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Sample records for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

  1. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Dharnidharka, Vikas R; Webster, Angela C; Martinez, Olivia M; Preiksaitis, Jutta K; Leblond, Veronique; Choquet, Sylvain

    2016-01-28

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a group of conditions that involve uncontrolled proliferation of lymphoid cells as a consequence of extrinsic immunosuppression after organ or haematopoietic stem cell transplant. PTLDs show some similarities to classic lymphomas in the non-immunosuppressed general population. The oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a key pathogenic driver in many early-onset cases, through multiple mechanisms. The incidence of PTLD varies with the type of transplant; a clear distinction should therefore be made between the conditions after solid organ transplant and after haematopoietic stem cell transplant. Recipient EBV seronegativity and the intensity of immunosuppression are among key risk factors. Symptoms and signs depend on the localization of the lymphoid masses. Diagnosis requires histopathology, although imaging techniques can provide additional supportive evidence. Pre-emptive intervention based on monitoring EBV levels in blood has emerged as the preferred strategy for PTLD prevention. Treatment of established disease includes reduction of immunosuppression and/or administration of rituximab (a B cell-specific antibody against CD20), chemotherapy and EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells. Despite these strategies, the mortality and morbidity remains considerable. Patient outcome is influenced by the severity of presentation, treatment-related complications and risk of allograft loss. New innovative treatment options hold promise for changing the outlook in the future.

  2. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  3. Epstein-Barr Virus-Negative Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Diseases: Three Distinct Cases from a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Bakanay, Şule Mine; Kaygusuz, Gülşah; Topçuoğlu, Pervin; Şengül, Şule; Tunçalı, Timur; Keven, Kenan; Kuzu, Işınsu; Uysal, Akın; Arat, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    Three cases of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease that occurred 6 to 8 years after renal transplantation are reported. The patients respectively had gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and atypical Burkitt lymphoma. Absence of EBV in the tissue samples was demonstrated by both in situ hybridization for EBV early RNA and polymerase chain reaction for EBV DNA. Patients were treated with reduction in immunosuppression and combined chemotherapy plus an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab. Despite the reduction in immunosuppression, patients had stable renal functions without loss of graft functions. The patient with atypical Burkitt lymphoma had an abnormal karyotype, did not respond to treatment completely, and died due to disease progression. The other patients are still alive and in remission 5 and 3 years after diagnosis, respectively. EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases are usually late-onset and are reported to have poor prognosis. Thus, reduction in immunosuppression is usually not sufficient for treatment and more aggressive approaches like rituximab with combined chemotherapy are required. PMID:24764734

  4. Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease of natural killer cell lineage: a clinicopathological and molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Y L; Lam, C C; Chan, T M

    2000-07-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) occur after solid organ and bone marrow transplantation. They are predominantly of B-cell and occasionally of T-cell lineage. We report a case of PTLD of natural killer (NK) cell lineage. A renal allograft recipient developed progressive pancytopenia 1 year after transplantation. Serial bone marrow biopsies showed an increasing infiltration by large granular lymphoid cells. A subsequent leukaemic phase also developed with systemic infiltration of other organs. Immunophenotyping showed that these cells were CD2+, CD3-, CD3epsilon+, CD56+, CD94+, CD158a- and CD158b-. In situ hybridization showed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of the neoplastic cells. Genotypical analysis showed the T-cell receptor gene in germline configuration and clonal EBV episomal integration. The overall features were consistent with NK cell lymphoma/leukaemia. The patient did not respond to cessation of immunosuppression or anti-EBV treatment. Combination chemotherapy was given, but the patient died ultimately of disseminated fungal infection. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that NK cell lymphoma is another rare type of PTLD that appears to be highly aggressive and therefore may require early chemotherapy to improve treatment outcome.

  5. Umbilical cord blood transplantation in adults with advanced hodgkin's disease: high incidence of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Piñana, José Luis; Sanz, Jaime; Esquirol, Albert; Martino, Rodrigo; Picardi, Alessandra; Barba, Pere; Parody, Rocio; Gayoso, Jorge; Montesinos, Pau; Guidi, Stefano; Terol, Maria José; Moscardó, Federico; Solano, Carlos; Arcese, William; Sanz, Miguel A; Sierra, Jorge; Sanz, Guillermo

    2016-02-01

    We report the outcome of 30 consecutive patients with Hodgkin disease (HD) who underwent single-unit UCBT. Most (90%) patients had failed previous autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The conditioning regimens were based on combinations of thiotepa, busulfan, cyclophosphamide or fludarabine, and antithymocyte globulin. The cumulative incidence (CI) of myeloid engraftment was 90% [95% confidence interval (C.I.), 74-98%] with a median of 18 d (range, 10-48). CI of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) grades II-IV was 30% (95% C.I., 17-44%), while the incidence of chronic GVHD was 42% (95% C.I., 23-77%). The non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 100 d and 4 yr was 30% (95% C.I., 13-46%) and 47% (95% C.I., 29-65%), respectively. EBV-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-PTLD) accounted for more than one-third of transplant-related death, with an estimate incidence of 26% (95% C.I., 9-44). The incidence of relapse at 4 yr was 25% (95% C.I., 9-42%). Four-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 28% and 30%, respectively. Despite a high NRM and an unexpected high incidence of EBV-PTLD, UCBT in heavily pretreated HD patients is an option for patients lacking a suitable adult donor, provided the disease is not in refractory relapse.

  6. Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (FCD), and rituximab: a remission induction therapy for aggressive pediatric post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD).

    PubMed

    Giraldi, Eugenia; Provenzi, Massimo; Fiocchi, Roberto; Colledan, Michele; Cornelli, Pieremilio; Torre, Giuliano; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Conter, Valentino

    2011-08-01

    Management of aggressive, usually late-occurring, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs), a life-threatening complication after solid organ transplants, remains controversial. Four children affected by aggressive CD20+ PTLDs received a chemo-immunotherapy regimen for remission induction based on fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and rituximab, associated with a rapid discontinuation of immunosuppression (IS). Subsequent consolidation chemotherapy consisted of Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster-modified blocks. All patients achieved a complete remission, which persisted for 25, 68+, 80+, and 103+ months after diagnosis. Therapy was well tolerated. No patients developed allograft rejection during PTLD treatment. Our experience suggests that this chemo-immunotherapeutic approach may be an effective treatment strategy while allowing for a concomitant discontinuation of IS.

  7. EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after umbilical cord blood transplantation in adults with hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Sanz, J; Arango, M; Senent, L; Jarque, I; Montesinos, P; Sempere, A; Lorenzo, I; Martín, G; Moscardó, F; Mayordomo, E; Salavert, M; Cañigral, C; Boluda, B; Salazar, C; López-Hontangas, J L; Sanz, M A; Sanz, G F

    2014-03-01

    We analyzed the incidence, clinicopathological features, risk factors and prognosis of patients with EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV-PTLD) in 288 adults undergoing umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) at a single institution. Twelve patients developed proven EBV-PTLD at a median time of 73 days (range, 36-812). Three-year cumulative incidence (CI) of EBV-PTLD was 4.3% (95% CI: 1.9-6.7). All patients presented with extranodal involvement. Most frequently affected sites were the liver, spleen, central nervous system (CNS), Waldeyer's ring and BM in 7, 6, 4, 3 and 3 patients, respectively. One patient had polymorphic and 11 had monomorphic EBV-PTLD (7 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified, 4 plasmablastic lymphomas). We confirmed donor origin and EBV infection in all histological samples. EBV-PTLD was the cause of death in 11 patients at a median time of 23 days (range, 1-84). The 3-year CI of EBV-PTLD was 12.9% (95% CI: 3.2-22.5) and 2.6% (95% CI: 0.5-4.7) for patients receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and myeloablative conditioning, respectively (P<0.0001). In conclusion, adults with EBV-PTLD after UCBT showed frequent visceral and CNS involvement. The prognosis was poor despite routine viral monitoring and early intervention. An increased risk of EBV-PTLD was noted among recipients of RIC regimens.

  8. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Role of Viral Infection, Genetic Lesions and Antigen Stimulation in the Pathogenesis of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Capello, Daniela; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2009-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation or, more rarely, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The majority of PTLD is of B-cell origin and associated with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection. PTLD generally display involvement of extranodal sites, aggressive histology and aggressive clinical behavior. The molecular pathogenesis of PTLD involves infection by oncogenic viruses, namely EBV, as well as genetic or epigenetic alterations of several cellular genes. At variance with lymphoma arising in immunocompetent hosts, whose genome is relatively stable, a fraction of PTLD are characterized by microsatellite instability as a consequence of defects in the DNA mismatch repair mechanism. Apart from microsatellite instability, molecular alterations of cellular genes recognized in PTLD include alterations of cMYC, BCL6, TP53, DNA hypermethylation, and aberrant somatic hypermutation of protooncogenes. The occurrence of IGV mutations in the overwhelming majority of PTLD documents that malignant transformation targets germinal centre (GC) B-cells and their descendants both in EBV–positive and EBV–negative cases. Analysis of phenotypic markers of B-cell histogenesis, namely BCL6, MUM1 and CD138, allows further distinction of PTLD histogenetic categories. PTLD expressing the BCL6+/MUM1+/-/CD138− profile reflect B-cells actively experiencing the GC reaction, and comprise diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) centroblastic and Burkitt lymphoma. PTLD expressing the BCL6−/MUM1+/CD138− phenotype putatively derive from B-cells that have concluded the GC reaction, and comprise the majority of polymorphic PTLD and a fraction of DLBCL immunoblastic. A third group of PTLD is reminiscent of post-GC and preterminally differentiated B-cells that show the BCL6−/MUM1+/CD138+ phenotype, and are morphologically represented by either polymorphic PTLD or DLBCL immunoblastic. PMID:21416004

  9. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease of donor origin, following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a patient with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Piccin, Andrea; Morello, Enrico; Svaldi, Mirija; Haferlach, Torsten; Facchetti, Fabio; Negri, Giovanni; Vecchiato, Cinzia; Fisogni, Simona; Pusceddu, Irene; Cortelazzo, Sergio

    2012-12-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is an extremely rare condition that originates from dendritic cells. We report on the first case of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) of donor origin in a BPDC patient post-allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Flow cytometry study identified a cell population CD4+/CD56+/CD45RA+/CD123+/TCL1+ suggestive of BPDCN diagnosis, which was confirmed by a lymph node biopsy (cells positive for BCL11a, BDCA-2, CD2AP, CD123, TCL1 and S100). Cytogenetic analysis revealed a complex karyotype: (19 metaphase) 47,XX,t(1;6)(q21;q2?5),-13 + 2mar[11]/47, XX, +21 [3]/46,XX [5]. The patient was started on acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) induction schedule, and subsequently an allogeneic HSCT was performed. On day +36 post-HSCT, bone marrow biopsy/aspirate showed complete morphological remission, and chimerism study showed 100% donor chimera. However, on day +37, the patient was found to have enlarged cervical and supraclavicular lymphoadenopathy, splenomegaly and raised lactic dehydrogenase. EBV-DNA copies in blood were elevated, consistent with a lytic cycle. A lymph node biopsy showed EBV encoded RNA and large atypical B cells (CD45dim-, CD4+/CD56+, monoclonal for k-chain, CD19+/CD20+/CD21+/CD22+/CD38+/CD43+/CD79β-/CD5-/CD10-), consistent with PTLD monomorphic type. Chimerism study showed that PTLD was of donor origin. This case together with the recent literature findings on BPDCN and PTLD are discussed.

  10. Isolated cerebral post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a lymphoma recipient.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tzung-Chih; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Chang, Hung

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) can occur after solid organ transplantation (SOT) or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The majority of PTLDs are related to the reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the lymphoid organs. PLTDs in HSCT recipients tend to present with systemic involvement, and isolated PTLD in these patients is rare. Only 14 isolated cerebral PTLDs have been reported in HSCT recipients, and none have been reported in lymphoma patients. When diagnosing PTLD in a lymphoma patient, it is challenging to discriminate between a PTLD that originated from previous disease and a newly developed clone and to distinguish between donor and recipient origin. In this report, we present the first case of a B-cell lymphoma patient who developed isolated PTLD in the CNS, and we confirmed that the PTLD originated in a distinct clone and from a different origin. Furthermore, the role of EBV-DNA monitoring in such patients is discussed.

  11. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. CD30+ Primary Cutaneous Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder with Signet-ring Cell Features

    PubMed Central

    Malviya, Neeta; Wickless, Heather

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of primary cutaneous CD30+ post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder with an uncommon finding of signet ring cell features in a heart transplant patient. The neoplastic cells were CD4 and CD30 positive, and negative for S-100, pancytokeratin, myeloperoxidase, and CD56. In situ hybridization for Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) was negative, even though the patient did have EBV viremia. PMID:27499836

  13. Early post-transplant smooth muscle neoplasia of the colon presenting as diminutive polyps: a case complicating post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Medlicott, S A C; Devlin, S; Helmersen, D S; Yilmaz, A; Mansoor, A

    2006-04-01

    A 44-year-old woman, 3 years post-transplant for pulmonary sarcoidosis, developed abdominal pain and diarrhea 13 months subsequent to an eradicated diffuse large B-cell-type, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) of the cecal region. Endoscopic examination identified multiple pale tan 5-to-9 mm rubbery nodules of the transverse and right colon in an otherwise unremarkable mucosa. Histology was characterized by bland smooth muscle proliferations, focally pushing into the mucosa. Immunohistochemistry (IHC), in situ hybridization (ISH), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the sampled nodules confirmed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of neoplastic cells. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of EBV-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative and smooth muscle neoplasms (PTSN) having distinct tropism for the colon. Endoscopic features of early PTSN, which in this case presented as diminutive polypoid lesions, have not been described previously.

  14. Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders: diagnosis, prognosis, and current approaches to therapy.

    PubMed

    Evens, Andrew M; Roy, Rupali; Sterrenberg, Danielle; Moll, Michelle Z; Chadburn, Amy; Gordon, Leo I

    2010-11-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a heterogenous group of abnormal lymphoid proliferations that occur after solid organ transplant (SOT) or hematopoietic transplantation. PTLDs consist of a disease spectrum ranging from hyperplasia to aggressive lymphomas with 60-70% being Epstein-Barr virus positive. The majority of cases are B-cell, although 10-15% are of T-cell origin or rarely Hodgkin lymphoma. Recent SOT series suggest PTLD occurs at a median of 36-40 months after transplant. Clinically, extra-nodal disease is common (up to 75-85%) including CNS involvement, which is seen in 10-15% of all cases. Since the first report over 40 years ago, PTLD has remained one of the most morbid complications associated with SOT. However, recent data suggests improved survival in the modern era, especially with the integration of early rituximab-based therapy. These studies utilized first line rituximab (+/- chemotherapy) together with reduced immune suppression (RI) for monomorphic and polymorphic PTLD. It will be critical in future studies to determine which PTLDs are most amenable to initial therapy with RI alone, versus RI/rituximab, versus RI/rituximab/chemotherapy. Additionally, novel therapeutics, such as adoptive immunotherapy, should continue to be explored.

  15. Genetic landscape of T- and NK-cell post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Margolskee, Elizabeth; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Jain, Preti; Chen, Jinli; Ganapathi, Karthik; Nahum, Odelia; Levy, Brynn; Morscio, Julie; Murty, Vundavalli; Tousseyn, Thomas; Alobeid, Bachir

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders of T- or NK-cell origin (T/NK-PTLD) are rare entities and their genetic basis is unclear. We performed targeted sequencing of 465 cancer-related genes and high-resolution copy number analysis in 17 T-PTLD and 2 NK-PTLD cases. Overall, 377 variants were detected, with an average of 20 variants per case. Mutations of epigenetic modifier genes (TET2, KMT2C, KMT2D, DNMT3A, ARID1B, ARID2, KDM6B, n=11). and inactivation of TP53 by mutation and/or deletion(n=6) were the most frequent alterations, seen across disease subtypes, followed by mutations of JAK/STAT pathway genes (n=5). Novel variants, including mutations in TBX3 (n=3), MED12 (n=3) and MTOR (n=1), were observed as well. High-level microsatellite instability was seen in 1 of 14 (7%) cases, which had a heterozygous PMS2 mutation. Complex copy number changes were detected in 8 of 16 (50%) cases and disease subtype-specific aberrations were also identified. In contrast to B-cell PTLDs, the molecular and genomic alterations observed in T/NK-PTLD appear similar to those reported for peripheral T-cell lymphomas occurring in immunocompetent hosts, which may suggest common genetic mechanisms of lymphoma development. PMID:27203213

  16. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Vase, Maja Ølholm; Kampmann, Jan; d'Amore, Francesco; Møller, Michael Boe; Strandhave, Charlotte; Bendix, Knud; Bistrup, Claus; Thiesson, Helle Charlotte; Søndergaard, Esben; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Jespersen, Bente

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) incidence is difficult to determine, mainly because both early and other lesions may go unrecognized and unregistered. Few studies have included systematic pathology review to maximize case identification and decide more accurately PTLD frequency after long-term post-transplantation follow-up. A retrospective population-based cohort study including all kidney transplant recipients at two Danish centres (1990-2011; population covered 3.1 million; 2175 transplantations in 1906 patients). Pathology reports were reviewed for all patient biopsies to identify possible PTLDs. Candidate PTLDs underwent histopathological review and classification. Seventy PTLD cases were identified in 2175 transplantations (3.2%). The incidence rate (IR) after first transplantation was 5.4 cases per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 4.0-7.3). Most PTLDs were monomorphic (58.5%), or early lesions (21.5%). Excluding early lesions and patients <18 years, IR was 3.7 (95% CI: 2.9-5.5). Ten patients with PTLD were retransplanted, 2 developing further PTLDs. Post-transplant patient survival was inferior in patients with PTLD, while death-censored graft survival was not. Using registry data together with extensive pathological review and long follow-up, a rather high incidence of PTLD was found.

  17. T-cell post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders after cardiac transplantation: a single institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Draoua, H Y; Tsao, Lawrence; Mancini, Donna M; Addonizio, Linda J; Bhagat, Govind; Alobeid, Bachir

    2004-11-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a well-recognized and potentially life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation. While the vast majority of PTLDs are B-cell lymphoproliferations, T-cell PTLDs are rarely seen. Among 898 patients receiving cardiac transplants between 1990 and 2003, 34 patients (3.8%) developed PTLDs with two (0.2%) T-cell PTLDs, 31 (3.5%) B-cell PTLDs and one (0.1%) natural killer cell PTLD. An additional three cases of T-cell PTLD were identified among all cardiac transplant patients followed at our institution. These T-cell PTLDs comprised a heterogeneous group of Epstein-Barr virus negative lymphoproliferations that developed late after transplantation and followed an aggressive course.

  18. Clinicopathologic spectrum and EBV status of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding-Bao; Song, Qiu-Jing; Chen, Yun-Xin; Chen, Yu-Hong; Shen, Dan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are serious, life-threatening complications of solid-organ transplantation (SOT) and bone marrow transplantation, and are associated with high mortality. PTLDs represent a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative diseases, which show a spectrum of clinical, morphologic, and molecular genetic features ranging from reactive polyclonal lesions to frank lymphomas. We describe clinicopathologic features of 17 cases of PTLD after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), which were analyzed by in situ hybridization for EBV and a panel of antibodies directed against numerous antigens, including CD20, PAX5, CD3, bcl-6, CD10, MUM-1/IRF4, CD138, Kappa, Lambda, CD30, CD15, and Ki67. The cases included 13 males and 4 females with a median age of 31 years (range 9-49 years) and the PTLDs developed 1.5-19 months post-transplant (mean 4.7 months). The histological types indicated five cases of early lesions, two of plasmacytic hyperplasia and three of infectious mononucleosis-like PTLD. Eight cases were polymorphic PTLD, and four were monomorphic PTLD, including three of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, and one of plasmablastic lymphoma. Foci and sheets of necrosis were observed in five cases. The infected ratio of EBV was 88.2 %. Some cases were treated by reduction of immunosuppression, antiviral therapy, donor lymphocyte infusion, or anti-CD20 monoclonal rituximab. Eight cases died. The first half year after allo-HSCT is very important for the development of PTLD. The diagnosis of PTLD relies on morphology and immunohistochemistry, and EBV plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PTLD. The prognosis of PTLD is poor, and, notably, PTLD after allo-HSCT exhibits some features different from those of PTLD after SOT.

  19. Array-CGH predicts prognosis in plasma cell post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Kaltenbach, Sophie; Faurie, Pierre; Canioni, Danielle; Berger, Françoise; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Ghesquieres, Hervé; Salles, Gilles; Bachy, Emmanuel; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Hermine, Olivier; Neven, Bénédicte; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Romana, Serge; Molina, Thierry Jo; Suarez, Felipe; Asnafi, Vahid; Bruneau, Julie

    2017-03-01

    Plasma-cell post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PC-PTLD) is a rare monomorphic PTLD entity divided into plasma cell myeloma (PCM) and plasmacytoma-like lesion (PLL) PTLD. To date, there are no exhaustive published cytogenetic data on PC-PTLD. We report array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) of 10 cases of PCM and PLL-PTLD. Patients had received kidney (n = 6), heart (n = 2), lung (n = 1) or bone marrow (n = 1) transplantation. There were six men and median age at time of PTLD was 56.5 years (3-74). We identified two different cytological features, plasmacytic and plasmablastic, among six PLL and three PCM PTLD. Eight cases were associated with EBV. First line treatment was heterogeneous: rituximab alone (n = 5), CHOP-like (n = 3) and multiple myeloma-like (n = 1). One patient died before any treatment. After a median follow-up of 19.5 months (0-150), five patients died (four from PTLD) and five were alive without evidence of disease. By aCGH, 5/10 demonstrated a complex profile. The most frequent abnormalities were +7q (5/10), +16q (5/10), +17q (5/10), +17p (4/10), +5q (4/10), t7 (4/10), t9 (3/10), del1p (3/10). No del17p13 (TP53) were observed. Del1p32.3 (CDKN2C) was observed in 2 cases. On univariate prognostic analysis, a complex aCGH was associated with a shorter OS. Thus, cytogenetic abnormalities seem to be closely related to those reported in multiple myeloma or diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Complex aCGH constitutes an unfavorable prognostic marker and aCGH should be integrated in the evaluation of patients with PLL/PCM-PTLD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Role of diffusion weighted imaging in diagnosis of post transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: Case reports and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Singh, A.; Das, C. J.; Gupta, A. K.; Bagchi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder include a spectrum of conditions occurring in immunosuppressed post transplant recipients, lymphoma being the most ominous. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography CT) is the current imaging gold standard for lymphoma imaging as it allows both morphological and functional assessment. CT and/or conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used for morphological evaluation in transplant recipients. Integrating diffusion weighted imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient analysis in MRI protocol enhances its sensitivity and may prove invaluable in response assessment in transplant recipients. PMID:27194838

  1. Serum free light chains and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in patients with renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Rodrigo C; Rizzatti, Edgar G; Braga, Walter M T; Santos, Melina G; de Oliveira, Mariana B; Pestana, José O M; Baiocchi, Otavio C G; Colleoni, Gisele W B

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether there is an association between serum free light chains (sFLC) quantification and the development of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), using serum samples from a nested case-control cohort of patients with renal transplant. Ten new cases of PTLD and 46 controls were enrolled. Additional comparison groups consisted of five human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, five with untreated Hodgkin lymphoma and six normal individuals. Serum κ and λ FLC concentrations were measured by nephelometry and compared with reference ranges (normal and renal ranges). κ and/or λ were above the normal range in 90% of cases and in 65% of matched controls. There was no statistically significant difference between all groups, except for λ FLC concentrations between cases of PTLD and normal individuals (p = 0.016). The κ/λ sFLC ratios of cases and controls were within the renal range and normal range. Our results suggest that sFLC are not useful to predict PTLD development in renal transplant recipients.

  2. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Following Clinical Islet Transplantation: Report of the First Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Peters, Anthea; Olateju, Tolu; Deschenes, Jean; Shankarnarayan, Santosh H; Chua, Neil; Shapiro, A M James; Senior, Peter

    2017-04-08

    We report the first two cases of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in recipients of islet transplants worldwide. First, a 44-year old recipient of 3 islet infusions developed PTLD 80 months after his initial transplant, presenting with abdominal pain and diffuse terminal ileum thickening on imaging. He was treated with surgical excision, reduction of immunosuppression and rituximab. Seven months later he developed central nervous system PTLD, presenting with vertigo and diplopia; immunosuppression was discontinued, resulting in graft loss, and he was given high-dose methotrexate and consolidative autologous stem cell transplant. He remains in remission 37 months after initial diagnosis. Second, a 58-year old female recipient of 2 islet infusions developed PTLD 24 months after initial islet infusion, presenting with pancytopenia secondary to extensive bone marrow involvement. Immunosuppression was discontinued, resulting in graft loss, and she received rituximab and chemotherapy, achieving complete remission. Both cases were monomorphic B-cell PTLD subtype by histology and negative for EBV in tissue or blood. These cases document the first occurrences of this rare complication in islet transplant, likely secondary to prolonged, intensive immunosuppression, and highlight the variable clinical manifestations of PTLD. Further studies are needed to determine incidence rate and risk factors in islet transplantation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder subtypes correlate with different recurring chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Djokic, Miroslav; Le Beau, Michelle M; Swinnen, Lode J; Smith, Sonali M; Rubin, Charles M; Anastasi, John; Carlson, Katrin M

    2006-03-01

    Although cytogenetic analysis advanced the understanding of the pathogenesis of primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma and led to improved clinical management, there have been no large cytogenetic studies of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). We examined the karyotypes of 36 PTLD cases and correlated them with clinical, laboratory, and pathologic findings. The cases included 2 early lesions, 13 polymorphic PTLDs, and 21 monomorphic PTLDs (18 B-cell and 3 T-cell proliferations). Cytogenetic abnormalities were identified in 72% of monomorphic B-cell PTLDs and in all T-cell PTLDs, but in only 15% of polymorphic PTLDs and in no early lesions. The most frequent clonal abnormalities in monomorphic PTLD were trisomies 9 and/or 11 (5 cases), followed by rearrangements of 8q24.1 (4 cases), 3q27 (2 cases), and 14q32 (2 cases). MYC rearrangement (8q24.1) and T-cell-associated chromosomal abnormalities correlated with poor outcome and short survival. PTLD with trisomy 9 and/or 11 developed early after transplant, presenting as Epstein-Barr virus-positive large B-cell lymphoma with prolonged survival.

  4. Occurrence and prognostic relevance of CD30 expression in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Bendix, Knud; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Andersen, Claus; Møller, Michael Boe; Sørensen, Søren Schwartz; Jespersen, Bente; Kampmann, Jan; Søndergård, Esben; Nielsen, Patricia Switten; D'amore, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are potentially fatal, often Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven neoplasias developing in immunocompromised hosts. Initial treatment usually consists of a reduction in immunosuppressive therapy and/or rituximab with or without chemotherapy. However, patients who relapse do poorly, and new treatment options are warranted. With the introduction of the immunoconjugate brentuximab vedotin, the CD30 antigen has become an effectively targetable molecule. Therefore, we investigated the frequency and level of CD30 expression in PTLDs. We identified 108 patients with PTLDs diagnosed during 1994-2011, of whom 62 had adequate paraffin-embedded tissue for tissue microarray construction. Immunohistochemical expression of CD30 was consistently detected in all types of PTLD (overall 85.25%), including the monomorphic subtypes, and was correlated with a more favorable outcome. For diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)-type PTLD this was regardless of EBV status, and remained significant in multivariate analysis. Cell-of-origin had no independent prognostic value in our series of DLBCL PTLD.

  5. Clinical and pathological prognostic markers for survival in adult patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in solid transplant.

    PubMed

    Oton, Ana B; Wang, Hong; Leleu, Xavier; Melhem, Mona F; George, Diane; Lacasce, Ann; Foon, Kenneth; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2008-09-01

    We sought to determine the clinical and immunohistopathological prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) in adult patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). Eighty-four patients diagnosed with PTLDs between 1980 and 2004 at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center were identified. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on tumor tissue at the time of diagnosis for the following proteins: Bcl-2, Bcl-6, c-myc and p53. The median survival for all patients was 20.8 months, 95% CI: (7.4-77.6). On univariate analysis for OS, the following poor prognostic factors were identified: age at transplant >60 years (p = 0.024), multiorgan transplant (p = 0.019), ECOG > 2 (p < 0.0001), grafted organ involvement (p < 0.0001), extranodal disease (p = 0.011), early (<1 year) PTLDs (p < 0.0001), stage IV (p = 0.0017), EBV positive (p = 0.012) and elevated white blood count (p = 0.010). Good prognostic factors included ECOG<2 (p < 0.0001), late (>1 year) PTLDs (p = 0.002), early stage at diagnosis (stages I and II, p = 0.005), nodal disease (p = 0.0053), monomorphic disease (0.0034), initial immunosuppression reduction (p = 0.0015) and use of rituximab (p = 0.045). Bcl-2 but not Bcl-6, c-myc, or p53 correlated with poor survival, p = 0.0036. This study identifies new clinical and pathological markers for poor survival in PTLDs.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: a distinct entity?

    PubMed

    Nelson, B P; Nalesnik, M A; Bahler, D W; Locker, J; Fung, J J; Swerdlow, S H

    2000-03-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are usually but not invariably associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The reported incidence, however, of EBV-negative PTLDs varies widely, and it is uncertain whether they should be considered analogous to EBV-positive PTLDs and whether they have any distinctive features. Therefore, the EBV status of 133 PTLDs from 80 patients was determined using EBV-encoded small ribonucleic acid (EBER) in situ hybridization stains with or without Southern blot EBV terminal repeat analysis. The morphologic, immunophenotypic, genotypic, and clinical features of the EBV-negative PTLDs were reviewed, and selected features were compared with EBV-positive cases. Twenty-one percent of patients had at least one EBV-negative PTLD (14% of biopsies). The initial EBV-negative PTLDs occurred a median of 50 months post-transplantation compared with 10 months for EBV-positive cases. Although only 2% of PTLDs from before 1991 were EBV negative, 23% of subsequent PTLDs were EBV negative (p <0.001). Of the EBV-negative PTLDs, 67% were of monomorphic type (M-PTLD) compared with 42% of EBV-positive cases (p <0.05). The other EBV-negative PTLDs were of infectious mononucleosis-like, plasma cell-rich (n = 2), small B-cell lymphoid neoplasm, large granular lymphocyte disorder (n = 4) and polymorphic (P) types. B-cell clonality was established in 14 specimens and T-cell clonality was established in three (two patients). None of the remaining specimens were studied with Southern blot analysis and some had no ancillary studies. Rearrangement of c-MYC was identified in two M-PTLDs with small noncleaved-like features, and rearrangement of BCL-2 was found in one large noncleaved-like M-PTLD. Ten patients were alive at 3 to 63 months (only three patients received chemotherapy). Seven patients, all with M-PTLDs, are dead at 0.3 to 6 months. Therefore, EBV-negative PTLDs have distinct features, but some do respond to decreased immunosuppression, similar

  7. Effect of anti-CD 20 antibody rituximab in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD).

    PubMed

    Oertel, S H K; Verschuuren, E; Reinke, P; Zeidler, K; Papp-Váry, M; Babel, N; Trappe, R U; Jonas, S; Hummel, M; Anagnostopoulos, I; Dörken, B; Riess, H B

    2005-12-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a life-threatening complication following solid organ transplantation. Treatment with rituximab, a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has proved to be a promising approach and shown a low toxicity profile. Between February 1999 and April 2002, we conducted a multicentre phase II trial investigating rituximab as single agent in 17 patients with PTLD. Transplanted organs were heart (n = 5), kidney (n = 4), lung (n = 4) and liver (n = 4). Patients were treated with four weekly doses of 375 mg/m(2) of rituximab. The mean follow-up time is 24.2 months. Histology was distributed in 10 diffuse large cell-, 2 marginal zone-, 1 Burkitt-like lymphoma, 1 Hodgkin-like PTLD and 3 polymorphic lymphoproliferations. Therapy was well tolerated and no severe adverse events were observed. The mean overall survival period is 37.0 months with 11 patients still living. In total, 9 patients (52.9%) achieved a complete remission, with a mean duration of 17.8 months. Partial remission was observed in 1 patient, minor remission in 2 patients, no change in 3 patients and 1 patient experienced progressive disease. Two patients relapsed, at intervals 3 and 5 months after obtaining complete remission. Rituximab proved to be well tolerated and effective in the treatment of PTLD.

  8. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: clinicopathological analysis of 43 cases in a single center, 1990-2009.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sun Och; Yu, Eunsil; Cho, Yong Mee; Suh, Cheolwon; Kim, Kyung Mo; Han, Duck Jong; Lee, Seung Gyu; Huh, Jooryung

    2012-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a heterogeneous set of complications of organ transplantation associated with poor patient prognosis. We analyzed the clinicopathological features of PTLDs in 43 adult and pediatric recipients of solid organ or bone marrow transplantation at a large transplant service in the Republic of Korea between 1990 and 2009. Of 4545 solid organ and 747 bone marrow transplant recipients, 37 (0.81%) and 6 (0.8%), respectively, developed heterogeneous types of PTLDs. The cumulative incidences of PTLDs during this period were 1.79% (4/223) for heart transplant recipients, 0.78% (17/2192) for kidney transplant recipients, and 0.77% (16/2067) for liver transplant recipients. The patterns of disease onset, histology, and patient survival were associated with the types of organs transplanted. There is a trend for shorter overall survival (OS) in recipients with early-onset PTLDs and monomorphic PTLD histology, while kidney transplant recipients showed favorable OS. This study may be the first comprehensive analysis of the characteristics of PTLDs in Korean patients.

  9. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after pancreas transplantation: a United Network for Organ Sharing database analysis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K; Ruppert, K; Shapiro, R

    2013-01-01

    There are not a great deal of data on post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) following pancreas transplantation. We analyzed the United Network for Organ Sharing national database of pancreas transplants to identify predictors of PTLD development. A univariate Cox model was generated for each potential predictor, and those at least marginally associated (p < 0.15) with PTLD were entered into a multivariable Cox model. PTLD developed in 43 patients (1.0%) of 4205 pancreas transplants. Mean follow-up time was 4.9 ± 2.2 yr. In the multivariable Cox model, recipient EBV seronegativity (HR 5.52, 95% CI: 2.99-10.19, p < 0.001), not having tacrolimus in the immunosuppressive regimen (HR 6.02, 95% CI: 2.74-13.19, p < 0.001), recipient age (HR 0.96, 95% CI: 0.92-0.99, p = 0.02), non-white ethnicity (HR 0.11, 95% CI: 0.02-0.84, p = 0.03), and HLA mismatching (HR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.67-0.97, p = 0.02) were significantly associated with the development of PTLD. Patient survival was significantly decreased in patients with PTLD, with a one-, three-, and five-yr survival of 91%, 76%, and 70%, compared with 97%, 93%, and 88% in patients without PTLD (p < 0.001). PTLD is an uncommon but potentially lethal complication following pancreas transplantation. Patients with the risk factors identified should be monitored closely for the development of PTLD.

  10. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: implications for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated malignancies.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, L J

    2001-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) comprise a histologic spectrum, ranging from hyperplastic-appearing lesions to frank non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or multiple myeloma histology. Multiple clones may coexist, each representing a discrete lymphomagenic event, a situation that is unique to immunodeficiency states. The incidence varies from 1% in renal recipients to 5% in heart recipients, but can be markedly increased by the use of anti-T-cell therapies or by T-cell depletion in bone marrow transplantation. PTLD continues to arise, even many years after transplantation, and late T-cell lymphomas have recently been recognized. Pretransplant Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seronegativity increases risk to as high as 30%-50%. PTLD has a highly variable clinical picture; certain patterns are, however, seen. Reversibility of PTLD with reduction in immunosuppressives has long been recognized. Predicting reversibility has been difficult. The presence or absence of bcl-6 mutations has recently been identified as being of predictive value. Surgical resection can be curative. Cytotoxics, although problematic, can also be curative. Long-term remission has been achieved with anti CD21 and CD24 antibodies; efficacy has been reported for interferon alfa and for rituximab. In vitro expanded EBV-specific T cells have been effective as treatment and as prophylaxis in the setting of bone marrow transplantation. EBV viral load measured in blood appears to associate with the emergence of PTLD and may facilitate prophylactic studies. PTLD is a model of immunodeficiency-related EBV lymphomagenesis. Pathogenetic, therapeutic, and prophylactic insights gained from the study of PTLD are likely to be applicable to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome setting.

  11. Persistent Epstein-Barr viral load in Epstein-Barr viral naïve pediatric heart transplant recipients: Risk of late-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bibhuti; Morrow, Robert; Huang, Rong; Fixler, David

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the risk of late-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in the presence of persisting high Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in EBV naïve pediatric heart transplant (HT) recipients. METHODS A retrospective review of the medical records of the 145 pediatric HT recipients who had serial EBV viral load monitoring at our center was performed. We defined EBV naive patients whose EBV serology either IgM or IgG in the blood were negative at the time of HT and excluded passive transmission from mother to child in subjects less than 6 mo of age. RESULTS PTLD was diagnosed in 8 out of 145 patients (5.5%); 6/91 (6.5%) in those who were EBV seropositive and 2/54 (3.7%) in the EBV naïve group at the time of HT (P = 0.71). We found 32/145 (22%) patients with persistently high EBV load during continuing follow-up; 20/91 (22%) in EBV seropositive group vs 12/54 (22%) in EBV naïve group (P = 0.97). There was no significant association between pre-HT serostatus and EBV load after transplant (P > 0.05). In the EBV seropositive group, PTLD was diagnosed in 15% (3/20) of patients with high EBV vs 4.2% (3/71) of patients with low or undetectable EBV load (P = 0.14) whereas in EBV naïve patients 8.3% (1/12) of those with high EBV load and 2.3% (1/42) with low or undetectable EBV load (P = 0.41). There was a highly significant association between occurrence of PTLD in those with high EBV load and duration of follow up (4.3 ± 3.9 years) after HT by Cochran-Armitage test for the entire cohort (P = 0.005). At least one episode of acute rejection occurred in 72% (23/32) of patients with high EBV vs 36% (41/113) patients with low or undetectable EBV after HT (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION There is an association between persistently high EBV load during post-HT follow up and the occurrence of late-onset PTLD in pediatric HT recipients irrespective of serostatus at the time of transplant. The occurrence of allograft rejection increased in patients with high EBV load

  12. Treatment of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplant with rituximab and conversion to m-TOR inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Rios, John Fredy; Gómez de los Ríos, Sandra Milena; Ocampo-Kohn, Catalina; Aristizabal-Alzate, Arbey; Gálvez-Cárdenas, Kenny Mauricio; Zuluaga-Valencia, Gustavo Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders are serious complications of organ transplantation which treatment is not yet standardized. Objective: To describe the clinical response, overall and graft survival of patients in our center with this complication after kidney transplantation, which received rituximab as part of their treatment as well as conversion to m-TOR. Methods: Retrospective study, which included patients, diagnosed with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation from January 2011 to July 2014. Results: Eight cases were found with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Most had monomorphic histology, 85% were associated with Epstein-Barr virus, 25% of patients had tumor involvement of the renal graft, and 12.5% ​​had primary central nervous system lymphoma. All patients were managed with reduction of immunosuppression, conversion to m-TOR (except one who lost the graft at diagnosis) and rituximab-based therapy. The overall response rate was 87.5% (62.5% complete response, 25% partial response). Survival was 87.5% with a median follow-up of 34 months. An additional patient lost the graft, with chronic nephropathy already known. All the remaining patients had stable renal function. Conclusions: There are no standardized treatment regimens for lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation, but these patients can be managed successfully with reduction of immunosuppression, conversion to m-TOR and rituximab-based schemes. PMID:28293043

  13. Molecular characterization of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders of donor origin occurring in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Capello, Daniela; Rasi, Silvia; Oreste, Pierluigi; Veronese, Silvio; Cerri, Michaela; Ravelli, Erika; Rossi, Davide; Minola, Ernesto; Colosimo, Anna; Gambacorta, Marcello; Muti, Giuliana; Morra, Enrica; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2009-08-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) represent a frequent complication of solid organ transplantation. Although most PTLDs arise from recipient lymphoid cells, a considerable fraction of cases may arise from donor B-cells. In an attempt to clarify the histogenesis and pathogenesis of PTLDs derived from donor B-cells, monoclonal PTLDs occurring in liver transplant recipients were chosen as a model to compare donor (D-PTLDs) versus recipient PTLDs (R-PTLDs). The tumour panel included nine D-PTLDs and six R-PTLDs. D-PTLDs were early-onset, EBV-infected lymphoproliferations classified as polymorphic PTLD (P-PTLD; n = 7) or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 2) with tumour localization confined to the hepatic hilum. All R-PTLDs were late-onset DLBCLs and showed extrahepatic localization. A BCL-6(-)/MUM1(+)/CD138(+/-) phenotype, consistent with a post-germinal centre (GC) stage of pre-terminal B-cell differentiation, was observed in all D-PTLDs and in 2/6 R-PTLDs, whereas a BCL6(+)/MUM1(-)/CD138(-) profile, reminiscent of GC B-cells, was detected in 4/6 R-PTLDs. The presence of somatic IGHV hypermutation was observed in 6/9 D-PTLDs and in 4/6 R-PTLDs, suggesting derivation from antigen-experienced B-cells. IGHV4-39 was the IGHV gene most frequently encountered, being rearranged in 3/9 D-PTLDs. Among IGHV-mutated PTLDs, a mutational profile suggesting antigen stimulation and/or selection was observed in 4/6 D-s and in 2/4 R-PTLDs. The presence of ongoing IGHV mutations was detected in 2/4 D-PTLDs. Aberrant SHM was detected in 10/15 (66.7%) PTLDs, including 6/9 D-PTLDs and 4/6 R-PTLDs. Our findings suggest that (i) D-PTLDs show a clinical presentation distinct from R-PTLDs; (ii) immunophenotypic and genetic features of D-PTLDs are consistent with mature, GC-experienced B-cells; (iii) transformed donor-derived B-cells may experience antigen-driven stimulation and selection, and may acquire genetic lesions during neoplastic expansion in the recipient

  14. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder presenting with skin ulceration in a renal transplant recipient who achieved sustained remission with rituximab therapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Law, Man Fai; Chan, Hay Nun; Lai, Ho Kei; Ha, Chung Yin; Ng, Celia; Yeung, Yiu Ming; Yip, Sze Fai

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is associated with a variety of clinical presentations, but rarely involves the skin. We herein report a case of PTLD presenting with skin ulceration in a renal transplant recipient. A biopsy of the ulcer confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient was initially treated with immunosuppression reduction, but the skin ulcer persisted. He was then treated with two courses of chemotherapy, but his condition was complicated with cryptococcal infection. Antifungal agents were administered to control the fungal infection. The patient later developed lymphoma recurrence and was successfully treated with single-agent rituximab. The patient remains well 6 years after treatment, with no evidence of disease relapse. Therefore, PTLD may manifest as skin lesions and physicians must be aware of this rare presentation. PMID:27900097

  15. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after liver transplantation: Incidence, long-term survival and impact of serum tacrolimus level

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghian, Ahad; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Shamsaeefar, Alireza; Barshans, Frouzan; Kazemi, Kourosh; Geramizadeh, Bita; Malek-Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate incidence and survival of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) patients after liver transplantation. METHODS A cross-sectional survey was conducted among patients who underwent liver transplantation at Shiraz Transplant Center (Shiraz, Iran) between August 2004 and March 2015. Clinical and laboratory data of patients were collected using a data gathering form. RESULTS There were 40 cases of PTLD in the pediatric age group and 13 cases in the adult group. The incidence of PTLD was 6.25% in pediatric patients and 1.18% in adult liver transplant recipients. The post-PTLD survival of patients at 6 mo was 75.1% ± 6%, at 1 year was 68.9% ± 6.5% and at 5 years was 39.2% ± 14.2%. Higher serum tacrolimus level was associated with lower post-PTLD survival in pediatric patients (OR = 1.07, 95%CI: 1.006-1.15, P = 0.032). A serum tacrolimus level over 11.1 ng/mL was predictive of post PTLD survival (sensitivity = 90%, specificity = 52%, area under the curve = 0.738, P = 0.035). CONCLUSION Incidence of PTLD in our liver transplant patients is comparable to other centers. Transplant physicians may consider adjustment of tacrolimus dose to maintain its serum level below this cutoff point. PMID:28275302

  16. Croup as Unusual Presentation of Post-transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder after Liver Transplantation in an 18-month-old Child

    PubMed Central

    Keshtkari, A.; Dehghani, S. M.; Haghighat, M.; Imanieh, M. H.; Nasimfard, A.; Yousefi, G.; Javaherizadeh, H.

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation that occurs due to immunosuppression and other risk factors. PTLD may present with involvement of other organs and with unusual presentation. The presentation is often extranodal (e.g., in the gastrointestinal tract, lung, or the central nervous system). Herein, we report on a 1.5-year-old girl who underwent liver transplantation almost 5 months prior to admission. She was on medications such as tacrolimus and prednisolone. Her presentation was started with symptoms of the upper respiratory infection followed by croupy cough and respiratory distress with no response to usual treatments. She had respiratory arrest during broncoscopy. Therefore, emergency tracheostomy was done. Biopsy from the paratracheal mass revealed large B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PTLD, monomorphic and high grade). This case presentation shows that persistent upper airway symptoms, particularly stridor and croupy cough, in children who underwent liver transplant should be further evaluated; the physician needs to have a high degree of clinical suspicion for the diagnosis of PTLD in this situation. PMID:26889375

  17. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: determination of donor/recipient origin in a large cohort of kidney recipients.

    PubMed

    Olagne, J; Caillard, S; Gaub, M P; Chenard, M P; Moulin, B

    2011-06-01

    Although in previous studies most post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) were reported to derive from recipient cells, some cases derived from donor lymphocytes have been reported. To provide a better description of the features and outcome of PTLD according to the origin of the lymphoma, we performed histologic and molecular studies of PTLD in kidney recipients. Forty-three specimens were analyzed by histochemistry, fluorescent hybridization of the Y chromosome and analysis of multiple short tandem repeat microsatellite loci. Sixteen tumors were shown to be of donor origin and 27 of recipient origin. Time to PTLD was shorter in donor-derived PTLDs (20 ± 27 vs. 69 ± 67 months, p = 0.013). Ten-year patient survival was similar among patients with recipient- and donor-derived PTLD, but when PTLD-related mortality was analyzed, there was a trend to better survival in patients with donor lymphomas. Among the 21 PTLDs localized in the allograft, 14 lymphomas were of donor origin and seven of recipient origin. No difference was found between the two groups. Our analysis of the origin of PTLDs in the largest cohort studied to date with a description of the clinical and histological characteristics of donor and recipient PTLDs should lead to a better understanding of lymphomagenesis.

  18. Localization of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders to the stomach might be associated with favorable outcome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Khedmat, Hossein; Ghamar-Chehreh, Mohammad Ebrahim; Amini, Mohsen; Agah, Shahram; Taheri, Saeed

    2014-03-01

    Gastric localization of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) is very rare. In this study, we aimed to accumulate existing data in the current literature to reveal the clinical, histopathological and prognostic specificities associated with gastric PTLDs and to find the best treatment strategies in this patient population. A comprehensive search was conducted for the available data in the current literature using Pubmed and Google scholar search engines for reports on gastric PTLD in renal transplant recipients. Data of different studies were standardized and entered into a database and analyzed. No statistically significant difference was found between gastric and non-gastric PTLD. Gastric PTLD was relatively more prevalent in female patients (P = 0.08) and showed a trend toward better outcome (P = 0.1) and less metastasis (P = 0.07). Surgical intervention and rituximab therapy were associated with a more favorable outcome (17% mortality). Our study showed that organ transplant recipients having gastric PTLD develop metastasis less frequently and tend to have a relatively more favorable outcome. Prospective studies with larger patient populations are needed to confirm or modify our results.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) load and interleukin-10 in EBV-positive and EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Muti, Giuliana; Klersy, Catherine; Baldanti, Fausto; Granata, Simonetta; Oreste, Pierluigi; Pezzetti, Laura; Gatti, Marta; Gargantini, Livio; Caramella, Marianna; Mancini, Valentina; Gerna, Guiseppe; Morra, Enrica

    2003-09-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are heterogeneous severe complications occurring in 1-10% of transplanted patients. In most cases, PTLDs are associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection but, recently, some clinical studies have reported an increasing number of EBV-negative PTLDs. Several studies have emphasized the critical role of the early identification of patients at risk for PTLD, in prompting the adoption of either pre-emptive strategies or timely treatment. To this purpose, monitoring of EBV DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is considered to be a useful test. Moreover, recently, the role of interleukin (IL)-10 in EBV-related diseases has been remarked, and high levels of IL-10 have been detected in PTLD patients. In this study, both EBV load and IL-10 were monitored in 38 PTLD patients at diagnosis and during follow-up, as well as in a control group, in order to establish the diagnostic role of the two tests, their relationship with the different PTLD subsets (EBV-positive and EBV-negative) and their behaviour during treatment. Results of our study suggest that the usefulness of IL-10 assay for early diagnosis of PTLD is similar to that of EBV load quantification, and its clinical diagnostic value is lower in EBV-negative than in EBV-positive PTLDs.

  20. The radiological spectrum of pulmonary lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Hare, S S; Souza, C A; Bain, G; Seely, J M; Frcpc; Gomes, M M; Quigley, M

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) are characterised by abnormal proliferation of indigenous cell lines or infiltration of lung parenchyma by lymphoid cells. They encompass a wide spectrum of focal or diffuse abnormalities, which may be classified as reactive or neoplastic on the basis of cellular morphology and clonality. The spectrum of reactive disorders results primarily from antigenic stimulation of bronchial mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) and comprises three main entities: follicular bronchiolitis, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia and (more rarely) nodular lymphoid hyperplasia. Primary parenchymal neoplasms are most commonly extranodal marginal zone lymphomas of MALT origin (MALT lymphomas), followed by diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) and lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG). Secondary lymphomatous parenchymal neoplasms (both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas) are far more prevalent than primary neoplasms. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphoma (ARL) and post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) may also primarily affect the lung parenchyma. Modern advances in treatments for AIDS and transplant medicine are associated with an increase in the incidence of LPD and have heightened the need to understand the range of imaging appearance of these diseases. The multidetector CT (MDCT) findings of LPD are heterogeneous, thereby reflecting the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of these entities. Understanding the spectrum of LPD and the various imaging manifestations is crucial because the radiologist is often the first one to suggest the diagnosis and has a pivotal role in differentiating these diseases. The current concepts of LPD are discussed together with a demonstration of the breadth of MDCT patterns within this disease spectrum. PMID:22745203

  1. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P.; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  2. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged.

  3. Risk factors for early-onset and late-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in kidney recipients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Scott C; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Morton, Lindsay M; Engels, Eric A

    2011-02-01

    Solid-organ transplant recipients have an elevated risk for some malignancies because of the requirement for immunosuppression [1]. In particular, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is common and comprises one end of a spectrum of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) ranging from benign hyperplasia to lymphoid malignancy [2]. PTLD risk is influenced by the type of organ transplanted, the age and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serostatus of the transplant recipient, and the intensity of immunosuppression [3-9]. PTLD incidence is high immediately after transplantation, decreases subsequently, and then rises again 4-5 years from transplantation [10,11]. This incidence pattern suggests the presence of separate early-onset and late-onset PTLD subtypes. Early-onset PTLDs tend to be EBV-positive and, when extranodal, are more likely than late-onset PTLDs to be localized to the transplanted organ [12,13]. Late-onset PTLD is less likely to be associated with EBV and, overall, is more likely than early-onset PTLD to be extranodal [13,14]. The Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) includes data on a large number of solid-organ transplant recipients in the United States and information on malignancies diagnosed post-transplantation. We used these data to conduct a retrospective cohort study among kidney transplant recipients to examine differences in risk factors between early-onset PTLD and late-onset PTLD.

  4. Primary CNS lymphoproliferative disease, mycophenolate and calcineurin inhibitor usage

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Powell, Helen; Kostadinov, Rumen; Rocafort, Patrick Tim; Rifkin, Dena E.; Burger, Peter C.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Swinnen, Lode J.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppression for solid organ transplantation increases lymphoproliferative disease risk. While central nervous system (CNS) involvement is more rare, we noticed an increase in primary CNS (PCNS) disease. To investigate a potential association with the immunosuppressive regimen we identified all post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) cases diagnosed over a 28-year period at our institution (174 total, 29 PCNS) and all similar cases recorded in a United Network for Organ Sharing-Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (UNOS-OPTN) data file. While no PCNS cases were diagnosed at our institution between 1986 and 1997, they comprised 37% of PTLD cases diagnosed from 2011–2014. PCNS disease was more often associated with renal vs. other organ transplant, Epstein-Barr virus, large B-cell morphology and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as compared to PTLD that did not involve the CNS. Calcineurin inhibitors were protective against PCNS disease when given alone or in combination with MMF. A multivariate analysis of a larger UNOS-OPTN dataset confirmed these findings, where both MMF and lack of calcineurin inhibitor usage were independently associated with risk for development of PCNS PTLD. These findings have significant implications for the transplant community, particularly given the introduction of new regimens lacking calcineurin inhibitors. Further investigation into these associations is warranted. PMID:26460822

  5. Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder occurring after bone marrow transplantation for aplastic anemia in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Aya; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Hodohara, Keiko; Yoshii, Miyuki; Okuno, Hiroko; Horinouchi, Akiko; Nakanishi, Ryota; Harada, Ayumi; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Yoshida, Takashi; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that Down's syndrome exhibits a predisposition to development of leukemia, however, association between aplastic anemia and Down's syndrome is exceptional. Herein, we describe a case of aplastic anemia occurring in Down's syndrome following post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). A 27-year-old Japanese male with Down's syndrome presented with a headache. Laboratory tests revealed severe pancytopenia, and bone marrow biopsy demonstrated hypocellular bone marrow with decrease of trilineage cells, which led to a diagnosis of aplastic anemia. One year after diagnosis, he was incidentally found to have an anterior mediastinal tumor, which was histopathologically diagnosed as seminoma. Subsequently, he received BMT from a female donor, and engraftment was observed. Three months after transplantation, he experienced cough and high fever. Biopsy specimen from the lung revealed diffuse proliferation of large-sized lymphoid cells expressing CD20 and EBER. These lymphoid cells had XY chromosomes. Thus, a diagnosis of EBV-associated PTLD was made. This is the seventh documented case of aplastic anemia occurring in Down's syndrome. Association between aplastic anemia and Down's syndrome has not been established, therefore, additional clinicopathological studies are needed. Moreover, this is the first case to undergo BMT for aplastic anemia in Down's syndrome. Although engraftment was observed, he developed EBV-positive PTLD. The neoplastic cells of the present case were considered to be of recipient origin, although the majority of PTLD cases with BMT are of donor origin.

  6. Detection of bone marrow involvement in newly diagnosed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography versus bone marrow biopsy.

    PubMed

    Gheysens, Olivier; Thielemans, Sanne; Morscio, Julie; Boeckx, Nancy; Goffin, Karolien E; Deroose, Christophe M; Sagaert, Xavier; Wlodarska, Iwona; Verhoef, Gregor; Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Detecting bone marrow involvement (BMI) in lymphoma is important as it adversely affects stage. Bone marrow biopsy (BMB) remains the standard to detect BMI but is prone to sampling error. We retrospectively investigated whether (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) could identify BMI in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) with sufficient accuracy in comparison with staging BMB. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with PTLD who underwent (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and BMB within one month were evaluated. Based on our criteria, six patients (24%) were considered positive for BMI on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to one by BMB. Although we cannot completely exclude false positive results on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT, our data indicate a significantly higher sensitivity of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to BMB (100% vs 17%) but similar specificity. These data confirm the high diagnostic performance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT for detecting BMI, but prospective studies are needed to determine whether (18)F-FDG-PET/CT could indeed replace staging BMB in PTLD.

  7. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD) Manifesting in the Oral Cavity of a 13-Year-Old Liver Transplant Recipient (LTx).

    PubMed

    Krasuska-Sławińska, Ewa; Minko-Chojnowska, Izabela; Pawłowska, Joanna; Dembowska-Bagińska, Bożenna; Pronicki, Maciej; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota

    2015-08-18

    BACKGROUND Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a potential complication of solid organ or bone marrow transplants. The main PTLD risk factors are: the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), transplant type, and use of immunosuppressants. It mainly consists of an uncontrolled growth of lymphocytes in transplant recipients under chronic immunosuppressive therapy. About 85% of PTLDs are EBV-containing B-cell proliferations; 14% are T-cell proliferations, of which only 40% contain EBV; and the remaining 1% is NK-cell or plasmocyte proliferations. PTLD may present various clinical manifestations, from non-specific mononucleosis-like syndrome to graft or other organ damage resulting from pathologic lymphocyte infiltration. PTLD may manifest in the oral cavity. CASE REPORT The objective of this study was to present the case of a 13-year-old female living-donor liver transplant recipient, resulting from biliary cirrhosis caused by congenital biliary atresia, with exophytic fibrous lesions on buccal mucosa and tongue. Exophytic and hyperplastic lesion of oral mucosa were removed and histopathological examination revealed polymorphic PTLD. The patient underwent 6 cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and all the oral lesions regressed completely. CONCLUSIONS All oral pathological lesions in organ transplant recipients need to be surgically removed and histopathologically examined because they present an increased risk of neoplastic transformations such as PTLD.

  8. Virus and Autoantigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells Are Key Effectors in a SCID Mouse Model of EBV-Associated Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Linnerbauer, Stefanie; Behrends, Uta; Adhikary, Dinesh; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Mautner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cell line (lymphoblastoid cell lines; LCL)-stimulated T-cell preparations have been successfully used to treat EBV-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) in transplant recipients, but function and specificity of the CD4+ component are still poorly defined. Here, we assessed the tumor-protective potential of different CD4+ T-cell specificities in a PTLD-SCID mouse model. Injection of different virus-specific CD4+ T-cell clones showed that single specificities were capable of prolonging mouse survival and that the degree of tumor protection directly correlated with recognition of target cells in vitro. Surprisingly, some CD4+ T-cell clones promoted tumor development, suggesting that besides antigen recognition, still elusive functional differences exist among virus-specific T cells. Of several EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell clones tested, those directed against virion antigens proved most tumor-protective. However, enriching these specificities in LCL-stimulated preparations conferred no additional survival benefit. Instead, CD4+ T cells specific for unknown, probably self-antigens were identified as principal antitumoral effectors in LCL-stimulated T-cell lines. These results indicate that virion and still unidentified cellular antigens are crucial targets of the CD4+ T-cell response in this preclinical PTLD-model and that enriching the corresponding T-cell specificities in therapeutic preparations may enhance their clinical efficacy. Moreover, the expression in several EBV-negative B-cell lymphoma cell lines implies that these putative autoantigen(s) might also qualify as targets for T-cell-based immunotherapy of virus-negative B cell malignancies. PMID:24853673

  9. Characterization of Clonality of Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Human B Lymphoproliferative Disease in Mice with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nakamine, Hirokazu; Masih, Aneal S.; Okano, Motohiko; Taguchi, Yuichi; Pirruccello, Samuel J.; Davis, Jack R.; Mahloch, Mark L.; Beisel, Kirk W.; Kleveland, Kimberly; Sanger, Warren G.; Purtilo, David T.

