPENSION (Burch, MMK): Best long-term results of all operative procedures, to date considered the gold standard. (3) LAPAROSCOPIC COLPOSUSPENSION (different modifications): Long-term success rates appear dependent on operator skills. There are few long-term data. (4) NEEDLE SUSPENSION: (Stamey, Pareyra and modifications): Initial results were equal to Burch with less morbidity, but long-term success rates are worse. (5) SLING PROCEDURES (autologous, synthetic, allogenic graft materials, different modes of support and anchoring, free tapes): The suburethral sling has traditionally been considered a procedure for those in whom suspension had failed and for those with severe ISD. The most current trend shows its use as a primary procedure for SUI. Long-term data beyond 5 years are insufficient. (6) EXTERNAL OCCLUSIVE DEVICES (vaginal sponges and pessaries, urethral insert): Both vaginal and urethral insert devices can be effective in selected patients. (7) IMPLANTABLE ARTEFICIAL URETHRAL SPHINCTERS: Modifications and improvements of the devices resulted in improved clinical results regarding durability and efficacy. CONCLUSION: (1) The Burch colposuspension is still considered the gold standard in the treatment of female

  11. Urinary tract infections in women with stress urinary incontinence treated with transobturator suburethral tape and benefit gained from the sublingual polibacterial vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo Gómez, María F.; Collazos Robles, Rafael E.; Virseda Rodríguez, Álvaro J.; García Cenador, María B.; Mirón Canelo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and objectives: Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs) are highly prevalent diseases. Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between RUTIs and surgical correction of SUI with transobturator suburethral tape (TOT) and to describe the benefit gained from a sublingual polibacterial preparation on RUTIs developed after TOT. Materials and methods: A retrospective study was performed on 420 women who underwent TOT surgery due to SUI between April 2003 and October 2011. Group A: patients without urinary tract infections (UTIs) before TOT (n = 294). Group B: patients with UTIs before TOT (n = 126). Variables: age, personal history, number of UTIs/month prior to and after surgery, appearance of urgent urinary incontinence (UUI) with or without UTIs, response to International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF) and Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaires. Results: Group A: 85% dry; 5% UUI; 4% de novo UTIs with good response to antibiotics over 6 days. No RUTIs during the follow-up period, 2% with sporadic UTIs. Group B: 47.61% RUTIs; 52.39% sporadic UTIs; greater incidence of diabetes mellitus (p < 0.0025) and smoking (p < 0.0031) than group A. After TOT: 79.36% dry; 10% RUTIs. After treatment with antibiotics for 6 days and bacterial preparation for 3 months, 82% of patients did not have a UTI anymore. Postoperative cystourethrogram revealed 38% of nondiagnosed cystoceles before TOT. No patient had a postvoiding volume greater than 100 cm3 after TOT. Improvement of ICIQ-SF (p < 0.001) and SF-36 (p < 0.0004) in both groups. Conclusion: After eliminating bias associated with the tape, the technique and the surgeon’s skills, SUI correction may decrease the number of UTIs and improve the quality of life. UTIs disappeared in 82% of patients with RUTIs after TOT. PMID:26445597

  12. The Joanna Briggs Institute best practice information sheet: the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle exercises on urinary incontinence in women following childbirth.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    This Best Practice Information Sheet is derived from 21 studies and aims to synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle exercises on urinary incontinence in women following childbirth. The information that is contained in this sheet has been derived from studies that were included in a systematic review that was conducted by the Joanna Briggs Institute. The original references can be sourced from the systematic review. Pregnancy and childbirth are major risk factors for the development of urinary incontinence as the muscles of the pelvic floor become stretched and weakened. For some women, such incontinence after childbirth is temporary, but for others, their suffering can be of much longer-term duration. A number of risk factors has been identified for urinary incontinence following childbirth, including antenatal urinary incontinence, obesity, and significant perineal trauma. The aim of pelvic floor muscle exercises is to strengthen the perivaginal and perianal musculature in order to increase a woman's control of urinary leakage.

  13. Meta-analysis of four different surgical treatments for stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Serels, Scott; Stein, Mark

    1997-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: Multiple surgical approaches for the correction of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) have been described. In an attempt to determine which procedure may be superior, we performed a meta-analysis comparing the needle suspensions (i.e. Gittes, Stamey), Raz, Burch/MMK colposuspension, and urethral sling. METHODS: The most complete 87 of 310 articles relating to the surgical therapy for SUI published between 1982 and 1995 were selected by Medline search for review. These articles incorporated patients operated on from 1965 to 1995. Fixed effects Baysian and variance weighted models were applied to derive estimates and confidence intervals. Bonferroni multiple comparison procedures wee also incorporated. RESULTS: The mean reported success rates were 81% for the needle suspensions, 84% for the Raz, 85% for the colposuspension, and 85% for the sling. There was a significant difference between the sling and needle suspension as well as between the colposuspension and needle suspension (P<0.05). There was no correlation between length of follow-up and the success rate (P>.05). CONCLUSION: There is currently a general impression among urologists that the sling has the best success rates for the treatment of SUI and that the Raz and colposuspension are clinically superior to the needle suspension. Recent literature also indicates a significant increase in the failure rate over time. Our meta-analysis of the best 25% of SUI papers does not support either view entirely. This may be due to publication bias and incomplete reporting by the authors. Prior to developing ever "improved" procedures, urologist must start to report their results in a consistent fashion to allow meaningful conclusions concerning the risks and benefits of our existing procedures.

  14. Transperineal ultrasonography in stress urinary incontinence: The significance of urethral rotation angles

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saadi, Wasan Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess, using transperineal ultrasonography (TPUS), the numerical value of the rotation of the bladder neck [represented by the difference in the anterior (α angle) and posterior urethral angles (β angle)] at rest and straining, in continent women and women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), to ascertain if there are significant differences in the angles of rotation (Rα and Rβ) between the groups. Patients, subjects and methods In all, 30 women with SUI (SUI group) and 30 continent women (control group) were included. TPUS was performed at rest and straining (Valsalva manoeuver), and the threshold value for the urethral angles (α and β angles) for each group were estimated. The degree of rotation for each angle was calculated and was considered as the angle of rotation. Results Both the α and β angles were significantly different between the groups at rest and straining, and there was a significant difference in the mean increment in the value of each angle. Higher values of increment (higher rotation angles) were reported in the SUI group for both the α and β angles compared with those of the control group [mean (SD) Rα SUI group 19.43 (12.76) vs controls 10.53 (2.98) °; Rβ SUI group 28.30 (12.96) vs controls 16.33 (10.8) °; P < 0.001]. Conclusion Urethral rotation angles may assist in the assessment and diagnosis of patients with SUI, which may in turn reduce the need for more sophisticated urodynamic studies. PMID:26966596

  15. Prevalence and Correlates of Urinary Incontinence Among Older, Community-Dwelling Women

    PubMed Central

    Bresee, Catherine; Dubina, Emily D.; Khan, Aqsa A.; Sevilla, Claudia; Grant, David; Eilber, Karyn S.; Anger, Jennifer T.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES As the aging population in the United States grows, the investigation of urinary incontinence (UI) issues becomes increasingly important, especially among women. Using data from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), we sought to determine the prevalence and correlates of UI among an ethnically diverse population of older, community-dwelling women. METHODS 5,374 female Californians aged 65 or older participated in a population-based, cross-sectional random digit dialing telephone survey. The CHIS 2003 adult survey included one question for Californians aged 65+ about UI. Additional information collected via the self-reported survey included demographics (age, race/ethnicity, education, and household income); general health data (self-reported health status, height and weight, fall history, and special equipment needs); medical co-morbidities; and health behaviors (tobacco usage, physical activity, and hormone replacement therapy (HRT)). RESULTS The estimated state-wide female prevalence rate for UI was 24.4%. Prevalence rates increased with age. UI was significantly associated with poorer overall health (adjusted OR 3.43, p<0.001), decreased mobility (OR 1.81, p=0.004), current use of HRT (OR 1.72, p<0.001), being overweight or obese (OR 1.60, p<0.001), a history of falls (OR 1.53, p=0.002), and a history of heart disease (OR 1.38, p=0.010). After adjusting for all health factors, UI was not found to have any significant association with level of education, household poverty status, or smoking status. CONCLUSIONS UI prevalence among this diverse group of older community-dwelling Californian women parallels that of other population-based studies. CHIS demonstrated that poor health, increased BMI, falls, and decreased mobility are strongly correlated with UI. PMID:25185631

  16. Mini–slings – an option in stress urinary incontinence treatment. Case studies

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Michał; Kliś, Rafał; Różański, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a social disease caused by numerous contributing factors such as natural childbirth, obesity, hormonal deficiencies and changes in collagen fibers, to name a few. Currently, mini–slings, among all the surgical treatment methods, have gained significance. The aim of this study was to establish the effectiveness of this method. Material and methods From 2008 to 2012, one hundred sixty women suffering from SUI underwent surgical procedures to implant mini–slings under the middle part of the urethra and 140 (87.5%) of them remained under observation. In 65 cases, Johnson & Johnson's TVT–Secur was used; in 70 cases, BARD's Adjust mini–sling was used; and in 5 cases, AMS Mini–Arc mini–sling was used. The average period of hospitalization was 3 days per admission, operation and discharge day. Results In 82 cases, patients urinated well after the removal of the catheter, and had full urine continence. Fourteen patients showed great improvement, and in four cases temporary urine retention was observed. In two cases vaginal bleeding was observed, yet there was no need for wound revision. Evaluation of the ‘quality of life improvement’ was done using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Conclusions The obtained results allowed the conclusion that the implantation of mini–slings is a low invasive, relatively safe and effective procedure for the treatment of SUI even in cases of recurrence. Almost full recovery was achieved in all the cases of this study. The mini–sling has become an important element in modern urogynecology. PMID:25914841

  17. Laser treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: optical, thermal, and tissue damage simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Chang, Chun-Hung; Myers, Erinn M.; Kennelly, Michael J.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) by laser thermal remodeling of subsurface tissues is studied. Light transport, heat transfer, and thermal damage simulations were performed for transvaginal and transurethral methods. Monte Carlo (MC) provided absorbed photon distributions in tissue layers (vaginal wall, endopelvic fascia, urethral wall). Optical properties (n,μa,μs,g) were assigned to each tissue at λ=1064 nm. A 5-mm-diameter laser beam and power of 5 W for 15 s was used, based on previous experiments. MC output was converted into absorbed energy, serving as input for ANSYS finite element heat transfer simulations of tissue temperatures over time. Convective heat transfer was simulated with contact cooling probe set at 0 °C. Thermal properties (κ,c,ρ) were assigned to each tissue layer. MATLAB code was used for Arrhenius integral thermal damage calculations. A temperature matrix was constructed from ANSYS output, and finite sum was incorporated to approximate Arrhenius integral calculations. Tissue damage properties (Ea,A) were used to compute Arrhenius sums. For the transvaginal approach, 37% of energy was absorbed in endopelvic fascia layer with 0.8% deposited beyond it. Peak temperature was 71°C, treatment zone was 0.8-mm-diameter, and almost all of 2.7-mm-thick vaginal wall was preserved. For transurethral approach, 18% energy was absorbed in endopelvic fascia with 0.3% deposited beyond it. Peak temperature was 80°C, treatment zone was 2.0-mm-diameter, and only 0.6 mm of 2.4-mm-thick urethral wall was preserved. A transvaginal approach is more feasible than transurethral approach for laser treatment of SUI.

  18. Application of Tissue Engineering to Pelvic Organ Prolapse and Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Chapple, Christopher R; Osman, Nadir I; Mangera, Altaf; Hillary, Christopher; Roman, Sabiniano; Bullock, Anthony; Macneil, Sheila

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic or biological materials can be used for the surgical repair of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) or stress urinary incontinence (SUI). While non-degradable synthetic mesh has a low failure rate, it is prone to complications such as infection and erosion, particularly in the urological/gynecological setting when subject to chronic influences of gravity and intermittent, repetitive strain. Biological materials have lower complication rates, although allografts and xenografts have a high risk of failure and the theoretical risk of infection. Autografts are used successfully for the treatment of SUI and are not associated with erosion; however, can lead to morbidity at the donor site. Tissue engineering has thus become the focus of interest in recent years as researchers seek an ideal tissue remodeling material for urogynecological repair. Herein, we review the directions of current and future research in this exciting field. Electrospun poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) and porcine small intestine submucosa (SIS) are two promising scaffold material candidates. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) appear to be a suitable cell type for scaffold seeding, and cells grown on scaffolds when subjected to repetitive biaxial strain show more appropriate biomechanical properties for clinical implantation. After implantation, an appropriate level of acute inflammation is important to precipitate moderate fibrosis and encourage tissue strength. New research directions include the use of bioactive materials containing compounds that may help facilitate integration of the new tissue. More research with longer follow-up is needed to ascertain the most successful and safe methods and materials for pelvic organ repair and SUI treatment.

  19. Potential risk factors associated with stress urinary incontinence among Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Zargham, Mahtab; Chatraei, Maryam; Bahrami, Faranak; Alizadeh, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is considered as one of the major hygienic problems among women. The main aim of the study is to assess the potential risk factors associated with SUI among Iranian women. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 90 married women with history of SUI diagnosed by an urologist and were selected randomly. Their pelvic muscles contraction (PMC) and the history of the subjects were assessed for some of risk factors such as age, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), pregnancy history, miscarriage, type of delivery (normal vaginal delivery or cesarean section), number of offspring born healthy in addition to other risk factors such as chronic cough, constipation and hypothyroidism by use of POP Questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and SPSS version 18 Software. Results: There was a significant relation between SUI and height (P < 0.05, r = 0.45), vaginal delivery (NVD) (P < 0.05, r = 0.2), number of genitourinary surgery (P < 0.05, r = 0.42), hypothyroidism and constipation (P < 0.05). An inverse relatively strong significant relation was found between SUI and cesarean section (P < 0.05, r = –0.50) No significant relation was found between SUI and weight, BMI, age, chronic cough and miscarriage, and other study parameters. An inverse significant relation between PMC and weight (P < 0.05, r = –0.52), BMI (P < 0.05, r = –0.42) and number of genitourinary surgery (P < 0.05, r = –0.18). Conclusion: Cesarean section had a preventive effect on SUI versus normal vaginal delivery. The rate of SUI was higher in taller women or those suffering from hypothyroidism or constipation or who had genitourinary surgery. The women with high BMI had lower pelvic floor muscles strength. PMID:26601093

  20. Association of Functional Ability and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia With Urinary Incontinence in Older Korean Men

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) and analyze its association with instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in community-dwelling older men in Korea. Methods: This study was a secondary analysis of data from the Actual Living Condition of the Elderly and Welfare Need Survey conducted in the year 2008. Data was subjected to hierarchical logistic regression analysis to examine the association of IADL and BPH with UI in older men, entering IADL and BPH in model 1, and age, body mass index (BMI) and education in model 2, and then comorbidities and walking speed in model 3. Results: Of 6,185 men, 243 (3.9%) had self-reported UI. The prevalence of UI was 1.8% in men aged 60–64 years and 11.7% in those aged 85 years and above, indicating an increase in the prevalence of UI with their age. IADL and BPH remained the only significant factors associated with UI in model 1 (odds ratio [OR], 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44–1.64 and OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.47–5.10, respectively), model 2 (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.40–1.61 and OR, 2.68; 95% CI, 1.42–5.07), and model 3 (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.32–1.54 and OR, 2.58; 95% CI, 1.36–4.90). Conclusions: IADL limitations and presence of BPH were associated with UI in older men after controlling for BMI, education, comorbidities, and walking speed. Thus, UI should be assessed in older Korean men with IADL decline and BPH. Gender-sensitive interventions to attenuate IADL limitations and manage BPH should be developed and applied to improve UI in older men. PMID:27377946

  1. Argus T® versus Advance® Sling for postprostatectomy urinary incontinence: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lima, João Paulo Cunha; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima; Bezerra, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To compare the results of two slings, Argus T® and Advance®, for the treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPUI). Material and Methods: From December 2010 to December 2011, 22 patients with PPUI were randomized as follows: 11 (mean age 62.09(±5.30)) underwent treatment with Advance® and 11 (mean age 62.55(±8.54)) with Argus T®. All patients were evaluated preoperatively with urodynamic testing, quality of life questionnaire (ICIQ-SF), voiding diary and 24-hour pad test. Exclusion criteria were: neurological diseases, severe detrusor overactivity and urethral stenosis. Evaluation was performed at 6, 12 and 18 months after the surgery. After implantation of the Argus T® sling, patients who experienced urine leakage equal to or greater than the initial volume underwent adjustment of the sling tension. Results were statistically analyzed using the Fisher’s test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Friedman’s non-parametric test or the Mann-Whitney test. Results Significant improvement of the 24-hour pad test was observed with the Argus T® sling (p=0.038) , With regard to the other parameters, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Removal of the Argus T® device due to perineal pain was performed in one patient (9%). Despite non uniform results, both devices were considered useful to improve quality of life (ICIQ-SF): Argus T® (p=0.018) and Advance® (p=0.017). Conclusions Better results were observed in the 24h pad test and in levels of satisfaction with the Argus T® device. Both slings contributed to improve quality of life (ICIQ-SF), with acceptable side effects. PMID:27286117

  2. Factorial validity and internal consistency of the PRAFAB questionnaire in women with stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Erik JM; Bernards, Arnold TM; Staal, J Bart; de Vet, Henrica CW; de Bie, Rob A

    2008-01-01

    Background To investigate the factor structure, dimensionality and construct validity of the (5-item) PRAFAB questionnaire score in women with stress urinary incontinence (stress UI). Methods A cross validation study design was used in a cohort of 279 patients who were randomly divided into Sample A or B. Sample A was used for preliminary exploratory factor analyses with promax rotation. Sample B provided an independent sample for confirming the premeditated and proposed factor structure and item retention. Internal consistency, item-total and subscale correlations were determined to assess the dimensionality. Construct validity was assessed by comparing factor-based scale means by clinical characteristics based on known relationships. Results Factor analyses resulted in a two-factor structure or subscales: items related to 'leakage severity' (protection, amount and frequency) and items related to its 'perceived symptom impact' or consequences of stress UI on the patient's life (adjustment and body (or self) image). The patterns of the factor loadings were fairly identical for both study samples. The two constructed subscales demonstrated adequate internal consistency with Cronbach's alphas in a range of 0.78 and 0.84 respectively. Scale scores differed by clinical characteristics according to the expectations and supported the construct validity of the scales. Conclusion The findings suggest a two-factorial structure of the PRAFAB questionnaire. Furthermore the results confirmed the internal consistency and construct validity as demonstrated in our previous study. The best description of the factorial structure of the PRAFAB questionnaire was given by a two-factor solution, measuring the stress UI leakage severity items and the perceived symptom impact items. Future research will be necessary to replicate these findings in different settings, type of UI and non-white women and men. PMID:18218110

  3. Functional disability and compromised mobility among older women with urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Erekson, Elisabeth A.; Ciarleglio, Maria M.; Hanissian, Paul D.; Strohbehn, Kris; Bynum, Julie P.W.; Fried, Terri R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to determine the prevalence of functional disability among older women with urinary incontinence (UI). Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of the 2005-06 National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP). Daily UI was defined as answering “daily” to the question, “How frequently...have you had difficulty controlling your bladder, including leaking small amounts of urine, leaking when you cough or sneeze, or not being able to make it to the bathroom on time?” We then explored functional status. Women were asked about seven basic activities of daily living (ADLs). Statistical analyses with percentage estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. Logistic regression was performed to assess the association between functional status and daily UI. Results In total, 1,412 women were included in our analysis. Daily UI was reported by 177 (12.5%) women. Functional dependence or disability with any ADLs was reported in 62.1% (95% CI 54.2%, 70.1%) of women with daily UI. Among women with daily UI, 23.6% (95% CI 16.8%, 30.5%) reported specific difficulty or dependence with using the toilet signifying functional limitations which may contribute to urine leakage. After adjusting for age category, race/ethnicity, education level, and parity, women with daily UI had 3.31 increased odds of functional difficulty or dependence compared with continent older women. Conclusion Over 60% of older women with daily UI reported functional difficulty or dependence and 1/4 of women with daily UI specifically reported difficulty or dependence with using the toilet. PMID:25185600

  4. TVT-Secur mini-sling for stress urinary incontinence: a review of outcomes at 12 months.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Colin A

    2011-09-01

    • Synthetic mid-urethral slings (MUSs) are considered the first choice surgical procedure for stress urinary incontinence. Recent publications have raised concerns about the efficacy of third generation single-incision mini-slings. The present paper is a systematic review of studies reporting 12-month outcomes after the TVT-Secur (TVT-S) procedure. • Pubmed/Medline online databases, abstracts from recent International Continence Society and International Urogynecological Association annual scientific meetings and the Clinicaltrials.gov and Controlled-trials.com online trial registries were searched for English-language articles containing the terms 'TVT-Secur', 'TVT Secur' or 'mini-sling'. The primary outcomes were objective and subjective cure rates at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included peri-operative (vaginal perforation, urinary retention, urinary tract infection [UTI]) and postoperative (mesh exposure, de novo overactive bladder (OAB), dyspareunia and return to theatre) complication rates. • Among 1178 women undergoing the TVT-S procedure, from 10 studies, both objective and subjective cure rate at 12 months was 76%, with objective cure significantly higher in women undergoing the 'U-type' approach. Vaginal perforation was a complication in 1.5% of cases, with a 2.4% incidence of mesh exposure in the first year. The incidence of de novo OAB symptoms was 10%. Rates of urinary retention (2.3%), UTI (4.4%), dyspareunia (1%) and return to theatre for complications (0.8%) were low. In the first year after a TVT-S procedure 5% of women required repeat continence surgery. • Longer-term studies and randomized comparisons with more established MUSs are required before TVT-S should be routinely used in the surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

  5. Focal lingual dystonia, urinary incontinence, and sensory deficits secondary to low voltage electrocution: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, J R; McAninch, S A

    2002-07-01

    Electrocution injuries are well reported in review articles and cases of high voltage electrocution injury are abundant. However, reports of low voltage electrocution injury are few. A case is presented of low voltage shock from a 120 volt AC source with presentation, acute and chronic course, and a five year follow up. The patient experienced several unusual complications of low voltage electrocution: a persistent right tongue deviation, which initially presents as an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy, but subsequently manifests as a focal lingual dystonia; total body paresthesia with urinary incontinence; and persistent sensory deficits to the face and tongue.

  6. Delayed sigmoid colon perforation and enterocutaneous fistula due to tension free transvaginal tape operation for stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Kyu; Sohn, Dong Wan

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old female patient presented with sustained sigmoid colon perforation at the time of a tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure and subsequently developed enterocutaneous fistula and subcutaneous abscess. She came to our emergency department complaining of left lower abdominal tenderness and swelling for 2 weeks previously. Her right thigh also was tender and swollen. A foreign body in sigmoid colon and subcutaneous abscess were found on computed tomography scan. We diagnosed the perforation of sigmoid colon and enterocutaneous fistula by TVT mesh. We performed laparoscopic excision of the mesh in sigmoid colon. We performed transobturator tape surgery for recurrence of stress urinary incontinence after 6 months. PMID:26085881

  7. Acquired urinary incontinence in the bitch: update and perspectives from human medicine. Part 2: The urethral component, pathophysiology and medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Noël, Stéphanie; Claeys, Stéphanie; Hamaide, Annick

    2010-10-01

    Various pathologies can affect the bladder and/or urethral contractility causing signs of urinary incontinence. In this second part of a three-part review, the pathophysiology of impaired urethral contractility (including urethral hyper- and hypotonicity) in the bitch and in women is discussed. Urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) is the most common form of acquired urinary incontinence in bitches and is characterized by a decreased urethral tone. The pathophysiology and current recommended medical treatment options for USMI and cases of modified urethral tonicity due to a neurological disorder or functional outlet obstruction are discussed. Treatment options in human medicine in cases of impaired urethral contractility are described.

  8. Evaluating and managing urinary incontinence after prostatectomy: beyond pads and diapers.

    PubMed

    Atiemo, Humphrey O; Moy, Louis; Vasavada, Sandip; Rackley, Raymond

    2007-01-01

    Men who become persistently incontinent after undergoing prostatectomy have a variety of options for regaining control, ranging from behavioral changes to surgery. To determine the best therapy, one should define the problem with a thorough urologic evaluation.

  9. Urethral duplication: a rare cause of urinary incontinence in a female child

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay; Tiwari, Rajesh; Kumar, Vijoy; Singh, Mahendra

    2012-01-01

    Female urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly. We report a case of complete urethral duplication along with horseshoe kidney in a four-years-old female child presenting with incontinence since childhood. PMID:24578937

  10. Treatment success for overactive bladder with urinary urge incontinence refractory to oral antimuscarinics: a review of published evidence

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment options for overactive bladder (OAB) with urinary urge incontinence (UUI) refractory to oral antimuscarinics include: botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA), sacral neuromodulation (SNM), and augmentation cystoplasty (AC). A standard treatment success metric that can be used in both clinical and economic evaluations of the above interventions has not emerged. Our objective was to conduct a literature review and synthesis of published measures of treatment success for OAB with UUI interventions and to identify a treatment success outcome. Methods We performed a literature review of primary studies that used a definition of treatment success in the OAB with UUI population receiving BoNTA, SNM, or AC. The recommended success outcome was compared to generic and disease-specific health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) measures using data from a BoNTA treatment study of neurogenic incontinent patients. Results Across all interventions, success outcomes included: complete continence (n = 23, 44%), ≥ 50% improvement in incontinence episodes (n = 16, 31%), and subjective improvement (n = 13, 25%). We recommend the OAB with UUI treatment success outcome of ≥ 50% improvement in incontinence episodes from baseline. Using data from a neurogenic BoNTA treatment study, the average change in the Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire was 8.8 (95% CI: -4.7, 22.3) higher for those that succeeded (N = 25) versus those that failed (N = 26). The average change in the SF-6D preference score was 0.07 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.12) higher for those that succeeded versus those that failed. Conclusion A treatment success definition that encompasses the many components of underlying OAB with UUI symptoms is currently not practical as a consequence of difficulties in measuring urgency. The treatment success outcome of ≥ 50% improvement in incontinence episodes was associated with a clinically meaningful improvement in disease-specific HRQoL for those with neurogenic OAB with UUI

  11. Injectable biomaterials for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence: their potential and pitfalls as urethral bulking agents.

    PubMed

    Davis, Niall F; Kheradmand, F; Creagh, T

    2013-06-01

    Injectable urethral bulking agents composed of synthetic and biological biomaterials are minimally invasive treatment options for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The development of an ideal urethral bulking agent remains challenging because of clinical concerns over biocompatibility and durability. Herein, the mechanical and biological features of injectable urethral biomaterials are investigated, with particular emphasis on their future potential as primary and secondary treatment options for SUI. A literature search for English language publications using the two online databases was performed. Keywords included "stress urinary incontinence", "urethral bulking agent" and "injectable biomaterial". A total of 98 articles were analysed, of which 45 were suitable for review based on clinical relevance and importance of content. Injectable biomaterials are associated with a lower cure rate and fewer postoperative complications than open surgery for SUI. They are frequently reserved as secondary treatment options for patients unwilling or medically unfit to undergo surgery. Glutaraldehyde cross-linked bovine collagen remains the most commonly injected biomaterial and has a cure rate of up to 53 %. Important clinical features of an injectable biomaterial are durability, biocompatibility and ease of administration, but achieving these requirements is challenging. In carefully selected patients, injectable biomaterials are feasible alternatives to open surgical procedures as primary and secondary treatment options for SUI. In future, higher cure rates may be feasible as researchers investigate alternative biomaterials and more targeted injection techniques for treating SUI.

  12. Efficacy and safety of a readjustable midurethral sling (Remeex system) for stress urinary incontinence with female voiding dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the efficacy and safety of a readjustable midurethral sling (Remeex system) for stress urinary incontinence with female voiding dysfunction. Materials and Methods From May 2007 to December 2015, 151 women received the Remeex system. We excluded patients who presented with pelvic organ prolapse and/or who missed the regular follow-up. Finally, 102 patients were included in the study, and we divided them into 2 groups: group A (n=74), who did not present with female voiding dysfunction and group B (n=28), who presented with female voiding dysfunction. Female voiding dysfunction was defined as a maximal flow rate≤12 mL/s when the voided volume was ≥150 mL on preoperative uroflowmetry. We retrospectively reviewed the patients' medical records and compared surgical outcomes between groups A and B. Results There were no significant differences in subjective surgical outcomes and patient satisfaction between the 2 groups. Postoperative uroflowmetry showed that the maximal flow rate and voided volume decreased and the postvoid residual urine volume increased in both groups, and these changes were not significantly different between groups. The overall complication rate was 21.6% (22 of 102), and the complication rate was not significantly different between the 2 groups according to the modified Clavien-Dindo classification. Conclusions The Remeex system is efficacious and safe for stress urinary incontinence with female voiding dysfunction. PMID:28261682

  13. The Effect of Urinary Incontinence on Quality of Life of Women at Childbearing Age in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Bakarman, Marwan A; Al-Ghamdi, Sadiah Saeed

    2015-07-19

    To estimate the prevalence of urinary incontinence among women of childbearing age at Maternity and Children's Hospital (MCH), Jeddah, 2012, and to assess its impact on the quality of their life. A cross-sectional analytic approach was carried out among women of childbearing age seen at MCH, Jeddah. Systematic random sampling technique was followed. Each woman fulfilling the inclusion criteria was invited to enroled in the study, the inclusion criteria were women aged 15-50 years, agreed to participate in the study, the exclusion criteria were pregnant women and patients who are seriously ill. Self-administered questionnaire using the King's Health Questionnaire was utilized to measure Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) of patients with UI. Out of 1200 patients attending the gynecology clinic in the MCH, 412 (34.3%) were diagnosed as having UI. Their age ranged between 15 and 50 years with a mean of 34.3 ± 7.2 years. Almost 50% indicated that UI affected them badly as wife, mother, their emotions, and their physical and social activities. The most commonly occurring problems were frequent micturition (88.3%), nocturnal enuresis (87.9%). The least occurring, were kidney problems (38.6%) and dripping during sexual activities (40.8%). Increasing age and higher parity were significantly associated with limitations in different life domains. Urinary incontinence is common and often disturbing for Saudi women. It adversely impaired their quality of life.