    1993-01-01

    To improve the diagnostic accuracy and understanding of the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs) occurring in immunosuppressed transplant recipients (post-transplantation LPD), clonality of Epstein-Barr virus-induced human LPDs in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency was examined by analyzing: 1) human immunoglobulin genes and their products, 2) the clonality of Epstein-Barr virus DNA, and 3) genetic alteration of c-myc or bcl-2 genes. A spectrum of clonality was found in the LPDs comparable with that reported for post-transplantation LPDs, although rearrangements of c-myc or bcl-2 genes were not detected. It is confirmed that this system is useful in terms of clonality for understanding the early phases in the pathogenesis of post-transplantation LPD or LPD in immune deficient patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:8380952

  10. Checking whether there is an increased risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other cancers with specific modern immunosuppression regimens in renal transplantation: Protocol for a network meta-analysis of randomized and observational studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing renal transplant procedures require multi-agent immunosuppressive regimens both short term (induction phase) and long term (maintenance phase) to minimize the risk of organ rejection. There are several drug classes and agents for immunosuppression. Use of these agents may increase the risk of different harms including not only infections, but also malignancies including post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. There is a need to identify which regimens minimize the risk of such outcomes. The objective of this systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized and observational studies is to explore whether certain modern regimens of immunosuppression used to prevent organ rejection in renal transplant patients are associated with an increased risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other malignancies. Methods/design ‘Modern’ regimens were defined to be those evaluated in controlled studies beginning in 1990 or later. An electronic literature search of Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials has been designed by an experienced information specialist and peer reviewed by a second information specialist. Study selection and data collection will be performed by two reviewers. The outcomes of interest will include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other incident forms of malignancy occurring in adult renal transplant patients. Network meta-analyses of data from randomized and observational studies will be performed where judged appropriate based on a review of the clinical and methodological features of included studies. A sequential approach to meta-analysis will be used to combine data from different designs. Discussion Our systematic review will include both single-agent and multi-agent modern pharmacotherapy regimens in patients undergoing renal transplantation. It will synthesize malignancy outcomes. Our work will also add to the development of methods for

  11. Post-transplant cyclophosphamide versus anti-thymocyte globulin as graft- versus-host disease prophylaxis in haploidentical transplant

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Annalisa; Sun, Yuqian; Labopin, Myriam; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Lorentino, Francesca; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Gülbas, Zafer; Blaise, Didier; Messina, Giuseppe; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshi; Malard, Florent; Bruno, Benedetto; Diez-Martin, Jose Luis; Koc, Yener; Ciceri, Fabio; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-01-01

    Severe graft-versus-host disease is a major barrier for non-T-cell-depleted haploidentical stem cell transplantation. There is no consensus on the optimal graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. This study compared the two most commonly used graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis regimens (post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based vs. the anti-thymocyte globulin-based) in adults with acute myeloid leukemia reported to the European Society for Blood and Bone Marrow Transplantation. A total of 308 patients were analyzed; 193 received post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based regimen and 115 anti-thymocyte globulin-based regimen as anti-graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. The post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based regimen was more likely to be associated to bone marrow as graft source (60% vs. 40%; P=0.01). Patients in the post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based regimen group had significantly less grade 3–4 acute graft-versus-host disease than those in the anti-thymocyte globulin-based group (5% vs. 12%, respectively; P=0.01), comparable to chronic graft-versus-host disease. Multivariate analysis showed that non-relapse mortality was lower in the post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based regimen group [22% vs. 30%, Hazard ratio (HR) 1.77(95%CI: 1.09–2.86); P=0.02] with no difference in relapse incidence. Patients receiving post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based regimen had better graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival [HR 1.45 (95%CI: 1.04–2.02); P=0.03] and leukemia-free survival [HR 1.48 (95%CI: 1.03–2.12); P=0.03] than those in the anti-thymocyte globulin-based group. In the multivariate analysis, there was also a trend for a higher overall survival [HR 1.43 (95%CI: 0.98–2.09); P=0.06] for post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based regimen versus the anti-thymocyte globulin-based group. Notably, center experience was also associated with non-relapse mortality and graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival. Haplo-SCT using a post-transplant

  12. Lymphoproliferative disorders in inflammatory bowel disease patients on immunosuppression: Lessons from other inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Grace Y; Halloran, Brendan P; Peters, Anthea C; Fedorak, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents, such as thiopurines, methotrexate, and biologics, have revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, a number of case reports, case control studies and retrospective studies over the last decade have identified a concerning link between immunosuppression and lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), the oncological phenomenon whereby lymphocytes divide uncontrollably. These LPDs have been associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the virus provides the impetus for malignant transformation while immunosuppression hampers the immune system’s ability to detect and clear these malignant cells. As such, the use of immunosuppressive agents may come at the cost of increased risk of developing LPD. While little is known about the LPD risk in IBD, more is known about immunosuppression in the post-transplantation setting and the development of EBV associated post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). In review of the PTLD literature, evidence is available to demonstrate that certain immune suppressants such as cyclosporine and T-lymphocyte modulators in particular are associated with an increased risk of PTLD development. As well, high doses of immunosuppressive agents and multiple immunosuppressive agent use are also linked to increased PTLD development. Here, we discuss these findings in context of IBD and what future studies can be taken to understand and reduce the risk of EBV-associated LPD development from immunosuppression use in IBD. PMID:26600976

  13. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christina; Schuchmann, Marcus; Zimmermann, Tim

    2011-02-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a life-threatening complication following solid organ transplantation. Many posttransplant lymphomas develop from the uncontrolled proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B-cells, whereas EBV-negative PTLDs were increasingly recognized within the past decade. Major risk factors for the development of PTLDs after liver transplantation are immunosuppressive therapy and the type of underlying disease: viral hepatitis, autoimmune liver disease, or alcoholic liver cirrhosis contribute to an increased risk for PTLD. Therapeutic regimens include reduction of immunosuppression, the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab, and chemotherapy, as well as new approaches using interferon-α and anti-interleukin-6 antibodies. Despite the different therapeutic regimens, mortality from PTLD remains high. Therefore, it is of major importance to identify patients at risk at an early stage of the disease. In this review, risk factors for PTLD development after liver transplantation, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy are discussed.

  14. Rapamycin improves lymphoproliferative disease in murine autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Obzut, Dana A; Axsom, Kelly; Choi, John K; Goldsmith, Kelly C; Hall, Junior; Hulitt, Jessica; Manno, Catherine S; Maris, John M; Rhodin, Nicholas; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Brown, Valerie I; Grupp, Stephan A

    2006-09-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte survival caused by defective Fas-mediated apoptosis, leading to lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and an increased number of double-negative T cells (DNTs). Treatment options for patients with ALPS are limited. Rapamycin has been shown to induce apoptosis in normal and malignant lymphocytes. Since ALPS is caused by defective lymphocyte apoptosis, we hypothesized that rapamycin would be effective in treating ALPS. We tested this hypothesis using rapamycin in murine models of ALPS. We followed treatment response with serial assessment of DNTs by flow cytometry in blood and lymphoid tissue, by serial monitoring of lymph node and spleen size with ultrasonography, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibodies. Three-dimensional ultrasound measurements in the mice correlated to actual tissue measurements at death (r = .9648). We found a dramatic and statistically significant decrease in DNTs, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and autoantibodies after only 4 weeks when comparing rapamycin-treated mice with controls. Rapamycin induced apoptosis through the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. We compared rapamycin to mycophenolate mofetil, a second-line agent used to treat ALPS, and found rapamycin's control of lymphoproliferation was superior. We conclude that rapamycin is an effective treatment for murine ALPS and should be explored as treatment for affected humans.

  15. Molecular signature of Epstein Barr virus-positive Burkitt lymphoma and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder suggest different roles for Epstein Barr virus

    PubMed Central

    Navari, Mohsen; Fuligni, Fabio; Laginestra, Maria A.; Etebari, Maryam; Ambrosio, Maria R.; Sapienza, Maria R.; Rossi, Maura; De Falco, Giulia; Gibellini, Davide; Tripodo, Claudio; Pileri, Stefano A.; Leoncini, Lorenzo; Piccaluga, Pier P.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection is commonly associated with human cancer and, in particular, with lymphoid malignancies. Although the precise role of the virus in the pathogenesis of different lymphomas is largely unknown, it is well recognized that the expression of viral latent proteins and miRNA can contribute to its pathogenetic role. In this study, we compared the gene and miRNA expression profile of two EBV-associated aggressive B non-Hodgkin lymphomas known to be characterized by differential expression of the viral latent proteins aiming to dissect the possible different contribution of such proteins and EBV-encoded miRNAs. By applying extensive bioinformatic inferring and an experimental model, we found that EBV+ Burkitt lymphoma presented with significant over-expression of EBV-encoded miRNAs that were likely to contribute to its global molecular profile. On the other hand, EBV+ post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas presented a significant enrichment in genes regulated by the viral latent proteins. Based on these different viral and cellular gene expression patterns, a clear distinction between EBV+ Burkitt lymphoma and post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas was made. In this regard, the different viral and cellular expression patterns seemed to depend on each other, at least partially, and the latency type most probably played a significant role in their regulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that EBV influence over B-cell malignant clones may act through different mechanisms of transcriptional regulation and suggest that potentially different pathogenetic mechanisms may depend upon the conditions of the interaction between EBV and the host that finally determine the latency pattern. PMID:25566237

  16. First-line use of rituximab correlates with increased overall survival in late post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: retrospective, single-centre study.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Calle, Nicolás; Alfonso, Ana; Rifón, José; Herrero, Ignacio; Errasti, Pedro; Rábago, Gregorio; Merino, Juana; Panizo, Ángel; Pardo, Javier; Prósper, Felipe; García-Muñoz, Ricardo; Lecumberri, Ramón; Panizo, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluates the impact of rituximab on PTLD response and survival in a single-centre cohort. PTLD cases between 1984 and 2009, including heart, kidney, liver and lung transplant recipients, were included. Survival was analysed taking into account the type of PTLD (monomorphic vs. polymorphic), EBV infection status, IPI score, Ann Arbor stage and use of rituximab. Among 1335 transplanted patients, 24 developed PTLD. Median age was 54 yr (range 29-69), median time to diagnosis 50 months (range 0-100). PTLD type was predominantly late/monomorphic (79% and 75%), mostly diffuse large B-cell type. Overall response rate (ORR) was 62% (66% rituximab vs. 50% non-rituximab; P = 0.5). R-CHOP-like regimens were used most frequently (72% of patients treated with rituximab). Median overall survival was 64 months (CI 95% 31-96). OS was significantly increased in patients treated with rituximab (P = 0.01; CI 95% rituximab 58-79 months; non-rituximab 1-30 months). Post-transplant immunosuppression regimen had no effect on survival or time to PTLD, except for cyclosporine A (CyA), which associated with increased time to PTLD (P = 0.02). Rituximab was associated with increased survival in our single-centre series, and it should be considered as first-line therapy for PTLD patients. The possible protective effect of CyA for development of PTLD should be prospectively evaluated.

  17. Epstein Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative diseases: the virus as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Eric; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs) express all EBV latent antigens (type III latency) in immunodeficient patients and limited antigens (type I and II latencies) in immunocompetent patients. Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is the prototype exhibiting type III EBV latency. Although EBV antigens are highly immunogenic, PTLD cell proliferation remains unchecked because of the underlying immunosuppression. The restoration of anti-EBV immunity by EBV-specific T cells of either autologous or allogeneic origin has been shown to be safe and effective in PTLDs. Cellular therapy can be improved by establishing a bank of human leukocyte antigen-characterized allogeneic EBV-specific T cells. In EBV+ LPDs exhibiting type I and II latencies, the use of EBV-specific T cells is more limited, although the safety and efficacy of this therapy have also been demonstrated. The therapeutic role of EBV-specific T cells in EBV+ LPDs needs to be critically reappraised with the advent of monoclonal antibodies and other targeted therapy. Another strategy involves the use of epigenetic approaches to induce EBV to undergo lytic proliferation when expression of the viral thymidine kinase renders host tumor cells susceptible to the cytotoxic effects of ganciclovir. Finally, the prophylactic use of antiviral drugs to prevent EBV reactivation may decrease the occurrence of EBV+ LPDs. PMID:25613733

  18. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral-associated lymphoproliferative neoplasia in domestic poultry is caused by infection with a herpesvirus (Marek’s disease virus) or three species of retroviruses [Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), Avian leukosis/sarcoma virus, lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV)]. Previously, retroviral n...

  19. Post transplant urinary tract infection in Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease a perpetual diagnostic dilema - 18-fluorodeoxyglucose - Positron emission computerized tomography - A valuable tool.

    PubMed

    Sainaresh, Vv; Jain, Sh; Patel, Hv; Shah, Pr; Vanikar, Av; Trivedi, Hl

    2011-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection contracted by renal allograft recipients. In patients of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), cyst infection presents a complex diagnostic and therapeutic challenge especially in the post transplant period. Accurate diagnosis forms the cornerstone in salvaging the graft from potentially catastrophic outcome. We describe a case of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XPN) in the native kidney in a patient of post transplant ADPKD which presented as frequently relapsing UTI with graft dysfunction where in accurate diagnosis was made possible with the aid of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) - Positron emission computerized tomography (PET/CT).

  20. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lymphoproliferative disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 59. doi: 10.1007/s12026-008-8048-7. Review. Citation on PubMed GeneReview: Lymphoproliferative Disease, X-Linked ... Clin Immunol. 2007 Dec;7(6):510-4. Review. Citation on PubMed Marsh RA, Madden L, Kitchen ...

  1. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease involving the pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Meriden, Zina; Bullock, Grant C; Bagg, Adam; Bonatti, Hugo; Cousar, John B; Lopes, M Beatriz; Robbins, Mark K; Cathro, Helen P

    2010-11-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are heterogeneous lesions with variable morphology, immunophenotype, and molecular characteristics. Multiple distinct primary lesions can occur in PTLD, rarely with both B-cell and T-cell characteristics. Lesions can involve both grafted organs and other sites; however, PTLD involving the pituitary gland has not been previously reported. We describe a patient who developed Epstein-Barr virus-negative PTLD 13 years posttransplantation involving the terminal ileum and pituitary, which was simultaneously involved by a pituitary adenoma. Immunohistochemistry of the pituitary lesion showed expression of CD79a, CD3, and CD7 with clonal rearrangements of both T-cell receptor gamma chain (TRG@) and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH@) genes. The terminal ileal lesion was immunophenotypically and molecularly distinct. This is the first report of pituitary PTLD and illustrates the potentially complex nature of PTLD.

  2. Post-transplantation primary central nervous system lymphoma in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and prolonged use of immunosuppressant.

    PubMed

    Tse, Teresa P K; Chan, Allan N L; Chan, Tony K T; Po, Y C

    2014-12-01

    Post-transplantation primary central nervous system lymphoma is an uncommon and fatal post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Such lymphomas have been described in only a few case series in the literature. The incidence of this condition is rising with improved survival after organ transplantation. A case of post-transplantation primary central nervous system lymphoma in a young Chinese woman with systemic lupus erythematosus is described here. She presented with right-sided weakness and memory loss after tooth extraction 2 weeks before admission. Contrast computed tomography of the brain demonstrated a contrast rim-enhancing lesion over the left frontal lobe. With a history of recent dental procedure, long-term immunosuppressive therapy and computed tomography findings, cerebral abscess was highly suspected. Emergency operation was performed. Histopathology showed post-transplantation primary central nervous system lymphoma, with cells positive for B-cell marker CD20. Immunosuppressant was stopped and she was treated with radiotherapy and rituximab (anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody). She remained disease-free at 16 months. Post-transplantation primary central nervous system lymphoma is rare with variable presentation and radiological features. We believe rituximab may have a role in the treatment of such lymphomas.

  3. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease with somatic KRAS mutation.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Masatoshi; Shinoda, Kunihiro; Piao, Jinhua; Mitsuiki, Noriko; Takagi, Mari; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Muramatsu, Hideki; Doisaki, Sayoko; Nagasawa, Masayuki; Morio, Tomohiro; Kasahara, Yoshihito; Koike, Kenichi; Kojima, Seiji; Takao, Akira; Mizutani, Shuki

    2011-03-10

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is classically defined as a disease with defective FAS-mediated apoptosis (type I-III). Germline NRAS mutation was recently identified in type IV ALPS. We report 2 cases with ALPS-like disease with somatic KRAS mutation. Both cases were characterized by prominent autoimmune cytopenia and lymphoadenopathy/splenomegaly. These patients did not satisfy the diagnostic criteria for ALPS or juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and are probably defined as a new disease entity of RAS-associated ALPS-like disease (RALD).

  4. Post-transplantation Infections in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Arze, S; Arze, L; Abecia, C

    2016-03-01

    Over 26 years, we found 46 infectious episodes in 350 kidney transplant recipients. Fifteen were urinary tract infections, recurrent in 4 patients. There were 8 cytomegalovirus infections, three of them fatal when intravenous (IV) ganciclovir was not available. Seven patients had a reactivation of tuberculosis (TB) in the pleura, cervical spine, lumbar spine, knee, ankle, skin and peritoneum, respectively, and were all resolved satisfactorily with conventional anti-TB therapy. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of acyclovir developed an extensive herpes zoster infection in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was resolved with the use of oral acyclovir, and 1 had a disseminated herpes simplex infection resolved with the use of IV acyclovir. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with trimethoprim sulfa developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was fatal in one of them. In 2 patients, we found a Nocardia infection, confined to the lung, which was cured in one of the cases and systemic and fatal in the other. Two patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of nystatin developed esophageal candidiasis in the 1st 6 months after transplantation. One patient developed infective endocarditis in a stenotic bicuspid aortic valve and died 10 years later after another incident of infective endocarditis at the prosthetic aortic valve. Two patients developed an extensive condyloma at the penis, perianal region, and perineum owing to human papillomavirus, requiring extensive surgical resection and podophyllin applications. Another patient developed fatal post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease due to Epstein-Barr virus infection 15 years after transplantation. One patient developed a severe and fatal mucocutaneous leishmaniasis with no response to conventional antimonial therapy. It is interesting to note that despite Chagas disease being endemic

  5. MTHFR C677 T gene polymorphism in lymphoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed

    Deligezer, Ugur; Akisik, Ebru E; Yaman, Fulya; Erten, Nilgün; Dalay, Nejat

    2006-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a key enzyme in folate metabolism, has been implicated in cancer risk. In the present study we used a melting curve analysis to investigate the association of the common MTHFR C677 T polymorphism with lymphoproliferative diseases. Patients (n=117) were compared with age- and sex-matched control subjects (n=154). Our results indicate that the 677 T variant occurred less frequently in patients (26%) than in the control group (33.7%; P=0.05). Investigation of the variant allele (677 T) frequency in the subgroups with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and B-cell neoplasms (BCNs) revealed that this difference was a result of the significantly lower distribution of the variant allele in patients with HL (20.5%; P=0.01). This was accompanied by a significantly higher frequency of the homozygote normal genotype (677CC) among the patients with HL. In patients with BCNs the distribution of the variant allele (30.3%) was comparable to that in the control group (P=0.47). However, the difference between HL (20.5%) and BCNs (30.3%) did not reach statistical significance (P=0.09). Our results suggest that the distribution of the C677 T polymorphism may vary among lymphoproliferative diseases.

  6. Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide and Tacrolimus-Mycophenolate Mofetil Combination Prevents Graft-versus-Host Disease in Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation from HLA-Matched Donors.

    PubMed

    Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Caravelli, Daniela; Gallo, Susanna; Coha, Valentina; D'Ambrosio, Lorenzo; Vassallo, Elena; Fizzotti, Marco; Nesi, Francesca; Gioeni, Luisa; Berger, Massimo; Polo, Alessandra; Gammaitoni, Loretta; Becco, Paolo; Giraudo, Lidia; Mangioni, Monica; Sangiolo, Dario; Grignani, Giovanni; Rota-Scalabrini, Delia; Sottile, Antonino; Fagioli, Franca; Aglietta, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) remains the only curative therapy for many hematologic malignancies but it is limited by high nonrelapse mortality (NRM), primarily from unpredictable control of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Recently, post-transplant cyclophosphamide demonstrated improved GVHD control in allogeneic bone marrow HCT. Here we explore cyclophosphamide in allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (alloPBSCT). Patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies received alloPBSCT from HLA-matched unrelated/related donors. GVHD prophylaxis included combination post-HCT cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg (days +3 and +4) and tacrolimus/mofetil mycophenolate (T/MMF) (day +5 forward). The primary objective was the cumulative incidence of acute and chronic GVHD. Between March 2011 and May 2015, 35 consecutive patients received the proposed regimen. MMF was stopped in all patients at day +28; the median discontinuation of tacrolimus was day +113. Acute and chronic GVHD cumulative incidences were 17% and 7%, respectively, with no grade IV GVHD events, only 2 patients requiring chronic GVHD immunosuppression control, and no deaths from GVHD. Two-year NRM, overall survival, event-free survival, and chronic GVHD event-free survival rates were 3%, 77%, 54%, and 49%, respectively. The graft-versus-tumor effect was maintained as 5 of 15 patients (33%) who received HCT with evidence of disease experienced further disease response. A post-transplant cyclophosphamide + T/MMF combination strategy effectively prevented acute and chronic GVHD after alloPBSCT from HLA-matched donors and achieved an unprecedented low NRM without losing efficacy in disease control or impaired development of the graft-versus-tumor effect. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02300571.

  7. EBV Lymphoproliferative Disease after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Rouce, Rayne H; Louis, Chrystal U; Heslop, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW EBV reactivation can cause significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT). Delays in reconstitution of EBV-specific T lymphocyte activity can lead to life-threatening EBV lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-PTLD). This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of EBV viremia and PTLD. RECENT FINDINGS During the past decade, early detection strategies, such as serial measurement of EBV-DNA load, have helped to identify high-risk patients and to diagnose early lymphoproliferation. The most significant advances have come in the form of innovative treatment options, including manipulation of the balance between outgrowing EBV-infected B cells and the EBV cytotoxic T lymphocyte (EBV-CTL) response, and targeting infected B cells with monoclonal antibodies, chemotherapy, unmanipulated donor lymphocytes, and donor or more recently third party EBV-CTLs. Defining criteria for preemptive therapy and remains a challenge. SUMMARY EBV reactivation is a significant complication after SCT. Continued improvements in risk-stratification and treatment options are required to improve the morbidity and mortality caused by EBV associated diseases. Current approaches use Rituximab to deplete B cells or adoptive transfer of EBV-CTL to reconstitute immunity. The availability of rapid EBV specific T cell products offers the possibility of improved outcomes. PMID:25159713

  8. Post-transplantation diabetes-state of the art.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Adnan; Cohney, Solomon

    2016-04-01

    With increasing success in overcoming the immunological and infectious challenges accompanying solid organ transplantation, susceptibility to post-transplant diabetes and cardiovascular disease has assumed increasing importance. Although some guidance is available from diabetes-related literature pertaining to the general population, some aspects are unique to solid organ allograft recipients. Both insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction are generally agreed to contribute to development and manifestation of post-transplant diabetes, but controversy continues about which is most important and to what extent post-transplant diabetes is a distinct entity or simply a variant of type 2 diabetes with transplant-specific components. The optimum method and timing for detection and diagnosis of post-transplant diabetes remains an area of uncertainty. However, the greatest needs are to: address the absence of contemporary data for incidence and clinical outcomes associated with post-transplant diabetes; establish the role of glycaemic control; and assess the role of new diabetic therapies in prevention and management of post-transplant diabetes. We place the present knowledge base in the context of other advances in transplantation, challenge some existing ideas, and examine the potential role of emerging diabetes therapies. In highlighting existing deficiencies, we hope to provide direction for future research that will ultimately reduce incidence and improve management of post-transplant diabetes.

  9. Clinical characteristics of patients with lymphoproliferative neoplasms in the setting of systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Suvajdzic, Nada; Djurdjevic, Predrag; Todorovic, Milena; Perunicic, Maja; Stojanović, Roksanda; Novkovic, Aleksandra; Mihaljevic, Biljana

    2012-09-01

    Clinical features of 40 lymphoproliferative neoplasm patients in the setting of systemic autoimmune diseases managed in the Clinic of Hematology during 1994-2006 were analyzed retrospectively. The classification of systemic autoimmune disease patients was as follows: 15 systemic lupus erythematosus--SLE, 11 rheumatoid arthritis--RA, 12 Sjögren's syndrome--SS, 1 scleroderma, and 1 dermatomyositis. Patients comprised 31 women and 9 men of mean age 55 years (range 33-76). Systemic autoimmune diseases preceeded the development of lymphoproliferative neoplasms in 37/40 (92.5%) patients. Mean latency period between the onset of systemic autoimmune diseases and lymphoproliferative neoplasms occurrence was significantly longer in RA (113 months) than in SLE (75 months) and SS patients (65 months)--P < 0.05. The most frequent lymphoproliferative neoplasms were non-Hodgkin's lymphoma--NHL (35/40; 88%), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DBCL)--12 (34%), follicular lymphoma (FC)--7 (20%), small lymphocytic (SL), and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL)--5 (14%) each. The primary site of NHL was extranodal in 18/35 (51.5%) cases. Advanced disease on diagnosis (III + IV clinical stages), constitutional symptoms, and bulky disease were diagnosed in 27/35 (77%), 26/35 (74%), and 3/35 (8.5%) patients, respectively. The overall survival (OS) was as follows (months): DBCL-12, FC-63, SLL-60, and MZL-48. There was no association between the lymphoproliferative neoplasm histological subtype and the systemic autoimmune diseases type or antirheumatic treatment P > 0.05. Our findings are in line with earlier reports showing a high proportion of patients with advanced disease, constitutional symptoms, extranodal manifestations, high grade histology, and low OS in the systemic autoimmune diseases setting.

  10. Conservative management of post-transplant central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Valavoor, Shahul H; Ashraf, Zubair; Narwal, Rawan; Ratnam, Shobha

    2013-08-01

    Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare B cell variant non-Hodgkins lymphoma that is confined to the brain, leptomeninges, spinal cord and eyes. Its incidence is increasing, primarily due to increase in the number of organ transplantations being undertaken. The majority of the PTLD (post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder) is seen in kidney transplant recipients simply because they constitute a larger group of transplant recipients each year as compared to other solid organ transplantations. Primary infection of previously infected EBV seronegative patients and immunosuppression are found to be the main etiologic factors in the development of PTLD-PCNSL. There are no clear guidelines on treatment regimens, and it should be individualized according to patient comorbidities. We report a case of PCNS lymphoproliferative disorder in a kidney transplant recipient, which underwent complete remission with decreasing immunosuppression. The patient could not undergo chemotherapy/radiotherapy due to underlying comorbidities. We highlight the available treatment modalities for PTLD-PCNSL.

  11. Avian oncogenesis induced by lymphoproliferative disease virus: a neglected or emerging retroviral pathogen?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is an exogenous oncogenic retrovirus that induces lymphoid tumors in some galliform species of birds. Historically, outbreaks of LPDV have been reported from Europe and Israel. Although the virus has previously never been detected in North America, herein we ...

  12. Deregulation of Fas ligand expression as a novel cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease.

    PubMed

    Nabhani, Schafiq; Ginzel, Sebastian; Miskin, Hagit; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Harlev, Dan; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Hönscheid, Andrea; Oommen, Prasad T; Kuhlen, Michaela; Thiele, Ralf; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Borkhardt, Arndt; Stepensky, Polina; Fischer, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is frequently caused by mutations in genes involved in the Fas death receptor pathway, but for 20-30% of patients the genetic defect is unknown. We observed that treatment of healthy T cells with interleukin-12 induces upregulation of Fas ligand and Fas ligand-dependent apoptosis. Consistently, interleukin-12 could not induce apoptosis in Fas ligand-deficient T cells from patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. We hypothesized that defects in the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may cause a similar phenotype as that caused by mutations of the Fas ligand gene. To test this, we analyzed 20 patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome of unknown cause by whole-exome sequencing. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.698G>A, p.R212*) in the interleukin-12/interleukin-23 receptor-component IL12RB1 in one of these patients. The mutation led to IL12RB1 protein truncation and loss of cell surface expression. Interleukin-12 and -23 signaling was completely abrogated as demonstrated by deficient STAT4 phosphorylation and interferon γ production. Interleukin-12-mediated expression of membrane-bound and soluble Fas ligand was lacking and basal expression was much lower than in healthy controls. The patient presented with the classical symptoms of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: chronic non-malignant, non-infectious lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, elevated numbers of double-negative T cells, autoimmune cytopenias, and increased levels of vitamin B12 and interleukin-10. Sanger sequencing and whole-exome sequencing excluded the presence of germline or somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. Our data suggest that deficient regulation of Fas ligand expression by regulators such as the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may be an alternative cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease.

  13. A Novel and Likely Inherited Lymphoproliferative Disease in British Shorthair Kittens.

    PubMed

    Aberdein, D; Munday, J S; Fairley, R A; Vernau, W; Thompson, K G

    2015-11-01

    An unusual lymphoproliferative disease was identified in multiple closely related British Shorthair (BSH) kittens, suggesting an inherited predisposition to disease. Affected kittens typically developed rapidly progressive and marked generalized lymphadenopathy, moderate splenomegaly, and regenerative and likely hemolytic anemia from 6 weeks of age. Microscopic findings were suggestive of multicentric T-cell lymphoma, but additional testing revealed a polyclonal population of CD3+/CD4-/CD8- "double negative" T cells (DNT cells). This is a novel disease presentation with similarities to the human disorder autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), a rare inherited disease causing lymphoproliferation and variable manifestations of autoimmunity. The human disease is most commonly due to the presence of Fas gene mutations causing defective lymphocyte apoptosis, and further investigations of both the mode of inheritance and genetic basis for disease in affected cats are currently in progress.

  14. De novo post-transplant thrombotic microangiopathy localized only to the graft in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with thrombophilia

    PubMed Central

    Rolla, Davide; Fontana, Iris; Ravetti, Jean Louis; Marsano, Luigina; Bellino, Diego; Panaro, Laura; Ansaldo, Francesca; Mathiasen, Lisa; Storace, Giulia; Trezzi, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a serious complication of renal transplantation and is mostly related to the prothrombotic effect of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). A subset of TMA (29%-38%) is localized only to the graft. Case 1: A young woman suffering from autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) underwent kidney transplant. After 2 months, she showed slow renal deterioration (serum creatinine from 1.9 to 3.1 mg/dl), without hematological signs of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS); only LDH enzyme transient increase was detected. Renal biopsy showed TMA: temporary withdraw of tacrolimus and plasmapheresis was performed. The renal function recovered (serum creatinine 1.9 mg/dl). From screening for thrombophilia, we found a mutation of the Leiden factor V gene. Case 2: A man affected by ADPKD underwent kidney transplantation, with delay graft function; first biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis, but a second biopsy revealed TMA, while no altered hematological parameters of HUS was detected. We observed only a slight increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. The tacrolimus was halved and plasmapheresis was performed: LDH levels normalized within 10 days and renal function improved (serum creatinine from 9 to 2.9 mg/dl). We found a mutation of the prothrombin gene. Only a renal biopsy clarifies the diagnosis of TMA, but it is necessary to pay attention to light increasing level of LDH. Conclusion: Prothrombotic effect of CNIs and mTOR inhibitor, mutation of genes encoding factor H or I, anticardiolipin antibodies, vascular rejection, cytomegalovirus infection are proposed to trigger TMA; we detected mutations of factor II and Leiden factor V, as facilitating conditions for TMA in patients affected by ADPKD. PMID:26693501

  15. Establishment and operation of a Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant allogeneic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic cell bank for the treatment of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Mark A; Wilkie, Gwen M; Robinson, Nicolas; Rivera, Nadja; Haque, Tanzina; Crawford, Dorothy H; Barry, Jacqueline; Fraser, Neil; Turner, David M; Robertson, Victoria; Dyer, Phil; Flanagan, Peter; Newlands, Helen R; Campbell, John; Turner, Marc L

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several malignancies, including post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Conventional treatments for PTLD are often successful, but risk organ rejection and cause significant side effects. EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) generated in vitro from peripheral blood lymphocytes provide an alternative treatment modality with few side effects, but autologous CTLs are difficult to use in clinical practice. Here we report the establishment and operation of a bank of EBV-specific CTLs derived from 25 blood donors with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) types found at high frequency in European populations. Since licensure, there have been enquiries about 37 patients, who shared a median of three class I and two class II HLA types with these donors. Cells have been infused into ten patients with lymphoproliferative disease, eight of whom achieved complete remission. Neither patient with refractory disease was matched for HLA class II. Both cases of EBV-associated non-haematopoietic sarcoma receiving cells failed to achieve complete remission. Thirteen patients died before any cells could be issued, emphasizing that the bank should be contacted before patients become pre-terminal. Thus, this third party donor-derived EBV-specific CTL cell bank can supply most patients with appropriately matched cells and most recipients have good outcomes. PMID:25066775

  16. Expression of the Epstein-Barr virus in lymphoproliferative diseases of the lung.

    PubMed

    Shimakage, Misuzu; Sakamoto, Haruhiko; Harada, Shizuko; Sasagawa, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Ken

    2007-06-01

    There have been few studies regarding the etiology of lymphoproliferative disorders of the lung. To examine the possible involvement of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in these diseases, EBV mRNAs, proteins and DNA, were detected. Two non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) originating in the lung, 5 mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas (MALT lymphoma) of the lung, 1 lymphoid hyperplasia of the lung and 1 lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP), were subjected to mRNA in situ hybridization, indirect immunofluorescence staining and PCR. mRNA in situ hybridization using BamHIW, BamHIY1Y2, the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA) and the EBV encoded small non-polyadenylated RNA (EBER1) probe revealed signals in all the examined samples, although some samples showed weak signals by using the EBER1 probe. Indirect immunofluorescence staining using the anti-leader protein, anti-EBNA2, the anti-latent member protein-1 and anti-BamHIZ coding leftward reading frame-1 antibodies showed definitive fluorescence. PCR also revealed EBV DNA in these specimens. EBV infected all the lymphoproliferative diseases of the lung irrespective of the histological or clinical stages. Furthermore, EBV infected not only the atypical lymphocytes but also the macrophages in the tissues of these diseases. These results suggest that the expression of EBV could be involved in the pathogenesis of many lymphoproliferative diseases of the lung.

  17. [Post-transplant distal limb syndrome].

    PubMed

    Borghi Torzillo, María Florencia; Bavcar, Paula; Lutfi, Rubén; Díaz, Alberto C

    2017-01-01

    The post-transplant distal limb syndrome is a not well known entity, with a prevalence of 5% in patients with renal transplant. Its diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms, bone scintigraphy and MRI, it has a benign course and the patient recovers without sequel. We present the case of a 37-year-old male, with medical history of hypertension, Berger's disease in 1999 that required dialysis three times a week for four years (2009-2013) and renal transplant in 2013. The patient consults on January 2014 referring severe pain in both feet, with sudden onset; he remembers the exact date of the beginning of the pain and denies trauma, pain prevents ambulation. The bone scintigraphy shows pathological uptake in both feet with no difference between the two. Although there is no treatment for this disease, it has a benign course.

  18. Evidence of abnormality of lymphocyte uroporphyrinogen synthase in family members of patients with lymphoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed

    Lahav, M; Epstein, O; Schoenfeld, N; Nemesh, L; Shaklai, M; Atsmon, A

    1985-01-01

    Patients with active lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD) were shown to have high activity of lymphocyte uroporphyrinogen synthase (L-UROS), the enzyme which converts porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen. The mean L-UROS activity of 64 first-degree relatives of patients with LPD was significantly higher than that of a control group and 45% of these relatives had pathological values of L-UROS. L-UROS activity was also determined in the spouses of 2 patients and was pathologically elevated in both. The pattern of pathological values among family members may indicate the presence of a communicable agent.

  19. Lymphoproliferative disease in antibody deficiency: a multi-centre study

    PubMed Central

    GOMPELS, M M; HODGES, E; LOCK, R J; ANGUS, B; WHITE, H; LARKIN, A; CHAPEL, H M; SPICKETT, G P; MISBAH, S A; SMITH, J L

    2003-01-01

    We have undertaken a retrospective study of antibody deficient patients, with and without lymphoma, and assessed the ability of specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers to determine if the detection of clonal lymphocyte populations correlates with clinical and immunohistochemical diagnosis of lymphoma. We identified 158 cases with antibody deficiency presenting during the past 20 years. Paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens or slides were available for analysis in a cohort of 34 patients. Of these patients, 29 had common variable immunodeficiency, one X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, one X-linked immunoglobulin deficiency of uncertain cause and three isolated IgG subclass deficiency. We have confirmed that lymphoma in antibody deficiency is predominantly B cell in origin. Clonal lymphocyte populations were demonstrated in biopsies irrespective of histology (16/19 with lymphoma and 11/15 without). Isolated evidence of clonality in biopsy material is therefore an insufficient diagnostic criterion to determine malignancy. Furthermore, our data suggest that clonal expansions are rarely the result of Epstein–Barr virus-driven disease. PMID:14616793

  20. Transgenic mouse model of IgM+ lymphoproliferative disease mimicking Waldenström macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, V S; Sompallae, R; Rosean, T R; Walsh, S; Acevedo, M; Kovalchuk, A L; Han, S-S; Jing, X; Holman, C; Rehg, J E; Herms, S; Sunderland, J S; Morse, H C; Janz, S

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a low-grade incurable immunoglobulin M+ (IgM+) lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma for which a genetically engineered mouse model of de novo tumor development is lacking. On the basis of evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6), and the survival-enhancing oncoprotein, B cell leukemia 2 (BCL2), have critical roles in the natural history of WM, we hypothesized that the enforced expression of IL6 and BCL2 in mice unable to perform immunoglobulin class switch recombination may result in a lymphoproliferative disease that mimics WM. To evaluate this possibility, we generated compound transgenic BALB/c mice that harbored the human BCL2 and IL6 transgenes, EμSV-BCL2-22 and H2-Ld-hIL6, on the genetic background of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency. We designated these mice BCL2+IL6+AID− and found that they developed—with full genetic penetrance (100% incidence) and suitably short latency (93 days median survival)—a severe IgM+ lymphoproliferative disorder that recapitulated important features of human WM. However, the BCL2+IL6+AID− model also exhibited shortcomings, such as low serum IgM levels and histopathological changes not seen in patients with WM, collectively indicating that further refinements of the model are required to achieve better correlations with disease characteristics of WM. PMID:27813533

  1. Transgenic mouse model of IgM(+) lymphoproliferative disease mimicking Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, V S; Sompallae, R; Rosean, T R; Walsh, S; Acevedo, M; Kovalchuk, A L; Han, S-S; Jing, X; Holman, C; Rehg, J E; Herms, S; Sunderland, J S; Morse, H C; Janz, S

    2016-11-04

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a low-grade incurable immunoglobulin M(+) (IgM(+)) lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma for which a genetically engineered mouse model of de novo tumor development is lacking. On the basis of evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6), and the survival-enhancing oncoprotein, B cell leukemia 2 (BCL2), have critical roles in the natural history of WM, we hypothesized that the enforced expression of IL6 and BCL2 in mice unable to perform immunoglobulin class switch recombination may result in a lymphoproliferative disease that mimics WM. To evaluate this possibility, we generated compound transgenic BALB/c mice that harbored the human BCL2 and IL6 transgenes, EμSV-BCL2-22 and H2-L(d)-hIL6, on the genetic background of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency. We designated these mice BCL2(+)IL6(+)AID(-) and found that they developed-with full genetic penetrance (100% incidence) and suitably short latency (93 days median survival)-a severe IgM(+) lymphoproliferative disorder that recapitulated important features of human WM. However, the BCL2(+)IL6(+)AID(-) model also exhibited shortcomings, such as low serum IgM levels and histopathological changes not seen in patients with WM, collectively indicating that further refinements of the model are required to achieve better correlations with disease characteristics of WM.

  2. Avian oncogenesis induced by lymphoproliferative disease virus: a neglected or emerging retroviral pathogen?

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Keel, M. Kevin; Philips, Jamie E.; Cartoceti, Andrew N.; Munk, Brandon A.; Nemeth, Nicole M.; Welsh, Trista I.; Thomas, Jesse M.; Crum, James M.; Lichtenwalner, Anne B.; Fadly, Aly M.; Zavala, Guillermo; Holmes, Edward C.; Brown, Justin D.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is an exogenous oncogenic retrovirus that induces lymphoid tumors in some galliform species of birds. Historically, outbreaks of LPDV have been reported from Europe and Israel. Although the virus has previously never been detected in North America, herein we describe the widespread distribution, genetic diversity, pathogenesis, and evolution of LPDV in the United States. Characterization of the provirus genome of the index LPDV case from North America demonstrated an 88% nucleotide identity to the Israeli prototype strain. Although phylogenetic analysis indicated that the majority of viruses fell into a single North American lineage, a small subset of viruses from South Carolina were most closely related to the Israeli prototype. These results suggest that LPDV was transferred between continents to initiate outbreaks of disease. However, the direction (New World to Old World or vice versa), mechanism, and time frame of the transcontinental spread currently remain unknown. PMID:24503062

  3. Avian oncogenesis induced by lymphoproliferative disease virus: a neglected or emerging retroviral pathogen?

    PubMed

    Allison, Andrew B; Kevin Keel, M; Philips, Jamie E; Cartoceti, Andrew N; Munk, Brandon A; Nemeth, Nicole M; Welsh, Trista I; Thomas, Jesse M; Crum, James M; Lichtenwalner, Anne B; Fadly, Aly M; Zavala, Guillermo; Holmes, Edward C; Brown, Justin D

    2014-02-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is an exogenous oncogenic retrovirus that induces lymphoid tumors in some galliform species of birds. Historically, outbreaks of LPDV have been reported from Europe and Israel. Although the virus has previously never been detected in North America, herein we describe the widespread distribution, genetic diversity, pathogenesis, and evolution of LPDV in the United States. Characterization of the provirus genome of the index LPDV case from North America demonstrated an 88% nucleotide identity to the Israeli prototype strain. Although phylogenetic analysis indicated that the majority of viruses fell into a single North American lineage, a small subset of viruses from South Carolina were most closely related to the Israeli prototype. These results suggest that LPDV was transferred between continents to initiate outbreaks of disease. However, the direction (New World to Old World or vice versa), mechanism, and time frame of the transcontinental spread currently remain unknown.

  4. Report on the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease in an Australian family.

    PubMed

    Turner, A M; Berdoukas, V A; Tobias, V H; Ziegler, J B; Toogood, I R; Mulley, J C; Skare, J; Purtilo, D T

    1992-04-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease is characterized by immune deficiency, particularly to the Epstein-Barr virus and by a tendency to develop fatal infectious mononucleosis, acquired hypogammaglobulinaemia or malignant lymphoma. This disorder has been diagnosed in three boys, two brothers and a maternally related cousin, residing in Australia. The proband presented at 6 years of age with fulminating infectious mononucleosis. His 9 year old male cousin had developed an ileal Burkitt lymphoma one year earlier. Immunological and molecular genetic evidence is presented to support our view that his younger sibling is also affected with this condition. DNA linkage studies using probes to DXS10 and DXS37 provide confirmatory evidence for the diagnosis in the proband's brother and information on carrier status in female family members.

  5. Novel molecular and cellular therapeutic targets in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Seif, Alix E.; Reid, Gregor S. D.; Teachey, David T.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2010-01-01

    While the outcome for pediatric patients with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) or lymphoid malignancies, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has improved dramatically, patients often suffer from therapeutic sequelae. Additionally, despite intensified treatment, the prognosis remains dismal for patients with refractory or relapsed disease. Thus, novel biologically targeted treatment approaches are needed. These targets can be identified by understanding how a loss of lymphocyte homeostasis can result in LPD or ALL. Herein, we review potential molecular and cellular therapeutic strategies that (i) target key signaling networks (e.g., PI3K/AKT/mTOR, JAK/STAT, Notch1, and SRC kinase family-containing pathways) which regulate lymphocyte growth, survival, and function; (ii) block the interaction of ALL cells with stromal cells or lymphoid growth factors secreted by the bone marrow microenvironment; or (iii) stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:18716718

  6. Molecular Surveillance for Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jesse M.; Allison, Andrew B.; Holmes, Edward C.; Phillips, Jamie E.; Bunting, Elizabeth M.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Brown, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease. PMID:25897755

  7. FAS haploinsufficiency is a common disease mechanism in the human autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Hye Sun; Caminha, Iusta; Niemela, Julie E; Rao, V Koneti; Davis, Joie; Fleisher, Thomas A; Oliveira, João B

    2011-05-15

    The autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by early-onset lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, immune cytopenias, and an increased risk for B cell lymphomas. Most ALPS patients harbor mutations in the FAS gene, which regulates lymphocyte apoptosis. These are commonly missense mutations affecting the intracellular region of the protein and have a dominant-negative effect on the signaling pathway. However, analysis of a large cohort of ALPS patients revealed that ∼30% have mutations affecting the extracellular region of FAS, and among these, 70% are nonsense, splice site, or insertions/deletions with frameshift for which no dominant-negative effect would be expected. We evaluated the latter patients to understand the mechanism(s) by which these mutations disrupted the FAS pathway and resulted in clinical disease. We demonstrated that most extracellular-region FAS mutations induce low FAS expression due to nonsense-mediated RNA decay or protein instability, resulting in defective death-inducing signaling complex formation and impaired apoptosis, although to a lesser extent as compared with intracellular mutations. The apoptosis defect could be corrected by FAS overexpression in vitro. Our findings define haploinsufficiency as a common disease mechanism in ALPS patients with extracellular FAS mutations.

  8. Are T-LGL Leukemia and NK-Chronic Lymphoproliferative Disorder Really Two Distinct Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Zambello, Renato; Teramo, Antonella; Gattazzo, Cristina; Semenzato, Gianpietro

    2014-01-01

    Mature Large Granular lymphocytes (LGL) disorders include a spectrum of conditions, ranging from polyclonal to clonal indolent and/or overt leukemic LGL proliferations. Most cases are represented by clonal expansions of TCRα/β+ LGL displaying a CD8+ phenotype with expression of cytotoxic T-cell antigens (CD57, CD16, TIA-1, perforin and granzyme B). Proliferations of CD3-CD16+ NK cells with a restricted patter of NK receptors are less common, usually comprising 15% of the cases. Main features are cytopenias, splenomegaly and autoimmune phenomena. Morphology, immunophenotyping and molecular analyses are crucial to establish a correct diagnosis of disease. According to the 2008 WHO classification, two separate entities account for the majority of cases, T-LGL leukemia and Chronic Lymphoproliferative Disease of NK cell (this latter still provisional). Although these disorders are characterized by the expansion of different cells types i.e. T and NK cells, with specific genetic features and abnormalities, compelling evidence supports the hypothesis that a common pathogenic mechanism would be involved in both disorders. As a matter of fact, a foreign antigen driven clonal selection is considered the initial step in the mechanism ultimately leading to generation of both conditions. In this chapter we will discuss recent advances on the pathogenesis of chronic T and NK disorders of granular lymphocytes, challenging the current WHO classification on the opportunity to separate T and NK disorders, which are likely to represent two sides of the same coin. PMID:24778993

  9. Diagnosis of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease by analysis of SLAM-associated protein expression.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, K C; Cranston, T; Jones, A; Davies, E G; Goldblatt, D; Thrasher, A; Kinnon, C; Nichols, K E; Gaspar, H B

    2000-06-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an inherited immunodeficiency in which affected boys show abnormal responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection. The gene defective in XLP has been identified and designated SH2D1A and encodes a protein termed SLAM-associated protein (SAP). Mutation analysis in individuals with typical XLP presentations and family histories has only detected abnormalities in approximately 60% of patients. Thus, genetic analysis alone cannot confirm a diagnosis of XLP We have developed a SAP expression assay that can be used as a diagnostic indicator of XLP We show that SAP is constitutively expressed in normal individuals, in patients with severe sepsis and in patients with other primary immunodeficiencies. In six XLP patients, four with classical and two with atypical presentations, SAP expression was absent. In the latter two, who were previously assigned as having common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), the diagnosis of XLP was initially made using the protein expression assay. In two further patients in whom no mutation could be detected by genetic analysis, lack of SAP expression strongly suggests that these individuals have XLP. We therefore suggest that XLP should be suspected in certain boys previously diagnosed as having CVID and recommend that patients are investigated both by genetic analysis of SH2D1A and by expression of SAP protein.

  10. Expression of HSV-1 receptors in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease determines susceptibility to oncolytic HSV.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-Y; Currier, M A; Hansford, L; Kaplan, D; Chiocca, E A; Uchida, H; Goins, W F; Cohen, J B; Glorioso, J C; van Kuppevelt, T H; Mo, X; Cripe, T P

    2013-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation. As PKR is a major cellular defense against Herpes simplex virus (HSV), and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) mutants have shown promising antitumor efficacy in preclinical models, we sought to determine whether EBV-LPD cells are susceptible to infection by oHSVs. We tested three primary EBV-infected lymphocyte cell cultures from neuroblastoma (NB) patients as models of naturally acquired EBV-LPD. NB12 was the most susceptible, NB122R was intermediate and NB88R2 was essentially resistant. Despite EBER expression, PKR was activated by oHSV infection. Susceptibility to oHSV correlated with the expression of the HSV receptor, nectin-1. The resistance of NB88R2 was reversed by exogenous nectin-1 expression, whereas downregulation of nectin-1 on NB12 decreased viral entry. Xenografts derived from the EBV-LPDs exhibited only mild (NB12) or no (NB88R2) response to oHSV injection, compared with a NB cell line that showed a significant response. We conclude that EBV-LPDs are relatively resistant to oHSV virotherapy, in some cases, due to low virus receptor expression but also due to intact antiviral PKR signaling.

  11. Systemic Epstein-Barr virus positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood with hemophagocytic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoshu; Chen, Li; Qin, Xiaohua; Huang, Zhuoya; Xie, Xiaoling; Li, Guowei; Xu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) are commonly derived from B-cells, however, it is becoming more and more apparently that EBV can also infect T-lymphocytes. Systemic EBV positive T-cell LPD of childhood is rare and characterized by an extremely aggressive course and poor prognosis. Here, we report a 22-year-old female of systemic EBV positive TLPD with acute EBV infection and review the clinical features of this disorder. A 22-year-old previously healthy female without immunocompromised status presented with persisting coach and fever resistant to conventional therapies. Physical examination showed hemorrhage and hepatosplenomegaly. Laboratory examinations revealed severe pancytopenia, disseminated intra-vascular coagulopathy (DIC), and anti-EBV-IgM positivity. Peripheral blood smears and bone marrow investigation identified a number of atypical lymphocytes. Flow cytometry (FCM) did not show any significant evidence of leukemia or lymphoma. The lymph node biopsy showed apparent infiltration of lymphocytes, which expressed CD2+, CD3+, CD7+ and TIA1+. There was no CD20+ or CD56+ cells. EBV early RNA (EBER) was positive. Cytogenetic analysis showed a normal karyotype. T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement revealed a polyclonal pattern. The patient received prednisolone and IVIG therapy with a transient good condition, and then died of multiorgan failure one week after diagnosis.

  12. Expression of HSV-1 Receptors in EBV-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disease Determines Susceptibility to Oncolytic HSV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pin-Yi; Currier, Mark A; Hansford, Loen; Kaplan, David; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Uchida, Hiroaki; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Mo, Xiaokui; Cripe, Timothy P

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation. Because PKR is a major cellular defense against Herpes simplex virus, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) mutants have shown promising anti-tumor efficacy in preclinical models, we sought to determine whether EBV-LPD cells are susceptible to infection by oHSVs. We tested three primary EBV-infected lymphocyte cell cultures from neuroblastoma (NB) patients as models of naturally acquired EBV-LPD. NB12 was most susceptible, NB122R was intermediate, and NB88R2 was essentially resistant. Despite EBER expression, PKR was activated by oHSV infection. Susceptibility to oHSV correlated with the expression of the HSV receptor, nectin-1. The resistance of NB88R2 was reversed by exogenous nectin-1 expression, whereas down-regulation of nectin-1 on NB12 decreased viral entry. Xenografts derived from the EBV-LPDs exhibited only mild (NB12) or no (NB88R2) response to oHSV injection, compared with a neuroblastoma cell line that showed a significant response. We conclude that EBV-LPDs are relatively resistant to oHSV virotherapy, in some cases due to low virus receptor expression but also due to intact anti-viral PKR signaling. PMID:23254370

  13. Systemic Epstein-Barr virus positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood with hemophagocytic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoshu; Chen, Li; Qin, Xiaohua; Huang, Zhuoya; Xie, Xiaoling; Li, Guowei; Xu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) are commonly derived from B-cells, however, it is becoming more and more apparently that EBV can also infect T-lymphocytes. Systemic EBV positive T-cell LPD of childhood is rare and characterized by an extremely aggressive course and poor prognosis. Here, we report a 22-year-old female of systemic EBV positive TLPD with acute EBV infection and review the clinical features of this disorder. A 22-year-old previously healthy female without immunocompromised status presented with persisting coach and fever resistant to conventional therapies. Physical examination showed hemorrhage and hepatosplenomegaly. Laboratory examinations revealed severe pancytopenia, disseminated intra-vascular coagulopathy (DIC), and anti-EBV-IgM positivity. Peripheral blood smears and bone marrow investigation identified a number of atypical lymphocytes. Flow cytometry (FCM) did not show any significant evidence of leukemia or lymphoma. The lymph node biopsy showed apparent infiltration of lymphocytes, which expressed CD2+, CD3+, CD7+ and TIA1+. There was no CD20+ or CD56+ cells. EBV early RNA (EBER) was positive. Cytogenetic analysis showed a normal karyotype. T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement revealed a polyclonal pattern. The patient received prednisolone and IVIG therapy with a transient good condition, and then died of multiorgan failure one week after diagnosis. PMID:25400806

  14. Monotypic plasma cells in labial salivary glands of patients with Sjögren's syndrome: prognosticator for systemic lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bodeutsch, C; de Wilde, P C; Kater, L; van den Hoogen, F H; Hené, R J; van Houwelingen, J C; van de Putte, L B; Vooijs, G P

    1993-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the prevalence of plasma cell monotypia in labial salivary gland tissue of patients with and without Sjögren's syndrome, and to evaluate its relation to the development of systemic monoclonal lymphoproliferative disorders. METHODS: A quantitative immunohistological study was performed on labial salivary gland tissue of 45 patients with Sjögren's syndrome, 18 with rheumatoid arthritis without Sjögren's syndrome, and 80 healthy controls. In none of the patients with Sjögren's syndrome was there evidence of systemic monoclonal lymphoproliferative disease at the time of biopsy. RESULTS: Monotypic plasma cell populations, defined by a kappa:lambda ratio of > or = 3, were only observed in older patients (above 43 years) with Sjögren's syndrome. In almost all these patients monotypic plasma cell populations were present in multiple labial salivary gland tissues and the IgM/kappa monotypia was observed most frequently. The prevalence of monotypic plasma cell populations in the group with Sjögren's syndrome was 22% (10/45) and there was no significant predilection for primary Sjögren's syndrome. Of special clinical interest was the observation that progression to systemic monoclonal lymphoproliferative disease had occurred exclusively in this subgroup of patients with Sjögren's syndrome, with a prevalence of 30% (3/10). CONCLUSION: Quantitative immunohistological examination of labial salivary gland tissues provides pathologists with a simple method to select those patients with Sjögren's syndrome who have an increased relative risk at the time of biopsy to develop benign or malignant lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:8459032

  15. Increased Risk of Post-Transplant Malignancy and Mortality in Transplant Tourists

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Mu-Chi; Wu, Ming-Ju; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Yu, Tung-Min; Ho, Hao-Chung; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Chung, Chi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Information on post-transplant malignancy and mortality risk in kidney transplant tourists remains controversial and is an important concern. The present study aimed to evaluate the incidence of post-transplant malignancy and mortality risk between tourists and domestic transplant recipients using the claims data from Taiwan's universal health insurance. A retrospective study was performed on 2394 tourists and 1956 domestic recipients. Post-transplant malignancy and mortality were defined from the catastrophic illness patient registry by using the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision. Cox proportional hazard regression and Kaplan–Meier curves were used for the analyses. The incidence for post-transplant de novo malignancy in the tourist group was 1.8-fold higher than that of the domestic group (21.8 vs 12.1 per 1000 person-years). The overall cancer recurrence rate was approximately 11%. The top 3 post-transplant malignancies, in decreasing order, were urinary tract, kidney, and liver cancers, regardless of the recipient type. Compared with domestic recipients, there was significant higher mortality risk in transplant tourists (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.2, 95% confidence interval: 1.0–1.5). In addition, those with either pre-transplant or post-transplant malignancies were associated with increased mortality risk. We suggest that a sufficient waiting period for patients with pre-transplant malignancies should be better emphasized to eliminate recurrence, and transplant tourists should be discouraged because of the possibility of higher post-transplant de novo malignancy occurrence and mortality. PMID:25546686

  16. Identification of distinct subgroups of EBV-positive post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Morscio, Julie; Finalet Ferreiro, Julio; Vander Borght, Sara; Bittoun, Emilie; Gheysens, Olivier; Dierickx, Daan; Verhoef, Gregor; Wlodarska, Iwona; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder is an aggressive complication of transplantation, most frequently of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma morphology and associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection/reactivation. In this study the microenvironment of EBV(+) (n=23) and EBV(-) (n=9) post-transplant non-germinal center B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was characterized. Of EBV(+) cases somatic hypermutation analysis, gene expression profiling, and extensive phenotyping were performed. Our results demonstrated variable cytotoxic T-cell infiltration and significantly increased CD163(+) M2 macrophage infiltration in EBV(+) compared with EBV(-) post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. On the basis of IgM staining and hypermutation analysis, two EBV(+) post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma subgroups were identified: IgM(+) tumors lacking somatic hypermutations and IgM(-) tumors harboring somatic hypermutations. IgM(-) tumors arose late following transplantation (median interval: 16 months), mainly in kidney recipients. IgM(+) tumors on the other hand arose early (median interval: 3 months, P-value=0.0032), almost exclusively following stem cell transplantation and were associated with worse outcome (median survival 1 month for IgM(+) versus 41 months for IgM(-) tumors, log-rank/Wilcoxon P-value 0.07/0.04). Notably, IgM(+) tumors were characterized by plasma cell features (monotypic kappa/lambda expression, high MUM1 expression, and partial CD138 expression) and a high proliferation index. Consistent with the plasma cell phenotype, unfolded protein response signaling was upregulated. In contrast, IgM(-) EBV(+) post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma did not express kappa, lambda, IgD, or CD138 and expressed limited MUM1. In these tumors T-cell signaling was enhanced associated with increased T-cell infiltration compared with IgM(+) cases. Overall, our results allow further molecular classification of EBV(+) post-transplant diffuse

  17. HCV-related liver and lymphoproliferative diseases: association with polymorphisms of IL28B and TLR2.

    PubMed

    De Re, Valli; De Zorzi, Mariangela; Caggiari, Laura; Lauletta, Gianfranco; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Fognani, Elisa; Miorin, Marta; Racanelli, Vito; Quartuccio, Luca; Gragnani, Laura; Russi, Sabino; Pavone, Fabio; Ghersetti, Michela; Costa, Elena Garlatti; Casarin, Pietro; Bomben, Riccardo; Mazzaro, Cesare; Basaglia, Giancarlo; Berretta, Massimiliano; Vaccher, Emanuela; Izzo, Francesco; Buonaguro, Franco Maria; De Vita, Salvatore; Zignego, Anna Linda; De Paoli, Paolo; Dolcetti, Riccardo

    2016-06-21

    To explore the relationship between innate immunity and hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in determining the risk of cirrhosis (CIR), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome (MCS) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we investigated the impact of the toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2) and interleukin-28B (IL28B) genetic variants. TLR2 -174 del variant was associated with TLR2 expression and with specific downstream molecules that drive the expression of different interleukins; rs12979860 Il28B was important in response to interferon-treatment and in spontaneous clearance of HCV. The risk for liver and lymphoproliferative diseases in HCV progression was clarified by stratifying 862 HCV-positive patients into groups based on liver (CIR, HCC) and lymphoproliferative HCV-related diseases (MCS, NHL) and compared with chronic HCV (CHC) infection. Analysis of TLR2-IL28B haplotypes showed an association of wild type haplotype with the lymphoproliferative diseases (OR 1.77, p = 0.029) and a slight increase in HCV viral load (HR 1.38, p = 0.054). Wild type haplotype (TLR2 ins/ins- IL28B C/C) was also found associated with older age in patients with an hepatic diseases (in CIR and in HCC p = 0.038 and p = 0.020, respectively) supporting an effect of innate immunity in the liver disease progression. TLR2 and IL28B polymorphisms in combination showed a role in the control of HCV viral load and different HCV disease progression.

  18. High-dose, post-transplantation cyclophosphamide to promote graft-host tolerance after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Luznik, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease, or GVHD, is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. Here, we describe a novel method for preventing GVHD after alloHSCT using high-dose, post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (Cy). Post-transplantation Cy promotes tolerance in alloreactive host and donor T cells, leading to suppression of both graft rejection and GVHD after alloHSCT. High-dose, post-transplantation Cy facilitates partially HLA-mismatched HSCT without severe GVHD and is effective as sole prophylaxis of GVHD after HLA-matched alloHSCT. By reducing the morbidity and mortality of alloHSCT, post-transplantation Cy may expand the applications of this therapy to the treatment of autoimmune diseases and non-malignant hematologic disorders such as sickle cell disease. PMID:20066512

  19. Minimal residual disease (MRD) status prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a powerful predictor for post-transplant outcome in children with ALL.

    PubMed

    Bader, P; Hancock, J; Kreyenberg, H; Goulden, N J; Niethammer, D; Oakhill, A; Steward, C G; Handgretinger, R; Beck, J F; Klingebiel, T

    2002-09-01

    We have retrospectively investigated the relationship between the level of minimal residual disease (MRD) detected in bone marrow taken prior to conditioning therapy and outcome following stem cell transplantation for high risk childhood ALL. Forty-one patients, in whom both a molecular marker of MRD and sufficient archival material was available, were included in the study. All were in remission at BMT: eight in CR1, 32 in CR2 and five in greater than CR2. MRD was measured by PCR amplification of antigen receptor gene rearrangements and clone-specific oligoprobing, the median sensitivity of detection being one leukaemic cell in 10000 normals. Results were classified as high-level positive (if a clonal band was evident after electrophoresis), low-level positive (if MRD was detected only after oligoprobing) and negative. MRD was detected at high levels in 17 patients, at low levels in 10 patients and 14 patients were MRD negative at the time of transplant. The 5-year event-free survival for these groups was 23%, 48% and 78%, respectively (P = 0.022). Limited multivariate analysis confirmed the significance of MRD (P = 0.0095) vs CR status, donor type, sex, immunophenotype and acute GvHD. This study confirms the strong relationship between MRD level and outcome following allogeneic transplantation. In contrast to a previous study we observed that a minority of children with high-level pre-BMT MRD can enter long lasting remission. The possible role for acute GVHD coupled with a graft-versus-leukaemia effect in the clearance of high level MRD in patients with ALL is discussed.

  20. 137 Hypogammaglobulinemia in a Boy: Consider Also X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gamez, Luisa; Yamazaki, Marco Antonio; Espinosa, Sara; Lugo-Reyes, Saul; Hernandez, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Background X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a primary immunodeficiency presenting with a variety of clinical manifestations, the most common being dysgammaglobulinemia and B-cell lymphoma. The first gene causing XLP, when defective, was termed SH2D1A or SAP for signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein. The absence of SH2D1A leads to an overwhelming and uncontrolled TH1- shifted cytotoxic immune response, which might, at least in part, explain the severe clinical picture. A second gene, XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis), was later identified. Methods An 8 year old Mexican boy was admitted in June 2008 for bronchopneumonia, with no previous history of recurrent or severe infections. He had a family history of a brother deceased at 7 years from fulminate hepatitis, who was diagnosed with agammaglobulinemia. A laboratory evaluation for primary immunodeficiency was made, including serum immunoglobulins: IgG 30 mg/dL, IgA <5 mg/dL IgM 8.6 mg/dL; and flow citometry for lymphocyte subpopulations: CD3+ 2590 mm3 (56%) CD4+ 1004 mm3 (42%), CD8+ 1267 mm3(53%) CD16/56 171mm3 (41%) CD19+ 1493 mm3 (35%). The patient was started on monthly intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He was admitted in December 2008 with fever and severe abdominal pain; an exploratory laparotomy revealed a rectal-sigmoid tumor. The biopsy reported an atypical Burkitt lymphoma (Immunophenotype “B”: Bcl 2+, CD10+) with surgical margins negative for malignancy. Bone marrow aspirate and biopsy were negative for malignancy. In February 2009, management with chemotherapy was started with the diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma stage III. Patient received 6 courses of chemotherapy with complete response to induction; for consolidation, 4 doses of rituximab were given. PCR amplification and direct automated sequencing by the Sanger method was performed in both genes known to be responsible for XLP in chromosome X. Results A hemizygous splice-site deletion in SAP

  1. Post-transplant adoptive T-cell immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Aqui, Nicole A.; June, Carl H.

    2008-01-01

    Immune reconstitution following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is an often slow and incomplete process that leads to increased risk of infection and malignant disease. Immunization in SCT is frequently unsuccessful due to the prolonged lymphopenia, especially of CD4 T cells, seen following transplant. The transfusion of T cells, also called ‘adoptive T-cell therapy’, has the potential to enhance anti-tumour and overall immunity, and augment vaccine efficacy in the post-transplant setting. Recent advances in tissue culture, cellular immunology and tumour biology are guiding new approaches to adoptive T-cell therapy. This chapter will discuss the challenges that face the field before adoptive T-cell therapy can be translated into routine clinical practice. PMID:18790452

  2. Lymphoproliferative disease after lung and heart-lung transplantation: first description in Spain.

    PubMed

    Morales, P; Torres, J; Pérez-Enguix, D; Solé, A; Pastor, A; Segura, A; Zurbano, F

    2005-11-01

    Lymphoproliferative syndromes are the most common tumors in transplant recipients. More than 90% of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative syndromes (PTLS) are considered to be associated with Epstein-Barr virus, and 86% are of the B-cell line. Histopathology ranges from polymorphic-reactive to monomorphic forms. Clonality should be studied using molecular biology techniques. Clinically, a differentiation is usually made between early PTLS (occurring within 1 year after transplantation) and late PTLS, which occur as localized or disseminated nodal lymphomas. In localized forms, immunosuppression should be discontinued or decreased, and the involved area should be subsequently resected or irradiated. In disseminated cases, immunosuppression should be decreased and administration of acyclovir/ganciclovir should be considered. If this is not effective, treatment should be started with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (rituximab). If no response occurs, use of chemotherapy, possibly with interferon, should be considered. Our aim was to report the incidence, clinical signs, and treatment in a series of patients undergoing lung transplantation (LTx).

  3. Immune profiling and cancer post transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Christopher Martin; Coates, Patrick Toby H; Carroll, Robert Peter

    2015-01-01

    Half of all long-term (> 10 year) australian kidney transplant recipients (KTR) will develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or solid organ cancer (SOC), making cancer the leading cause of death with a functioning graft. At least 30% of KTR with a history of SCC or SOC will develop a subsequent SCC or SOC lesion. Pharmacological immunosuppression is a major contributor of the increased risk of cancer for KTR, with the cancer lesions themselves further adding to systemic immunosuppression and could explain, in part, these phenomena. Immune profiling includes; measuring immunosuppressive drug levels and pharmacokinetics, enumerating leucocytes and leucocyte subsets as well as testing leucocyte function in either an antigen specific or non-specific manner. Outputs can vary from assay to assay according to methods used. In this review we define the rationale behind post-transplant immune monitoring assays and focus on assays that associate and/or have the ability to predict cancer and rejection in the KTR. We find that immune monitoring can identify those KTR of developing multiple SCC lesions and provide evidence they may benefit from pharmacological immunosuppressive drug dose reductions. In these KTR risk of rejection needs to be assessed to determine if reduction of immunosuppression will not harm the graft. PMID:25664246

  4. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in pregnancy: a case of favorable mother-fetal outcome in a well-controlled disease.

    PubMed

    Patti, Simona; Perrone, Giuseppina; De Pratti, Valentina; Quinti, Isabella; Milito, Cinzia; Brunelli, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    The autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte survival caused by the dysregulation of the Fas apoptotic pathway. The Fas gene is expressed at the maternal-fetal interface and is involved in the regulation of immune response and implantation. Altered Fas expression may result in altered apoptosis and, ultimately, affect both the immune response and implantation; it is in fact associated with recurrent pregnancy loss, preterm premature rupture of membranes and pre-eclampsia. Currently, there are over 500 cases of ALPS reported worldwide from various racial and ethnic backgrounds. Up to date, the published work contains no specific reports on pregnancy outcome in women affected by ALPS. We present a case of full-term uneventful pregnancy in a patient affected by ALPS. A specific clinical follow-up in a pregnant woman with primary immunologic disease is suggested.

  5. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease in patients with LRBA mutation.

    PubMed

    Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Fischer, Ute; Keller, Bärbel; Nabhani, Schafiq; Gámez-Díaz, Laura; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Gombert, Michael; Hönscheid, Andrea; Saleh, Hani; Shaag, Avraham; Borkhardt, Arndt; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Elpeleg, Orly; Stepensky, Polina

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in LPS-responsive and beige-like anchor (LRBA) gene were recently described in patients with combined immunodeficiency, enteropathy and autoimmune cytopenia. Here, we extend the clinical and immunological phenotypic spectrum of LRBA associated disorders by reporting on three patients from two unrelated families who presented with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, cytopenia, elevated double negative T cells and raised serum Fas ligand levels resembling autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) and one asymptomatic patient. Homozygous loss of function mutations in LRBA were identified by whole exome analysis. Similar to ALPS patients, Fas mediated apoptosis was impaired in LRBA deficient patients, while apoptosis in response to stimuli of the intrinsic mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathway was even enhanced. This manuscript illustrates the phenotypic overlap of other primary immunodeficiencies with ALPS-like disorders and strongly underlines the necessity of genetic diagnosis in order to provide early correct diagnosis and subsequent care.

  6. [Associated factors and clinical implications of post transplant renal anemia].

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Mónica; Chiurchiu, Carlos; Capra, Raúl; Eckhardt, Andrea; De La Fuente, Jorge; Douthat, Walter; De Arteaga, Javier; Massari, Pablo U

    2013-01-01

    A considerable percentage of patients exhibit anemia post kidney transplant. Its origin is multifactorial and the main causes involved depend on the post transplant period considered. We studied in a group of 134 consecutive patients the associated factors and the clinical implications of "late anemia" (6 months post transplant). Multiple regression analysis showed that post transplant oliguria and acute rejection episodes were significantly associated with anemia. Graft survival at 36 months was significantly reduced in the anemic group (83 % versus 96%, p < 0.01). No differences in patients survival or rate of cardiovascular events were observed. We concluded that anemia at 6 months post transplant is independently and significantly associated with events that reduced functioning renal mass and kidney survival.

  7. Deregulated expression of HDAC9 in B cells promotes development of lymphoproliferative disease and lymphoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Veronica S.; Howell, Louise; Zhang, Jiyuan; Kim, Chae H.; Stengel, Sven; Vega, Francisco; Zelent, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) is expressed in B cells, and its overexpression has been observed in B-lymphoproliferative disorders, including B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). We examined HDAC9 protein expression and copy number alterations in primary B-NHL samples, identifying high HDAC9 expression among various lymphoma entities and HDAC9 copy number gains in 50% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To study the role of HDAC9 in lymphomagenesis, we generated a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model that constitutively expressed an HDAC9 transgene throughout B-cell development under the control of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) enhancer (Eμ). Here, we report that the Eμ-HDAC9 GEM model develops splenic marginal zone lymphoma and lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) with progression towards aggressive DLBCL, with gene expression profiling supporting a germinal center cell origin, as is also seen in human B-NHL tumors. Analysis of Eμ-HDAC9 tumors suggested that HDAC9 might contribute to lymphomagenesis by altering pathways involved in growth and survival, as well as modulating BCL6 activity and p53 tumor suppressor function. Epigenetic modifications play an important role in the germinal center response, and deregulation of the B-cell epigenome as a consequence of mutations and other genomic aberrations are being increasingly recognized as important steps in the pathogenesis of a variety of B-cell lymphomas. A thorough mechanistic understanding of these alterations will inform the use of targeted therapies for these malignancies. These findings strongly suggest a role for HDAC9 in B-NHL and establish a novel GEM model for the study of lymphomagenesis and, potentially, preclinical testing of therapeutic approaches based on histone deacetylase inhibitors. PMID:27799148

  8. Oral Lesions and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Castellarin, P.; Pozzato, G.; Tirelli, G.; Di Lenarda, R.; Biasotto, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders are heterogeneous malignancy characterized by the expansion of a lymphoid clone more or less differentiated. At the level of the oral cavity, the lymphoproliferative disorder can occur in various ways, most commonly as lymphoid lesions with extranodal externalization, but sometimes, oral lesions may represent a localization of a disease spread. With regard to the primary localizations of lymphoproliferative disorders, a careful examination of the head and neck, oral, and oropharyngeal area is necessary in order to identify suspicious lesions, and their early detection results in a better prognosis for the patient. Numerous complications have been described and frequently found at oral level, due to pathology or different therapeutic strategies. These complications require precise diagnosis and measures to oral health care. In all this, oral pathologists, as well as dental practitioners, have a central role in the treatment and long-term monitoring of these patients. PMID:20871659

  9. Indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of the gastrointestinal tract after treatment with adalimumab in resistant Crohn's colitis.

    PubMed

    Edison, Natalia; Belhanes-Peled, Hila; Eitan, Yuval; Guthmann, Yifat; Yeremenko, Yelena; Raffeld, Mark; Elmalah, Irit; Trougouboff, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    We report a case of intestinal indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (TCLPD) occurring after the initiation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor therapy for resistant Crohn's disease. A prominent T-cell infiltrate positive for CD8, TIA-1, and T-cell receptor-βF1 was associated with the foci of active inflammation. T-cell receptor gene clonality studies (BIOMED-2) demonstrated monoclonality. After the TNF-α inhibitor treatment was withdrawn, the T-cell infiltrates regressed, but 2 years later, the same monoclonal T-cell infiltrate reappeared at the only site of active inflammation. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to show a link between active inflammation and the TCLPD. In addition, it suggests a possible influence of the TNF-α inhibitor treatment on the evolution of the TCLPD. A high degree of suspicion is required in the presence of any unusual lymphoid infiltrate in inflammatory bowel disease to avoid overlooking an indolent TCLPD or misdiagnose an aggressive lymphoma.

  10. Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation as Platform for Post-transplant Cellular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kongtim, Piyanuch; Lee, Dean A.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E.; Ciurea, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Haploidentical transplantation can extend the opportunity for transplantation to almost all patients who lack an HLA-matched donor. Advances in the field of haploidentical transplantation have led to a marked decrease in treatment-related mortality, allowing investigators to focus on developing rationale pre- and peri-remission therapies aimed at preventing disease relapse post-transplant. Due to widespread availability, low treatment-related mortality and cost, haploidentical donors may become the preferred “alternative” donors for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. One of the major advantages of using a related donor is the possibility to collect or generate additional cellular products from the same immediate available donor, which will not be rejected. Infusion of these cells in the peri-transplant period, derived from the same immune system, is opening the possibility to markedly enhance the anti-tumor effects of the graft and hasten immunologic reconstitution post-transplant. PMID:26172479

  11. An overview of the pathogenesis and natural history of post-transplant T-cell lymphoma (corrected and republished article originally printed in Leukemia & Lymphoma, June 2007; 48(6): 1237 - 1241).

    PubMed

    Jamali, Faek R; Otrock, Zaher K; Soweid, Assaad M; Al-Awar, Ghassan N; Mahfouz, Rami A; Haidar, Ghassan R; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2007-09-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are well recognized complications of solid organ transplantation. The vast majority of early PTLDs are B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas. PTLDs of T-cell origin occur much less frequently and account for only a minority of cases. T-cell PTLDs have been reported to occur primarily at extranodal sites, commonly affecting bone marrow or splenic tissues. The small bowel is an uncommon site of origin of these tumors with only seven cases of primary intestinal post-transplant T-cell lymphomas reported in the literature. We hereby report a new case of primary intestinal post-transplant T-cell lymphoma, arising 18 years following renal transplantation, along with a literature review of all published cases.

  12. Emerging therapeutic strategies for Epstein-Barr virus+ post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Olivia; Martinez, Olivia M; Esquivel, Carlos O

    2012-05-01

    De novo malignancies represent an increasing concern in the transplant population, particularly as long-term graft and patient survival improves. EBV-associated B-cell lymphoma in the setting of PTLD is the leading malignancy in children following solid organ transplantation. Therapeutic strategies can be categorized as pharmacologic, biologic, and cell-based but the variable efficacy of these approaches and the complexity of PTLD suggest that new treatment options are warranted. Here, we review current therapeutic strategies for treatment of PTLD. We also describe the life cycle of EBV, addressing the viral mechanisms that contribute to the genesis and persistence of EBV+ B-cell lymphomas. Specifically, we focus on the oncogenic signaling pathways activated by the EBV LMP1 and LMP2a to understand the underlying mechanisms and mediators of lymphomagenesis with the goal of identifying novel, rational therapeutic targets for the treatment of EBV-associated malignancies.

  13. An unusual manifestation of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in the lip after pediatric heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Akanay-Diesel, S; Schuster, F R; Klee, D; Schmidt, K G; Donner, B C

    2012-11-01

    PTLD is a serious and frequently observed complication after solid organ transplantation. We present a six-yr-old girl with a rapidly growing, solid tumor of the lip four yr after orthotopic heart transplantation, which was classified as monomorphic PTLD with the characteristics of a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Treatment with reduction in immunosuppression, ganciclovir, and anti B-cell monoclonal antibody (rituximab) resulted in full remission since 12 months. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first description of PTLD in the lip in a pediatric patient after heart transplantation in the English literature.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disease misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaodan; Xie, Jianlan; Zhou, Xiaoge

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) is not uncommon in China, but gastrointestinal involvement is very rare. We report on an immunocompetent patient with EBV-associated T-cell LPD of the colon. The 26-year-old man was initially misdiagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC). A colon biopsy revealed the presence of small to medium-sized lymphoid cells infiltrating the intestinal wall. The neoplastic cells expressed CD3, CD5, and granzyme B, not CD56. EBV-encoded small ribonucleic acid was detected in the tumor cells of the colon as well as the lymph node, and the T-cell receptor gene rearrangement result displayed δ gene monoclonal rearrangement. The patient died 2 moths after the diagnosis. The clinical course of EBV-associated T-cell LPD is aggressive and the prognosis is poor, the wrong diagnosis may delay treatment. Therefore, we should be very careful to prevent misdiagnosis. When patients have multiple intestinal ulcers that are not typical of UC and the clinical course is unusual, although morphology looks like inflammatory change, pathologist should consider the possibility of EBV-associated LPD. The treatment strategy and prognosis of these two diseases are different. PMID:26339440

  15. Development of disseminated histiocytic sarcoma in a patient with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and associated Rosai-Dorfman disease.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Girish; McClain, Kenneth L; Pittaluga, Stefania; Rao, V Koneti; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2010-04-01

    Patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) have defective lymphocyte apoptosis with increased risk for lymphoid malignancies. Herein, we report a patient with ALPS who developed histiocytic sarcoma in a background of sinus histiocytosis and massive lymphadenopathy or Rosai- Dorfman disease. This patient had documented ALPS type Ia with a germline missense mutation in exon 9 of the TNFRSF6 gene (973 A>T, D244V) encoding Fas (CD95/Apo-1). He presented at 10 months with hepatosplenomegaly and autoimmune hemolytic anemia and was diagnosed with ALPS. At the age of 6 (1/2) years, he developed classic Hodgkin lymphoma which was treated using standard chemotherapy. Two years later, a biopsy of a positron emission tomography-positive axillary node showed features of ALPS and focal involvement by sinus histiocytosis and massive lymphadenopathy. Thereafter, the patient continued to have continued lymphadenopathy and progressive splenomegaly, leading to exploratory surgery at the age of 13 years for suspicion of lymphoma. Para-abdominal nodes revealed sheets of malignant- looking histiocytes with increased mitotic activity and areas of necrosis, indicative of histiocytic sarcoma. Spleen and lymph nodes also showed involvement by Rosai-Dorfman disease. Both components had an identical phenotype of S-100+/CD68+/ CD163+. The occurrence of malignancies involving 2 separate hematopoietic lineages in ALPS has not been reported earlier. Given the central role of defective Fas signaling in ALPS, histiocytes may be yet another lineage at risk for neoplastic transformation secondary to a block in apoptosis.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disease misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaodan; Xie, Jianlan; Zhou, Xiaoge

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) is not uncommon in China, but gastrointestinal involvement is very rare. We report on an immunocompetent patient with EBV-associated T-cell LPD of the colon. The 26-year-old man was initially misdiagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC). A colon biopsy revealed the presence of small to medium-sized lymphoid cells infiltrating the intestinal wall. The neoplastic cells expressed CD3, CD5, and granzyme B, not CD56. EBV-encoded small ribonucleic acid was detected in the tumor cells of the colon as well as the lymph node, and the T-cell receptor gene rearrangement result displayed δ gene monoclonal rearrangement. The patient died 2 moths after the diagnosis. The clinical course of EBV-associated T-cell LPD is aggressive and the prognosis is poor, the wrong diagnosis may delay treatment. Therefore, we should be very careful to prevent misdiagnosis. When patients have multiple intestinal ulcers that are not typical of UC and the clinical course is unusual, although morphology looks like inflammatory change, pathologist should consider the possibility of EBV-associated LPD. The treatment strategy and prognosis of these two diseases are different.

  17. X inactivation as a mechanism of selection against lethal alleles: further investigation of incontinentia pigmenti and X linked lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, A; Collins, J; Vetrie, D; Cole, C; Bobrow, M

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-one females with incontinentia pigmenti (IP), 42 controls, and 11 females from four families segregating for X linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) were studied for evidence of skewed X inactivation by analysis of methylation at sites in the HPRT, PGK, and M27 beta (DXS255) regions of the X chromosome. Extensive skewing of X inactivation was present in blood from 4/42 (9.5%) control females and 11/31 (35%) of those with IP. This frequency of skewed inactivation was seen in both familial and sporadic cases of IP. Analysis of inactivation in mother/daughter pairs, both affected and control subjects, showed no familial consistency of pattern, arguing against specific mutations being associated with particular patterns of inactivation. In the only informative family where both mother and daughter were affected by IP and showed skewed inactivation, the IP mutation was on the active X chromosome. This argues against cell selection during early embryogenesis being the explanation for the skewed inactivation observed. These data confirm that skewed inactivation of one X is observed in lymphocytes from a significant minority of normal females, and is seen with raised frequency in IP heterozygotes. It is not, however, a universally observed phenomenon, and the relationship of X inactivity to the IP mutation appears to be complex. In the case of XLP, though skewed X inactivation patterns are seen in most disease carriers, the frequency with which this phenomenon occurs in normal females renders it an unreliable diagnostic marker for XLP carriers. Images PMID:1404291

  18. Genomic organization and characterization of mouse SAP, the gene that is altered in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, C; Sayos, J; Wang, N; Howie, D; Coyle, A; Terhorst, C

    2000-08-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) disease is a fatal immunological disorder that renders the immune system unable to respond effectively to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The gene that encodes a protein termed SAP or SH2D1A is either deleted or mutated in XLP patients, resulting in uncontrolled B- and T-cell proliferation upon EBV infection. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of the mouse SAP gene. It is localized on the mouse X chromosome and comprises four exons spanning approximately 25 kb. Its expression appears to be restricted to T lymphocytes. Whereas a high level of SAP expression is observed in Thl cells, only small amounts are detectable in Th2 cells. Moreover, SAP expression is down-regulated upon in vitro activation of T cells, including CD4+, CD8+ single-positive T cells, and Thl and Th2 cells. This study provides valuable information for in-depth genetic and biochemical analysis of the function of SAP in the immune system.

  19. SAP gene transfer restores cellular and humoral immune function in a murine model of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Rivat, Christine; Booth, Claire; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria; Blundell, Michael; Sebire, Neil J; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2013-02-14

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP1) arises from mutations in the gene encoding SLAM-associated protein (SAP) and leads to abnormalities of NKT-cell development, NK-cell cytotoxicity, and T-dependent humoral function. Curative treatment is limited to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. We tested whether HSC gene therapy could correct the multilineage defects seen in SAP(-/-) mice. SAP(-/-) murine HSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors containing either SAP or reporter gene before transplantation into irradiated recipients. NKT-cell development was significantly higher and NK-cell cytotoxicity restored to wild-type levels in mice receiving the SAP vector in comparison to control mice. Baseline immunoglobulin levels were significantly increased and T-dependent humoral responses to NP-CGG, including germinal center formation, were restored in SAP-transduced mice.We demonstrate for the first time that HSC gene transfer corrects the cellular and humoral defects in SAP(-/-) mice providing proof of concept for gene therapy in XLP1.

  20. Semi-quantitative in situ hybridization and immunohistology for antigen expression of human herpesvirus-6 in various lymphoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed

    Rojo, J; Ferrer Argote, V E; Klueppelberg, U; Krueger, G R; Eidt, E; Ablashi, D V; Luka, J; Tesch, H

    1994-01-01

    Fifty patients with various hyperplastic and malignant lymphoproliferative diseases were investigated for evidence of human herpesvirus-6 infection. Virus DNA and antigen expression was investigated in lymph node biopsies by in situ hybridization and immunohistology and was correlated with data of immunophenotyping. Supplemental immunoglobulin- and T cell receptor gene rearrangement studies were used to support the classification of the proliferative lymphoid lesion. Elevated numbers of cells carrying HHV-6 DNA and/or antigens were found in cases of Hodgkin's lymphoma and follicular center cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma as well as atypical polyclonal lymphoproliferation (APL), yet not in reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and in most other lymphomas. Immunophenotyping showed that virus -infected cells were primarily lympho-histiocytic elements, less frequently Hodgkin's- and Reed-Sternberg cells, and not malignant B lymphocytes as in follicular center cell lymphomas. This suggests that the virus is rather not the causative oncogen in these cases, yet does not exclude a cocarcinogenic effect of it during the development and ths course of uncontrolled lymphoproliferation.

  1. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hazem A H; Naresh, Kikkeri N

    2012-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a group of diseases that range from benign polyclonal to malignant monoclonal lymphoid proliferations. They arise secondary to treatment with immunosuppressive drugs given to prevent transplant rejection. Three main pathologic subsets/stages of evolution are recognised: early, polymorphic, and monomorphic lesions. The pathogenesis of PTLDs seems to be multifactorial. Among possible infective aetiologies, the role of EBV has been studied in depth, and the virus is thought to play a central role in driving the proliferation of EBV-infected B cells that leads to subsequent development of the lymphoproliferative disorder. It is apparent, however, that EBV is not solely responsible for the "neoplastic" state. Accumulated genetic alterations of oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes (deletions, mutations, rearrangements, and amplifications) and epigenetic changes (aberrant hypermethylation) that involve tumour suppressor genes are integral to the pathogenesis. Antigenic stimulation also plays an evident role in the pathogenesis of PTLDs. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) that are critical to fight viral infections have been thought to play a pathogenetically relevant role in PTLDs. Furthermore, regulatory T cells (Treg cells), which are modulators of immune reactions once incited, seem to have an important role in PTLDs where antigenic stimulation is key for the pathogenesis.

  2. Accuracy of sentinel lymph node dissection for melanoma staging in the presence of a collision tumour with a lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Gero, Daniel; Queiros da Mota, Vanessa; Boubaker, Ariane; Berthod, Gregoire; de Leval, Laurence; Demartines, Nicolas; Matter, Maurice

    2014-08-01

    Sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) identifies melanoma patients with metastatic disease who would benefit from radical lymph node dissection (RLND). Rarely, patients with melanoma have an underlying lymphoproliferative disease, and melanoma metastases might develop as collision tumours in the sentinel lymph node (SLN). The aim of this study was to measure the incidence and examine the effect of collision tumours on the accuracy of SLND and on the validity of staging in this setting. Between 1998 and 2012, 750 consecutive SLNDs were performed in melanoma patients using the triple technique (lymphoscintigraphy, gamma probe and blue dye). The validity of SLND in collision tumours was analysed. False negativity was reflected by the disease-free survival. The literature was reviewed on collision tumours in melanoma. Collision tumours of melanoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) were found in two SLN and in one RLND (0.4%). Subsequent RLNDs of SLND-positive cases were negative for melanoma. The patient with negative SLND developed relapse after 28 months with an inguinal lymph node metastasis of melanoma; RLND showed collision tumours. The literature review identified 12 cases of collision tumours. CLL was associated with increased melanoma incidence and reduced overall survival. This is, to our knowledge, the first assessment of the clinical value of SLND when collision tumours of melanoma and CLL are found. In this small series of three patients with both malignancies present in the same lymph node basin, lymphocytic infiltration of the CLL did not alter radioisotope uptake into the SLN. No false-negative result was observed. Our data suggest the validity of SLND in collision tumours, but given the rarity of the problem, further studies are necessary to confirm this reliability.

  3. Mixed lymphocyte culture stimulatory and responding capacity of lymphocytes from patients with lymphoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Rühl, H; Vogt, W; Bochert, G; Schmidt, S; Moelle, R; Schaoua, H

    1975-01-01

    Lymphocyte reactivity in vitro was studied in patients with Hodgkin's disease, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphosarcoma. The responding capacity to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) was markedly depressed and delayed in all three groups of patients compared with the PHA response observed in lymphocyte cultures from normal individuals. In one-way mixed lymphocyte culture experiments a significant decrease in responding capacity of the patients' lymphocytes to lymphocytes from normal donors could be demonstrated. In contrast, the stimulatory capacity of the patients' lymphocytes was found to be intact, or only slightly reduced. PMID:128426

  4. Disclosing the CXCR4 Expression in Lymphoproliferative Diseases by Targeted Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wester, Hans Jürgen; Keller, Ulrich; Schottelius, Margret; Beer, Ambros; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Hoffmann, Frauke; Šimeček, Jakub; Gerngross, Carlos; Lassmann, Michael; Herrmann, Ken; Pellegata, Natalia; Rudelius, Martina; Kessler, Horst; Schwaiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine ligand-receptor interactions play a pivotal role in cell attraction and cellular trafficking, both in normal tissue homeostasis and in disease. In cancer, chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) expression is an adverse prognostic factor. Early clinical studies suggest that targeting CXCR4 with suitable high-affinity antagonists might be a novel means for therapy. In addition to the preclinical evaluation of [68Ga]Pentixafor in mice bearing human lymphoma xenografts as an exemplary CXCR4-expressing tumor entity, we report on the first clinical applications of [68Ga]Pentixafor-Positron Emission Tomography as a powerful method for CXCR4 imaging in cancer patients. [68Ga]Pentixafor binds with high affinity and selectivity to human CXCR4 and exhibits a favorable dosimetry. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET provides images with excellent specificity and contrast. This non-invasive imaging technology for quantitative assessment of CXCR4 expression allows to further elucidate the role of CXCR4/CXCL12 ligand interaction in the pathogenesis and treatment of cancer, cardiovascular diseases and autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. PMID:25825601

  5. Post-transplant hepatic complications: Imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Drudi, F.M.; Pagliara, E.; Cantisani, V.; Arduini, F.; D'Ambrosio, U.; Alfano, G.

    2007-01-01

    Transplantation is considered definitive therapy for acute or chronic irreversible pathologies of the liver, and the increased survival rates are mainly due to improved immunosuppressive therapies and surgical techniques. However, early diagnosis of possible graft dysfunction is crucial to liver graft survival. Diagnostic imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of the liver before and after transplant and in the detection of complications such as vascular and biliary diseases, acute and chronic rejection and neoplastic recurrence. Integrated imaging using color-Doppler, CT, MRI and traditional x-ray reach a high level of sensitivity and specificity in the management of transplanted patients. PMID:23395917

  6. Treatment options for post-transplantation diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Treatment options for management of post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) are limited with regards to the availability of strong clinical evidence base. This is a concern as PTDM is common after solid organ transplantation and associated with poor clinical outcomes. PTDM and type 2 diabetes mellitus are distinct pathophysiological entities that have important differences with regards to aetiology, clinical course and management. Therefore, any clinical evidence of treatment benefit from the general population with type 2 diabetes mellitus may not be directly translated to the solid organ transplant recipient. In addition, the potential risk and benefit of using many of these therapeutic agents must take account of the complicated post-transplantation milieu of immunosuppression. While there is reasonable evidence base for treatment of diabetes mellitus in the general population, the same is not true in a post-transplantation setting. In this article the treatment options available for PTDM will be discussed, with a transplant-specific focus on the pros and cons of each particular component of the glucose lowering therapy armoury.

  7. Post-transplant dyslipidemia: Mechanisms, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Arnav; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant dyslipidemia is highly prevalent and presents unique management challenges to the clinician. The two major outcomes to consider with post-transplant therapies for dyslipidemia are preserving or improving allograft function, and reducing cardiovascular risk. Although there are other cardiovascular risk factors such as graft dysfunction, hypertension, and diabetes, attention to dyslipidemia is warranted because interventions for dyslipidemia have an impact on reducing cardiac events in clinical trials specific to the transplant population. Dyslipidemia is not synonymous with hyperlipidemia. Numerous mechanisms exist for the occurrence of post-transplant dyslipidemia, including those mediated by immunosuppressive drug therapy. Statin therapy has received the most attention in all solid organ transplant recipient populations, although the effect of proper dietary advice and adjuvant pharmacological and non-pharmacological agents should not be dismissed. At all stages of treatment appropriate monitoring strategies for side effects should be implemented so that the benefits from these therapies can be achieved. Clinicians have a choice when there is a conflict between various transplant society and lipid society guidelines for therapy and targets. PMID:27011910

  8. Early use of plasmapheresis for recurrent post-transplant FSGS.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Madhura; Petro, Julie; Palmer, Joanne; Meyers, Kevin; Baluarte, H Jorge

    2003-09-01

    Recurrence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) in an allograft is a challenging clinical situation because it frequently results in graft loss. We report our experience with early use of plasmapheresis in recurrent FSGS. Of the 18 (33%) children with biopsy-proven FSGS (in their native kidneys) transplanted at our institution, 6 had recurrence (elevated urine protein/creatinine ratios) post transplant and were treated with plasmapheresis. Patients who received treatment within 1 day of the recurrence (4/6) went into remission after 5-13 plasmapheresis treatments, within 5-27 days of starting treatment. Patients who did not respond to plasmapheresis (2/6) were treated 7 and 17 days after onset of proteinuria; 1 of these had acute tubular necrosis and acute rejection leading to graft loss and the other developed acute rejections, ongoing proteinuria, and subsequent graft loss. All 4 patients who went into remission have maintained good graft function, 22-53 months post transplant. In our experience early institution of plasmapheresis for recurrent post-transplant proteinuria in FSGS is effective.

  9. Haploidentical Related Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for DOCK8 Deficiency Using Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nirali N; Freeman, Alexandra F; Su, Helen; Cole, Kristen; Parta, Mark; Moutsopoulos, Niki M; Baris, Safa; Karakoc-Aydiner, Elif; Hughes, Thomas E; Kong, Heidi H; Holland, Steve M; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2017-03-10

    Dedicator-of-Cytokinesis-8 (DOCK8) deficiency, a primary immunodeficiency disease, can be reversed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT); however, there are few reports describing the use of alternative donor sources for HSCT in DOCK8 deficiency. We describe HSCT for patients with DOCK8 deficiency who lack a matched related or unrelated donor using bone marrow from haploidentical related donors and post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/CY) for GVHD prophylaxis. Seven patients with DOCK8 deficiency (median age 20 years, range 7-25 years) received a haploidentical related donor HSCT. The conditioning regimen included 2 days of low-dose cyclophosphamide, 5 days of fludarabine, three days of busulfan, and 200 cGy TBI. Graft-versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PT/CY) 50 mg/kg/day on days +3 and +4, and tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil starting at day +5. The median times to neutrophil and platelet engraftment were 15 and 19 days, respectively. All patients attained >90% donor engraftment by day +30. Four subjects developed acute GVHD (one with maximum grade 3). No patient developed chronic GVHD. With a median follow-up time of 20.6 months (range 9.5 - 31.7 months), 6 of 7 patients are alive and disease-free. Haploidentical related donor HSCT with PT/CY represents an effective therapeutic approach for patients with DOCK8 deficiency who lack a matched related or unrelated donor.

  10. Elevated Fasting Plasma Glucose before Liver Transplantation is Associated with Lower Post-Transplant Survival

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Emi; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Taura, Naota; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu; Miuma, Satoshi; Shibata, Hidetaka; Honda, Takuya; Hidaka, Masaaki; Soyama, Akihiko; Takeshima, Fuminao; Eguchi, Susumu; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of liver cirrhosis is higher among individuals with diabetes mellitus, and a cirrhotic patient with diabetes may have a poorer prognosis after liver transplantation compared to a patient without diabetes. Thus, we evaluated whether fasting plasma glucose prior to receiving a liver transplant was a prognostic factor for post-transplant survival. Material/Methods Ninety-one patients received a living donor liver transplant between November 2005 and December 2012. Patients were considered diabetic if they were prescribed diabetes medications or had impaired glucose tolerance as measured by an oral glucose tolerance test. Each patient was monitored through December 31, 2013, to evaluate prognosis. Results Fasting plasma glucose of at least 100 mg/dL significantly decreased survival following transplant (52% in the high FPG group compared to 78% in the control group, p=0.04), while postprandial hyperglycemia had no effect on survival. Additionally, overall mortality and the incidence of vascular disease were significantly higher among patients with uncontrolled plasma glucose. Impaired fasting plasma glucose was significantly and inversely associated with overall survival in the univariate and multivariate analyses, while creatinine (at least 1 mg/dL) was inversely associated with survival in the univariate analysis. Conclusions Elevated fasting plasma glucose prior to liver transplantation was inversely associated with post-transplant survival. This effect may be due to underlying microangiopathy as a result of uncontrolled diabetes before transplantation. Our data demonstrated the importance of controlled blood glucose prior to liver transplantation. PMID:27909287

  11. Management and prevention of post-transplant malignancies in kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Stallone, Giovanni; Infante, Barbara; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The central issue in organ transplantation remains suppression of allograft rejection. Thus, the development of immunosuppressive drugs has been the key to successful allograft function. The increased immunosuppressive efficiency obtained in the last two decades in kidney transplantation dramatically reduced the incidence of acute rejection. However, the inevitable trade-off was an increased rate of post-transplant infections and malignancies. Since the incidence of cancer in immunosuppressed transplant recipients becomes greater over time, and the introduction of new immunosuppressive strategies are expected to extend significantly allograft survival, the problem might grow exponentially in the near future. Thus, cancer is becoming a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients otherwise successfully treated by organ transplantation. There are at least four distinct areas requiring consideration, which have a potentially serious impact on recipient outcome after transplantation: (i) the risk of transmitting a malignancy to the recipient within the donor organ; (ii) the problems of previously diagnosed and treated malignancy in the recipient; (iii) the prevention of de novo post-transplant malignant diseases and (iv) the management of these complex and often life-threatening clinical problems. In this scenario, the direct and indirect oncogenic potential of immunosuppressive therapy should be always carefully considered. PMID:26413294

  12. EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders: classification and treatment.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Antonino; Gloghini, Annunziata; Dotti, Giampietro

    2008-05-01

    Since its discovery as the first human tumor virus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the development of a wide range of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, including Burkitt's lymphoma, classic Hodgkin's lymphoma, and lymphomas arising in immunocompromised individuals (post-transplant and HIV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders). T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that have been reported to be EBV associated include a subset of peripheral T-cell lymphomas, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, extranodal nasal type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, and other rare histotypes. EBV encodes a series of products interacting with or exhibiting homology to a wide variety of antiapoptotic molecules, cytokines, and signal transducers, hence promoting EBV infection, immortalization, and transformation. However, the exact mechanism by which EBV promotes oncogenesis is an area of active debate. The focus of this review is on the pathology, diagnosis, classification, and pathogenesis of EBV-associated lymphomas. Recent advances in EBV cell-based immunotherapy, which is beginning to show promise in the treatment of EBV-related disorders, are discussed.

  13. Facial manifestations of Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disease in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission: Two atypical presentations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Benjamin Y; Kojima, Lisa; Huang, Mary S; Friedmann, Alison M; Ferry, Judith A; Weinstein, Howard J

    2016-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) rarely occurs in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), who have not received hematopoietic transplantation. We describe EBV-LPD manifesting as facial lesions in two children with ALL in remission. One patient was a 16-year-old male with T-cell ALL with an EBV-positive angiocentric polymorphous lip lesion presenting as right-sided facial swelling. The other patient was a 12-year-old male with B-cell ALL with an EBV-positive polymorphous lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate presenting as bilateral dacryoadenitis. Neither patient had known primary immunodeficiencies. Both cases improved with immunosuppressant de-escalation. These cases suggest that immunosuppression induced by maintenance chemotherapy is sufficient to promote EBV-LPD.

  14. Alternative Donor Transplantation with High-Dose Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide for Refractory Severe Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E.; Zahurak, Marianna; Symons, Heather; Cooke, Kenneth; Jones, Richard J.; Brodsky, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a life-threatening hematopoietic stem cell disorder that is treated with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or immunosuppressive therapy (IST). The management of patients with refractory SAA after IST is a major challenge. Alternative donor BMT is the best chance for cure in refractory SAA, but morbidity and mortality from graft failure and complications of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) have limited enthusiasm for this approach. Here, we employed post-transplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide in an effort to safely expand the donor pool in 16 consecutive patients with refractory SAA who did not have a matched sibling donor. Between July 2011 and August 2016, 16 patients underwent allogeneic (allo) BMT for refractory SAA from 13 haploidentical donors and 3 unrelated donors. The nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen consisted of antithymocyte globulin, fludarabine, low-dose cyclophosphamide, and total body irradiation. Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg/day i.v. on days +3 and +4 was administered for GVHD prophylaxis. Additionally, patients received mycophenolate mofetil on days +5 through 35 and tacrolimus from day +5 through 1 year. The median age of the patients at the time of transplantation was 30 (range, 11 to 69) years. The median time to neutrophil recovery over 1000 × 103/mm3 for 3 consecutive days was 19 (range, 16 to 27) days, to red cell engraftment was 25 (range, 2 to 58) days, and to last platelet transfusion to keep platelets counts over 50 × 103/mm3 was 27.5 (range, 22 to 108) days. Graft failure, primary or secondary, was not seen in any of the patients. All 16 patients are alive, transfusion independent, and without evidence of clonality. The median follow-up is 21 (range, 3 to 64) months. Two patients had grade 1 or 2 skin-only acute GVHD. These same 2 also had mild chronic GVHD of the skin/mouth requiring systemic steroids. One of these GVHD patients was able to come off all IST by 15 months and the

  15. Distribution of lymphocytes with interleukin-2 receptors (TAC antigens) in reactive lymphoproliferative processes, Hodgkin's disease, and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. An immunohistologic study of 300 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Sheibani, K.; Winberg, C. D.; van de Velde, S.; Blayney, D. W.; Rappaport, H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigated the distribution of interleukin-2 receptors (TAC antigen) in the lymph nodes of 300 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. They used fresh-frozen sections to evaluate a possible correlation between the immunophenotype of specific lymphoid disorders and the presence or absence of TAC expression and to determine whether the TAC positivity of lymphoid cells contributes to the characterization of lymphoproliferative processes. All of the cases had previously been studied with a large screening panel of monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal antisera. Among 85 patients with a variety of benign reactive processes, the lymph nodes from 47 contained TAC-bearing lymphocytes in various patterns of distribution. Of 41 patients with Hodgkin's disease, 37 had TAC-bearing lymphocytes. Of 26 B-cell, well-differentiated lymphocytic lymphomas (WDL), 14 were diffusely TAC-positive and one had TAC-bearing cells in random distribution. Six cases of intermediate lymphocytic lymphoma were also studied, and three showed randomly distributed TAC-bearing lymphocytes. Of 19 patients with follicular or follicular and diffuse, poorly differentiated lymphocytic (PDL) lymphoma, 14 were TAC-positive. All 3 diffuse PDL lymphomas studied were TAC-negative. Among 23 cases of B-cell and 5 cases of T-cell mixed cell lymphoma, 15 and three, respectively, had TAC-positive lymphocytes. Of 39 large cell lymphomas (B-cell, 33; T-cell, 6), 14 were TAC-positive. All 13 cases of hairy cell leukemia were diffusely positive. Of 23 T-lymphoblastic lymphomas, only 1 showed positive TAC reactivity, which was focal. Of 5 cases of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, 2 had TAC-bearing lymphocytes. Our study indicates that the TAC antigen is not lineage-specific, and that it may be expressed by lymphoid cells regardless of their phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3105322

  16. Chemoselection of Allogeneic HSC After Murine Neonatal Transplantation Without Myeloablation or Post-transplant Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Falahati, Rustom; Zhang, Jianqing; Flebbe-Rehwaldt, Linda; Shi, Yimin; Gerson, Stanton L; Gaensler, Karin ML

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of allogeneic transplantation, without myeloablation or post-transplant immunosuppression, was tested using in vivo chemoselection of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) after transduction with a novel tricistronic lentiviral vector (MGMTP140K-2A-GFP-IRES-TK (MAGIT)). This vector contains P140K-O6-methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMTP140K), HSV-thymidine kinase (TKHSV), and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) enabling (i) in vivo chemoselection of HSC by conferring resistance to benzylguanine (BG), an inhibitor of endogenous MGMT, and to chloroethylating agents such as 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)nitrosourea (BCNU) and, (ii) depletion of proliferating cells such as malignant clones or transduced donor T cells mediating graft versus host disease (GVHD), by expression of the suicide gene TKHSV and Ganciclovir (GCV) administration. Non-myeloablative transplantation of transduced, syngeneic, lineage-depleted (Lin−) BM in neonates resulted in 0.67% GFP+ mononuclear cells in peripheral blood. BG/BCNU chemoselection, 4 and 8 weeks post-transplant, produced 50-fold donor cell enrichment. Transplantation and chemoselection of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched MAGIT-transduced Lin− BM also produced similar expansion for >40 weeks. The efficacy of this allotransplant approach was validated in Hbbth3 heterozygous mice by correction of β-thalassemia intermedia, without toxicity or GVHD. Negative selection, by administration of GCV resulted in donor cell depletion without graft ablation, as re-expansion of donor cells was achieved with BG/BCNU treatment. These studies show promise for developing non-ablative allotransplant approaches using in vivo positive/negative selection. PMID:22871662

  17. A Case Report of NK-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disease With a Wide Involvement of Digestive Tract Develop Into Epstein–Barr Virus Associated NK/T Cell Lymphoma in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haotian; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Zhinong; Zhou, Wei; Cao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) plays an important role in various diseases. EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) is a rare disease with a canceration tendency. It is difficult to differentiate LPD with involvement of digestive tract from Crohn disease due to similar clinical and endoscopic manifestations. We present a case report of multiple ulcers with esophagus, small bowel and the entire colon involved, proved to be NK-Cell LPD, developed into EBV-associated NK/T Cell lymphoma, in an immunocompetent man who was initially misdiagnosed as Crohn disease. This report underscores that intestinal ulcers should be cautiously diagnosed, for it sometimes could be a precancerous lesion. PMID:27015206

  18. Treatment of steroid-resistant post-transplant nephrotic syndrome with cyclophosphamide in a child with congenital nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Flynn, J T; Schulman, S L; deChadarevian, J P; Dunn, S P; Kaiser, B A; Polinsky, M S; Baluarte, H J

    1992-11-01

    A child with congenital nephrotic syndrome underwent renal transplantation, was treated for acute rejection, and then developed nephrotic syndrome and renal failure. He was felt to have minimal change disease on allograft biopsy, but failed to respond to therapy with corticosteroids. Cyclophosphamide was substituted for cyclosporine and rapidly induced a complete remission of his nephrotic syndrome. We feel that this case not only represents an important example of a useful therapeutic approach to the child with congenital nephrotic syndrome who develops nephrotic syndrome post transplantation, and also raises questions concerning the pathogenesis of congenital nephrotic syndrome.

  19. Eosinophilic esophagitis in children following cardiac transplantation: association with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other transplant outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kindel, Steven J; Joy, Brian F; Pahl, Elfriede; Wald, Eric L

    2014-08-01

    Although cardiac transplantation is life-saving, morbidities from immunosuppression are significant. EoE is a complication of calcineurin inhibitors following liver transplant causing feeding intolerance, weight loss, vomiting, and dysphagia. There are limited reports of EoE following heart transplantation. We performed a retrospective single-center review of pediatric cardiac transplant patients from 2000 to 2010. A case-control analysis of patients with and without EoE was performed evaluating heart transplantation outcomes such as rates of rejection, CAV, PTLD, and graft loss. Eighty-six transplants were performed in 84 patients; 34 (40%) underwent diagnostic endoscopy, and 10 (12%) had EoE. Median time to diagnosis of EoE was 3.7 yr (IQR: 2.0-5.2). There were no differences in demographics or use of induction medications between patients with or without EoE. Patients with EoE had fewer episodes of treated rejection (1.0 vs. 2.5; p = 0.04). Four of 10 (40%) EoE patients had PTLD compared with only 2/24 (8%) of those without EoE (p = 0.048; OR 7.33 [95% CI: 1.1-50.2]). There were no differences in CAV or graft loss between groups. EoE should be considered as a cause of GI symptoms in children after cardiac transplantation and may be associated with fewer rejection episodes and increased rates of PTLD, thus representing a marker of over-immunosuppression.

  20. Mouse model of Epstein-Barr virus LMP1- and LMP2A-driven germinal center B-cell lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Minamitani, Takeharu; Ma, Yijie; Zhou, Hufeng; Kida, Hiroshi; Tsai, Chao-Yuan; Obana, Masanori; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Fujio, Yasushi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Zhao, Bo; Kikutani, Hitoshi; Kieff, Elliott; Gewurz, Benjamin E; Yasui, Teruhito

    2017-03-28

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a major cause of immunosuppression-related B-cell lymphomas and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). In these malignancies, EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and LMP2A provide infected B cells with surrogate CD40 and B-cell receptor growth and survival signals. To gain insights into their synergistic in vivo roles in germinal center (GC) B cells, from which most EBV-driven lymphomas arise, we generated a mouse model with conditional GC B-cell LMP1 and LMP2A coexpression. LMP1 and LMP2A had limited effects in immunocompetent mice. However, upon T- and NK-cell depletion, LMP1/2A caused massive plasmablast outgrowth, organ damage, and death. RNA-sequencing analyses identified EBV oncoprotein effects on GC B-cell target genes, including up-regulation of multiple proinflammatory chemokines and master regulators of plasma cell differentiation. LMP1/2A coexpression also up-regulated key HL markers, including CD30 and mixed hematopoietic lineage markers. Collectively, our results highlight synergistic EBV membrane oncoprotein effects on GC B cells and provide a model for studies of their roles in immunosuppression-related lymphoproliferative diseases.

  1. Impaired humoral immunity in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease is associated with defective IL-10 production by CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cindy S.; Hare, Nathan J.; Nichols, Kim E.; Dupré, Loic; Andolfi, Grazia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Adelstein, Stephen; Hodgkin, Philip D.; Tangye, Stuart G.

    2005-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an often-fatal immunodeficiency characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, fulminant infectious mononucleosis, and/or lymphoma. The genetic lesion in XLP, SH2D1A, encodes the adaptor protein SAP (signaling lymphocytic activation molecule–associated [SLAM-associated] protein); however, the mechanism(s) by which mutations in SH2D1A causes hypogammaglobulinemia is unknown. Our analysis of 14 XLP patients revealed normal B cell development but a marked reduction in the number of memory B cells. The few memory cells detected were IgM+, revealing deficient isotype switching in vivo. However, XLP B cells underwent proliferation and differentiation in vitro as efficiently as control B cells, which indicates that the block in differentiation in vivo is B cell extrinsic. This possibility is supported by the finding that XLP CD4+ T cells did not efficiently differentiate into IL-10+ effector cells or provide optimal B cell help in vitro. Importantly, the B cell help provided by SAP-deficient CD4+ T cells was improved by provision of exogenous IL-10 or ectopic expression of SAP, which resulted in increased IL-10 production by T cells. XLP CD4+ T cells also failed to efficiently upregulate expression of inducible costimulator (ICOS), a potent inducer of IL-10 production by CD4+ T cells. Thus, insufficient IL-10 production may contribute to hypogammaglobulinemia in XLP. This finding suggests new strategies for treating this immunodeficiency. PMID:15761493

  2. Precursors to Lymphoproliferative Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Goldin, Lynn R.; McMaster, Mary L.; Caporaso, Neil E.

    2013-01-01

    We review monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) as a precursor to chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) as a precursor to plasma cell disorders. These conditions are present in the general population and increase with age. These precursors aggregate with lymphoproliferative malignancies in families suggesting shared inheritance. MBL and MGUS may share some of the same risk factors as their related malignancies but data are limited. While these conditions are characterized by enhanced risk for the associated malignancy, the majority of individuals with these conditions do not progress to malignancy. A key focus for current work is to identify markers that predict progression to malignancy. PMID:23549397

  3. Comparable composite endpoints after HLA-matched and HLA-haploidentical transplantation with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, Shannon R.; Kasamon, Yvette L.; Kanakry, Christopher G.; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Showel, Margaret M.; Kanakry, Jennifer A.; Symons, Heather J.; Gojo, Ivana; Smith, B. Douglas; Bettinotti, Maria P.; Matsui, William H.; Dezern, Amy E.; Huff, Carol Ann; Borrello, Ivan; Pratz, Keith W.; Gladstone, Douglas E.; Swinnen, Lode J.; Brodsky, Robert A.; Levis, Mark J.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Rosner, Gary L.; Jones, Richard J.; Luznik, Leo

    2017-01-01

    Composite endpoints that not only encompass mortality and relapse, but other critical post-transplant events such as graft-versus-host disease, are being increasingly utilized to quantify survival without significant morbidity after allogeneic blood or marrow transplantation. High-dose, post-transplantation cyclophosphamide reduces severe graft-versus-host disease with allogeneic marrow transplantation, making composite endpoints after this management particularly interesting. We retrospectively analyzed 684 adults with hematologic malignancies who received T-cell-replete bone marrow grafts and cyclophosphamide after myeloablative HLA-matched related (n=192) or unrelated (n=120), or non-myeloablative HLA-haploidentical (n=372) donor transplantation. The median follow up was 4 (range, 0.02–11.4) years. Graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival was defined as the time after transplantation without grade III–IV acute graft-versus-host disease, chronic graft-versus-host disease requiring systemic treatment, relapse, or death. Chronic graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival was defined as the time after transplantation without moderate or severe chronic graft-versus-host disease, relapse, or death. One-year graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival and chronic graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival estimates were, respectively, 47% (95% CI: 41–55%) and 53% (95% CI: 46–61%) after myeloablative HLA-matched related, 42% (95% CI: 34–52%) and 52% (95% CI: 44–62%) after myeloablative HLA-matched unrelated, and 45% (95% CI: 40–50%) and 50% (95% CI: 45–55%) after non-myeloablative HLA-haploidentical donor transplantation. In multivariable models, there were no differences in graft-versus-host disease-free, or chronic graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival after either myeloablative HLA-matched unrelated or non-myeloablative HLA-haploidentical, compared with myeloablative HLA-matched related

  4. Wildebeest-associated malignant catarrhal fever: perspectives for integrated control of a lymphoproliferative disease of cattle in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Wambua, Lillian; Wambua, Peninah Nduku; Ramogo, Allan Maurice; Mijele, Domnic; Otiende, Moses Yongo

    2016-01-01

    Wildebeest-associated malignant catarrhal fever (WA-MCF), an acute lymphoproliferative disease of cattle caused by alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), remains a significant constraint to cattle production in nomadic pastoralist systems in eastern and southern Africa. The transmission of WA-MCF is dependent on the presence of the wildlife reservoir, i.e. wildebeest, belonging to the species Connochaetes taurinus and Connochaetes gnou; hence, the distribution of WA-MCF is largely restricted to Kenya, Tanzania and the Republic of South Africa, where wildebeest are present. WA-MCF is analogous to sheep-associated MCF (SA-MCF) in many aspects, with the latter having sheep as its reservoir host and a more global distribution, mainly in developed countries with intensive livestock production systems. However, unlike SA-MCF, the geographic seclusion of WA-MCF may have contributed to an apparent neglect in research efforts aimed at increased biological understanding and control of the disease. This review aims to highlight the importance of WA-MCF and the need for intensified research towards measures for its integrated control. We discuss current knowledge on transmission and geographical distribution in eastern and southern Africa and the burden of WA-MCF in affected vulnerable pastoral communities in Africa. Recent findings towards vaccine development and pertinent knowledge gaps for future research efforts on WA-MCF are also considered. Finally, integrated control of WA-MCF based on a logical three-pronged framework is proposed, contextualizing vaccine development, next-generation diagnostics, and diversity studies targeted to the viral pathogen and cattle hosts.