  14. A pilot study on the use of acupuncture or pelvic floor muscle training for mixed urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Mona; Alræk, Terje; Mdala, Ibrahimu; Klovning, Atle

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the feasibility and acceptability of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) acupuncture and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in reducing symptoms and bothersomeness in women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI); and to estimate the sample size for a full scale trial. Methods Thirty-four women with MUI were randomly assigned to either 12 sessions of TCM acupuncture, 12 sessions of PFMT, or to a waiting list control group. Outcome measures included an assessment of interest to participate in the trial, identification of successful recruitment strategies, the appropriateness of eligibility criteria, and compliance with treatment. Clinical outcomes were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks, and included the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF), expectations of treatment effect, and adverse events. Results Recruitment was feasible and randomisation worked adequately by means of SurveyMonkey. SurveyMonkey does not permit stratification by ICIQ-UI SF baseline score. Fourteen of 22 women found the treatment options acceptable. The dropout rate was high, especially in the control group (6/12). Outcome forms were completed by 20 of 34 women. The median (IQR) changes of the ICIQ-UI SF scores in the acupuncture, physiotherapy, and waiting list group were 5.5 (2.3 to 6.8), 1.0 (−3.0 to 4.5), and 1.5 (−1.5 to 3.0), respectively, suggesting the need for a full scale trial. Conclusions Women with MUI were willing to participate in this study. There is a need for adjusting eligibility criteria. A sample size of 129 women, 43 in three arms, is required. No major adverse events occurred. PMID:26362793

  15. Preoperative maximal flow rate may be a predictive factor for the outcome of tension-free vaginal tape procedure for stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Paick, Jae-Seung; Kim, Soo Woong; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Oh, Seung-June; Son, Hwancheol; Park, Jae Young

    2004-01-01

    This study examined factors potentially predicting on the outcome of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure for stress urinary incontinence. A total of 60 women (aged 35-71 years, mean 57) with at least follow-up of 2 years were included in the study. The tension-free vaginal tape procedure was performed under local anesthesia except in two patients. At the latest follow-up 50 (83.3%) were cured of stress urinary incontinence. Two patients had new-onset urge symptoms without urge incontinence episodes. Multivariate regression analysis showed maximal flow rate to be associated with 0.9-fold risk of the failure; no other parameters had statistical significance. Our results confirm the feasibility and safety of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure and demonstrate that preoperative low maximal flow rate may be associated with the failure of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure.

  16. Effect of home-based Kegel exercises on quality of life in women with stress and mixed urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Cavkaytar, S; Kokanali, M K; Topcu, H O; Aksakal, O S; Doğanay, M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of home-based Kegel exercises in women with stress and mixed urinary incontinence. A total of 90 women with urodynamically proven urinary stress (SUI) and mixed (MUI) incontinence awaiting anti-incontinence surgery were recruited in the urogynaecology clinic of Ankara Zekai Tahir Burak Women's Health Research and Education Hospital. Of these, 18 women were excluded due to low compliance and the remaining 72 were divided into two groups according to urodynamic diagnosis (SUI group, n = 38; MUI group, n = 34). Age, BMI, menopausal status and medical history of the women were recorded. The women took Kegel exercise, consisting of 10 sets of contractions/day; each set included 10 repetitions, for at least 8 weeks. To evaluate the pelvic floor muscle strength, the modified Oxford grading system was used before and after Kegel exercising. The Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7); Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) and the Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) questions were compared before and after 8 weeks of Kegel exercising. The age, BMI, gravidity, menopausal status, macrosomic fetus history, hypertension and asthma were similar between the groups. There were statistically significant lower scores in both IIQ-7 and UDI-6 before and after Kegel exercises within each group (p < 0.001). The mean change of the IIQ-7 and UDI-6 score was statistically significantly higher in the SUI group than in the MUI group (p = 0.023 and p = 0.003, respectively). Results of the Oxford scale were also statistically significantly higher after Kegel exercises within each group (p = < 0.001). In total, 68.4% of the women in the SUI group and 41.2% of the women in the MUI group reported improvements which were statistically significant (p = 0.02). We conclude that home-based Kegel exercises, with no supervision, have been found effective in women with SUI and MUI. The improvement was more prominent in women with SUI.

  17. Subject-Controlled, On-demand, Dorsal Genital Nerve Stimulation to Treat Urgency Urinary Incontinence; a Pilot

    PubMed Central

    van Breda, Hendrikje M. K.; Farag, Fawzy F.; Martens, Frank M. J.; Heesakkers, John P. F. A.; Rijkhoff, Nico J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of subject-controlled, on-demand, dorsal genital nerve (DGN) stimulation on non-neurogenic urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) in a domestic setting. Materials and Methods:Non-neurogenic patients >18 years with overactive bladder symptoms and UUI were included. Exclusion criteria were mainly stress urinary incontinence. Patients underwent 1 week of subject-controlled, on-demand, DGN stimulation, delivered by a percutaneously placed electrode near the DGN connected to an external stimulator (pulse-rate 20 Hz, pulse-width 300 μs). Patients activated the stimulator when feeling the urge to void and stimulated for 30 s. The amplitude was set at the highest tolerable level. A bladder diary including a severity score of the UUI episodes/void (scores: 0 = none, 1 = drops, 2 = dashes, 3 = soaks) and a padtest was kept 3 days prior to, during, and 3 days after the test period. The subjective improvement was also scored. Results: Seven patients (4 males/3 females) were enrolled, the mean age was 55 years (range 23–73). Six completed the test week. In the remaining patient the electrode migrated and was removed. 5/6 finalized the complete bladder diary, 1/6 recorded only the heavy incontinence episodes (score = 3). 4/6 completed the padtest. In all patients who finalized the bladder diary the number of UUI episodes decreased, in 3/5 with ≥60%. The heavy incontinence episodes (score = 3) were resolved in 2/6 patients, and improved ≥80% in the other 4. The severity score of the UUI episodes/void was improved with ≥ 60% in 3/5 patients. The mean subjective improvement was 73%. Conclusion: This feasibility study indicates that subject-controlled, on-demand DGN stimulation using a percutaneously placed electrode is possible over a longer time period, in a home setting, with a positive effect on non-neurogenic overactive bladder symptoms with UUI. Although the placement is an easy procedure, it is difficult to fixate the electrode to keep

  18. Urodynamic assessment of bladder and urethral function among men with lower urinary tract symptoms after radical prostatectomy: A comparison between men with and without urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hansol; Kim, Ki Bom; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Myong; Cho, Sung Yong; Oh, Seung-June

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared bladder and urethral functions following radical prostatectomy (RP) between men with and without urinary incontinence (UI), using a large-scale database from SNU-experts-of-urodynamics-leading (SEOUL) Study Group. Materials and Methods Since July 2004, we have prospectively collected data on urodynamics from 303 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) following RP at three affiliated hospitals of SEOUL Study Group. After excluding 35 patients with neurogenic abnormality, pelvic irradiation after surgery, or a history of surgery on the lower urinary tract, 268 men were evaluated. We compared the urodynamic findings between men who had LUTS with UI (postprostatectomy incontinence [PPI] group) and those who had LUTS without UI (non-PPI group). Results The mean age at an urodynamic study was 68.2 years. Overall, a reduced bladder compliance (≤20 mL/cmH2O) was shown in 27.2% of patients; and 31.3% patients had idiopathic detrusor overactivity. The patients in the PPI group were older (p=0.001) at an urodynamic study and had a lower maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP) (p<0.001), as compared with those in the non-PPI group. Bladder capacity and detrusor pressure during voiding were also significantly lower in the PPI group. In the logistic regression, only MUCP and maximum cystometric capacity were identified as the related factor with the presence of PPI. Conclusions In our study, significant number of patients with LUTS following RP showed a reduced bladder compliance and detrusor overactivity. PPI is associated with both impairment of the urethral closuring mechanism and bladder storage dysfunction. PMID:26682020

  19. Management of tissue excoriation in older patients with urinary or faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Copson, Dale

    This article discusses good skin care in relation to the management of incontinence. It outlines the structure and functions of the skin and describes how the skin changes as we age. It examines how incontinence can damage the skin and provides an overview of the current management methods that are used to prevent tissue excoriation. It also suggests an effective alternative that could be used if previous strategies have failed and the skin begins to breakdown, that is, the use of a silver regimen.

  20. Prevalence of overactive bladder and stress urinary incontinence in women who have sex with women: an internet-based survey.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Renea M; Breyer, Benjamin N; Li, Chin-Shang; Subak, Leslee L; Brown, Jeannete S; Shindel, Alan W

    2014-11-01

    Women who have sex with women (WSW) are a medically underserved population. Data on urologic health in WSW are scant. We hypothesized that the prevalence of urinary symptoms in WSW is similar to population norms and that urinary symptoms in WSW would be associated with known risk factors for urologic problems. WSW were recruited to participate in an internet-based survey via invitations, listserves, and social media. Primary outcome measures were the validated Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q) and a single question assessing stress urinary incontinence (SUI). OAB status was dichotomized by OAB-q score (0-8=none/mild; >8=moderate/severe). SUI was dichotomized by single item response (none/little bit of the time=none/mild; sometimes through always=moderate/severe). Ethnodemographic, health, sexuality, and relationship data was also collected. Multivariable logistic regression utilizing 17 factors was performed with SAS V9.2, followed by multivariable analysis with stepwise selection based on the initial analysis (included factors, p<0.25). The final study population consisted of 1,566 adult WSW with mean age 34.6±10.4 years. Moderate/severe OAB was present in 354 (23%) women; 275 (18%) reported moderate /severe SUI. Concomitant OAB and SUI were present in 183 (12%). In multivariable analysis with stepwise selection, OAB symptoms were significantly associated with diabetes, history of urinary tract infection, gynecologic surgery, routine health care, and consultation with a provider regarding urinary symptoms. SUI symptoms were associated with sexual bother. This is the first survey report of prevalence and associations of OAB and SUI in a population of WSW. SUI and OAB were prevalent in WSW. Further attention to urological health in WSW is warranted.

  1. Prevalence of Overactive Bladder and Stress Urinary Incontinence in Women Who Have Sex with Women: An Internet-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Renea M.; Breyer, Benjamin N.; Li, Chin-Shang; Subak, Leslee L.; Brown, Jeannete S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Women who have sex with women (WSW) are a medically underserved population. Data on urologic health in WSW are scant. We hypothesized that the prevalence of urinary symptoms in WSW is similar to population norms and that urinary symptoms in WSW would be associated with known risk factors for urologic problems. WSW were recruited to participate in an internet-based survey via invitations, listserves, and social media. Primary outcome measures were the validated Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q) and a single question assessing stress urinary incontinence (SUI). OAB status was dichotomized by OAB-q score (0–8=none/mild; >8=moderate/severe). SUI was dichotomized by single item response (none/little bit of the time=none/mild; sometimes through always=moderate/severe). Ethnodemographic, health, sexuality, and relationship data was also collected. Multivariable logistic regression utilizing 17 factors was performed with SAS V9.2, followed by multivariable analysis with stepwise selection based on the initial analysis (included factors, p<0.25). The final study population consisted of 1,566 adult WSW with mean age 34.6±10.4 years. Moderate/severe OAB was present in 354 (23%) women; 275 (18%) reported moderate /severe SUI. Concomitant OAB and SUI were present in 183 (12%). In multivariable analysis with stepwise selection, OAB symptoms were significantly associated with diabetes, history of urinary tract infection, gynecologic surgery, routine health care, and consultation with a provider regarding urinary symptoms. SUI symptoms were associated with sexual bother. This is the first survey report of prevalence and associations of OAB and SUI in a population of WSW. SUI and OAB were prevalent in WSW. Further attention to urological health in WSW is warranted. PMID:25314336

  2. An Evaluation of the Effects of the Transobturator Tape Procedure on Sexual Satisfaction in Women with Stress Urinary Incontinence Using the Libido Scoring System

    PubMed Central

    Narin, Raziye; Nazik, Hakan; Narin, Mehmet Ali; Aytan, Hakan; Api, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Hypothesis. Most women experience automatic urine leakage in their lifetimes. SUI is the most common type in women. Suburethral slings have become a standard surgical procedure for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence when conservative therapy failed. The treatment of stress urinary incontinence by suburethral sling may improve body image by reducing urinary leakage and may improve sexual satisfaction. Methods. A total of 59 sexually active patients were included in the study and underwent a TOT outside-in procedure. The LSS was applied in all patients by self-completion of questionnaires preoperatively and 6 months after the operation. General pleasure with the operation was measured by visual analogue score (VAS). Pre- and postoperative scores were recorded and analyzed using SPSS 11.5. Results. Two parameters of the LSS, orgasm and who starts the sexual activity, increased at a statistically significant rate. Conclusion. Sexual satisfaction and desire have partially improved after the TOT procedure. PMID:24288621

  3. Mirabegron, a β₃-adrenoceptor agonist for the potential treatment of urinary frequency, urinary incontinence or urgency associated with overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Tyagi, Vikas

    2010-10-01

    Mirabegron (YM-178), currently in development by Astellas Pharma Inc, is an orally active β₃-adrenoceptor (AR) agonist for the potential symptomatic treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). Mirabegron demonstrates nanomolar EC50 values against the human β₃-AR in biochemical assays with potent selectivity over the β₁- and β₂-ARs. Originally developed as a treatment for diabetes, the development of mirabegron was later refocused to OAB. Cystometric experiments in rats reported a reduction in resting intravesical pressure and contraction frequency in anesthetized rats, without any effect on the amplitude of micturition contraction. Mirabegron also reduced non-micturition bladder contractions in an awake rat model of bladder outlet obstruction. Top-line results from clinical trials to date indicate that mirabegron has been well tolerated with significant efficacy in reducing the number of incontinence episodes and mean micturition frequency in patients. Evidence of cytochrome P450 (CYP)2D6 inhibition in clinical trials highlighted a concern for pharmacokinetic interaction with other drugs that are CYP2D6 substrates, as confirmed by a rise in the pharmacokinetic parameters of desipramine with concomitant administration of mirabegron. Mirabegron exhibits a novel mode of action in targeting the β₃-AR for bladder relaxation, and the studies and trials conducted to date suggest mirabegron as a promising new treatment in the management of OAB symptoms, such as increased urinary urgency and frequency, and urgency incontinence.

  4. Self-reported urge urinary incontinence (UUI) among older Mexican-American men: risk factors and psycho-social consequences.

    PubMed

    Gerst, K; Ray, L A; Samper-Ternent, R; Espino, D V; Markides, K S

    2011-12-01

    Extant literature on Urge Urinary Incontinence (UUI) focuses on women and non-Hispanic Whites and little is known about ethnic minority men. We analyzed 700 Mexican-American men aged 75 and older from the fifth Wave (2004/5) of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly. Logistic regression analyses examined risk factors for self-reported UUI and the impact of UUI on mental health and social support. Twenty-nine percent reported having difficulty holding their urine until they could get to a toilet. Men with more co-morbid conditions and men with prostate problems were more likely to report UUI symptoms. Men with UUI were less likely to report having a confidant and had a higher risk of high depressive symptoms. This study is the first to examine risk factors for and consequences of self-reported UUI among older Mexican-American men using a large community-based survey.

  5. [The surgical treatment of urinary stress incontinence in women by using a tube flap from the vagina].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Pushkar', D Iu; Labazanov, G A

    1996-01-01

    According to statistical estimates, incidence of urinary stress incontinence (USI) in females ranges from 3 to 20%. Operative correction of USI is feasible by 200 methods. The authors propose one more procedure which implies cutting out of tube graft from the anterior vaginal wall followed by the graft fixation in the bladder cervical region and placing prolen supporting ligatures into the suprapubic area with a special needle. In 1992-1995 such operation was performed in 55 USI females with positive effect in 48 (89%) patients. The technique provides enhanced mobilization of the bladder posterior wall and paraurethral space performing plastic reconstruction of cystocele. Moreover, creation of vaginal tube graft in the zone of urethrovesical segment contributes to reconstruction of normal anatomy. Thus, sling operations are method of choice in the treatment of patients with type 3 USI.

  6. Management of Urinary Incontinence in Complete Bladder Duplication by Injection of Bulking Agent at Bladder Neck Level into the Proximal Urethra

    PubMed Central

    Khorramirouz, Reza; Ladi Seyedian, Seyedeh Sanam; Keihani, Sorena; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Bladder duplication is a rare entity in children. The term encompasses a wide spectrum of anomalies from isolated bladder duplication in coronal or sagittal planes to duplicated bladder exstrophy and associated musculoskeletal and visceral anomalies. Given this wide variability, the treatment of these patients is not standardized. We hereby present a female patient with chief complaint of long-standing urinary incontinence who had complete bladder and urethral duplication and pubic diastasis. The patient was treated with bulking agent injection at the incompetent bladder neck and proximal urethra with resolution of incontinence, obviating the need for extensive surgeries. PMID:26904349

  7. Risk factors for the development of stress urinary incontinence during pregnancy in primigravidae: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sangsawang, Bussara

    2014-07-01

    The most common type of urinary incontinence (UI) in pregnant women is stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The number of pregnant women with SUI was variable, the prevalence ranged from 18.6% to 75% and increased with gestational age. It can affect the quality of life (QoL) of approximately 54.3% of all pregnant women in four domains including physical activity, travel, social relationships and emotional health. Pregnancy is one of the main risk factors for the development of SUI in young women. Physiological changes during pregnancy, such as increasing pressure of the growing uterus and fetal weight on the pelvic floor muscle (PFM) throughout pregnancy, together with pregnancy-related hormonal changes such as increased progesterone, decreased relaxin, and decreased collagen levels, may lead to reduced strength and supportive and sphincteric function of the PFM. Pregnancy may associate with the reduction of the PFM strength which can develop the SUI. However, the exact causes of pregnancy-related SUI remain unclear. Multiple factors have been found to be associated with the development of SUI during pregnancy. In genetic risk factors, aging is an important role in SUI development. The other risk factors such as obesity, smoking, constipation, pre-pregnancy SUI, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) that utilized preventive strategies can reduce SUI in pregnant women. The purpose of this review is to identify the risk factors for the development of SUI in pregnant women. These understanding can be useful for health professions to inform and counsel the pregnant women to prevent and reduce the risk factors that contribute to the development of SUI during pregnancy and postpartum period.

  8. Myogenic Potential of Whole Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo for Usage in Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Giammò, Alessandro; Boido, Marina; Rustichelli, Deborah; Mareschi, Katia; Errichiello, Edoardo; Parola, Maurizio; Ferrero, Ivana; Fagioli, Franca; Vercelli, Alessandro; Carone, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, defined as the complaint of any involuntary loss of urine, is a pathological condition, which affects 30% females and 15% males over 60, often following a progressive decrease of rhabdosphincter cells due to increasing age or secondary to damage to the pelvic floor musculature, connective tissue and/or nerves. Recently, stem cell therapy has been proposed as a source for cell replacement and for trophic support to the sphincter. To develop new therapeutic strategies for urinary incontinence, we studied the interaction between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and muscle cells in vitro; thereafter, aiming at a clinical usage, we analyzed the supporting role of MSCs for muscle cells in vitro and in in vivo xenotransplantation. MSCs can express markers of the myogenic cell lineages and give rise, under specific cell culture conditions, to myotube-like structures. Nevertheless, we failed to obtain mixed myotubes both in vitro and in vivo. For in vivo transplantation, we tested a new protocol to collect human MSCs from whole bone marrow, to get larger numbers of cells. MSCs, when transplanted into the pelvic muscles close to the external urethral sphincter, survived for a long time in absence of immunosuppression, and migrated into the muscle among fibers, and towards neuromuscular endplates. Moreover, they showed low levels of cycling cells, and did not infiltrate blood vessels. We never observed formation of cell masses suggestive of tumorigenesis. Those which remained close to the injection site showed an immature phenotype, whereas those in the muscle had more elongated morphologies. Therefore, MSCs are safe and can be easily transplanted without risk of side effects in the pelvic muscles. Further studies are needed to elucidate their integration into muscle fibers, and to promote their muscular transdifferentiation either before or after transplantation. PMID:23029081

  9. Effectiveness and Safety of Electroacupuncture on Poststroke Urinary Incontinence: Study Protocol of a Pilot Multicentered, Randomized, Parallel, Sham-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This pilot multicentered, randomized, parallel, sham-controlled trial is intended to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture therapy for poststroke patients with urinary incontinence. Forty stroke survivors aged >19 years will be recruited in 2 hospitals in the Republic of Korea. Patients who experienced stroke within 2 years and satisfy criteria of urinary frequencies ≥2 with either 3 to 4 points on the Patient Perception of Intensity of Urgency Scale or 13 points or more on the Korean version of the International Prostate Symptom Scale (K-IPSS) will be identified, along with other eligibility criteria. Patients will be randomly allocated to either a treatment or control group to receive 10 sessions of electroacupuncture or sham therapies, respectively. Patients and outcome assessors will be blinded. The primary outcome is the change of Total Urgency and Frequency Score between the baseline and the trial endpoint. The K-IPSS, the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence Short Form, and the Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Outcome Score will be evaluated for effectiveness assessment. Adverse events will be reported after every session. The Blinding Index will also be calculated. Data will be statistically analyzed with 0.05 significance levels by 2-sided testing. PMID:28042304

  10. Telephone - delivered quality of life after 365 male stress urinary incontinence (SUI) operations

    PubMed Central

    Bretterbauer, Katharina Maria; Huber, Erik Randall; Remzi, Mesut; Huebner, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To assess patient satisfaction and quality of life and factors that may be related to these outcomes. Materials and Methods: Between 2000 and 2008 a retrospective chart review and telephone survey of all surgeries for male SUI was performed. Average age at times of operation was 69.4 ± 7.4 (median 69). As part of the survey 270 of 365 patients were available (response rate: 74%). The average follow up time (from operation to telephone survey) was 34.8 ± 22.8 months (median 32). Results: Pad use per day improved significantly after operation from 6.23±5.3 to 1.61±2.92 pads/day (p=0.001). 74.7% (n=198) declared to be continent with one safety pad and 87.7% (n=236) confirmed the postoperative improvement of incontinence. 189 (70.5%) patients were “very satisfied” and “satisfied”. In 81% (n=218) the expectation in operation could be met, therefore 84.3% (n=226) would undergo it again and 90.3% (n=243) would recommend it to others. Lower age (rs=0.211), few postoperative pads per day (rs=0.58), high reduction of pads (rs=-0.35) and physical activity level (rs=0.2) correlate significantly with better satisfaction. Conclusions: Eighty-seven pint seven percent (87.7%) of our incontinence operations (n=236) lead to an improvement, which is independent from the number of prior incontinence operations and preoperative pad count. The postoperative quality of life remains constant over the observed follow up time. Certain subgroups of patients (younger age, high physical activity level, large reduction of pads) demonstrated superior satisfaction rates. PMID:27532111

  11. A Comparative Study of Whole Body Vibration Training and Pelvic Floor Muscle Training on Women's Stress Urinary Incontinence: Three- Month Follow- Up

    PubMed Central

    Farzinmehr, Azizeh; Moezy, Azar; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Kashanian, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether Whole Body Vibration Training (WBVT) is effective at improving pelvic floor muscles strength in women with Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI). Materials and methods: The study was designed as a randomized clinical trial. 43 women with SUI were randomly assigned in two groups; WBVT and Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT) and received interventions for four weeks. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength, quality of life and incontinence intensity were evaluated. All measurements were conducted pre and post intervention and also after 3 months in all participants. The ANOVA and the independent sample t test were applied respectively to determine the differences in each group and between the groups. Results: This study showed the WBVT protocol in this study was effective in pelvic floor muscles strength similar to PFMT, and also in reducing the severity of incontinence and increasing I-QOL questionnaire score. We found significant differences in each group pre and post intervention (p = 0.0001); but no significant difference in comparison of two groups' outcomes. Also after three-month follow up, there was no significant difference between groups. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed the beneficial effects of WBVT in improving pelvic floor muscles strength and quality of life in patients with urinary incontinence in four-week treatment period and after three months follow up. PMID:27047560

  12. Diaper area granuloma of incontinence.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, W Z; Abahussein, A A; Alzayer, A A

    1992-05-01

    Granulomas in the diaper area developed in four patients; two male infants following surgery for Hirschsprung's disease and two female children with urinary (and/or fecal) incontinence. The use of the term 'Diaper area granuloma of incontinence' is suggested to describe these lesions seen in the elderly, as well as in incontinent infants and children.

  13. Guideline-Based Strategies in the Surgical Treatment of Female Urinary Incontinence: The New Gold Standard is Almost the Same as the Old One

    PubMed Central

    Viereck, V.; Bader, W.; Lobodasch, K.; Pauli, F.; Bentler, R.; Kölbl, H.

    2016-01-01

    The modern sling procedures for treating female stress urinary incontinence encompass numerous methods, materials and manufacturers. On the basis of the current S2e guidelines, the methods used most frequently in the diagnosis of and therapy for stress urinary incontinence in women are critically illustrated. An individualised procedure is necessary for the choice of the surgical method, especially in the presence of accompanying pathologies. This article is intended to help the treating physician to carry out quality-assured diagnostics and therapy for the patient and to offer the best possible urogynaecological management. In addition to the complications and chances of success of the surgical options, the legal aspects of therapy planning are also taken into consideration. PMID:27570251

  14. Associations between low back pain, urinary incontinence, and abdominal muscle recruitment as assessed via ultrasonography in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Vânia F.; Amorim, Juleimar S. C.; Pereira, Aline M.; Ferreira, Paulo H.; Pereira, Leani S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) and urinary incontinence (UI) are highly prevalent among elderly individuals. In young adults, changes in trunk muscle recruitment, as assessed via ultrasound imaging, may be associated with lumbar spine stability. Objective: To assess the associations between LBP, UI, and the pattern of transversus abdominis (TrA), internal (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscle recruitment in the elderly as evaluated by ultrasound imaging. Method: Fifty-four elderly individuals (mean age: 72±5.2 years) who complained of LBP and/or UI as assessed by the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form, and ultrasound imaging were included in the study. The statistical analysis comprised a multiple linear regression model, and a p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results: The regression models for the TrA, IO, and EO muscle thickness levels explained 2.0% (R2=0.02; F=0.47; p=0.628), 10.6% (R2=0.106; F=3.03; p=0.057), and 10.1% (R2=0.101; F=2.70; p=0.077) of the variability, respectively. None of the regression models developed for the abdominal muscles exhibited statistical significance. A significant and negative association (p=0.018; β=-0.0343) was observed only between UI and IO recruitment. Conclusion: These results suggest that age-related factors may have interfered with the findings of the study, thus emphasizing the need to perform ultrasound imaging-based studies to measure abdominal muscle recruitment in the elderly. PMID:25714438

  15. Quality of life and objective outcome assessment in women with tape division after surgery for stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Daniela; Bjelic-Radisic, Vesna; Höllein, Anna; Tamussino, Karl; Aigmüller, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Midurethral tapes may cause long-term complications such as voiding dysfunction, groin pain, de novo urgency or mesh erosion, which necessitate a reoperation. There is a paucity of data regarding health related quality of life in patients undergoing tape removal. The aim of the study was to evaluate quality of life (QoL) and objective outcome after midurethral tape division or excision. Methods All patients who underwent a midurethral tape division for voiding difficulties, pain or therapy resistant de novo overactive bladder between 1999 and 2014 were invited for follow-up. A control group with a suburethral tape without division was established in a 1:2 ratio and matched for age, tape used and year of tape insertion. Patients completed the Kings´ Health Questionnaire (KHQ), Incontinence Outcome Questionnaire, Female Sexual Function Index Questionnaire and the Patient Global Impression of Improvement score. Results Tape division or excision was performed in 32 women. Overall, 15 (60%) of 25 women who were alive were available for clinical examination and completed the questionnaires. Tape division was performed for voiding dysfunction (n = 7), overactive bladder (n = 2), mesh extrusion (n = 3) and ongoing pain (n = 3). Median time to tape division/excision was 10 months. Three women in the tape division group had undergone reoperation for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). At a median follow-up of 11 years (IQR 9–13) subjective SUI rate was 53% (8/15 women) in the tape division group and 17% (5/30) in the control group (p = 0.016), with no significant differences in objective SUI rates between groups. With regard to quality of life, the study group had significantly worse scores in the SUI related domains role limitation, physical limitation, severity measures and social limitations (KHQ) compared to the control group. Conclusions Women needing tape division or excision have lower SUI related QoL scores compared to controls mostly because of higher

  16. Urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor dysfunctions in female athletes in Brazil: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Almeida, M B A; Barra, A A; Saltiel, F; Silva-Filho, A L; Fonseca, A M R M; Figueiredo, E M

    2016-09-01

    The pelvic floor (PF) provides support to all pelvic organs, as well as appropriately closure/opening mechanism of the urethra, vagina, and anus. Therefore, it is likely that female athletes involved in high-impact and in strong-effort activities are at risk for the occurrence of urinary incontinence (UI). This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of UI and other PF dysfunctions (PFD) [anal incontinence (AI), symptoms of constipation, dyspareunia, vaginal laxity, and pelvic organ prolapse] in 67 amateur athletes (AT) compared with a group 96 of nonathletes (NAT). An ad hoc survey based on questions from reliable and valid instruments was developed to investigate the occurrence of PFD symptoms. The risk of UI was higher in AT group (odds ratio: 2.90; 95% CI: 1.50-5.61), mostly among artistic gymnastics and trampoline, followed by swimming and judo athletes. Whereas, AT group reported less straining to evacuate (OR: 0.46; 95% CI: 0.22-0.96), manual assistance to defecate (OR: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.05-1.12), and a higher stool frequency (OR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.13-0.64) than NAT group. The occurrence of loss of gas and sexual symptoms was high for both groups when compared with literature, although with no statistical difference between them. Pelvic organ prolapse was only reported by nonathletes. Athletes are at higher risk to develop UI, loss of gas, and sexual dysfunctions, either practicing high-impact or strong-effort activities. Thus, pelvic floor must be considered as an entity and addressed as well. Also, women involved in long-term high-impact and strengthening sports should be advised of the impact of such activities on pelvic floor function and offered preventive PFD strategies as well.

  17. Therapeutic Efficacy of a New Procedure for Male Urinary Incontinence Combining a Suburethral Polypropylene Mesh and Cardiovascular Patch

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in men is a complication secondary to prostatectomy or resulting from neurological lesions. This study presents our experiences with male suburethral slings over the past decade. Methods In this study, we considered patients who presented with SUI and were diagnosed with an intrinsic sphincteric deficiency due to postprostatectomy incontinence (PPI) or other causes (non-PPI). Patients who underwent the suburethral sling procedure using a polypropylene mesh and a cardiovascular patch were retrospectively included. An urodynamic study was performed before and after the operation. Global response assessment (GRA) and SUI grading were used for surgical outcome. The revision rate and the infection rate were also evaluated. Results A total 31 patients were enrolled in this study; the mean patient age was 59.5±18.9 years, and the mean follow-up period was 36.9±29.4 months. Fourteen patients comprised the non-PPI group and 17 were in the PPI group. The preoperative SUI of all patients were categorized as a moderate to severe problem according to the SUI grade, with a mean score of 2.32±0.48 before the operation and 0.48±0.57 after the operation. With a mean score of 2.35±0.71, GRA showed that the patients were satisfied with the treatment. After the sling procedure, 4 patients (13%) reported a mild improvement, 12 (38.7%) a moderate improvement, while 15 (48.4%) reported an excellent improvement. Six patients (19.4%), including 5 from the non-PPI group (35.7%) and 1 (5.9%) from the PPI group (P=0.037), underwent sling removal because of infection. Conclusions The male suburethral sling procedure using a polypropylene mesh and a cardiovascular patch is a safe, efficacious, and inexpensive surgical procedure for PPI. In cases of neurological incontinence, however, the higher infection rate in non-PPI patients means that they should be carefully managed. PMID:28361511

  18. Prevalence of Bowel Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Urinary Incontinence in Adults. December 12, 2007. Drossman DA, Li Z, Andruzzi E, et al. U.S. Householder ... Rectum Vol. 41, No. 10 October 1998. Drossman DA, Sandler RS, Broom CM, et al. Urgency and ...