  5. Alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide for nonmalignant disorders

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Orly R.; Chen, Allen R.; Gamper, Christopher; Loeb, David; Zambidis, Elias; Llosa, Nicolas; Huo, Jeffrey; Dezern, Amy E.; Steppan, Diana; Robey, Nancy; Holuba, Mary Jo; Cooke, Kenneth R.; Symons, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic (allo-) hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is curative for many nonmalignant pediatric disorders, including hemoglobinopathies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and immunodeficiencies. There is great success using HLA-matched related donors for these patients; however, the use of alternative donors has been associated with increased graft failure, graft versus host disease (GVHD), and transplant-related mortality (TRM). HSCT using alternative donors with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/Cy) for GVHD prophylaxis has been performed for hematologic malignancies with engraftment, GVHD, and TRM comparable to that seen with HLA-matched related donors. There are limited reports of HSCT in nonmalignant pediatric disorders other than hemoglobinopathies using alternative donors and PT/Cy. We transplanted eleven pediatric patients with life-threatening nonmalignant conditions using reduced intensity conditioning (RIC), alternative donors, and PT/Cy alone or in combination with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. We observed limited GVHD, no TRM, and successful engraftment sufficient to eliminate manifestations of disease in all patients. Allo-HSCT using alternative donors and PT/Cy shows promise for curing nonmalignant disorders; development of prospective clinical trials to confirm these observations is warranted. PMID:26860634

  6. Methotrexate-related lymphoproliferative disorder of the stomach in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis: a case of disease regression after methotrexate cessation.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuki; Nakamura, Takefumi; Kinoshita, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Mikio; Uose, Suguru; Someda, Hitoshi; Miyoshi, Takashi; Io, Katsuhiro; Nagai, Ken-Ichi

    2016-02-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old woman with methotrexate-related gastric lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). The patient had a history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and had been treated with methotrexate (MTX). Endoscopic examination revealed round elevated lesions in the stomach, and a biopsy specimen showed atypical lymphoid cell proliferation. Immunohistological study found these atypical cells to be positive for L-26 but not for CD3 or EBER. Therefore, we made a diagnosis of MTX-related LPD showing features of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Combined positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) showed increased avidity in the stomach in addition to slightly increased FDG-avidity in the mediastinum and left chest wall. We decided not to start chemotherapy but to discontinue administration of MTX, with follow-up using endoscopy and PET-CT. The endoscopic examinations after cessation of MTX demonstrated gradual regression of the elevated lesions. PET-CT 6 months after cessation showed no increased FDG avidity in the stomach. While disease regression was observed in the stomach, the other FDG-avid spots remained unchanged on PET-CT. Therefore, we performed chemotherapy as additional therapy. On PET-CT after chemotherapy, the FDG-avid spots remained unchanged for more than 1 year, and we eventually concluded that they were RA-related inflammatory lesions. In patients with MTX-related LPD, cessation of MTX may be a therapeutic option, but careful follow-up and chemotherapy in accordance with the clinical course are essential.

  7. Early post-transplant complications following ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Naciri Bennani, Hamza; Abdulrahman, Zhyiar; Allal, Asma; Sallusto, Federico; Delarche, Antoine; Game, Xavier; Esposito, Laure; Doumerc, Nicolas; Debiol, Bénédicte; Kamar, Nassim; Rostaing, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Living-kidney transplantation is increasing because of the scarcity of kidneys from deceased donors and the increasing numbers of patients on waiting lists for a kidney transplant. Living-kidney transplantation is now associated with increased long-term patient- and allograft-survival rates. Objectives: The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify, in a cohort of 44 ABO-incompatible (ABOi) live-kidney transplant patients, the main complications that occurred within 6 months post-transplantation, and to compare these findings with those from 44 matched ABO-compatible (ABOc) live-kidney transplant patients who were also from our center. Patients and Methods: This single-center retrospective study assessed post-transplantation complications in 44 ABO-i versus 44 matched ABO-c patients. All patients were comparable at baseline except that ABO-i patients had greater immunological risks. Results: During the 6-month post-transplant period, more ABO-i patients presented with postoperative bleeds, thus requiring significantly more blood transfusions. Bleeds were associated with significantly lower values of fibrinogen, platelets, prothrombin time, and hemoglobin levels. Surgical complications, patient- and graft-survival rates, and kidney-function statuses were similar between both groups at 6 months post-transplantation. Conclusions: We conclude that impairment of hemostatic factors at pre-transplant explained the increased risk of a post-transplant bleed in ABO-i patients. PMID:27047806

  8. Postprandial blood glucose level in maintenance hemodialysis patients predicts post-transplant-diabetes-mellitus.

    PubMed

    Haider, D G; Mittermayer, F; Friedl, A; Batrice, A; Auinger, M; Wolzt, M; Hörl, W H

    2010-03-01

    Post-transplant-diabetes-mellitus (PTDM) is a frequent complication after kidney transplantation. One-hundred-and-seven patients with kidney transplantation were screened for the occurrence of PTDM. Of these, full data sets from 49 subjects were available with documented glucose concentrations during maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) and regular clinical follow-up of 7-34 months. For assessment of glucose metabolism the response to a standard meal during MHD was used in normoglycemic patients based on fasting blood glucose. Abnormal postprandial blood glucose concentration was defined as >140 mg/dl 2 h after food intake.Twelve end stage renal disease patients had abnormal postprandial blood glucose on MHD. All 12 subjects but also four MHD patients with normal postprandial and fasting blood glucose values developed PTDM. Multivariate Cox-regression analysis revealed that abnormal postprandial blood glucose is a strong predictor for PTDM (Hazard ratio: 42.3 (IQR: 7.9-227.2); p<0.001). Fasting blood glucose (94 vs. 100 mg/dl) was not different between MHD patients who did (n=16) or did not (n=33) develop PTDM.This study suggests that measurement of postprandial blood glucose during MHD identifies patients who develop PTDM after kidney transplantation. It should be used for screening of patients at risk.

  9. Advances in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndromes.

    PubMed

    Madkaikar, Manisha; Mhatre, Snehal; Gupta, Maya; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2011-07-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of lymphocyte homeostasis. It is characterized by non-malignant lymphoproliferation autoimmunity mostly directed toward blood cells and increased risk of lymphoma. Majority of patients with ALPS harbor heterozygous germline mutations in the gene for the TNF receptor-family member Fas (CD 95, Apo-1) which are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Somatic Fas mutations are the second most common genetic etiology of ALPS. Additionally mutations in the genes encoding Fas-ligand (FASLG), caspase 10 (CASP10) and caspase 8 (CASP8), NRAS and KRAS have been identified in a small number of patients with ALPS and related disorders. Approximately one-third of patients with ALPS have yet unidentified defect. ALPS was initially thought to be a very rare disease, but recent studies have shown that it may be more common than previously thought. Testing for ALPS should therefore be considered in patients with unexplained lymphadenopathy, cytopenias, and hepatosplenomegaly. There have been significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of ALPS in last few years which has resulted in the development of new diagnostic criteria and a number of targeted therapies. This review describes the clinical and laboratory manifestations found in patients with ALPS, as well as the molecular basis for the disease and new advances in treatment.

  10. Risk Factors for and Spatial Distribution of Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus (LPDV) in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in New York State, USA.

    PubMed

    Alger, Katrina; Bunting, Elizabeth; Schuler, Krysten; Whipps, Christopher M

    2017-03-22

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is an oncogenic avian retrovirus that was previously thought to exclusively infect domestic turkeys but was recently shown to be widespread in Wild Turkeys ( Meleagris gallopavo ) throughout most of the eastern US. In commercial flocks, the virus spreads between birds housed in close quarters, but there is little information about potential risk factors for infection in wild birds. Initial studies focused on distribution of LPDV nationally, but investigation of state-level data is necessary to assess potential predictors of infection and detect patterns in disease prevalence and distribution. We tested wild turkey bone marrow samples (n=2,536) obtained from hunter-harvested birds in New York State from 2012 to 2014) for LPDV infection. Statewide prevalence for those 3 yr was 55% with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 53-57%. We evaluated a suite of demographic, anthropogenic, and land cover characteristics with logistic regression to identify potential predictors for infection based on odds ratio (OR). Age (OR=0.16, 95% CI=0.13-0.19) and sex (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.03-1.24) were strong predictors of LPDV infection, with juveniles less likely to test positive than adults, and females more likely to test positive than males. The number of birds released during the state's 40-yr translocation program (OR=0.993, 95% CI=0.990-0.997) and the ratio of agriculture to forest cover (OR=1.13, 95% CI=1.03-1.19) were also predictive of LPDV infection. Prevalence distribution was analyzed using dual kernel density smoothing to produce a risk surface map, combined with Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic and the Anselin Local Moran's I to identify statistically significant geographic clusters of high or low prevalence. These methods revealed the prevalence of LPDV was high (>50%) throughout New York State, with regions of variation and several significant clusters. We revealed new information about the risk factors and distribution of LPDV in

  11. Epstein-Barr virus-associated posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder after high-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous CD34-selected hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Nash, Richard A; Dansey, Roger; Storek, Jan; Georges, George E; Bowen, James D; Holmberg, Leona A; Kraft, George H; Mayes, Maureen D; McDonagh, Kevin T; Chen, Chien-Shing; Dipersio, John; Lemaistre, C Fred; Pavletic, Steven; Sullivan, Keith M; Sunderhaus, Julie; Furst, Daniel E; McSweeney, Peter A

    2003-09-01

    High-dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently being evaluated for the control of severe autoimmune diseases. The addition of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) to high-dose chemoradiotherapy in the high-dose immunosuppressive therapy regimen and CD34 selection of the autologous graft may induce a higher degree of immunosuppression compared with conventional autologous HSCT for malignant diseases. Patients may be at higher risk of transplant-related complications secondary to the immunosuppressed state, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), but this is an unusual complication after autologous HSCT. Fifty-six patients (median age, 42 years; range, 23-61 years) with either multiple sclerosis (n = 26) or systemic sclerosis (n = 30) have been treated. The median follow-up has been 24 months (range, 2-60 months). Two patients (multiple sclerosis, n = 1; systemic sclerosis, n = 1) had significant reactivations of herpesvirus infections early after HSCT and then developed aggressive EBV-PTLD and died on days +53 and +64. Multiorgan clonal B-cell infiltrates that were EBV positive by molecular studies or immunohistology were identified at both autopsies. Both patients had positive screening skin tests for equine ATG (Atgam) and had been converted to rabbit ATG (Thymoglobulin) from the first dose. Of the other 54 patients, 2 of whom had partial courses of rabbit ATG because of a reaction to the intravenous infusion of equine ATG, only 1 patient had a significant clinical reactivation of a herpesvirus infection (herpes simplex virus 2) early after HSCT, and none developed EBV-PTLD. The T-cell count in the peripheral blood on day 28 was 0/microL in all 4 patients who received rabbit ATG; this was significantly less than in patients who received equine ATG (median, 174/microL; P =.001; Mann-Whitney ranked sum test). Although the numbers are limited

  12. Cysteamine in renal transplantation: A report of two patients with nephropathic cystinosis and the successful re-initiation of cysteamine therapy during the immediate post-transplant period.

    PubMed

    Berryhill, Allison; Bhamre, Suvarna; Chaudhuri, Abanti; Concepcion, Waldo; Grimm, Paul C

    2016-02-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is a rare disorder causing the accumulation of intracellular cystine crystals in tissues. The damage to the proximal tubules of the kidneys results in Fanconi syndrome, and patients with cystinosis experience the progression of chronic kidney disease, resulting in the need for kidney transplantation. Treatment of cystinosis with cysteamine has proven to be effective; however, it has many gastrointestinal side effects that are concerning for transplant specialists during the immediate post-transplant period. Transplant specialists routinely discontinue cysteamine therapy for up to six weeks to ensure proper immunosuppressant absorption. This practice is worrisome because it communicates the acceptability of lapses of cysteamine treatment to patients. It may be better to re-initiate cysteamine therapy shortly after transplantation while the patient is followed more closely by the transplant team. This report presents two pediatric patients with nephropathic cystinosis who successfully restarted cysteamine therapy in the immediate post-transplant period without issue in regard to immunosuppression absorption or gastrointestinal side effects. These cases challenge current practice of discontinuing cysteamine therapy during kidney transplantation, and immediate re-initiation of cysteamine therapy in cystinosis patients post-transplant should be considered.

  13. T-gamma-lymphoproliferative disorder arising in a background of autoimmune disease and terminating in plasma cell dyscrasia with primary amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Amparo, E; Kaplan, L; Rosenbloom, B; Lee, S

    1991-01-01

    T-gamma-lymphoproliferative disorder, a syndrome of T-cell lymphocytosis with neutropenia has been described in patients with various autoimmune disorders, especially rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of T-gamma-lymphoproliferative disorder occurring in a 42-year-old white woman with a long history of dermatitis herpetiformis and subsequent development of Coomb's positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia and polymyositis. The peripheral blood lymphocytes showed the T-suppressor cell phenotype (CD2-, CD3-, CD8-, and CD4-). DNA analysis of the peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed a T-cell receptor beta-chain gene rearrangement and an immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene rearrangement. The patient's course was marked by numerous bouts of infection. The unique factor in this patient was the development of a plasma cell dyscrasia and amyloidosis prior to death.

  14. [Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vera; Conde, Marta; Figueiredo, António; Vasconcelos, Júlia; Dias, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is an impairment of lymphocyte apoptosis expressed by generalized non-malignant lymphoproliferation, lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly. This article describes a seven and 14 year old males. The first one was admitted at 3 years of age with fever, bicytopenia and generalized lymphadenopathy. Hystopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed reactive follicular hyperplasia and marked paracortical expansion. He was readmitted three years later presenting herpes zoster and similar clinical features. High levels of IL-10 and increasing tendency of Fas-L in plasma and serum. The second child was admitted at 13 years of age presenting thigh and gluteus cellulitis, anemia and neutropenia. T lymphocytes aß+CD4-CD8- 3,1%. Hystopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed marked paracortical hyperplasia. Both children are treated with mycophenolate mofetil with good response. ALPS is an underestimated entity that must be considered in non malign lymphoproliferation, autoimmunity and expansion of an unusual population of a/ßCD3+CD4-CD8-(double-negative T cells>1%).

  15. Hepatitis C and kidney disease: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, Rashad S; William, Emad A; Khalil, Soha S

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis-C (HCV) infection can induce kidney injury, mostly due to formation of immune-complexes and cryoglobulins, and possibly to a direct cytopathic effect. It may cause acute kidney injury (AKI) as a part of systemic vasculitis, and augments the risk of AKI due to other etiologies. It is responsible for mesangiocapillary or membranous glomerulonephritis, and accelerates the progression of chronic kidney disease due to other causes. HCV infection increases cardiovascular and liver-related mortality in patients on regular dialysis. HCV-infected patients are at increased risk of acute post-transplant complications. Long-term graft survival is compromised by recurrent or de novo glomerulonephritis, or chronic transplant glomerulopathy. Patient survival is challenged by increased incidence of diabetes, sepsis, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, and liver failure. Effective and safe directly acting antiviral agents (DAAs) are currently available for treatment at different stages of kidney disease. However, the relative shortage of DAAs in countries where HCV is highly endemic imposes a need for treatment-prioritization, for which a scoring system is proposed in this review. It is concluded that the thoughtful use of DAAs, will result in a significant change in the epidemiology and clinical profiles of kidney disease, as well as improvement of dialysis and transplant outcomes, in endemic areas.

  16. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Other Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Wall, Sarah; Woyach, Jennifer A

    2016-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia affects less than 1% of US adults but is the most common leukemia and primarily affects older patients. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas are the seventh most common cancers in the United States and also primarily affect older patients. In general, older patients should be treated differently than their younger, fitter counterparts. Fitness level and comorbidities should be taken into account when planning treatment. First-line treatment of most of these B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders consists of chemoimmunotherapy. In relapsed and refractory disease, there is a growing role for therapies targeting the B-cell receptor signaling pathway.

  17. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) in a Boy with Massive Lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Khalesi, Maryam; Farid, Reza; Badiee, Zahra; Rastin, Maryam; Ahanchian, Hamid

    2010-09-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an uncommon nonmalignant lymphoproliferative disease which is characterized by chronic, persistent or recurrent lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, immune cytopenia , hypergammaglobinemia and increased risk of lymphoma. We report a 2-year old boy with hepatosplenomegaly as first presentation. Petechial and purpuric rashes with massive cervical lymphadenopathies developed 10 months later.In laboratory tests anemia, thrombocytopenia and hypergammaglobinemia were observed. According to flocytometry increased double negative T cells and by apoptosis assay decrease apoptosis of lymphocytes accompanied clinical manifestations, thus diagnosis of ALPS was established. In conclusion; in all patients with massive lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegay; especially with cytopenia; ALPS should be considered.

  18. Clinical Significance of Pre- and Post-Transplant BAFF Levels in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ji Won; Kim, Kyoung Woon; Kim, Bo-Mi; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Choi, Min Seok; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that pre-transplant B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels are associated with the development of de novo anti-HLA antibodies and antibody mediated rejection post-transplant. However, the clinical significance of BAFF values at allograft rejection has not been determined. In this study, we investigated the clinical significance of pre-transplant BAFF level as well as post-transplant BAFF levels measured when indication biopsy was done. We checked for anti-HLA antibodies in 115 kidney transplant recipients who required allograft biopsy due to an increase in serum creatinine. With the same serum specimen, we measured BAFF levels, and in 78 of these patients, pre-transplant BAFF and anti-HLA antibody levels were detected as well. Patients in each group were divided into tertiles according to BAFF levels. We investigated the relationship between BAFF levels and the occurrence of anti-HLA antibodies. Pre-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, and also with early rejection (Tertile 3, 26.9% vs. Tertile 1, 11.5%; P<0.05). Post-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, but did not show association with anti-HLA antibodies and positive donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy. We did not find any association between post-transplant BAFF levels and allograft biopsy results, Banff scores and microvascular inflammation scores. In conclusion, pre-transplant BAFF levels are associated with pre-transplant sensitization and are useful in predicting allograft rejection. But post-transplant BAFF levels measured at the time of indication biopsy are not associated with the appearance of de novo HLA-DSA, allograft rejection, biopsy findings and other allograft outcomes. PMID:27631619

  19. The clinical course and outcomes of post-transplantation diabetes mellitus after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Soo; Choi, Hyo-In; Kim, In-Ok; Jung, Sung-Ho; Yun, Tae-Jin; Lee, Jae-Won; Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Jae-Joong

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe in more detail the predisposition, natural course, and clinical impact of post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) after heart transplantation (HT). The characteristics and clinical outcomes of 54 patients with PTDM were compared with those of 140 patients without PTDM. The mean age of PTDM patients was significantly higher than controls (48.9 ± 9.3 vs 38.6 ± 13.3 yr, respectively, P = 0.001), and ischemic heart disease was a more common indication of HT (20.4% [11/54] vs 7.1% [10/140], respectively, P = 0.008). In multivariate analysis, only recipient age (odds ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.40; P = 0.001) was associated with PTDM development. In 18 patients (33%), PTDM was reversed during the follow-up period, and the reversal of PTDM was critically dependent on the time taken to develop PTDM (1.9 ± 1.0 months in the reversed group vs 14.5 ± 25.3 months in the maintained group, P = 0.005). The 5-yr incidence of late infection (after 6 months) was higher in the PTDM group than in the control group (30.4% ± 7.1% vs 15.4% ± 3.3%, respectively, P = 0.031). However, the 5-yr overall survival rate was not different (92.9% ± 4.1% vs 85.8% ± 3.2%, respectively, P = 0.220). In conclusion, PTDM after HT is reversible in one-third of patients and is not a critical factor in patient survival after HT.

  20. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): a rare cause of immune cytopenia.

    PubMed

    John, M Joseph; Rajasekhar, Reena; Mathews, Vikram

    2008-02-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an inherited disorder manifesting with autoimmune cytopenia, lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. The differential diagnosis includes infections, autoimmune disorders or malignancies. The disease is characterized by accumulation of double negative (CD3+ CD4- CD8-) T cells (DNT) in the peripheral blood. We describe a case and review the literature.

  1. CD4(+) memory T cells retain surface expression of CD31 independently of thymic function in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders following autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Batorov, Egor V; Tikhonova, Marina A; Kryuchkova, Irina V; Sergeevicheva, Vera V; Sizikova, Svetlana A; Ushakova, Galina Y; Batorova, Dariya S; Gilevich, Andrey V; Ostanin, Alexander A; Shevela, Ekaterina Y; Chernykh, Elena R

    2017-03-14

    High-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (AHSCT) causes severe and long-lasting immunodeficiency in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. The thymus begins to restore the T-cell repertoire approximately from the sixth month post-transplant. We assessed the dynamics of post-transplant recovery of CD4(+)CD45RA(+)CD31(+) T cells, "recent thymic emigrants" (RTEs), and a poorly described subtype of CD4(+)CD45RA(-)CD31(+) T cells in 90 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders following high-dose chemotherapy with AHSCT. Relative and absolute counts of CD4(+)CD31(+) naïve and memory T cells were evaluated before AHSCT, at the day of engraftment, and 6- and 12-month post-transplant. The pre-transplant count of CD4(+)CD45RA(+)CD31(+) T cells was lower than in healthy controls, and did not reach donors' values during the 12-month period. The pre-transplant number of CD4(+)CD45RA(-)CD31(+) T cells was higher than in healthy controls and was restored rapidly following AHSCT. Post-transplant mediastinal radiotherapy reduced counts of RTEs and elongated recovery period. Non-thymic tissue irradiation did not reduce this subset. The obtained data indicate that homeostatic proliferation may decrease the significance of CD31 expression on CD4(+)CD45RA(+) T cells as a marker of RTEs, and suggest that evaluation of RTEs recovery by flow cytometry requires an accurate gating strategy to exclude CD31(+) memory T cells.

  2. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Manifesting as Intestinal Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma in an Adult Renal Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Börcek, Pelin; Özdemir, B Handan; Özgün, Gonca; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a relatively common posttransplant malignancy affecting as many as 10% of all solid-organ recipients. Most cases of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder are of B-cell origin, with common Epstein-Barr virus association. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders of T-cell origin are much rarer and less frequently associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Here, we report an unusual case of Epstein-Barr virus-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma causing an intestinal perforation in an adult renal transplant recipient. A 52-year-old male patient with renal allograft developed cryptogenic end-stage liver failure and was accepted as a candidate for liver transplant. Before transplant, he was admitted with severe abdominal pain, which turned out to result from ileal perforation. Pathologic evaluation of the intestinal resection showed diffuse malignant lymphoid infiltration of the ileum, consistent with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. The tumor was positive for Epstein-Barr virus genome. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma is a rare form of T-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder that is infrequently associated with Epstein-Barr virus. The occurrence of this extraordinary form of post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, its late onset, intestinal localization, and Epstein-Barr virus as sociation represent a unique clinical rarity.

  3. Cutaneous EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Gru, Alejandro A; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2017-01-01

    This article will focus on the cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders associated with EBV, with an emphasis on the upcoming changes in the revised 4th Edition of the WHO classification of tumors of the hematopoietic system, many of which deal with cutaneous disorders derived from NK-cells or T-cells. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma usually presents in the upper aerodigestive tract, but can involve the skin secondarily. EBV-associated T- and NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in the pediatric age group include the systemic diseases, chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) and systemic EBV+ T-cell lymphoma of childhood. Hydroa vacciniforme (HV)-like LPD is a primarily cutaneous form of CAEBV and encompasses the lesions previously referred to as HV and HV-like lymphoma (HVLL). All the T/NK-cell-EBV-associated diseases occur with higher frequency in Asians, and indigenous populations from Central and South America and Mexico. Among the B-cell EBV-associated LPD two major changes have been introduced in the WHO. The previously designated EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV-DLBCL) of the elderly, has been changed to EBV-DLBCL with 'not otherwise specified' as a modifier (NOS). A new addition to the WHO system is the more recently identified EBV+ mucocutaneous ulcer, which involves skin and mucosal-associated sites.

  4. Timed Sequential Busulfan and Post Transplant Cyclophosphamide for Allogeneic Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-27

    Other Diseases of Blood and Blood-forming Organs; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myeloproliferative Syndrome; Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma; Hodgkins Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma

  5. Image findings of monomorphic non-hogdkin lymphoproliferative disorder in a post renal transplant patient diagnosed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajasekar, Thirugnanam; Shibu, Deepu; Radhakrishnan, Edathurthy Kalarikal; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations caused by immunosuppression after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. PTLD is categorized by early lesion, polymorphic PTLD and monomorphic PTLD. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) scans have clinical significance in the evaluation of PTLD following renal transplantation. We report imaging findings of a monomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post renal transplant seen on FDG PET/CT in a 32-year-old lactating woman. Whole body FDG- ET/CT demonstrated uptake in right external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:25210292

  6. FGF23 is associated with early post-transplant hypophosphataemia and normalizes faster than iPTH in living donor renal transplant recipients: a longitudinal follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Narayan; Jaiswal, Akhilesh; Agarwal, Vikas; Kumar, Shashi; Chaturvedi, Saurabh; Yadav, Subhash; Gupta, Amit; Sharma, Raj K.; Bhadauria, Dharmendra; Kaul, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to longitudinally analyse changes in the levels of serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and associated minerals in patients undergoing renal transplantation. Methods Sixty-three patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who underwent living donor transplantation were recruited. Serum FGF23, iPTH, uric acid, inorganic phosphorous (iP), blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine were measured pre-transplant and at 1 (M1), 3 (M3) and 12 months (M12) post-transplantation. Results FGF23 levels were decreased at M1, M3 and M12 by 93.81, 96.74 and 97.53%, respectively. iPTH levels were decreased by 67.95, 74.95 and 84.9%, respectively. The prevalence of hyperparathyroidism at M1, M3 and M12 post-transplantation was 63.5, 42.9 and 11.1%, respectively. FGF23 and iP levels remained above the normal range in 23 (36.5%) and 17 (27%) patients at M1, 10 (15.9%) and 5 (8%) at M3 and in none at M12 post-transplantation, respectively. A multivariate regression model revealed that, pre-transplant, iP was positively associated with iPTH (P = 0.016) but not with FGF 23; however, post-transplant, iP level was negatively associated with FGF23 (P < 0.001) but not with iPTH. Conclusions Post-transplant FGF23 levels settle faster than those of iPTH. However, 11% of patients continued to have hyperparathyroidism even after 12 months. PMID:27679713

  7. A role for everolimus in post-transplant encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis: first case report.

    PubMed

    Sud, Rahul; Garry, Lorraine; Spicer, Stephen Timothy; Allen, Richard D M; Eris, Josette M; Wyburn, Kate; Verran, Deborah; Cooper, Caroline Louise; Chadban, Steve

    2014-04-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a rare complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) that carries a high morbidity and mortality. The 'two hit theory' suggests that long term deterioration of the peritoneum combined with intraperitoneal inflammation is needed in the pathogenesis of EPS. For unclear reasons, post transplantation EPS is being increasingly reported in patients previously on PD. To date, there is no proven effective therapy with an absence of randomised controlled trials. Individual case reports and small case series have reported on the use of tamoxifen and corticosteroids for medical management of EPS. The use of everolimus has been reported in a single case, and never in the setting of renal transplantation. Here, we present the first case of post-transplant encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis treated successfully with a combination of everolimus, tamoxifen, low dose corticosteroid and surgery.

  8. New concepts and best practices for management of pre- and post-transplantation cancer.

    PubMed

    Campistol, Josep M; Cuervas-Mons, Valentín; Manito, Nicolás; Almenar, Luis; Arias, Manuel; Casafont, Fernando; Del Castillo, Domingo; Crespo-Leiro, María G; Delgado, Juan F; Herrero, J Ignacio; Jara, Paloma; Morales, José M; Navarro, Mercedes; Oppenheimer, Federico; Prieto, Martín; Pulpón, Luis A; Rimola, Antoni; Román, Antonio; Serón, Daniel; Ussetti, Piedad

    2012-10-01

    Solid-organ transplant recipients are at increased risk of developing cancer compared with the general population. Tumours can arise de novo, as a recurrence of a preexisting malignancy, or from the donated organ. The ATOS (Aula sobre Trasplantes de Órganos Sólidos; the Solid-Organ Transplantation Working Group) group, integrated by Spanish transplant experts, meets annually to discuss current advances in the field. In 2011, the 11th edition covered a range of new topics on cancer and transplantation. In this review we have highlighted the new concepts and best practices for managing cancer in the pre-transplant and post-transplant settings that were presented at the ATOS meeting. Immunosuppression plays a major role in oncogenesis in the transplant recipient, both through impaired immunosurveillance and through direct oncogenic activity. It is possible to transplant organs obtained from donors with a history of cancer as long as an effective minimization of malignancy transmission strategy is followed. Tumour-specific wait-periods have been proposed for the increased number of transplantation candidates with a history of malignancy; however, the patient's individual risk of death from organ failure must be taken into consideration. It is important to actively prevent tumour recurrence, especially the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in liver transplant recipients. To effectively manage post-transplant malignancies, it is essential to proactively monitor patients, with long-term intensive screening programs showing a reduced incidence of cancer post-transplantation. Proposed management strategies for post-transplantation malignancies include viral monitoring and prophylaxis to decrease infection-related cancer, immunosuppression modulation with lower doses of calcineurin inhibitors, and addition of or conversion to inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin.

  9. Epstein-Barr virus-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qingqing; Chen, Kailin; Young, Ken H

    2015-01-23

    Epstein-Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, can induce both lytic and latent infections that result in a variety of human diseases, including lymphoproliferative disorders. The oncogenic potential of Epstein-Barr virus is related to its ability to infect and transform B lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cells. However, Epstein-Barr virus has also been implicated in the development of T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Epstein-Barr virus encodes a series of products that mimic several growth, transcription and anti-apoptotic factors, thus usurping control of pathways that regulate diverse homeostatic cellular functions and the microenvironment. However, the exact mechanism by which Epstein-Barr virus promotes oncogenesis and inflammatory lesion development remains unclear. Epstein-Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases often have overlapping clinical symptoms as well as histologic and immunophenotypic features because both lymphoid cell types derive from a common precursor. Accurate classification of Epstein-Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases is a prerequisite for appropriate clinical management. Currently, the treatment of most T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases is less than satisfactory. Novel and targeted therapies are strongly required to satisfy clinical demands. This review describes our current knowledge of the genetics, oncogenesis, biology, diagnosis and treatment of Epstein-Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases.

  10. Epstein–Barr virus-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qingqing; Chen, Kailin; Young, Ken H

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, can induce both lytic and latent infections that result in a variety of human diseases, including lymphoproliferative disorders. The oncogenic potential of Epstein–Barr virus is related to its ability to infect and transform B lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cells. However, Epstein–Barr virus has also been implicated in the development of T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Epstein–Barr virus encodes a series of products that mimic several growth, transcription and anti-apoptotic factors, thus usurping control of pathways that regulate diverse homeostatic cellular functions and the microenvironment. However, the exact mechanism by which Epstein–Barr virus promotes oncogenesis and inflammatory lesion development remains unclear. Epstein–Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases often have overlapping clinical symptoms as well as histologic and immunophenotypic features because both lymphoid cell types derive from a common precursor. Accurate classification of Epstein–Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases is a prerequisite for appropriate clinical management. Currently, the treatment of most T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases is less than satisfactory. Novel and targeted therapies are strongly required to satisfy clinical demands. This review describes our current knowledge of the genetics, oncogenesis, biology, diagnosis and treatment of Epstein–Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases. PMID:25613730

  11. CCL2 gene polymorphism is associated with post-transplant diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dabrowska-Zamojcin, Ewa; Romanowski, Maciej; Dziedziejko, Violetta; Maciejewska-Karlowska, Agnieszka; Sawczuk, Marek; Safranow, Krzysztof; Domanski, Leszek; Pawlik, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after solid organ transplantation, especially in recipients treated with calcineurin inhibitors. Previous studies suggest that chronic inflammation and chemokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can increase or decrease transcriptional activity and can change the production of chemokines. The aim of this study was to examine the association between CCL2 and CCL5 gene polymorphisms and the development of post-transplant diabetes mellitus. The study included 315 patients who received kidney transplants and were treated with calcineurin inhibitors. Patients were divided into two subgroups: with PTDM (n=43) and without PTDM (n=272). An additive model of univariate Cox regression analysis showed that the hazard of PTDM development was significantly positively associated with the number of CCL2 rs1024611 G alleles (HR 1.65; 95%CI 1.08-2.53; p=0.021). Multivariate Cox regression analysis, taking into the account the recipient's sex, age and BMI, as well as the number of G alleles of the CCL2 rs1024611 polymorphism, revealed that this polymorphism is an independent risk factor for post-transplant diabetes. The results of our study suggest an association between the CCL2 gene rs1024611 G allele and PTDM in patients treated with tacrolimus or cyclosporine.

  12. Comparison of Subcutaneous versus Intravenous Alemtuzumab for Graft-versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis with Fludarabine/Melphalan-Based Conditioning in Matched Unrelated Donor Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Khilna; Parmar, Sapna; Shah, Shreya; Shore, Tsiporah; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; van Besien, Koen

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare infusion-related reactions and outcomes of using subcutaneous (subQ) alemtuzumab versus intravenous (i.v.) alemtuzumab as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis for matched unrelated donor stem cell transplantations. Outcomes include incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV)/Epstein-Barr (EBV) viremia, development of CMV disease or post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder, fatal infections, acute and chronic GVHD, time to engraftment, relapse rate, and survival. We conducted a retrospective study of all adult matched unrelated donor stem cell transplantations patients who received fludarabine/melphalan with subQ or i.v. alemtuzumab in combination with tacrolimus as part of their conditioning for unrelated donor transplantation at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center from January 1, 2012 to March 21, 2014. Alemtuzumab was administered at a total cumulative dose of 100 mg (divided over days -7 to -3). Forty-six patients received an unrelated donor stem cell transplantation with fludarabine/melphalan and either subQ (n = 26) or i.v. (n = 20) alemtuzumab in combination with tacrolimus. Within the evaluable population, 130 subQ and 100 i.v. alemtuzumab doses were administered. For the primary outcome, ≥grade 2 infusion-related reactions occurred in 11 (8%) versus 25 (25%) infusions in the subQ and i.v. cohorts, respectively (P = .001). Overall, 12 injections (9%) in the subQ arm versus 26 infusions (26%) in the i.v. arm experienced an infusion-related reaction of any grade (P = .001). There were no significant differences between the subQ and i.v. arms in rates of reactivation of CMV/EBV, development of CMV disease or post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder, fatal infections, acute and chronic GVHD, relapse, or survival. Subcutaneous administration of alemtuzumab for GVHD prophylaxis was associated with fewer infusion-related reactions compared with i.v. administration in the SCT setting

  13. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Case report and family history.

    PubMed

    Ries, F; Ferster, A; Rieux-Laucat, F; Biwer, A; Dicato, M

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disease caused by defective lymphocyte apoptosis and is characterized by non-malignant lymphoproliferation, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune manifestations and increased risk of both Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Most forms of the disease are due to germ line mutations of the FAS gene and manifest during the first years of life with fluctuating lymphadenopathies, hemolysis, immune thrombocytopenia. During the second decade of life disease manifestations improve spontaneously but autoimmune problems still occur and there is an increased risk of lymphoproliferative malignancy. We describe a typical case of ALPS in a now 44 year old man, followed since the age of 2 for disease manifestations that were unclear at the beginning.

  14. T-replete haploidentical allogeneic transplantation using post-transplantation cyclophosphamide in advanced AML and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Devillier, R; Bramanti, S; Fürst, S; Sarina, B; El-Cheikh, J; Crocchiolo, R; Granata, A; Chabannon, C; Morabito, L; Harbi, S; Faucher, C; Santoro, A; Weiller, P-J; Vey, N; Carlo-Stella, C; Castagna, L; Blaise, D

    2016-02-01

    Unmanipulated haploidentical transplantation (Haplo-SCT) using post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy) represents an alternative for patients with high-risk diseases lacking HLA-identical donor. Although it provides low incidences of GVHD, the efficacy of Haplo-SCT is still questioned, especially for patients with myeloid malignancies. Thus, we analyzed 60 consecutive patients with refractory (n=30) or high-risk CR (n=30) AML or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) who underwent PT-Cy Haplo-SCT. The median age was 57 years (22-73 years), hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index was ⩾3 in 38 patients (63%) and Haplo-SCT was the second allogeneic transplantation for 10 patients (17%). Although most of patients received PBSC as graft source (n=48, 80%), we found low incidences of grade 3-4 acute (2%) and severe chronic GVHD (4%). Among patients with high-risk CR diseases, 1-year non-relapse mortality, cumulative incidence of relapse, progression-free and overall survivals were 20%, 32%, 47% and 62%, respectively. In patients with refractory disease, corresponding results were 34%, 35%, 32% and 37%, respectively. We conclude that PT-Cy Haplo-SCT could provide promising anti-leukemic effect even in the setting of very advanced diseases. Thus, it represents a viable alternative for high-risk AML/MDS patients without HLA-identical donor.

  15. What is the impact of immunosuppressive treatment on the post-transplant renal osteopathy?

    PubMed

    Blaslov, Kristina; Katalinic, Lea; Kes, Petar; Spasovski, Goce; Smalcelj, Ruzica; Basic-Jukic, Nikolina

    2014-05-01

    Although glucocorticoid therapy is considered to be the main pathogenic factor, a consistent body of evidence suggests that other immunosuppressants might also play an important role in the development of the post-transplant renal osteopathy (PRO) through their pleiotropic pharmacological effects. Glucocorticoids seem to induce osteoclasts' activity suppressing the osteoblasts while data regarding other immunosuppressive drugs are still controversial. Mycophenolate mofetil and azathioprine appear to be neutral regarding the bone metabolism. However, the study analyzing any independent effect of antimetabolites on bone turnover has not been conducted yet. Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) induce trabecular bone loss in rodent, with contradictory results in renal transplant recipients. Suppression of vitamin D receptor is probably the underlying mechanism of renal calcium wasting in renal transplant recipients receiving CNI. In spite of an increased 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D level, the kidney is not able to reserve calcium, suggesting a role of vitamin D resistance that may be related to bone loss. More efforts should be invested to determine the role of CNI in PRO. In particular, data regarding the role of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi), such as sirolimus and everolimus, in the PRO development are still controversial. Rapamycin markedly decreases bone longitudinal growth as well as callus formation in experimental models, but also lowers the rate of bone resorption markers and glomerular filtration in clinical studies. Everolimus potently inhibits primary mouse and human osteoclast activity as well as the osteoclast differentiation. It also prevents the ovariectomy-induced loss of cancellous bone by 60 %, an effect predominantly associated with a decreased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, resulting in a partial preservation of the cancellous bone. At present, there is no clinical study analyzing the effect of everolimus on bone turnover in renal

  16. [Advances in the knowledge and management of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome].

    PubMed

    Garrido Colino, C

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis. ALPS often manifest in childhood with cytopenias, chronic non-malignant lymphoproliferation and autoimmune complications. A number of new insights have improved the understanding of the genetics and biology of ALPS. The treatment of the disease has changed and mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus have been demonstrated to have marked activity against the disease, improving quality of life for many patients. These will be discussed in this review.

  17. Therapeutic drug monitoring for either oral or intravenous busulfan when combined with pre- and post-transplantation cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Lindsey R.; Kanakry, Christopher G.; Zahurak, Marianna; Durakovic, Nadira; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Kasamon, Yvette L.; Gladstone, Douglas E.; Matsui, William; Borrello, Ivan; Huff, Carol Ann; Swinnen, Lode J.; Brodsky, Robert A.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Rosner, Gary L.; Jones, Richard J.; Luznik, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Busulfan (Bu)/cyclophosphamide (Cy) is a standard conditioning platform for allogeneic transplantation. We developed a strategy separating the Cy into two pre/post-transplantation doses (PTCy), providing myeloablative conditioning and single-agent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. We investigated the impact of Bu route on treatment-related toxicity for 131 consecutive adult patients. Busulfan was administered in four daily divided doses either orally (n = 72) or intravenously (n = 59) with pharmacokinetics on the first-dose and as necessary on subsequent doses to achieve a target area-under-the-concentration-curve (AUC) of 800–1400 µmol*min/L per dose. BuCy/PTCy with pharmacokinetics is well-tolerated with low treatment-related toxicity. Hepatic veno-occlusive disease incidence was 6% with two fatal events. Bu administration route in the context of BuCy/PTCy did not statistically impact hepatotoxicity, GVHD, relapse, disease-free survival, or overall survival. The BuCy/PTCy platform has a low incidence of treatment-related toxicity, including hepatotoxicity, in hematologic malignancies when using pharmacokinetics for a target AUC of 800–1400 µmol*min/L, irrespective of Bu administration route. PMID:26292764

  18. Cross-sectional imaging of extranodal involvement in abdominopelvic lymphoproliferative malignancies.

    PubMed

    Leite, Nuno Pinto; Kased, Norbert; Hanna, Robert F; Brown, Michele A; Pereira, Jose M; Cunha, Rui; Sirlin, Claude B

    2007-01-01

    Extranodal lymphoproliferative diseases are common, and their prevalence is increasing. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas and Hodgkin disease, in particular, frequently involve extranodal structures in the abdomen and pelvis, including both the solid organs (liver, spleen, kidneys, and pancreas) and the hollow organs of the gastrointestinal tract. Because virtually any abdominopelvic tissue may be involved, many different imaging manifestations are possible, and lymphoproliferative diseases may mimic other disorders. Familiarity with the imaging manifestations that are diagnostically specific for extranodal lymphoproliferative diseases is important because imaging plays an important role in the noninvasive management of disease. However, a definitive diagnosis requires a biopsy (of bone marrow, a lymph node, or a mass), a peripheral blood analysis, and other laboratory tests. In patients with known disease, the goals of imaging are staging, evaluation of response to therapy, and identification of new or recurrent disease or of complications of therapy. In patients without known disease, imaging permits a provisional diagnosis.

  19. Diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by FAS deficiency in adults.

    PubMed

    Lambotte, Olivier; Neven, Bénédicte; Galicier, Lionel; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Hermine, Olivier; Meyts, Isabelle; Picard, Capucine; Godeau, Bertrand; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    A diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by FAS deficiency during adulthood is unusual. We analyzed 17 cases of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by FAS deficiency diagnosed during adulthood in French reference centers for hereditary immunodeficiencies and for immune cytopenias. Twelve of the 17 patients had developed their first symptoms during childhood. The diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome had been delayed for a variety of reasons, including unusual clinical manifestations, late referral to a reference center, and the occurrence of somatic FAS mutations. The 5 other patients presented their first symptoms after the age of 16 years. In these patients, three germline heterozygous FAS mutations were predicted to be associated with haploinsufficiency and a somatic event on the second FAS allele was observed in 2 cases. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome may well be diagnosed in adulthood. The occurrence of additional genetic events may account for the delayed disease onset.

  20. Mapping the x-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Skare, J.C.; Milunsky, A.; Byron, K.S.; Sullivan, J.L.

    1987-04-01

    The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is triggered by Epstein-Barr virus infection and results in fatal mononucleosis, immunodeficiency, and lymphoproliferative disorders. This study shows that the mutation responsible for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is genetically linked to a restriction fragment length polymorphism detected with the DXS42 probe (from Xq24-q27). The most likely recombination frequency between the loci is 4%, and the associated logarithm of the odds is 5.26. Haplotype analysis using flanking restriction fragment length polymorphism markers indicates that the locus for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is distal to probe DXS42 but proximal to probe DXS99 (from Xq26-q27). It is now possible to predict which members of a family with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome are carrier females and to diagnose the syndrome prenatally.

  1. Comparison of two real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction strategies for minimal residual disease evaluation in lymphoproliferative disorders: correlation between immunoglobulin gene mutation load and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction performance.

    PubMed

    Della Starza, Irene; Cavalli, Marzia; Del Giudice, Ilaria; Barbero, Daniela; Mantoan, Barbara; Genuardi, Elisa; Urbano, Marina; Mannu, Claudia; Gazzola, Anna; Ciabatti, Elena; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin; Galimberti, Sara; Piccaluga, Pierpaolo; Gaidano, Gianluca; Ladetto, Marco; Monitillo, Luigia

    2014-09-01

    We compared two strategies for minimal residual disease evaluation of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by a variable immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) genes mutation load. Twenty-five samples from chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (n = 18) or mantle cell lymphoma (n = 7) patients were analyzed. Based on IGH variable region genes, 22/25 samples carried > 2% mutations, 20/25 > 5%. In the IGH joining region genes, 23/25 samples carried > 2% mutations, 18/25 > 5%. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed on IGH genes using two strategies: method A utilizes two patient-specific primers, whereas method B employs one patient-specific and one germline primer, with different positions on the variable, diversity and joining regions. Twenty-three samples (92%) resulted evaluable using method A, only six (24%) by method B. Method B poor performance was specifically evident among mutated IGH variable/joining region cases, although no specific mutation load above, which the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction failed was found. The molecular strategies for minimal residual disease evaluation should be adapted to the B-cell receptor features of the disease investigated.

  2. Retroviral vector integration in post-transplant hematopoiesis in mice conditioned with either submyeloablative or ablative irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sadat, M A; Dirscherl, S; Sastry, L; Dantzer, J; Pech, N; Griffin, S; Hawkins, T; Zhao, Y; Barese, C N; Cross, S; Orazi, A; An, C; Goebel, W S; Yoder, M C; Li, X; Grez, M; Cornetta, K; Mooney, S D; Dinauer, M C

    2009-12-01

    X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency with absent phagocyte NADPH-oxidase activity caused by defects in the gene-encoding gp91(phox). Here, we evaluated strategies for less intensive conditioning for gene therapy of genetic blood disorders without selective advantage for gene correction, such as might be used in a human X-CGD protocol. We compared submyeloablative with ablative irradiation as conditioning in murine X-CGD, examining engraftment, oxidase activity and vector integration in mice transplanted with marrow transduced with a gamma-retroviral vector for gp91(phox) expression. The frequency of oxidase-positive neutrophils in the donor population was unexpectedly higher in many 300 cGy-conditioned mice compared with lethally irradiated recipients, as was the fraction of vector-marked donor secondary CFU-S12. Vector integration sites in marrow, spleen and secondary CFU-S12 DNA from primary recipients were enriched for cancer-associated genes, including Evi1, and integrations in or near cancer-associated genes were more frequent in marrow and secondary CFU-S12 from 300 cGy-conditioned mice compared with fully ablated mice. These findings support the concept that vector integration can confer a selection bias, and suggest that the intensity of the conditioning regimen may further influence the effects of vector integration on clonal selection in post-transplant engraftment and hematopoiesis.

  3. Post-Transplant Diabetes Mellitus: Causes, Treatment, and Impact on Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shivaswamy, Vijay; Boerner, Brian; Larsen, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a frequent consequence of solid organ transplantation. PTDM has been associated with greater mortality and increased infections in different transplant groups using different diagnostic criteria. An international consensus panel recommended a consistent set of guidelines in 2003 based on American Diabetes Association glucose criteria but did not exclude the immediate post-transplant hospitalization when many patients receive large doses of corticosteroids. Greater glucose monitoring during all hospitalizations has revealed significant glucose intolerance in the majority of recipients immediately after transplant. As a result, the international consensus panel reviewed its earlier guidelines and recommended delaying screening and diagnosis of PTDM until the recipient is on stable doses of immunosuppression after discharge from initial transplant hospitalization. The group cautioned that whereas hemoglobin A1C has been adopted as a diagnostic criterion by many, it is not reliable as the sole diabetes screening method during the first year after transplant. Risk factors for PTDM include many of the immunosuppressant medications themselves as well as those for type 2 diabetes. The provider managing diabetes and associated dyslipidemia and hypertension after transplant must be careful of the greater risk for drug-drug interactions and infections with immunosuppressant medications. Treatment goals and therapies must consider the greater risk for fluctuating and reduced kidney function, which can cause hypoglycemia. Research is actively focused on strategies to prevent PTDM, but until strategies are found, it is imperative that immunosuppression regimens are chosen based on their evidence to prolong graft survival, not to avoid PTDM.

  4. ABO-Incompatible Living Donor Kidney Transplantation without Post-Transplant Therapeutic Plasma Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Yabu, J. M.; Fontaine, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Blood group incompatibility remains a significant barrier to kidney transplantation. Approximately one-third of donors are blood group incompatible with their intended recipient. Options for these donor-recipient pairs include blood group incompatible transplantation or kidney paired donation. However, the optimal protocol for blood group incompatible transplantation is unknown. Protocols differ in techniques to remove ABO antibodies, titer targets and immunosuppression regimens. In addition, the mechanisms of graft accommodation to blood group antigens remain poorly understood. We describe a blood group incompatible protocol using pre-transplant therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab in addition to prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. In this protocol, we do not exclude patients based on a high initial titer and do not implement post-transplant TPE. All 16 patients who underwent this protocol received a living donor transplant with 100 percent patient and graft survival, and no reported episodes of antibody-mediated rejection to date with a median follow-up of 2.6 years (range 0.75 to 4.7 years). We conclude that blood group incompatible transplantation can be achieved without post-transplant TPE. PMID:25739580

  5. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders following liver transplantation: Where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Dierickx, Daan; Cardinaels, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation has emerged as a life-saving treatment for several patients with acute liver failure, end stage liver disease and primary hepatic malignancies. However, long term immunosuppressive therapy aiming to reduce the risk of transplant rejection increases the incidence of several complications including malignancies. This is illustrated by the observation of a high ratio between observed and expected cases of lymphoproliferative disorders following liver transplantation. Despite a huge heterogeneity in morphological appearance of these disorders ranging from reactive-like lesions to real lymphomas, they are collectively termed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders. In this review we will provide an overview of this rare but challenging disorder as a complication of liver transplantation. PMID:26494960

  6. The accuracy of positron emission tomography in the detection of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas; Requilé, Annelies; Verscuren, Raf; Sagaert, Xavier; Morscio, Julie; Wlodarska, Iwona; Herreman, An; Kuypers, Dirk; Van Cleemput, Johan; Nevens, Frederik; Dupont, Lieven; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Pirenne, Jacques; De Wolf-Peeters, Christiane; Verhoef, Gregor; Brepoels, Lieselot; Gheysens, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    We investigated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in 170 cases with suspected or biopsy-proven posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. All solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients who underwent an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan between 2003 and 2010 in our center for the indication posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder, were retrospectively reviewed and results were compared with tissue biopsy whenever possible. One hundred and seventy positron emission tomography scans in 150 patients were eligible for evaluation. In 45 cases, the patient had a biopsy-confirmed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder before positron emission tomography scanning and positron emission tomography was performed for staging purposes. In the remaining 125 cases, positron emission tomography was performed to differentiate between posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other diseases. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-uptake was quantitatively expressed by calculation of maximum and mean standardized uptake value in the most intense lesion or, in the absence of attenuation corrected positron emission tomography scans, by comparing uptake in target lesion to liver and mediastinal uptake. We found an overall sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 89%, positive predictive value of 91% and negative predictive value of 87% for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder detection by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. In a subanalysis of the 125 scans performed for differentiating posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder from other diseases, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 90%, 89%, 85% and 93%, respectively. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-uptake in posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder was generally high with a median mean and maximum standardized uptake

  7. The accuracy of positron emission tomography in the detection of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas; Requilé, Annelies; Verscuren, Raf; Sagaert, Xavier; Morscio, Julie; Wlodarska, Iwona; Herreman, An; Kuypers, Dirk; Van Cleemput, Johan; Nevens, Frederik; Dupont, Lieven; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Pirenne, Jacques; De Wolf-Peeters, Christiane; Verhoef, Gregor; Brepoels, Lieselot; Gheysens, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    We investigated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in 170 cases with suspected or biopsy-proven posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. All solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients who underwent an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan between 2003 and 2010 in our center for the indication posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder, were retrospectively reviewed and results were compared with tissue biopsy whenever possible. One hundred and seventy positron emission tomography scans in 150 patients were eligible for evaluation. In 45 cases, the patient had a biopsy-confirmed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder before positron emission tomography scanning and positron emission tomography was performed for staging purposes. In the remaining 125 cases, positron emission tomography was performed to differentiate between posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other diseases. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-uptake was quantitatively expressed by calculation of maximum and mean standardized uptake value in the most intense lesion or, in the absence of attenuation corrected positron emission tomography scans, by comparing uptake in target lesion to liver and mediastinal uptake. We found an overall sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 89%, positive predictive value of 91% and negative predictive value of 87% for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder detection by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. In a subanalysis of the 125 scans performed for differentiating posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder from other diseases, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 90%, 89%, 85% and 93%, respectively. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-uptake in posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder was generally high with a median mean and maximum standardized uptake

  8. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis in individuals from sporadic (non-familial) chronic lymphocytic leukemia families persists over time, but does not progress to chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Daniel Mazza; Furtado, Felipe Magalhães; Falcão, Roberto Passetto

    2015-01-01

    Background Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis is classified as ‘high-count or clinical’ monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and ‘low-count or population’ monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis. Previously, 167 first-degree relatives pertaining to sporadic (non-familial) chronic lymphocytic leukemia families were studied and the presence of seven monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis individuals was reported. Objective The aim of this report is to describe the outcomes of five of the original monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis individuals. Methods Flow cytometry analysis was performed on mononuclear cells previously isolated from peripheral blood samples. A strategy of sequential gating designed to identify the population of CD19+/CD5+ B-lymphocytes was used and, subsequently, the monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis cells were characterized by the CD20weak/CD79bweak/negative phenotype. Results The monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis clone showed consistent stability over time with little variations in size. After a median follow-up of 7.6 years, none of the five monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis individuals progressed to chronic lymphocytic leukemia or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disease. Conclusions The data of this study suggest that chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis detected in the context of sporadic chronic lymphocytic leukemia families is not prone to clinical evolution and could be just a sign of immune senescence. PMID:26408361

  9. Pure red cell aplasia and lymphoproliferative disorders: an infrequent association.

    PubMed

    Vlachaki, Efthymia; Diamantidis, Michael D; Klonizakis, Philippos; Haralambidou-Vranitsa, Styliani; Ioannidou-Papagiannaki, Elizabeth; Klonizakis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare bone marrow failure syndrome defined by a progressive normocytic anaemia and reticulocytopenia without leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Secondary PRCA can be associated with various haematological disorders, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The aim of the present review is to investigate the infrequent association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders. PRCA might precede the appearance of lymphoma, may present simultaneously with the lymphoid neoplastic disease, or might appear following the lymphomatic disorder. Possible pathophysiological molecular mechanisms to explain the rare association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders are reported. Most cases of PRCA are presumed to be autoimmune mediated by antibodies against either erythroblasts or erythropoietin, by T-cells secreting factors selectively inhibiting erythroid colonies in the bone marrow or by NK cells directly lysing erythroblasts. Finally, focus is given to the therapeutical approach, as several treatment regimens have failed for PRCA. Immunosuppressive therapy and/or chemotherapy are effective for improving anaemia in the majority of patients with lymphoma-associated PRCA. Further investigation is required to define the pathophysiology of PRCA at a molecular level and to provide convincing evidence why it might appear as a rare complication of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  10. Primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders: new insights into biology and therapy.

    PubMed

    Querfeld, Christiane; Kuzel, Timothy M; Guitart, Joan; Rosen, Steven T

    2007-05-01

    The spectrum of CD30+ lymphoproliferative diseases of the skin includes CD30+ cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, lymphomatoidpapulosis, as well as borderline cases. These entities constitute the second most common group of cutaneous lymphomas according to the newly revised World Health Organization and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus classification. Recent progress in immune and molecular biology, and identification of therapeutic targets have increased our understanding of these diseases and have led to novel treatment approaches. This review will provide an update on recent findings of immunologic, molecular, cytogenetic features and treatment strategies for patients with CD30+ lymphoproliferative diseases.

  11. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome with Red Cell Aplasia.

    PubMed

    Meena, K R; Bisht, Supriya; Tamaria, K C

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is a rare inherited disorder of abnormal lymphocyte apoptosis, leading to chronic lymphoproliferation. It presents as lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and autoimmune phenomena. Pure red cell aplasia is characterized by normochromic normocytic anemia, reticulocytopenia, and absence of erythroblasts from a normal bone marrow. Only few lymphoproliferative disorders have been associated with erythroid aplasia. The authors are reporting a case of ALPS associated with red cell aplasia in a 7-y-old girl.