  19. AB312. SPR-39 The use of support vector machine in the prediction of stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Brian M.; Zhao, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is the involuntary leakage of urine due to an increase in abdominal pressure and it affects 30% of women over the age of 40. One of the primary risk factor is childbirth. The baby’s weight, head size and maternal age are just some of the variables clinicians can use to predict if women will develop SUI. Additional, previous family history of SUI is another predictor for development suggesting a genetic role in development of SUI. A new method used to create predictive models is a support vector machine (SVM) use in the field of cancer biology. The purpose of the study was to determine if a SVM algorithm could construct a model that can improve the performance of predicting SUI compared with previous methods. Methods Data was obtained from the Pelvic Floor Disorder Network Childbirth and Pelvic symptoms Study (CAPS). Only information from the Urinary Incontinence and general data forms were used (e.g., maternal age, baby weight, head circumferences). We compared our models efficiency to a previously published model. Based on the data, we employ SVM algorithm to construct a model for predicting SUI. The basic idea of SVM is to find an optimal hyper-plane which can separate the data of one class from another class. In our study, we first divided the preprocessed data into two subsets, one is training data set, and the other one is testing data set. The testing data set was utilized to train an optimal model, that is, to find an optimal hyper-plane. The testing data set was employed to test the performance of the trained model. In order to obtain stable performance, we use 10 folds cross validation to train the model and to test its performance. Results An optimal hyper-plane was determined. The results indicate the accuracy of prediction is around 70 percent, which is a little better than that of previous methods at 69 percent. Conclusions The proposed method in this study can predict SUI. Further investigation is needed

  20. [Guidelines for the surgical treatment of female urinary stress incontinence in women using the suburethral sling].

    PubMed

    Delorme, E; Hermieu, J-F

    2010-02-01

    The complications of suburethral slings are rare but varied. The operative complications result most often from errors in surgical technique. Intraoperative cystoscopy is required when implanting a retropubic sling to diagnose vesical transfixion intraoperatively. Functional complications are the most frequent. They require a true diagnostic strategy before proposing treatment adapted to the patient. The first examination should be an endoscopic urethrovesical exploration to eliminate vesicourethral transfixion by the suburethral slings. Acute postoperative retention most often stems from surgical relaxation of the suburethral slings during the immediate postoperative period. Dysuria is more easily reversed if it is treated early with resection or ablation of the suburethral slings. De novo urge incontinence has many etiologies : infection, urethral obstruction, more rarely cystocele, and idiopathic causes. With recurrent stress incontinence after suburethral slings, management will depend on anamnesis, as well as the clinical and urodynamic workups. The treatment could involve the sling (second suburethral sling, kinking of the suburethral sling); however, another therapeutic alternative will have to be suggested relatively early (artificial sphincter, ACT balloons, etc.). The recommended use of the large-mesh knitted monofilament polypropylene suburethral sling has considerably reduced the risk of infectious complications related to the prosthetic material. In case of vaginal erosion, prosthesis infection must be eliminated, which requires removing the sling. Simple erosion can be treated with partial resection of the exposed sling and vaginal suture. Many nonabsorbant palliative treatments have been reported, often with small series. They can be grouped into three types: extra-urethral occlusive devices, intra-urethral obstructive devices, and intravaginal support devices. The use of a pessary or other vaginal devices can be proposed, in particular with

  1. Incidence and Risk Factors of De novo Stress Urinary Incontinence after Pelvic Floor Reconstruction: A Nested Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi-Yan; Cao, Ting-Ting; Wang, Run-Zhi; Yang, Xin; Sun, Xiu-Li; Wang, Jian-Liu

    2017-01-01

    Background: Some patients with pelvic organ prolapse may suffer from lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), especially stress urinary incontinence (SUI) named de novo SUI after pelvic floor reconstruction. This study aimed to investigate the incidence and risk factors of de novo SUI. Methods: This is a nested case-control study of 533 patients who underwent pelvic floor reconstruction due to pelvic organ prolapse (POP) at the Department of Gynecology in Peking University People's Hospital from January 2011 to March 2013. According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 401 patients were enrolled in the study with the follow-up rate of 74.8% (101 patients lost to follow-up). There were 75 patients with de novo SUI postoperatively. According to the ratio of 1:3, we ensured the number of control group (n = 225). The preoperative urinary dynamics, POP-quantification scores, and LUTS were compared between the two groups by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to investigate the risk factors of de novo SUI. Results: The incidence of de novo SUI was 25% (75/300). Univariate analysis showed that the ratio of lower urinary tract obstruction (LUTO) before surgery in de novo SUI group was significantly higher than the control group (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.1–4.0], P = 0.022). The interaction test of LUTO and other factors displayed that Aa value was an interaction factor. With the increasing score of Aa, the incidence of de novo SUI become higher (OR = 2.1, 95% CI [1.0–3.7], P = 0.045). After multivariable adjustment, multiple regression analysis showed that LUTO was independently associated with a greater risk of de novo SUI after pelvic floor surgery (OR = 2.3, 95% CI [1.2–4.6], P = 0.013). Conclusions: Preoperative LUTO in patients with POP is a high-risk factor of de novo SUI, and high score of Aa-point is related to the occurrence of de novo SUI, which might be due to the outlet obstruction caused by bladder

  2. Sexual Function Among Overweight and Obese Women With Urinary Incontinence in a Randomized Controlled Trial of an Intensive Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alison J.; Stewart, Anita L.; Hernandez, Alexandra L.; Shen, Hui; Subak, Leslee L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We examined sexual function in overweight and obese women with urinary incontinence, and evaluated the effects of an intensive behavioral weight reduction intervention on sexual function in this population. Materials and Methods: A total of 338 overweight and obese women reporting 10 or more incontinence episodes weekly were randomized to an intensive behavioral change (226) or structured education program (112) for 6 months. Sexual function was assessed using self-administered questionnaires. Multivariate regression was used to examine factors associated with baseline and 6-month change in sexual function as well as intervention effects. Results: Two-thirds of participants (233) were sexually active at baseline but more than half (188) reported low desire and a quarter (91) were sexually dissatisfied. More than half of sexually active participants (123) reported problems with arousal, lubrication, orgasm or incontinence during sex. Compared to controls women in the intervention group demonstrated a borderline increase in frequency of sexual activity at 6 months (OR 1.34, 95% CI 0.99–1.81, p = 0.06) but no differences in satisfaction (OR 1.28, 95% CI 0.83–1.99, p = 0.26), desire (OR 1.12, 95% CI 0.79–1.61, p = 0.52) or problems (β ± SE 0.03 ± 0.07, p = 0.68 for intervention effects on problems score). Neither clinical incontinence severity nor body mass index was independently associated with baseline or 6-month change in function (p >0.10 for all). Conclusions: Sexual dysfunction is common in overweight and obese women with incontinence but the severity of this dysfunction may not be directly related to the severity of incontinence or obesity. An intensive 6-month behavioral weight reduction intervention did not significantly improve sexual function in this population relative to controls. PMID:19296980

  3. Female stress urinary incontinence: clinical efficacy and satisfaction after transobturator adjustable tape sling. An observational longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Patrelli, Tito Silvio; Gizzo, Salvatore; Noventa, Marco; Dall'Asta, Andrea; Musarò, Andrea; Faioli, Raffaele; Zanni, Giuliano Carlo; Piantelli, Giovanni; Lukanovic, Adolf; Bacchi Modena, Alberto; Berretta, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    We performed an observational longitudinal cohort study on patients affected by stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and surgically treated with a transobturator adjustable tape sling (TOA) in order to evaluate this surgical procedure in terms of efficacy, safety, quality of life (QoL) improvement, and patient satisfaction. For all patients, we recorded: general features, preoperative SUI risk factors, obstetrics history, preoperative urodynamic tests, intraoperative/postoperative complications, number of postoperative sling regulations, postmicturition residue, and hospital stay. All patients were asked to complete the validated short version of the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) questionnaire 18 months after discharge to evaluate the efficacy of the TOA system. We added 2 adjunctive items to the UDI-6 in order to evaluate patient satisfaction and QoL. All 77 surgical procedures were performed under locoregional anesthesia without complications. Postoperative TOA regulations were performed in 46.8% of patients immediately after the procedure and in 14.3% during hospitalization. Before discharge, postmicturition residue was negative in 67 cases and less than 50 cc in 10 cases. Mean hospital stay was 2.18 days. From the questionnaire evaluation, we found that after the procedure, 90.9% of patients showed a complete regression of urinary symptoms, 1.3% obtained considerable relief from preoperative symptoms, and 6.6% reported poor or absent symptom improvements; 75.3% of patients were totally satisfied and 5.2% totally disappointed. The possibility of modulating postoperative sling tension and reusing the surgical materials in association with short hospitalization as well as high patient satisfaction render TOA a safe, effective, and low-cost technique for the treatment of female SUI.

  4. Optical clearing of vaginal tissues, ex vivo, for minimally invasive laser treatment of female stress urinary incontinence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Hung; Myers, Erinn M.; Kennelly, Michael J.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2017-01-01

    Near-infrared laser energy in conjunction with applied tissue cooling is being investigated for thermal remodeling of the endopelvic fascia during minimally invasive treatment of female stress urinary incontinence. Previous computer simulations of light transport, heat transfer, and tissue thermal damage have shown that a transvaginal approach is more feasible than a transurethral approach. However, results were suboptimal, and some undesirable thermal insult to the vaginal wall was still predicted. This study uses experiments and computer simulations to explore whether application of an optical clearing agent (OCA) can further improve optical penetration depth and completely preserve the vaginal wall during subsurface treatment of the endopelvic fascia. Several different mixtures of OCA's were tested, and 100% glycerol was found to be the optimal agent. Optical transmission studies, optical coherence tomography, reflection spectroscopy, and computer simulations [including Monte Carlo (MC) light transport, heat transfer, and Arrhenius integral model of thermal damage] using glycerol were performed. The OCA produced a 61% increase in optical transmission through porcine vaginal wall at 37°C after 30 min. The MC model showed improved energy deposition in endopelvic fascia using glycerol. Without OCA, 62%, 37%, and 1% of energy was deposited in vaginal wall, endopelvic fascia, and urethral wall, respectively, compared with 50%, 49%, and 1% using OCA. Use of OCA also resulted in 0.5-mm increase in treatment depth, allowing potential thermal tissue remodeling at a depth of 3 mm with complete preservation of the vaginal wall.

  5. Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence by Cinnamaldehyde, the Major Constituent of the Chinese Medicinal Herb Ramulus Cinnamomi

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Ning; Chen, Wen-Chi; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chen, Huey-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a common disorder in middle-aged women and the elderly population. Although surgical treatment of SUI has progressed, pharmacological therapies remain unelucidated. We screened potential herbal medicines against SUI with an ex vivo organ bath assay. Ramulus Cinnamomi and its major constituent cinnamaldehyde cause a high contractile force of the urethra and a low contractile force of blood vessels. Cinnamaldehyde dose-dependently reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in RAW 264.7 cells. In the vaginal distension- (VD-) induced SUI model in mice, cinnamaldehyde significantly reversed the VD-induced SUI physical signs and reduced blood pressure. Cinnamaldehyde may offer therapeutic potential against SUI without the possible side effect of hypertension. The modulation of several SUI-related proteins including myosin, iNOS, survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, and superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD3) may play some crucial roles in the therapeutic approach against SUI. This information may offer clues to the pathogenesis of SUI and open additional avenues for potential therapy strategies. PMID:24711852

  6. Pelvic floor muscle training and adjunctive therapies for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Patricia B; Grimmer, Karen A; Deenadayalan, Yamini

    2006-01-01

    Background Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a prevalent and costly condition which may be treated surgically or by physical therapy. The aim of this review was to systematically assess the literature and present the best available evidence for the efficacy and effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) performed alone and together with adjunctive therapies (eg biofeedback, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones) for the treatment of female SUI. Methods All major electronic sources of relevant information were systematically searched to identify peer-reviewed English language abstracts or papers published between 1995 and 2005. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and other study designs eg non-randomised trials, cohort studies, case series, were considered for this review in order to source all the available evidence relevant to clinical practice. Studies of adult women with a urodynamic or clinical diagnosis of SUI were eligible for inclusion. Excluded were studies of women who were pregnant, immediately post-partum or with a diagnosis of mixed or urge incontinence. Studies with a PFMT protocol alone and in combination with adjunctive physical therapies were considered. Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of each study, its level of evidence and the methodological quality. Due to the heterogeneity of study designs, the results are presented in narrative format. Results Twenty four studies, including 17 RCTs and seven non-RCTs, met the inclusion criteria. The methodological quality of the studies varied but lower quality scores did not necessarily indicate studies from lower levels of evidence. This review found consistent evidence from a number of high quality RCTs that PFMT alone and in combination with adjunctive therapies is effective treatment for women with SUI with rates of 'cure' and 'cure/improvement' up to 73% and 97% respectively. The contribution of adjunctive therapies is unclear and there is limited evidence about treatment

  7. A real-world comparative assessment of complications following various mid-urethral sling procedures for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Magee, Glenn; Roy, Sanjoy; Hinoul, Piet; Moretz, Chad; Kozarev, Roumen; Waters, Heidi; Whitmore, Kristene

    2012-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence affects a significant proportion of the adult female population in the United States with prevalence increasing with growing age. Mid-urethral slings are among surgical options offering important improvement in the condition. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes of different mid-urethral sling products with respect to postsurgery complications. This retrospective study utilized data from the Premier Perspective Database for mid-urethral sling procedures between 2005 and 2009. Patients were grouped into retropubic or transobturator cohorts, and these cohorts were further divided by the sling utilized during the procedure. Surgical outcomes and 12-month complication rates were assessed. In general, there were fewer complications noted for transobturator procedures than for retropubic procedures. In the retropubic category, Gynecare TVT had significantly lower rates of urinary obstruction/retention than other retropubic procedures. In the transobturator category, lower rates of overall pelvic complications as well as urologic complications, including urgency incontinence and urinary tract infections, were observed in the Gynecare TVTO subgroup than other transobturator procedures. Results of this study confirm the low overall rate of complications for midurethral sling procedures while at the same time suggesting that product choice may also have an impact on complication rates.

  8. Salutary effect of gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in two different stress urinary incontinence models in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Jandric, Ivan; Vrcic, Hrvoje; Balen, Marica Jandric; Kolenc, Danijela; Brcic, Luka; Radic, Bozo; Drmic, Domagoj; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2013-01-01

    Background Since an originally anti-ulcer stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL 14736) was shown to promote healing of injured striated muscle and smooth muscle in the gastrointestinal tract, we explored its therapeutic potentials for leak point pressure (LPP) recovery in rat stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after transabdominal urethrolysis (TU) and prolonged vaginal dilatation (VD). Material/Methods During a 7-day period, TU-rats and VD-rats (or healthy rats) received BPC 157, either (i) intraperitoneally, 10 μg/kg or 10 ng/kg, once daily (first administration 30 min after surgery, last 24 h before LPP-testing and sacrifice), or (ii) per-orally, 10 μg/kg in drinking water (0.16 μg/mL, 12 mL/rat/day). Vesicourethral segments were harvested for immunohistochemical evaluation. Results All BPC 157 regimens counteracted decrease of LPP values in TU-rats and VD-rats. Additionally, BPC 157-TU rats (μg-intraperitoneally or per-orally) and BPC 157-VD rats (μg intraperitoneally) reached LPP values originally noted in healthy rats. Conversely, in healthy rats, BPC 157 did not alter LPP. Immunohistochemical studies revealed higher desmin (delineates striated organization of skeletal muscle), smooth muscle actin, and CD34 (angiogenic marker) positivity within the urethral wall in BPC 157-treated rats vs. controls, as well as overall preserved muscle/connective tissue ratio assessed with Mallory’s trichrome staining. Conclusions Pentadecapeptide BPC 157, applied parenterally or per-orally, appears to ameliorate the SUI in rat models, improving the otherwise detrimental course of healing after VD and TU, which may be analogous to human injury. These beneficial effects may possibly be selectively used in future strategies for treatment of SUI. PMID:23478678

  9. The Influence of Back Pain and Urinary Incontinence on Daily Tasks of Mothers at 12 Months Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Sheila W.; Tough, Suzanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study examined back pain (BP) and/or urinary incontinence (UI) impact on the ability to perform daily tasks at 12 months after childbirth in healthy reproductive women who sought maternity care in community based family practice clinics. Methods This study is a secondary analysis from the All Our Babies Study, a prospective, community-based pregnancy cohort in Calgary, Alberta. Maternal self-reported information on demographics, lifestyle, experiences with pregnancy and childbirth, occurrence of BP, UI and consequent impairment of daily tasks were collected by questionnaires administered before 25 weeks, at 34-36 weeks gestation and at 4 and 12 months postpartum. The occurrence and severity of BP and UI at one year after childbirth was assessed using descriptive and bivariate analyses. Logistic regression models examined the association between demographic and obstetrical variables and the severity of functional impairment due to UI and BP. Results From 1574 women with singleton pregnancies included in the study, 1212 (77%) experienced BP, 773 (49%) UI, and 620 (40%) both BP and UI. From the 821 women reporting impairment of daily tasks due to BP, 199 (24 %) were moderately and 90 (11%) severely affected with the remainder, 532 (64%) being mildly affected. From 267 women with functional impairment due to UI, 52 (19%) reported moderately to severe impairment in their ability to perform daily tasks. Obesity and parity were risk factors for impairment of daily functioning due to BP, whereas obesity and vaginal delivery increased the risk of moderate to severe impairment due to UI. Conclusions BP and UI are common occurrences 1 year after childbirth. Maternal performance of daily tasks and women’s health and quality of life are more often impaired due to BP than UI. Our study brings new evidence of the risk factors that predict severity and impact of these conditions on women functioning at 12 months postpartum. PMID:26083252

  10. Testing and Treating Women after Unsuccessful Conservative Treatments for Overactive Bladder or Mixed Urinary Incontinence: A Model-Based Economic Evaluation Based on the BUS Study

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Pelham; Middleton, Lee J.; Deeks, Jonathan J.; Daniels, Jane P.; Latthe, Pallavi; Coomarasamy, Arri; Rachaneni, Suneetha; McCooty, Shanteela; Verghese, Tina S.; Roberts, Tracy E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the cost-effectiveness of bladder ultrasonography, clinical history, and urodynamic testing in guiding treatment decisions in a secondary care setting for women failing first line conservative treatment for overactive bladder or urgency-predominant mixed urinary incontinence. Design Model-based economic evaluation from a UK National Health Service (NHS) perspective using data from the Bladder Ultrasound Study (BUS) and secondary sources. Methods Cost-effectiveness analysis using a decision tree and a 5-year time horizon based on the outcomes of cost per woman successfully treated and cost per Quality-Adjusted Life-Year (QALY). Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses, and a value of information analysis are also undertaken. Results Bladder ultrasonography is more costly and less effective test-treat strategy than clinical history and urodynamics. Treatment on the basis of clinical history alone has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of £491,100 per woman successfully treated and an ICER of £60,200 per QALY compared with the treatment of all women on the basis of urodynamics. Restricting the use of urodynamics to women with a clinical history of mixed urinary incontinence only is the optimal test-treat strategy on cost-effectiveness grounds with ICERs of £19,500 per woman successfully treated and £12,700 per QALY compared with the treatment of all women based upon urodynamics. Conclusions remained robust to sensitivity analyses, but subject to large uncertainties. Conclusions Treatment based upon urodynamics can be seen as a cost-effective strategy, and particularly when targeted at women with clinical history of mixed urinary incontinence only. Further research is needed to resolve current decision uncertainty. PMID:27513926

  11. [Fusion of the labia minora as a cause of urinary incontinence in a postmenopausal woman. A case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Nevarez Bernal, Roberto Armando; Meraz Avila, Diego

    2009-06-01

    Labial fusion is rarely presented in the postmenopausal age group, its predisposing factors are hipoestrogenism and a inflamation/repair process in the vaginal epithelium. Our case report involves a 73 years old woman that presents with urinary incontinence. On physical exploration, complete labial fusion was noted, a surgical approach was undertaken with liberation of the labia and fixation, postoperatory local estrogen ointment was indicated with complete recovery. The literature review confirmed that this was the ideal treatment and also confirms the role of local estrogen ointment as profilactic and therapeutic.

  12. Surgical management of stress urinary incontinence: Burch colposuspension, modified Pereyra and Stamey bladder neck suspension, and collagen injection--Toa Payoh Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Tay, K P; Lim, P H; Chng, H C

    1995-12-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 34 female patients who underwent corrective surgery for stress urinary incontinence over a 4-year period at the Toa Payoh Hospital. These patients were offered surgery only after an adequate trial of medical therapy, pelvic floor exercises and weight reduction. Bladder neck suspension operations were performed via the Burch, Stamey and modified Pereyra techniques. Towards the later part of this study, endoscopic injection of Collagen was performed as a salvage procedure in 2 patients. The Burch colposuspension gave uniformly good results, with all patients being completely dry. Seventy percent and sixty percent complete continence were achieved via the modified Pereyra and Stamey techniques respectively. Three patients required additional surgical procedures. Using these techniques, the overall results showed that 27 patients (79.4%) had complete urinary continence following surgery, while the remaining 7 patients (20.6%) experienced significant improvement of symptoms.

  13. Concomitant Laparoscopic Burch Urethropexy and Combined Vaginal-Laparoscopic Mesh Sling Removal (x2) for Pain and Persistent Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap-Wright, LaChanda; Miklos, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Although midurethral mesh tape slings are considered the standard of care in the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI), complications such as pain, dyspareunia, or erosion are known to occur in addition to persistent incontinence. The management of these types of mesh sling complications can be very complex, especially when the pain is not just isolated to the vagina but extends into other areas, such as the abdomen which requires a much more extensive dissection. Additionally, if a mesh sling needs to be removed, the patient will most likely have a return of her SUI that often necessitates subsequent treatment. Vaginal and/or laparoscopic removal or revision of mesh tape slings should be considered in patients presenting with complications such as vaginal pain, abdominal pain, dyspareunia, or urinary obstructive symptoms. In those patients who demonstrate persistent SUI, concomitant laparoscopic Burch urethropexy can be considered and can safely be performed at the time mesh removal. In this case report we present a patient who required a dual-approach removal of two painful midurethral slings in addition to concomitant treatment of persistent SUI with a laparoscopic Burch urethropexy procedure. PMID:27872788

  14. Expression and significance of TIMP-3, PACAP and VIP in vaginal wall tissues of patients with stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bo; Jin, Xiaohua; Shi, Yi; Zhu, Hailiang; Zhou, Wenjun; Tu, Wenjian; Ding, Li

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate whether tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) participate in the occurrence of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) by measuring the expression levels of TIMP-3, PACAP, and VIP in the vaginal wall and analyzing their correlation to understand the pathogenesis of female SUI. Forty female patients who were admitted to our hospital for tension-free obturator tape surgery for treatment of SUI from April, 2012 to December, 2015 were selected as the study group. Forty patients who underwent vaginal or total abdominal hysterectomy for treatment of non-estrogen-related diseases during the same period were selected as the control group. Tissue samples from the anterior vaginal wall, located at twelve o'clock, were taken from both groups. The expression levels of TIMP-3, PACAP and VIP were detected by immunohistochemistry, and the correlation of integral optical density (IOD) among expressions of TIMP-3, PACAP, and VIP was investigated. The expression of TIMP-3 in vaginal wall tissues of the study group was lower than that of the control group (P<0.05). The expression of PACAP and VIP in vaginal tissues of the study group were lower than those of the control group (P<0.05). In the study group, the IOD of PACAP expression was significantly and positively correlated with that of VIP (r=0.873, P<0.05), the IOD of PACAP expression was significantly and positively correlated with that of TIMP-3 (r=0.802, P<0.05), and the IOD of VIP expression was significantly and positively correlated with that of TIMP-3 (r=0.716, P<0.05). In conclusion, TIMP-3, PACAP and VIP jointly participate in the occurrence of female SUI. Increasing the expression of TIMP-3, PACAP, and VIP, repairing neurons, and enhancing the elasticity of vaginal wall tissues may become a new way to treat female SUI. PMID:28352341

  15. Incontinence - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - incontinence ... The following organizations are good resources for information on incontinence. Fecal incontinence : The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists -- www.acog.org/~/media/for%20patients/faq139.ashx ...

  16. Urinary Incontinence in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... can appear as a constant dribbling of urine. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Children with ADHD are three times more likely ... asleep. Nighttime UI has also been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and anxiety. Certain ...

  17. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marchetti-Krantz (MMK) procedure; Laparoscopic retropubic colposuspension; Needle suspension; Burch colposuspension ... bladder. There are two ways to do retropubic suspension: open surgery or laparoscopic surgery. Either way, surgery ...

  18. Urinary incontinence products

    MedlinePlus

    ... absorbent pads you can use to protect bed linens and chairs. These underpads, sometimes called Chux, are ... place a rubber pad between layers of bed linens. KEEP YOUR SKIN DRY When you used these ...

  19. What is Urinary Incontinence?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ...

  20. Comparison of Effectiveness between Tension-Free Vaginal Tape (TVT) and Trans-Obturator Tape (TOT) in Patients with Stress Urinary Incontinence and Intrinsic Sphincter Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Gon; Park, Hyoung Keun; Paick, Sung Hyun; Choi, Woo Suk

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the two types of mid-urethral slings for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD). Methods This retrospective study included patients who underwent tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure or transobturator tape (TOT) procedure by a single surgeon for SUI with ISD, defined as Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) < 60 cmH2O in a urodynamic study. Cases of neurogenic bladder, previous SUI surgery, and concomitant cystocele repair were excluded. The primary outcome was treatment success at 12 months, defined by self-reported absence of symptoms, no leakage episodes recorded, and no retreatment. Results Among the 157 women who were included in the final analysis, 105 patients received TVT and 52 patients received TOT. Age, underlying diseases, Stamey grade, cystocele grade, and presence of urge incontinence were not significantly different between the two groups. Urodynamic parameters including maximal urethral closing pressure, detrusor overactivity, VLPP, urethral hypermobility (Q-tip ≥ 30°), were also comparable between the two groups. Success rate was significantly higher in the TVT group than in the TOT group (95.2% vs. 82.7%, p = 0.009). On multivariate analysis, only TOT surgery (OR = 3.922, 95%CI = 1.223–12.582, p = 0.022) was a risk factor for failure following surgical treatment. Conclusion TVT is more effective than TOT in treatment of female SUI with ISD. PMID:27228092

  1. Improvement of quality of life, anxiety and depression after surgery in patients with stress urinary incontinence: Results of a longitudinal short-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Innerkofler, Petra C; Guenther, Verena; Rehder, Peter; Kopp, Martin; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Dominic P; Giesinger, Johannes M; Holzner, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the effect of incontinence surgery and pelvic floor training on quality of life (QOL), anxiety and depression in patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods In a prospective longitudinal study, females with proven SUI were asked to complete a set of standardized questionnaires (sociodemographic data sheet, FACT-G, I-QOL, HADS) before and eight weeks after treatment. The comparison groups consisted of a surgical treatment group and a conservative group that underwent supervised pelvic floor training for eight weeks. Results From the 67 female patients included in the study a number of 53 patients completed both assessment time points (mean age 57.4, mean years of SUI 7.6). The surgical treatment group consisted of 32 patients of which 21 patients received a modified Burch colposuspension and 11 patients a tension-free mid-urethral tape suspension. The 21 patients in the conservative group attended eight once-weekly supervised pelvic floor training sessions. After treatment the surgical intervention group showed a significantly higher improvement of QOL (FACT-G and I-QOL) and anxiety (HADS) than the pelvic floor training group. Conclusion For female patients with SUI surgery yielded a better outcome than pelvic floor training with regard to quality of life and anxiety. PMID:18823552

  2. Urethral closure mechanisms under sneeze-induced stress condition in rats: a new animal model for evaluation of stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Izumi; Torimoto, Kazumasa; Chancellor, Michael B; de Groat, William C; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2003-08-01

    The urethral closure mechanism under a stress condition induced by sneezing was investigated in urethane-anesthetized female rats. During sneezing, while the responses measured by microtip transducer catheters in the proximal and middle parts of the urethra increased, the response in the proximal urethra was almost negligible when the bladder response was subtracted from the urethral response or when the abdomen was opened. In contrast, the response in the middle urethra during sneezing was still observed after subtracting the bladder response or after opening the abdomen. These responses in the middle urethra during sneezing were significantly reduced approximately 80% by bilateral transection of the pudendal nerves and the nerves to the iliococcygeous and pubococcygeous muscles but not by transection of the visceral branches of the pelvic nerves and hypogastric nerves. The sneeze leak point pressure was also measured to investigate the role of active urethral closure mechanisms in maintaining total urethral resistance against sneeze-induced urinary incontinence. In sham-operated rats, no urinary leakage was observed during sneeze, which produced an increase of intravesical pressure up to 37 +/- 2.2 cmH2O. However, in nerve-transected rats urinary leakage was observed when the intravesical pressure during sneezing exceeded 16.3 +/- 2.1 cmH2O. These results indicate that during sneezing, pressure increases elicited by reflex contractions of external urethral sphincter and pelvic floor muscles occur in the middle portion of the urethra. These reflexes in addition to passive transmission of increased abdominal pressure significantly contribute to urinary continence mechanisms under a sneeze-induced stress condition.

  3. Incontinence Pad Usage in Medical Welfare Facilities in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyub; Kang, Ji Soon; Kim, Jeong-Wha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of urinary incontinence and the usage of incontinence pads by elderly residents in Korean medical welfare facilities were investigated. Methods From a total of 1,832 facilities, 33 medical welfare facilities in the capital area were randomly selected; all nursing homes were excluded. All data were collected by questionnaires to investigate the residents' age and sex, the presence or absence of urinary incontinence, incontinence pad usage per month, and management methods for urinary incontinence. Surveys were also conducted from January 2010 to August 2010. Results A total number of residents in medical welfare facilities were 2,783, and all of them were selected for this study. Approximately, 65.3% of residents (1,816 individuals) had incontinence. The mean usage was 75 incontinence pads per month. Only 15.6% of residents received proper management for urinary incontinence, while the remaining 84.4% of residents did not have any experience in evaluating or managing their urinary symptoms. Conclusions The prevalence of urinary incontinence in medical welfare facilities in Korea was about 65.3%. However, the management of urinary incontinence was insufficient. Urologists should make further efforts for the proper management of urinary incontinence in elders in these facilities. PMID:24466466

  4. Definition and visualisation of regions of interest in post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Linda J Cox, Jennifer; Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Kneebone, Andrew

    2014-09-15

    Standard post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) image verification uses bony anatomy alignment. However, the prostate bed (PB) moves independently of bony anatomy. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be used to soft tissue match, so radiation therapists (RTs) must understand pelvic anatomy and PPRT clinical target volumes (CTV). The aims of this study are to define regions of interest (ROI) to be used in soft tissue matching image guidance and determine their visibility on planning CT (PCT) and CBCT. Published CTV guidelines were used to select ROIs. The PCT scans (n = 23) and CBCT scans (n = 105) of 23 post-prostatectomy patients were reviewed. Details on ROI identification were recorded. Eighteen patients had surgical clips. All ROIs were identified on PCTs at least 90% of the time apart from mesorectal fascia (MF) (87%) due to superior image quality. When surgical clips are present, the seminal vesicle bed (SVB) was only seen in 2.3% of CBCTs and MF was unidentifiable. Most other structures were well identified on CBCT. The anterior rectal wall (ARW) was identified in 81.4% of images and penile bulb (PB) in 68.6%. In the absence of surgical clips, the MF and SVB were always identified; the ARW was identified in 89.5% of CBCTs and PB in 73.7%. Surgical clips should be used as ROIs when present to define SVB and MF. In the absence of clips, SVB, MF and ARW can be used. RTs must have a strong knowledge of soft tissue anatomy and PPRT CTV to ensure coverage and enable soft tissue matching.

  5. OnabotulinumtoxinA (Botox(®)): a review of its use in the treatment of urinary incontinence in patients with multiple sclerosis or subcervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Mark

    2014-09-01

    OnabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX(®)) is a type A neurotoxin derived from Clostridium botulinum bacteria that is approved as treatment for urinary incontinence (UI) in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity resulting from multiple sclerosis (MS) or subcervical spinal cord injury (SCI) who are not adequately treated by antimuscarinics. This article reviews the pharmacology of intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA in this indication. The presumed mode of action of onabotulinumtoxinA in bladder disorders is by interfering with efferent innervation of the detrusor muscle and afferent pathways involved in the micturition reflex. In phase III trials in adult patients with MS or SCI with UI who were not adequately treated with antimuscarinics, intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA 200 U produced significantly greater mean changes (reductions) from baseline in UI episodes/week at week 6 than placebo (primary endpoint). Similar significant benefits of intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA 200 U over placebo were observed on other UI, urodynamic, health-related quality of life and treatment satisfaction endpoints. Intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA 200 U was generally well tolerated, with the most frequent adverse events being urinary tract infections and urinary retention. Few patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events. Based on interim analyses of an extension study of the phase III trials, repeat injections of onabotulinumtoxinA 200 U were similarly efficacious and well tolerated. Intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA represents a clinically important advance in the therapy of UI in patients with MS or SCI who have not responded to antimuscarinics or who are unable to tolerate antimuscarinics.

  6. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Women With Stress Urinary Incontinence Causes Hypertrophy of the Urethral Sphincters and Reduces Bladder Neck Mobility During Coughing

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Linda; Varette, Kevin; Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; Harvey, Marie-Andree; Baker, Kevin; Sauerbrei, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a 12-week pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training program on urethral morphology and mobility in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods Forty women with SUI were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the treatment group received 12 weekly physiotherapy sessions during which they learned how to properly contract their pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) and a home exercise program was prescribed, reviewed, and progressed; the control group received no treatment. Before and after the 12-week study period, ultrasound imaging was used to evaluate bladder neck position and mobility during coughing and Valsalva maneuver in supine and in standing, as well as urethral morphology. Secondary outcome measures included a 3-day bladder diary, 30-min pad test, the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6). Results The women in the treatment group demonstrated reduced bladder neck mobility during coughing and increased cross-sectional area of their urethra after as compared to before the training. These changes were not evident in the control group. No differences in the resting position of the bladder neck or in bladder neck excursion during Valsalva maneuver were noted in either group. Concomitantly the women in the treatment group demonstrated significant improvements in the 3-day bladder diary and IIQ-7 after the PFM training and improved significantly more than the control group. Conclusion Physiotherapist-supervised PFM training reduces bladder neck motion during coughing, and results in hypertrophy of the urethral sphincter in women who present with SUI. PMID:23861324

  7. Does Preoperative Urodynamic Testing Improve Surgical Outcomes in Patients Undergoing the Transobturator Tape Procedure for Stress Urinary Incontinence? A Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Sudheer; Patnaik, Pranab; Shaw, Dipak; Jain, Madhu; Trivedi, Sameer; Dwivedi, Udai Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Urodynamic studies are commonly performed as part of the preoperative work-up of patients undergoing surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). We aimed to assess the extent to which these urodynamic parameters influence patient selection and postoperative outcomes. Materials and Methods Patients presenting with SUI were randomly assigned to two groups: one undergoing office evaluation only and the other with a preoperative urodynamic work-up. Patients with unfavorable urodynamic parameters (detrusor overactivity [DO] and/or Valsalva leak point pressure [VLPP]<60 cm H2O and/or maximum urethral closure pressure [MUCP]<20 cm H2O) were excluded from the urodynamic testing group. All patients in both groups underwent the transobturator midurethral sling procedure. Evaluation for treatment success (reductions in urogenital distress inventory and incontinence impact questionnaire scoring along with absent positive stress test) was done at 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. Results A total of 72 patients were evaluated. After 12 patients with any one or more of the abnormal urodynamic parameters were excluded, 30 patients were finally recruited in each of the "urodynamic testing" and "office evaluation only" groups. At both the 6- and the 12-month follow-ups, treatment outcomes (reduction in scores and positive provocative stress test) were significantly better in the urodynamic testing group than in the office evaluation only group (p-values significant for all outcomes). Conclusions Our findings showed statistically significantly better treatment outcomes in the urodynamic group (after excluding those with poor prognostic indicators such as DO, low VLPP, and MUCP) than in the office evaluation only group. We recommend exploiting the prognostic value of these urodynamic parameters for patient counseling and treatment decisions. PMID:25512817

  8. Correlates of 1-year incidence of urinary incontinence in older Latino adults enrolled in a community-based physical activity trial.

    PubMed

    Morrisroe, Shelby N; Rodriguez, Larissa V; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Smith, Ariana L; Trejo, Laura; Sarkisian, Catherine A

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) among older urban Latinos is high. Insight into etiologies of and contributing factors to the development of this condition is needed. This longitudinal cohort study identified correlates of 1-year incidence of UI in older community-dwelling Latino adults participating in a senior center-based physical activity trial in Los Angeles, California. Three hundred twenty-eight Latinos aged 60 to 93 participating in Caminemos, a randomized trial to increase walking, were studied. Participants completed an in-person survey and physical performance measures at baseline and 1 year. UI was measured using the International Consultation on Incontinence item: "How often do you leak urine?" Potential correlates of 1-year incidence of UI included sociodemographic, behavioral, medical, physical, and psychosocial characteristics. The overall incidence of UI at 1 year was 17.4%. Incident UI was associated with age, baseline activity of daily living impairment, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), mean steps per day, and depressive symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression models revealed that improvement in physical performance score (odds ratio (OR) = 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.50-0.95) and high baseline physical (OR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.40-0.89) and mental (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.43-0.91) HRQoL were independently associated with lower rates of 1-year incident UI. An increase in depressive symptoms at 1 year (OR = 4.48, 95% CI = 1.02-19.68) was independently associated with a higher rate of incident UI. One-year UI incidence in this population of older urban Latino adults participating in a walking trial was high but was lower in those who improved their physical performance. Interventions aimed at improving physical performance may help prevent UI in older Latino adults.

  9. Current Developments and Perspectives on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Urinary Incontinence and Genital Prolapse in Women

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, G.; Kölbl, H.

    2012-01-01

    As a key area of gynaecology, urogynaecology has undergone impressive changes in the past few years. Together with the high prevalence of functional pelvic floor disorders, modern anaesthesia procedures and the introduction of new, innovative minimally invasive operation techniques have led to a dramatic increase in the number of operations for incontinence and prolapses. The increasingly subtle diagnostic options, such as, e. g., 2D and 3D sonography of the pelvic floor provide unambiguous findings and facilitate decision making. Tension-free vaginal slings in retro-pubic, trans-obturator or single-incision techniques show a high success rate with few complications and have almost completely replaced the more invasive abdominal surgical techniques for the operative management of stress incontinence. Especially for recurrent prolapse the use of alloplastic nets leads to a markedly improved anatomic and functional outcome. In spite of the euphoria about modern operation techniques and novel net materials, in-depth knowledge of pelvic floor anatomy, sufficient surgical experience and unequivocal guideline-conform indications are mandatory for satisfactory treatment outcomes. The afflicted women must be informed in detail about alternative procedures and more emphasis should be placed on conservative therapy. Novel surgical techniques should be monitored by registers or clinical trials. The professional society is called upon to improve the training curricula for pelvic floor surgery. PMID:25308980

  10. Tomographic Ultrasound Imaging to Control the Placement of Tension-Free Transobturator Tape in Female Urinary Stress Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Gräf, Charlotte M; Kupec, Tomas; Stickeler, Elmar; Goecke, Tamme W; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Najjari, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objective was to evaluate, by means of tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI), the reliability of a novel approach for determining the position of the implanted tension-free transobturator tape (TOT). Furthermore, we analyzed the association between the position of the tape at rest and the subjective cure in stress incontinent women. Methods. This retrospective pilot study consists of 32 stress incontinent women, who underwent TOT procedure and routine sonographic control at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up visit. TUI was applied on the resulting 4D volumes, thereby delivering 9 axial slices with a 4 mm interslice distance starting at the meatus urethrae internus in caudal direction. The reliability of the approach was tested by two examiners. Postoperative and follow-up ultrasound parameters of uncured and cured patients were analyzed. Results. Measurements of the position of the TOT demonstrated high intraclass correlation coefficients. We found minor differences between sonographic parameters at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up after a median period of 321 days. In cured patients, the position of the tape was measured in a more caudal position than in uncured patients. Conclusions. TUI can be a reliable method for determining the position of the tape. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether the postoperatively determined position can be used as an indicator of future subjective cure.

  11. Tomographic Ultrasound Imaging to Control the Placement of Tension-Free Transobturator Tape in Female Urinary Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kupec, Tomas; Stickeler, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objective was to evaluate, by means of tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI), the reliability of a novel approach for determining the position of the implanted tension-free transobturator tape (TOT). Furthermore, we analyzed the association between the position of the tape at rest and the subjective cure in stress incontinent women. Methods. This retrospective pilot study consists of 32 stress incontinent women, who underwent TOT procedure and routine sonographic control at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up visit. TUI was applied on the resulting 4D volumes, thereby delivering 9 axial slices with a 4 mm interslice distance starting at the meatus urethrae internus in caudal direction. The reliability of the approach was tested by two examiners. Postoperative and follow-up ultrasound parameters of uncured and cured patients were analyzed. Results. Measurements of the position of the TOT demonstrated high intraclass correlation coefficients. We found minor differences between sonographic parameters at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up after a median period of 321 days. In cured patients, the position of the tape was measured in a more caudal position than in uncured patients. Conclusions. TUI can be a reliable method for determining the position of the tape. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether the postoperatively determined position can be used as an indicator of future subjective cure. PMID:27610378

  12. Rationale and design for the Vaginal Erbium Laser Academy Study (VELAS): an international multicenter observational study on genitourinary syndrome of menopause and stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Gambacciani, M; Torelli, M G; Martella, L; Bracco, G L; Casagrande, A G; Albertin, E; Tabanelli, S; Viglietta, M; D'Ambrogio, G; Garone, G; Cervigni, M

    2015-01-01

    The genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) are common clinical challenges for women's health and quality of life. The laser treatment and particularly the vaginal erbium laser (VEL) may provide a new non-invasive treatment for both GSM and SUI. However, the estimation of the ultimate results of different laser treatments may be altered by different issues, such as patient selection, concomitant treatments, and long-term effect of vaginal laser thermotherapy. In the present paper, we present the protocol for a large multicenter study on the evaluation of the efficacy and safety of VEL for the treatment of GSM and SUI, the Vaginal Erbium Laser Academy Study (VELAS). This study will evaluate the effects of three laser applications in 1500 postmenopausal women. Subjective and objective symptoms will be evaluated prior to the first laser treatment with follow-up visits after 4 weeks from the last laser application, and subsequently after every 3 months for 1 year. Findings from the VELAS have the potential to affect clinical care practice and health decisions for millions of women world-wide for a non-hormonal treatment for GSM and a non-invasive treatment of SUI.

  13. Synergistic Effect of Vaginal Trauma and Ovariectomy in a Murine Model of Stress Urinary Incontinence: Upregulation of Urethral Nitric Oxide Synthases and Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huey-Yi; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Yu-Ning

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying stress urinary incontinence (SUI) are unclear. We aimed to evaluate the molecular alterations in mice urethras following vaginal trauma and ovariectomy (OVX). Twenty-four virgin female mice were equally distributed into four groups: noninstrumented control; vaginal distension (VD) group; OVX group; and VD + OVX group. Changes in leak point pressures (LPPs), genital tract morphology, body weight gain, plasma 17β-estradiol level and expressions of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and estrogen receptors (ERs—ERα and ERβ) were analyzed. Three weeks after VD, the four groups differed significantly in genital size and body weight gain. Compared with the control group, the plasma estradiol levels were significantly decreased in the OVX and VD + OVX groups, and LPPs were significantly decreased in all three groups. nNOS, iNOS, and ERα expressions in the urethra were significantly increased in the VD and VD + OVX groups, whereas ERβ expression was significantly increased only in the VD + OVX group. These results show that SUI following vaginal trauma and OVX involves urethral upregulations of nNOS, iNOS, and ERs, suggesting that NO- and ER-mediated signaling might play a role in the synergistic effect of birth trauma and OVX-related SUI pathogenesis. PMID:25258476

  14. Comparison and correlates of three preference-based health-related quality-of-life measures among overweight and obese women with urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Angela Marinilli; Kuppermann, Miriam; Nakagawa, Sanae; Vittinghoff, Eric; Wing, Rena R.; Kusek, John W.; Herman, William H.; Subak, Leslee L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare three preference-based health-related quality-of-life (HRQL) measures and examine independent correlates of HRQL among overweight and obese women with urinary incontinence (UI) enrolled in a weight loss intervention trial. Methods Participants completed baseline questionnaires, which included the Health Utilities Index 3 (HUI3) and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36). The SF-36 was used to derive SF-6D and estimated Quality of Well-Being (eQWB) scores. Height, weight, medical history, incontinence measures, and level of physical activity also were assessed. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was computed, and differences in mean scores across HRQL measures were examined. Potential correlates of HUI3, SF-6D, and eQWB scores were evaluated using multivariable generalized linear models. Results Mean ± SD scores for the HUI3, SF-6D, and eQWB were 0.81 ± 0.18, 0.75 ± 0.10, and 0.71 ± 0.06, respectively. Significant differences were observed across measures (P < 0.0001), and the overall ICC was 0.36. In multivariable analyses, BMI was negatively associated with HUI3 (P = 0.003) and eQWB (P < 0.001), and UI episode frequency was negatively associated with eQWB (P = 0.015) and SF-6D (P < 0.001). Conclusions Significant differences in mean utilities across the HUI3, SF-6D, and eQWB indicate that these measures do not assess identical dimensions of HRQL. Both BMI and UI episode frequency were related to HRQL in this cohort; however, the magnitude of the relationship depended on the preference-based measure used. These findings highlight the need to consider the method used to generate HRQL values for calculating quality-adjusted life-years in cost-utility analyses, since choice of method may have a substantial impact on the outcome of the analysis. PMID:21461953

  15. Managing incontinence: women's normalizing strategies.

    PubMed

    Skoner, M M; Haylor, M J

    1993-01-01

    Women's strategies for managing urinary incontinence were examined in a grounded-theory study. The women's basic social concern was dealing with incontinence in a manner that enabled them to feel normal. Feeling normal meant being able to do what they wanted to do and needed to do to have a normal life-style as they perceived it. This goal was accomplished by normalizing incontinence and its management. Normalization was achieved by directing its course through self-management, accounting for it in terms of personal history and life experiences, and delaying medical counsel. These strategies are described. The findings provide fresh insights about women's response to incontinence and their practice of self-managing its consequences.

  16. Skin care and incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Incontinence - skin care; Incontinence - pressure sore; Incontinence - pressure ulcer ... redness, peeling, irritation, and yeast infections likely. Bedsores ( pressure sores ) may also develop if the person: Has ...

  17. The effect of weight loss on changes in health-related quality of life among overweight and obese women with urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Angela Marinilli; Subak, Leslee L.; Nakagawa, Sanae; Vittinghoff, Eric; Wing, Rena R.; Kusek, John W.; Herman, William H.; West, Delia Smith; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the effect of change in weight and change in urinary incontinence (UI) frequency on changes in preference-based measures of health-related quality of life (HRQL) among overweight and obese women with UI participating in a weight loss trial. METHODS We conducted a longitudinal cohort analysis of 338 overweight and obese women with UI enrolled in a randomized clinical trial comparing a behavioral weight loss intervention to an educational control condition. At baseline, 6, and 18 months, health utilities were estimated using the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3), a transformation of the SF-36 to the preference-based SF-6D, and the estimated Quality of Well-Being (eQWB) score (a summary calculated from the SF-36 physical functioning, mental health, bodily pain, general health perceptions, and role limitations-physical subscale scores). Potential predictors of changes in these outcomes were examined using generalized estimating equations. RESULTS In adjusted multivariable models, weight loss was associated with improvement in HUI3, SF-6D, and eQWB at 6 and 18 months (p<.05). Increases in physical activity also were independently associated with improvement in HUI3 (p=.01) and SF-6D (p=.006) scores at 18 months. In contrast, reduction in UI frequency did not predict improvements in HRQL at 6 or 18 months. CONCLUSION Weight loss and increased physical activity, but not reduction in UI frequency, were strongly associated with improvements in health utilities measured by the HUI3, SF-6D, and eQWB. These findings provide important information that can be used to inform cost-utility analyses of weight loss interventions. PMID:22161726

  18. Vitamin D and Urinary Incontinence among Korean Women: a Propensity Score-matched Analysis from the 2008–2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A recent study investigated the role of vitamin D in urinary incontinence (UI). However, very few data are available on this topic. Therefore, we evaluated these relationships using nationally representative data from Korea. We included 6,451 women over the age of 20 years who had participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV. We conducted a propensity-matched study by identifying women with UI. Women without UI, matched for menopause, number of pregnancies, hypertension, diabetes, body mass index, age, stroke, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, were selected as a control group at a 2:1 ratio. The χ2 test, t-test and logistic regression analyses were used. Following propensity score matching, 558 UI cases and 1,116 normal controls were included, and confounders (menopause, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, asthma, age, obesity, and number of pregnancies) were evenly dispersed and did not differ significantly between the groups. There was no significant difference between the mean vitamin D levels of the UI and normal groups (vitamin D: 18.4 ± 6.6 vs. 18.5 ± 7.0 ng/mL; P = 0.752). Additionally, there was no significant difference in the distribution of vitamin D levels (< 20 ng/mL, 20–30 ng/mL, > 30 ng/mL: 63.8%, 30.5%, and 5.7% in normal controls, 64.0%, 27.8%, and 8.2% in UI cases; P = 0.107). In conclusion, low serum vitamin D is not significantly and independently related to female UI after propensity score matching in representative Korean data. PMID:28244294

  19. Comparison between the retropubic and transobturator approaches in the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: a systematic review and meta-analysis of effectiveness and complications

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xincheng; Yang, Qingsong; Sun, Feng; Shi, Qinglu

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare the effectiveness and complications between the retropubic and transobturator approaches for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) by conducting a systematic review. Materials and Methods We selected all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared retropubic and transobturator sling placements for treatment of SUI. We estimated pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for intraoperative and postoperative outcomes and complications. Results Six hundred twelve studies that compared retropubic and transobturator approaches to midurethral sling placement were identified, of which 16 were included in our research. Our study was based on results from 2646 women. We performed a subgroup analysis to compare outcomes and complications between the two approaches. The evidence to support the superior approach that leads to better objective/subjective cure rate was insufficient. The transobturator approach was associated with lower risks of bladder perforation (odds ratio (OR) 0.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.09-0.32), retropubic/vaginal hematoma (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.16-0.63), and long-term voiding dysfunction (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.17-0.61). However, the risk of thigh/groin pain seemed higher in the transobturator group (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.72-3.72). We found no statistically significant differences in the risks of other complications between the two approaches. Conclusions This meta-analysis shows analogical objective and subjective cure rates between the retropubic and transobturator approaches to midurethral sling placement. The transobturator approach was associated with lower risks of several complications. However, good-quality studies with long-term follow-ups are warranted for further research. PMID:26005962

  20. Fecal Incontinence in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Donate Find a Doctor Join eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us What is Incontinence? FAQs Prevalence Causes of Incontinence Fecal Incontinence in Children Reporter's Guide to Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms ...

  1. Bowel incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... may lead to incontinence in some people include: Alcohol Caffeine Dairy products (in people who are unable to digest lactose , a sugar found in most dairy products) Fatty, fried, or greasy foods Spicy foods Cured or ...

  2. Fecal Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... org editorial staff Tags: bowel management program, bowel movements, defecation, fecal incontinence, leaking feces, leaking stool, perineal exercises Family Health, Seniors, Women September 2000 Copyright © American Academy of Family PhysiciansThis ...

  3. Internet-based treatment of stress urinary incontinence: 1- and 2-year results of a randomized controlled trial with a focus on pelvic floor muscle training

    PubMed Central

    Sjöström, Malin; Umefjord, Göran; Stenlund, Hans; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard; Samuelsson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the long-term effects of two non-face-to-face treatment programmes for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) based on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). Subjects and Methods The present study was a randomized controlled trial with online recruitment of 250 community-dwelling women aged 18–70 years with SUI ≥ one time/week. Diagnosis was based on validated self-assessed questionnaires, 2-day bladder diary and telephone interview with a urotherapist. Consecutive computer-generated block randomization was carried out with allocation by an independent administrator to 3 months of treatment with either an internet-based treatment programme (n = 124) or a programme sent by post (n = 126). Both interventions focused mainly on PFMT. The internet group received continuous e-mail support from a urotherapist, whereas the postal group trained on their own. Follow-up was performed after 1 and 2 years via self-assessed postal questionnaires. The primary outcomes were symptom severity (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form [ICIQ-UI SF]) and condition-specific quality of life (ICIQ-Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life [ICIQ-LUTSqol]). Secondary outcomes were the Patient Global Impression of Improvement, health-specific quality of life (EQ-visual analogue scale [EQ-VAS]), use of incontinence aids, and satisfaction with treatment. There was no face-to-face contact with the participants at any time. Analysis was based on intention-to-treat. Results We lost 32.4% (81/250) of participants to follow-up after 1 year and 38.0% (95/250) after 2 years. With both interventions, we observed highly significant (P < 0.001) improvements with large effect sizes (>0.8) for symptoms and condition-specific quality of life (QoL) after 1 and 2 years, respectively. No significant differences were found between the groups. The mean (sd) changes in symptom score were 3.7 (3.3) for the internet group and 3.2 (3.4) for the postal group (P = 0

  4. Incidence and Characteristics of Incontinence Associated Dermatitis in Community-Dwelling Persons with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Zimmaro; Funk, Taylor; Jacobson, Megan; Savik, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about the incidence and characteristics of incontinence associated dermatitis (IAD) in community-living individuals with fecal incontinence. The primary aim of this study was to describe the incidence and characteristics of self-reported IAD among community-living individuals with fecal incontinence. The study also examined whether IAD was associated with older age, gender, presence of urinary incontinence, or fecal incontinence severity. Design Secondary data analysis using a prospective cohort design. Subjects and Setting Community-living adults (N = 98) with fecal incontinence (76% female, 34% aged 65+ years, 90% White) who participated in a study about dietary fiber supplementation and were free of IAD at the start. Thirty five percent also had urinary incontinence. Methods Subjects assessed their skin for IAD daily for 52 days reporting types of IAD damage (redness, rash/fungal infection, and skin loss), location of IAD, and symptoms. They reported fecal incontinence on a diary for the first and last 14 study days. Results The incidence of IAD was 41% (40/98). The fecal incontinence severity score for subjects developing IAD was 1.2 higher than those who never had IAD (p < .001). There was no significant association of IAD with age, gender, or dual fecal and urinary incontinence. Incontinence Associated Dermatitis developed within 2 weeks and healed in approximately 1 week. The most common sign and symptom were redness (60% patients) and soreness (78%), respectively. Most subjects (85%) had IAD in one location. Conclusions Assessing for IAD in community-living patients with fecal incontinence is important as IAD is common and causes discomfort. The relatively mild severity of IAD offers WOC nurses opportunity for improving patient outcomes by preventing and managing this problem. PMID:26336048

  5. Incontinence in persons with Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C; Niemczyk, J; Equit, M; Curfs, L; von Gontard, A

    2017-02-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a congenital syndrome with a prevalence of 1:15,000. Individuals with AS often have severe intellectual disability, typical dysmorphic signs, and behavioral problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the rate of incontinence and associated psychological problems in children and adults with AS. Ninety children (4-18 years) and 54 adults (18-31 years) with AS were recruited through a parent support group (55.6% male, mean age 15.1 years). The Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence, the Incontinence Questionnaire-Pediatric Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (ICIQ-CLUTS), as well as the Developmental Behaviour Checklist for parents (DBC-P) or for adults (DBC-A) were filled out by parents or caregivers. 85.6% of individuals with AS were affected by at least one subtype of incontinence (82.7% nocturnal enuresis (NE), 64.7% daytime urinary incontinence (DUI), and 57.1% fecal incontinence (FI)). 52.5% of the children and 32.6% of adults reached a clinically relevant DBC score. Incontinence was not associated with behavioral problems. NE and DUI were associated with genotype and epilepsy.

  6. Fecal Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Fecal Incontinence Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  7. When you have urinary incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... few weeks, you should leak urine less often. Train your bladder to wait a longer time between ... you might leak. Set aside specific times to train your bladder. Urinate often enough at other times ...

  8. Correlates and Predictors of Patient Satisfaction with Drug Therapy and Combined Drug Therapy and Behavioral Training for Urgency Urinary Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Patricia S.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Kenton, Kimberly; Litman, Heather J.; Richter, Holly E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Hypothesis The goal was to identify correlates of patient satisfaction with drug and behavioral treatments for urge-predominant incontinence, which may help tailor treatments to improve satisfaction. Methods Planned secondary analysis of a multi-center, clinical trial randomizing 307 women to 10-weeks of tolterodine alone or combined with behavioral training. Satisfaction was measured using the Patient Satisfaction Question (PSQ). Potential correlates included baseline demographics, incontinence characteristics and prior treatments, history and physical parameters, expectations of treatment success, and outcome variables including the Global Perception of Improvement (GPI) and Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI). Results After multivariable analysis, every ten-point increase in UDI change score increased odds of satisfaction by 11% (OR 1.11; 1.04-1.19). Odds of satisfaction increased among women reporting “much better” on the GPI (OR 13.8; 4.94-38.60). Conclusions Treatment satisfaction for women with urge-predominant incontinence was associated with patient-related outcomes reflecting impression of improvement and bother from incontinence-related symptoms. PMID:20945064

  9. Incontinence Treatment: Surgical Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms of Incontinence Diarrhea Treatment Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel Management Biofeedback Surgical Treatments Newer Treatment Options Tips on Finding a Doctor ...

  10. Incontinence in individuals with Angelman syndrome: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Radstaake, Maartje; Didden, Robert; Giesbers, Sanne; Korzilius, Hubert; Peters-Scheffer, Nienke; Lang, Russell; von Gontard, Alexander; Curfs, Leopold M G

    2013-11-01

    Frequency and type of incontinence and variables associated with incontinence were assessed in individuals with Angelman syndrome (AS; n=71) and in a matched control group (n=69) consisting of individuals with non-specific intellectual disability (ID). A Dutch version of the "Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence" (Beetz, von Gontard, & Lettgen, 1994) was administered and information on primary caretakers' perspectives regarding each individual's incontinence was gathered. Results show that diurnal incontinence and fecal incontinence during the day more frequently occurred in the control group than in the AS group. In both groups, nocturnal enuresis was the most common form of incontinence. More incontinence was seen in individuals with AS who were younger, had a lower level of adaptive functioning and/or had epilepsy. Individuals with AS were able to stay dry for longer periods of time than the controls and often showed both in-toilet urination and urinary accidents during the day, whereas accidents and correct voids during the day were more set apart in the control group. Also, persons with AS had a lower micturition frequency implying possible voiding postponement. Both groups showed high rates of LUTS (lower urinary tract symptoms) possibly indicative of functional bladder disorders such as voiding postponement, dysfunctional voiding, or even an underactive bladder. In general, most primary caretakers reported severe intellectual disability as the main cause for urinary incontinence. Based on these results incontinence does not appear to be part of the behavioral phenotype of Angelman syndrome. Therefore, pediatric or urologic diagnostics and treatment are recommended for all persons with incontinence and intellectual disability. Further implications for practice and research are given.

  11. Incontinence Treatment: Newer Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    Donate Find a Doctor Join eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us What is Incontinence? FAQs Prevalence Causes of Incontinence Fecal Incontinence in Children Reporter's Guide to Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms ...

  12. Incontinence products and devices for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Newman, Diane K

    2004-08-01

    Devices and products to contain or collect the urine are part of the management of bladder dysfunction, particularly urinary incontinence (UI) (Newman, Bliss, & Fader, in press). The aim of continence nurse experts and those who care for incontinent individuals during the past decade has been to greatly decrease the indiscriminate use of absorbent pads and garments, external collecting devices, and indwelling catheterization, through the successful treatment of urinary incontinence (UI) with behavioral interventions, drug therapies, and new surgical procedures. However, these products and devices can be beneficial for persons who are elderly, fail treatment and remain incontinent, who are too ill or disabled to participate in behavioral programs, who cannot be helped by medications, or who have a type of UI that cannot be alleviated by other interventions (Newman, 2003). The judicious use of products to contain urine loss and maintain skin integrity is a first-line defense for these patients (Fantl et al., 1996). Urinary collection devices and products that are appropriate for elderly patients, that are used by nurses in all clinical settings, and are available at local pharmacies, retail stores, medical equipment dealers or directly from manufacturers are discussed.