  12. Unmanipulated haploidentical bone marrow transplantation and post-transplant cyclophosphamide for hematologic malignanices following a myeloablative conditioning: an update.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, A; Dominietto, A; Ghiso, A; Di Grazia, C; Lamparelli, T; Gualandi, F; Bregante, S; Van Lint, M T; Geroldi, S; Luchetti, S; Grasso, R; Pozzi, S; Colombo, N; Tedone, E; Varaldo, R; Raiola, A M

    2015-06-01

    This is a report of 148 patients with hematologic malignancies who received an unmanipulated haploidentical bone marrow transplant (BMT), followed by post-transplant high-dose cyclophosphamide (PT-CY). All patients received a myeloablative conditioning consisting of thiotepa, busulfan, fludarabine (n=92) or TBI, fludarabine (n=56). The median age was 47 years (17-74); 47 patients were in first remission (CR1), 37 in second remission (CR2) and 64 had an active disease; all patients were first grafts. The diagnosis was acute leukemia (n=75), myelodisplastic syndrome (n=24), myelofibrosis (n=16), high-grade lymphoma (n=15) and others (n=18). GVHD prophylaxis consisted in PT-CY on days +3 and +5, cyclosporine (from day 0), and mycophenolate (from day +1). The median day for neutrophil engraftment was day +18 (13-32). The cumulative incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD was 24%, and of grades III-IV GVHD 10%. The incidence of moderate-severe chronic GVHD was 12%. With a median follow-up for the surviving patients of 313 days (100-1162), the cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality (TRM) is 13%, and the relapse-related death is 23%. The actuarial 22 months overall survival is 77% for CR1 patients, 49% for CR2 patients and 38% for patients grafted in relapse (P<0.001). Major causes of death were relapse (22%), GVHD (2%) and infections (6%). We confirm our initial results, suggesting that a myeloablative conditioning regimen followed by unmanipulated haploidentical BMT with PT-CY, results in a low risk of acute and chronic GVHD and encouraging rates of TRM and overall survival, also for patients with active disease at the time of transplant.

  13. An evolving understanding of modifiable risk factors for post-transplant mortality.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, S; Horne, J; Madill, J

    2017-02-20

    With great interest, we read the recently published article in Transplant International by Upala et al. entitled Underweight and obesity increase the risk of mortality after lung transplantation: a systematic review and meta-analysis [1]. To-date, lung transplant clinical practice guidelines have been based on expert opinions or site-specific experiences. The authors should be commended for recognizing the need to assess articles with rigorous study designs in order to guide evidence-based practice. In their recent work, Upala et al. concluded that both pre-transplant obese and underweight body mass indices are associated with significant risk of post-transplant mortality. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of magnesium supplements on early post-transplantation glucose metabolism: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Van Laecke, Steven; Nagler, Evi Vanessa; Taes, Youri; Van Biesen, Wim; Peeters, Patrick; Vanholder, Raymond

    2014-09-01

    Post-transplantation hypomagnesemia is common and predicts diabetes. Magnesium improves glycemic control in diabetics and insulin sensitivity in insulin resistant subjects. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of oral magnesium for improving glycemic control and insulin sensitivity at 3 months post-transplantation. We conducted a single-center, open-label, randomized parallel group study. We included adults with serum magnesium <1.7 mg/dl within 2 weeks after kidney transplantation. We randomized participants to 450 mg magnesium oxide up to three times daily or no treatment. The primary endpoint was the mean difference in fasting glycemia. Secondary endpoints were the mean difference in area under the curve (AUC) of glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test and insulin resistance measured by Homeostasis Model of Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Analyses were on intention-to-treat basis. In patients randomized to magnesium oxide (N = 27) versus no treatment (N = 27), fasting glycemia on average was 11.5 mg/dl lower (95% CI 1.7 to 21.3; P = 0.02). There was no difference between the two groups neither for 2 h AUC, where the mean value was 1164 mg/dl/min (95% CI -1884 to 4284; P = 0.45) lower in the treatment group nor for HOMA-IR. Magnesium supplements modestly improved fasting glycemia without effect on insulin resistance. Higher baseline glycemia among patients in the control group may have driven the positive outcome (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01889576).

  15. Post-Transplant Diabetes Mellitus: Causes, Treatment, and Impact on Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shivaswamy, Vijay; Boerner, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a frequent consequence of solid organ transplantation. PTDM has been associated with greater mortality and increased infections in different transplant groups using different diagnostic criteria. An international consensus panel recommended a consistent set of guidelines in 2003 based on American Diabetes Association glucose criteria but did not exclude the immediate post-transplant hospitalization when many patients receive large doses of corticosteroids. Greater glucose monitoring during all hospitalizations has revealed significant glucose intolerance in the majority of recipients immediately after transplant. As a result, the international consensus panel reviewed its earlier guidelines and recommended delaying screening and diagnosis of PTDM until the recipient is on stable doses of immunosuppression after discharge from initial transplant hospitalization. The group cautioned that whereas hemoglobin A1C has been adopted as a diagnostic criterion by many, it is not reliable as the sole diabetes screening method during the first year after transplant. Risk factors for PTDM include many of the immunosuppressant medications themselves as well as those for type 2 diabetes. The provider managing diabetes and associated dyslipidemia and hypertension after transplant must be careful of the greater risk for drug-drug interactions and infections with immunosuppressant medications. Treatment goals and therapies must consider the greater risk for fluctuating and reduced kidney function, which can cause hypoglycemia. Research is actively focused on strategies to prevent PTDM, but until strategies are found, it is imperative that immunosuppression regimens are chosen based on their evidence to prolong graft survival, not to avoid PTDM. PMID:26650437

  16. Donor IFNL4 Genotype Is Associated with Early Post-Transplant Fibrosis in Recipients with Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Taylor; Garber, Ari; Thomas, Dawn; Hamon, Nicole; Lopez, Rocio; Konjeti, Rajesh; McCullough, Arthur; Zein, Nizar; Fung, John; Askar, Medhat; John, Binu V.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Early post-transplant hepatic fibrosis is associated with poor outcomes and may be influenced by donor/recipient genetic factors. The rs368234815 IFNL4 polymorphism is related to the previously described IL28B polymorphism, which predicts etiology-independent hepatic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to identify the impact of donor and/or recipient IFNL4 genotype on early fibrosis among patients transplanted for hepatitis C (HCV). Methods Clinical data were collected for 302 consecutive patients transplanted for HCV. 116 patients who had available liver biopsies and donor/recipient DNA were included. 28% of these patients with stage 2 fibrosis or greater were compared to patients without significant post-transplant fibrosis with respect to clinical features as well as donor/recipient IFNL4 genotype. Results The IFNL4 TT/TT genotype was found in 26.0% of recipients and 38.6% of donors. Patients who developed early post-transplant fibrosis had a 3.45 adjusted odds of having donor IFNL4 TT/TT genotype (p = 0.012). Donor IFNL4 TT/TT genotype also predicted decreased overall survival compared to non-TT/TT genotypes (p = 0.016). Conclusions Donor IFNL4 TT/TT genotype, a favorable predictor of spontaneous HCV clearance pre-transplant, is associated with increased early post-transplant fibrosis and decreased survival. PMID:27875564

  17. Spontaneous Post-Transplant Disorders in NOD.Cg- Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Sug/JicTac (NOG) Mice Engrafted with Patient-Derived Metastatic Melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Omodho, Lorna; Francis, Annick; Vander Borght, Sara; Marine, Jean-Christophe; van den Oord, Joost; Amant, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) approach is nowadays considered a reliable preclinical model to study in vivo cancer biology and therapeutic response. NOD scid and Il2rg-deficient mice represent the “gold standard” host for the generation of PDTXs. Compared to other immunocompromised murine lines, these mice offers several advantages including higher engraftment rate, longer lifespan and improved morphological and molecular preservation of patient-derived neoplasms. Here we describe a spectrum of previously uncharacterized post-transplant disorders affecting 14/116 (12%) NOD.Cg- Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Sug/JicTac (NOG) mice subcutaneously engrafted with patient-derived metastatic melanomas. Affected mice exhibited extensive scaling/crusting dermatitis (13/14) associated with emaciation (13/14) and poor/unsuccessful tumor engraftment (14/14). In this context, the following pathological conditions have been recognized and characterized in details: (i) immunoinflammatory disorders with features of graft versus host disease (14/14); (ii) reactive lymphoid infiltrates effacing xenografted tumors (8/14); (iii) post-transplant B cell lymphomas associated with Epstein-Barr virus reactivation (2/14). We demonstrate that all these entities are driven by co-transplanted human immune cells populating patient-derived tumor samples. Since the exploding interest in the utilization of NOD scid and Il2rg-deficient mice for the establishment of PDTX platforms, it is of uppermost importance to raise the awareness of the limitations associated with this model. The disorders here described adversely impact tumor engraftment rate and animal lifespan, potentially representing a major confounding factor in the context of efficacy and personalized therapy studies. The occurrence of these conditions in the NOG model reflects the ability of this mouse line to promote efficient engraftment of human immune cells. Co-transplanted human lymphoid cells have indeed the potential to colonize

  18. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with neonatal onset.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Muhammad; Khamis Butt, Umar Bin; Mannan, Jovaria

    2014-05-01

    We describe 2 cases of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is a rare disorder of auto-immunity, chronic persistent or recurrent lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and hyper gamma globulinemia (1gG, 1gA). Both cases presented in neonatal period which is a rare age of presentation in this disease. A 20 days old female neonate presented with respiratory symptoms which rapidly progressed needing ventilatory support. There was hepatomegaly and no auscultatory findings in the chest. Serial CBCs (complete blood counts) showed persistent leucocytosis with predominant lymphocytosis. Her chest X-ray showed left sided consolidation which responded poorly to antibiotics. Her prompt clinical response to steroids raised the suspicion of autoimmunity and the diagnosis was established after a negative bone marrow examination for leukemia and a positive result for ALPS on flow cytometry. The second case presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia starting in neonatal period followed by persistent lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and recurrent infections which responded poorly to antibiotics. Diagnosis was delayed due to low index of suspicion, and finally achieved with multiple radiological studies, histopathology and flow cytometry.

  19. Primary lymphoproliferative conditions of lung.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, A R; Seal, R M

    1978-04-01

    The clinical, laboratory, and pathological features of six primary lymphoproliferative conditions of the lung are described. These comprise two patients with malignant lymphomas, one with pseudolymphoma, one with lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP), one with lymphomatoid granulomatosis, and one with plasma cell granuloma. We recommend that the term 'premalignant lymphoma' be used for pseudolymphoma since the condition, although tending to remain localised, has a malignant potential. A combination of dyspnoea, cough, and pyrexia were the presenting features in our cases of premalignant and malignant lymphoma although they may often be discovered accidentally by chest radiography. The patient with LIP presented with the usual symptoms of dyspnoea and cough. The initial manifestations of the patient with lymphomatoid granulomatosis were skin radh and peripheral neuropathy nine months before the pulmonary symptoms, a not unusual occurrence. Plasma cell granuloma is often asymptomatic but our patient presented with cough, chest pain, haemoptysis. Premalignant lymphoma tends to pursue a benign course although exceptionally it may become disseminated. Malignant lymphoma may remain localised for many years but a significant proportion metastasise. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis and LIP have a varied course but both may terminate in malignant lymphoma. Plasma cell granuloma is always benign. The interrelationships of these conditions and their differential diagnosis are discussed.

  20. A case of age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder metachronously showing two distinct morphologic appearances, one of a polymorphic disease resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma, and the other of a large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Murase, Tadashi; Fujita, Ayumi; Ueno, Hironori; Park, Jae-Won; Yano, Takahiro; Hoshikawa, Masahiro; Takagi, Masayuki; Kuramochi, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (age-related EBV+ B-cell LPD) metachronously showing two distinct morphologic appearances: one of a polymorphic disease resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL), and the other of a large-cell lymphoma. A 71-year-old man was admitted to the St. Marianna University Hospital because of fever and generalized lymphadenopathy. Right axillary lymph node biopsy revealed mixed cellularity classical Hodgkin lymphoma (MCHL). The patient was referred to the Tokyo Medical Center, where he was treated with chemotherapy and obtained CR. One year later, the patient again developed fever and generalized lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the right cervical mass revealed a diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient was treated with salvage chemotherapies and obtained the second CR. Two years later, the patient developed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Although CR was achieved with chemotherapy, AML relapsed 5 months later and proved to be refractory. Two and a half years later, the patient developed right cervical lymph node enlargement. The biopsy again revealed diagnosis of MCHL. The patient died 2 months later. On reviewing all of the biopsy specimens, including the findings of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, possibility of CHL was ruled out, because neoplastic giant cells resembling Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells were positive for both Oct2 and BOB.1, which has not been reported in CHL. Both HRS-like cells at the time of diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma and lymphoma cells at the time of diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma were positive for CD20 and EBV-encoded small RNAs. This case was finally diagnosed as having age-related EBV+ B-cell LPD. We report the case here as it underscores the difficulty in diagnosing age-related EBV+ B-cell LPDs and also suggests an important role of EBV in the pathogenesis of lymphoid neoplasms.

  1. Membrane phenotypic studies in B cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, C S; Limbert, H J; MacKarill, I D; Roberts, B E

    1985-01-01

    A total of 398 cases of B cell lymphoproliferative disease were phenotypically characterised by membrane mouse red blood cell (MRBC) receptor, surface immunoglobulin, common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (CALLA), and FMC7 and T1 monoclonal antibody studies. Relations between chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), prolymphocytic leukaemia (PLL), and "prolymphocytoid" CLL variants were examined with particular reference to the expression of FMC7. In addition, the reactivity of TU1 monoclonal antibody with B cell disorders was established. The results suggest that despite some heterogeneity most cases may be characterised by their phenotypic patterns and that these investigations provide a reproducible basis for classification. PMID:2413082

  2. Live Donor Renal Anatomic Asymmetry and Post-Transplant Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Tanriover, Bekir; Fernandez, Sonalis; Campenot, Eric S.; Newhouse, Jeffrey H.; Oyfe, Irina; Mohan, Prince; Sandikci, Burhaneddin; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Wexler, Jennifer J.; Carroll, Maureen A.; Sharif, Sairah; Cohen, David J.; Ratner, Lloyd E.; Hardy, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Relationship between live donor renal anatomic asymmetry and post-transplant recipient function has not been studied extensively. Methods We analyzed 96 live-kidney donors, who had anatomical asymmetry (>10% renal length and/or volume difference calculated from CT angiograms) and their matching recipients. Split function differences (SFD) were quantified with 99mTc-DMSA renography. Implantation biopsies at time-zero were semi-quantitatively scored. A comprehensive model utilizing donor renal volume adjusted to recipient weight (Vol/Wgt), SFD, and biopsy score was used to predict recipient estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at one-year. Primary analysis consisted of a logistic regression model of outcome (odds of developing eGFR>60ml/min/1.73 m2 at one-year), a linear regression model of outcome (predicting recipient eGFR at one-year, using the CKD-EPI formula), and a Monte Carlo simulation based on the linear regression model (N=10,000 iterations). Results In the study cohort, the mean Vol/Wgt and eGFR at one-year were 2.04 ml/kg and 60.4 ml/min/1.73m2, respectively. Volume and split ratios between two donor kidneys were strongly correlated (r=0.79, p-value<0.001). The biopsy scores among SFD categories (<5%, 5–10%, >10%) were not different (p=0.190). On multivariate models, only Vol/Wgt was significantly associated with higher odds of having eGFR>60ml/min/1.73 m2 (OR=8.94, 95% CI 2.47–32.25, p=0.001) and had a strong discriminatory power in predicting the risk of eGFR<60ml/min/1.73m2 at one-year (ROC curve=0.78, 95% CI 0.68–0.89). Conclusion In the presence of donor renal anatomic asymmetry, Vol/Wgt appears to be a major determinant of recipient renal function at one-year post-transplantation. Renography can be replaced with CT volume calculation in estimating split renal function. PMID:25719258

  3. Challenges and opportunities for checkpoint blockade in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Tycel; Devata, Sumana; Wilcox, Ryan A

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are a heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) for which current therapeutic strategies are inadequate, as most patients afflicted with these NHL will succumb to disease progression within 2 years of diagnosis. Appreciation of the genetic and immunologic landscape of these aggressive NHL, including PD-L1 (B7-H1, CD274) expression by malignant T cells and within the tumor microenvironment, provides a strong rationale for therapeutic targeting this immune checkpoint. While further studies are needed, the available data suggests that responses with PD-1 checkpoint blockade alone will unlikely approach those achieved in other lymphoproliferative disorders. Herein, we review the unique challenges posed by the T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and discuss potential strategies to optimize checkpoint blockade in these T-cell derived malignancies.

  4. Lymphoproliferative Disorders in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: A Single-Center Case Series.

    PubMed

    Alshehry, Nawal F; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Michelis, Fotios V

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders presenting simultaneously with or subsequent to the occurrence of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have rarely been reported. Herein, we report 8 cases of a variety of lymphoproliferative conditions associated with CML at different times during the course of the disease. All 8 patients were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors at some point during the course of their illness. The literature regarding the uncommon association of these apparently unrelated disorders is reviewed as well as the possible underlying mechanisms that could be associated with this phenomenon.

  5. 'A post-transplant person': Narratives of heart or lung transplantation and intensive care unit delirium.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Katy; Daiches, Anna; Malpus, Zoey; Yonan, Nizar; Sanchez, Melissa

    2014-07-01

    Exploring patients' narratives can lead to new understandings about perceived illness states. Intensive Care Unit delirium is when people experience transitory hallucinations, delusions or paranoia in the Intensive Care Unit and little is known about how this experience affects individuals who have had a heart or lung transplant. A total of 11 participants were recruited from two heart and lung transplant services and were invited to tell their story of transplant and Intensive Care Unit delirium. A narrative analysis was conducted and the findings were presented as a shared story. This shared story begins with death becoming prominent before the transplant: 'you live all the time with Mr Death on your shoulder'. Following the operation, death permeates all aspects of dream worlds, as dreams in intensive care 'tunes into the subconscious of your fears'. The next part of the shared story offers hope of restitution; however, this does not last as reality creeps in: 'I thought it was going to be like a miracle cure'. Finally, the restitution narrative is found to be insufficient and individuals differ in the extent to which they can achieve resolution. The societal discourse of a transplant being a 'gift', which gives life, leads to internalised responsibility for the 'success' or 'failure' of the transplant. Participants describe how their experiences impact their sense of self: 'a post-transplant person'. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  6. Prognostic and diagnostic value of procalcitonin in the post-transplant setting after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Stirkat, Falk; Croner, Roland S.; Vassos, Nikolaos; Raptis, Dimitrios; Yedibela, Süleyman; Hohenberger, Werner; Müller, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT) as a marker for complications and as a prognostic factor for mortality after liver transplantation. Material and methods Liver transplant patients between January 2007 and April 2011 were prospectively included in the study. Procalcitonin serum concentration was recorded before, 6 h after reperfusion and then daily. Postoperative clinical course was prospectively analyzed from admission to discharge. Main surgical data such as operating procedure, type of reperfusion, operating and ischemic times, high urgency (HU) status and MELD score at the time of transplantation were also recorded. Results Sixteen patients with initial PCT > 5 ng/ml suffered ≥ 1 complication (p = 0.03). However, there was no association between the level of the 1st peak PCT and the further postoperative course or the occurrence of complications. Patients in whom a 2nd PCT peak occurred had a significantly higher risk for a complicated course, for a complicated sepsis course and for mortality (p < 0.0001). Warm ischemic time over 58 min, operating time over 389 min and HU status were significant independent factors for a complicated postoperative course (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 and p = 0.03 respectively). Conclusions Based on our results, we believe that PCT course and the occurrence of a 2nd peak seem to possess important diagnostic and prognostic power in the post-transplant setting after liver transplantation. PMID:27186183

  7. Post-transplant development of C1q-positive HLA antibodies and kidney graft survival.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Antonina; Poggi, Elvira; Ozzella, Giuseppina; Adorno, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    The development of de novo human leukocyte antigen (HLA) donor specific antibodies (DSA), detected by both cytotoxic or solid phase assays, was considered the major risk factor for allograft failure in kidney transplantation. However, it was shown that not all patients with persistent production of DSA suffered loss of their grafts. Modified Luminex-Single Antigen assays, able to identify C1q-fixing antibodies, represent a new strategy in assessing the clinical relevance of detected DSA. This study demonstrated that C1q-fixing capability of de novo DSA is a clinically relevant marker of worse outcome and inferior graft survival in kidney transplantation. In fact, our findings evidenced a very low graft survival only in the patients who developed DSA able to fix C1q during post-transplant course, while patients producing C1q-negative DSA had good graft survival, which was comparable to that found in our previous study for DSA-negative patients. Moreover, anti-HLA class II antibodies had a higher incidence than anti-HLA class I, and the ability to fix C1q was significantly more frequent among anti-DQ DSA than anti-DR DSA. Monitoring of de novo C1q-DSA production represents a useful, non-invasive tool for risk stratification and prediction of graft outcome in kidney transplantation.

  8. Role of HHV-8 and mTOR pathway in post-transplant Kaposi sarcoma staging.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sierra, Astrid; Rovira, Jordi; Petit, Anna; Moya-Rull, Daniel; Mazuecos, María Auxiliadora; Sánchez-Fructuoso, Ana Isabel; Errasti, Pedro; Idoate, Miguel Ángel; Cruzado, Josep María; Vidal, August; Diekmann, Fritz; Oppenheimer, Federico; Campistol, Josep M; Revuelta, Ignacio

    2016-09-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is one of the most frequent transplant related tumors. Several pathways are involved; however, the impact of the molecular phenotype associated to the tumor stage and the behavior-depending resultant therapy is still unknown. The aim of our study was to analyze the role of HHV-8 and mTOR pathway in tumor stages of skin KS after renal transplantation. Twelve renal transplant recipients with cutaneous KS from five transplant centers (1980-2007) under reduction of immunosuppression or conversion to mTOR inhibitor were included. The expression of HHV-8, PTEN, TGFβ, VEGF, phospho-mTOR, and phospho-P70S6K in tumoral tissue was analyzed. KS lesions were classified as patch, plaque, and nodule state. HHV-8 infection was found in all tissue samples. KS lesions showed high activation of VEGF, p-mTOR and p-P70S6K, low PTEN, and null TGFβ expression. The only pathway activated in a staging-dependent manner was mTOR with higher p-mTOR and p-P70S6K expression in nodule versus patch stage. KS lesions disappeared after 5.24 months in all converted patients without any recurrence in 14.05 years of mean follow-up. The activation of mTOR pathway according to KS stages supports the rational of the mTOR inhibitor in post-transplant Kaposi.

  9. Sodium nitrite protects against kidney injury induced by brain death and improves post-transplant function.

    PubMed

    Kelpke, Stacey S; Chen, Bo; Bradley, Kelley M; Teng, Xinjun; Chumley, Phillip; Brandon, Angela; Yancey, Brett; Moore, Brandon; Head, Hughston; Viera, Liliana; Thompson, John A; Crossman, David K; Bray, Molly S; Eckhoff, Devin E; Agarwal, Anupam; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-08-01

    Renal injury induced by brain death is characterized by ischemia and inflammation, and limiting it is a therapeutic goal that could improve outcomes in kidney transplantation. Brain death resulted in decreased circulating nitrite levels and increased infiltrating inflammatory cell infiltration into the kidney. Since nitrite stimulates nitric oxide signaling in ischemic tissues, we tested whether nitrite therapy was beneficial in a rat model of brain death followed by kidney transplantation. Nitrite, administered over 2 h of brain death, blunted the increased inflammation without affecting brain death-induced alterations in hemodynamics. Kidneys were transplanted after 2 h of brain death and renal function followed over 7 days. Allografts collected from nitrite-treated brain-dead rats showed significant improvement in function over the first 2 to 4 days after transplantation compared with untreated brain-dead animals. Gene microarray analysis after 2 h of brain death without or with nitrite therapy showed that the latter significantly altered the expression of about 400 genes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that multiple signaling pathways were affected by nitrite, including those related to hypoxia, transcription, and genes related to humoral immune responses. Thus, nitrite therapy attenuates brain death-induced renal injury by regulating responses to ischemia and inflammation, ultimately leading to better post-transplant kidney function.

  10. Updated Understanding of Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS).

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Huang, Ping; Yang, Ye; Hao, Mu; Peng, Hongwei; Li, Fei

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), a disorder characterized by immune dysregulation due to disrupted lymphocyte homeostasis, is mainly resulted from the mutations in FAS-mediated apoptotic pathway. In addition, other mutations of the genes such as Fas-ligand (FASLG), Caspase 10 (CASP10) and Caspase 8 (CASP8), NRAS and KRAS have also been observed in a small number of patients with ALPS or ALPS-related disorders. However, approximately 20-30% of patients with ALPS have unidentified defect. Its clinical manifestations observed in multiple family members include unexplained lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune cytopenias such as thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and anemia due to excessive production of antibodies by lymphocytes, elevated number of double-negative T (DNT) cells, and increased risk of lymphoma. As a very rare disease, ALPS was first characterized in the early 1990s. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have been reported till now; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years. ALPS has historically considered as a primary immune defect presenting in early childhood, however, recent studies have shown that it may be more common than previous thought because adult onset presentation is increasingly becoming recognized and more adult ALPS patients are diagnosed. The new genetic and biological insights have improved the understanding of ALPS and a number of targeted therapeutic strategies such as mycophenolate mofetil, sirolimus, and pentostatin have been successfully applied in ALPS patients with promising treatment efficacy. This article comprehensively reviews the clinical and laboratory manifestations, new research advances in the molecular pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatments of this disorder.

  11. Molecular histogenesis of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Capello, Daniela; Cerri, Michaela; Muti, Giuliana; Berra, Eva; Oreste, Pierluigi; Deambrogi, Clara; Rossi, Davide; Dotti, Giampietro; Conconi, Annarita; Viganò, Mario; Magrini, Umberto; Ippoliti, Giovanbattista; Morra, Enrica; Gloghini, Annunziata; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Paulli, Marco; Carbone, Antonino; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2003-11-15

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) represent a serious complication of solid organ transplantation. This study assessed the molecular histogenesis of 52 B-cell monoclonal PTLDs, including 12 polymorphic PTLDs (P-PTLDs), 36 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs), and 4 Burkitt/Burkitt-like lymphomas (BL/BLLs). Somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) genes documented that most monoclonal B-cell PTLDs (75% P-PTLDs, 91.3% DLBCLs, 100% BL/BLLs) derive from germinal center (GC)-experienced B cells. B-cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) mutations occurred in 25% P-PTLDs, 60.6% DLBCLs, and 75.0% BL/BLLs. A first histogenetic category of PTLDs (31.2% DLBCLs) express the BCL6+/multiple myeloma oncogene-1 protein (MUM1-/+)/CD138- profile and mimic B cells experiencing the GC reaction, as also suggested by ongoing SHM in a fraction of these cases. A second subset of PTLDs (66.7% P-PTLDs and 31.2% DLBCLs) display the BCL6-/MUM1+/CD138- phenotype and mimic B cells that have concluded the GC reaction. A third histogenetic category of PTLDs (25.0% P-PTLDs and 31.2% DLBCLs) shows the BCL6-/MUM1+/CD138+ profile, consistent with preterminally differentiated post-GC B cells. Crippling mutations of IgV heavy chain (IgVH) and/or IgV light chain (IgVL) genes, leading to sterile rearrangements and normally preventing cell survival, occur in 4 DLBCLs and 1 BL/BLL that may have been rescued from apoptosis through expression of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1). Overall, the histogenetic diversity of monoclonal B-cell PTLDs may help define biologically homogeneous categories of the disease.

  12. Post-transplantation hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence: Patterns and relation between vascularity and differentiation degree

    PubMed Central

    Pecchi, Annarita; Besutti, Giulia; De Santis, Mario; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Nosseir, Sofia; Tarantino, Giuseppe; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Torricelli, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the relationship between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) vascularity and grade; to describe patterns and vascular/histopathological variations of post-transplantation recurrence. METHODS: This retrospective study included 165 patients (143 men, 22 women; median age 56.8 years, range 28-70.4 years) transplanted for HCC who had a follow-up period longer than 2 mo. Pre-transplantation dynamic computed tomography or magnetic resonance examinations were retrospectively reviewed, classifying HCC imaging enhancement pattern into hypervascular and hypovascular based on presence of wash-in during arterial phase. All pathologic reports of the explanted livers were reviewed, collecting data about HCC differentiation degree. The association between imaging vascular pattern and pathological grade was estimated using the Fisher exact test. All follow-up clinical and imaging data were reviewed for evidence of recurrence. Recurrence rate was calculated and imaging features of recurrent tumor were collected, classifying early and late recurrences based on timing (< or ≥ 2 years after transplantation) and intrahepatic, extrahepatic and both intrahepatic and extrahepatic recurrences based on location. All intrahepatic recurrences were classified as hypervascular or hypovascular and the differentiation degree was collected where available. The presence of variations in imaging enhancement pattern and pathological grade between the primary tumor and the intrahepatic recurrence was evaluated and the association between imaging and histopatholgical variations was estimated by using the χ2 test. RESULTS: Of the 163 patients with imaging evidence of viable tumor, 156 (95.7%) had hypervascular and 7 (4.3%) hypovascular HCC. Among the 125 patients with evidence of viable tumor in the explanted liver, 19 (15.2%) had grade 1, 56 (44.8%) grade 2, 40 (32%) grade 3 and 4 (3.2%) grade 4 HCC, while the differentiation degree was not assessable for 6 patients (4.8%). A significant

  13. [Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia-peng; Lu, Xin-tian; Zhao, Wei-hong; Hua, Ying

    2015-12-18

    We described 1 case of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), first diagnosed in our hospital, and reviewed the recent literature. The 11-month old male patient presented with a history of splenomegaly and hepatomegaly since 1 month after birth. He suffered recurrent infectious diseases including cytomegalovirus infection, parvovirus B19 infection and chronic diarrhea disease. Besides, his symptoms included hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. The laboratory abnormality indicated an expanded population of alpha/beta double-negative T cells (DNTs) (27.18% of lymphocytes, 35.16% of CD3+ T lymphocytes) in peripheral blood, and autoantibodies including antinuclear antibody, double-stranded DNA and rheumatic factor were positive. Hyper gamma globulinemia and positive direct Coombs tests were seen in the patient. His parents were both healthy and denied autoimmune diseases. We identified a heterozygous point mutation in exon 3 of the FAS gene carrying c.309 A>C, resulting in a single base pair substitution in exon 3 of FAS gene which changed the codon of Arg103 to Ser103. Unfortunately, we were unable to obtain the gene results of the child's parents. The patient was treated with glucocorticoids in our hospital and with mycophenolatemofetil in other hospital. And we were informed that his anemia condition relieved through the telephone follow-up, but he still suffered recurrent infections, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly still existed. As we all know ALPS is characterized by defective lymphocyte apoptosis, and thus cause lymphoproliferative disease and autoimmune disease, and increase the risk of lymphoma. It is more likely to be misdiagnosed as other diseases. ALPS should be suspected in the case of chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and autoimmune features. Flow cytometry approach is helpful for the diagnosis. Immunosuppressive drugs are the necessary treatment.

  14. X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Disease (XLP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Helps Researchers Explore Microbial Genomic Data Biological Materials Biological Material Repositories HIV/AIDS Specimen Repository Guidance for Accessing Network Samples DAIDS VAX004 Clinical Trial Specimens Scientific Priorities ...

  15. HLA-Haploidentical Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation with Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide after Busulfan-Containing Reduced-Intensity Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Junichi; Kawashima, Naomi; Fujisaki, Tomoaki; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Ota, Shuichi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Akashi, Koichi; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Harada, Mine; Teshima, Takanori

    2015-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) using post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy) is increasingly performed. We conducted a multicenter phase II study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PTCy-based HLA-haploidentical peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PTCy-haploPBSCT) after busulfan-containing reduced-intensity conditioning. Thirty-one patients were enrolled; 61% patients were not in remission and 42% patients had a history of prior allo-SCT. Neutrophil engraftment was achieved in 87% patients with a median of 19 days. The cumulative incidence of grades II to IV and III to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and chronic GVHD at 1 year were 23%, 3%, and 15%, respectively. No patients developed severe chronic GVHD. Day 100 nonrelapse mortality (NRM) rate was 19.4%. Overall survival, relapse, and disease-free survival rates were 45%, 45%, and 34%, respectively, at 1 year. Subgroup analysis showed that patients who had a history of prior allo-SCT had lower engraftment, higher NRM, and lower overall survival than those not receiving a prior allo-SCT. Our results suggest that PTCy-haploPBSCT after busulfan-containing reduced-intensity conditioning achieved low incidences of acute and chronic GVHD and NRM and stable donor engraftment and low NRM, particularly in patients without a history of prior allo-SCT.

  16. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: an update and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shaili; Wu, Eveline; Rao, V Koneti; Tarrant, Teresa K

    2014-09-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by immune dysregulation due to a defect in lymphocyte apoptosis. The clinical manifestations may be noted in multiple family members and include lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, increased risk of lymphoma, and autoimmune disease, which typically involves hematopoietic cell lines manifesting as multilineage cytopenias. Since the disease was first characterized in the early 1990s, there have been many advances in the diagnosis and management of this syndrome. The inherited genetic defect of many ALPS patients has involved (FAS) pathway signaling proteins, but there remain those patients who carry undefined genetic defects. Despite ALPS having historically been considered a primary immune defect presenting in early childhood, adult onset presentation is increasingly becoming recognized and more so in genetically undefined patients and those with somatic FAS mutations. Thus, future research may identify novel pathways and/or regulatory proteins important in lymphocyte activation and apoptosis.

  17. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome misdiagnosed as hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Rudman Spergel, Amanda; Walkovich, Kelly; Price, Susan; Niemela, Julie E; Wright, Dowain; Fleisher, Thomas A; Rao, V Koneti

    2013-11-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare inherited disorder of apoptosis, most commonly due to mutations in the FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. It presents with chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and symptomatic multilineage cytopenias in an otherwise healthy child. Unfortunately, these clinical findings are also noted in other childhood lymphoproliferative conditions, such as leukemia, lymphoma, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, which can confound the diagnosis. This report describes a 6-year-old girl with symptoms misdiagnosed as hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and treated with chemotherapy before the recognition that her symptoms and laboratory values were consistent with a somatic FAS mutation leading to ALPS. This case should alert pediatricians to include ALPS in the differential diagnosis of a child with lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and cytopenias; obtain discriminating screening laboratory biomarkers, such as serum vitamin B-12 and ferritin levels; and, in the setting of a highly suspicious clinical scenario for ALPS, pursue testing for somatic FAS mutations when germ-line mutation testing is negative.

  18. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis prevalence in pre-transplant patients and its effect on survival and graft loss post-transplant

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neeral L; Intagliata, Nicolas M; Henry, Zachary H; Argo, Curtis K; Northup, Patrick G

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in pre-transplant patients and its effect on post transplant mortality and graft failure. METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patient records from the organ procurement and transplant network data set. Patients were identified by the presence of SBP pre-transplant. Univariate post-transplant survival models were constructed using the Kaplan-Meier technique and multivariate models were constructed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Variables that affected post-transplant graft survival were identified in the SBP population. RESULTS Forty-seven thousand eight hundred and eighty patient records were included in the analysis for both groups, and 1966 (4.11%) patients were identified in the data set as having pre-transplant SBP. Patients that had pre-transplant SBP had higher rates of graft loss from recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) (3.6% vs 2.0%, P < 0.0001), infections leading to graft loss (1.9% vs 1.3%, P = 0.02), primary non-function (4.3% vs 3.0%, P < 0.0001) and chronic rejection (1.1% vs 0.7%, P = 0.04). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a statistically significant difference in all-cause survival in patients with a history of SBP vs those without (P < 0.0001). Pre-transplant history of SBP was independently predictive of mortality due to recurrent HCV (HR = 1.11, 95%CI: 1.02-1.21, P < 0.017) after liver transplantation. CONCLUSION HCV patients prior to the advent of directing acting anti-viral agents had a higher incidence of pre-transplant SBP than other patients on the liver transplant wait list. SBP history pre-transplant resulted in a higher rate of graft loss due to recurrent HCV infection and chronic rejection. PMID:28083084

  19. Parainfluenza virus type 3 Ab in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients: factors influencing post-transplant Ab titers and associated outcomes.

    PubMed

    Seo, S; Xie, H; Karron, R A; Thumar, B; Englund, J A; Leisenring, W M; Stevens-Ayers, T; Boeckh, M; Campbell, A P

    2014-09-01

    Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV-3) can cause severe respiratory illness among hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. Factors associated with PIV-3-specific Ab level, and the association between PIV-3 Ab levels and clinical outcomes in HCT recipients who acquire PIV-3 infection, are unknown. We evaluated PIV-3-specific hemagglutination inhibition Ab levels and clinical outcomes among 172 patients with PIV-3 infection following HCT. In a multivariable linear regression model, high post-transplantation Ab levels were independently associated with higher pre-transplantation recipient titer (mean difference 0.38 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.26, 0.50), P<0.001). Significant associations between pre-HCT Ab titers in both patients and donors and occurrence of lower respiratory tract disease (LRD) after HCT were not observed. In conclusion, low pre-transplantation titers are associated with low Ab levels after HCT. The relationship between PIV-3 Ab levels and outcomes remain uncertain. Further study is needed to prospectively evaluate the dynamics of PIV-3-specific Ab responses and the relative contribution of PIV-3-specific Ab to protection from infection acquisition and progression to LRD.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder developed following autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for relapsing Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Izumiya, Sakura; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Hodohara, Keiko; Yoshida, Takashi; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2012-06-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are lymphoid or plasmacytic proliferations that develop as a consequence of immunosuppression in a recipient of a solid organ, bone marrow or stem cell allograft. The development of PTLDs is usually associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the disorder is also termed EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). The development of PTLD is a rare complication in autologous bone marrow/peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. In the present study, we report a case of EBV-associated LPD which developed following autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for relapsing Hodgkin's lymphoma. A 51-year-old male presented with swelling of the left cervical lymph nodes. A biopsy revealed nodular sclerosis classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. Following four courses of ABVd (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) therapy, the Hodgkin's lymphoma relapsed. CHASE (cyclophosphamide, etoposide, cytarabine, dexamethasone) therapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation were performed. In the 128 days following the transplantation, lymph node swelling was noted and a biopsy specimen demonstrated EBV-associated LPD. The serum copy number of EBV-DNA was 2.7×10(3) copies/ml. The occurrence of EBV-associated LPD may be on the rise due to the increased number of patients undergoing immunosuppression therapy. The measurement of the serum EBV-DNA copy number and the detection of EBV-infected atypical lymphocytes using in situ hybridization are significant in establishing an early accurate diagnosis and initiating the correct treatment for EBV-associated LPD in patients with immunosuppression.

  1. Optimal Management of Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome in Children.

    PubMed

    George, Lindsey A; Teachey, David T

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte homeostasis, resulting from mutations in the Fas apoptotic pathway. Clinical manifestations include noninfectious and nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and autoimmune pathology-most commonly, autoimmune cytopenias. Rarely, and in association with specific genetic mutations, patients with ALPS may go on to develop secondary lymphoid malignancies. Though ALPS is a rare disorder, it should be suspected and ruled out in children presenting with chronic and refractory multilineage cytopenias associated with nonmalignant lymphoproliferation. Revised diagnostic criteria and insights into disease biology have improved both diagnosis and treatment. Sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil are the best-studied and most effective corticosteroid-sparing therapies for ALPS, and they should be considered first-line therapy for patients who need chronic treatment. This review highlights practical clinical considerations for diagnosis and management of ALPS.

  2. Partial Least Squares Based Gene Expression Analysis in EBV- Positive and EBV-Negative Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sa; Zhang, Xin; Li, Zhi-Ming; Shi, Yan-Xia; Huang, Jia-Jia; Xia, Yi; Yang, Hang; Jiang, Wen-Qi

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a common complication of therapeutic immunosuppression after organ transplantation. Gene expression profile facilitates the identification of biological difference between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive and negative PTLDs. Previous studies mainly implemented variance/regression analysis without considering unaccounted array specific factors. The aim of this study is to investigate the gene expression difference between EBV positive and negative PTLDs through partial least squares (PLS) based analysis. With a microarray data set from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, we performed PLS based analysis. We acquired 1188 differentially expressed genes. Pathway and Gene Ontology enrichment analysis identified significantly over-representation of dysregulated genes in immune response and cancer related biological processes. Network analysis identified three hub genes with degrees higher than 15, including CREBBP, ATXN1, and PML. Proteins encoded by CREBBP and PML have been reported to be interact with EBV before. Our findings shed light on expression distinction of EBV positive and negative PTLDs with the hope to offer theoretical support for future therapeutic study.

  3. Post-transplantation Cyclophosphamide and Sirolimus after Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Using a Treosulfan-based Myeloablative Conditioning and Peripheral Blood Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Cieri, Nicoletta; Greco, Raffaella; Crucitti, Lara; Morelli, Mara; Giglio, Fabio; Levati, Giorgia; Assanelli, Andrea; Carrabba, Matteo G; Bellio, Laura; Milani, Raffaella; Lorentino, Francesca; Stanghellini, Maria Teresa Lupo; De Freitas, Tiago; Marktel, Sarah; Bernardi, Massimo; Corti, Consuelo; Vago, Luca; Bonini, Chiara; Ciceri, Fabio; Peccatori, Jacopo

    2015-08-01

    Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) performed using bone marrow (BM) grafts and post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) has gained much interest for the excellent toxicity profile after both reduced-intensity and myeloablative conditioning. We investigated, in a cohort of 40 high-risk hematological patients, the feasibility of peripheral blood stem cells grafts after a treosulfan-melphalan myeloablative conditioning, followed by a PTCy and sirolimus-based graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis (Sir-PTCy). Donor engraftment occurred in all patients, with full donor chimerism achieved by day 30. Post-HSCT recovery of lymphocyte subsets was broad and fast, with a median time to CD4 > 200/μL of 41 days. Cumulative incidences of grade II to IV and III-IV acute GVHD were 15% and 7.5%, respectively, and were associated with a significant early increase in circulating regulatory T cells at day 15 after HSCT, with values < 5% being predictive of subsequent GVHD occurrence. The 1-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 20%. Nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at 100 days and 1 year were 12% and 17%, respectively. With a median follow-up for living patients of 15 months, the estimated 1-year overall and disease-free survival (DFS) was 56% and 48%, respectively. Outcomes were more favorable in patients who underwent transplantation in complete remission (1-year DFS 71%) versus patients who underwent transplantation with active disease (DFS, 34%; P = .01). Overall, myeloablative haploidentical HSCT with peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) and Sir-PTCy is a feasible treatment option: the low rates of GVHD and NRM as well as the favorable immune reconstitution profile pave the way for a prospective comparative trial comparing BM and PBSC in this specific transplantation setting.

  4. A FAS-ligand variant associated with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in cats.

    PubMed

    Aberdein, Danielle; Munday, John S; Gandolfi, Barbara; Dittmer, Keren E; Malik, Richard; Garrick, Dorian J; Lyons, Leslie A

    2017-02-01

    British shorthair (BSH) kittens in multiple litters died as a result of a severe non-neoplastic lymphoproliferative disease that showed many similarities with human autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Human ALPS is caused by inherited defects in FAS-mediated lymphocyte apoptosis and the possibility of similar defects was investigated in BSH cats. The whole genomes of two affected kittens were sequenced and compared to 82 existing cat genomes. Both BSH kittens had homozygous insertions of an adenine within exon 3 of the FAS-ligand gene. The resultant frameshift and premature stop codon were predicted to result in a severely truncated protein that is unlikely to be able to activate FAS. Three additional affected BSH kittens were homozygous for the variant, while 11 of 16 unaffected, but closely related, BSH cats were heterozygous for the variant. All BSH cats in the study were from a population with significant inbreeding. The variant was not identified in a further survey of 510 non-BSH cats. Identification of a genetic defect in the FAS-mediated apoptosis pathway confirms that the lymphoproliferative disease in BSH cats fulfills the diagnostic criteria for ALPS in humans. These results will enable the development of a genetic test to detect BSH carrier animals.

  5. Association of severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) with probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-variant.

    PubMed

    Berio, A; Mangiante, G; Piazzi, A

    2014-12-30

    The paper reported on a case of severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) associated with a probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome variant (Dianzani autoimmune lymphoproliferative disease) (DALD). A male patient with typical features of SMEI and a SCN1A gene variant presented in the first year of life with multiple lymph nodes, palpable liver at 2 cm from the costal margin, neutropenia, dysgammaglobulinemia, relative and sometimes absolute lymphocytosis. Subsequently the patient presented with constantly raised IgA in serum and positive antinuclear and thyroid antimicrosomal antibodies. The diagnosis of probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome was made; arthritis, skin and throat blisters, which appeared subsequently led to the diagnosis of linear IgA disease. On the basis of these unique associations, the Authors hypothesized that autoimmunity may be partly responsible of the severe epileptic symptomatology, perhaps mediated by autoantibodies against sodium channels or by accompanying cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Corticosteroid treatment ameliorated the epilepsy and laboratory tests. Future studies will be necessary to evaluate the relevance of autoimmunity in SMEI.

  6. Factors affecting graft survival within 1-year post-transplantation in heart and lung transplant: an analysis of the OPTN/UNOS registry.

    PubMed

    Ohe, Hidenori

    2012-01-01

    Today, a main focus of the transplant community is the long-term outcomes of lung and heart allograft recipients. However, even early post-transplant survival (within the first post-transplant year) needs improvement, as early graft failure still accounts for many allograft losses. In this chapter, we review the experience of heart and lung transplantation as reported to the Organ Procurement Transplant Network/United Network of Organ Sharing registry and investigate the factors responsible for causing failure in the first post-transplant year. Trends indicate that sicker patients are increasingly being transplanted, thereby limiting improvements in early post-transplant survival. More lung and heart transplant patients are coming to transplant on dialysis. In heart transplant, there is an increase in the number of heart retransplant patients and an increase in patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. For lung transplant, more patients are on a ventilator prior to transplant than in the past 25 years. Given that sicker/riskier patients are now receiving more heart and lung transplants, future studies need to take place to better understand these patients so that they can have the same survival as patients entering transplant with less severe illnesses.

  7. Benefits of PEGylation in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging of labeled islets

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sang-Man; Oh, Seung-Hoon; Oh, Bae Jun; Suh, Sunghwan; Bae, Ji Cheol; Lee, Jung Hee; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    While a few studies have demonstrated the benefit of PEGylation in islet transplantation, most have employed renal subcapsular models and none have performed direct comparisons of islet mass in intraportal islet transplantation using islet magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, our aim was to demonstrate the benefit of PEGylation in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation with a novel algorithm for islet MRI. Islets were PEGylated after ferucarbotran labeling in a rat syngeneic intraportal islet transplantation model followed by comparisons of post-transplant glycemic levels in recipient rats infused with PEGylated (n = 12) and non-PEGylated (n = 13) islets. The total area of hypointense spots and the number of hypointense spots larger than 1.758 mm2 of PEGylated and non-PEGylated islets were quantitatively compared. The total area of hypointense spots (P < 0.05) and the number of hypointense spots larger than 1.758 mm2 (P < 0.05) were higher in the PEGylated islet group 7 and 14 days post translation (DPT). These results translated into better post-transplant outcomes in the PEGylated islet group 28 DPT. In validation experiments, MRI parameters obtained 1, 7, and 14 DPT predicted normoglycemia 4 wk post-transplantation. We directly demonstrated the benefit of islet PEGylation in protection against nonspecific islet destruction in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation using a novel algorithm for islet MRI. This novel algorithm could serve as a useful tool to demonstrate such benefit in future clinical trials of islet transplantation using PEGylated islets. PMID:25483878

  8. Benefits of PEGylation in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging of labeled islets.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang-Man; Oh, Seung-Hoon; Oh, Bae Jun; Suh, Sunghwan; Bae, Ji Cheol; Lee, Jung Hee; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    While a few studies have demonstrated the benefit of PEGylation in islet transplantation, most have employed renal subcapsular models and none have performed direct comparisons of islet mass in intraportal islet transplantation using islet magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, our aim was to demonstrate the benefit of PEGylation in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation with a novel algorithm for islet MRI. Islets were PEGylated after ferucarbotran labeling in a rat syngeneic intraportal islet transplantation model followed by comparisons of post-transplant glycemic levels in recipient rats infused with PEGylated (n = 12) and non-PEGylated (n = 13) islets. The total area of hypointense spots and the number of hypointense spots larger than 1.758 mm(2) of PEGylated and non-PEGylated islets were quantitatively compared. The total area of hypointense spots (P < 0.05) and the number of hypointense spots larger than 1.758 mm(2) (P < 0.05) were higher in the PEGylated islet group 7 and 14 days post translation (DPT). These results translated into better post-transplant outcomes in the PEGylated islet group 28 DPT. In validation experiments, MRI parameters obtained 1, 7, and 14 DPT predicted normoglycemia 4 wk post-transplantation. We directly demonstrated the benefit of islet PEGylation in protection against nonspecific islet destruction in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation using a novel algorithm for islet MRI. This novel algorithm could serve as a useful tool to demonstrate such benefit in future clinical trials of islet transplantation using PEGylated islets.

  9. Antigen and Lymphopenia Driven Donor T cells are Differentially Diminished by Post-Transplant Administration of Cyclophosphamide Following Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Duncan; Jones, Monica; Komanduri, Krishna; Levy, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Administration of cyclophosphamide following transplant (Post-transplant cyclophosphamide, PTC) has shown promise in the clinic as a prophylactic agent against graft vs. host disease. An important issue with regard to recipient immune function and reconstitution after PTC is the extent to which in addition to diminution of anti-host allo-reactive donor T cells, the remainder of the non-host allo-reactive donor T cell pool may be impacted. To investigate PTC’s effects on non-host reactive donor CD8 T cells, ova specific (OT-I) and gp100 specific Pmel-1 T cells were labeled with proliferation dyes and transplanted into syngeneic and allogeneic recipients. Notably, an intermediate dose (66mg/kg) of PTC which abrogated GVHD following allogeneic HSCT, did not significantly diminish these peptide specific donor T cell populations. Analysis of the rate of proliferation following transplant illustrated that lymphopenic driven donor non host reactive TCR Tg T cells in syngeneic recipients underwent slow division resulting in significant sparing of these donor populations. In contrast, following exposure to specific antigen at the time of transplant, these same T cells were significantly depleted by PTC demonstrating the global susceptibility of rapidly dividing T cells following encounter with cognate antigen. In total, our results employing both syngeneic and allogeneic minor antigen mismatched T cell replete models of transplantation, demonstrate a concentration of PTC that abrogates GVHD can preserve most cells that are dividing due to the accompanying lymphopenia following exposure. These findings have important implications with regard to immune function and reconstitution in recipients following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. PMID:23819914

  10. β-HHVs and HHV-8 in Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Quadrelli, C.; Barozzi, P.; Riva, G.; Vallerini, D.; Zanetti, E.; Potenza, L.; Forghieri, F.; Luppi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Similarly to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is a γ-herpesvirus, recently recognized to be associated with the occurrence of rare B cell lymphomas and atypical lymphoproliferations, especially in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected subjects. Moreover, the human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), a β-herpesvirus, has been shown to be implicated in some non-malignant lymph node proliferations, such as the Rosai Dorfman disease, and in a proportion of Hodgkin’s lymphoma cases. HHV-6 has a wide cellular tropism and it might play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of human diseases, but given its ubiquity, disease associations are difficult to prove and its role in hematological malignancies is still controversial. The involvement of another β-herpesvirus, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), has not yet been proven in human cancer, even though recent findings have suggested its potential role in the development of CD4+ large granular lymphocyte (LGL) lymphocytosis. Here, we review the current knowledge on the pathogenetic role of HHV-8 and human β-herpesviruses in human lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:22110893

  11. Comparison of Non-myeloablative Conditioning Regimens for Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sanghee; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Artz, Andrew; McCarthy, Philip L.; Logan, Brent R.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with non-myeloablative conditioning (NMA) for lymphoproliferative diseases (LD) includes fludarabine with and without low-dose total body irradiation (TBI). Transplant outcomes were compared among patients ≥40 years with LD who received a HCT with TBI (N=382) and no-TBI (N=515) NMA from 2001 to 2011. The groups were comparable except for donor, graft, prophylaxis for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), disease status and year of HCT. Cumulative incidences of grades II–IV GVHD at 100 days, were 29% and 20% (p=0.001), and chronic GVHD at 1 year were 54% and 44% (p=0.004) for TBI and no-TBI, respectively. Multivariate analysis of progression/relapse, treatment failure and mortality showed no outcome differences by conditioning. Full donor chimerism at day 100 was observed in 82% vs. 64% in the TBI and no-TBI groups, respectively (p=0.006). Subset of four most common conditioning/ GVHD prophylaxis combinations demonstrated higher rates of grades II–IV acute (p<0.001) and chronic GVHD (p<0.001) among recipients of TBI-mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) compared to other combinations. TBI-based NMA conditioning induces faster full donor chimerism but overall survival outcomes are comparable to no-TBI regimens. Combination of TBI and MMF are associated with higher rates of GVHD without impact on survival outcomes in patients with LD. PMID:25437248

  12. How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rao, V Koneti; Oliveira, João Bosco

    2011-11-24

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented.

  13. Childhood polyarteritis nodosa in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naumann-Bartsch, Nora; Stachel, Daniel; Morhart, Patrick; Staatz, Gundula; Jüngert, Jörg; Schwarz, Klaus; Holter, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an uncommon disorder of Fas-mediated apoptosis that results in impaired lymphocyte death and, therefore, disturbed immune homeostasis. Besides presentation with lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, patients with ALPS have a high incidence of autoimmune phenomena. To our knowledge, this is the first description of polyarteritis nodosa that includes numerous arterial aneurysms in a child with ALPS. Active vasculitis resolved after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This report of polyarteritis nodosa associated with human ALPS supports previous findings in Fas-deficient mouse models that frequently develop vasculitic manifestations and suggests that apoptotic defects of lymphocytes may play a role in the pathophysiology of systemic vasculitis. Thus, patients with ALPS might be more susceptible to autoimmune vessel inflammation. This case furthermore emphasizes that even rare autoimmune manifestations should be considered and investigated in patients with immunodeficiencies, because that might help in planning treatment strategies for these patients.

  14. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  15. Post-transplant anti-HLA class II antibodies as risk factor for late kidney allograft failure.

    PubMed

    Campos, E F; Tedesco-Silva, H; Machado, P G; Franco, M; Medina-Pestana, J O; Gerbase-DeLima, M

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively analyze the relationship between the post-transplant anti-HLA class I and/or class II panel reactive antibodies and graft failure due to chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). We studied 512 first kidney recipients transplanted at a single center, with a graft functioning for at least 3 years. A single blood sample was collected from each patient for antibody evaluation. The median posttransplant time after blood collection was 4.4 years and did not differ between patients with (n = 91) or without anti-HLA antibodies (n = 421). Female gender, pregnancies and blood transfusions were associated with the presence of anti-HLA class I antibodies. Graft function deterioration was associated with anti-HLA class II antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed independent association for creatinine levels (RR = 7.5), acute rejection (RR = 2.6), recipient male gender (RR = 3.6) and anti-HLA class II antibodies (RR = 2.9) and CAN-associated graft loss. In conclusion, the presence of anti-HLA class II antibodies conferred a risk for graft loss before a decline in renal function and increased the risk of graft failure in patients who already had a decline in graft function. Thus, anti-HLA class II antibody monitoring is a useful tool for the management of long-term kidney recipients.

  16. A new data-driven model for post-transplant antibody dynamics in high risk kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Briggs, David; Lowe, David; Mitchell, Daniel; Daga, Sunil; Krishnan, Nithya; Higgins, Robert; Khovanova, Natasha

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of donor specific human leukocyte antigen antibodies during early stage after kidney transplantation are of great clinical interest as these antibodies are considered to be associated with short and long term clinical outcomes. The limited number of antibody time series and their diverse patterns have made the task of modelling difficult. Focusing on one typical post-transplant dynamic pattern with rapid falls and stable settling levels, a novel data-driven model has been developed for the first time. A variational Bayesian inference method has been applied to select the best model and learn its parameters for 39 time series from two groups of graft recipients, i.e. patients with and without acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) episodes. Linear and nonlinear dynamic models of different order were attempted to fit the time series, and the third order linear model provided the best description of the common features in both groups. Both deterministic and stochastic parameters are found to be significantly different in the AMR and no-AMR groups showing that the time series in the AMR group have significantly higher frequency of oscillations and faster dissipation rates. This research may potentially lead to better understanding of the immunological mechanisms involved in kidney transplantation.

  17. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Swetha; Joshi, Avni Y; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Kumar, Seema

    2016-01-01

    The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation.

  18. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Swetha; Joshi, Avni Y.; Rodriguez, Vilmarie

    2016-01-01

    The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation. PMID:27579193

  19. DiGeorge syndrome who developed lymphoproliferative mediastinal mass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu Yeun; Hur, Ji Ae; Kim, Ki Hwan; Cha, Yoon Jin; Lee, Mi Jung; Kim, Dong Soo

    2015-03-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is an immunodeficient disease associated with abnormal development of 3rd and 4th pharyngeal pouches. As a hemizygous deletion of chromosome 22q11.2 occurs, various clinical phenotypes are shown with a broad spectrum. Conotruncal cardiac anomalies, hypoplastic thymus, and hypocalcemia are the classic triad of DiGeorge syndrome. As this syndrome is characterized by hypoplastic or aplastic thymus, there are missing thymic shadow on their plain chest x-ray. Immunodeficient patients are traditionally known to be at an increased risk for malignancy, especially lymphoma. We experienced a 7-year-old DiGeorge syndrome patient with mediastinal mass shadow on her plain chest x-ray. She visited Severance Children's Hospital hospital with recurrent pneumonia, and throughout her repeated chest x-ray, there was a mass like shadow on anterior mediastinal area. We did full evaluation including chest computed tomography, chest ultrasonography, and chest magnetic resonance imaging. To rule out malignancy, video assisted thoracoscopic surgery was done. Final diagnosis of the mass which was thought to be malignancy, was lymphoproliferative lesion.

  20. Tumor-Infiltrating Macrophages in Post-Transplant, Relapsed Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Are Donor-Derived.

    PubMed

    Crane, Genevieve M; Samols, Mark A; Morsberger, Laura A; Yonescu, Raluca; Thiess, Michele L; Batista, Denise A S; Ning, Yi; Burns, Kathleen H; Vuica-Ross, Milena; Borowitz, Michael J; Gocke, Christopher D; Ambinder, Richard F; Duffield, Amy S

    Tumor-associated inflammatory cells in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) typically outnumber the neoplastic Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (H/RS) cells. The composition of the inflammatory infiltrate, particularly the fraction of macrophages, has been associated with clinical behavior. Emerging work from animal models demonstrates that most tissue macrophages are maintained by a process of self-renewal under physiologic circumstances and certain inflammatory states, but the contribution from circulating monocytes may be increased in some disease states. This raises the question of the source of macrophages involved in human disease, particularly that of CHL. Patients with relapsed CHL following allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) provide a unique opportunity to begin to address this issue. We identified 4 such patients in our archives. Through molecular chimerism and/or XY FISH studies, we demonstrated the DNA content in the post-BMT recurrent CHL was predominantly donor-derived, while the H/RS cells were derived from the patient. Where possible to evaluate, the cellular composition of the inflammatory infiltrate, including the percentage of macrophages, was similar to that of the original tumor. Our findings suggest that the H/RS cells themselves define the inflammatory environment. In addition, our results demonstrate that tumor-associated macrophages in CHL are predominantly derived from circulating monocytes rather than resident tissue macrophages. Given the association between tumor microenvironment and disease progression, a better understanding of macrophage recruitment to CHL may open new strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  1. Tumor-Infiltrating Macrophages in Post-Transplant, Relapsed Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Are Donor-Derived

    PubMed Central

    Morsberger, Laura A.; Yonescu, Raluca; Thiess, Michele L.; Batista, Denise A. S.; Ning, Yi; Burns, Kathleen H.; Vuica-Ross, Milena; Borowitz, Michael J.; Gocke, Christopher D.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated inflammatory cells in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) typically outnumber the neoplastic Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (H/RS) cells. The composition of the inflammatory infiltrate, particularly the fraction of macrophages, has been associated with clinical behavior. Emerging work from animal models demonstrates that most tissue macrophages are maintained by a process of self-renewal under physiologic circumstances and certain inflammatory states, but the contribution from circulating monocytes may be increased in some disease states. This raises the question of the source of macrophages involved in human disease, particularly that of CHL. Patients with relapsed CHL following allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) provide a unique opportunity to begin to address this issue. We identified 4 such patients in our archives. Through molecular chimerism and/or XY FISH studies, we demonstrated the DNA content in the post-BMT recurrent CHL was predominantly donor-derived, while the H/RS cells were derived from the patient. Where possible to evaluate, the cellular composition of the inflammatory infiltrate, including the percentage of macrophages, was similar to that of the original tumor. Our findings suggest that the H/RS cells themselves define the inflammatory environment. In addition, our results demonstrate that tumor-associated macrophages in CHL are predominantly derived from circulating monocytes rather than resident tissue macrophages. Given the association between tumor microenvironment and disease progression, a better understanding of macrophage recruitment to CHL may open new strategies for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27685855

  2. Post-Transplant Membranous Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Active Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Hepatitis C Infection after Deceased Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doke, Tomohito; Sato, Waichi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Sigehisa; Sasaki, Hitomi; Kusaka, Mamoru; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Asami; Yuzawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Midori

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman who had undergone deceased donor kidney transplantation twice, at 35 and 43 years of age, presented with renal impairment. She was infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The histology of the graft kidney revealed post-transplant membranous nephropathy (MN) with podocytic infolding and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). IgG subclass staining showed fine granular deposits of IgG1 and IgG3, but not IgG4, in the glomerular capillary walls. Panel reactive antibody scores for human leukocyte antigen class I and class II were 92.67% and 66.68%, respectively. Thus, this case of post-transplanted MN was considered to be associated with AMR and HCV infection.

  3. Primary central nervous system posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Castellano-Sanchez, Amilcar A; Li, Shiyong; Qian, Jiang; Lagoo, Anand; Weir, Edward; Brat, Daniel J

    2004-02-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) represent a spectrum ranging from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven polyclonal lymphoid proliferations to EBV+ or EBV- malignant lymphomas. Central nervous system (CNS) PTLDs have not been characterized fully. We reviewed the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of 12 primary CNS PTLDs to define them more precisely. Patients included 10 males and 2 females (median age, 43.4 years) who were recipients of kidney (n = 5), liver (n = 2), heart (n = 2), peripheral blood stem cells (n = 2), or bone marrow (n = 1). All received immunosuppressive therapy. CNS symptoms developed 3 to 131 months (mean, 31 months) after transplantation. By neuroimaging, most showed multiple (3 to 9) intra-axial, contrast-enhancing lesions. Histologic sections showed marked expansion of perivascular spaces by large, cytologically malignant lymphoid cells that were CD45+, CD20+, EBV+ and showed light chain restriction or immunoglobulin gene rearrangement. In distinction to PTLDs in other organ systems, CNS PTLDs were uniformly high-grade lymphomas that fulfilled the World Health Organization criteria for monomorphic PTLDs. Extremely short survival periods were noted for each CNS PTLD that followed peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Survival of others with CNS PTLD varied; some lived more than 2 years.

  4. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders in Neuronal Xenotransplanted Macaques.

    PubMed

    Cavicchioli, L; Ferraresso, S; Westmoreland, S; Kaliyaperumal, S; Knight, H; Crossan, C; Scobie, L; Danesi, A; Vadori, M; Trez, D; Badin, R Aron; Hantraye, P; Cozzi, E

    2017-03-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations that occur in the setting of depressed T-cell function due to immunosuppressive therapy used following solid organ transplantation, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and also xenotransplantation. In the present study, 28 immunosuppressed parkinsonian Macaca fascicularis were intracerebrally injected with wild-type or CTLA4-Ig transgenic porcine xenografts to identify a suitable strategy to enable long-term cell survival, maturation, and differentiation. Nine of 28 (32%) immunosuppressed primates developed masses compatible with PTLD, located mainly in the gastrointestinal tract and/or nasal cavity. The masses were classified as monomorphic PTLD according to the World Health Organization classification. Immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses revealed that the PTLDs were associated with macaca lymphocryptovirus as confirmed by double-labeling immunohistochemistry for CD20 and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2), where the viral protein was located within the CD20+ neoplastic B cells. In sera from 3 distinct phases of the experimental life of the primates, testing by quantitative PCR revealed a progression of the viral load that paralleled the PTLD progression and no evidence of zoonotic transmission of porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus through xenoneuronal grafts. These data suggest that monitoring the variation of macaca lymphocryptovirus DNA in primates could be used as a possible early diagnostic tool for PTLD progression, allowing preemptive treatment such as immunosuppression therapy reduction.

  5. How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Bosco

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrial.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:21885601

  6. [Assessment and management of post-transplant iron overload: Guidelines of the Francophone Society of Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Aurélie; Bouhya, Salaheddine; Belaiche, Stéphanie; Chevallier, Patrice; Hermet, Eric; Hospital-Gustems, Carole; Michallet, Mauricette; Rialland, Fanny; Samsonova, Olga; Sirvent, Anne; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Rohrlich, Pierre-Simon; Beguin, Yves

    2016-11-01

    To harmonize clinical practice in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy (SFGM-TC) set up the sixth annual series of workshops which brought together practitioners from all member centers and took place in September 2015 in Lille. The main aim of this session was to describe the impact, evaluation and treatment of post-transplant iron overload.

  7. Early post-transplant hyperbilirubinemia is a possible predictive factor for developing neurological complications in pediatric living donor liver transplant patients receiving tacrolimus.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazushige; Kobayashi, Yoshinobu; Nakamura, Atsushi; Fukushima, Daizo; Satomi, Susumu

    2017-03-01

    The cause of post-transplant CNI-NCs is multifactorial and not ascribed solely to CNI toxicity. A total of 90 children (aged <20 years) who underwent LDLT were evaluated to investigate the predictive factors associated with CNI-NCs. Twelve patients (13.3%) developed CNI-NCs after LDLT (age range, 2-15 years). The symptoms of CNI-NCs were seizures, VD, and stupor. The median onset of CNI-NCs was 10 days (range, 5-30 days) post-transplant. In the univariate analysis, higher recipient age at LDLT, donor age and recipient's BW, lower actual GV/SLV and TAC dosage/BW, and higher mean T-Bil and sodium level for 7 days after transplantation were independently significantly associated with TAC-NCs. Multivariate analysis showed that the T-Bil level in the first week after LDLT was the only significant independent predictive factor for TAC-NCs (HR, 1.588; 95% CI, 1.042-2.358; P=.031). In conclusion, CNI-NCs occurred most frequently in children over 5 years and were associated with hyperbilirubinemia for 7 days post-transplant, regardless of TAC levels. The transplant team should refer to a neurologist to define the diagnosis and to collaborate to resolve the neurological problems.

  8. Post-reperfusion rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis in post-transplant IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tovbin, David; Shnaider, Alla; Kachko, Leonid; Basok, Anna; Vorobiov, Marina; Rogachev, Boris; Abramov, Dan; Zlotnik, Moshe

    2004-01-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) is a rare occurrence in IgA nephropathy (IgAN) in renal transplant patients on immunosuppressive therapy. RPGN post ischemia-reperfusion has not been previously reported. We report a 62 year old male patient on azathioprine therapy, 9 years after left cadaveric renal transplantation due to end stage renal disease of unknown etiology, who presented with progressive deterioration in renal function and hematuria. Renal biopsy was consistent with IgAN. Duplex and CT scan demonstrated a decreased renal graft perfusion, due to severe atherosclerosis and stenosis of iliac arteries. The patient underwent left axilo-femoral bypass graft surgery with improvement in kidney graft perfusion and function. However, few weeks later, patient presented with pulmonary edema and advanced renal failure and he was initiated on hemodialysis. Repeated renal biopsy demonstrated crescentic GN. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of RPGN following reversal of ischemia and reperfusion. There was no evidence for atherembolic disease which is not uncommon after vascular surgery and it has been reported to be rarely associated to crescentic GN. Theoretical explanations for exacerbation of IgAN to crescentic GN, following successful reperfusion, could be enhancement of capillary damage, inflammation and oxidative stress. Putative mechanisms for these phenomena may be interaction of reperfusion-induced hyperfiltration, high intraglomerular capillary pressure, oxidative stress, increased polymorphonucler cells infiltration and inflammation; the presence of IgA immune deposits and azathioprine metabolites, both can also be associated to enhancement of oxidative stress.

  9. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  10. Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of the Lung: Evolution from an Underlying Reactive Lymphoproliferative Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Jon Nicholas; Beatty, Colleen; Kinkade, Zoe; Bryan, Cara; Hogg, Jeffery Paul; Gibson, Laura F; Vos, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-01

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma (ENMZL) of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (MALT) is a problematic and sometimes controversial diagnosis. While commonly seen in the stomach in the setting of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection, other extranodal sites, such as the lung, may also present with disease. ENMZL is clinically and morphologically heterogeneous; however, regardless of presentation, the etiology lies in the accumulation of lymphoid tissue in non-traditional sites. This phenomenon is typically secondary to an underlying inflammatory stimulus such as chronic infection or autoimmune states. The current case report details the clinical history of a patient with Sjögren syndrome over a four year period who eventually developed ENMZL. The patient initially presented with an atypical, but polyclonal, lymphoproliferative process diagnosed as lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. Over time, the patient showed evolution to a monoclonal process with associated radiologic progression of disease. This evolution manifested as a dense lymphoid infiltrate with prominent plasmacytic differentiation and the development of a lung mass radiologically. This case contributes to the growing body of knowledge that suggests ENMZL lies along a biological spectrum of lymphoproliferative disorders whereby a benign, reactive process may eventually undergo malignant transformation. This evolution likely represents the acquisition of genetic abnormalities that allow autonomous proliferation in the absence of the initial immune stimulus. In practice, determining when this event occurs and, thus, distinguishing between reactive and neoplastic disorders within this spectrum may be difficult as no single clinicopathologic feature may be present to establish the diagnosis. This case further illustrates the importance of correlating the clinical, radiologic and pathologic data to evaluate patients with atypical pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders and to allow the optimal management of

  11. Advances in the management and understanding of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Seif, Alix E; Grupp, Stephan A

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of T cell dysregulation caused by defective Fas-mediated apoptosis. Patients with ALPS can develop a myriad of clinical manifestations including lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmunity and increased rates of malignancy. ALPS may be more common that originally thought, and testing for ALPS should be considered in patients with unexplained lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and/or autoimmunity. As the pathophysiology of ALPS is better characterized, a number of targeted therapies are in preclinical development and clinical trials with promising early results. This review describes the clinical and laboratory manifestations found in ALPS patients, as well as the molecular basis for the disease and new advances in treatment.

  12. Diffuse glomerular basement membrane lamellation in post-transplant IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kye Weon; Hong, Soon Won; Kim, Soon Il; Kim, Yu Seun; Park, Ki Il; Jeong, Hyeon Joo

    2002-06-01

    Diffuse glomerular basement membrane (GBM) lamellation, reminiscent of Alport's syndrome, has rarely, and exclusively, been reported in renal allografts from pediatric donors to adult recipients. We report on a similar lesion, identified in a 42-year-old male, who received a kidney from an unrelated 21-year-old living male donor. The disease of the recipient was unknown. Renal allograft biopsies were performed 3.5 and 4.8 years after the renal transplantation, due to massive proteinuria and serum creatinine elevation. The histological features of both biopsies were similar, but more advanced in the second biopsy. Glomerular mesangium was widened and had an IgA deposit in the first biopsy. In addition to the presence of mesangial electron dense deposits, the GBM showed diffuse lamellation and splintering on the subepithelial side, but no definite deposits. In the second biopsy, IgA deposits were extended to the peripheral capillary walls, but electron microscopic examination was not available. Two months after the second biopsy, the patient returned for hemodialysis.

  13. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping in posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Cherie H; Gardner, Laura J; Grosso, Leonard E; Evans, H Lance

    2002-01-01

    We studied the flow cytometric immunophenotyping (FCI) and genotypic data of 11 specimens from 10 transplant recipients and categorized them based on a scheme for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). Specimens had been analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and/or Southern blot for T-cell and B-cell (immunoglobulin heavy chain and light chain genes) gene rearrangements (BGR). The categories for PTLDs were as follows: 1, 1; 2, 6; and 3, 4. The plasmacytic and polymorphic B-cell hyperplasias (PBCHs) revealed no monoclonal/aberrant cells by FCI or genotypic studies (GS). Three of 4 polymorphic B-cell lymphomas (PBCLs) revealed monoclonal or aberrant (no surface light chain) B cells by FCI; 1 of 3 revealed a BGR. However, the 1 case with no monoclonal/aberrant B cells by FCI revealed a BGR. Both immunoblastic lymphomas revealed monoclonal or aberrant B cells by FCI; 1 revealed a BGR. Both multiple myelomas revealed monoclonal plasma cells by FCI; 1 revealed a BGR. In the 4 PTLDs with monoclonal/aberrant B cells by FCI and no clonality detected by GS, the GS were performed on fresh and paraffin-embedded tissue samples. FCI of the plasmacytic and PBCHs supported no clonal process by GS. FCI defined a clonal process in 2 PBCLs, I immunoblastic lymphoma, and 1 multiple myeloma that were negative by GS. However, 1 PBCL that was polyclonal by FCI was monoclonal by GS. Thus, FCI is useful for identifying a clonal process in PTLDs with negative results by GS; FCI and GS should be performed routinely in PTLDs to detect a clonal process.

  14. Drug-drug interactions between immunosuppressants and antidiabetic drugs in the treatment of post-transplant diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vanhove, Thomas; Remijsen, Quinten; Kuypers, Dirk; Gillard, Pieter

    2016-09-14

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus is a frequent complication of solid organ transplantation that generally requires treatment with lifestyle interventions and antidiabetic medication. A number of demonstrated and potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) exist between commonly used immunosuppressants and antidiabetic drugs, which are comprehensively summarized in this review. Cyclosporine (CsA) itself inhibits the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 enzyme and a variety of drug transporters. As a result, it increases exposure to repaglinide and sitagliptin, will likely increase the exposure to nateglinide, glyburide, saxagliptin, vildagliptin and alogliptin, and could theoretically increase the exposure to gliquidone and several sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT)-2 inhibitors. Currently available data, although limited, suggest that these increases are modest and, particularly with regard to gliptins and SGLT-2 inhibitors, unlikely to result in hypoglycemia. The interaction with repaglinide is more pronounced but does not preclude concomitant use if repaglinide dose is gradually titrated. Mycophenolate mofetil and azathioprine do not engage in DDIs with any antidiabetic drug. Although calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) are intrinsically prone to DDIs, their disposition is not influenced by metformin, pioglitazone, sulfonylureas (except possibly glyburide) or insulin. An effect of gliptins on the disposition of CNIs and mTORi is unlikely, but has not been definitively ruled out. Based on their disposition profiles, glyburide and canagliflozin could affect CNI and mTORi disposition although this requires further study. Finally, delayed gastric emptying as a result of glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists seems to have a limited, but not necessarily negligible effect on CNI disposition.

  15. Bone marrow findings in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with germline FAS mutation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Pittaluga, Stefania; Price, Susan; Raffeld, Mark; Hahn, Jamie; Jaffe, Elaine S; Rao, V Koneti; Maric, Irina

    2017-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by defective FAS-mediated apoptosis, autoimmune disease, accumulation of mature T-cell receptor alpha/beta positive, CD4 and CD8 double-negative T cells and increased risk of lymphoma. Despite frequent hematologic abnormalities, literature is scarce regarding the bone marrow pathology in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed 3l bone marrow biopsies from a cohort of 240 patients with germline FAS mutations. All biopsies were performed for the evaluation of cytopenias or to rule out lymphoma. Clinical information was collected and morphological, immunohistochemical, flow cytometric and molecular studies were performed. Bone marrow lymphocytosis was the predominant feature, present in 74% (23/31) of biopsies. The lymphoid cells showed several different patterns of infiltration, most often forming aggregates comprising T cells in 15 cases, B cells in one and a mixture of T and B cells in the other seven cases. Double-negative T cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in the minority of cases (10/31; 32%); significantly, all but one of these cases had prominent double-negative T-lymphoid aggregates, which in four cases diffusely replaced the marrow space. One case showed features of Rosai-Dorfman disease, containing scattered S-100(+) cells with emperipolesis and double-negative T cells. No clonal B or T cells were detected by polymerase chain reaction in any evaluated cases. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma was identified in three cases. Our results demonstrate that infiltrates of T cells, or rarely B cells, can be extensive in patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, mimicking lymphoma. A multi-modality approach, integrating clinical, histological, immunohistochemical as well as other ancillary tests, can help avoid this diagnostic pitfall. This study is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov ID # NCT00001350.

  16. Bone marrow findings in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with germline FAS mutation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yi; Pittaluga, Stefania; Price, Susan; Raffeld, Mark; Hahn, Jamie; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Rao, V. Koneti; Maric, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by defective FAS-mediated apoptosis, autoimmune disease, accumulation of mature T-cell receptor alpha/beta positive, CD4 and CD8 double-negative T cells and increased risk of lymphoma. Despite frequent hematologic abnormalities, literature is scarce regarding the bone marrow pathology in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed 3l bone marrow biopsies from a cohort of 240 patients with germline FAS mutations. All biopsies were performed for the evaluation of cytopenias or to rule out lymphoma. Clinical information was collected and morphological, immunohistochemical, flow cytometric and molecular studies were performed. Bone marrow lymphocytosis was the predominant feature, present in 74% (23/31) of biopsies. The lymphoid cells showed several different patterns of infiltration, most often forming aggregates comprising T cells in 15 cases, B cells in one and a mixture of T and B cells in the other seven cases. Double-negative T cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in the minority of cases (10/31; 32%); significantly, all but one of these cases had prominent double-negative T-lymphoid aggregates, which in four cases diffusely replaced the marrow space. One case showed features of Rosai-Dorfman disease, containing scattered S-100+ cells with emperipolesis and double-negative T cells. No clonal B or T cells were detected by polymerase chain reaction in any evaluated cases. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma was identified in three cases. Our results demonstrate that infiltrates of T cells, or rarely B cells, can be extensive in patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, mimicking lymphoma. A multi-modality approach, integrating clinical, histological, immunohistochemical as well as other ancillary tests, can help avoid this diagnostic pitfall. This study is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov ID # NCT00001350 PMID:27846610

  17. Variations of the UNC13D gene in patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aricò, Maurizio; Boggio, Elena; Cetica, Valentina; Melensi, Matteo; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Clemente, Nausicaa; Cappellano, Giuseppe; Buttini, Sara; Soluri, Maria Felicia; Comi, Cristoforo; Dufour, Carlo; Pende, Daniela; Dianzani, Irma; Ellis, Steven R; Pagliano, Sara; Marcenaro, Stefania; Ramenghi, Ugo; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Dianzani, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is caused by genetic defects decreasing Fas function and is characterized by lymphadenopathy/splenomegaly and expansion of CD4/CD8 double-negative T cells. This latter expansion is absent in the ALPS variant named Dianzani Autoimmune/lymphoproliferative Disease (DALD). In addition to the causative mutations, the genetic background influences ALPS and DALD development. We previously suggested a disease-modifying role for the perforin gene involved in familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The UNC13D gene codes for Munc13-4, which is involved in perforin secretion and FHL development, and thus, another candidate for a disease-modifying role in ALPS and DALD. In this work, we sequenced UNC13D in 21 ALPS and 20 DALD patients and compared these results with sequences obtained from 61 healthy subjects and 38 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. We detected four rare missense variations in three heterozygous ALPS patients carrying p.Cys112Ser, p.Val781Ile, and a haplotype comprising both p.Ile848Leu and p.Ala995Pro. Transfection of the mutant cDNAs into HMC-1 cells showed that they decreased granule exocytosis, compared to the wild-type construct. An additional rare missense variation, p.Pro271Ser, was detected in a healthy subject, but this variation did not decrease Munc13-4 function. These data suggest that rare loss-of-function variations of UND13D are risk factors for ALPS development.

  18. Variations of the UNC13D Gene in Patients with Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aricò, Maurizio; Boggio, Elena; Cetica, Valentina; Melensi, Matteo; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Clemente, Nausicaa; Cappellano, Giuseppe; Buttini, Sara; Soluri, Maria Felicia; Comi, Cristoforo; Dufour, Carlo; Pende, Daniela; Dianzani, Irma; Ellis, Steven R.; Pagliano, Sara; Marcenaro, Stefania; Ramenghi, Ugo; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Dianzani, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is caused by genetic defects decreasing Fas function and is characterized by lymphadenopathy/splenomegaly and expansion of CD4/CD8 double-negative T cells. This latter expansion is absent in the ALPS variant named Dianzani Autoimmune/lymphoproliferative Disease (DALD). In addition to the causative mutations, the genetic background influences ALPS and DALD development. We previously suggested a disease-modifying role for the perforin gene involved in familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The UNC13D gene codes for Munc13-4, which is involved in perforin secretion and FHL development, and thus, another candidate for a disease-modifying role in ALPS and DALD. In this work, we sequenced UNC13D in 21 ALPS and 20 DALD patients and compared these results with sequences obtained from 61 healthy subjects and 38 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. We detected four rare missense variations in three heterozygous ALPS patients carrying p.Cys112Ser, p.Val781Ile, and a haplotype comprising both p.Ile848Leu and p.Ala995Pro. Transfection of the mutant cDNAs into HMC-1 cells showed that they decreased granule exocytosis, compared to the wild-type construct. An additional rare missense variation, p.Pro271Ser, was detected in a healthy subject, but this variation did not decrease Munc13-4 function. These data suggest that rare loss-of-function variations of UND13D are risk factors for ALPS development. PMID:23840885

  19. Risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Landgren, Ola; Gilbert, Ethel S; Rizzo, J Douglas; Socié, Gérard; Banks, Peter M; Sobocinski, Kathleen A; Horowitz, Mary M; Jaffe, Elaine S; Kingma, Douglas W; Travis, Lois B; Flowers, Mary E; Martin, Paul J; Deeg, H Joachim; Curtis, Rochelle E

    2009-05-14

    We evaluated 26 901 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at 271 centers worldwide to define patterns of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). PTLDs developed in 127 recipients, with 105 (83%) cases occurring within 1 year after transplantation. In multivariate analyses, we confirmed that PTLD risks were strongly associated (P < .001) with T-cell depletion of the donor marrow, antithymocyte globulin (ATG) use, and unrelated or HLA-mismatched grafts (URD/HLA mismatch). Significant associations were also confirmed for acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The increased risk associated with URD/HLA-mismatched donors (RR = 3.8) was limited to patients with T-cell depletion or ATG use (P = .004). New findings were elevated risks for age 50 years or older at transplantation (RR = 5.1; P < .001) and second transplantation (RR = 3.5; P < .001). Lower risks were found for T-cell depletion methods that remove both T and B cells (alemtuzumab and elutriation, RR = 3.1; P = .025) compared with other methods (RR = 9.4; P = .005 for difference). The cumulative incidence of PTLDs was low (0.2%) among 21 686 patients with no major risk factors, but increased to 1.1%, 3.6%, and 8.1% with 1, 2, and more than 3 major risk factors, respectively. Our findings identify subgroups of patients who underwent allogeneic HCT at elevated risk of PTLDs for whom prospective monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus activation and early treatment intervention may be particularly beneficial.

  20. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome mimicking chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Keiko; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Otsubo, Keisuke; Wakiguchi, Hiroshi; Noda, Yukihiro; Kasahara, Yoshihito; Miyawaki, Toshio

    2011-06-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) is defined as a systemic EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, and splenomegaly in apparently immunocompetent persons. Recent studies have revealed that EBV infects T or natural killer cells in most patients with CAEBV; the etiology of CAEBV, however, remains unknown. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorder (ALPS) is an inherited disorder associated with defects in apoptosis, and clinically characterized by lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hypergammaglobulinemia, and autoimmune disease. ALPS is most often associated with mutations in the FAS gene, which is an apoptosis-signaling receptor important for homeostasis of the immune system. Based on the clinical similarity between ALPS and CAEBV with respect to lymphoproliferation, we have examined the possibility of the co-occurrence of ALPS in patients with a diagnosis of CAEBV. In this study, we have identified FAS gene mutations in three Japanese patients with lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and unusual EBV infection, who were diagnosed with CAEBV. These observations, which indicate that the clinical development of ALPS may be associated with EBV infection, alert us to a potential diagnostic pitfall of CAEBV.

  1. A de novo monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease in a kidney transplant recipient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Myeloma following kidney transplantation is a rare entity. It can be divided into two groups: relapse of a previous myeloma and de novo myeloma. Some of these myelomas can be complicated by a monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease, which is even less common. Less than ten cases of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease after renal graft have been reported in the literature. The treatment of these patients is not well codified. Case presentation We report the case of a 43-year-old white European man who received a renal transplant for a nephropathy of unknown etiology and developed a nephrotic syndrome with kidney failure at 2-years follow-up. We diagnosed a de novo monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease associated with a kappa light chain multiple myeloma, which is a very uncommon presentation for this disease. Three risk factors were identified in this patient: Epstein–Barr virus reactivation with cytomegalovirus co-infection; intensified immunosuppressive therapy during two previous rejection episodes; and human leukocyte antigen-B mismatches. Chemotherapy treatment and decrease in the immunosuppressive therapy were followed by remission and slight improvement of renal function. A relapse occurred 8 months later and his renal function worsened rapidly requiring hemodialysis. He died from septic shock 4 years after the diagnosis of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease. Conclusions This rare case of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder with an uncommon presentation illustrates the fact that treatment in such a situation is very difficult to manage because of a small number of patients reported and a lack of information on this disease. There are no guidelines, especially concerning the immunosuppressive therapy management. PMID:24942882

  2. Deconvoluting post-transplant immunity: cell subset-specific mapping reveals pathways for activation and expansion of memory T, monocytes and B cells.

    PubMed

    Grigoryev, Yevgeniy A; Kurian, Sunil M; Avnur, Zafi; Borie, Dominic; Deng, Jun; Campbell, Daniel; Sung, Joanna; Nikolcheva, Tania; Quinn, Anthony; Schulman, Howard; Peng, Stanford L; Schaffer, Randolph; Fisher, Jonathan; Mondala, Tony; Head, Steven; Flechner, Stuart M; Kantor, Aaron B; Marsh, Christopher; Salomon, Daniel R

    2010-10-14

    A major challenge for the field of transplantation is the lack of understanding of genomic and molecular drivers of early post-transplant immunity. The early immune response creates a complex milieu that determines the course of ensuing immune events and the ultimate outcome of the transplant. The objective of the current study was to mechanistically deconvolute the early immune response by purifying and profiling the constituent cell subsets of the peripheral blood. We employed genome-wide profiling of whole blood and purified CD4, CD8, B cells and monocytes in tandem with high-throughput laser-scanning cytometry in 10 kidney transplants sampled serially pre-transplant, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Cytometry confirmed early cell subset depletion by antibody induction and immunosuppression. Multiple markers revealed the activation and proliferative expansion of CD45RO(+)CD62L(-) effector memory CD4/CD8 T cells as well as progressive activation of monocytes and B cells. Next, we mechanistically deconvoluted early post-transplant immunity by serial monitoring of whole blood using DNA microarrays. Parallel analysis of cell subset-specific gene expression revealed a unique spectrum of time-dependent changes and functional pathways. Gene expression profiling results were validated with 157 different probesets matching all 65 antigens detected by cytometry. Thus, serial blood cell monitoring reflects the profound changes in blood cell composition and immune activation early post-transplant. Each cell subset reveals distinct pathways and functional programs. These changes illuminate a complex, early phase of immunity and inflammation that includes activation and proliferative expansion of the memory effector and regulatory cells that may determine the phenotype and outcome of the kidney transplant.

  3. Haploidentical T Cell-Replete Transplantation with Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide for Patients in or above the Sixth Decade of Age Compared with Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation from an Human Leukocyte Antigen-Matched Related or Unrelated Donor.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Didier; Fürst, Sabine; Crocchiolo, Roberto; El-Cheikh, Jean; Granata, Angela; Harbi, Samia; Bouabdallah, Reda; Devillier, Raynier; Bramanti, Stephania; Lemarie, Claude; Picard, Christophe; Chabannon, Christian; Weiller, Pierre-Jean; Faucher, Catherine; Mohty, Bilal; Vey, Norbert; Castagna, Luca

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been shown that a T cell-replete allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from a haploidentical donor (haplo-ID) could be a valid treatment for hematological malignancies. However, little data exist concerning older populations. We provided transplantation to 31 patients over the age of 55 years from a haplo-ID and compared their outcomes with patients of the same ages who underwent transplantation from a matched related (MRD) or an unrelated donor (UD). All 3 groups were comparable, except for their conditioning. Patients in haplo-ID group received 2 days of post-transplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide followed by cyclosporine A and mycophenolate mofetil, whereas patients in other groups received pretransplantation antithymocyte globulin, cyclosporine A, and additional mycophenolate mofetil in case of 1-antigen mismatch. All patients but 1 in the haplo-ID group engrafted. The incidence of grades 2 to 4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was not statistically different between recipients from haplo-ID (cumulative incidence, 23%) and MRD (cumulative incidence, 21%) transplantations but it was lower than after UD HSCT (cumulative incidence, 44%). No patient in the haplo-ID group developed severe chronic GVHD, compared with cumulative incidences of 16% and 14% after MRD (P = .02) and UD (P = .03) grafts, respectively. The cumulative incidences of relapse were similar in the 3 groups, whereas nonrelapse mortality after UD HSCT was 3-fold higher than after haplo-ID or MRD HSCT. Overall, 2-year overall survival (70%), progression-free survival (67%), and progression and severe chronic GVHD-free survival (67%) probabilities after haplo-ID did not statistically differ from MRD transplantation (78%, 64%, and 51%, respectively), although they were higher than after UD transplantation (51% [P = .08], 38% [P = .02], and 31% [P = .007]). We conclude that T cell-replete haplo-ID HSCT followed by post-transplantation high

  4. Early-onset EBV-positive post-transplant plasmablastic lymphoma arising in a liver allograft: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Benítez, Carlos E; Rey, Paula; Zoroquiaín, Pablo; Martínez, Jorge; Ramírez, Pablo; Arrese, Marco; Pérez-Ayuso, Rosa María; Valbuena, José R

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of a 51-year-old man who received a cadaveric liver allograft for autoimmune and hepatopulmonary syndrome. The patient was admitted with symptoms of progressive vomiting and diarrhea 16 months after transplantation. Laboratory studies showed abnormal liver functions, and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 76-mm heterogeneous mass in the liver. Histological examination showed a malignant lymphoid neoplasm with plasmablastic features. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PL) is rare in the post-transplantation period. To the best of our knowledge, only 25 well-documented cases of posttransplant PL, including ours, have been described.

  5. A case of multiple hepatic lesions associated with methotrexate-associated lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ruby; Numata, Kazushi; Doba, Nobutaka; Hara, Koji; Chuma, Makoto; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Nozaki, Akito; Tanaka, Katsuaki; Ishii, Yoshimi; Maeda, Shin

    2016-10-01

    Patients receiving methotrexate (MTX) for the treatment of autoimmune disease are at a high risk of developing lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD), the so-called methotrexate-associated lymphoproliferative disorders (MTX-LPD). We recently performed abdominal ultrasonography (US) in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had developed hepatic dysfunction during the course of MTX therapy; the examination revealed multiple well-demarcated hepatic tumors with slightly irregular borders, the largest one measuring 9 cm in diameter. In view of the finding of portal and hepatic veins perforating the tumor, we suspected a diagnosis of malignant lymphoma and performed a hepatic tumor biopsy. Histopathological examination of the biopsy specimens revealed a diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and we made a final diagnosis of MTX-LPD. MTX treatment was discontinued, which resulted in rapid resolution of the lesions. Resolution of MTX-LPD can be obtained just by discontinuation of MTX treatment. In patients receiving MTX therapy who are found to have hepatic tumors perforated by the portal vein and/or hepatic vein on abdominal US, it is advisable to perform hepatic tumor biopsy to facilitate differential diagnosis of MTX-LPD and enable a definite diagnosis.

  6. Early post-transplant urinary IP-10 expression after kidney transplantation is predictive of short- and long-term graft function.

    PubMed

    Matz, M; Beyer, J; Wunsch, D; Mashreghi, M-F; Seiler, M; Pratschke, J; Babel, N; Volk, H-D; Reinke, P; Kotsch, K

    2006-05-01

    The early identification of renal transplant recipients at enhanced risk of developing acute and subclinical rejection would allow individualized adjustment of immunosuppression before functional graft injury occurs and would exclude these patients from drug-weaning studies. Protein and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction-based analyses of candidate markers in urine open the opportunity to closely monitor kidney-transplanted patients non-invasively. The chemokine interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10; CXCL10) might be an interesting candidate to uncover ongoing immune processes within the graft. Urine samples from kidney-transplanted recipients were retrospectively analyzed for IP-10 mRNA and protein expression. IP-10 levels were correlated with the incidence of acute rejection episodes proven by histology and long-term graft function assessed by the glomerular filtration rate 6 months post transplantation. IP-10 expression in urine identified patients with ongoing acute rejection episodes several days before a biopsy was indicated by rising serum creatinine levels. Most importantly, elevated levels of urinary IP-10 protein within the first four postoperative weeks were predictive of graft function at 6 months even in the absence of acute rejection. These data reveal a correlation between elevated IP-10 expression in urine at early time points post-transplantation and intragraft immune activation that leads to acute rejection and compromised long-term graft function.

  7. Sirolimus for Refractory Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Case Report and Literature Review of the Treatment of Post-Transplant Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong A; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Kwon, Hyun-Seop; Baik, Chung-Ryul; Song, Sae-Am; Lee, Jung Nye

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) may occur after any type of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT), even ABO-matched transplantation. It tends to be refractory to standard corticosteroid treatment and requires multiple transfusions. Though, there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment for post-transplant severe AIHA. We present a pediatric patient with refractory AIHA after umbilical cord blood transplantation. She developed severe AIHA at 3months after transplantation and was unresponsive to multiple treatment modalities, including corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and rituximab, resulting in persistent transfusion dependency. Sirolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, was started on day 67 after the onset of AIHA, and this patient was successfully rescued without any complications. Sirolimus induces apoptosis in autoreactive lymphocytes, increases regulatory T cells and has been reported to have a positive effect on AIHA following solid organ transplantation (SOT). We reviewed the literature regarding post-transplant AIHA in the PubMed database and evaluated the treatment outcome of sirolimus in AIHA after SOT.

  8. The autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: A rare disorder providing clues about normal tolerance.

    PubMed

    Turbyville, Joseph C; Rao, V Koneti

    2010-05-01

    The autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by chronic, non-malignant lymphoproliferation, autoimmunity often manifesting as multilineage cytopenias, and an increased risk of lymphoma. While considered a rare disease, there are currently over 250 patients with ALPS being followed at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Most of these patients have a mutation in the gene for the TNF receptor-family member Fas (CD 95, Apo-1), and about one-third have an unknown defect or mutations affecting function of other signaling proteins involved in the apoptotic pathway. While ALPS is one of the few autoimmune diseases with a known genetic defect, there remain unanswered questions regarding how a defect in apoptosis results in the observed phenotype. In addition to shedding light on the pathophysiology of this rare and fascinating condition, studying ALPS may improve our understanding of normal tolerance and more common, sporadic autoimmune disorders.

  9. Clinical and immunological overlap between autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Rensing-Ehl, A; Warnatz, K; Fuchs, S; Schlesier, M; Salzer, U; Draeger, R; Bondzio, I; Joos, Y; Janda, A; Gomes, M; Abinun, M; Hambleton, S; Cant, A; Shackley, F; Flood, T; Waruiru, C; Beutel, K; Siepermann, K; Dueckers, G; Niehues, T; Wiesel, T; Schuster, V; Seidel, M G; Minkov, M; Sirkiä, K; Kopp, M V; Korhonen, M; Schwarz, K; Ehl, S; Speckmann, C

    2010-12-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is mainly caused by defects in the CD95 pathway. Raised CD3+TCRαβ+CD4-CD8- double negative T cells and impaired T cell apoptosis are hallmarks of the disease. In contrast, the B cell compartment has been less well studied. We found an altered distribution of B cell subsets with raised transitional B cells and reduced marginal zone B cells, switched memory B cells and plasma blasts in most of 22 analyzed ALPS patients. Moreover, 5 out of 66 ALPS patients presented with low IgG and susceptibility to infection revealing a significant overlap between ALPS and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). In patients presenting with lymphoproliferation, cytopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia and impaired B cell differentiation, serum biomarkers were helpful in addition to apoptosis tests for the identification of ALPS patients. Our observations may indicate a role for apoptosis defects in some diseases currently classified as CVID.

  10. HTLV Tax gene expression in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, E A; Miranda, N; Gameiro, P; Frade, M J; Figueiredo, M; Parreira, A

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To study the expression of the human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV) Tax gene in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. METHODS: Blood was collected from 72 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. Serum from all patients was assayed for antibodies directed against HTLV-I structural proteins by ELISA and western blotting. RNA was purified from fresh blood cells and amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). After Southern blotting, the PCR products were hybridised with a 32P end-labelled probe specific for the Tax gene. RESULTS: All samples were seronegative. A specific band for the Tax gene was found in five samples. Each of the patients positive for Tax gene expression had a different type of lymphoproliferative disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Infection by HTLV-I cannot be assessed solely by immunological assays, particularly when only disrupted virions are used. Sensitive molecular biology assays are essential for detecting viral gene expression in fresh blood cells. Images PMID:8944616

  11. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): a case with congenital onset.

    PubMed

    Kahwash, Samir B; Fung, Bonita; Savelli, Stephanie; Bleesing, Jack J; Qualman, Stephen J

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is very unusual with regard to a clinical onset soon after birth, and a clinical picture dominated by splenomegaly, jaundice, and consumptive peripheral blood cytopenias, with minimal lymphadenopathy. Our documented close follow up demonstrated initial involvement of the spleen, followed by involvement of the bone marrow and the peripheral blood. The patient underwent bone marrow transplant and is alive and well 20 months after diagnosis.

  12. Feasibility and Outcome of Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation with Post-Transplant High-Dose Cyclophosphamide for Children and Adolescents with Hematologic Malignancies: An AIEOP-GITMO Retrospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Berger, Massimo; Lanino, Edoardo; Cesaro, Simone; Zecca, Marco; Vassallo, Elena; Faraci, Maura; De Bortoli, Massimiliano; Barat, Veronica; Prete, Arcangelo; Fagioli, Franca

    2016-05-01

    Post-transplant high-dose cyclophosphamide (PTCy) is a novel approach to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and rejection in patients given haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Thirty-three patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies and lacking a match-related or -unrelated donor were treated with PTCy haploidentical HSCT in 5 Italian AIEOP centers. Nineteen patients had a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen (57%), and 14 patients received a full myeloablative conditioning regimen (43%). No patients received serotherapy; GVHD prophylaxis was based on PTCy (50 mg/kg on days +3 and +4) combined with mycophenolate plus tacrolimus or cyclosporine A. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment was achieved on days +17 (range, 14 to 37) and +27 (range, 16 to 71). One patient had autologous reconstitution for anti-HLA antibodies. Acute GVHD grades II to IV and III to IV and chronic GVHD developed in 22% (95% CI, 11 to 42), 3% (95% CI, 0 to 21), and 4% (95% CI, 0 to 27) of cases, respectively. The 1-year overall survival rate was 72% (95% CI, 56 to 88), progression-free survival rate was 61% (95% CI, 43 to 80), cumulative incidence of relapse was 24% (95% CI, 13 to 44), and transplant-related mortality was 9% (95% CI, 3 to 26). The univariate analysis for risk of relapse incidence showed how 3 significant variables, mother as donor (P = .02), donor gender as female (P = .04), and patient gender as female (P = .02), were significantly associated with a lower risk of relapse. Disease progression was the main cause of death. PTCy is a safe procedure also for children and adolescents who have already received several lines of chemotherapy. Among the different diseases, a trend for better 1-year rates of overall survival was obtained for nonacute leukemia patients.

  13. End-Stage Renal Disease after Liver Transplantation in Patients with Pre-Transplant Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bahirwani, Ranjeeta; Forde, Kimberly A.; Mu, Yifei; Lin, Fred; Reese, Peter; Goldberg, David; Abt, Peter; Reddy, K Rajender; Levine, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Renal dysfunction prior to liver transplantation has a marked impact on post-transplant kidney outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess post-transplant renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) receiving orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) alone. METHODS Retrospective review of 40 OLT recipients with pre-transplant CKD (serum creatinine ≥ 2 mg/dl for at least 3 months) at the University of Pennsylvania from February 2002 to July 2010. Primary outcome was estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) up to 3 years post-transplant. Secondary outcomes included incidence of stage 4 CKD (eGFR < 30 ml/min), need for renal replacement therapy (RRT), meeting criteria for kidney transplant listing (eGFR ≤ 20 ml/min), and mortality. RESULTS Median patient age was 56.5 years and 48% patients had pre-transplant diabetes. Median serum creatinine at transplant was 2.7 mg/dl (eGFR 24 ml/min). Median eGFR at 1, 2, and 3 years post-transplant was 35, 34, and 37 ml/min respectively. Twelve patients (30%) required RRT at a median of 1.21 years posttransplant and 16 (40%) achieved an eGFR ≤ 20 ml/min at 1.09 years post-transplant. Mortality was 35% at a median of 1.60 years post-transplant. CONCLUSIONS OLT recipients with pre-transplant CKD have a substantial burden of post-transplant renal dysfunction and high short-term mortality, questioning the rationale for OLT alone in this population. PMID:24382253

  14. Molecular etiology of an indolent lymphoproliferative disorder determined by whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jeremy D.K.; Shen, Yaoqing; Pleasance, Erin; Li, Yvonne; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Zhao, Yongjun; Moore, Richard; Wegrzyn-Woltosz, Joanna; Savage, Kerry J.; Weng, Andrew P.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco; Laskin, Janessa; Karsan, Aly

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to assess potential treatment options, whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing were performed on a patient with an unclassifiable small lymphoproliferative disorder. Variants from genome sequencing were prioritized using a combination of comparative variant distributions in a spectrum of lymphomas, and meta-analyses of gene expression profiling. In this patient, the molecular variants that we believe to be most relevant to the disease presentation most strongly resemble a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), whereas the gene expression data are most consistent with a low-grade chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The variant of greatest interest was a predicted NOTCH2-truncating mutation, which has been recently reported in various lymphomas. PMID:27148583

  15. [Transfer of skills: implementing post-transplant follow-up care status for transplant nurses: a report by the SFGM-TC].

    PubMed

    Cornillon, J; Peffault de Latour, R; Apaza, S; Bourg, M-A; Courbon, C; Evard, S; Guiraud, M; Le Bars, L; Petit, S; Magro, L; Schmitt, S; Tardieu, L; Samsonova, O; Tipton, R; Yakoub-Agha, I

    2014-08-01

    The number of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantations has globally taken off in the past decade. However, this increase in transplantation activity has put in the spotlight the need to create a special transplantation-skilled population of nurses. This type of specialisation allocated solely to this activity has not existed within the French nursing community until now. In the attempt to harmonize clinical practices between different French transplantation centers, the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy (SFGM-TC) sets up its forth annual series of workshops which brought together practitioners from all member centers and took place in September 2013 in Lille. Here we report our results and recommendations regarding the implementation of a transplant nurse status for post-transplant follow-up care.

  16. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver transplantation: Outcomes and advances

    PubMed Central

    Said, Adnan

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most prevalent causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. In the last decade it has become the third most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States. Increasing prevalence of NAFLD in the general population also poses a risk to organ donation, as allograft steatosis can be associated with non-function of the graft. Post-transplant survival is comparable between NAFLD and non-NAFLD causes of liver disease, although long term outcomes beyond 10 year are lacking. NAFLD can recur in the allograft frequently although thus far post transplant survival has not been impacted. De novo NAFLD can also occur in the allograft of patients transplanted for non-NAFLD liver disease. Predictors for NAFLD post-transplant recurrence include obesity, hyperlipidemia and diabetes as well as steroid dose after liver transplantation. A polymorphism in PNPLA3 that mediates triglyceride hydrolysis and is linked to pre-transplant risk of obesity and NAFLD has also been linked to post transplant NAFLD risk. Although immunosuppression side effects potentiate obesity and the metabolic syndrome, studies of immunosuppression modulation and trials of specific immunosuppression regimens post-transplant are lacking in this patient population. Based on pre-transplant data, sustained weight loss through diet and exercise is the most effective therapy for NAFLD. Other agents occasionally utilized in NAFLD prior to transplantation include vitamin E and insulin-sensitizing agents. Studies of these therapies are lacking in the post-transplant population. A multimodality and multidisciplinary approach to treatment should be utilized in management of post-transplant NAFLD. PMID:24409043

  17. Herpesvirus saimiri-induced lymphoproliferative disease in howler monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rangan, S R; Martin, L N; Enright, F M; Abee, C R

    1977-07-01

    Four of 5 howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya) experimentally infected with Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) developed a rapidly fatal malignant lymphoma accompanied by peripheral T-cell lymphocytosis. HVS was isolated from fresh and tissue cultured blood and tissue lymphocytes and from cell cultures derived from nonlymphoid organs. Humoral antibodies against HVS-induced antigens were detected in the sera of the animals. The in vitro response of the peripheral blood lymphocytes to mitogenic stimulants was depressed following HVS infection.

  18. Yersinia enterocolitica Infection Simulating Lymphoproliferative Disease, after Liver Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Jakobovich, E.; Koplewitz, B.; Marva, E.; Granot, E.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 14-year-old girl, who was 13 y after liver transplantation for biliary atresia with an unremarkable postoperative course. She presented with fever of up to 40°C, extreme fatigue, malaise, anorexia, and occasional vomiting. On physical examination the only finding was splenomegaly. Lab results showed hyperglobulinemia and an elevated sedimentation rate. Liver function tests were normal except for mild elevation of γGTP. Abdominal U/S and CT demonstrated an enlarged spleen with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes enlargement. An exhaustive evaluation for infectious causes, autoimmune conditions, and malignancy was negative. A full recovery after 5 months prompted testing for self-limited infectious etiologies. Yersinia enterocolitica infection was diagnosed. PMID:25126442

  19. Pentostatin for treatment of refractory autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Rajinder; Savelli, Stephanie; Gross, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), a disorder of programmed cell death, could be due to a congenital defect in the Fas signaling pathway or other pathways for apoptosis. Most cases present with lymphoproliferation and certain autoimmune features such as thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and anemia are due to excessive production of antibodies by B lymphocytes. Majority of cases present within the first few years of life. We report a case of ALPS presenting at birth which was refractory to splenectomy and immunosuppressive therapy, but responded to pentostatin followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  20. Accessory spleen: differential diagnosis for lymphoma in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Aouba, Achille; Canioni, Danielle; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Fischer, Alain; Hermine, Olivier

    2010-07-01

    Mutations of Fas or, less frequently, Fas ligand genes result in a rare inherited lymphoid disorder called autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) in which lymphoma frequency is increased. We report on a patient with ALPS who had been splenectomized for giant splenomegaly and progressively developed a voluminous abdominal tumor. The histology of the removed tumor revealed that it was an accessory spleen exhibiting typical features of ALPS involvement, as shown by the presence of a large excess of CD3+CD4-CD8- T cells and plasma cells without a detectable monoclonal population. This observation highlights the lymphoma's differential diagnosis in this context.

  1. Aggressive angiomyxoma of transplanted kidney mimicking posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Gorsi, Ujjwal; Naranje, Priyanka; Rathi, Manish; Nada, Ritambhara; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2017-01-01

    Angiomyxoma is a scarce neoplasm arising from the soft tissues of perineum and pelvis, more commonly seen in the females. For such a tumor to arise in a renal allograft is rare and has previously been reported only in few case. We report a case of aggressive angiomyxoma arising de novo in the renal allograft nine-year posttransplantation. We describe its imaging features on ultrasound and computed tomography which closely mimic the more usual tumor of the transplanted kidney, posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder and suggest that angiomyxoma may be considered as a differential diagnosis in a case of soft tissue mass arising within the renal allograft.

  2. In vitro lymphoproliferative response and cytokine production in mice with experimental disseminated candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Ali Reza; Shokri, Hojjatollah; Eshghi, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Systemic candidiasis is an infection of Candida albicans (C. albicans) causing disseminated disease and sepsis, invariably when host defenses are compromised. We investigated the histopathological changes as well as the lymphoproliferative responses and cytokine production of splenic cells after stimulation with Concanavalin A (Con A) and Pokeweed mitogen (PWM) in mice with disseminated candidiasis. Materials and Methods: Lymphoproliferative responses were stimulated in vitro with Con A (1 µg/ml) and PWM (1 µg/ml) mitogens in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 media, and the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin-4 (IL-4) in the supernatants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The results revealed that C. albicans organisms multiplied to a greater extent in the kidneys than in the liver and spleen of infected mice. The most predominant forms of C. albicans in different parts of the kidneys were yeast mixed with hyphal forms. Infected mice had a significantly increased proliferative response when splenocytes were stimulated with PWM (2.0±0.16) and Con A (1.9±0.19) (P<0.05). PWM and Con A-stimulated production of IFN-γ significantly tended to be higher in infected mice (PWM: 68.4±14.0 pg/ml; Con A: 53.7±17.3 pg/ml) when compared to controls (P<0.05). Stimulation with PWM and Con A showed no differences in IL-4 production between infected mice and controls. Conclusion: These findings demonstrated a significant increase in both cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in supernatants of PWM and Con A- stimulated splenocyte cultures obtained from mice with disseminated candidiasis. PMID:28293397

  3. Sirolimus, Tacrolimus, Thymoglobulin and Rituximab as Graft-versus-Host-Disease Prophylaxis in Patients Undergoing Haploidentical and HLA Partially Matched Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-09

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Graft Versus Host Disease; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

  4. Hematopoietic Neoplasias in Horses: Myeloproliferative and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    MUÑOZ, Ana; RIBER, Cristina; TRIGO, Pablo; CASTEJÓN, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia, i.e., the neoplasia of one or more cell lines of the bone marrow, although less common than in other species, it is also reported in horses. Leukemia can be classified according to the affected cells (myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders), evolution of clinical signs (acute or chronic) and the presence or lack of abnormal cells in peripheral blood (leukemic, subleukemic and aleukemic leukemia). The main myeloproliferative disorders in horses are malignant histiocytosis and myeloid leukemia, the latter being classified as monocytic and myelomonocytic, granulocytic, primary erythrocytosis or polycythemia vera and megakaryocytic leukemia. The most common lymphoproliferative disorders in horses are lymphoid leukemia, plasma cell or multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic neoplasia in horses and usually involves lymphoid organs, without leukemia, although bone marrow may be affected after metastasis. Lymphoma could be classified according to the organs involved and four main clinical categories have been established: generalized-multicentric, alimentary-gastrointestinal, mediastinal-thymic-thoracic and cutaneous. The clinical signs, hematological and clinical pathological findings, results of bone marrow aspirates, involvement of other organs, prognosis and treatment, if applicable, are presented for each type of neoplasia. This paper aims to provide a guide for equine practitioners when approaching to clinical cases with suspicion of hematopoietic neoplasia. PMID:24833969

  5. A Rare Presentation of Isolated CNS Posttransplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Casey; Streicher, Andrew; Magnuson, Allison; Newman, Susan; Bertoli, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a recognized and extremely morbid complication of solid organ transplantation, but central nervous system involvement, particularly in isolation, is rare. There are no standardized treatment strategies for PTLD, though commonly used strategies include reduction of immunosuppression, chemotherapy, rituximab, radiation, and surgery. We present a case of an unusual morphologic variant of primary central nervous system PTLD with successful response to rituximab and cranial radiation. A 69-year-old Asian male, who underwent postrenal transplant nine years earlier, presented with a one-month history of new onset seizure activity. His evaluation revealed multiple brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as serologic and cerebrospinal fluid studies which were positive for Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection. Ultimately, he underwent craniotomy with tissue biopsy with the final pathology report showing posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder, polymorphic type. The patient was managed with reduction in immunosuppression, rituximab therapy, and cranial radiation treatments. He had demonstrated marked improvement in his neurologic function and was ultimately discharged to inpatient rehabilitation facility. PMID:28116196

  6. Related Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Stem Cell Transplantation; Bone Marrow Transplantation; Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Allogeneic Transplantation; Genetic Diseases; Thalassemia; Pediatrics; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Combined Immune Deficiency; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Metabolic Diseases

  7. Onset of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) in humans as a consequence of genetic defect accumulation.

    PubMed

    Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Neven, Bénédicte; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Daussy, Cécile; Arkwright, Peter D; Lanzarotti, Nina; Schaffner, Catherine; Cluet-Dennetiere, Sophie; Haerynck, Filomeen; Michel, Gérard; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Zarhrate, Mohammed; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Romana, Serge P; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases develop in approximately 5% of humans. They can arise when self-tolerance checkpoints of the immune system are bypassed as a consequence of inherited mutations of key genes involved in lymphocyte activation, survival, or death. For example, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) results from defects in self-tolerance checkpoints as a consequence of mutations in the death receptor-encoding gene TNF receptor superfamily, member 6 (TNFRSF6; also known as FAS). However, some mutation carriers remain asymptomatic throughout life. We have now demonstrated in 7 ALPS patients that the disease develops as a consequence of an inherited TNFRSF6 heterozygous mutation combined with a somatic genetic event in the second TNFRSF6 allele. Analysis of the patients' CD4(-)CD8(-) (double negative) T cells--accumulation of which is a hallmark of ALPS--revealed that in these cells, 3 patients had somatic mutations in their second TNFRSF6 allele, while 4 patients had loss of heterozygosity by telomeric uniparental disomy of chromosome 10. This observation provides the molecular bases of a nonmalignant autoimmune disease development in humans and may shed light on the mechanism underlying the occurrence of other autoimmune diseases.