  13. Tension-free vaginal tape versus lata fascia sling: The importance of transvulvar ultrasound in the assessment of relevant anatomical parameters in treatment of women with stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Frederico Teixeira; Lorenzato, Felipe; Albuquerque, Carla Daisy Costa; Junior, Agostinho de Sousa Machado; de Carvalho Poça, Amanda; Viana, Raíssa Almeida

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the relevance of transvulvar ultrasound in the assessment of anatomical differences induced by the lata fascia sling (LFS) and tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedures. Materials and Methods: Forty women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), aged 30 to 60 years, have been treated with either LFS (20 patients) or TVT (20 patients). The transvulvar ultrasound of the urethrovesical junction (UVJ) and proximal urethra (PU) has been used as the main investigational tool both pre- and post-operatively. The studied parameters were the vertical (VUVJD) and horizontal (HUVJD) UVJ distances, the pubourethral distance (PUD) and the PU length. Results: The VUVJD did not vary significantly after the LFS surgery (P=0.10). The PUD became shorter (P=0.001) and the HUVJD became shorter only at rest (P=0.03) after the correction by LFS. The TVT procedure has led to shortening of the VUVJ displacement (P=0.0005) and of the PU length (P=0.02). Conclusions: The transvulvar ultrasound was of utmost importance in the demonstration that both the LFS and TVT surgical procedures elongate the PU, even though the LFS technique does it more efficiently. The LFS technique focus more on shortening the PUD and the TVT procedure focus more on the correction of the vertical UVJ displacement. PMID:19468431

  14. Knowledge and Attitudes of Nursing Home Staff and Surveyors about the Revised Federal Guidance for Incontinence Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBeau, Catherine E.; Ouslander, Joseph G.; Palmer, Mary H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed nursing home staff and state nursing home surveyors regarding their knowledge and attitudes about urinary incontinence, its management, and the revised federal Tag F315 guidance for urinary incontinence. Design and Methods: We conducted a questionnaire survey of a convenience sample of nursing home staff and state nursing home…

  15. Outcome of the laparoscopic two-team sling procedure, tension-free vaginal tape insertion, and transobturator tape insertion in women with recurrent stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Hassonah, Seham; Medel, Sebastian; Lovatsis, Danny; Drutz, Harold P; Alarab, May

    2013-11-01

    Objectif : Bien que la prise en charge chirurgicale de l’incontinence urinaire à l’effort primaire (IUE) ait été bien étudiée, la prise en charge optimale de l’IUE persistante ou récurrente constitue un défi considérable pour le chirurgien et les données publiées pertinentes sont limitées. Cette étude avait pour but de documenter les données quant aux issues de diverses techniques chirurgicales utilisées dans notre centre pour la prise en charge de l’IUE récurrente, ainsi que d’évaluer les complications immédiates et à long terme étant associées à ces interventions. Méthodes : Cette étude rétrospective a évalué l’issue de l’intervention laparoscopique de fronde à deux équipes, de l’insertion d’une bandelette vaginale sans tension (TVT) et de l’insertion d’une bandelette transobturatrice (TOT) dans la prise en charge de l’IUE récurrente chez des femmes. Parmi les données recueillies, on trouvait les caractéristiques démographiques des patientes, les données urodynamiques, la guérison postopératoire subjective et la guérison objective (test à la toux négatif), ainsi que les complications peropératoires et postopératoires. Résultats : Quarante-six femmes présentant une IUE récurrente ont été admises à l’étude : 24 d’entre elles ont subi une intervention laparoscopique de fronde à deux équipes, 15 ont subi une insertion de TVT et 7 ont subi une insertion de TOT. Les taux de guérison objective ont été de 91,7 %, de 73,3 % et de 85,7 %, respectivement, tandis que les taux de guérison subjective ont été de 79,2 %, de 60 % et de 57,1 %, respectivement. Au sein du groupe « intervention laparoscopique de fronde à deux équipes », une des participantes en est venue à présenter un hématome infecté, tandis qu’une autre a nécessité une chirurgie en raison d’une occlusion de l’intestin grêle. Conclusion : L’intervention laparoscopique de fronde à deux

  16. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: reducing adverse events.

    PubMed

    Rippon, Mark; Colegrave, Melanie; Ousey, Karen

    2016-10-13

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common problem in patients with faecal and/or urinary incontinence. Urine alters the normal skin flora and increases permeability of the stratum corneum and faecal enzymes on the skin contribute to skin damage. Faecal bacteria can then penetrate the skin, increasing the risk of secondary infection. However, IAD can be prevented and healed with timely and appropriate skin cleansing and skin protection. This includes appropriate use of containment devices. This article also looks at HARTMANN incontinence pads that have been developed to absorb the fluids that cause IAD and maintain the skin's acidic pH. The acidic pH of the skin contributes to its barrier function and defence against infection. Therefore, maintaining an acidic pH will help protect the skin from damage.

  17. Mixed Incontinence: How Best to Manage It?

    PubMed

    Porena, Massimo; Costantini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Although common in women, mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) is under-reported and under-treated. It is linked to concomitant disturbances, which may be due to childbirth, ageing, or other medical conditions, in the complex bladder-urethra coordinated system of urine storage and emptying. Primary care physicians can evaluate MUI through history and simple clinical assessment or they can avail of more complex device and tools, such as urodynamic assessment. There is a wide range of therapeutic options. The recent proliferation of new drug treatments and surgical devices for urinary incontinence offers innovative strategies for therapy but products risk being introduced without long-term safety and efficacy assessment. Direct-to-consumer advertising has increased public awareness of MUI.

  18. Promoting social continence using incontinence management products.

    PubMed

    Dingwall, Lindsay

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common problem which affects men and women for a variety of reasons. For some people with UI cure is not achievable. For others, time is required to accurately diagnose and treat their urinary symptoms. In order to improve quality of life for people with UI, health professionals require awareness of the products available to achieve social continence. Continence products and devices fall into three categories: collective devices, containment products and occlusive devices. This article provides a brief overview of the more common products available and discusses some of the common benefits and drawbacks to their use.

  19. Incontinence in Intellectual Disability: An Under Recognized Cause

    PubMed Central

    Sagayaraj, Benjamin; V.T.T., Rajan; Kumar, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Many children with Down syndrome may develop urinary incontinence during adolescence or nearing adulthood. Most often low mental ability, behavioural issues, urinary tract infection, hypothyroidism, atlanto-axial subluxation or sexual abuse may be suspected to be the reason. We report a case of Down syndrome with tethered cord syndrome (TCS) and Lipoma of Filum terminale with Cauda equina in normal position, as a cause of bowel and bladder incontinence. The need for operating with Cauda Equina in normal position is debated. But a conscious decision was taken to operate and the incontinence improved markedly which was documented by using a standardized questionnaire (King’s questionnaire) and thereby making a difference in the child’s life. A literature search did not result in any case of Down syndrome with tethered cord syndrome and secondary incontinence as presentation. Considering the possibility of TCS as a cause of incontinence, often neglected even in normal children, careful evaluation and correction of such problems will make a difference in the life of many intellectually disabled children. Incontinence should not be casually attributed to intellectual disability without ruling out other causes. PMID:26500975

  20. 21 CFR 876.5270 - Implanted electrical urinary continence device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted electrical urinary continence device... Implanted electrical urinary continence device. (a) Identification. An implanted electrical urinary device is a device intended for treatment of urinary incontinence that consists of a receiver implanted...

  1. Managing faecal incontinence or leakage: the Peristeen Anal Plug.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Willie

    Incontinence can be a devastating problem to many individuals. It is embarrassing and limiting socially, and prevents those with the problem from going about their day-to-day activities. People adopt coping strategies to manage the problem and those with urinary incontinence often look for containment products such as disposable pads or nappy-style products. These products have been developed using different absorbent materials and are accessible to sufferers in local supermarkets. Absorbency of the products has improved so that once wetted, they hold urine more easily. However, the same cannot be said for faecal incontinence management products and there are few that can be called upon to manage this devastating condition. The Peristeen Anal Plug, developed originally as the Conveen Anal Plug, stands alone in the search for a device to manage faecal incontinence or leakage.

  2. Functional daytime incontinence: non-pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    van Gool, J D; Vijverberg, M A; Messer, A P; Elzinga-Plomp, A; de Jong, T P

    1992-01-01

    In children with 'functional incontinence', defined as any form of (daytime) wetting caused by non-neuropathic bladder/sphincter dysfunction, most signs and symptoms are rooted in habitual non-physiological responses to signals from bladder and urethra. These responses develop at toddler age, when children learn how to remain dry. Once they have become a habit, incomplete bladder emptying and recurrent urinary tract infections come into play, reiterating the non-physiological responses into fixed patterns of bladder/sphincter dysfunction with functional incontinence as the leading symptom. Non-pharmacological treatment of functional incontinence implies relearning and training the normal responses to signals from bladder and urethra: a cognitive process, with perception of the signals reinforced by biofeedback. This type of treatment is best combined with long-term chemoprophylaxis. Severe cases will benefit from anticholinergic drugs, as adjuvants to the training programme. Urodynamics play a crucial role in documenting the specific patterns of incontinence and in providing biofeedback. For a successful programme, psychological screening of the children is indispensable.

  3. Recent developments in technology for the assessment and management of incontinence.

    PubMed

    Hillary, Christopher J; Slovak, Martin; McCarthy, Avril; Hashim, Hashim; Chapple, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, the leakage of urine, is a common condition, which can have a significant impact on a patient's quality-of-life. Incontinence may arise as a consequence of a weakness of the urinary sphincter or bladder dysfunction, usually over-activity. Incontinence therapies occupy a large proportion of the healthcare budget. As no single device to manage incontinence is appropriate for all situations, a diverse range of products are available on the market and the development of improved products based on fundamental designs has been slow. This review highlights some of the key issues of continence care and describes the current technology and recent developments involved in the diagnosis, assessment and treatment of incontinence, along with the strengths and limitations of these methods. These issues are imperative to address if improved technology is to be developed.

  4. Incontinence Treatment: Biofeedback

    MedlinePlus

    ... Allis, WI . Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication ... of Hope "For a person who is incontinent, replacing feelings of helplessness with a measure of empowerment , with teaching a person that they can take steps to ...

  5. Eldercare at Home: Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... on long trips or in unfamiliar settings. However, diapers and pads can worsen incontinence if the older person relies only on them and does not practice bladder exercises. If pads or diapers are necessary, change them often to avoid odor, ...

  6. Urinary Incontinence: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish Diagnosis and Tests Cystoscopy and Ureteroscopy (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Daily Bladder Diary (National Institute of Diabetes and ...

  7. Urinary Incontinence - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Arabic (العربية) Care of a Foley Catheter (Arabic) العربية ...

  8. Urinary incontinence - tension-free vaginal tape

    MedlinePlus

    ... place) Damage to the urethra, bladder, or vagina Erosion of the tape into surrounding normal tissues (urethra ... told to take with a small sip of water. Your doctor or nurse will tell you when ...

  9. Incontinence-associated dermatitis in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Foxley, Susan; Baadjies, Ruth

    Evidence-based patient care for those with urinary and faecal incontinence involves routine tasks that are integral to essential patient care. However, over the past few decades, researchers have demonstrated how ritualistic practice in this area has become. There is also a growing range of skin care products that can be used to prevent incontinence-associated dermatitis and for nurses, deciding which ones to use can be problematic Incontinent patients have a 22% higher risk of developing pressure ulcers - when immobile this risk increases to 30% - and the often indiscriminate use of various lotions, without a significant evidence base, is a growing cause of concern. Maintaining healthy skin for those patients who have a spinal cord injury and also experience urinary and faecal incontinence is a challenge faced by nurses in primary and secondary care. Research undertaken in secondary care demonstrates that standardization to an evidence-based skin care regime, to be used after incontinent episodes, improves patient care in this specialist area.

  10. Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12%) to after childbirth (21 and 28%) in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women. PMID:20696633

  11. The Role of Geriatricians and Family Practitioners in the Treatment of Overactive Bladder and Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Voytas, John

    2002-01-01

    Although the prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) and that of its symptoms (urinary urge incontinence, urgency, and frequency) increase with age, these conditions are not necessarily normal consequences of aging. Patients who present with urinary symptoms should be evaluated and treated, whether they are living on their own or in a residential, assisted-care, or long-term-care environment. Effective treatment for OAB and urinary incontinence (UI) is available and improves quality of life for the elderly. The primary care physician and geriatrician can accomplish a basic evaluation for UI using a systematic approach, as detailed in the following pages. PMID:16986021

  12. Fecal incontinence in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Syed H

    2007-11-01

    Fecal incontinence is an underreported and underappreciated problem in older adults. Although fecal incontinence is more common in women than in men, this difference narrows with aging. Risk factors that lead to the development of fecal incontinence include dementia, physical disability, and fecal impaction. Treatment options include medical or conservative therapy for older adults who have mild incontinence, and surgical options can be explored in selected older adults if surgical expertise is available.

  13. [Sexuality and incontinence].

    PubMed

    Buffat, J

    2009-03-18

    Incontinence is anything that inhibits the expression of sexuality. Male problems like premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunctions are forms of incontinence. The inability to retain ejaculation or maintain erection long enough to give pleasure to the partner generates feelings of shame and guilt which weaken virility. Feminine sexual dysfunctions like loss of desire, anorgasmia and vaginismus are results of excessive continence due to negative familial and religious education, moral and social values. The sexologist's task is first to find out the origins of the sexual trouble then to propose an adequate treatment.

  14. Faecal incontinence in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lee, K S; Owen, R E; Choo, P W; Jayaratnam, F J

    1991-04-01

    Faecal incontinence is distressing both to the patient and the carers. However with accurate diagnosis of its cause, the condition can often be treated. Causes can be classified by pathophysiology. The most common cause in the elderly is faecal impaction with overflow incontinence. Other causes include inflammatory conditions of the bowel, neurological disorder, functional incontinence and iatrogenic incontinence. Management depends on an accurate diagnosis. A proper bowel and drug history is important. A rectal examination is mandatory, in order not to miss a diagnosis of faecal impaction with overflow incontinence. Specific treatment is directed at the cause.

  15. Vascular incontinence: incontinence in the elderly due to ischemic white matter changes

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Panicker, Jalesh; Fowler, Clare J; Tateno, Fuyuki; Kishi, Masahiko; Tsuyuzaki, Yohei; Ogawa, Emina; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    This review article introduces the new concept of vascular incontinence, a disorder of bladder control resulting from cerebral white matter disease (WMD). The concept is based on the original observation in 1999 of a correlation between the severity of leukoareosis or WMD, urinary symptoms, gait disorder and cognitive impairment. Over the last 20 years, the realization that WMD is not a benign incidental finding in the elderly has become generally accepted and several studies have pointed to an association between geriatric syndromes and this type of pathology. The main brunt of WMD is in the frontal regions, a region recognized to be crucial for bladder control. Other disorders should be excluded, both neurological and urological, such as normal-pressure hydrocephalus, progressive supranuclear palsy, etc., and prostatic hyperplasia, physical stress incontinence, nocturnal polyuria, etc. Treatment involves management of small vessel disease risk factors and anticholinergic drugs that do not easily penetrate the blood brain barrier to improve bladder control. PMID:23139851

  16. Adaptation and validation of the Michigan Incontinence Severity Index in a Turkish population

    PubMed Central

    Sargın, Mehmet Akif; Yassa, Murat; Taymur, Bilge Dogan; Ergun, Emrah; Akca, Gizem; Tug, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To translate and validate the Michigan Incontinence Severity Index (M-ISI) for its use in Turkish-speaking women with urinary incontinence. Methods The translation and cross-cultural adaptation were based on international guidelines. Content validity by content validity ratio/content validity index, internal consistency by Cronbach’s alpha, test–retest reliability by Pearson’s correlation, and construct validity by using Spearman rank correlations to show the relationship between individual items and the relevant domains and subdomains were analyzed in 100 female participants with a chief complaint of urinary incontinence. Correlations between the relevant scores of M-ISI and The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire – Short Form scores were analyzed to indicate convergent validity. The Varimax rotation method was used to conduct exploratory factor analysis in order to investigate the factor structures/distribution of M-ISI items. Results Content validity index and content validity ratio values increased to 0.97 and 1.00, respectively, showing sufficient content validity of the Turkish version of the M-ISI. The analysis formed three factors which was slightly different from original developers. In our proposed three-factor construct, all of the ten items demonstrated high correlations with their subdomains and lower correlations with the other domains, indicating good construct validity. Correlations between stress urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence (UUI) scores and The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire – Short Form scores were found high, which indicated convergent validity (r: 0.953, P<0.001). Good internal consistency of the scores for each subdomain was observed (stress urinary incontinence, 0.787; UUI, 0.862; pad usage and bother, 0.832). Test–retest reliability was shown for each subdomain (stress urinary incontinence, 0.973; UUI, 0.973; pad usage and bother, 0.979). Conclusion

  17. The female urinary microbiota, urinary health and common urinary disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    This review provides the clinical context and updated information regarding the female urinary microbiota (FUM), a resident microbial community within the female bladder of many adult women. Microbial communities have variability and distinct characteristics in health, as well as during community disruption (dysbiosis). Information concerning characteristics of the FUM in health and disease is emerging. Sufficient data confirms that the microbes that compose the FUM are not contaminants and are cultivatable under appropriate conditions. Common clinical conditions, including urinary tract infection (UTI) and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI), a common form of urinary incontinence (UI), may be usefully reconsidered to determine the role of the FUM. Knowledge of FUM characteristics may help advance prevention, diagnosis and treatment of these conditions and other common lower urinary disorders in women. The FUM appears related to UTI and UUI in adult women. The specific role of the FUM remains to be clarified and requires significant additional work in describing FUM variability and resilience in health. Unique aspects of the FUM prompt re-evaluation of existing nomenclature to more appropriately define health and disease; the concept of dysbiosis may be useful for understanding the interaction of the FUM with other aspects of lower urinary tract physiology, including urothelial signaling. Clinicians, through their clinical laboratories, can adopt enhanced urine culture techniques that more fully describe the living microbes within the FUM. This additional information may provide clinicians and their patients an opportunity to impact clinical care without antibiotic use, if the FUM can be appropriately modified to improve treatment precision for UTI and UUI. PMID:28217699

  18. Slings in iatrogenic male incontinence: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Fabrizio; Schenone, M.; Giberti, C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The increasing number of prostatectomies entails an increasing number of patients suffering from iatrogenic incontinence despite improved surgical techniques. The severity of this problem often requires invasive treatments such as periurethral injection of bulking agents, artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation, and sub-urethral sling positioning. The artificial urethral sphincter has represented, until today, the gold standard but, in the recent years, sling systems have been investigated as minimally invasive alternative options. Today, three different sling procedures are commonly performed: bone-anchored, readjustable, and trans-obturator slings systems. The aim of this review is to critically report the current status of sling systems in the treatment of iatrogenic male incontinence. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE and PubMed databases were searched and all articles between 1974 and 2009 were evaluated. Results: With regard to bone-anchored, readjustable, and trans-obturator slings systems, cure rates ranged between 58.0% and 86.0%, 55.5% and 73.0%, and 40.0% and 63.0%, respectively, while major complication rates ranged between 0 and 14.5%, 10.0 and 22.2%, and 0 and 10.0%, respectively. Conclusions: Suburethral slings are the only alternative techniques which can be favorably compared with the AUS, showing more advantages with respect to AUS implantations which are mainly represented by a quick and less invasive approach, low morbidity, and low costs. In spite of the difficulty in identifying the most effective sling procedure, overall, sling systems can be recommended for patients with persistent mild or moderate incontinence. However, the indication can also be extended to patients with severe incontinence, after appropriate counseling, allowing AUS implantation in the event of sling failure. PMID:20877609

  19. Symptoms of Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... might feel the urge to have a bowel movement, but impaired muscles are unable to control it ... sure when an episode might strike. The personal impact of incontinence becomes even more profound as sufferers begin to withdraw from social situations because of the problem. They may participate ...

  20. Assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms in different stages of menopause

    PubMed Central

    Varella, Larissa Ramalho Dantas; Bezerra da Silva, Rossânia; Eugênia de Oliveira, Maria Clara; Melo, Priscylla Hellouyse Angelo; Maranhão, Técia Maria de Oliveira; Micussi, Maria Thereza Albuquerque Barbosa Cabral

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To assess lower urinary tract symptoms in different stages of menopause and the quality of life of females with incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] The sample consisted of 302 females, aged between 40 and 56 years, divided into three groups: PRE (n= 81), PERI (n= 108) and POST (n= 113). This was a cross-sectional, analytical, observational study. Data were collected by assessment chart and conducting the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form. [Results] Most of the women had less than 10 years of schooling and were married. In PERI and POST menopause, the most frequent lower urinary tract symptoms were urinary urgency and stress incontinence. The PRE group did not exhibit nocturia, urge incontinence or urinary urgency, and had the lowest symptoms frequency. In the three stages, stress incontinence was the most prevalent symptom. Of the three menopause stages, PERI had a greater impact on urinary incontinence according to the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire. [Conclusion] The presence of lower urinary tract symptoms can vary across the different stages of menopause and the urinary incontinence was the most frequent complaint. Moreover, it was observed that quality of life was more affected in the perimenopause stage. PMID:27942131

  1. Assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms in different stages of menopause.

    PubMed

    Varella, Larissa Ramalho Dantas; Bezerra da Silva, Rossânia; Eugênia de Oliveira, Maria Clara; Melo, Priscylla Hellouyse Angelo; Maranhão, Técia Maria de Oliveira; Micussi, Maria Thereza Albuquerque Barbosa Cabral

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] To assess lower urinary tract symptoms in different stages of menopause and the quality of life of females with incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] The sample consisted of 302 females, aged between 40 and 56 years, divided into three groups: PRE (n= 81), PERI (n= 108) and POST (n= 113). This was a cross-sectional, analytical, observational study. Data were collected by assessment chart and conducting the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form. [Results] Most of the women had less than 10 years of schooling and were married. In PERI and POST menopause, the most frequent lower urinary tract symptoms were urinary urgency and stress incontinence. The PRE group did not exhibit nocturia, urge incontinence or urinary urgency, and had the lowest symptoms frequency. In the three stages, stress incontinence was the most prevalent symptom. Of the three menopause stages, PERI had a greater impact on urinary incontinence according to the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire. [Conclusion] The presence of lower urinary tract symptoms can vary across the different stages of menopause and the urinary incontinence was the most frequent complaint. Moreover, it was observed that quality of life was more affected in the perimenopause stage.

  2. [Urine incontinence referral criteria for primary care].

    PubMed

    Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Cozar Olmo, J M; Esteban Fuertes, M; Fernández-Pro Ledesma, A; Molero García, J M

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of urinary incontinence (UI), health professional awareness of this disease is low, which in itself is not serious but significantly limits the lives of the patients. The Primary Care associations, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN], Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG], Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [semFYC]) along with the Asociación Española de Urología (EAU) have developed this consensus with the proposal of making GPs aware, and to help them in the diagnosis, treatment and referral to Urologists. The first goal in primary care must be the detection of UI, thus an opportunistic screening at least once in the lifetime of asymptomatic women > 40 years old and asymptomatic men > 55 years old. The diagnosis, based on medical history and physical examination, must determine the type and severity of the UI in order to refer severe cases to the Urologist. Except for overactive bladder (OAB), non-pharmacological conservative treatment is the first approach to uncomplicated UI in females and males. Antimuscarinics are the only drugs that have demonstrated efficacy and safety in urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and OAB. In men with mixed symptoms, excluding severe obstruction cases, a combination therapy of alpha-blockers and antimuscarinics should be chosen.

  3. [Urine incontinence referral criteria for primary care].

    PubMed

    Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Cozar Olmo, J M; Esteban Fuertes, M; Fernández-Pro Ledesma, A; Molero García, J M

    2013-05-01

    Despite the high incidence of urinary incontinence (UI), health professional awareness of this disease is low, which in itself is not serious but significantly limits the lives of the patients. The Primary Care associations, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN], Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG], Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [semFYC]) along with the Asociación Española de Urología (EAU) have developed this consensus with the proposal of making GPs aware, and to help them in the diagnosis, treatment and referral to Urologists. The first goal in primary care must be the detection of UI, thus an opportunistic screening at least once in the lifetime of asymptomatic women > 40 years old and asymptomatic men > 55 years old. The diagnosis, based on medical history and physical examination, must determine the type and severity of the UI in order to refer severe cases to the Urologist. Except for overactive bladder (OAB), non-pharmacological conservative treatment is the first approach to uncomplicated UI in females and males. Antimuscarinics are the only drugs that have demonstrated efficacy and safety in urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and OAB. In men with mixed symptoms, excluding severe obstruction cases, a combination therapy of alpha-blockers and antimuscarinics should be chosen.

  4. Classification and treatment of functional incontinence in children.

    PubMed

    Nijman, R J

    2000-05-01

    Functional urinary incontinence in children may be caused by disturbances of the filling phase, the voiding phase or a combination of both. Detrusor overactivity may cause frequency and urgency, with or without urge incontinence. Girls present with symptoms of detrusor overactivity more often than boys, but sometimes other symptoms, e.g. urinary tract infections or constipation, prevail. Frequent contractions of the detrusor may cause the pelvic floor muscles to become overactive, resulting in staccato or fractionated voiding. When incontinence is the result of a voiding disorder the term 'dysfunctional voiding' is used. Bladder function in these children may be normal, but instability may be present. In children with a 'lazy' bladder, voiding occurs with no detrusor contractions, and postvoid residual volumes and overflow incontinence are the main characteristics. Diagnosis is based on the medical and voiding history, a physical examination, bladder diaries and uroflowmetry. The upper urinary tract should be evaluated in children with recurrent infections and dysfunctional voiding (reflux). Uroflowmetry can be combined with pelvic floor electromyography to detect overactivity of the pelvic floor muscles. Urodynamic studies are usually reserved for patients with dysfunctional voiding and those not responding to anticholinergic drugs. Treatment is usually a combination of 'standard therapy', behavioural therapy, bladder training, physiotherapy and medical treatment. The role of alpha-blockers needs to be evaluated further. Also, neuromodulation may have a place in treatment but the exact indications need to be defined. Clean intermittent self-catheterization is sometimes necessary in children with a lazy bladder and large residual volumes who do not respond to a more conservative approach. Future research needs to be directed towards improving understanding of the pathophysiology, epidemiology, classification and treatment modalities of functional incontinence in

  5. 21 CFR 876.5280 - Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence....5280 Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device. (a) Identification. An implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device is a device used to treat urinary incontinence by...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5280 - Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence....5280 Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device. (a) Identification. An implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device is a device used to treat urinary incontinence by...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5280 - Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence....5280 Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device. (a) Identification. An implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device is a device used to treat urinary incontinence by...

  8. Recent Advances in Urinary Tract Reconstruction for Neuropathic Bladder in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Roberto I.; Lorenzo, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic bladder usually causes several limitations to patients’ quality of life, including urinary incontinence, recurrent urinary tract infections, and upper urinary tract damage. Its management has significantly changed over the last few years. The aim of our paper is to address some salient features of recent literature dealing with reconstructive procedures in pediatric and adolescent patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26962441

  9. 21 CFR 876.5280 - Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence....5280 Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device. (a) Identification. An implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device is a device used to treat urinary incontinence by...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5280 - Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence....5280 Implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device. (a) Identification. An implanted mechanical/hydraulic urinary continence device is a device used to treat urinary incontinence by...

  11. A Content Incontinent: Report of Liposomal Bupivacaine Induced Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Proper surgical management of anal fistula demands sound clinical judgment and extraordinary care to prevent incontinence and adequate postoperative pain control and provide satisfactory resolution to optimize quality of life. Fecal incontinence can be a devastating complication of procedures performed for fistula in ano. We report a unique case in which temporary incontinence (for less than 4 days) followed injection of liposomal bupivacaine for postoperative pain control after draining seton placement for fistula in ano. Patients and physicians should be aware as it may be mistaken for a more serious anatomical and permanent cause of fecal incontinence. PMID:27747127

  12. [Urinary tract dysfunction in older patients].

    PubMed

    Verdejo, Carlos; Méndez, Santiago; Salinas, Jesús

    2016-11-18

    Urinary tract dysfunction in older patients has a multifactorial aetiology and is not a uniform clinical condition. Changes due to physiological ageing as well as comorbidity and polypharmacy, can produce several dynamic conditions such as urinary incontinence and urinary retention. Lower urinary tract symptoms increase with age in both sexes and are a major problem in older patients due to their medical and psychosocial consequences. For these reasons, in assessing urinary dysfunction in older patients, we should consider external circumstances such as polypharmacy, poor mobility, affective and cognitive disorders and also accessibility to housing.

  13. Findings of universal cystoscopy at incontinence surgery and their sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Zyczynski, Halina M.; Sirls, Larry T.; Greer, W. Jerod; Rahn, David D.; Casiano, Elizabeth; Norton, Peggy; Kim, Hae-Young; Brubaker, Linda

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to report the frequency of abnormal cystoscopy at incontinence surgery and to identify risk factors and sequelae of injury. STUDY DESIGN Findings of cystoscopy were collected prospectively in 3 multicenter surgical trials. Clinical, demographic, and procedure characteristics and surgeon experience were analyzed for association with iatrogenic injury and noninjury abnormalities. Impact of abnormalities on continence outcomes and adverse events during 12 months after the procedure were assessed. RESULTS Abnormal findings in the bladder or urethra were identified in 95 of 1830 women (5.2%). Most injuries (75.8%) were iatrogenic. Lower urinary tract (LUT) injury was most common at retropubic urethropexy and retropubic midurethral sling procedures (MUS; 6.4% each), followed by autologous pubovaginal sling procedures (1.7%) and transobturator MUS (0.4%). Increasing age (56.9 vs 51.9 years; P = .04), vaginal deliveries (3.2 vs 2.6; P = .04), and blood loss (393 vs 218 mL; P=.01) were associated with LUT injury during retropubic urethropexy; however, only age (62.9 vs 51.4 years; P = .02) and smoking history (P = .04) were associated for pubovaginal sling procedures. No factors correlated with increased risk of injury at retropubic and transobturator MUS. Notably, previous incontinence surgery, concomitant procedures, anesthesia type, and trainee participation did not increase LUT injury frequency. Although discharge with an indwelling catheter was more common after trocar perforation compared with the noninjury group (55.6% vs 18.5%; P < .001), they did not differ in overall success, voiding dysfunction, recurrent urinary tract infections, or urge urinary incontinence. CONCLUSION Universal cystoscopy at incontinence surgery detects abnormalities in 1 in 20 women. Urinary trocar perforations that are addressed intraoperatively have no long-term adverse sequelae. PMID:24380742

  14. Sexual function following surgery for urodynamic stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jha, Swati; Moran, Paul; Greenham, Helen; Ford, Caroline

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare sexual function in women before and after surgery for urodynamic stress incontinence in the absence of pelvic organ prolapse. This was a prospective questionnaire survey. Fifty-four women undergoing surgery (tension-free vaginal tape/tension-free vaginal tape-obturator) for urodynamic stress incontinence with no evidence of detrusor overactivity or concomitant prolapse were assessed preoperatively and 6 months post operatively. Assessment was based on the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ), the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ) and the Patient Global Impression of Improvement. Paired t-tests were used for comparing pre- and post-op scores and unpaired t-tests for comparing observations between groups. Spearman's rank correlation was used for testing whether two numerically scored items were related, and McNemar test was used to compare pre- and postoperative responses to individual questions. ICIQ scores showed significant improvement after surgery (p < 0.001). Women completing PISQ were significantly younger (mean = 54) than those who did not (mean = 65; p < 0.001). The total PISQ score was better postoperatively (preoperative = 87.2, postoperative = 92.7; p < 0.001), with improvements in both the physical (preoperative = 31.0, postoperative = 35.2; p < 0.001) and partner-related domains (preoperative = 18.8, postoperative = 19.9; p = 0.002) but no improvement in behaviour emotive domains (preoperative = 37.3, postoperative = 37.6; p = 0.70). There was a reduction in episodes of coital incontinence postoperatively (preoperatively = 16/54, postoperatively = 39/54; p < 0.002). Previous vaginal surgery, oestrogen status of respondents and hysterectomy status did not affect the PISQ. Surgical correction of stress incontinence is associated with an improvement in sexual function.