  8. Notch-Deficient Skin Induces a Lethal Systemic B-Lymphoproliferative Disorder by Secreting TSLP, a Sentinel for Epidermal Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Demehri, Shadmehr; Liu, Zhenyi; Lee, Jonghyeob; Lin, Meei-Hua; Crosby, Seth D; Roberts, Christopher J; Grigsby, Perry W; Miner, Jeffrey H; Farr, Andrew G; Kopan, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes form a highly organized stratified epithelium and sustain a competent barrier function together with dermal and hematopoietic cells. The Notch signaling pathway is a critical regulator of epidermal integrity. Here, we show that keratinocyte-specific deletion of total Notch signaling triggered a severe systemic B-lymphoproliferative disorder, causing death. RBP-j is the DNA binding partner of Notch, but both RBP-j–dependent and independent Notch signaling were necessary for proper epidermal differentiation and lipid deposition. Loss of both pathways caused a persistent defect in skin differentiation/barrier formation. In response, high levels of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) were released into systemic circulation by Notch-deficient keratinocytes that failed to differentiate, starting in utero. Exposure to high TSLP levels during neonatal hematopoiesis resulted in drastic expansion of peripheral pre- and immature B-lymphocytes, causing B-lymphoproliferative disorder associated with major organ infiltration and subsequent death, a previously unappreciated systemic effect of TSLP. These observations demonstrate that local skin perturbations can drive a lethal systemic disease and have important implications for a wide range of humoral and autoimmune diseases with skin manifestations. PMID:18507503

  9. Post-transplant immune complex nephritis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus associated with ANCA vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Carlos; Rebolledo, Alejandra; Gahona, Junior; Rojas, Mauricio; Jiménez, Raquel; Bojórquez, Aurora

    2017-01-29

    Nearly 20% of SLE corresponds to the pediatric population, and 75% of them have kidney involvement representing an important etiology of chronic kidney disease. A correlation between SLE and ANCA-associated vasculitis has been identified as an overlapping syndrome. Kidney allograft recurrence is rare in SLE when disease control is achieved and with nowadays immunosuppression treatment. Histologic transformation is unusual, especially when there are negative serologic markers and no immune complex deposition reported in native kidneys. A 17-year-old female with crescentic glomerulonephritis, p-ANCA-positive antibodies with pauci-immune pattern in kidney biopsy develops end-stage renal disease requiring hemodialysis. Deceased donor kidney transplant was performed receiving triple immunosuppression thereafter. Thirteen months later serum creatinine rises without evidence of infection, urinary obstruction, or clinical and serologic disease relapse. Allograft biopsy reports mesangial proliferation and "full-house" immunofluorescence. The role of ANCA in SLE physiopathology is controversial, and its relation with lupus nephritis is also discordant. ANCA could represent an important factor in the heterogeneity of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

  10. Donor-reactive CD8 Memory T Cells Infiltrate Cardiac Allografts Within 24 Hours Post-Transplant in Naïve Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, A.D.; Nozaki, T.; Rabant, M.; Valujskikh, A.; Fairchild, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Normal immune responses stimulated by pathogenic and environmental antigens generate memory T cells that react with donor antigens and no currently used immunosuppressive drug completely inhibits memory T cell function. While donor-reactive memory T cells clearly compromise graft outcomes, mechanisms utilized by memory T cells to promote rejection are largely unknown. In the current study we investigated how early endogenous memory cells infiltrate and express effector function in cardiac allografts. Endogenous CD8 memory T cells in non-sensitized recipients distinguish syngeneic vs. allogeneic cardiac allografts within 24 hours of reperfusion. CD8-dependent production of IFN-γ and CXCL9/Mig was observed 24–72 hours post-transplant in allografts but not isografts. CXCL9 was produced by donor cells in response to IFN-γ made by recipient CD8 T cells reactive to donor class I MHC molecules. Activated CD8 T cells were detected in allografts at least three days before donor-specific effector T cells producing IFN-γ were detected in the recipient spleen. Early inflammation mediated by donor-reactive CD8 memory T cells greatly enhanced primed effector T cell infiltration into allografts. These results suggest that strategies for optimal inhibition of alloimmunity should include neutralization of infiltrating CD8 memory T cells within a very narrow window after transplantation. PMID:18557725

  11. A Metabolomic Approach (1H HRMAS NMR Spectroscopy) Supported by Histology to Study Early Post-transplantation Responses in Islet-transplanted Livers

    PubMed Central

    Vivot, Kevin; Benahmed, Malika A.; Seyfritz, Elodie; Bietiger, William; Elbayed, Karim; Ruhland, Elisa; Langlois, Allan; Maillard, Elisa; Pinget, Michel; Jeandidier, Nathalie; Gies, Jean-Pierre; Namer, Izzie-Jacques; Sigrist, Séverine; Reix, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic transplantation of islets requires a lot of islets because more than 50% of the graft is lost during the 24 hours following transplantation. We analyzed, in a rat model, early post-transplantation inflammation using systemic inflammatory markers, or directly in islet-transplanted livers by immunohistochemistry. 1H HRMAS NMR was employed to investigate metabolic responses associated with the transplantation. Inflammatory markers (Interleukin-6, α2-macroglobulin) are not suitable to follow islet reactions as they are not islet specific. To study islet specific inflammatory events, immunohistochemistry was performed on sections of islet transplanted livers for thrombin (indicator of the instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR)) and granulocytes and macrophages. We observed a specific correlation between IBMIR and granulocyte and macrophage infiltration after 12 h. In parallel, we identified a metabolic response associated with transplantation: after 12 h, glucose, alanine, aspartate, glutamate and glutathione were significantly increased. An increase of glucose is a marker of tissue degradation, and could be explained by immune cell infiltration. Alanine, aspartate and glutamate are inter-connected in a common metabolic pathway known to be activated during hypoxia. An increase of glutathione revealed the presence of antioxidant protection. In this study, IBMIR visualization combined with 1H HRMAS NMR facilitated the characterization of cellular and molecular pathways recruited following islet transplantation. PMID:27766032

  12. MicroRNA expression in Epstein-Barr virus-associated post-transplant smooth muscle tumours is related to leiomyomatous phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated post-transplant smooth muscle tumours (PTSMT) are rare complications. In our previous molecular analysis, we have evaluated the expression of regulatory microRNA which are known to be EBV-related (miR-146a and miR-155) but found no deregulation in PTSMT. In this current analysis, we aimed to characterize the expression profiles of several hundred microRNA. Tissue samples from PTSMT and uterine leiomyomas were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR for the expression of 365 mature microRNA. PTSMT and leiomyomas share a highly similar microRNA profile, e.g. strong expression of miR-143/miR-145 cluster and low expression of miR-200c. Among EBV-related microRNA (miR-10b, miR-21, miR-29b, miR-34a, miR-127, miR-146a, miR-155, miR-200b, miR-203 and miR-429) only miR-10b and miR-203 were significantly deregulated. The expression pattern of microRNA in PTSMT is not associated with EBV infection but reflects the leiomyomatous differentiation of the tumour cells. PMID:23830214

  13. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3+CD4−CD8− T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient. PMID:27979843

  14. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-12-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient.

  15. Tubulointerstitial nephritis in a patient with probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Glerup, Mia; Herlin, Troels; Rittig, Søren; Grønbæk, Kirsten; Hokland, Marianne; Hasle, Henrik

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is caused by a nonmalignant defective Fas-mediated apoptosis. The main clinical manifestations are chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and autoimmune cytopenia. Most patients with ALPS have a FAS germline mutation. ALPS has occasionally been associated with glomerulonephritis and we present the first report of tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with probable ALPS. A 5-year-old girl presented with fever, vomiting, hypertension, and azotemia. No autoantibodies, viral, or streptococcal antibodies were detected. A renal biopsy showed small-vessel vasculitis with normal glomeruli and inflammation in the interstitium. The patient responded to prednisolone treatment and obtained a full renal recovery. Symptoms of connective tissue disorder supervened and after the development of more pronounced splenomegaly, a diagnosis of ALPS was confirmed.

  16. The evolving art of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: translational research in post-transplant immune reconstitution and immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Komanduri, Krishna V; Wieder, Eric D; Benjamin, Cara L; Levy, Robert B

    2013-12-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) offers the best chance for cure and/or long-term survival for a broad range of diseases, including many high-risk hematologic malignancies, bone marrow failure states and subsets of inherited metabolic diseases and hemoglobinopathies. Clinical advances in allogeneic SCT have resulted in dramatically improved clinical outcomes over the past two decades, resulting in a significant expansion of transplant utilization to many recipients who would previously have been excluded from consideration, including elderly recipients and individuals lacking matched sibling or unrelated donors. Despite these advances, significant clinical challenges remain, including delayed immune reconstitution and the frequent occurrence of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, especially in the unrelated donor transplant setting. Translational laboratory efforts, facilitated by technical advances in our ability to measure thymopoiesis and functional T cell subsets in humans, have resulted in an improved understanding of immune recovery and have provided novel insights that may lead to more rational and selective immunosuppression.

  17. Early lymphocyte recovery at 28 d post-transplant is predictive of reduced risk of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia transplanted with peripheral blood stem cell grafts.

    PubMed

    Michelis, Fotios V; Messner, Hans A; Loach, David; Uhm, Jieun; Gupta, Vikas; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Seftel, Matthew D; Kuruvilla, John; Kim, Dennis D

    2014-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is potentially curative for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Impact of lymphocyte recovery on post-transplant outcomes has been suggested but reports are conflicting. We evaluated the impact of lymphocyte recovery at 28 d post-HCT in 191 AML patients using peripheral blood stem cells as graft. Patients were divided into those with absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) ≥ 0.5 × 10(9) /L (n = 111, 58%; high ALC group) and those with ALC < 0.5 × 10(9) /L (n = 80, 42%; low ALC group), at day 28 post-transplant. With a median follow-up of 49 months, overall survival (OS) was significantly improved in the high ALC group (59% at 3 yr) vs. patients with low ALC (40% at 3 yr, P = 0.03). Cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) was significantly lower in the high ALC group (16% at 3 yr) vs. low ALC group (36% at 3 yr, P = 0.001). Multivariable analysis for CIR demonstrated high ALC group as an independent factor decreasing relapse risk (P = 0.03, HR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.26-0.92). Multivariable analysis for OS and non-relapse mortality did not demonstrate ALC ≥ 0.5 × 10(9) /L at 28 d post-transplant to be predictive. We conclude that lymphocyte recovery with ALC ≥ 0.5 × 10(9) /L at day 28 post-transplant is associated with less relapse in AML patients undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood HCT, but without survival benefit.

  18. Ibrutinib: another weapon in our arsenal against lympho-proliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Cabras, Maria Giuseppina; Angelucci, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    In Volume 16, issue 12 of Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy, an important article on the new drug ibrutinib was published. This new drug promises to further improve outcome in the treatment of several lympho-proliferative disorders. In this editorial, the most important findings of the article looking particularly to the integration of ibrutinib in current clinical practice will be summarized. Finally this editorial will focus on the next challenges for scientists and physicians in the treatment of lympho-proliferative disorders.

  19. Mutation of FAS, XIAP, and UNC13D genes in a patient with a complex lymphoproliferative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Boggio, Elena; Aricò, Maurizio; Melensi, Matteo; Dianzani, Irma; Ramenghi, Ugo; Dianzani, Umberto; Chiocchetti, Annalisa

    2013-10-01

    This article presents a case report for a child presenting with mixed clinical features of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), and X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) disease. From 6 months, he exhibited splenomegaly and lymphoadenopathy and from 4 years, he showed recurrent severe autoimmune hemocytopenia and sepsislike bouts of fever, from which he eventually died at the age of 12. Intriguingly, the patient carried mutations in FAS, XIAP, and UNC13D genes, which are involved in ALPS, XLP disease, and FHL, respectively. These mutations were inherited from the mother, who had rheumatoid arthritis but no signs of ALPS. A role for other modifying genes was suggested by the finding that the healthy father exhibited defective Fas function, without mutation of the FAS gene, and had transmitted to the patient an osteopontin (OPN) gene variant previously associated with ALPS. Therefore, several genes might influence the disease outcome in this family. In vitro analyses revealed that the FAS and the XIAP mutations decreased expression of the corresponding proteins, and the UNC13D mutation decreased granule secretion and Munc interaction with Rab-27a. These findings suggest that overlap may exist between ALPS, FHL, and XLP disease, in accordance with the notion that FHL and XLP disease are due to defective natural killer (NK)/NK T-cell function, which involves Fas. Therefore, we propose that NK cell defects should be evaluated in patients with ALPS-like characteristics, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation should be considered in individuals with severe refractory cytopenia and FHL-like manifestations.

  20. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) caused by Fas (CD95) mutation mimicking sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Müllauer, Leonhard; Emhofer, Josef; Wohlfart, Sabine; Pichlhöfer, Bettina; Stary, Susanne; Ebetsberger, Georg; Mannhalter, Christine; Chott, Andreas

    2008-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an inherited disorder associated with defects in apoptosis, characterized by childhood onset of lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and autoimmune disease. ALPS is most frequently associated with a mutation in the cell death receptor Fas (CD95). Very rarely a mutation in caspase 10 is present. An increase of CD4/CD8 double negative T cells in the peripheral blood and lymph nodes is a feature characteristic of ALPS. Additionally, histiocytic proliferations resembling sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (Rosai-Dorfman disease) were reported recently in patients with ALPS. In the rare cases with a caspase 10 mutation an accumulation of dendritic cells in lymphoid organs was noted. We describe a different, sarcoidosislike, histiocytic infiltration of lymph nodes that persisted for years in a girl, that was initially supposed to suffer from sarcoidosis, but was eventually diagnosed as ALPS, associated with a missense mutation in the intracellular death domain of Fas. This sarcoidosislike histologic picture extends the spectrum of histiocytic lymph node alterations observed in ALPS and alerts of a potential diagnostic pitfall.

  1. A survey of 90 patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome related to TNFRSF6 mutation.

    PubMed

    Neven, Bénédicte; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Florkin, Benoit; Gobert, Delphine; Lambotte, Olivier; De Somer, Lien; Lanzarotti, Nina; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Chantrain, Christophe; Bertrand, Yves; Jeziorski, Eric; Leverger, Guy; Michel, Gérard; Suarez, Felipe; Oksenhendler, Eric; Hermine, Olivier; Blanche, Stéphane; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2011-11-03

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a genetic disorder characterized by early-onset, chronic, nonmalignant lymphoproliferation, autoimmune manifestations, and susceptibility to lymphoma. The majority of ALPS patients carry heterozygous germline (ALPS-FAS) or somatic mutations (ALPS-sFAS) of the TNFRSF6 gene coding for FAS. Although the clinical features of ALPS have been described previously, long-term follow-up data on morbidity and mortality are scarce. We performed a retrospective analysis of clinical and genetic features of 90 ALPS-FAS and ALPS-sFAS patients monitored over a median period of 20.5 years. Heterozygous germline mutations of TNFRSF6 were identified in 83% of probands. Somatic TNFRSF6 mutations were found in 17% of index cases (all located within the intracellular domain of FAS). Sixty percent of the ALPS-FAS patients with mutations in the extracellular domain had a somatic mutation affecting the second allele of TNFRSF6; age at onset was later in these patients. No other genotype-phenotype correlations could be found. Long-term analysis confirmed a trend toward spontaneous remission of lymphoproliferation in adulthood but mixed outcomes for autoimmune manifestations. We observed significant and potentially life-threatening disease and treatment-related morbidity, including a high risk of sepsis after splenectomy that calls for careful long-term monitoring of ALPS patients. We also noted a significantly greater occurrence of disease-related symptoms in male than in female patients.

  2. HHV8/EBV Coinfection Lymphoproliferative Disorder: Rare Entity with a Favorable Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Chelly, Beya; Kilani, Houda; Charfi, Lamia; Douggaz, Amel; Chatti, Samia; Chelbi, Emna

    2017-01-01

    HHV8/EBV-associated germinotropic lymphoproliferative disorder (GLD) is a challenging diagnosis given its rarity, the particular clinical presentation, and the lack of expression of markers usually used in establishing hematopoietic lineage. We report a new case of HHV8/EBV GLD in an immunocompetent 78-year-old woman. The diagnosis was made in an incidentally discovered lymphadenopathy. Histological examination showed a nodular lymphoid proliferation centered by aggregates of atypical plasmablastic cells admixed with small lymphoid cells. Tumor cells were strongly positive with EMA, HHV8, LMP1, CD38, CD138, and kappa light chains. They were negative with common lymphoma-associated markers (CD20, CD3, CD15, CD30, CD10, and bcl2). In situ hybridization confirmed the monotypic kappa light chains and the EBV infection (EBER+). A polyclonal pattern of Ig gene rearrangement was detected by PCR analysis. In the adjacent lymph node parenchyma, some germinal centers mimicked Castleman disease. In this case, the differential diagnosis was discussed with an early stage of large B-cell lymphoma arising in HHV8-associated multicentric Castleman disease. The clinical presentation, the immunophenotype, and the molecular results helped to make the accurate diagnosis. Through the review of the nine previously reported cases in literature, we discuss the clinical and pathologic features and the differential diagnosis of HHV8/EBV GLD. PMID:28280640

  3. Treatment of Recurrent Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder with Autologous Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Bharat; Rahal, Ahmad K.; Farhoud, Hussam; Moore, Dennis F.; Kallail, K. James

    2015-01-01

    Background. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) occur after solid organ transplantation. Treatment guidelines include reduction in immunosuppression (RIS), radiation, rituximab, chemotherapy, and immunological agents. We present a rare case of recurrent diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as a PTLD in a heart transplant patient treated with autologous blood stem cell transplant (ASCT) after failure of conventional therapy. Case Presentation. A 66-year-old male presented with a neck mass. He has a history of Hodgkin's disease status after staging laparotomy with splenectomy and heart transplantation due to dilated nonischemic cardiomyopathy 8 years prior to the development of PTLD. His examination was remarkable for right submandibular swelling. An excisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell NHL. Patient received RIS, rituximab, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy with a complete remission. His lymphoma relapsed and he subsequently was treated with RICE salvage chemotherapy and consolidative high-dose chemotherapy with BEAC regimen followed by ASCT resulting in a complete remission. Conclusion. Patients with PTLD present a difficult therapeutic challenge. In this case, the patient's prior history of Hodgkin's disease, splenectomy, and a heart transplant appear to be unique features, the significance of which is unclear. ASCT might be a promising therapy for patients with relapsed or refractory PTLD. PMID:26688773

  4. Cell-engineered human elastic chondrocytes regenerate natural scaffold in vitro and neocartilage with neoperichondrium in the human body post-transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Hiroko; Imai, Keisuke; Koga, Mika; Yanaga, Katsu

    2012-10-01

    cartilage. Using our multilayered culture system supplemented with FGF2, elastic chondrocytes produce an ECM and also exhibit an intercellular network; therefore, they are able to maintain tissue integrity post-transplantation. These findings realized a clinical application for generative cartilage surgery.

  5. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) in a patient with a new germline Fas gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Del-Rey, Manuel J; Manzanares, Javier; Bosque, Alberto; Aguiló, Juan I; Gómez-Rial, José; Roldan, Ernesto; Serrano, Antonio; Anel, Alberto; Paz-Artal, Estela; Allende, Luis M

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by chronic lymphoproliferation, autoimmune manifestations and expansion of TCRalphabeta+CD4-CD8- lymphocytes. The main pathogenic factor is a defective Fas-mediated apoptosis generally caused by mutations in the Fas gene. This report describes a new heterozygous Fas gene mutation in a boy with clinical and immunological features of ALPS. In vitro, T-cell blasts from the patient are completely resistant to the effects on the anti-Fas cytotoxic mAb CH-11, they also have a higher proliferation rate than T cells from healthy donors, while PHA-induced AICD is normal. The location of the mutation (I246S) found in the intracytoplasmic death domain, and the conservation of that residue in four different species from human suggest that I246 is an essential amino acid for Fas function. The patient has inherited the mutation from his father who also shows defective Fas-mediated apoptosis but the clinical and immunological manifestations are much less severe. These results provide evidence that the penetrance of genetic defects in Fas is variable and that other factors may influence the phenotype of the disease.

  6. Approaches to Managing Autoimmune Cytopenias in Novel Immunological Disorders with Genetic Underpinnings Like Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rao, V Koneti

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of apoptosis. It is frequently caused by mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. Unlike most of the self-limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory, as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically, more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence, current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to the disease and its treatments.

  7. Radioimmunotherapy ((90) Y-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan) for Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders After Prior Exposure to Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, J; Terriou, L; Robu, D; Willekens, C; Hivert, B; Pascal, L; Guieze, R; Trappe, R; Baillet, C; Huglo, D; Morschhauser, F

    2015-07-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are life-threatening complications after solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Only half of CD20-positive PTLDs respond to rituximab monotherapy, and outcomes remain poor for patients with relapsed/refractory disease, especially those who do not qualify for an anthracycline containing regimen due to frailty or comorbidities. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) might be an option in this particular setting. We report a panel of eight patients with rituximab refractory/relapsed CD20-positive PTLDs including three ineligible for subsequent CHOP-like chemotherapy who received (90) Y-Ibritumomab tiuxetan as a single agent (n = 7) or combined to chemotherapy (n = 1). Five out of eight patients were kidney transplant recipients, while 2/8 had a liver transplant and 1/8 had a heart transplant. Patients received a median of two previous therapies. Overall response rate was 62.5%. Importantly, all responders achieved complete response. At a median follow-up of 37 months [5; 84], complete response was ongoing in four patients. Toxicity was predominantly hematological and easily manageable. No graft rejection was noticed concomitantly or following RIT administration despite immunosuppression reduction after diagnosis of PTLDs. This report emphasizes the potential efficiency of salvage RIT for early rituximab refractory PTLDs without any unexpected toxicity.

  8. Plasmacytoma-like posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder following orthotopic liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vishnu, P; Jiang, L; Cortese, C; Menke, D M; Tun, H W

    2011-09-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are among the most serious and potentially fatal complications of both stem-cell and solid-organ transplantation. Most monomorphic PTLDs are of B-cell origin and frequently associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the setting of pharmacological immunosuppression posttransplantation. The majority of monomorphic PTLDs commonly resemble diffuse large B-cell or Burkitt's lymphoma; plasmacytoma-like PTLDs are very rare. We report a case of plasmacytoma-like PTLD arising in the allograft in a 66-year-old male diagnosed 2 months following an orthotopic liver transplant for alcohol-related end-stage liver disease. The liver biopsy revealed marked infiltration of atypical plasma cells with lambda light chain restriction and positivity for EBV by in situ hybridization confirming the diagnosis. Also noted was a remarkable increase of tissue eosinophils. Reduction of immunosuppression led to improvement in his clinical condition, and also resolution of the hepatic lesions and abdominal lymphadenopathy noted on imaging studies. While a few cases of plasmacytoma-like PTLDs have been described in literature, to our knowledge, this is the first reported case of early onset plasmacytoma-like PTLD in a liver transplant recipient occurring in the allograft with associated lymphadenopathy having distinct histopathologic features including tissue eosinophilia. Timely recognition of such an entity is critical in order to initiate early and appropriate intervention.

  9. Epstein-Barr Virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders: experimental and clinical developments

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingyun; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), the first human virus related to oncogenesis, was initially identified in a Burkitt lymphoma cell line in 1964. EBV infects over 90% of the world’s population. Most infected people maintain an asymptomatic but persistent EBV infection lifelong. However, in some individuals, EBV infection has been involved in the development of cancer and autoimmune disease. Nowadays, oncogenic potential of EBV has been intensively studied in a wide range of human neoplasms, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma (GC), etc. EBV encodes a series of viral protein and miRNAs, promoting its persistent infection and the transformation of EBV-infected cells. Although the exact role of EBV in the oncogenesis remains to be clarified, novel diagnostic and targeted therapeutic approaches are encouraging for the management of EBV-related malignancies. This review mainly focuses on the experimental and clinical advances of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26628948

  10. Approaches to Managing Autoimmune Cytopenias in Novel Immunological Disorders with Genetic Underpinnings Like Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Koneti

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of apoptosis. It is frequently caused by mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. Unlike most of the self-limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory, as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically, more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence, current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to the disease and its treatments. PMID:26258116

  11. Donor or recipient origin of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders following solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kinch, A; Cavelier, L; Bengtsson, M; Baecklund, E; Enblad, G; Backlin, C; Thunberg, U; Sundström, C; Pauksens, K

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies of donor or recipient origin of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) following solid organ transplantation (SOT) have either been small or with selected patient groups. We studied tumor origin in a population-based cohort of 93 patients with PTLD following SOT. Tumor origin of PTLD tissue was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization of the sex chromosomes in cases of sex mismatch between donor and recipient (n = 41), or HLA genotyping in cases of identical sex but different HLA type (n = 52). Tumor origin of PTLD could be determined in 67 of the 93 cases. All 67 PTLDs were of recipient origin. They were found in recipients of kidney (n = 38), liver (n = 12), heart (n = 10) and lung (n = 7). The most common recipient-derived lymphomas were monomorphic B-cell PTLDs (n = 45), monomorphic T cell PTLDs (n = 9), indolent lymphomas (n = 6), and polymorphic PTLD (n = 4). Half of the recipient-derived PTLDs were Epstein-Barr virus-positive. Twelve of the recipient-derived PTLDs were located in the grafts: in four cases exclusively and in eight cases in combination with disseminated disease outside the graft. Tumor origin was indeterminable in 26 cases, probably due to low DNA quality. We conclude that the vast majority of PTLDs after SOT was of recipient origin.

  12. Disturbed B-lymphocyte selection in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Janda, Ales; Schwarz, Klaus; van der Burg, Mirjam; Vach, Werner; Ijspeert, Hanna; Lorenz, Myriam Ricarda; Elgizouli, Magdeldin; Pieper, Kathrin; Fisch, Paul; Hagel, Joachim; Lorenzetti, Raquel; Seidl, Maximilian; Roesler, Joachim; Hauck, Fabian; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Speckmann, Carsten; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Ehl, Stephan; Eibel, Hermann; Rizzi, Marta

    2016-05-05

    Fas is a transmembrane receptor involved in the maintenance of tolerance and immune homeostasis. In murine models, it has been shown to be essential for deletion of autoreactive B cells in the germinal center. The role of Fas in human B-cell selection and in development of autoimmunity in patients carrying FAS mutations is unclear. We analyzed patients with either a somatic FAS mutation or a germline FAS mutation and somatic loss-of-heterozygosity, which allows comparing the fate of B cells with impaired vs normal Fas signaling within the same individual. Class-switched memory B cells showed: accumulation of FAS-mutated B cells; failure to enrich single V, D, J genes and single V-D, D-J gene combinations of the B-cell receptor variable region; increased frequency of variable regions with higher content of positively charged amino acids; and longer CDR3 and maintenance of polyreactive specificities. Importantly, Fas-deficient switched memory B cells showed increased rates of somatic hypermutation. Our data uncover a defect in B-cell selection in patients with FAS mutations, which has implications for the understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

  13. T-cell and NK-cell posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Steven H

    2007-06-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) of T-cell or natural killer (NK)-cell origin are an uncommon heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations that fulfill the criteria for one of the T- or NK-cell lymphomas/leukemias. This report summarizes 130 T/NK-cell PTLDs reported in the literature or presented at the Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology Workshop on T/NK-cell malignancies. The T/NK-cell PTLDs occur at a median of 66 months following transplantation and are usually extranodal. The most common types reported are peripheral T-cell lymphoma, unspecified, and hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma. Approximately one third are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)+. The median survival is 6 months. EBV+ cases have a significantly longer survival than EBV- cases, even when indolent T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemias are included among the EBV- cases. Many T/NK-cell PTLDs have been treated with chemotherapy, often together with decreased immunosuppression, but there are infrequent patients who have done well without chemotherapy or radiation.

  14. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  15. Changes in Pre- and Post-Exercise Gene Expression among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Coletta, Dawn K.; Campbell, Latoya E.; Weil, Jennifer; Kaplan, Bruce; Clarkson, Marie; Finlayson, Jean; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Chakkera, Harini A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Decreased insulin sensitivity blunts the normal increase in gene expression from skeletal muscle after exercise. In addition, chronic inflammation decreases insulin sensitivity. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an inflammatory state. How CKD and, subsequently, kidney transplantation affects skeletal muscle gene expression after exercise are unknown. Methods Study cohort: non-diabetic male/female 4/1, age 52±2 years, with end-stage CKD who underwent successful kidney transplantation. The following were measured both pre-transplant and post-transplant and compared to normals: Inflammatory markers, euglycemic insulin clamp studies determine insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle biopsies performed before and within 30 minutes after an acute exercise protocol. Microarray analyses were performed on the skeletal muscle using the 4x44K Whole Human Genome Microarrays. Since nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) plays an important role in T cell activation and calcineurin inhibitors are mainstay immunosuppression, calcineurin/NFAT pathway gene expression was compared at rest and after exercise. Log transformation was performed to prevent skewing of data and regression analyses comparing measures pre- and post-transplant performed. Result Markers of inflammation significantly improved post-transplantation. Insulin infusion raised glucose disposal slightly lower post-transplant compared to pre-transplant, but not significantly, thus concluding differences in insulin sensitivity were similar. The overall pattern of gene expression in response to exercise was reduced both pre-and post-transplant compared to healthy volunteers. Although significant changes were observed among NFAT/Calcineurin gene at rest and after exercise in normal cohort, there were no significant differences comparing NFAT/calcineurin pathway gene expression pre- and post-transplant. Conclusions Despite an improvement in serum inflammatory markers, no significant differences in glucose

  16. Risk factors for post-transplant diabetes mellitus in renal transplant: Role of genetic variability in the CYP450-mediated arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gervasini, Guillermo; Luna, Enrique; García-Cerrada, Montserrat; García-Pino, Guadalupe; Cubero, Juan José

    2016-01-05

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and 20-hidroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), which play an important role both in renal transplant and diabetes mellitus (DM). We searched for associations between polymorphisms in this metabolic pathway and the risk of post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) in kidney recipients. One-hundred-sixty-four patients were genotyped for common SNPs in this route, namely CYP2C8*3, CYP2C8*4, CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*3, CYP2J2*7, CYP4A11 F434S and CYP4F2 V433M. Demographic and clinical parameters were retrospectively collected at four time-points in the first year after grafting. Thirty-four patients (20.73%) developed PTDM, which was more prevalent among older patients [OR for older age = 1.06 (1.03-1.10), p < 0.001] and in those with higher body mass index (BMI) [OR for higher average BMI in the first year = 1.13 (1.04-1.23); p < 0.01]. Creatinine clearance [OR = 0.97 (0.95-0.99); p < 0.01] and exposure to tacrolimus [OR = 3.25 (1.15-9.19); p < 0.05] were also relevant for PTDM risk. With regard to genetic variants, logistic regression analysis controlling for significant demographic and clinical variables showed that the V433M polymorphism in CYP4F2, responsible for 20-HETE synthesis, was an independent risk factor for PTDM [OR = 3.94 (1.08-14.33); p < 0.05]. We have shown that a genetic variant in the CYP4F2 gene, the main gene implicated in 20-HETE synthesis, is associated with the risk for PTDM. Our findings suggest that genes in the metabolic pathways of AA may become good candidates in genetic association studies for PTDM.

  17. In-Hospital Mortality and Post-Transplant Complications in Elderly Multiple Myeloma Patients Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: a Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Larysa; Sylvester, Michael; Parrondo, Ricardo; Mariotti, Veronica; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Chang, Victor T

    2017-03-09

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT) has improved survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and is increasingly used in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare in-hospital complications and mortality after auto-HSCT in younger (< age 65) vs. elderly (≥ age 65) MM patients utilizing the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Over a three-year period (2008-2010), 2209 patients with MM were admitted to U.S. Hospitals for auto-HSCT. The median age was 59 years, with 1650 patients (74.7%) younger than age 65 and 559 patients (25.3%) age 65 or older. Overall, in-hospital mortality in MM patients following auto-HSCT was rare (1.5%) and there was no significant difference in mortality between elderly and younger patients. Elderly patients did have a significantly increased mean length of stay (18.6 days + 10.8 days (standard deviation) vs. 16.8 days + 7.2 days, p<0.001) and mean total hospital charges ($161,117 + $105,008 vs. $151,192 + $78,342, p=0.018) compared to younger pts. Elderly patients were significantly more likely than younger patients to develop major in-hospital post-transplant complications such as severe sepsis (OR 2.70, 95% CI: 1.40-5.21, p=0.003), septic shock, (OR 3.10, 95% CI: 1.43-6.71, p=0.004), pneumonia (OR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.06-2.46, p=0.024), acute respiratory failure (OR 3.44, 95% CI: 1.70-6.96, p=0.001), endotracheal intubation requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation (OR 2.19, 95% CI: 1.06-4.55, p=0.035), acute renal failure (OR 2.14, 95% CI: 1.38-3.33, p=0.001), and cardiac arrhythmias (OR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.52-2.79, <0.001). This data may help guide informed consent discussions and provide a focus for future studies to reduce treatment-related morbidity in elderly MM patients undergoing auto-HSCT.

  18. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of expanded B-cell clones from multiclonal versus monoclonal B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Langerak, Anton W.; Nieto, Wendy G.; Lécrevisse, Quentin; González, Marcos; Cortesão, Emília; Paiva, Artur; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antigen-stimulation has been recurrently involved in the earlier stages of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The expansion of two or more B-cell clones has frequently been reported in individuals with these conditions; potentially, such coexisting clones have a greater probability of interaction with common immunological determinants. Here, we analyzed the B-cell receptor repertoire and molecular profile, as well as the phenotypic, cytogenetic and hematologic features, of 228 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like and non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like clones comparing multiclonal (n=85 clones from 41 cases) versus monoclonal (n=143 clones) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The B-cell receptor of B-cell clones from multiclonal cases showed a slightly higher degree of HCDR3 homology than B-cell clones from mono clonal cases, in association with unique hematologic (e.g. lower B-lymphocyte counts) and cytogenetic (e.g. lower frequency of cytogenetically altered clones) features usually related to earlier stages of the disease. Moreover, a subgroup of coexisting B-cell clones from individual multiclonal cases which were found to be phylogenetically related showed unique molecular and cytogenetic features: they more frequently shared IGHV3 gene usage, shorter HCDR3 sequences with a greater proportion of IGHV mutations and del(13q14.3), than other unrelated B-cell clones. These results would support the antigen-driven nature of such multiclonal B-cell expansions, with potential involvement of multiple antigens/epitopes. PMID:24488564

  19. EBV-driven B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders: from biology, classification and differential diagnosis to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Ok, Chi Young; Li, Ling; Young, Ken H

    2015-01-23

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus, affecting >90% of the adult population. EBV targets B-lymphocytes and achieves latent infection in a circular episomal form. Different latency patterns are recognized based on latent gene expression pattern. Latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) mimics CD40 and, when self-aggregated, provides a proliferation signal via activating the nuclear factor-kappa B, Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways to promote cellular proliferation. LMP-1 also induces BCL-2 to escape from apoptosis and gives a signal for cell cycle progression by enhancing cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and by inhibiting p16 and p27. LMP-2A blocks the surface immunoglobulin-mediated lytic cycle reactivation. It also activates the Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway and induces Bcl-xL expression to promote B-cell survival. Recent studies have shown that ebv-microRNAs can provide extra signals for cellular proliferation, cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis. EBV is well known for association with various types of B-lymphocyte, T-lymphocyte, epithelial cell and mesenchymal cell neoplasms. B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders encompass a broad spectrum of diseases, from benign to malignant. Here we review our current understanding of EBV-induced lymphomagenesis and focus on biology, diagnosis and management of EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

  20. Lymphoproliferative disorders after solid organ transplantation-classification, incidence, risk factors, early detection and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Végso, Gyula; Hajdu, Melinda; Sebestyén, Anna

    2011-09-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous disease group of benign and malignant entities. The new World Health Organisation classification introduced in 2008 distinguishes early lesions, polymorphic, monomorphic and classical Hodgkin lymphoma-type PTLD. Based on the time of appearance, early and late forms can be identified.PTLDs are the second most frequent posttransplantation tumors in adulthood, and the most frequent ones in childhood. The incidence varies with the transplanted organ-from 1%-2% following kidney transplantation to as high as 10% following thoracic organ transplantation-due to different intensities in immunosuppression. Immunocompromised state and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection are the two major risk factors.In Europe and the US approximately 85% of PTLDs are of B-cell origin, and the majority are EBV-associated. Symptoms are often unspecific; extranodal, organ manifestations and central nervous system involvement is common. Early lesions respond well to a decrease in immunosuppression. Malignant entities are treated with rituximab, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgical therapy. Adoptive T-cell transfer represents a promising therapeutic approach. The prognosis is favorable in early PTLD, and poor in late PTLD. Five-year survival is 30% for high-grade lymphomas. The prognosis of EBV-negative lymphomas is worse.Lowering the risk of PTLD may be achieved by low dose maintenance immunosuppression, immunosuppressive drugs inhibiting cell proliferation, and special immunotherapy (e.g. interleukin-2 inhibitors). Early detection is especially important for high risk-e.g. EBV-negative-patients, where the appearance of EBV-DNA and the increase in its titer may help.

  1. Pesticide exposure as a risk factor for lymphoproliferative disorders in adults.

    PubMed

    Salem, E A; Hegazy, M M; El Khouley, E A

    2014-06-18

    In view of the widespread use of pesticides in Egypt and the increasing incidence of leukaemia and lymphoma we aimed to assess pesticide exposure and other selected variables as risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders (leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma). In a hospital-based, retrospective, case-control study in 2011-2012, adult cases of lymphoproliferative disorders (n = 130) were recruited from outpatient clinics in Menoufia, Egypt, while controls (n = 130) were age- and sex-matched fracture patients. Family history of cancer, exposure to X-rays, smoking and use of hair dyes were not risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders in univariate analysis. History of exposure to pesticides and HCV infection were significant risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders in multivariate analysis (OR = 2.24; 95% CI: 1.22-4.11 and OR = 2.67; 95% CI: 1.50-4.80 respectively). The risk was significant for cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma but not chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

  2. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome after Liver Transplant.

    PubMed

    Gitto, Stefano; Villa, Erica

    2016-04-02

    Liver transplant is the unique curative therapy for patients with acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease, with or without hepatocellular carcinoma. Increase of body weight, onset of insulin resistance and drug-induced alterations of metabolism are reported in liver transplant recipients. In this context, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and arterial hypertension can be often diagnosed. Multifactorial illnesses occurring in the post-transplant period represent significant causes of morbidity and mortality. This is especially true for metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic steatosis and steatohepatitis are hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome and after liver transplant both recurrent and de novo steatosis can be found. Usually, post-transplant steatosis shows an indolent outcome with few cases of fibrosis progression. However, in the post-transplant setting, both metabolic syndrome and steatosis might play a key role in the stratification of morbidity and mortality risk, being commonly associated with cardiovascular disease. The single components of metabolic syndrome can be treated with targeted drugs while lifestyle intervention is the only reasonable therapeutic approach for transplant patients with non-alcoholic steatosis or steatohepatitis.

  3. Atypical methotrexate ulcerative stomatitis with features of lymphoproliferative like disorder: Report of a rare ciprofloxacin-induced case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Katsoulas, Nikolaos; Piperi, Evangelia; Levidou, Georgia; Sklavounou-Andrikopoulou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an established immunomodulating agent used in low doses (LDMTX) to treat several autoimmune diseases. Ulcerative stomatitis (US) may be observed as a long-term LDMTX adverse effect showing a wide histopathologic spectrum. A 73-year old female presented with painful oral ulcers of 5 days duration. The patient had been under treatment for rheumatoid arthritis with LDMTX, while one week before presentation she was prescribed ciprofloxacin for a urinary infection. Histopathologic examination of a lingual ulcer revealed a polymorphous lymphohistiocytic proliferation with scattered binucleated atypical lymphocytes. Immunohistochemically, most cells were of T-cell lineage while the EBER test was negative and a diagnosis of MTX-induced reactive ulceration was rendered. MTX cessation resulted in complete resolution of the ulcers with no recurrences reported so far. The clinical and histopathologic features of MTX-induced oral ulcers are not always diagnostic and a detailed history and an extensive clinicopathologic investigation may be needed to exclude a lymphoproliferative disorder. Key words:Atypical oral ulcers, ciprofloxacin, lymphoproliferative disorders, methotrexate. PMID:27957282

  4. Clinical and In Vitro Studies on Impact of High-Dose Etoposide Pharmacokinetics Prior Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on the Risk of Post-Transplant Leukemia Relapse.

    PubMed

    Sobiak, Joanna; Kazimierczak, Urszula; Kowalczyk, Dariusz W; Chrzanowska, Maria; Styczyński, Jan; Wysocki, Mariusz; Szpecht, Dawid; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2015-10-01

    The impact of etoposide (VP-16) plasma concentrations on the day of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) on leukemia-free survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was studied. In addition, the in vitro effects of VP-16 on the lymphocytes proliferation, cytotoxic activity and on Th1/Th2 cytokine responses were assessed. In 31 children undergoing allo-HSCT, VP-16 plasma concentrations were determined up to 120 h after the infusion using the HPLC-UV method. For mentioned in vitro studies, VP-16 plasma concentrations observed on allo-HSCT day were used. In 84 % of children, VP-16 plasma concentrations (0.1-1.5 μg/mL) were quantifiable 72 h after the end of the drug infusion, i.e. when allo-HSCT should be performed. In 20 (65 %) children allo-HSCT was performed 4 days after the end of the drug infusion, and VP-16 was still detectable (0.1-0.9 μg/mL) in plasma of 12 (39 %) of them. Post-transplant ALL relapse occurred in four children, in all of them VP-16 was detectable in plasma (0.1-0.8 μg/mL) on allo-HSCT day, while there was no relapse in children with undetectable VP-16. In in vitro studies, VP-16 demonstrated impact on the proliferation activity of stimulated lymphocytes depending on its concentration and exposition time. The presence of VP-16 in plasma on allo-HSCT day may demonstrate an adverse effect on graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) reaction and increase the risk of post-transplant ALL relapse. Therefore, if 72 h after VP-16 administration its plasma concentration is still above 0.1 μg/mL then the postponement of transplantation for next 24 h should be considered to protect GvL effector cells from transplant material.

  5. Loss-of-function of the protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) causes a B-cell lymphoproliferative syndrome in humans.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Hye Sun; Niemela, Julie E; Rangel-Santos, Andreia; Zhang, Mingchang; Pittaluga, Stefania; Stoddard, Jennifer L; Hussey, Ashleigh A; Evbuomwan, Moses O; Priel, Debra A Long; Kuhns, Douglas B; Park, C Lucy; Fleisher, Thomas A; Uzel, Gulbu; Oliveira, João B

    2013-04-18

    Defective lymphocyte apoptosis results in chronic lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly associated with autoimmune phenomena. The prototype for human apoptosis disorders is the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is caused by mutations in the FAS apoptotic pathway. Recently, patients with an ALPS-like disease called RAS-associated autoimmune leukoproliferative disorder, in which somatic mutations in NRAS or KRAS are found, also were described. Despite this progress, many patients with ALPS-like disease remain undefined genetically. We identified a homozygous, loss-of-function mutation in PRKCD (PKCδ) in a patient who presented with chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, autoantibodies, elevated immunoglobulins and natural killer dysfunction associated with chronic, low-grade Epstein-Barr virus infection. This mutation markedly decreased protein expression and resulted in ex vivo B-cell hyperproliferation, a phenotype similar to that of the PKCδ knockout mouse. Lymph nodes showed intense follicular hyperplasia, also mirroring the mouse model. Immunophenotyping of circulating lymphocytes demonstrated expansion of CD5+CD20+ B cells. Knockdown of PKCδ in normal mononuclear cells recapitulated the B-cell hyperproliferative phenotype in vitro. Reconstitution of PKCδ in patient-derived EBV-transformed B-cell lines partially restored phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced cell death. In summary, homozygous PRKCD mutation results in B-cell hyperproliferation and defective apoptosis with consequent lymphocyte accumulation and autoantibody production in humans, and disrupts natural killer cell function.

  6. Loss-of-function of the protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) causes a B-cell lymphoproliferative syndrome in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Hye Sun; Niemela, Julie E.; Rangel-Santos, Andreia; Zhang, Mingchang; Pittaluga, Stefania; Stoddard, Jennifer L.; Hussey, Ashleigh A.; Evbuomwan, Moses O.; Priel, Debra A. Long; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Park, C. Lucy; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Uzel, Gulbu

    2013-01-01

    Defective lymphocyte apoptosis results in chronic lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly associated with autoimmune phenomena. The prototype for human apoptosis disorders is the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is caused by mutations in the FAS apoptotic pathway. Recently, patients with an ALPS-like disease called RAS-associated autoimmune leukoproliferative disorder, in which somatic mutations in NRAS or KRAS are found, also were described. Despite this progress, many patients with ALPS-like disease remain undefined genetically. We identified a homozygous, loss-of-function mutation in PRKCD (PKCδ) in a patient who presented with chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, autoantibodies, elevated immunoglobulins and natural killer dysfunction associated with chronic, low-grade Epstein-Barr virus infection. This mutation markedly decreased protein expression and resulted in ex vivo B-cell hyperproliferation, a phenotype similar to that of the PKCδ knockout mouse. Lymph nodes showed intense follicular hyperplasia, also mirroring the mouse model. Immunophenotyping of circulating lymphocytes demonstrated expansion of CD5+CD20+ B cells. Knockdown of PKCδ in normal mononuclear cells recapitulated the B-cell hyperproliferative phenotype in vitro. Reconstitution of PKCδ in patient-derived EBV-transformed B-cell lines partially restored phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate–induced cell death. In summary, homozygous PRKCD mutation results in B-cell hyperproliferation and defective apoptosis with consequent lymphocyte accumulation and autoantibody production in humans, and disrupts natural killer cell function. PMID:23430113

  7. Age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders: diagnostic approach to a newly recognized clinicopathological entity.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Yoshie; Asano, Naoko; Kojima, Masaru; Morishima, Satoko; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Oyama, Takashi; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2009-12-01

    EBV is prevalent among healthy individuals, and is implicated in numerous reactive and neoplastic processes in the immune system. The authors originally identified a series of senile or age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) bearing a resemblance to immunodeficiency-associated ones, which may be associated with immune senescence in the elderly and which are now incorporated into the 2008 World Health Organization lymphoma classification as EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly. This newly described disease is pathologically characterized by a proliferation of atypical large B cells including Reed-Sternberg-like cells with reactive components, which pose a diagnostic problem for pathologists. Clinically, this disease may present with lymphadenopathy, and is often extranodal, frequently involving the skin, gastrointestinal tract, or lung. Onset is usually after the age of 50; the median patient age is 70-79 years, and incidence continues to increase with age, providing additional support to the nosological term of EBV+ DLBCL of the elderly. These patients have a worse prognosis than those with EBV-negative DLBCL or EBV+ classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL). The aim of the present review was to summarize the clinicopathological profile of age-related EBV+ LPD and EBV+ Hodgkin lymphoma to facilitate diagnostic approach.

  8. Research update: Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory avian tumor viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomics and Immunogenetics Use of genomics to identify QTL, genes, and proteins associated with resistance to Marek’s disease. Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV), continues to be a major disease concern to the p...

  9. B-cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders Associated with Primary and Acquired Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Low, Lawrence K; Song, Joo Y

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders associated with immunodeficiency can be challenging because many of these conditions have overlapping clinical and pathologic features and share similarities with their counterparts in the immunocompetent setting. There are subtle but important differences between these conditions that are important to recognize for prognostic and therapeutic purposes. This article provides a clinicopathologic update on how understanding of these B-cell lymphoproliferations in immunodeficiency has evolved over the past decade.

  10. Human american cutaneous leishmaniasis (Leishmania b. braziliensis) in Brazil: lymphoproliferative responses and influence of therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, S C; Coutinho, S G; Amendoeira, R R; Marzochi, M C; Pirmez, C

    1986-01-01

    The host defence to Leishmania parasites is believed to depend on cell-mediated immune responses. Three groups of inhabitants from an endemic area in Rio de Janeiro were studied: Group I consisted of 28 patients with cutaneous lesions, Group II of 28 healthy persons (without ulcers) but with positive Montenegro skin tests (MST) and Group III of 29 healthy persons with negative MST. The peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferative responses induced by leishmanial-antigens (Leishmania b. braziliensis lymphoproliferative response) as well as by Concanavalin A (Con A-lymphoproliferative response), both measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation were tested in each group. The results showed that: The Leishmania b. braziliensis lymphoproliferative response (L.b.b.-LPR) in healthy persons with positive MST (Group II) was higher than in patients prior to therapy (Group I); A significantly higher L.b.b.-LPR was found in patients and healthy persons with positive MST as compared to Group III (negative MST); The L.b.b.-LPR of Group I (patients) increased during antimonial therapy--this might possibly be related to the destruction of parasites; The levels of L.b.b.-LPR after therapy became similar to the ones before therapy; All individuals from the three groups had a positive Con A-lymphoproliferative response (Con A-LPR); All patients who had a histopathological picture of granulomatous reaction also had a positive L.b.b.-LPR; A poor response to antimonial therapy observed in six patients was associated with a low L.b.b.-LPR. PMID:3742876

  11. No evidence of HTLV-I proviral integration in lymphoproliferative disorders associated with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wood, G S; Schaffer, J M; Boni, R; Dummer, R; Burg, G; Takeshita, M; Kikuchi, M

    1997-02-01

    Several recent studies have reported detection of HTLV-I genetic sequences in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) including mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HTLV-I was detectable in lesional tissues of patients suffering from diseases known to be associated with CTCL. Thirty-five cases were obtained from diverse geographical locations including Ohio, California, Switzerland, and Japan. Six of them had concurrent CTCL. Cases were analyzed using a combination of genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/ Southern blot, dot blot, and Southern blot analyses. All assays were specific for HTLV-I provirus. Sensitivity ranged from approximately 10(-6) for PCR-based studies to 10(-2) for unamplified genomic blotting. Lesional DNA from patients with lymphomatoid papulosis (fourteen cases), Hodgkin's disease (twelve cases), and CD30+ large-cell lymphoma (nine cases) was tested for the HTLV-I proviral pX region using a genomic PCR assay followed by confirmatory Southern blot analysis with a nested oligonucleotide pX probe. All cases were uniformly negative. All of the Hodgkin's disease cases, eight of the large-cell lymphoma cases, and six of the lymphomatoid papulosis cases were then subjected to dot blot analysis of genomic DNA using a full-length HTLV-I proviral DNA probe that spans all regions of the HTLV-I genome. Again, all cases were negative. Finally, eleven of the Hodgkin's disease cases were also subjected to Southern blot analysis of EcoRI-digested genomic DNA using the same full-length HTLV-I probe. Once again, all cases were negative. These findings indicated that, despite utilization of a variety of sensitive and specific molecular biological methods, HTLV-I genetic sequences were not detectable in patients with CTCL-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. These results strongly suggest that the HTLV-I retrovirus is not involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  12. Revised diagnostic criteria and classification for the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): report from the 2009 NIH International Workshop.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Joao B; Bleesing, Jack J; Dianzani, Umberto; Fleisher, Thomas A; Jaffe, Elaine S; Lenardo, Michael J; Rieux-Laucat, Frederic; Siegel, Richard M; Su, Helen C; Teachey, David T; Rao, V Koneti

    2010-10-07

    Lymphadenopathy in children for which no infectious or malignant cause can be ascertained constitutes a challenging diagnostic dilemma. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human genetic disorder of lymphocyte apoptosis resulting in an accumulation of lymphocytes and childhood onset chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, multilineage cytopenias, and an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. In 1999, investigators at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) suggested criteria to establish the diagnosis of ALPS. Since then, with approximately 500 patients with ALPS studied worldwide, significant advances in our understanding of the disease have prompted the need for revisions to the existing diagnostic criteria and classification scheme. The rationale and recommendations outlined here stem from an international workshop held at NIH on September 21 and 22, 2009, attended by investigators from the United States, Europe, and Australia engaged in clinical and basic science research on ALPS and related disorders. It is hoped that harmonizing the diagnosis and classification of ALPS will foster collaborative research and better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune cytopenias and B-cell lymphomas.

  13. Comprehensive polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of pathogenic DNA in lymphoproliferative disorders of the ocular adnexa

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Yoshihiko; Rao, Narsing A.; Takase, Hiroshi; Tsubota, Kinya; Umazume, Kazuhiko; Diaz-Aguilar, Daniel; Kezuka, Takeshi; Mochizuki, Manabu; Goto, Hiroshi; Sugita, Sunao

    2016-01-01

    Infectious agents have been identified as a major cause of specific types of human cancers worldwide. Several microorganisms have been identified as potential aggravators of ocular adnexal neoplasms; however, given the rarity of these neoplasms, large epidemiological studies are difficult to coordinate. This study aimed to conduct an exhaustive search for pathogenic DNA in lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) of the ocular adnexa in a total of 70 patients who were diagnosed with LPD of the ocular adnexa between 2008 and 2013. Specimens were screened for bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic DNA by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR. Among cases of conjunctival mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, human herpes virus (HHV)-6, HHV-7, chlamydia, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA were detected. In cases of IgG4-related ocular disease, similar pathogens were detected but in a larger number of patients. Our PCR assays detected DNAs of various infectious agents in tumor specimens, especially HHV6, HHV7, and EBV, with different positive rates in various types of LPD. Chronic inflammatory stimulation or activation of oncogenes from these infectious agents might be involved in the pathogenesis of LPD of the ocular adnexa. PMID:27830722

  14. Metachronous EBV-associated B-cell and T-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders in a heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Morovic, Anamarija; Jaffe, Elaine S; Raffeld, Mark; Schrager, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) may occur as a complication of immunosuppression in patients who have received solid organ or bone marrow allografts. Most PTLDs are of B-cell lineage, whereas T-cell proliferations are rare. The majority of B-cell lesions are associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection. The occurrence of both B-cell and T-cell PTLDs in the same patient is extremely rare and only 6 cases have been previously published. We report a case of a 63-year-old man who developed 2 metachronous Epstein-Barr virus-related PTLDs beginning 10 years after heart transplantation. A polymorphic B-cell PTLD developed first that completely regressed after immunosuppressive therapy was partially withdrawn. Then, a monomorphic T-cell PTLD developed 31 months later. The patient died 17 months later owing to disease progression. We highlight the diagnostic challenge of this case that required numerous ancillary studies for lineage assessment and classification. Such studies are often needed in patients with a history of immunosuppression.

  15. Attention! Cardiac tamponade may be caused by underlying Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    Atay, Hilmi; Kelkitli, Engin; Okuyucu, Muhammed; Yildiz, Levent; Turgut, Mehmet

    2015-05-01

    Castleman's disease is a rarely observed lymphoproliferative disease. In the literature, various signs and symptoms of the disease have been reported; one of these is secondary cardiac tamponade. We describe the case of a 41-year-old man who developed cardiac tamponade during examination, and who was later diagnosed with Castleman's disease, based on his lymph node biopsies.

  16. Research update: Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory avian tumor viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomics and Immunogenetics Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV), continues to be a major disease concern to the poultry industry. The fear of MD is further enhanced by unpredictable vaccine breaks that result in ...

  17. Marek's disease virus induced transient paralysis--a closer look

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s Disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by a highly cell-associated alpha herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Clinical signs of MD include depression, crippling, weight loss, and transient paralysis (TP). TP is a disease of the central nervous system...

  18. Rafting in the membrane. A lesson learnt from lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Svec, A

    2008-10-01

    Lipid rafts are chemically distinct compartments of the plasma membrane. Their integrity is a prerequisite for vital cellular functions particularly for signalling and trafficking. Their perturbation is associated with development of a broad spectrum of diseases. Lipid rafts are also important for therapeutic effects of some drugs. Moreover, some of the raft associated molecules are useful immunohistochemical markers in routine histopathology.

  19. Successful treatment of immunodeficiency-associated EBV-negative lymphoproliferative disorders in rheumatoid arthritis by methotrexate withdrawal and prevention of its relapse by rituximab administration.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Noriaki; Ono, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Shuro; Kuriyama, Takuro; Yamashita, Kiyoshi; Beppu, Kiichiro; Shimao, Yoshiya; Marutsuka, Kosuke; Ueda, Yuji; Ueda, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in rheumatoid arthritis are a rare, aggressive, and life-threatening clinical entity. We describe a 60-year-old man who had rheumatoid arthritis that was treated with methotrexate. Eight months after the treatment, the case was diagnosed as Epstein-Barr virus-negative LPD (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) with abdominal bulky mass and clinical stage IVB at high risk in the international prognostic index. Immediate withdrawal of methotrexate led the patient to achieve complete remission, and 8 subsequent courses of rituximab treatment for the prevention of relapse kept the patient disease-free for 29 months. Our case suggests that these treatments may be an effective, safe, and feasible strategy for immunodeficiency-associated LPD in rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Epstein–Barr Virus-Positive T/NK-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders Manifested as Gastrointestinal Perforations and Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hai-Juan; Li, Ji; Song, Hong-Mei; Li, Zheng-Hong; Dong, Mei; Zhou, Xiao-Ge

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Systemic Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) of childhood is a highly aggressive EBV-positive T/natural killer (NK)-cell LPD, which emerges in the background of chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) or shortly after primary acute EBV infection. The clinical presentations of CAEBV are varied; patients with atypical manifestations are easily misdiagnosed. We described a 14-year-old boy suffering from digestive disorders and intermittent fever for 1 year and 9 months, whose conditions worsened and skin lesions occurred 2 months before hospitalization. He was diagnosed as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and treated accordingly. His other clinical features, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, and elevated inflammatory marks, were found in hospitalization. The boy suffered from repeatedly spontaneous intestinal perforations shortly after hospitalization and died of intestinal hemorrhea. The pathological results of intestine and skin both showed EBV-positive T/NK-cell LPD (lymphoma stage). There are rare studies reporting gastrointestinal perforations in EBV-positive T/NK-cell LPD, let alone repeatedly spontaneous perforations. Based on the clinical features and pathological results of this patient, the disease progressed from CAEBV (T-cell type) to systemic EBV-positive T-cell LPD of childhood (lymphoma). Not all the patients with CAEBV could have unusual patterns of anti-EBV antibodies. However, the presence of high EBV loads (EBV-encoded early small ribonucleic acid (RNA) (EBER) in affected tissues and/or EBV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in peripheral blood) is essential for diagnosing CAEBV. Maybe because of his less common clinical features for CAEBV and negative anti-EBV antibodies, the boy was not diagnosed correctly. We should have emphasized the test for EBER or EBV-DNA. Meanwhile, for the IBD patients whose manifestations were not typical, and whose conditions were not improved by

  1. Blood disorders typically associated with renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation has become one of the most common surgical procedures performed to replace a diseased kidney with a healthy kidney from a donor. It can help patients with kidney failure live decades longer. However, renal transplantation also faces a risk of developing various blood disorders. The blood disorders typically associated with renal transplantation can be divided into two main categories: (1) Common disorders including post-transplant anemia (PTA), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), post-transplant erythrocytosis (PTE), and post-transplant cytopenias (PTC, leukopenia/neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and pancytopenia); and (2) Uncommon but serious disorders including hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), therapy-related myelodysplasia (t-MDS), and therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). Although many etiological factors involve the development of post-transplant blood disorders, immunosuppressive agents, and viral infections could be the two major contributors to most blood disorders and cause hematological abnormalities and immunodeficiency by suppressing hematopoietic function of bone marrow. Hematological abnormalities and immunodeficiency will result in severe clinical outcomes in renal transplant recipients. Understanding how blood disorders develop will help cure these life-threatening complications. A potential therapeutic strategy against post-transplant blood disorders should focus on tapering immunosuppression or replacing myelotoxic immunosuppressive drugs with lower toxic alternatives, recognizing and treating promptly the etiological virus, bacteria, or protozoan, restoring both hematopoietic function of bone marrow and normal blood counts, and improving kidney graft survival. PMID:25853131

  2. Liver transplantation for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: new challenges and new opportunities.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Mina; Tabbaa, Adam; Albeldawi, Mazen; Alkhouri, Naim

    2014-05-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming rapidly one of the most common indications for orthotopic liver transplantation in the world. Development of graft steatosis is a significant problem during the post-transplant course, which may happen as a recurrence of pre-existing disease or de novo NAFLD. There are different risk factors that might play a role in development of graft steatosis including post-transplant metabolic syndrome, immune-suppressive medications, genetics and others. There are few studies that assessed the effects of NAFLD on graft and patient survival; most of them were limited by the duration of follow up or by the number of patients. With this review article we will try to shed light on post-liver transplantation NAFLD, significance of the disease, how it develops, risk factors, clinical course and treatment options.