  15. [Current diagnostics and therapy of the overactive bladder and urge incontinence].

    PubMed

    Badawi, J K; Langbein, S

    2005-06-17

    Urinary incontinence affects millions of people worldwide and also represents a social problem. Costs of urinary incontinence and overactive bladder are very high. Urge incontinence is the involuntary loss of urine associated with a strong desire or urge to urinate. There are two types of urge incontinence: One is associated with involuntary detrusor contractions leading to a loss of urine, the other is characterized by a hypersensitive bladder in which micturition reflexes are induced due to an increased afferent activity. It is important to distinguish between an idiopathic type of urge incontinence and a symptomatic type possibly caused by infections, tumours, bladder stones or foreign bodies. Diagnostics is based on a careful medical history, clinical examination and urodynamic evaluation. The use of a voiding diary is necessary. Current agents for drug therapy rely upon their anticholinergic properties. Their use is limited by side effects such as blurred vision, dizziness, constipation and dryness of the mouth. Additionally, patients refractory to anticholinergic medication can be treated by endoscopic direct injection of botulinum toxin into the detrusor muscle. These patients can also be treated by intravesical application of vanilloid derivatives in the bladder leading to a desensitization of bladder sensory fibers. In some cases of refractory urge incontinence, electrical neuromodulation is effective. Other pharmacological approaches could be selective b-adrenoceptor agonists, calcium antagonists and potassium channel openers, but these substances are not yet available for clinical use.

  16. A Qualitative Study of Family Caregiver Experiences of Managing Incontinence in Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chien-Ning; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Yu, Po-Jui; Lou, Meei-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background Incontinence is a common problem faced by family caregivers that is recognized as a major burden and predictor of institutionalization. However, few studies have evaluated the experiences of family caregivers caring for stroke survivors with incontinence. Purpose To describe experiences of caregivers managing incontinence in stroke survivors. Design This qualitative descriptive study employed a grounded-theory approach. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews with ten family caregivers of stroke survivors with incontinence were conducted during 2011. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Findings Data analysis identified four themes: chaos, hypervigilance, exhaustion, and creating a new life. There were nine related subcategories: fluster, dirtiness, urgency, fear of potential health-hazard, physically demanding and time-consuming, mentally draining, financial burden, learning by doing, and attitude adjustment. Together, these described a process of struggling to cope with the care of stroke survivors with urinary/fecal incontinence. Of the four categories, “creating a new life” developed gradually over time to orient caregivers to their new life, while the other three categories occurred in a chronological order. Conclusion The research highlighted unique caring experiences of family caregivers of stroke patients, which focused solely on the ‘incontinence issue’. Understanding these experiences may help nurses provide better support and resources for family caregivers when caring for stroke survivors with incontinence. PMID:26066345

  17. Incontinence pads: recommending the best product-based wetback performance and price.

    PubMed

    Erekson, Elisabeth A; Meyer, Sara A; Melick, Clifford; McLennan, Mary T

    2008-10-01

    Incontinence pads are available in the USA without a prescription and are commonly the first treatment option a patient with incontinence uses. The goal of this study was to examine the difference in the performance and cost of commercially available incontinence pads with the intention of providing recommendations to women. Ten different urinary incontinence products were selected. A modified wetback test was used to test product performance. For the small volume leaks, the Walgreen's Extra pad generally performed worse on the wetback test than the three other pads tested (p = 0.001-0.012), but four tests were not statistically significant. At larger leak volumes, the Walgreen's underwear generally performed worse than other products (p < or = 0.001-0.046), with some exceptions. Brand name products generally performed better than generic products, but cost more. Undergarments and underwear do the worst job of keeping moisture inside the pad.

  18. Elective cesarean section to prevent anal incontinence and brachial plexus injuries associated with macrosomia--a decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Culligan, Patrick J; Myers, John A; Goldberg, Roger P; Blackwell, Linda; Gohmann, Stephan F; Abell, Troy D

    2005-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the cost-effectiveness of a policy of elective C-section for macrosomic infants to prevent maternal anal incontinence, urinary incontinence, and newborn brachial plexus injuries. We used a decision analytic model to compare the standard of care with a policy whereby all primigravid patients in the United States would undergo an ultrasound at 39 weeks gestation, followed by an elective C-section for any fetus estimated at > or =4500 g. The following clinical consequences were considered crucial to the analysis: brachial plexus injury to the newborn; maternal anal and urinary incontinence; emergency hysterectomy; hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion; and maternal mortality. Our outcome measures included (1) number of brachial plexus injuries or cases of incontinence averted, (2) incremental monetary cost per 100,000 deliveries, (3) expected quality of life of the mother and her child, and (4) "quality-adjusted life years" (QALY) associated with the two policies. For every 100,000 deliveries, the policy of elective C-section resulted in 16.6 fewer permanent brachial plexus injuries, 185.7 fewer cases of anal incontinence, and cost savings of $3,211,000. Therefore, this policy would prevent one case of anal incontinence for every 539 elective C-sections performed. The expected quality of life associated with the elective C-section policy was also greater (quality of life score 0.923 vs 0.917 on a scale from 0.0 to 1.0 and 53.6 QALY vs 53.2). A policy whereby primigravid patients in the United States have a 39 week ultrasound-estimated fetal weight followed by C-section for any fetuses > or =4500 g appears cost effective. However, the monetary costs in our analysis were sensitive to the probability estimates of urinary incontinence following C-section and vaginal delivery and the cost estimates for urinary incontinence, vaginal delivery, and C-section.

  19. Fecal incontinence - Challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Saldana Ruiz, Nallely; Kaiser, Andreas M

    2017-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is not a diagnosis but a frequent and debilitating common final pathway symptom resulting from numerous different causes. Incontinence not only impacts the patient’s self-esteem and quality of life but may result in significant secondary morbidity, disability, and cost. Treatment is difficult without any panacea and an individualized approach should be chosen that frequently combines different modalities. Several new technologies have been developed and their specific roles will have to be defined. The scope of this review is outline the evaluation and treatment of patients with fecal incontinence. PMID:28104977

  20. Urethro-urethral fistula: A rare cause of post-TURP incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, H. Krishna; Pillai, Biju S.

    2014-01-01

    Prostatic abscess rarely follows acute prostatitis and can sometimes lead to a fistula by breaking into the prostatic urethra, peri-rectal tissues, the perineum, or the rectum. We report a case of a prostatic abscess tracking into the bulbar urethra after a transurethral resection of the prostate. This created a fistula, mimicking a urethral duplication and leading to urinary incontinence. PMID:25553167

  1. [Incontinence--a common issue for people with Parkinson's disease. A systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Siegl, Eva; Lassen, Britta; Saxer, Susi

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is among the most common neurological diseases. About 4.1 million people are attected worldwide. The course of Parkinson's disease is chronically progressive. With L-Dopa therapy the life expectancy of people being affected by Parkinon's disease is not shortened compared with people who are not affected. Therefore people with Parkinson's disease often suffer from the serious effects for decades which include motor symptoms as well as vegetative disturbance, which concerns bladder function and functions of the gastrointestinal tract. Urinary and fecal incontinence involve severe impairment of quality of life. In this review the occurence of urinary and fecal incontinence should be determined in order to be able to describe its extent. There are different measures for treatment or improvement. These are reviewed based on the following research question: Which effects do interventions have in improving urinary and fecal incontinence in persons with Parkinson's disease compared to usual care? In order to answer the questions a systematic review was conducted. The literature search occured in the electronic databases Cochrane database, PubMed and CINAHL. Three studies investigating the prevalence with a total sample size of n = 1077 and for the evaluation of interventions four studies with a total sample size of n = 48 have been included. 25 percent of the women with Parkinson's disease suffer from urgency incontinence compared to seven percent of the women without Parkinson's disease (p < 0.01). Among men with Parkison's disease 28 percent are affected and six percent among men without Parkinson's disease (p < 0.01). In respect to stress and fecal incontinence there were no significant differences between people affected and people not affected by Parkinson's disease. With pelvic floor muscle exercises and accompanying measures as well as with injections of botulinum toxin A a reduction of urinary incontinence seems to be possible. Due to

  2. Urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Litza, Janice A; Brill, John R

    2010-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common urologic disorder and one of the most common conditions for which physicians are consulted. Patients at increased risk for UTI include women; diabetics; the immunocompromised; and those with anatomic abnormalities, impaired mobility, incontinence, advanced age, and instrumentation. Antibiotic therapy aims to relieve symptoms and prevent complications such as pyelonephritis and renal scarring. Distinguishing asymptomatic bacteriuria from a UTI can be difficult, especially in those with comorbidities. Most experts do not recommend screening for UTI, except in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  3. Management of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a common condition that often impairs quality of life. It is generally caused by a variety of conditions that are associated with anorectal sensorimotor dysfunction and/or diarrhea. A detailed characterization of symptoms, particularly bowel habits, is useful for assessing symptom severity and guiding management. A careful digital rectal examination is invaluable for gauging anal resting and squeeze pressures and anorectal evacuation. Tests should be tailored to age, symptom severity, and response to previous therapy. Anorectal manometry and sphincter imaging are useful starting tests. Depending upon the clinical circumstances, additional testing and therapeutic options may be useful. Fecal continence can be improved by measures to regulate bowel habits and pelvic floor retraining. Surgical repair of anal sphincter defects improves fecal continence in the short but not in the long term. Newer surgical therapies and devices are of limited and/or unproven utility. PMID:21960903

  4. Current Management of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jennifer Y; Abbas, Maher A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the management of fecal incontinence, which affects more than 1 in 10 people and can have a substantial negative impact on quality of life. Methods: The medical literature between 1980 and April 2012 was reviewed for the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence. Results: A comprehensive history and physical examination are required to help understand the severity and type of symptoms and the cause of incontinence. Treatment options range from medical therapy and minimally invasive interventions to more invasive procedures with varying degrees of morbidity. The treatment approach must be tailored to each patient. Many patients can have substantial improvement in symptoms with dietary management and biofeedback therapy. For younger patients with large sphincter defects, sphincter repair can be helpful. For patients in whom biofeedback has failed, other options include injectable medications, radiofrequency ablation, or sacral nerve stimulation. Patients with postdefecation fecal incontinence and a rectocele can benefit from rectocele repair. An artificial bowel sphincter is reserved for patients with more severe fecal incontinence. Conclusion: The treatment algorithm for fecal incontinence will continue to evolve as additional data become available on newer technologies. PMID:24355892

  5. Incontinence after radical prostatectomy: Anything new in its management?

    PubMed Central

    Caremel, Romain; Corcos, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: With the increasing number of radical prostatectomies (RP) performed, male stress urinary incontinence (SUI) has become common. The artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) is the gold standard to treat SUI post-RP, but new devices have recently been developed. We review the recent studies on the treatment of SUI post-RP; we also describe the surgical techniques, mechanisms of action and results of these new procedures. Methods: We conducted a literature review search in the PubMed/Medline and Embase databases. Our search was restricted to recent articles. We included studies even if the urinary incontinence was due to sphincter deficiency after RP in non-neurologic patients. Results: We found 8 cohort studies for the surgical procedure: 3 studies concerning slings, 1 involving balloons adjustable implant, and 4 involving new devices. The only randomized controlled trial (RCT) was a pharmacologic clinical trial comparing duloxetine to placebo. The social continence rates were analyzed for 6 studies and were up to 66%. Conclusion: New minimally invasive surgical procedures have emerged as the main alternative to AUS, with social continence rates up to 60% despite just 1 RCT studying the pharmacologic approach. There is an urgent need for well-designed clinical trials to clarify the role of new surgical alternatives in the management of SUI post-RP. New technologies should continue to be evaluated and compared with the AUS, which remains the gold standard. PMID:25024791

  6. Behavior Therapy to Enable Drug Discontinuation in the Treatment of Urge Incontinence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Burgio, Kathryn L.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Menefee, Shawn; Borello-France, Diane; Corton, Marlene; Johnson, Harry W.; Mallett, Veronica; Norton, Peggy; FitzGerald, Mary P.; Dandreo, Kimberly J.; Richter, Holly E.; Rozanski, Thomas; Albo, Michael; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Lemack, Gary E.; Chai, Toby C.; Khandwala, Salil; Baker, Jan; Brubaker, Linda; Stoddard, Anne M.; Goode, Patricia S.; Nielsen-Omeis, Betsy; Nager, Charles W.; Kenton, Kimberly; Tennstedt, Sharon L.; Kusek, John W.; Chang, T. Debuene; Nyberg, Leroy M.; Steers, William

    2010-01-01

    Background Women with urge urinary incontinence are commonly treated with antimuscarinic medications, but many discontinue therapy. Objective To determine whether combining antimuscarinic drug therapy with supervised behavioral training, compared to drug therapy alone, improves the ability of women with urge incontinence to achieve clinically important reductions in incontinence episodes and to and sustain these improvements after discontinuing medication. Design Two-stage, multi-center, randomized clinical trial (BE-DRI trial) (July 2004 – January 2006). Setting Nine university-affiliated outpatient clinics. Patients 307 women with urge predominant incontinence. Interventions Ten weeks of open-label, extended-release tolterodine alone (N = 153) or combined with behavioral training (N = 154) (Stage 1), followed by discontinuation of therapy and follow-up at 8 months (Stage 2); 237 participants completed the trial. Measurements The primary outcome, measured at 8 months, was defined as not taking drug or receiving any other therapy for urge incontinence and ≥70% reduction in frequency of incontinence episodes. Secondary outcomes were reduction in incontinence, self-reported satisfaction and improvement, and scores on validated questionnaires measuring symptom distress/bother and health-related quality-of-life. Study staff who performed outcome evaluations were blinded to group assignment, but participants and interventionists were not. Results At 8 months, there was no difference in successful discontinuation of drug therapy between combined therapy and drug alone (41% in both groups, 95% confidence interval on difference: -12% to +12%). A higher proportion of patients in combined therapy achieved ≥70% reduction of incontinence than in drug therapy alone at 10 weeks (69% vs. 58%; difference = 11%; 95% confidence interval: -0.3 to +22.1). Combined therapy yielded better outcomes over time on the Urogenital Distress Inventory and Overactive Bladder Questionnaire

  7. Impact of incontinence on the quality of life of caregivers of older persons with incontinence: A qualitative study in four European countries.

    PubMed

    Santini, Sara; Andersson, Gunnel; Lamura, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of incontinence management on informal caregivers of older persons with incontinence. In order to investigate this phenomenon in different welfare systems via qualitative interviews and a content analysis methodology, the study was carried out in four European countries (Italy, the Netherlands, Slovak Republic and Sweden). To this purpose, 50 semi-structured interviews were conducted with spouses and children of older people receiving their help to manage the consequences of involuntary urinary and/or faecal leakage. Findings show that incontinence has a remarkably strong effect on caregivers' quality of life, because it results in progressive social isolation, causing them financial problems as well as psychological and physical exhaustion. The lack of appropriate support and the general silence regarding the problem, which is still considered a taboo by many, aggravate the caregivers' situation. It is therefore crucial that caregivers can count on a strong public and private support network, appropriate information and suitable incontinent products, in order to better handle incontinence and care tasks in general.

  8. [Stress incontinence in elderly women].

    PubMed

    Loertzer, H; Schneider, P

    2013-06-01

    Stress incontinence is one of the major challenges in geriatric medicine. This is becoming more apparent in routine urology practice with the demographic changes in the population. A thorough diagnosis for a correct treatment of stress incontinence is as important in elderly women as it is in younger patients. This includes assessing the risk factors of incontinence and obesity, parturition, pelvic surgery and changes in hormone levels are risk factors usually found in elderly women. These are the main reasons why this patient group is most frequently affected. Treatment options do not differ significantly from these of younger women. Lifestyle modification, weight loss and supervised pelvic floor training are the mainstays of conservative therapy and surgical treatment should only be considered after these options have been exhausted. In these cases minimally invasive surgical techniques offer clear advantages especially for elderly often multimorbid women.

  9. The Impact of Stress Incontinence Surgery of Female Sexual Function

    PubMed Central

    BRUBAKER, Linda; CHIANG, Seing; ZYCZYNSKI, Halina; NORTON, Peggy; KALINOSKI, D. Lynn; STODDARD, Anne; KUSEK, John W.; STEERS, William

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe change in sexual function 2 years after surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence. Methods This analysis included 655 women randomized to Burch colposuspension or sling surgery. Sexual activity was assessed by the PISQ-12 among those sexually active at baseline and two years after surgery. Results Mean PISQ-12 total score improved from baseline 32.23±6.85 to 36.85± 5.89. After surgery, fewer subjects reported incontinence (9% vs. 53%, p<0.0001), restriction of sexual activity due to fear of incontinence (10% vs. 52%, p<0.0001), avoidance of intercourse because of vaginal bulging (3% vs. 24%, p<0.0001) or negative emotional reactions during sex (9% vs. 35%, p<0.0001). Women with successful surgery had greater improvement PISQ-12 scores (5.77 vs. 3.79), p<0.006. Sexually active women were younger, thinner, and had lower MESA scores (total and urge subscale) than sexually inactive women. Conclusion Sexual function improves following successful surgery and did not differ between Burch or sling. PMID:19286143

  10. Quality of Life after Surgery for Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Tennstedt, S. L.; Litman, H. J.; Zimmern, P.; Ghetti, C.; Kusek, J. W.; Nager, C.W.; Mueller, E.R.; Kraus, S.R.; Varner, E.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated changes in condition-specific quality of life (QOL) after surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods Data from 655 women in a clinical trial comparing the Burch and fascial sling were examined. Results Improvement in QOL, measured with the IIQ (mean decrease 133.1; s.d. 109.8), was observed 6 months after surgery and persisted at 24 months. Women for whom surgery was successful (regardless of surgery type) had greater improvement in QOL (mean decrease 160.0; s.d 103.9) than did women for whom surgery was not successful (mean decrease 113.6; s.d 110.9) (p<0.0001), although not statistically significant after adjusting for covariates. Multivariable analysis showed that QOL improvement was related to decreased UI symptom bother, greater improvement in UI severity, younger age, Hispanic ethnicity and receiving Burch surgery. Among sexually active women, worsening sexual function had a negative impact on QOL. Conclusion Improved QOL was explained most by UI symptom improvement. Brief Summary Improvements in quality of life after stress incontinence surgery are significant, durable over 24 months, and associated with improvement of incontinence symptoms and symptom bother. PMID:18682875

  11. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: a cross-sectional prevalence study in the Australian acute care hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jill L; Coyer, Fiona M; Osborne, Sonya R

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to identify the prevalence of incontinence and incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) in Australian acute care patients and to describe the products worn to manage incontinence, and those provided at the bedside for perineal skin care. Data on 376 inpatients were collected over 2 days at a major Australian teaching hospital. The mean age of the sample group was 62 years and 52% of the patients were male. The prevalence rate of incontinence was 24% (91/376). Urinary incontinence was significantly more prevalent in females (10%) than males (6%) (χ(2)  = 4·458, df = 1, P = 0·035). IAD occurred in 10% (38/376) of the sample group, with 42% (38/91) of incontinent patients having IAD. Semi-formed and liquid stool were associated with IAD (χ(2)  = 5·520, df = 1, P = 0·027). Clinical indication of fungal infection was present in 32% (12/38) of patients with IAD. Absorbent disposable briefs were the most common incontinence aids used (80%, 70/91), with soap/water and disposable washcloths being the clean-up products most commonly available (60%, 55/91) at the bedside. Further data are needed to validate this high prevalence. Studies that address prevention of IAD and the effectiveness of management strategies are also needed.

  12. Urinary Problems Amongst Gynecological Consultations. Association Between Prolapse, Gynecological Surgery and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Saadia, Zaheera

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary incontinence is the inability of a woman to maintain bladder control. Symptoms range from urgency, frequency, nocturia to urge incontinence (1). It limits functional and social activities and leads to depression and social withdrawal. (2). This observational study aimed to describe the common urinary problems amongst gynecological consultations. It also describes the relationship of urinary incontinence with history of diabetes, previous gynecological surgery and prolapse. Methods: The study was conducted as a descriptive cross sectional study from Jan-May 2015 at Qassim University Clinic, Buraidah. Women with urinary problem and those without urinary problems were compared for risk factors including diabetes, prolapse and previous gynecological surgery. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 22 (SPSS 22) was used to conduct proportion z-tests to determine the association of prolapse, gynecological surgeries and diabetes with urinary incontinence. To test the hypothesis, differences between two groups on the aforementioned factors were examined. The groups included participants that reported having urinary problems (n = 111) and those who do not have urinary problems (n = 100). Results: The most frequent complaints of participants with urinary problems were urgency (n = 66, 59.46%), Stress incontinence (SI) (n = 65, 58.56%) and frequency (n = 62, 55.86%). For participants with a urinary problem, 89.19% have not had a gynecological surgery (n = 99) and the remaining 10.81% of participants had a gynecological surgery (n = 12). For participants without a urinary problem, 97.0% have not had a gynecological surgery (n = 97) and the remaining 3.0% had a gynecological surgery (n = 3). For participants with a urinary problem, 72.97% did not have diabetes (n = 81) and the remaining 27.03% of participants did have diabetes (n = 30). For participants without a urinary problem, 92.0% did not have diabetes (n = 92) and the remaining 8.0% did report

  13. URINARY PROBLEMS AMONGST GYNECOLOGICAL CONSULTATIONS. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PROLAPSE, GYNECOLOGICAL SURGERY AND DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Saadia, Zaheera

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary incontinence is the inability of a woman to maintain bladder control. Symptoms range from urgency, frequency, nocturia to urge incontinence (1). It limits functional and social activities and leads to depression and social withdrawal. (2). This observational study aimed to describe the common urinary problems amongst gynecological consultations. It also describes the relationship of urinary incontinence with history of diabetes, previous gynecological surgery and prolapse. Methods: The study was conducted as a descriptive cross sectional study from Jan-May 2015 at Qassim University Clinic, Buraidah. Women with urinary problem and those without urinary problems were compared for risk factors including diabetes, prolapse and previous gynecological surgery. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 22 (SPSS 22) was used to conduct proportion z-tests to determine the association of prolapse, gynecological surgeries and diabetes with urinary incontinence. To test the hypothesis, differences between two groups on the aforementioned factors were examined. The groups included participants that reported having urinary problems (n = 111) and those who do not have urinary problems (n = 100). Results: The most frequent complaints of participants with urinary problems were urgency (n = 66, 59.46%), Stress incontinence (SI) (n = 65, 58.56%) and frequency (n = 62, 55.86%). For participants with a urinary problem, 89.19% have not had a gynecological surgery (n = 99) and the remaining 10.81% of participants had a gynecological surgery (n = 12). For participants without a urinary problem, 97.0% have not had a gynecological surgery (n = 97) and the remaining 3.0% had a gynecological surgery (n = 3). For participants with a urinary problem, 72.97% did not have diabetes (n = 81) and the remaining 27.03% of participants did have diabetes (n = 30). For participants without a urinary problem, 92.0% did not have diabetes (n = 92) and the remaining 8.0% did report

  14. Fuzzy cognitive map in differential diagnosis of alterations in urinary elimination: A nursing approach

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes Lopes, Maria Helena Baena; Ortega, Neli Regina Siqueira; Silveira, Paulo Sérgio Panse; Massad, Eduardo; Higa, Rosângela; de Fátima Marin, Heimar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a decision support system to discriminate the diagnoses of alterations in urinary elimination, according to the nursing terminology of NANDA International (NANDA-I). Methods A fuzzy cognitive map (FCM) was structured considering six possible diagnoses: stress urinary incontinence, reflex urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence, functional urinary incontinence, total urinary incontinence and urinary retention; and 39 signals associated with them. The model was implemented in Microsoft Visual C++® Edition 2005 and applied in 195 real cases. Its performance was evaluated through the agreement test, comparing its results with the diagnoses determined by three experts (nurses). The sensitivity and specificity of the model were calculated considering the expert’s opinion as a gold standard. In order to compute the Kappa’s values we considered two situations, since more than one diagnosis was possible: the overestimation of the accordance in which the case was considered as concordant when at least one diagnoses was equal; and the underestimation of the accordance, in which the case was considered as discordant when at least one diagnosis was different. Results The overestimation of the accordance showed an excellent agreement (kappa = 0.92, p < 0.0001); and the underestimation provided a moderate agreement (kappa = 0.42, p < 0.0001). In general the FCM model showed high sensitivity and specificity, of 0.95 and 0.92, respectively, but provided a low specificity value in determining the diagnosis of urge urinary incontinence (0.43) and a low sensitivity value to total urinary incontinence (0.42). Conclusions The decision support system developed presented a good performance compared to other types of expert systems for differential diagnosis of alterations in urinary elimination. Since there are few similar studies in the literature, we are convinced of the importance of investing in this kind of modeling, both from the theoretical and from

  15. Bladder and rectal incontinence without paraplegia or paraparesis after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Naritomo; Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Maruyama, Ryushi; Ujihira, Kosuke; Iba, Yutaka; Hatta, Eiichiro; Yamada, Akira; Nakanishi, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Spinal cord ischemia is a well-known potential complication of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), and it is usually manifested by paraplegia or paraparesis. We describe a case in which spinal cord ischemia after EVAR presented by isolated bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological deficits. A 63-year-old woman presented with intermittent claudication secondary to an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and a left common iliac artery obstruction, for which she underwent EVAR using an aorto-uniiliac (AUI) device and ilio-femoral artery bypass. On postoperative day 3, she developed urinary and fecal incontinence without signs of paraplegia or paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a hyper-intense signal in the spinal cord. She received hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy and was discharged after 18 days when her urinary and fecal incontinence were almost resolved. This report suggests that spinal cord ischemia after EVAR for aortoiliac occlusive disease might present as bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological manifestations.

  16. Fecal Incontinence: Etiology, Evaluation, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Dana M.; Weiss, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a debilitating problem facing ~2.2% of the U.S. general population over 65 years of age. Etiologic factors include traumatic, neurologic, congenital, and iatrogenic. Most commonly, obstetric trauma causes fecal incontinence as well as poorly performed anorectal surgery or pelvic radiation. Several severity scores and quality of life indexes have been developed to quantify incontinent symptoms. There are several nonsurgical and surgical options for the treatment of fecal incontinence. Biofeedback is among the most successful nonoperative strategies. Depending on the cause, anal sphincter repair, artificial bowel sphincter, and sacral nerve stimulation are used to treat fecal incontinence with some success. Unfortunately, fecal incontinence is an extremely difficult problem to manage: there has not been one, single treatment option that has proven to be both safe and effective in long-term studies. PMID:22379407

  17. Urinary bladder herniation through a caudoventral abdominal wall defect in a mature cat.

    PubMed

    Neville-Towle, Jack; Sakals, Sherisse

    2015-09-01

    A 16-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat with no history of trauma was presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine for assessment of urinary incontinence. Diagnostic investigation revealed herniation of the urinary bladder through a caudoventral abdominal wall defect. Clinical signs resolved after surgical reduction of the bladder.

  18. [Delayed necrotizing fasciitis: a complication of stress incontinence surgery by suburethral sling].

    PubMed

    Tholozan, A-S; Delapparent, T; Terzibachian, J-J; Leung, F; Govyadovskiy, A; Maillet, R; Riethmuller, D

    2014-06-01

    We report a 50-year-old woman case with an extensive necrotizing fasciitis (NF). The NF appeared 10 years after a tension free vaginal tape procedure for urinary stress incontinence. Vital prognosis was engaged due to the initial sepsis severity. This kind of complication is rare and could be under estimated. NF usually appear soon after surgery, whatever within the year following implantation. Anyway, NF are always related to a vaginal erosion of the tape.

  19. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  20. Prevalence and correlates of fecal incontinence among nursing home residents: a population-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fecal incontinence is highly prevalent among nursing home residents. Previous nursing home studies have identified co-morbidity associated with fecal incontinence, but as this population is increasingly old and frail, we wanted to see if the rate of fecal incontinence had increased and to investigate correlates of fecal incontinence further. Methods Cross-sectional study of the entire nursing home population in one Norwegian municipality. Registered nurses filled in a questionnaire for all residents in the municipality (980 residents aged ≥65). Statistical methods used are descriptive statistics, binary logistic regression and multivariable logistic regression. Results The response rate of the study was 90.3%. The prevalence of fecal incontinence was 42.3%. In multivariable analysis of FI, residents with diarrhea (OR 7.33, CI 4.39-12.24), urinary incontinence (OR 2.77, CI 1.73-4.42) and dementia (OR 2.17, CI 1.28-3.68) had higher odds of having fecal incontinence compared to those without the condition. Residents residing in a nursing home between 4–5 years had higher odds of having fecal incontinence compared to residents who had stayed under a year (OR 2.65, CI 1.20-5.85). Residents with deficiency in feeding (2.17, CI 1.26-3.71), dressing (OR 4.03, CI 1.39-11.65), toilet use (OR 7.37, CI 2.65-20.44) and mobility (OR 2.54, CI 1.07-6.00) had higher odds of having fecal incontinence compared to residents without deficiencies in activities of daily living (ADL). Needing help for transfer between bed and chair was a protective factor for fecal incontinence compared to residents who transferred independently (OR 0.49, CI 0.26-0.91). Conclusions Fecal incontinence is a prevalent condition in the nursing home population and is associated with ADL decline, frailty, diarrhea and quality of care. This knowledge is important for staff in nursing home in order to provide the best treatment and care for residents with fecal incontinence. PMID:24119057

  1. Long-term results of a clinical trial comparing isolated vaginal stimulation with combined treatment for women with stress incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Maria Cláudia Bicudo; de Mendonça, Rafaela Rosalba; Rodrigues, Alexandre Oliveira; de Matos, Leandro Luongo; Pompeo, Antônio Carlos Lima; Bezerra, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the efficacy of stress urinary incontinence treatments adding pelvic floor muscle training to vaginal electrical stimulation. Methods Forty-eight women with stress urinary incontinence were randomized into 2 groups: 24 underwent isolated vaginal electrical stimulation, and 24 vaginal electrical stimulation plus pelvic floor muscle training. History, physical examination, voiding diary, perineum strength test, and urodynamic study were assessed. Comparisons were made for adherence to treatment, muscle strength improvement, urinary symptoms, and degree of satisfaction immediately, 12 and 96 months after treatment. Results Patients' degree of satisfaction on vaginal electrical stimulation, and on vaginal electrical stimulation plus pelvic floor muscle training immediately, 12 and 96 months post treatment, were, respectively: 88.2% versus 88.9% 64.7% versus 61.1% and 42.9% versus 28.6% (p>0.05). Conclusion Vaginal electrical stimulation associated to pelvic floor muscle training did not show better results than vaginal electrical stimulation alone. PMID:25003921

  2. [How Does Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Affekt Female Sexuality?].

    PubMed

    Anding, R; Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Rantell, A; Wiedemann, A

    2016-08-01

    With increasing age many women suffer from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) and female sexual dysfunction. An increasing body of evidence supports an association between the 2 conditions. Especially women with urodynamically proved detrusor hyperactivity suffer from sexual dysfunction and there is some evidence that in patients with stress incontinence sexual health improves after successful surgery.

  3. Urinary Incontinence Surgery: When Other Treatments Aren't Enough

    MedlinePlus

    ... two main categories: sling procedures and bladder neck suspension procedures. For a sling procedure, your surgeon uses ... after surgery while you heal. A bladder neck suspension reinforces the urethra and bladder neck so that ...

  4. Jacquet erosive diaper dermatitis: a complication of adult urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Van, Livia; Harting, Mandy; Rosen, Ted

    2008-07-01

    Jacquet erosive diaper dermatitis is typically described as a severe irritant dermatitis of the perianal region. However, Jacquet erosive diaper dermatitis, perianal pseudoverrucous papules and nodules, and granuloma gluteale infantum/ adultorum have been regarded as discrete entities or all part of the same clinical spectrum, representing the result of chronic, severe, irritant contact dermatitis. We present a case of Jacquet erosive diaper dermatitis and a discussion of the clinical spectrum of diseases to which it belongs.

  5. [Using polypropylene mesh in surgery for stress urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Murguía-Flores, Erick Arturo; Quintero-Granados, Fernando; Torres-Gómez, Luis Guillermo; Chávez-Navarro, Mariela Mariela; Vázquez-Gómez, Martha Berenice; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: la incontinencia urinaria de esfuerzo (IUE) se define como la pérdida involuntaria de orina con esfuerzos como toser, estornudar o realizar actividad física. Dado que la IUE genera costos elevados y afecta la calidad de vida, es importante el diagnóstico y el manejo adecuados. El objetivo fue conocer si es adecuado el uso de malla de polipropileno para la IUE. Métodos: se hizo un estudio de cohorte histórica que incluyó a pacientes con incontinencia urinaria de esfuerzo en los que se utilizó malla de polipropileno durante 2013 con un seguimiento a 12 meses. Resultados: se logró una corrección de la IUE en el 98% de las pacientes al año de seguimiento. La tasa de complicaciones fue del 2%. Solo el 12% de las pacientes tenía un peso normal. La cirugía más utilizada fue la colocación de cinta libre de tensión transobturadora. Conclusión: la curación que se reporta a nivel mundial en promedio es del 90%, mientras que para las complicaciones el promedio es del 10%. En este estudio tenemos resultados similares. Utilizar malla de polipropileno para la corrección quirúrgica de la IUE es una alternativa segura y eficaz; sin embargo, se requieren estudios con mayores poblaciones y un seguimiento más extenso para aclarar esta situación.

  6. Managing a common dermatological problem: incontinence dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Nazarko, Linda

    2007-08-01

    Incontinence dermatitis is an under-recognized and under-researched problem that mostly affects older people who have continence problems. Nurses who are aware of the risk factors can provide care that reduces the risk of this distressing problem. If incontinence dermatitis occurs, evidence-based care can be used to treat the person and reduce the risks of further complications.

  7. [Urinary tract infections in children].

    PubMed

    Lellig, E; Apfelbeck, M; Straub, J; Karl, A; Tritschler, S; Stief, C G; Riccabona, M

    2017-02-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common bacterial infections in children. The symptoms are not very specific and range from abdominal pain, poor feeding to nocturnal urinary incontinence. The technique of collecting urine plays an important role for securing the diagnosis. The best way to obtain urine in non-toilet-trained children is catheterization or suprapubic bladder aspiration. In toilet-trained children midstream urine is an acceptable alternative after cleaning the foreskin or labia. In the case of an infection a prompt empirical antibiotic therapy is necessary to reduce the risk of parenchymal scarring of the kidneys. There are different approaches to diagnose vesicoureteral reflux in different countries. The commonly used standard approach in Germany is voiding cystourethrography. In the case of reflux dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy should be performed additionally to exclude renal scarring (bottom-up approach).

  8. New frontiers in the treatment of overactive bladder and incontinence.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Michael B

    2002-01-01

    In this article the author tries to forecast how urologists will treat the overactive bladder (OAB) in the next decade. He reviews drugs currently under development and also logical and exciting pharmacological targets that would be suitable targets for treating OAB in the future. The author also discusses intravesical therapy and alternative drug delivery methods, such as intravesical capsaicin and botulinum toxin. There are many advantages to advanced drug delivery systems, including the achievement of long-term therapeutic efficacy, decreased incidence and severity of side effects, and improved patient compliance. Special emphasis is placed on approaches to modulating bladder afferent nerve function to prevent OAB. Speculation on future techniques such as gene therapy can also be considered for treating OAB, because they may make it possible to access all of the genitourinary organs via minimally invasive techniques. Traditional anticholinergic therapies are limited in their effectiveness. There is great hope for future research and therapy for OAB and urinary incontinence.

  9. The effect of hormones on the lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dudley; Toozs-Hobson, Philip; Cardozo, Linda

    2013-12-01

    The female genital and lower urinary tracts share a common embryological origin, arising from the urogenital sinus and both are sensitive to the effects of the female sex steroid hormones throughout life. Estrogen is known to have an important role in the function of the lower urinary tract and estrogen and progesterone receptors have been demonstrated in the vagina, urethra, bladder and pelvic floor musculature. In addition estrogen deficiency occurring following the menopause is known to cause atrophic change and may be associated with lower urinary tract symptoms such as frequency, urgency, nocturia, urgency incontinence and recurrent infection. These may also co-exist with symptoms of urogenital atrophy such as dyspareunia, itching, vaginal burning and dryness. Epidemiological studies have implicated estrogen deficiency in the aetiology of lower urinary tract symptoms with 70% of women relating the onset of urinary incontinence to their final menstrual period. Whilst for many years systemic and vaginal estrogen therapy was felt to be beneficial in the treatment of lower urinary and genital tract symptoms this evidence has recently been challenged by large epidemiological studies investigating the use of systemic hormone replacement therapy as primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. The aim of this paper is to examine the effect of the sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone, on the lower urinary tract and to review the current evidence regarding the role of systemic and vaginal estrogens in the management of lower urinary tract symptoms and urogenital atrophy.

  10. The pathogenesis of genitourinary prolapse and stress incontinence of urine. A histological and histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, S A; Gosling, J A; Smith, A R; Warrell, D W

    1989-01-01

    Histological and histochemical analysis of biopsy samples of pubococcygeus muscle obtained from asymptomatic women and from women with stress incontinence of urine, with or without genitourinary prolapse, have been compared. In the asymptomatic women both age and parity appeared to be related to the morphological features of the samples and in particular those obtained from the posterior part of the pubococcygeus. In the symptomatic women there was a significant increase in the number of muscle fibres showing pathological damage which were obtained from the posterior part of the pelvic floor. The range of diameters of both Type I and Type II fibres obtained from this region was significantly different between symptomatic and asymptomatic women. These findings may be attributable to partial denervation of the pelvic floor in patients with urinary stress incontinence with or without genital tract prolapse.

  11. Prevention and management of incontinence-associated dermatitis using a barrier cream.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Sharon; Graham, Katriona

    2014-12-01

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common skin disorder affecting patients with urinary and/or faecal incontinence. Maintaining the skin's integrity is a challenge, particularly in the elderly and individuals with medical or surgical comorbidities. It is widely reported that the issue is complex and recognition is inconsistent, with symptoms often being confused with those of pressure ulcers. This article explores the causes of IAD, looking at the structure of healthy skin and the pathology that occurs during skin breakdown. It identifies risk factors and prevention and management strategies, including the use of barrier creams. The article then presents the results of a large product evaluation that took place with Cavilon Durable Barrier Cream (3M). The barrier cream was shown to be more effective in treating and managing patients with IAD than the previous product that patients had been using. A case study is also included to demonstrate the efficacy of the newest version of Cavilon Durable Barrier Cream.

  12. Partial urethral resection in the surgical treatment of vulvar cancer does not have a significant impact on urinary continence. A confirmation of an authority-based opinion.

    PubMed

    de Mooij, Y; Burger, M P M; Schilthuis, M S; Buist, M; van der Velden, J

    2007-01-01

    Partial resection of the urethra is sometimes necessary in the surgical treatment of locally advanced vulvar cancer. In this study, the frequency of urinary incontinence after partial urethral resection was compared with that of patients who were treated without partial resection of the urethra. Eighteen patients with vulvar cancer encroaching or infiltrating the urethra, treated by a radical vulvectomy and partial urethrectomy, were compared with 17 patients treated by vulvectomy without partial removal of the urethra. Data on urinary incontinence pre- and postoperatively from both groups were retrospectively collected from the patient files. A questionnaire on urinary incontinence was sent to a subset of patients from both groups in order to get information on the current micturation pattern. In four out of 18 patients (22%) with a partial urethrectomy, incontinence was reported, versus two out of 17 patients (12%) in the control group (P= 0.860). Eight patients in the study group and 12 in the control group are currently alive, and all responded to the questionnaire. Two (25%) in the study group and three (25%) in the control group reported to have current symptoms of urinary incontinence. This retrospective study shows that partial resection of 1-1.5 cm of the distal urethra in addition to a radical local excision for vulvar cancer does not result in a significant increase in the frequency of urinary incontinence, compared with vulvar cancer patients without partial urethrectomy.

  13. Evolution of female urinary continence after physical therapy and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Urinary incontinence (UI) is defined as any involuntary loss of urine that can influence the quality of life, personal hygiene and social interaction. The types of UI that most affect women are stress urinary incontinence, urge incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence. There are several risk factors that result in specific treatments. We aimed to investigate the evolution of female urinary continence after physical therapy intervention and its associated factors. Method A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted with 71 participants who were discharged from physiotherapy sector from August 2006 to April 2012 and met the inclusion criteria. Results Among the studied variables, the number of sessions and completion of home pelvic floor exercises showed a significant association. The urinary continence appeared in 43.7% of the cases, and factors, performance of home exercises, and number of sessions showed a significant association. Conclusion The number of sessions and completion of home pelvic floor exercises showed a significant relationship with each other. PMID:24839462

  14. Neuromodulation for the Treatment of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Tomonori; Kaga, Kanya; Fuse, Miki; Shibata, Chiharu; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki

    2015-09-01

    Neuromodulation therapy incorporates electrical stimulation to target specific nerves that control lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The objectives of this article are to review the mechanism of action, the type of neuromodulation, and the efficacy of neuromodulation mainly according to the results of randomized controlled trials. Neuromodulation includes pelvic floor electrical stimulation (ES) using vaginal, anal and surface electrodes, interferential therapy (IF), magnetic stimulation (MS), percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation, and sacral nerve stimulation (SNS). The former four stimulations are used for external periodic (short-term) stimulation, and SNS are used for internal, chronic (long-term) stimulation. All of these therapies have been reported to be effective for overactive bladder or urgency urinary incontinence. Pelvic floor ES, IF, and MS have also been reported to be effective for stress urinary incontinence. The mechanism of neuromodulation for overactive bladder has been reported to be the reflex inhibition of detrusor contraction by the activation of afferent fibers by three actions, i.e., the activation of hypogastric nerve, the direct inhibition of the pelvic nerve within the sacral cord and the supraspinal inhibition of the detrusor reflex. The mechanism of neuromodulation for stress incontinence is contraction of the pelvic floor muscles through an effect on the muscle fibers as well as through the stimulation of pudendal nerves. Overall, cure and improvement rates of these therapies for urinary incontinence are 30-50, and 60-90% respectively. MS has been considered to be a technique for stimulating nervous system noninvasively. SNS is indicated for patients with refractory overactive bladder and urinary retention.

  15. Sex hormones and the female urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Miodrag, A; Castleden, C M; Vallance, T R

    1988-10-01

    Symptomatic clinical changes and urodynamic changes are apparent in the female urinary tract system during pregnancy, the menstrual cycle and following the menopause. The sex hormones exert physiological effects on the female urinary tract, from the ureters to the urethra, with oestrogens having an additional influence on the structures of the pelvic floor. High affinity oestrogen receptors have been identified in bladder, trigone, urethra and pubococcygeus muscle of women. Oestrogen pretreatment enhances the contractile response of animal detrusor muscle to alpha-adrenoceptor agonists, cholinomimetics and prostaglandins, as well as enhancing the contractile response to alpha-agonists in ureter and urethra. Progesterone on the other hand decreases tone in the ureter, bladder and urethra by enhancing beta-adrenergic responses. The dependence on oestrogens of the tissues of the lower urinary tract contributes to increased urinary problems in postmenopausal women. Urinary symptoms due to atrophic mucosal changes respond well to oestrogen replacement therapy. However, because they recur when treatment is stopped, continuous therapy with low dose natural oestrogens is recommended. Oestrogens may be of benefit in postmenopausal women with stress incontinence, but the doses necessary for clinical effect are higher than for the treatment of atrophic urethritis. The practice of adding a progestagen to long term oestrogen therapy to reduce the risk of endometrial carcinoma may, however, exacerbate stress incontinence by decreasing urethral pressure. Cyclical therapy with oestrogens may therefore be more appropriate particularly in women who are not suitable for surgery or have a mild degree of stress incontinence, along with other conservative measures such as pelvic floor exercises and alpha-adrenoceptor agonists. The place of oestrogen therapy in motor urge incontinence has not been determined. The risk of developing endometrial carcinoma as a result of long term high dose

  16. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  17. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  18. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  19. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  20. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  1. [Vesicourethral function study and application of urinary alarm in progressive supranuclear palsy].

    PubMed

    Wakatsuki, A; Tsujihata, M; Miyake, O; Ito, H; Itatani, H; Udaka, F

    1993-10-01

    We performed a vesicourethral function study on seven patients with progressive supranuclear palsy. In storage phase, 6 patients had decreased urinary sensation and overactive detrusor. Although bladder compliance was normal in all patients, maximum cystometric capacity was decreased in 3 patients. In micturition phase, detrusor contraction was underactive in 4 patients and acontractile in 1 patient. Sphincter electromyogram showed detrusor-sphincter-dyssynergia in 1 patient, no decrease in 3 patients and synergistic decrease in 1 patient. Six patients had urinary incontinence partially due to those neurological abnormality, partially due to dementia and lower activity of daily living. To facilitate the care of such functional incontinence, we devised a urinary alarm. The urinary alarm is a device to detect urine in a diaper. One can know the micturition in a diaper without being informed of micturition by the patient and change diapers as soon as possible. It was also useful to examine their frequency/volume chart.

  2. Dementia and lower urinary dysfunction: with a reference to anticholinergic use in elderly population.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Kishi, Masahiko

    2008-09-01

    Urinary incontinence is common in patients with dementia, and is more prevalent in demented than in non-demented older individuals. Neurogenic incontinence is common in multiple cerebral infarction and dementia with Lewy bodies, and in both diseases walking difficulty and falls are common. In contrast, functional incontinence is common in Alzheimer's disease due to cognitive disability and decreased motivation. Central cholinergic stimulation is the mainstay in the treatment of cognitive decline. In contrast, to date, the use of anticholinergic medications for detrusor overactivity in the elderly is still under consideration, since anticholinergic drugs may lead to undesirable events particularly in the central nervous system, although many studies have used severely demented cases. In the future, studies seeking treatment regimens for an elderly individual with both dementia and urinary dysfunction are warranted.

  3. Rare case of urinary bladder agenesis--multislice CT abdomen imaging.

    PubMed

    Indiran, Venkatraman; Chokkappan, Kabilan; Gunaseelan, Emmanuel

    2013-02-01

    Complete agenesis of urinary bladder is an extremely rare anomaly with only a few live cases reported so far. In most of the instances death occurs early as it may be incompatible with life. Here we report a case of adolescent female with urinary bladder and unilateral renal agenesis, who presented with a rather unusual presentation of incontinence, for a computed tomography (CT) examination. Other congenital abnormalities visualised in the CT abdomen are also discussed.

  4. Electrokinetic properties of incontinence nonwoven devices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the water transport properties of nonwoven incontinence devices is a prerequisite to the design of cotton-based nonwovens. A complete understanding of the interfacial moisture movement which occurs between the layers of coverstock, acquisition layer, distribution layer, absorbent...

  5. Management of patients with faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Duelund-Jakobsen, Jakob; Worsoe, Jonas; Lundby, Lilli; Christensen, Peter; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Faecal incontinence, defined as the involuntary loss of solid or liquid stool, is a common problem affecting 0.8–8.3% of the adult population. Individuals suffering from faecal incontinence often live a restricted life with reduced quality of life. The present paper is a clinically oriented review of the pathophysiology, evaluation and treatment of faecal incontinence. First-line therapy should be conservative and usually include dietary adjustments, fibre supplement, constipating agents or mini enemas. Biofeedback therapy to improve external anal sphincter function can be offered but the evidence for long-term effect is poor. There is good evidence that colonic irrigation can reduce symptoms and improve quality of life, especially in patients with neurogenic faecal incontinence. Surgical interventions should only be considered if conservative measures fail. Sacral nerve stimulation is a minimally invasive procedure with high rate of success. Advanced surgical procedures should be restricted to highly selected patients and only performed at specialist centres. A stoma should be considered if other treatment modalities fail. PMID:26770270

  6. Faecal incontinence products and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Evans, Debra

    Faecal incontinence has been defined as the involuntary or inappropriate passage of faeces (Royal College of Physicians, 1995). It is a distressing and isolating problem that affects people of all ages, with an estimated incidence of 1-2 per cent of the population (Soffer and Hull, 2000). Many people must rely on continence products to manage this stigmatising and embarrassing problem.

  7. Coping with the Impact of Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartley, Cheryle

    2008-01-01

    This article presents Part 2 of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. In this article, the author contends that it is extremely important to teach children coping skills…

  8. Efficacy of an improved absorbent pad on incontinence-associated dermatitis in older women: cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most older adults with urinary incontinence use absorbent pads. Because of exposure to moisture and chemical irritating substances in urine, the perineal skin region is always at risk for development of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD). The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of an improved absorbent pad against IAD. Methods A cluster randomized controlled design was used to compare the efficacy of two absorbent pads. Female inpatients aged ≥65 years who had IAD and used an absorbent pad or diaper all day were enrolled. Healing rate of IAD and variables of skin barrier function such as skin pH and skin moisture were compared between the usual absorbent pad group (n = 30) and the test absorbent pad group (n = 30). Results Thirteen patients (43.3%) from the test absorbent pad group and 4 patients (13.3%) from the usual absorbent pad group recovered completely from IAD. Moreover, the test absorbent pad group healed significantly faster than the usual absorbent pad group (p = 0.009). On the other hand, there were no significant differences between the two groups in skin barrier function. Conclusion The test absorbent pad for older adults with urinary incontinence might be more efficacious against IAD than usual absorbent pad. Trial registration UMIN-CTR: UMIN000006188 PMID:22642800

  9. The tethered vagina syndrome, post surgical incontinence and I-plasty operation for cure.

    PubMed

    Petros, P E; Ulmsten, U I

    1990-01-01

    Urinary incontinence was observed in 19 patients after bladder neck elevation or vaginal repair operations. Characteristically, patients could not suppress their urge to micturate on getting up in the morning, and they wet before arrival at the toilet. Urodynamically, a high posterior cough transmission ratio was noted. A 1.5 cm longitudinal incision in the vagina, dissected free and resutured horizontally (I-plasty), immediately cured this particular condition, but ultimately failed in 1/3 cases. Most of these failed patients were subsequently cured by further adjustment of vaginal tension under local anaesthesia (Tuck procedure). These findings confirm the emphasis given by the Integral Theory of Female Urinary Incontinence as to maintain adequate elasticity in the zone of critical elasticity (ZCE) of the supralevator vagina. The ZCE acts as an elastic hinge, allowing (i.e. facilitates) the separate and opposite contractile forces of anterior pubococcygeus, and levator plate which are necessary to close off urethra and bladder neck respectively. Inadequate elasticity at the ZCE converts the ZCE's role from facilitation to opposition. The stronger levator muscle contraction counteracts the forward section of the weaker anterior part of pubococcygeus muscle, preventing bladder neck closure.

  10. Adipose-Derived Regenerative Cell Injection Therapy for Postprostatectomy Incontinence: A Phase I Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Yang, Jung Dug; Suh, Jang Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We report our initial experience with transurethral injection of autologous adipose-derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) for the treatment of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods After providing written informed consent, six men with persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy were enrolled in the study. Under general anesthesia, about 50 mL of adipose tissue was obtained from the patients by liposuction. ADRCs were obtained by separation with centrifugation using the Celution cell-processing device. A mixture of ADRCs and adipose tissue were transurethrally injected into the submucosal space of the membranous urethra. Functional and anatomical improvement was assessed using a 24-h pad test, validated patient questionnaire, urethral pressure profile, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during 12-week follow-up. Results Urine leakage volume was improved with time in all patients in the 24-h pad test, with the exemption of temporal deterioration at the first 2 weeks post-injection in 2 patients. Subjective symptoms and quality of life assessed on the basis of questionnaire results showed similar improvement. The mean maximum urethral closing pressure increased from 44.0 to 63.5 cm H2O at 12 weeks after injection. MRI showed an increase in functional urethral length (from 6.1 to 8.3 mm) between the lower rim of the pubic bone and the bladder neck. Adverse events, such as pelvic pain, inflammation, or de novo urgency, were not observed in any case during follow-up. Conclusion This study demonstrated that transurethral injection of autologous ADRCs can be a safe and effective treatment modality for postprostatectomy incontinence. PMID:27401646

  11. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization Therapy for a Hypoplastic Pelvic Kidney with a Single Vaginal Ectopic Ureter to Control Incontinence: The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional CT Angiography Using Multidetector-Row Helical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Kouichi Kadota, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Imuta, Masanori; Yasuda, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Inadome, Akito; Yoshida, Masaki; Ueda, Shouichi

    2003-09-15

    A girl with continuous urinary incontinence was successfully treated by angiographic embolization of a hypoplastic pelvic kidney with a single unilateral vaginal ectopic opening of the ureter. For this intervention, CT angiography was useful for detecting the corresponding renal artery of the hypoplastic kidney.

  12. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor administered immediately after radical prostatectomy temporarily increases the need for incontinence pads, but improves final continence status

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Shinichi; Ito, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Yoshihide; Izumi, Hideaki; Kawamorita, Naoki; Adachi, Hisanobu; Mitsuzuka, Koji; Arai, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i) on urinary continence recovery after bilateral nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (BNSRP). Materials and Methods Between 2002 and 2012, 137 of 154 consecutive patients who underwent BNSRP in our institution retrospectively divided into 3 groups that included patients taking PDE5i immediately after surgery (immediate PDE5i group, n=41), patients starting PDE5i at an outpatient clinic after discharge (PDE5i group, n=56), and patients taking no medication (non-PDE5i group, n=40). Using self-administered questionnaires, the proportion of patients who did not require incontinence pads (pad-free patients) was calculated preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after BNSRP. Severity of incontinence was determined based on the pad numbers and then compared among the 3 groups. Results Proportions of pad-free patients and severity of incontinence initially deteriorated in all of the groups to the lowest values soon after undergoing BNSRP, with gradual improvement noted thereafter. The deterioration was most prominent in the immediate PDE5i group. As compared to the non-PDE5i group, both the PDE5i and immediate PDE5i groups exhibited a better final continence status. Conclusions PDE5i improves final continence status. However, administration of PDE5i immediately after surgery causes a distinct temporary deterioration in urinary incontinence. PMID:27617318

  13. [Prevalence of fecal incontinence in diabetic patients: epidemiological study of patients assisted as outpatients at the Clinical Hospital of the Medical School at the University of São Paulo].

    PubMed

    Amaral, S S; Teixeira, M G; Brito, S L; Amaral, G A; Jorge, J M; Habr-Gama, A; Pinotti, H W

    1997-01-01

    The object of this research was to establish the prevalence of fecal incontinence in those diabetics attended as outpatients at the Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo. Individual verbal interviewing was the an adopted method. The classification of diabetes mellitus of World Health Organization was employed (1985). Data was aggregated relative sex, age, color, type of diabetes mellitus, fecal incontinence, duration of diabetes mellitus, peripheral neuropathy, intestinal habits (normal, constipation and diarrhea), urgency to evacuate, sensation of incomplete evacuation, urinary incontinence, vaginal deliveries and its characteristics. The study involved 258 diabetics, 167 of female sex having an average age of 56.2 years (17 to 78 years of age) and 91 of the male sex having average age of 55.8 years (10 to 74 years of age). With relation to color, 57% were white, 28.7% mullato, 11.2% black and 3.1% yellow. Fecal incontinence was prevalent in 18.6% of the cases studied. It occurred also in types I and II diabetics with predominance in the male sex. It also occurred in diabetics having an average history of 10.8 years to onset of illness. Peripheral neuropathy was observed in 8.5% of the diabetics investigated however no association was observed between the peripheral neuropathy and fecal incontinence. Constipation occurred in 29.5% of the patients and diarrhea in 21.3%. Incomplete evacuation was apparent in 15.1% of diabetics and urgency to evacuate in 12.8%. A relationship was identified between fecal incontinence with diarrhea and incomplete evacuation in the group investigated. Total vaginal deliveries was 458 with 70 episiotomies and 25 by forceps. There was no statistical evidence of association between the average number of vaginal deliveries, episiotomies and forceps in diabetics demonstrating or not demonstrating fecal incontinence. Urinary incontinence was more prevalent that fecal incontinence. No relationship was

  14. Urinary tract infections. An overview.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, O B

    1987-06-01

    Urinary tract infection remains the most prevalent infection acquired by hospitalized patients. The association with manipulations of the urinary tract is well known and the etiology of these infections is studied in detail. The excess cost of preventable UTI has not been established. It may be negligible for the single case but a high prevalence of nosocomial UTI could add substantially to hospital expenses. Differences in practices of bladder drainage between hospitals and countries have been identified, and educational efforts would seem effective in the management of incontinent patients when hospitalized. Though the infection is often self-limiting, when the catheter is removed, complications are seen. The lower survival with bacteriuria in old age is best explained by the presence of fatal disease in bacteriuric patients. Prevention of the infection with the catheter in situ is discouraging, and measures intended to interfere with the endogenous source of infection have largely failed or postponed infection. A radical approach to the use of indwelling catheters in hospitalized patients may seem the only way out, requiring highly skilled nursing care instead.

  15. Urinary Retention

    MedlinePlus

    ... indicates the bladder does not empty completely. A health care provider performs this test during an office visit. The patient often receives ... more urodynamic tests to diagnose urinary retention. The health care provider will perform these tests during an office visit. For tests that use ...

  16. Hypothesis That Urethral Bulb (Corpus Spongiosum) Plays an Active Role in Male Urinary Continence

    PubMed Central

    Rehder, Peter; Staudacher, Nina M.; Schachtner, Joerg; Berger, Maria E.; Schillfahrt, Florian; Hauser, Verena; Mueller, Raphael; Skradski, Viktor; Horninger, Wolfgang; Glodny, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The proximal urethral bulb in men is enlarged, surrounds the bulbous urethra, and extends dorsally towards the perineum. During intercourse engorgement takes place due to increased blood flow through the corpus spongiosum. Antegrade ejaculation is facilitated by contraction of the bulbospongiosus muscles during climax. Micturition during sexual stimulation is functionally inhibited. Supporting the bulb may indirectly facilitate continence in a certain subset of patients with postprostatectomy incontinence. During physical activity with increased abdominal pressure, reflex contraction of the pelvic floor muscles as well as the bulbospongiosus muscles occurs to support sphincter function and limit urinary incontinence. Operations to the prostate may weaken urinary sphincter function. It is hypothesized that the distal urinary sphincter may be supported indirectly by placing a hammock underneath the urethral bulb. During moments of physical stress the “cushion” of blood within the supported corpus spongiosum helps to increase the zone of coaptation within the sphincteric (membranous) urethra. This may lead to urinary continence in patients treated by a transobturator repositioning sling in patients with postprostatectomy incontinence. This paper describes the possible role of the urethral bulb in male urinary continence, including its function after retroluminal sling placement (AdVance, AdVance XP® Male Sling System, Minnetonka, USA). PMID:27022393

  17. Self-esteem disturbance in patients with urinary diversions: assessing the void.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Mona

    2005-12-01

    Self-esteem can be affected by any change in health, appearance, or emotional status--change that can affect quality of life. A decrease in self-esteem is especially evident in people with urinary diversions. A review of the literature, conducted to demonstrate self-esteem problems related to this population, revealed that body image and sexuality changes related to urinary diversions are frequently discussed in the current literature but studies that focus directly on self-esteem in the urinary diversion population have not been published. However, self-esteem may be compromised in people with urinary diversions more frequently than the literature reflects. Patients with urinary diversions, whether continent or incontinent, may be at risk for self-esteem problems. Future research and exploration are needed to expand knowledge of self-esteem with regard to urinary diversions in order to further understand the issue.

  18. Novel Treatment Options for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Adam; Hurley, Jefferson

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a devastating condition affecting a substantial portion of the population. The etiologies of FI are wide ranging, as are the treatment options. When conservative measures fail, often surgical intervention is required. As in any area where a wide range of treatment options exist, there is no one perfect solution. Fortunately, novel treatment options for FI are becoming available, namely, posterior tibial nerve stimulation, magnetic anal sphincter, stem cell transplant, pyloric transplantation, and acupuncture. PMID:25320572

  19. Prevalence of functional bowel disorders and faecal incontinence: an Australian primary care survey

    PubMed Central

    Ng, K-S; Nassar, N; Hamd, K; Nagarajah, A; Gladman, M A

    2015-01-01

    Aim Interest in functional bowel disorders (FBDs) and faecal incontinence (FI) has increased amongst coloproctologists. The study aimed to assess the prevalence of FBDs and FI (including its severity) among Australian primary healthcare seekers using objective criteria. Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a primary care setting in Sydney, Australia. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect demographic information and diagnose FBDs (irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, functional bloating and functional diarrhoea) based on Rome III criteria. The severity of FI was determined using the Vaizey incontinence score. Associations with medical/surgical history and healthcare utilization were assessed. Results Of 596 subjects approached, 396 (66.4%) agreed to participate. Overall, 33% had FBD and/or FI. Irritable bowel syndrome was present in 11.1% and these participants were more likely to report anxiety/depression (P < 0.01) and to have had a previous colonoscopy (P < 0.001) or cholecystectomy (P = 0.02). Functional constipation was present in 8.1%, and functional bloating and functional diarrhoea were diagnosed in 6.1%, and 1.5%, respectively. FI was present in 12.1% with the majority (52%) reporting moderate/severe incontinence (Vaizey score > 8). Participants with FI were more likely to have irritable bowel syndrome, urinary incontinence and previous anal surgery (P < 0.01). Conclusion FBDs and FI are prevalent conditions amongst primary healthcare seekers and the needs of those affected appear to be complex given their coexisting symptoms and conditions. Currently, the majority do not reach colorectal services, although increased awareness by primary care providers could lead to sufferers being referred for specialist management. What does this paper add to the literature? This paper is the first to establish the prevalence of functional bowel disorders and faecal incontinence using explicit, standardized criteria amongst healthcare

  20. Neural Control of the Lower Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    de Groat, William C.; Griffiths, Derek; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes anatomical, neurophysiological, pharmacological, and brain imaging studies in humans and animals that have provided insights into the neural circuitry and neurotransmitter mechanisms controlling the lower urinary tract. The functions of the lower urinary tract to store and periodically eliminate urine are regulated by a complex neural control system in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic ganglia that coordinates the activity of smooth and striated muscles of the bladder and urethral outlet. The neural control of micturition is organized as a hierarchical system in which spinal storage mechanisms are in turn regulated by circuitry in the rostral brain stem that initiates reflex voiding. Input from the forebrain triggers voluntary voiding by modulating the brain stem circuitry. Many neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract exhibit switch-like patterns of activity that turn on and off in an all-or-none manner. The major component of the micturition switching circuit is a spinobulbospinal parasympathetic reflex pathway that has essential connections in the periaqueductal gray and pontine micturition center. A computer model of this circuit that mimics the switching functions of the bladder and urethra at the onset of micturition is described. Micturition occurs involuntarily in infants and young children until the age of 3 to 5 years, after which it is regulated voluntarily. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults can cause the re-emergence of involuntary micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. Neuroplasticity underlying these developmental and pathological changes in voiding function is discussed. PMID:25589273

  1. [Urinary bilharziasis].

    PubMed

    Gigase, P L

    1992-01-01

    A short account is given of present views on urinary schistosomiasis or bilharziasis. The incidence of infections is increasing in endemic areas of Africa and the near east, as a consequence of irrigation programs and hydroelectric power development. Urinary schistosomiasis is a disease of children and young adults. The serious consequences, obstructive uropathy due to more or less irreversible ureteral lesions, and cancer of the bladder, less directly related to the infection, appear but later in life. Diagnosis is still based on parasitology and serology but ultrasonography has proven to be an important means to evaluate the extent of lesions of the urinary tract, especially in developing countries. Praziquantel was a major development in the medical treatment and cures easily the infection. Some irreversible consequences have however to be treated surgically. Schistosomiasis is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality in medically backward endemic countries. The control of the disease aims at reducing morbidity and mortality, consequences of the infection, rather than to avoid infection itself. It is based on mass treatment of school age children, together with focal molluscacides at places where people have contacts with water. Vaccination will be available in the near future and will be a welcome addition to other control measures, but will not be able to interrupt transmission on its own. Only economic development will solve in the long term this social African problem.

  2. Prevention and management of post prostatectomy erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Salonia, Andrea; Castagna, Giulia; Capogrosso, Paolo; Castiglione, Fabio; Briganti, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is common in patients with prostate cancer (PC) following radical prostatectomy (RP). Review the available literature concerning prevention and management strategies for post-RP erectile function (EF) impairment in terms of preoperative patient characteristics, intra and postoperative factors that may influence EF recovery, and postoperative treatments for erectile dysfunction (ED). A literature search was performed using Google and PubMed database for English-language original and review articles, either published or e-published up to July 2013. The literature still demonstrates a great inconsistency in the definition of what is considered normal EF both before and after RP. Thus, using validated psychometric instruments with recognized cut-offs for normalcy and severity during the pre- and post-operative evaluation should be routinely considered. Therefore, a comprehensive discussion with the patient about the true prevalence of postoperative ED, the concept of spontaneous or pharmacologically-assisted erections, and the difference between “back to baseline” EF and “erections adequate enough to have successful intercourse” clearly emerge as key issues in the eventual understanding of post-RP ED prevention and promotion of satisfactory EF recovery. Patient factors (including age, baseline EF, comorbid conditions status), cancer selection (non- vs. uni- vs. bilateral nerve-sparing), type of surgery (i.e., intra vs. inter vs. extrafascial surgeries), surgical techniques (i.e., open, laparoscopic and robotically-assisted RP), and surgeon factors (i.e., surgical volume and surgical skill) represent the key significant contributors to EF recovery. A number of preclinical and clinical data show that rehabilitation and treatment in due time are undoubtedly better than leaving the erectile tissue to its unassisted postoperative fate. The role of postoperative ED treatment for those patients who received a non-nerve-sparing RP was also extensively discussed. Optimal outcomes are achieved mainly by the careful choice of the correct patient for the correct type of surgery. Despite a plethora of potential rehabilitative approaches, they should be only considered as “strategies”, since incontrovertible evidence of their effectiveness for improving natural EF recovery is limited. Conversely, numerous effective therapeutic options are available for treating post-RP ED. PMID:26816841

  3. Prevention of incontinence-related skin breakdown for acute and critical care patients: comparison of two products.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Mary; Droegemueller, Carol; Rivers, Sonja; Deuser, William E

    2012-01-01

    Perineal protection products were compared for their efficacy in preventing skin breakdown in the hospitalized patient with urinary and/or fecal incontinence. Each product was used for the duration of the hospital stay with daily observations for perineal skin condition. Results indicated the spray product and wipe product were comparable in rate of skin breakdown prevention. Findings suggest the wipe product is more cost-effective for use during hospitalization, and the spray product preserves skin integrity over a longer period of time, beyond average hospitalization duration.

  4. [Fecal incontinence and rectal prolapse. Clinico-functional assessment].

    PubMed

    Santini, L; Pezzullo, L; Caracò, C; Candela, G; Esposito, B

    1995-09-01

    Rectal Prolapse is a rare and distressing condition, with a multifactorial etiopathogenesis. Often, this pathology is associated with fecal incontinence. The recommended approach to the patient with rectal prolapse and fecal incontinence is to repair the prolapse first, then deal particularly with fecal incontinence at a second operation. A retrospective, clinical and manometric study has varying degrees of fecal incontinence. Clinically five of their operation, and a further three patients improved, in two patients the degree of fecal incontinence remained invariable. One patient was worsened after surgery. Manometrically resting and pressure (RAP) was significantly higher in continent patients than in voluntary contraction pressure (MVCP) (p < 0.05) in preoperative testing. Postoperatively, there was a significant increase in the resting anal pressure as well as in maximum voluntary contraction pressure. Patients who remained incontinent had a significantly lower RAP and MVCP than patients who improved our regained continence. In conclusion this study shows an alteration of internal and external sphincteric function in patients with rectal prolapse. The surgical treatment of this disease improves sphincteric function. Incontinent patients with RAP < 10 mmHg and MCVP < 20 mmHg, probably they would be better treated simultaneously either for rectal prolapsus and incontinence. In this kind of patients the perianal proctectomy with total sphincteroplasty could be the elective treatment.

  5. School Experiences of an Adolescent with Medical Complexities Involving Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filce, Hollie Gabler; Bishop, John B.

    2014-01-01

    The educational implications of chronic illnesses which involve incontinence are not well represented in the literature. The experiences of an adolescent with multiple complex illnesses, including incontinence, were explored via an intrinsic case study. Data were gathered from the adolescent, her mother, and teachers through interviews, email…

  6. Mental health of Chinese primary care patients with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Choi, Edmond P H; Lam, Cindy L K; Chin, Weng Yee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mental health of Chinese primary care patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This was a cross-sectional observational study. Five hundred and nineteen subjects with LUTS completed a structured questionnaire containing the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-Short Form, the International Prostate Symptom Score, the adapted International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form and questions about socio-demographics. Overall, 17.7% of subjects reported depressive symptoms, 24.3% anxiety symptoms and 9.6% stress symptoms. In males, demographic factors associated with poorer mental health included being not married; clinical factors included higher LUTS severity, weak stream, straining and mixed urinary incontinence. In females, demographic factors associated with poorer mental health included being younger, not married and lower household income; clinical factors included higher LUTS severity, incomplete bladder emptying, urgency and weak stream. Chinese primary care patients with LUTS appear to be an at-risk group for poorer mental health with increased prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms and may require routine screening to identify those who may require more tailored interventions to address both their urinary symptoms and psychological distress.

  7. Impact of preoperative and postoperative membranous urethral length measured by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging on urinary continence recovery after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wan; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hyun Moo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We sought to investigate the impact of preoperative and postoperative membranous urethral length (MUL) on urinary continence using 3 Tesla (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Methods Between 2008 and 2013, 190 men with RARP underwent preoperative and postoperative MRI. Patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy or who were lost to followup were excluded, leaving 186 patients eligible for analysis. Preoperative MUL was estimated from the prostate apex to the penile bulb, while postoperative MUL was estimated from the bladder neck to penile bulb. Patients with no pads or protection were considered to have complete continence. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors associated with urinary incontinence at six and 12 months. Results Age was commonly associated with urinary incontinence at six and 12 months. In addition, diabetes mellitus (DM) was another factor associated with urinary incontinence at 12 months. When adjusting these variables, preoperative MUL ≤16 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.14; p=0.022), postoperative MUL ≤14 mm (95% CI 1.16–9.80; p=0.025) and percent change of MUL >18% (95% CI 1.17–7.23; p=0.021) were significantly associated with urinary incontinence at six months. However, at 12 months, preoperative MUL ≤13.5 mm (95% CI 1.85–19.21; p=0.003) and postoperative MUL ≤13 mm (95% CI 1.24–13.84; p=0.021) had impacts on urinary incontinence, but not percent change of MUL. Conclusions Preoperative and postoperative MUL were significantly associated with urinary continence recovery after RARP. Therefore, efforts to preserve MUL are highly recommended during surgery for optimal continence outcomes after RARP. PMID:28360954

  8. Comparison of the Bologna and Ingelman-Sundberg procedures for stress incontinence associated with genital prolapse: prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Debodinance, P; Querleu, D

    1993-11-01

    It is difficult to make a choice among the many surgical procedures designed for the correction of stress urinary incontinence by the vaginal route because their results have not been correctly compared. The Bologna (B) operation uses two flaps from the anterior vaginal wall that are anchored to the abdominal wall; the Ingelman-Sundberg (IS) operation is a suburethral sling made from two transplants from the pubococcygeus muscle. A prospective randomized study has been carried out in order to compare these two procedures. A selection of cases has been based upon the presence of genuine or potential stress incontinence, genital prolapse and available tissues (anterior vaginal wall excess and palpable pubococcygeus muscles) for both procedures. No significant difference was noted for clinical results (91.7% and 93.7% of patients cured by the B and IS operations, respectively) or for transmission rate gain at 3 months and 1 year. Maximum urethral closing pressure was maintained in both treatment arms. No significant postoperative complication or persistent dysuria occurred. The Bologna procedure is best indicated in case of frank anterior vaginal excess, and the Ingelman-Sundberg procedure when strong anterior parts of pubococcygeus muscles are available. Both are excellent in the cure of stress incontinence associated with genital prolapse.

  9. Double incontinence as a first symptom of saddle embolism of the aorta leads to sudden paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2015-11-01

    An aortic saddle embolus causing cauda equine syndrome followed by paraplegia is an exceedingly rare phenomenon in post-operative period in coronary artery bypass grafting. In non-CABG cases, reported documentation of neurological recovery from this event is even rarer. A 57-year-old male 8 days after uneventful OPCAP presented with severe lower extremity pain and sudden fecal and urinary incontinence, followed by the absence of pulsations in the lower limbs and paraplegia, during 20-minute period. He underwent immediate bilateral transfemoral embolectomy. The postoperative period was uneventful. The paraplegia recovered immediately after embolectomy and recovery from anesthesia. An angiography has been made to verify that a high origin of the great radicular artery above T12 level may be responsible for better recovery of paraplegia when its ostium obstructed by a saddle embolus relieved using embolectomy. Early surgical intervention in restoring the blood flow into the great radicular artery may prevent severe histological changes hitherto responsible for non-recovery from paraplegia in the earlier reports. Three unique characteristics of this article are as follows: 1) Occurrence of this complication in the post-operative period in off-pump CABG surgery; 2) Commencing of emboli with bizarre symptoms of double incontinence; 3) Combination of cauda equine syndrome and complete paralysis.

  10. MASD part 2: incontinence-associated dermatitis and intertriginous dermatitis: a consensus.

    PubMed

    Black, Joyce M; Gray, Mikel; Bliss, Donna Z; Kennedy-Evans, Karen L; Logan, Susan; Baharestani, Mona M; Colwell, Janice C; Goldberg, Margaret; Ratliff, Catherine R

    2011-01-01

    A consensus panel was convened to review current knowledge of moisture-associated skin damage (MASD) and to provide recommendations for prevention and management. This article provides a summary of the discussion and the recommendations in regards to 2 types of MASD: incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) and intertriginous dermatitis (ITD). A focused history and physical assessment are essential for diagnosing IAD or ITD and distinguishing these forms of skin damage from other types of skin damage. Panel members recommend cleansing, moisturizing, and applying a skin protectant to skin affected by IAD and to the perineal skin of persons with urinary or fecal incontinence deemed at risk for IAD. Prevention and treatment of ITD includes measures to ensure that skin folds are dry and free from friction; however, panel members do not recommend use of bed linens, paper towels, or dressings for separating skin folds. Individuals with ITD are at risk for fungal and bacterial infections and these infections should be treated appropriately; for example, candidal infections should be treated with antifungal therapies.

  11. The role of prostanoids in the urinary bladder function and a potential use of prostanoid-targeting pharmacological agents in bladder overactivity treatment.

    PubMed

    Dobrek, Łukasz; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a syndrome involving urinary urgency with accompanying increased daytime urinary frequency and nocturia, with or without urgency urinary incontinence, in the absence of an urinary tract infection or other obvious pathology. The detailed OAB pathophysiology remains unclear. There is evidence that OAB pathogenesis also includes abnormal bladder paracrine activity, associated with release of local prostanoids. Those agents contribute to disturbances of peripheral neuronal bladder control resulting in detrusor instability. Thus, pharmacological agents abolishing prostanoid-induced bladder overactivity seem to be a potential, future OAB therapeutical option. This paper shortly describes the rationale for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and EP-1 receptor antagonists administration in future OAB pharmacotherapy.

  12. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS--URINARY BLADDER DUPLICATION IN A CAT.

    PubMed

    Cook, Alysa B; Langston, Cathy E; Fischetti, Anthony J; Donovan, Taryn A

    2015-01-01

    A female kitten presented for chronic, intermittent, antibiotic-responsive urinary incontinence and chronic kidney disease. Abdominal ultrasound identified bilateral pelvic/ureteral dilation and three closely apposed thin-walled fluid-filled structures in the caudal abdomen, extending toward the pelvic inlet. Excretory urography and negative contrast cystography identified contrast medium accumulation from the dilated ureters into two tubular soft tissue masses of the caudal abdomen, with subsequent gradual filling of a more cranially located urinary bladder. A retrograde vaginocystourethrogram identified a normal uterus, normal vagina, and a single urethra continuous with the cranially located urinary bladder. Antemortem diagnosis was suspicious for bilateral ectopic ureteroceles. Postmortem diagnosis, 35 months following initial presentation, determined the fluid-filled masses to have abundant smooth muscle in the wall, including a muscularis mucosa connected by a common ostium, consistent with urinary bladder duplication. Urinary bladder duplication should be included as a differential diagnosis in cats with these clinical and imaging characteristics. In this case, differentiation of ectopic ureterocele from urinary bladder duplication required histological confirmation.

  13. Designing micro- and nanostructures for artificial urinary sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Florian M.; Deyhle, Hans; Kovacs, Gabor; Müller, Bert

    2012-04-01

    The dielectric elastomers are functional materials that have promising potential as actuators with muscle-like mechanical properties due to their inherent compliancy and overall performance: the combination of large deformations, high energy densities and unique sensory capabilities. Consequently, such actuators should be realized to replace the currently available artificial urinary sphincters building dielectric thin film structures that work with several 10 V. The present communication describes the determination of the forces (1 - 10 N) and deformation levels (~10%) necessary for the appropriate operation of the artificial sphincter as well as the response time to master stress incontinence (reaction time less than 0.1 s). Knowing the dimensions of the presently used artificial urinary sphincters, these macroscopic parameters form the basis of the actuator design. Here, we follow the strategy to start from organic thin films maybe even monolayers, which should work with low voltages but only provide small deformations. Actuators out of 10,000 or 100,000 layers will finally provide the necessary force. The suitable choice of elastomer and electrode materials is vital for the success. As the number of incontinent patients is steadily increasing worldwide, it becomes more and more important to reveal the sphincter's function under static and stress conditions to realize artificial urinary sphincters, based on sophisticated, biologically inspired concepts to become nature analogue.

  14. Skin care in the frail, elderly, dependent, incontinent patient.

    PubMed

    Jeter, K F; Lutz, J B

    1996-01-01

    Despite a plethora of recommendations, protocols and dictums in the nursing literature, no research studies have defined the basic elements of preventive skin care for incontinent patients, and the prevalence of skin problems associated with incontinence is unknown. Yet the importance of skin care for incontinent elderly or immobilized patients has long been acknowledged. This literature review sought to determine current practices and principles for skin care of frail, elderly, dependent, incontinent patients. Protocols vary widely. And although there is mounting evidence that incontinence, particularly fecal incontinence, is a primary risk factor for pressure ulcer development, most preventive efforts focus on pressure relief, repositioning, and nutrition, rather than incontinence care. More clinical trials are needed in this area. The design and analysis of these trials should take into account the frequency and manner in which skin is cleansed, products used for skin care, risks and benefits of absorbent products and devices, the presence of infection, and patients' concomitant medical conditions and degree of immobility.

  15. Kegel's exercises with biofeedback therapy for treatment of stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Burns, P A; Marecki, M A; Dittmar, S S; Bullough, B

    1985-02-01

    True stress incontinence due to a weakened pelvic floor is one of the most frequently cited urologic complaints of multiparous women past age 40. One treatment modality currently used to treat stress incontinence is exercising the pubococcygeus muscle. Combining biofeedback therapy with a vaginal probe (perineometer) helps patients identify the muscle, provides immediate feedback and assists the nurse and patient in assessing problem resolution. This article describes an intervention program using biofeedback, and measured Kegel's exercises on a small number of women with symptoms of stress incontinence. The lessening of symptoms became a major factor in continued compliance with the exercise program.

  16. Development and marketing of a prosthetic urinary control valve system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, J. B., Jr.; Rabinowitz, R.; Rogers, D. W.; Harrison, H. N.

    1983-01-01

    An implantable prosthetic for the control of urinary incontinence was developed and marketed. Three phases are presented: bench development studies, animal trials, and human clinical trials. This work was performed under the direction of a Research Team at Rochester General Hospital (RGH). Bench trials were completed on prototype hardware and provided early verification of the device's ability to withstand repeated cyclic testing. Configurational variants were evaluated and a preferred design concept was established. Silicone rubber (medical grade) was selected as the preferred material for the prosthesis.

  17. Laparoscopic Rectopexy with Urinary Bladder Xenograft Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Aradhana; Afshar, Rami; Gardner, Amy; Ackerman, Ellen; Brandt, Jared; Sasse, Kent C.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Rectal prolapse is often repaired laparoscopically, frequently with the use of reinforcement material. Both synthetic and biologically derived materials reduce recurrence rate compared to primary suture repair. Synthetic mesh introduces potential complications such as mesh erosion, fibrosis, and infection. Urinary bladder matrix (UBM) represents a biologically derived material for reinforcement of rectal prolapse repair with the potential to improve durability without risks of synthetic materials. The objective of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness, durability, and functional result of laparoscopic rectopexy using urinary bladder matrix xenograft reinforcement at three years follow up. Methods: The 20 cases presented describe rectal prolapse repair by means of laparoscopic rectopexy with presacral UBM reinforcement. Patients were followed up for an average of 3 years and assessed with interviews, physical examination, manometry, and the fecal incontinence severity index (FISI). Results: Each repair was completed laparoscopically. UBM exhibited favorable handling characteristics when sutured to the sacrum and the lateral rectal walls. One patient underwent laparoscopic drainage of a postoperative abscess; no other complications occurred. In 3 years of follow-up, there have been no full-thickness recurrences, erosions, reoperations, or long-term complications. Two patients exhibited a small degree of mucosal prolapse on follow-up physical examination that did not require surgery. Three-year FISI scores averaged 8 (range, 0–33 of a possible 61), indicating low fecal incontinence symptomatology. Follow-up anorectal manometry was performed in 9 patients, showing mixed results. Conclusion: Surgeons may safely use laparoscopic rectopexy with UBM reinforcement for repair of rectal prolapses. In this series, repairs with UBM grafts have been durable at 3-year follow-up and may be an alternative to synthetic mesh reinforcement of rectal

  18. What's best--reusable or disposable incontinence products?

    PubMed

    Haeker, S

    1986-05-01

    To use paper or cloth? The director of nursing for a 72-bed intermediate care facility opted to continue using reusable incontinence products based on the results of a three-week study conducted by her staff.

  19. Office-Based Management of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Costilla, Vanessa C.; Mayer, Anita P.; Crowell, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a devastating disorder that is more prevalent than previously realized. FI is the involuntary loss of stool. Many factors contribute to the pathophysiology of FI, including advanced age, bowel irregularity, parity, and obesity. A detailed history and focused rectal examination are important to making the diagnosis and determining contributing causes. Although multiple diagnostic studies are available to assess the cause of FI, specific guidelines that delineate when testing should be done do not exist. Clinicians must weigh the risk, benefit, and burden of testing against the need for empiric treatment. All types of FI are initially managed in the same way, which includes lifestyle modification to reduce bowel derangements, improved access to toileting, and initiation of a bulking regimen to improve stool consistency. If initial conservative management fails, pharmaco-logic agents, biofeedback, or surgery may be indicated. PMID:23935551

  20. A review of the recent advances in antimicrobial coatings for urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Singha, Priyadarshini; Locklin, Jason; Handa, Hitesh

    2017-03-01

    More than 75% of hospital-acquired or nosocomial urinary tract infections are initiated by urinary catheters, which are used during the treatment of 15-25% of hospitalized patients. Among other purposes, urinary catheters are primarily used for draining urine after surgeries and for urinary incontinence. During catheter-associated urinary tract infections, bacteria travel up to the bladder and cause infection. A major cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infection is attributed to the use of non-ideal materials in the fabrication of urinary catheters. Such materials allow for the colonization of microorganisms, leading to bacteriuria and infection, depending on the severity of symptoms. The ideal urinary catheter is made out of materials that are biocompatible, antimicrobial, and antifouling. Although an abundance of research has been conducted over the last forty-five years on the subject, the ideal biomaterial, especially for long-term catheterization of more than a month, has yet to be developed. The aim of this review is to highlight the recent advances (over the past 10years) in developing antimicrobial materials for urinary catheters and to outline future requirements and prospects that guide catheter materials selection and design.

  1. Perineal hernia because of retroflexion of the urinary bladder in a rottweiler bitch during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sontas, B H; Apaydin, S O; Toydemir, T S F; Kasikci, G; Ekici, H

    2008-08-01

    A young pregnant rottweiler bitch was presented with a large mass of tissue protruding through the vulvar lips. Foetal death was diagnosed on ultrasonography, and ovariohysterectomy was performed, at which time the bladder was observed to be dislocated caudally into the pelvic cavity under the vagina. The bladder was manually repositioned during surgery. One week later, the bitch was healthy with no evidence of dysuria, stranguria or urinary incontinence. Two months later, the owner reported that the bitch was clinically normal with no recurrence of the retroflexion. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of retroflexion of the urinary bladder during pregnancy.

  2. Assessment of voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction in continent and incontinent women using transperineal ultrasound, manual muscle testing and vaginal squeeze pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Judith A; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Briffa, N Kathryn; Neumann, Patricia

    2006-11-01

    The aims of the study were: (1) to assess women performing voluntary pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contractions, on initial instruction without biofeedback teaching, using transperineal ultrasound, manual muscle testing, and perineometry and (2) to assess for associations between the different measurements of PFM function. Sixty continent (30 nulliparous and 30 parous) and 60 incontinent (30 stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and 30 urge urinary incontinence (UUI)) women were assessed. Bladder neck depression during attempts to perform an elevating pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction occurred in 17% of continent and 30% of incontinent women. The UUI group had the highest proportion of women who depressed the bladder neck (40%), although this was not statistically significant (p=0.060). The continent women were stronger on manual muscle testing (p=0.001) and perineometry (p=0.019) and had greater PFM endurance (p<0.001) than the incontinent women. There was a strong tendency for the continent women to have a greater degree of bladder neck elevation than the incontinent women (p=0.051). There was a moderate correlation between bladder neck movement during PFM contraction measured by ultrasound and PFM strength assessed by manual muscle testing (r=0.58, p=0.01) and perineometry (r=0.43, p=0.01). The observation that many women were performing PFM exercises incorrectly reinforces the need for individual PFM assessment with a skilled practitioner. The significant correlation between the measurements of bladder neck elevation during PFM contraction and PFM strength measured using MMT and perineometry supports the use of ultrasound in the assessment of PFM function; however, the correlation was only moderate and, therefore, indicates that the different measurement tools assess different aspects of PFM function. It is recommended that physiotherapists use a combination of assessment tools to evaluate the different aspects of PFM function that are important for continence

  3. Management of the devastated posterior urethra and bladder neck: refractory incontinence and stenosis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kirk M; Higuchi, Ty T; Flynn, Brian J

    2015-02-01

    Stricture of the proximal urethra following treatment for prostate cancer occurs in an estimated 1-8% of patients. Following prostatectomy, urethral reconstruction is feasible in many patients. However, in those patients with prior radiation therapy (RT), failed reconstruction, refractory incontinence or multiple comorbidities, reconstruction may not be feasible. The purpose of this article is to review the evaluation and management options for patients who are not candidates for reconstruction of the posterior urethra and require urinary diversion. Patient evaluation should result in the decision whether reconstruction is feasible. In our experience, risk factors for failed reconstruction include prior radiation and multiple failed endoscopic treatments. Pre-operative cystoscopy is an essential part of the evaluations to identify tissue necrosis, dystrophic calcification, or tumor in the urethra, prostate and/or bladder. If urethral reconstruction is not feasible it is imperative to discuss options for urine diversion with the patient. Treatment options include simple catheter diversion, urethral ligation, and both bladder preserving and non-preserving diversion. Surgical management should address both the bladder and the bladder outlet. This can be accomplished from a perineal, abdominal or abdomino-perineal approach. The devastated bladder outlet is a challenging problem to treat. Typically, patients undergo multiple procedures in an attempt to restore urethral continuity and continence. For the small subset who fails reconstruction, urinary diversion provides a definitive, "end-stage" treatment resulting in improved quality of life.

  4. Kidneys and Urinary Tract

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Kidneys and Urinary Tract KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidneys and ... be a sign of diabetes . continue What the Kidneys and Urinary Tract Do Although the two kidneys ...

  5. Faecal incontinence: Current knowledges and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Benezech, Alban; Bouvier, Michel; Vitton, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Faecal incontinence (FI) is a disabling and frequent symptom since its prevalence can vary between 5% and 15% of the general population. It has a particular negative impact on quality of life. Many tools are currently available for the treatment of FI, from conservative measures to invasive surgical treatments. The conservative treatment may be dietetic measures, various pharmacological agents, anorectal rehabilitation, posterior tibial nerve stimulation, and transanal irrigation. If needed, patients may have miniinvasive approaches such as sacral nerve modulation or antegrade irrigation. In some cases, a surgical treatment is proposed, mainly external anal sphincter repair. Although these different therapeutic options are available, new techniques are arriving allowing new hopes for the patients. Moreover, most of them are non-invasive such as local application of an α1-adrenoceptor agonist, stem cell injections, rectal injection of botulinum toxin, acupuncture. New more invasive techniques with promising results are also coming such as anal magnetic sphincter and antropylorus transposition. This review reports the main current available treatments of FI and the developing therapeutics tools. PMID:26909229

  6. Mapping liquid distribution in absorbent incontinence products.

    PubMed

    Landeryou, M A; Yerworth, R J; Cottenden, A M

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews methods available for mapping the distribution of fluid in incontinence pad materials to assist with evaluating existing products and developing new ones, and to provide data for building and validating predictive models. Specifically, the following technologies are considered and their strengths and limitations described: discrete sensors based on conductance, temperature or optical measurements, optical imaging, gravimetric methods, X-ray imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. It is suggested that the ideal method would enable fluid distribution to be mapped in three dimensions with good spatial and time resolution in single materials and composite structures of simple and complex geometries under static and dynamic mechanical loading. It would also allow liquid to be mapped in products when worn by users. It is concluded that, although each existing method meets some of these requirements, and each requirement is met, at least reasonably well, by at least one method, improved techniques are needed. The particular need for methods that can provide some measurement of liquid saturation within absorbent products, both in the laboratory and in real use, is highlighted. In many cases, simple methods used appropriately are sufficient to elicit the important aspects of liquid transport and storage within absorbent products.