  3. Spectrum of Epstein-Barr virus-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in adolescents and young adults in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ren-Ching; Chang, Sheng-Tsung; Hsieh, Yen-Chuan; Huang, Wan-Ting; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Tseng, Chih-En; Wang, Ming-Chung; Hwang, Wei-Shou; Wang, John; Chuang, Shih-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus usually infecting B-cells but may occasionally infect T- or natural killer (NK)-cells. EBV-associated T- or NK-cell lymphoproliferations represent a continuous spectrum of diseases ranging from asymptomatic infection, infectious mononucleosis (IM), to clonal and malignant lymphoproliferations including systemic EBV-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-T/NK-LPD) of childhood and hydroa-vacciniforme-like lymphoma of the skin. The clonal diseases are more prevalent in East Asia and exhibit overlapping clinical and pathological features with chronic active EBV infection. Here we report our experience on 10 cases of EBV-associated T-cell lymphoproliferation from Taiwan including five males and five females with a median age of 18 years old (range, 15-28). The most common clinical symptoms were fever, neck mass and hepatosplenomegaly. Eight of these patients showed elevated lactate dehydrogenase level and half of the patients had cytopenia. All patients had either elevated EBV antibody titers or increased serum EBV DNA levels. Five cases were clinically IM-like with polyclonal (3 cases) or clonal (2 cases) T-cell lymphoproliferation. Two patients each had chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). One patient had both CAEBV and HLH. One of the HLH patients with marrow infiltration by intra-sinusoidal large atypical lymphocytes experienced a fulminant course. In a median follow-up time of 21.5 months, seven patients were free of disease, one was alive with disease, and two died of disease in 31 and 3 months, respectively, despite chemotherapy. We confirmed a wide clinicopathological range of EVB-associated T-cell lymphoproliferation in Taiwan. Furthermore, monomorphic LPD and the single case with fulminant course as defined by Ohshima et al (Pathol Int 2018) as categories A3 and B, respectively, died of disease despite chemotherapy. Our report, the largest series in the recent

  4. Spectrum of Epstein-Barr virus-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in adolescents and young adults in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren-Ching; Chang, Sheng-Tsung; Hsieh, Yen-Chuan; Huang, Wan-Ting; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Tseng, Chih-En; Wang, Ming-Chung; Hwang, Wei-Shou; Wang, John; Chuang, Shih-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus usually infecting B-cells but may occasionally infect T- or natural killer (NK)-cells. EBV-associated T- or NK-cell lymphoproliferations represent a continuous spectrum of diseases ranging from asymptomatic infection, infectious mononucleosis (IM), to clonal and malignant lymphoproliferations including systemic EBV-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-T/NK-LPD) of childhood and hydroa-vacciniforme-like lymphoma of the skin. The clonal diseases are more prevalent in East Asia and exhibit overlapping clinical and pathological features with chronic active EBV infection. Here we report our experience on 10 cases of EBV-associated T-cell lymphoproliferation from Taiwan including five males and five females with a median age of 18 years old (range, 15-28). The most common clinical symptoms were fever, neck mass and hepatosplenomegaly. Eight of these patients showed elevated lactate dehydrogenase level and half of the patients had cytopenia. All patients had either elevated EBV antibody titers or increased serum EBV DNA levels. Five cases were clinically IM-like with polyclonal (3 cases) or clonal (2 cases) T-cell lymphoproliferation. Two patients each had chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). One patient had both CAEBV and HLH. One of the HLH patients with marrow infiltration by intra-sinusoidal large atypical lymphocytes experienced a fulminant course. In a median follow-up time of 21.5 months, seven patients were free of disease, one was alive with disease, and two died of disease in 31 and 3 months, respectively, despite chemotherapy. We confirmed a wide clinicopathological range of EVB-associated T-cell lymphoproliferation in Taiwan. Furthermore, monomorphic LPD and the single case with fulminant course as defined by Ohshima et al (Pathol Int 2018) as categories A3 and B, respectively, died of disease despite chemotherapy. Our report, the largest series in the recent

  5. Unusual Indolent Course of a Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Natural Killer Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Farsi, Khalil; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Hadabbi, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell lymphoproliferative disorders are uncommon and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays an important aetiological role in their pathogenesis. We report a 20-year-old male with a chronic active EBV infection associated with a NK cell lymphoproliferative disorder which had an unusual indolent course. He presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in December 2011 with a history of intermittent fever and coughing. Examinations revealed generalised lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis, transaminitis, diffuse bilateral lung infiltrates and bone marrow lymphocyte involvement. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test revealed a high EBV viral load in the peripheral blood cells. The patient received a course of piperacillin-tazobactam for Klebsiella pneumoniae, but no active treatment for the lymphoproliferative disorder. However, his lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase and liver enzymes dropped spontaneously. In addition, EBV PCR copies fluctuated and then decreased significantly. He remained clinically asymptomatic over the following four years. PMID:27226916

  6. Prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus infection in Iranian patients with lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Maryam; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Ghane, Masood; Basi, Ali; Meysami, Parisa; Keyvani, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Occult HCV infection is a form of chronic HCV infection characterized by absence of detectable anti-HCV antibodies or plasma HCV-RNA but presence of HCV-RNA in liver biopsy and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The aim of this study was to determine the presence of HCV-RNA in PBMCs of patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. One hundred and four consecutive patients with lymphoproliferative disorders admitted to Firouzgar Hospital from January 2010 to March 2011 were recruited in this cross-sectional study. A 6-ml sample of whole blood was taken from the patients, the total RNA was extracted from the samples after the separation of plasma and PBMCs. The HCV-RNA of the samples was amplified by reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR). The HCV genotypes of the positive samples were tested using the INNO-LiPA™ HCV II kit, and the HCV genotypes were then confirmed by sequencing of the 5'-UTR fragments after the PCR products were cloned into a pJET1.2/blunt cloning vector. The mean age of the patients was 48.3 ± 1.76 years (range: 16-83). HCV-RNA was found in PBMCs from 2 (1.9%) of the 104 patients. Genotyping showed that the patients were infected with HCV subtype 1a. One patient suffered non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and the other suffered chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Patients with lymphoproliferative disorders with negative anti-HCV antibodies and negative plasma HCV-RNA may have occult HCV infection. Therefore, in the absence of a liver biopsy, the testing of PBMCs for the detection of genomic HCV-RNA may be beneficial.

  7. Atypical presentation of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome due to CASP10 mutation.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, Serena Ilaria; Mazza, Cinzia; Moratto, Daniele; Ramenghi, Ugo; Caorsi, Roberta; Gattorno, Marco; Badolato, Raffaele

    2016-09-01

    Herein we describe the case of a 8-years-old boy with diagnosis of atypical autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), carrying heterozygous mutation of CASP10 gene (I406L). He presented with multiple non-invasive infections of the skin, that were associated to chronic non-malignant non-infectious lymphadenopathy, failure to thrive, weakness, arthralgia, relapsing oral aftosis, and expansion of TCRαβ(+) CD4(-)/CD8(-) T cells. This observation suggests that cutaneous infections can be observed in ALPS patients carrying CASP10 mutations.

  8. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for monitoring lymphadenopathy in the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

    PubMed

    Rao, V Koneti; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Dale, Janet K; Bacharach, Stephen L; Whatley, Millie; Dugan, Faith; Tretler, Jean; Fleisher, Thomas; Puck, Jennifer M; Wilson, Wyndham; Jaffe, Elaine S; Avila, Nilo; Chen, Clara C; Straus, Stephen E

    2006-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is associated with mutations that impair the activity of lymphocyte apoptosis proteins, leading to chronic lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmunity, and an increased risk of lymphoma. We investigated the utility of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in discriminating benign from malignant lymphadenopathy in ALPS. We report that FDG avidity of benign lymph nodes in ALPS can be high and, hence, by itself does not imply presence of lymphoma; but FDG-PET can help guide the decision for selecting which of many enlarged nodes in ALPS patients to biopsy when lymphoma is suspected.

  9. Chicks and SNPs--an entree into identifying genes conferring disease resistance in chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With high-density chicken rearing, control of infectious diseases are critical for economic viability and maintaining public confidence in poultry products. Among poultry diseases, Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (M...

  10. What can happen after lung transplantation and the importance of the time since transplantation: radiological review of post-transplantation complications.

    PubMed

    Daimiel Naranjo, I; Alonso Charterina, S

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation is the best treatment option in the final stages of diseases such as cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Better surgical techniques and advances in immunosuppressor treatments have increased survival in lung transplant recipients, making longer follow-up necessary because complications can occur at any time after transplantation. For practical purposes, complications can be classified as early (those that normally occur within two months after transplantation), late (those that normally occur more than two months after transplantation), or time-independent (those that can occur at any time after transplantation). Many complications have nonspecific clinical and radiological manifestations, so the time factor is key to narrow the differential diagnosis. Imaging can guide interventional procedures and can detect complications early. This article aims to describe and illustrate the complications that can occur after lung transplantation from the clinical and radiological viewpoints so that they can be detected as early as possible.

  11. A 47-year-old stem cell transplant recipient with fever, cough and chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Salh, Omar S; Nadhem, Omar N; Thakore, Sanket R; Halloush, Ruba A; Khasawneh, Faisal A

    2015-01-01

    Infections and malignancies are among the most serious complications that follow organ or stem cell transplantation. They may have a mild course, and nonspecific and overlapping manifestations. The present article describes a case of symptomatic nodular pulmonary disease that complicated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It was diagnosed to be post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, a potential sequela of immunosuppression and a very difficult entity to treat in profoundly immunosuppressed patients. PMID:26057372

  12. Prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus in egyptian patients with chronic lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Samar Samir; Nasr, Aml S; El Zanaty, Taher; El Rawi, Rasha Sayed; Mattar, Mervat M

    2012-01-01

    Background. Occult hepatitis C virus infection (OCI) was identified as a new form of Hepatitis C virus (HCV), characterized by undetectable HCV antibodies and HCV RNA in serum, while HCV RNA is detectable in liver and peripheral blood cells only. Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of OCI in Egyptian patients with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) and to compare its prevalence with that of HCV in those patients. Subjects and Methods. The current study included 100 subjects, 50 of them were newly diagnosed cases having different lymphoproliferative disorders (patients group), and 50 were apparently healthy volunteers (controls group). HCV antibodies were detected by ELISA, HCV RNA was detected in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR), and HCV genotype was detected by INNO-LiPA. Results. OCI was detected in 20% of patients group, compared to only 4% OCI in controls group. HCV was detected in 26% of patients group with a slightly higher prevalence. There was a male predominance in both HCV and OCI. All HCV positive patients were genotype 4. Conclusion. Our data revealed occurrence of occult HCV infection in Egyptian LPD patients at a prevalence of 20% compared to 26% of HCV.

  13. EBV-associated polymorphic posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder presenting as gingival ulcers.

    PubMed

    León, Jorge Esquiche; Takahama Júnior, Ademar; Vassallo, José; Soares, Fernando Augusto; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte

    2011-04-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) present a wide clinicopathological spectrum, varying from the usual Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven infectious mononucleosis-type polyclonal proliferations to EBV-positive or EBV-negative proliferations indistinguishable from overt lymphomas that occur in immunocompetent individuals. PTLDs characteristically have a predilection for extranodal sites and association with EBV.These disorders are usually B-cell type, although T-cell and rare cases involving both T- and B-cell types have also been described. The initial treatment consists in decreasing the immnosupressive therapy, usually with favorable results. The authors report on a rare case of a 19-year-old girl, with post-renal transplantation EBV-associated polymorphic lymphoproliferative gingival ulcerated lesions. To the best of their knowledge, this is the first case described in the English-language literature of polymorphic PTLD involving both B-cell and T-cell lineages, with an unusual immunoprofile affecting the mouth. The authors warn that this condition could be easily misdiagnosed as malignant lymphoma if not properly recognized.

  14. Comparison of Three Distinct Prophylactic Agents Against Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients Undergoing Haplo-identical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Post-transplant Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    El-Cheikh, Jean; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Vai, Andrea; Furst, Sabine; Bramanti, Stefania; Sarina, Barbara; Granata, Angela; Faucher, Catherine; Mohty, Bilal; Harbi, Samia; Bouabdallah, Reda; Vey, Norbert; Santoro, Armando; Chabannon, Christian; Castagna, Luca; Blaise, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, invasive fungal infections (IFIs) have remained an important problem in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT). The optimal approach for prophylactic antifungal therapy has yet to bedetermined. We conducted a retrospective analysis, comparing the safety and efficacy of micafungin 50mg/day vs. fluconazole 400mg/day vs. itraconazole 200mg/day as prophylaxis for adult patients with various haematological diseases receiving haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) followed by high-dose cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy). Overall, 99 patients were identified: 30 patients received micafungin, 50 and 19 patients received itraconazole and fluconazole, respectively. After a median follow-up of 12 months (range: 1–51), proven or probable IFIs were reported in 3 patients (10%) in the micafungin, 5 patients in the itraconazole (10%) and 2 patients (11%) in the fluconazole group (p=0.998). Fewer patients in the micafungin group had invasive aspergillosis (1 [3%] vs. 3 [6%] in the itraconazole vs. 2 [11%] in the fluconazole group, p=0.589). Four patients (13%) in the micafungin group vs 13 (26%) patients in the itraconazole group and 10 (53%) patients in the fluconazole received empirical antifungal therapy (P = 0.19). No serious adverse events related to treatment were reported by patients, and there was no treatment discontinuation because of drug-related adverse events in both groups. The present analysis shows that micafungin did better than fluconazole in preventing invasive aspergillosis after transplant in these high-risk hematological diseases, as expected. In addition, micafungin was more effective than itraconazole in preventing all IFI episodes when also considering possible fungal infections. Future prospective studies would shed light on this issue, concerning this increasingly used transplant platform. PMID:26401237

  15. Liver transplantation in the Nordic countries – An intention to treat and post-transplant analysis from The Nordic Liver Transplant Registry 1982–2013

    PubMed Central

    Fosby, Bjarte; Melum, Espen; Bjøro, Kristian; Bennet, William; Rasmussen, Allan; Andersen, Ina Marie; Castedal, Maria; Olausson, Michael; Wibeck, Christina; Gotlieb, Mette; Gjertsen, Henrik; Toivonen, Leena; Foss, Stein; Makisalo, Heikki; Nordin, Arno; Sanengen, Truls; Bergquist, Annika; Larsson, Marie E.; Soderdahl, Gunnar; Nowak, Greg; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Isoniemi, Helena; Keiding, Susanne; Foss, Aksel; Line, Pål-Dag; Friman, Styrbjörn; Schrumpf, Erik; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Höckerstedt, Krister; Karlsen, Tom H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim and background. The Nordic Liver Transplant Registry (NLTR) accounts for all liver transplants performed in the Nordic countries since the start of the transplant program in 1982. Due to short waiting times, donor liver allocation has been made without considerations of the model of end-stage liver disease (MELD) score. We aimed to summarize key outcome measures and developments for the activity up to December 2013. Materials and methods. The registry is integrated with the operational waiting-list and liver allocation system of Scandiatransplant (www.scandiatransplant.org) and accounted at the end of 2013 for 6019 patients out of whom 5198 were transplanted. Data for recipient and donor characteristics and relevant end-points retransplantation and death are manually curated on an annual basis to allow for statistical analysis and the annual report. Results. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, acute hepatic failure, alcoholic liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are the five most frequent diagnoses (accounting for 15.3%, 10.8%, 10.6%, 9.3% and 9.0% of all transplants, respectively). Median waiting time for non-urgent liver transplantation during the last 10-year period was 39 days. Outcome has improved over time, and for patients transplanted during 2004–2013, overall one-, five- and 10-year survival rates were 91%, 80% and 71%, respectively. In an intention-to-treat analysis, corresponding numbers during the same time period were 87%, 75% and 66%, respectively. Conclusion. The liver transplant program in the Nordic countries provides comparable outcomes to programs with a MELD-based donor liver allocation system. Unique features comprise the diagnostic spectrum, waiting times and the availability of an integrated waiting list and transplant registry (NLTR). PMID:25959101

  16. Pityriasis lichenoides: a clonal T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Magro, Cynthia; Crowson, A Neil; Kovatich, Al; Burns, Frank

    2002-08-01

    Pityriasis lichenoides (PL) is a papulosquamous disorder often considered a form of reactive dermatosis and classified with small plaque parapsoriasis (digitate dermatosis). However, some patients with PL have developed large plaque parapsoriasis (LPP) and mycosis fungoides (MF), and lymphoid atypia and T-cell clonality have been reported in lesions of PL. We set out to explore the possibility that PL is a form of T-cell dyscrasia. Cases were selected by natural language search from an outpatient dermatopathology database; 35 cases were reviewed and clinicians and patients were contacted. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections were examined and immunophenotyping was carried out on paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed tissue using antibodies to CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD8, CD20, CD30, and CD56. In paraffin-embedded tissue, T-cell receptor (TCR)-gamma chain rearrangement was sought through polymerase chain reaction single stranded conformational polymorphism analysis. There were 14 males and 21 females with a mean age of 40 years held clinically to have PL chronica (PLC) (28 cases) and/or PL et varioliformis acuta (PLEVA) (7 cases). Five patients developed large atrophic poikilodermatous and/or annular plaques compatible with MF and/or LPP in a background of typical PLC. All biopsies showed tropism of lymphocytes to an epidermis manifesting psoriasiform hyperplasia, dyskeratosis, parakeratosis, and intraepithelial collections of Langerhans' cells and lymphocytes mimicking Pautrier's microabascesses. Epidermal atrophy, dermal fibroplasia, poikilodermatous alterations, and a dominance of intraepidermal cerebriform cells were seen only in patients with chronic persistent disease (i.e., PLC) and in some cases corresponded with clinical progression to MF. All cases had a T cell-dominant infiltrate, with a CD7 deletion in 21 of 32 biopsies examined; the CD7-negative cells were typically the largest and most atypical forms, often in a cohesive array within the upper layers of

  17. Low blood lymphocyte count at 30 days post transplant predicts worse acute GVHD and survival but not relapse in a large retrospective cohort.

    PubMed

    Gul, Z; Van Meter, E; Abidi, M; Ditah, I; Abdul-Hussein, M; Deol, A; Ayash, L; Lum, L G; Waller, E K; Ratanatharathorn, V; Uberti, J; Al-Kadhimi, Z

    2015-03-01

    Multiple reports have shown that low absolute lymphocyte count at day 30 (ALC30) after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (AHSCT) is associated with higher risk of disease relapse and worse OS. However, these reports included heterogeneous populations with different grafts and GVHD prophylaxis. Therefore, we retrospectively evaluated the association of ALC30 with transplant outcomes in a cohort of 381 consecutive patients who underwent AHSCT between 2005 and 2010 and received T-replete PBSC grafts and Tacrolimus/Mycophenolate combination as GVHD prophylaxis. Median follow-up was 57 months. Lower ALC30 (⩽400 × 10(6)/L) was associated with lower OS and increased nonrelapse mortality (NRM) for the whole cohort as well as for recipients of SD and UD grafts separately. Lower ALC30 was associated with more severe acute GVHD (aGVHD; III-IV) for the entire cohort as well as for the SD and UD groups. No association was found between lower ALC30 and relapse. Pretransplant factors associated with lower ALC30 were: unrelated donors; HLA mismatch; older donors; lower recipient age; and lower CD34+ cell dose. In this large retrospective study, ALC30⩽400 × 10(6)/L was associated with worse OS, increased NRM and severe aGVHD.

  18. Lipoprotein metabolism differs between Marek's disease susceptible and resistant chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens caused by MD virus and has an important impact on the poultry industry worldwide.There have been reports showing different physiological characteristics between MD susceptible and resistant chickens. However, little is known about whe...

  19. Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance with light-chain deposition disease diagnosed postrenal transplant: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Nambirajan, Aruna; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Singh, Geetika; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Dinda, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Patients with light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) frequently do not meet criteria for myeloma. In such cases, despite low tumor burden, the circulating monoclonal immunoglobulins cause renal damage, are responsible for post-transplant recurrence, and are rightly categorized as monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) requiring chemotherapy. A 65-year male with uncharacterized nodular glomerulopathy presented with proteinuria 3 years postrenal transplant. His allograft biopsies were diagnostic of light-chain deposition disease (likely recurrent), and in the absence of myeloma, he was labeled as MGRS. Based on the limited literature available, he was treated with bortezomib which resulted in normalization of serum-free light-chain ratios and resolution of proteinuria. He, however, later succumbed to complications of chemotherapy. This case highlights the diagnostic difficulties in LCDD, the importance of an accurate pretransplant diagnosis, and treatment of the malignant clone, in the absence of which post-transplant management of recurrence is challenging with poor outcomes.

  20. Identifying autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in children with Evans syndrome: a multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Seif, Alix E; Manno, Catherine S; Sheen, Cecilia; Grupp, Stephan A; Teachey, David T

    2010-03-18

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte survival caused by dysregulation of the Fas apoptotic pathway. Clinical manifestations of ALPS include autoimmune cytopenias, organomegaly, and lymphadenopathy. These findings overlap with Evans syndrome (ES), defined by presence of at least 2 autoimmune cytopenias. We hypothesized a subset of patients with ES have ALPS and tested 45 children at 22 institutions, measuring peripheral blood double-negative T cells (DNTs) and Fas-mediated apoptosis. ALPS was diagnosed in 47% of patients tested. Markedly elevated DNTs (> or = 5%) were a strong predictor of ALPS (positive predictive value = 94%), whereas no patients with DNTs less than 2.5% had ALPS on apoptosis testing. Severity of cytopenias and elevated immunoglobulin levels also predicted ALPS. This is the largest published series describing children with ES and documents a high rate of ALPS among pediatric ES patients. These data suggest that children with ES should be screened for ALPS with DNTs.

  1. Decrease of the lymphoproliferative response to varicella-zoster virus antigen in the aged.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, R; Florent, G; Just, M

    1981-01-01

    Humoral antibodies and specific cellular immune reactions (proliferative immune response in the lymphocyte transformation test) to varicella-zoster virus antigen were measured in children, young adults, and elderly people. In children and young adults, the humoral varicella-zoster-specific antibodies and the virus-specific cellular immune response generally coincided. In the over-60 age group, however, a discrepancy was often observed between these parameters. Ninety percent of the elderly subjects showed humoral antibodies, but only 64% still had a measurable varicella-zoster-specific immune response. There was no correlation between the magnitude of the virus antigen-specific immune response and the mitogen-induced lymphoproliferative response (phytohemagglutinin stimulation). One in three elderly people, therefore, showed no cellular immune response to the varicella-zoster virus antigen, and this person could probably be regarded as a potential herpes zoster patient. PMID:6163722

  2. Surgical Management of Perforated Gastrointestinal Posttransplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder After Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Hideki; Uemura, Mamoru; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a relatively rare and life-threatening complication after organ transplantation. From 1999 to 2012, 45 adult patients underwent heart transplantation at our hospital. Two of the patients developed PTLD after transplantation and required emergency surgery due to intestinal perforation. These cases were informative regarding the adequate surgical management of such cases. Both cases revealed Epstein-Barr virus-related PTLD. The optimal treatment of PTLD remains controversial, and PTLD with gastrointestinal perforation could be critical because the patients are already debilitated and immunocompromised after transplantation. Therefore, the nonspecific abdominal symptoms can be diagnostic for PTLD, and proper surgical intervention should be performed immediately. We present these two suggestive and rare cases in regard to the management of perforation with PTLD and a review of literature. PMID:25692442

  3. EBV-positive mucocutaneous ulcer in organ transplant recipients: a localized indolent posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Hart, Melissa; Thakral, Beenu; Yohe, Sophia; Balfour, Henry H; Singh, Charanjeet; Spears, Michael; McKenna, Robert W

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive mucocutaneous ulcer (EBV MCU) is a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder occurring in elderly or iatrogenic immunocompromised patients. It has not been reported in solid organ transplant recipients. We observed 7 patients with EBV MCU in a cohort of 70 transplant recipients with EBV posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Transplants included: 5 renal, 1 heart, and 1 lung. Median patient age was 61; 5 were male. EBV MCU was observed in oral mucosa in 4 and gastrointestinal tract in 3. Duration of immunosuppressive therapy before EBV MCU was 0.6 to 13 years. Ulcers were undermined by inflammatory cells and polymorphic or monomorphic large cell lymphoproliferation. Reed-Sternberg-like cells were present in 5/7. Large B cells were CD20, CD30, and EBV-encoded RNA positive in all cases. Diagnosis in 3 recent patients was EBV MCU; 4 patients diagnosed before familiarity with EBV MCU were classified as monomorphic large cell (n=3) and polymorphic (n=1) PTLD. None of the patients had EBV DNA in their blood (<1000 copies/mL) at diagnosis or follow-up versus 35/44 transplant patients with systemic PTLD (P<0.001). All lesions resolved with reduced immunosuppression (7/7), change in immunosuppression (2/7), and rituximab (3/7). Five patients are living: 4 healthy, 1 awaiting second renal transplant. Two patients died 3 and 5 years after resolution of EBV MCU. No patient recurred with EBV MCU or other PTLDs. EBV MCU mimics more aggressive categories of PTLD but lacks EBV DNA in blood, which may be a useful distinguishing feature. Lesions are likely to resolve with conservative management. Awareness of EBV MCU in the posttransplant setting is necessary for appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Influence of Marek’s disease virus on the core-gut microbiome of chickens resistant or susceptible to Marek’s disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is an a-herpesvirus and the causative agent for the lymphoproliferative disease of chickens known as Marek’s disease (MD). Worldwide poultry industry losses due to MD amount to $1-2 billion per year. Presently, there is limited knowledge on the potential influence of MDV ...

  5. Immuno-histological diagnosis of lymphoproliferative diseases by selected combinations of antisera and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Janossy, G.; Thomas, J. A.; Pizzolo, G.; Granger, S. M.; McLaughlin, J.; Habeshaw, J. A.; Stansfeld, A. G.; Sloane, J.

    1980-01-01

    Tissue sections of frozen biopsy specimens obtained from normal and hyperplastic human lymphoid tissues, 33 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphomas as well as various forms of immunoregulatory disorders (angioimmunoblastic and dermatopathic lymphadenopathy) were analysed in immunofluorescence tests (using red TRITC and green FITC double-labelling). A panel of antisera including well-characterized conventional reagents to immunoglobulin classes, T lymphoid and Ia-like antigens, and monoclonal antibodies was used. In selected cases the results were compared with the observations of membrane-marker staining on viable cells in suspension. the findings show that the immunological methods can give a very accurate analysis of the normal and malignant lymphoid cells, and can provide complementary information to conventional histology. The investigator can choose the reagent combinations which give answers to various specific questions: e.g. antisera to light chains establish the monoclonality of lymphomas, whilst staining combinations for human T and Ia-like antigens are particularly useful in various immunoregulatory disorders. Monoclonal antibodies will be particularly useful in various immunoregulatory disorders. Monoclonal antibodies will be particularly useful reagents for analysing the tissue distribution of lymphoid subpopulations and ancillary cells in tissue biopsy specimens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6775656

  6. Study Provides Insights into Diagnosis, Treatment of Rare Immune Disease: Autoimmmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... by mutations in the FAS gene. This gene codes for a protein that helps control the life ... China Clinical Terms Guidance Compliance Sample Letter Inclusion Codes Involvement Codes How Write Human Subjects Grant Application ...

  7. Evaluation and identification of Marek’s disease virus BAC clones as standardized reagents for research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is an alphaherpesvirus that causes Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease in chickens. Understanding of MDV gene function advanced significantly following the cloning of the MDV genome as either a series of overlapping cosmids or as a bacterial artificial chr...

  8. Transcriptional profiling of Marek's disease virus genes during cytolytic and latent infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease of chicken is caused by a highly cell-associated alpha-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latent infection within CD4+ T cells. The expression analysis of limited viral transcripts ha...

  9. Marek's Disease Virus-Induced Immunosuppression: Array Analysis of Chicken Immune Response Gene Expression Profiling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens induced by a highly cell-associated oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latency infection within CD4+ T cells. Host-virus interaction, immune responses to...

  10. Global gene expression profiling of Marek's disease virus during cytolytic and latency infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens, is caused by an avian alpha-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MDV causes an early cytolytic infection in B cells followed by a latency infection in CD4+ T cells. The transcriptional analysis of a limited number of MD...

  11. Marek’s disease virus-induced transient cecal tonsil atrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens that is caused by a highly cell-associated oncogenic '-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latent infection within CD4+ T cells. MD is characterized by bursal/th...

  12. Expression of Marek's disease virus oncoprotein Meq during infection in the natural host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease virus (MDV, Gallid herpesvirus 2) causes a lymphoproliferative disease known as Marek's disease (MD), which is unique among alphaherpesviruses as the viral genome encodes an oncoprotein, Meq. Previous studies, using cultured fibroblasts and MDV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines, ...

  13. Transcriptional profiling of chicken gene expression during cytolytic infection of Marek's disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease of chicken is caused by a highly cell-associated alpha-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latent infection within CD4+ T cells. The expression analysis of limited viral and host transc...

  14. Marek’s disease virus induces transient atrophy of cecal tonsils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by an immunosupperessive alpha herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Clinical signs of MD include bursal/thymic atrophy and neurological disorders. The cecal tonsils (CT) are the largest lymphoid aggregates of avia...

  15. Mortality of one-week-old chickens during naturally occurring Marek's disease virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a serious economic disease of chickens which occurs worldwide. MD can present as one of several forms, with the most commonly occurring forms being the lymphoproliferative diseases. Under experimental conditions, an early mortality syndrome has been recognized following infec...

  16. HLA B44 is associated with decreased severity of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in patients with CD95 defects (ALPS type Ia).

    PubMed

    Vacek, Marla M; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Davis, Joie; Fischer, Roxanne E; Dale, Janet K; Adams, Sharon; Straus, Stephen E; Puck, Jennifer M

    2006-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of lymphocyte apoptosis characterized by non-malignant lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, expansion of T cells without either CD4 or CD8 surface markers, and increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and lymphoma. Most patients with ALPS have dominant, heterozygous mutations in tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 6 (TNFRSF6), which encodes CD95, also known as Fas, a mediator of apoptosis. Penetrance and range of disease manifestations in ALPS are highly variable, even among family members who share the same dominant TNFRSF6 mutation. To evaluate HLA as a candidate modifier locus, we typed HLA A, B (including subtypes), and DQB alleles in 356 individuals from 63 unrelated families with defined TNFRSF6 mutations associated with ALPS. We also developed a quantitative severity score and performed statistical analysis. Among the healthier, mutation-bearing individuals, transmission of HLA B44 was significantly overrepresented (nominal P<0.0074) as compared to transmission in patients with severe clinical features of ALPS. The B44 allele may exert a protective role in ALPS.

  17. Castleman's Disease Presenting as Localized Abdominal Mass and Paraneoplastic Pemphigus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Bishnoi, Kshitij; Murugavaithianathan, Pragatheeswarane; Panwar, Vikas Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Castleman's disease is a rare, benign lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown origin. Paraneoplastic pemphigus is a common association which presents as oral mucosal ulcerations. Abdominal and retroperitoneal Castleman's disease present either as a localized disease or as a systemic disease. We hereby present a 15-year-old male patient with oral mucosal lesions with localized vague right lower abdominal mass who was diagnosed to have Castleman's disease with paraneoplastic pemphigus which was surgically excised. PMID:27014502

  18. Lymphoproliferative response to herpes simplex virus type 1, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, varicella zoster virus, human herpes virus 6, 7, and 8 antigen stimulation in pediatric allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Frankie Wai Tsoi; Chan, Paul Kay Sheung; Lee, Vincent; Leung, Wing Kwan; Shing, Ming Kong; Li, Chi Kong; Leung, Ting Fan

    2010-09-01

    We evaluate the recovery of CMI to various herpes viruses by measuring in vitro LPR to specific recall antigens. CMI was evaluated by the in vitro LPR of PBMC to specific purified HSV-1, VZV, CMV, EBV, HHV-6, -7, -8, antigens. Results were expressed as SI. SI > or = 3 was regarded as positive LPR. Serial measurements were taken prospectively from pretransplant till 12-month post-transplant. Thirty-six patients (M = 19; F = 17) with median age 10.5 yr old were recruited. Most transplants were from MSD with PBSC as the stem cell source. Altogether 50% of subjects started to show positive LPR to HSV-1, CMV, and VZV antigens at two-month post-transplant, major upsurges were noted until 6-month post-transplant. Subjects showed positive LPR to EBV, HHV-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8 antigens were all along <50% throughout the study period. The antibody status of donor and recipient for HSV-1, CMV, and VZV were associated with the timing of recovery of CMI. Choice of donor and stem cell source were important determinants of eventual LPR to various herpes viruses at 3-month post-transplant. At 12-month post-transplant, there was no statistical difference in any parameters in affecting LPR to different herpes viruses.

  19. Challenges in transplantation for alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Berlakovich, Gabriela A

    2014-07-07

    Transplantation for the treatment of alcoholic cirrhosis is more controversially discussed than it is for any other indication. The crucial aspect in this setting is abstinence before and after liver transplantation. We established pre-transplant selection criteria for potential transplant candidates. Provided that the underlying disease can be treated, there is no reason to withhold liver transplantation in a patient suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis. Evaluation of the patient by a multidisciplinary team, including an addiction specialist, is considered to be the gold standard. However, several centers demand a specified period of abstinence - usually 6 mo- irrespective of the specialist's assessment. The 6-mo rule is viewed critically because liver transplantation was found to clearly benefit selected patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis; the benefit was similar to that achieved for other acute indications. However, the discussion may well be an academic one because the waiting time for liver transplantation exceeds six months at the majority of centers. The actual challenge in liver transplantation for alcoholic cirrhosis may well be the need for lifelong post-transplant follow-up rather than the patient's pre-transplant evaluation. A small number of recipients experience a relapse of alcoholism; these patients are at risk for organ damage and graft-related death. Post-transplant surveillance protocols should demonstrate alcohol relapse at an early stage, thus permitting the initiation of adequate treatment. Patients with alcoholic cirrhosis are at high risk of developing head and neck, esophageal, or lung cancer. The higher risk of malignancies should be considered in the routine assessment of patients suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis. Tumor surveillance protocols for liver transplant recipients, currently being developed, should become a part of standard care; these will improve survival by permitting diagnosis at an early stage. In conclusion, the key

  20. Age-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders: comparison with EBV-positive classic Hodgkin lymphoma in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Asano, Naoko; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Tamaru, Jun-Ichi; Oyama, Takashi; Ishida, Fumihiro; Ohshima, Koichi; Yoshino, Tadashi; Nakamura, Naoya; Mori, Shigeo; Yoshie, Osamu; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Morishima, Yasuo; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2009-03-19

    Age-related Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (aEBVLPD) is a disease group characterized by EBV-associated large B-cell lymphoma in elderly without predisposing immunodeficiency. In nearly one- third of cases, aEBVLPD occurs as a polymorphous subtype with reactive cell-rich components, bearing a morphologic similarity to classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). The aim of this study was to clarify clinicopathologic differences between the polymorphic subtype of aEBVLPD (n = 34) and EBV(+) cHL (n = 108) in patients aged 50 years or older. Results showed that aEBVLPD was more closely associated with aggressive clinical parameters than cHL, with a higher age at onset (71 vs 63 years); lower male predominance (male-female ratio, 1.4 vs 3.3); and a higher rate of involvement of the skin (18% vs 2%), gastrointestinal tract (15% vs 4%), and lung (12% vs 2%). aEBVLPD was histopathologically characterized by a higher ratio of geographic necrosis, greater increase (> 30%) in cytotoxic T cells among background lymphocytes, higher positivity for CD20 and EBNA2, and absence of CD15 expression. As predicted by the clinical profile, aEBVLPD had a significantly poorer prognosis than EBV(+) cHL (P < .001). The polymorphous subtype of aEBVLPD constitutes an aggressive group with an immune response distinct from EBV(+) cHL, and requires the development of innovative therapeutic strategies.

  1. Positive correlation between replication rate and pathotype of Marek’s disease virus strains in maternal antibody negative chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a highly contagious lymphoproliferative disease of chickens associated with large economic losses worldwide. The etiological agent, Marek’s disease virus (MDV), can be divided into three pathotypes: virulent (v), very virulent (vv), and very virulent plus (vv+). While previou...

  2. Characterizing the molecular basis of attenuation of Marek’s disease virus via in vitro serial passage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens caused by the oncogenic Gallid herpesvirus 2, commonly known as Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MD vaccines, the primary control method, are often generated by repeated in vitro serial passage of this highly cell-associated virus to atte...

  3. The genomes of Marek’s disease virus exist as quasispecies at defined intervals during serial passage-induced attenuation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens caused by gallid herpesvirus type 2 (GaHV-2). The disease is controlled through mass vaccination with live-attenuated strains. Attenuation of oncogenic GaHV-2 involves the serial passage of a virulent field isolate in avian embryo fib...

  4. KU HAPLOINSUFFIENCY CAUSES A LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDER OF IMMATURE T-CELL PRECURSORS DUE TO IKAROS MALFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Zahide; Qazi, Sanjive; Ishkhanian, Rita; Hasty, Paul; Ma, Hong; Uckun, Fatih M.

    2013-01-01

    Ikaros (IK) malfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer. Therefore, a stringent regulation of IK activity is very important. Here we provide unique genetic and biochemical evidence that the Ku protein components Ku70 and Ku80 act as positive regulators of IK function via formation of IK-Ku70 and IK-Ku80 heterodimers with augmented sequence-specific DNA binding activity. siRNA-mediated depletion of Ku70 or Ku80 reduced the sequence-specific DNA binding activity of IK in EMSA as well as the RT-PCR measured IK target gene expression levels in human cells. The interaction of Ku components with IK likely contributes to the anti-leukemic effects of IK as a tumor suppressor, because Ku70 as well as Ku80 haploinsuffiency in mice caused development of a lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) involving CD2+CD4+CD8+CD1+IL7R+ thymic T-cell precursors with functional IK deficiency. PMID:24478815

  5. SIGLEC-G deficiency increases susceptibility to develop B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Giorgia; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Rodriguez, Tania Veliz; Apollonio, Benedetta; Dagklis, Antonis; Rocchi, Martina; Innocenzi, Anna; Casola, Stefano; Winkler, Thomas H.; Nitschke, Lars; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ghia, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The sialic-acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin SIGLEC-G is a negative regulator of B-cell receptor-mediated calcium signaling. Its deficiency leads to reduced turnover and increased proliferation and survival of murine B-1a cells. Siglecg−/− mice show a premature expansion of polyclonal CD5+ B cells in the spleen and the peritoneal cavity. Here we studied the fate of B lymphocytes in Siglecg−/− mice over time. We demonstrate that in aging animals SIGLEC-G deficiency promotes progressive accumulation of monoclonal B lymphocytes and increases the susceptibility to develop B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Lymphoid tumors arising in aged Siglecg−/− mice are monoclonal and histologically heterogeneous as they include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and medium-to-large B-cell monomorphic lymphoma but surprisingly not chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The tumors express high levels of BCL-2 and are transplantable. In keeping with these findings we have also observed a remarkable down-regulation of the human ortholog SIGLEC10 in human B-cell lymphoma and leukemia cell lines. Taken together, these observations indicate that the down-regulation of negative B-cell receptor regulators such as SIGLEC-G/SIGLEC10 may represent another mechanism relevant to the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas. PMID:24859880

  6. The Immune Response to Epstein Barr Virus and Implications for Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Olivia M; Krams, Sheri M

    2017-04-04

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication in organ transplant recipients and is most often associated with the Epstein Barr virus (EBV). EBV is a common gammaherpes virus with tropism for B lymphocytes and infection in immunocompetent individuals is typically asymptomatic and benign. However, infection in immunocompromised or immunosuppressed individuals can result in malignant B cell lymphoproliferations such as PTLD. EBV+ PTLD can arise following primary EBV infection, or because of reactivation of a prior infection, and represents a leading malignancy in the transplant population. The incidence of EBV+ PTLD is variable depending on the organ transplanted and whether the recipient has preexisting immunity to EBV but can be as high as 20%. It is generally accepted that impaired immune function due to immunosuppression is a primary cause of EBV+ PTLD. In this overview, we review the EBV life cycle and discuss our current understanding of the immune response to EBV in healthy, immunocompetent individuals, in transplant recipients, and in PTLD patients. We review the strategies that EBV utilizes to subvert and evade host immunity and discuss the implications for the development of EBV+ PTLD.

  7. FAS Haploinsufficiency Caused by Extracellular Missense Mutations Underlying Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Bielke, María Gabriela Simesen; Perez, Laura; Yancoski, Judith; Oliveira, João Bosco; Danielian, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in the FAS gene are the most common cause of Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS), and the majority of them affect the intracellular domain of FAS protein, particularly the region termed death domain. However, approximately one third of these mutations affect the extracellular region of FAS and most are stop codons, with very few missense changes having been described to date. We previously described 7 patients with a FAS missense extracellular mutation, C107Y, two in homozygozity and 5 in heterozygosity. We investigated here the mechanistic effects of this mutation and observed that the homozygous patients did not show any FAS surface expression, while the heterozygous patients had diminished receptor expression. Aiming to understand why a missense mutation was abolishing receptor expression, we analyzed intracellular FAS protein trafficking using fluorescent fusion proteins of wild type FAS, two missense extracellular mutants (FAS-C107Y and FAS-C104Y) and one missense change localized in the intracellular region, FAS-D260E. The FAS-C107Y and FAS-C104Y mutants failed to reach the cell surface, being retained at the endoplasmic reticulum, unlike the WT or the FAS-D260E which were clearly expressed at the plasma membrane. These results support haploinsufficiency as the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of ALPS caused by extracellular FAS missense mutations.

  8. Natural history of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome associated with FAS gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Price, Susan; Shaw, Pamela A; Seitz, Amy; Joshi, Gyan; Davis, Joie; Niemela, Julie E; Perkins, Katie; Hornung, Ronald L; Folio, Les; Rosenberg, Philip S; Puck, Jennifer M; Hsu, Amy P; Lo, Bernice; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S; Fleisher, Thomas A; Rao, V Koneti; Lenardo, Michael J

    2014-03-27

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) presents in childhood with nonmalignant lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with a characteristic expansion of mature CD4 and CD8 negative or double negative T-cell receptor αβ(+) T lymphocytes. Patients often present with chronic multilineage cytopenias due to autoimmune peripheral destruction and/or splenic sequestration of blood cells and have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. Deleterious heterozygous mutations in the FAS gene are the most common cause of this condition, which is termed ALPS-FAS. We report the natural history and pathophysiology of 150 ALPS-FAS patients and 63 healthy mutation-positive relatives evaluated in our institution over the last 2 decades. Our principal findings are that FAS mutations have a clinical penetrance of <60%, elevated serum vitamin B12 is a reliable and accurate biomarker of ALPS-FAS, and the major causes of morbidity and mortality in these patients are the overwhelming postsplenectomy sepsis and development of lymphoma. With longer follow-up, we observed a significantly greater relative risk of lymphoma than previously reported. Avoiding splenectomy while controlling hypersplenism by using corticosteroid-sparing treatments improves the outcome in ALPS-FAS patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00001350.

  9. Hyperactive mTOR pathway promotes lymphoproliferation and abnormal differentiation in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Völkl, Simon; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Allgäuer, Andrea; Schreiner, Elisabeth; Lorenz, Myriam Ricarda; Rohr, Jan; Klemann, Christian; Fuchs, Ilka; Schuster, Volker; von Bueren, André O; Naumann-Bartsch, Nora; Gambineri, Eleonora; Siepermann, Kathrin; Kobbe, Robin; Nathrath, Michaela; Arkwright, Peter D; Miano, Maurizio; Stachel, Klaus-Daniel; Metzler, Markus; Schwarz, Klaus; Kremer, Anita N; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-07-14

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human disorder characterized by defective Fas signaling, resulting in chronic benign lymphoproliferation and accumulation of TCRαβ(+) CD4(-) CD8(-) double-negative T (DNT) cells. Although their phenotype resembles that of terminally differentiated or exhausted T cells, lack of KLRG1, high eomesodermin, and marginal T-bet expression point instead to a long-lived memory state with potent proliferative capacity. Here we show that despite their terminally differentiated phenotype, human ALPS DNT cells exhibit substantial mitotic activity in vivo. Notably, hyperproliferation of ALPS DNT cells is associated with increased basal and activation-induced phosphorylation of serine-threonine kinases Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin abrogated survival and proliferation of ALPS DNT cells, but not of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in vitro. In vivo, mTOR inhibition reduced proliferation and abnormal differentiation by DNT cells. Importantly, increased mitotic activity and hyperactive mTOR signaling was also observed in recently defined CD4(+) or CD8(+) precursor DNT cells, and mTOR inhibition specifically reduced these cells in vivo, indicating abnormal programming of Fas-deficient T cells before the DNT stage. Thus, our results identify the mTOR pathway as a major regulator of lymphoproliferation and aberrant differentiation in ALPS.

  10. Investigation of common variable immunodeficiency patients and healthy individuals using autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C A; Ayers, L; Bateman, E A L; Sadler, R; Magerus-Chatinet, A; Rieux-Laucat, F; Misbah, S A; Ferry, B L

    2013-12-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of dysregulated lymphocyte homeostasis. Biomarkers including elevated CD3+TCRαβ+CD4-CD8- double negative T cells (TCRαβ+ DNT), IL-10, sCD95L and vitamin B12 can be used to differentiate between ALPS and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) patients with an overlapping clinical phenotype. We investigated the utility of ALPS biomarkers in 13 CVID patients with lymphoproliferation and/or autoimmune cytopaenia with comparison to 33 healthy controls. Vitamin B12 (P < 0.01) and IL-10 (P < 0.0001), but not sCD95L or TCRαβ+ DNT, were increased in CVID compared to controls. The 95th percentile for TCRαβ+ DNT in healthy controls was used to define a normal range up to 2.3% of total lymphocytes or 3.4% of T cells. These frequencies lie markedly beyond the cut offs used in current ALPS diagnostic criteria (≥ 1.5% of total lymphocytes or 2.5% of CD3+ lymphocytes), suggesting these limits may have poor specificity for ALPS.

  11. Unmasking Evans syndrome: T-cell phenotype and apoptotic response reveal autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Manno, Catherine S; Axsom, Kelly M; Andrews, Timothy; Choi, John K; Greenbaum, Barbara H; McMann, Joseph M; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Travis, Susan F; Grupp, Stephan A

    2005-03-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of disrupted lymphocyte homeostasis. Clinical manifestations of ALPS vary but typically include autoimmune cytopenias, organomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and increased risk of malignancies. A similar spectrum of symptoms may be seen in some patients with Evans syndrome (ES), a hematologic disorder defined by autoimmune destruction of at least 2 hematologic cell types. We hypothesized that a subset of patients diagnosed with ES may have ALPS. We screened 12 children with ES by flow cytometric analysis for CD4-/CD8- (double negative) T cells (DNTs) and with the definitive test for ALPS, defective in vitro Fas-mediated apoptosis. Six of the patients had elevated DNTs, suggestive of ALPS and also had defective Fas-mediated apoptosis. The other 6 patients displayed normal T-cell apoptosis; 5 of whom had normal DNTs, and 1 had a borderline result. Thus, 7 (58%) of 12 patients with ES had elevated DNTs suggestive of ALPS, with functional confirmation in 6 of 7. This suggests that analysis of DNTs may be a sensitive first-line screening test, serving as a marker of patients who should undergo definitive testing for ALPS. Our data further suggest that a number of patients with ES may have ALPS, a novel finding with important therapeutic implications.

  12. Somatic FAS mutations are common in patients with genetically undefined autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dowdell, Kennichi C; Niemela, Julie E; Price, Susan; Davis, Joie; Hornung, Ronald L; Oliveira, João Bosco; Puck, Jennifer M; Jaffe, Elaine S; Pittaluga, Stefania; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Fleisher, Thomas A; Rao, V Koneti

    2010-06-24

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by childhood onset of lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune cytopenias, elevated numbers of double-negative T (DNT) cells, and increased risk of lymphoma. Most cases of ALPS are associated with germline mutations of the FAS gene (type Ia), whereas some cases have been noted to have a somatic mutation of FAS primarily in their DNT cells. We sought to determine the proportion of patients with somatic FAS mutations among a group of our ALPS patients with no detectable germline mutation and to further characterize them. We found more than one-third (12 of 31) of the patients tested had somatic FAS mutations, primarily involving the intracellular domain of FAS resulting in loss of normal FAS signaling. Similar to ALPS type Ia patients, the somatic ALPS patients had increased DNT cell numbers and elevated levels of serum vitamin B(12), interleukin-10, and sFAS-L. These data support testing for somatic FAS mutations in DNT cells from ALPS patients with no detectable germline mutation and a similar clinical and laboratory phenotype to that of ALPS type Ia. These findings also highlight the potential role for somatic mutations in the pathogenesis of nonmalignant and/or autoimmune hematologic conditions in adults and children.

  13. Circulating antibody free light chains and risk of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Engels, E A; Preiksaitis, J; Zingone, A; Landgren, O

    2012-05-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a major complication of solid-organ transplantation. With human immunodeficiency virus infection (an analogous immunosuppressive state), elevated kappa and lambda immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs) in peripheral blood are associated with increased risk of lymphoma. To assess the role of B-cell dysfunction in PTLD, we measured circulating FLCs among Canadian transplant recipients, including 29 individuals with PTLD and 57 matched transplant recipients who were PTLD-free. Compared with controls, PTLD cases had higher kappa FLCs (median 1.53 vs. 1.07 times upper limit of normal) and lambda FLCs (1.03 vs. 0.68). Using samples obtained on average 3.5 months before PTLD diagnosis, cases were more likely to have polyclonal FLC elevations (i.e. elevated kappa and/or lambda with normal kappa/lambda ratio: odds ratio [OR] 4.2, 95%CI 1.1-15) or monoclonal elevations (elevated kappa and/or lambda with abnormal ratio: OR 3.0, 95%CI 0.5-18). Strong FLC-PTLD associations were also observed at diagnosis/selection. Among recipients with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA measured in blood, EBV DNAemia was associated with FLC abnormalities (ORs 6.2 and 3.2 for monoclonal and polyclonal elevations). FLC elevations are common in transplant recipients and associated with heightened PTLD risk. FLCs likely reflect B-cell dysfunction, perhaps related to EBV-driven lymphoproliferation.

  14. Influence of Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder on Survival in Children After Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Don; Breuer, Christopher K; Horwitz, Edwin M; Yates, Andrew R; Tobias, Joseph D; Shinoka, Toshiharu

    2015-12-01

    The influence of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) on long-term survival in children after heart transplantation (HTx) is not well studied. The United Network for Organ Sharing database was queried from 1987 to 2013 for data on PTLD in relation to induction immunosuppression and recipient Epstein-Barr virus status in children (<18 years of age) who underwent HTx. Of 6818 first-time pediatric heart transplants, 5169 had follow-up data on posttransplant malignancy, with 360 being diagnosed with PTLD. Univariate Cox analysis identified diminished survival after PTLD onset using a time-varying measure of PTLD (HR 2.208; 95 % CI 1.812, 2.689; p < 0.001), although Kaplan-Meier survival functions found no difference in survival between the group ever diagnosed with PTLD and the non-PTLD reference group (log-rank test: χ 1 (2)  = 0.02; p = 0.928). A multivariate Cox model found a greater mortality hazard associated with the development of PTLD after adjusting for recipient EBV seronegativity and other covariates (HR 3.024; 95 % CI 1.902, 4.808; p < 0.001). Induction immunosuppression at time of HTx did not significantly influence posttransplant mortality. The development of PTLD adversely influenced long-term survival in children after HTx after adjusting for confounding variables.

  15. Extramedullary plasmacytoma-like posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders: clinical and pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Richendollar, Bill G; Hsi, Eric D; Cook, James R

    2009-10-01

    Most monomorphic posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma. Rare cases of PTLD resembling extramedullary plasmacytomas have also been described. This report describes the clinical, histologic, phenotypic, and genotypic findings in 4 cases of plasmacytoma-like PTLD (2 nodal, 1 adenoidal, and 1 cutaneous) and compares the findings with extramedullary involvement by plasma cell neoplasms arising in immunocompetent patients. Plasmacytoma-like PTLDs characteristically arise late after transplantation (mean, 7.0 years), show a variable association with Epstein-Barr virus (2/4 cases positive), and demonstrate histologic and phenotypic findings that overlap with immunocompetent extramedullary plasma cell neoplasms. None of the patients with plasmacytoma-like PTLD developed lytic bone lesions, and 3 of 4 patients had complete responses (>2 years) to reduction of immunosuppression, confirming the role of immunosuppression in the pathogenesis of these lesions. This report, which represents the first case series of plasmacytoma-like PTLD, clarifies the features of this rare subtype of PTLD.

  16. Natural history of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome associated with FAS gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Price, Susan; Shaw, Pamela A.; Seitz, Amy; Joshi, Gyan; Davis, Joie; Niemela, Julie E.; Perkins, Katie; Hornung, Ronald L.; Folio, Les; Rosenberg, Philip S.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Hsu, Amy P.; Lo, Bernice; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Lenardo, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) presents in childhood with nonmalignant lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with a characteristic expansion of mature CD4 and CD8 negative or double negative T-cell receptor αβ+ T lymphocytes. Patients often present with chronic multilineage cytopenias due to autoimmune peripheral destruction and/or splenic sequestration of blood cells and have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. Deleterious heterozygous mutations in the FAS gene are the most common cause of this condition, which is termed ALPS-FAS. We report the natural history and pathophysiology of 150 ALPS-FAS patients and 63 healthy mutation-positive relatives evaluated in our institution over the last 2 decades. Our principal findings are that FAS mutations have a clinical penetrance of <60%, elevated serum vitamin B12 is a reliable and accurate biomarker of ALPS-FAS, and the major causes of morbidity and mortality in these patients are the overwhelming postsplenectomy sepsis and development of lymphoma. With longer follow-up, we observed a significantly greater relative risk of lymphoma than previously reported. Avoiding splenectomy while controlling hypersplenism by using corticosteroid-sparing treatments improves the outcome in ALPS-FAS patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:24398331

  17. Rare Submandibular Presentation of Pediatric Castleman Disease: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jodi; Mandel, Louis

    2016-10-28

    Castleman disease (CD), a benign lymphoproliferative disorder that affects lymph nodes, is uncommon in children, with only approximately 100 cases published. Although 23% of pediatric CD cases are found in the neck, there is no substantial reported percentage found in the salivary glands, especially the submandibular salivary gland (SMSG). A pediatric case of CD involving the SMSG is reported because of its extreme rarity.

  18. FAS-L, IL-10, and double-negative CD4- CD8- TCR alpha/beta+ T cells are reliable markers of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) associated with FAS loss of function.

    PubMed

    Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Loffredo, Maria S; Neven, Bénédicte; Schaffner, Catherine; Ducrot, Nicolas; Arkwright, Peter D; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Barbot, José; Blanche, Stéphane; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Debré, Marianne; Ferster, Alina; Fieschi, Claire; Florkin, Benoit; Galambrun, Claire; Hermine, Olivier; Lambotte, Olivier; Solary, Eric; Thomas, Caroline; Le Deist, Francoise; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2009-03-26

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, hypergammaglobulinemia, accumulation of double-negative TCRalphabeta(+) CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells (DNT cells), and autoimmunity. Previously, DNT cell detection and a functional defect of T cells in a FAS-induced apoptosis test in vitro had been used for ALPS diagnosis. However, a functional defect can also be detected in mutation-positive relatives (MPRs) who remain free of any ALPS-related disease. In contrast, lymphocytes from patients carrying a somatic mutation of FAS exhibit normal sensitivity to FAS-induced apoptosis in vitro. We assessed the soluble FAS-L concentration in the plasma of ALPS patients carrying FAS mutations. Overall, we showed that determination of the FAS-L represents, together with the IL-10 concentration and the DNT cell percentage, a reliable tool for the diagnosis of ALPS.

  19. Blood concentration of cyclosporine during early post-transplant period may have influence on the occurrence of chronic graft versus host disease in patients who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Silvia; Kim, Kihyun; Jang, Jun Ho; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Jung, Chul Won

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It has rarely been studied that how the blood level of CsA affect the incidence of chronic GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Methods A total of 183 patients who underwent allo-HSCT from an HLA-matched or haplo matched family donors between 2006 and 2014 were reviewed. Results The average monthly CsA blood concentration (CsAavr, ng/ml) was calculated in each patient: 0-1, 1-2, and 2-3 months after allo-HSCT. CsAavr at the first month showed significant association with the occurrence of moderate to severe cGVHD in multivariate analysis adjusted for gender, age, total body irradiation, anti-thymocyte globulin, acute GVHD ≥ grade 2 and CsAavr levels of other periods. The risk of cGVHD development was lowest in patients with CsAavr of 200-250 ng/ml when compared to those with CsAavr of ≥ 250 or < 200 ng/ml (p=0.003). Conclusions CsA level between 200 and 250 mg/ml during the first month after transplantation was significantly associated with the decreased risk of moderate to severe cGVHD. PMID:27494893

  20. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder after pediatric solid organ transplantation: experiences of 20 years in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyung Joo; Ahn, Yo Han; Park, Eujin; Choi, Youngrok; Yi, Nam-Joon; Ko, Jae Sung; Min, Sang Il; Ha, Jong Won; Ha, Il-Soo; Cheong, Hae Il

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical spectrum of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after solid organ transplantation (SOT) in children. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 18 patients with PTLD who underwent liver (LT) or kidney transplantation (KT) between January 1995 and December 2014 in Seoul National University Children's Hospital. Results Eighteen patients (3.9% of pediatric SOTs; LT:KT, 11:7; male to female, 9:9) were diagnosed as having PTLD over the last 2 decades (4.8% for LT and 2.9% for KT). PTLD usually presented with fever or gastrointestinal symptoms in a median period of 7 months after SOT. Eight cases had malignant lesions, and all the patients except one had evidence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) involvement, assessed by using in situ hybridization of tumor tissue or EBV viral load quantitation of blood. Remission was achieved in all patients with reduction of immunosuppression and/or rituximab therapy or chemotherapy, although 1 patient had allograft kidney loss and another died from complications of chemotherapy. The first case of PTLD was encountered after the introduction of tacrolimus for pediatric SOT in 2003. The recent increase in PTLD incidence in KT coincided with modification of clinical practice since 2012 to increase the tacrolimus trough level. Conclusion While the outcome was favorable in that all patients achieved complete remission, some patients still had allograft loss or mortality. To prevent PTLD and improve its outcome, monitoring for EBV infection is essential, which would lead to appropriate modification of immunosuppression and enhanced surveillance for PTLD. PMID:28392824

  1. HLA Associations and Risk of Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Danish Population-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Strandhave, Charlotte; Søndergaard, Esben; Bendix, Knud; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Andersen, Claus; Møller, Michael Boe; Sørensen, Søren Schwartz; Kampmann, Jan; Eiskjær, Hans; Iversen, Martin; Weinreich, Ilse Duus; Møller, Bjarne; Jespersen, Bente; d'Amore, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a feared complication to organ transplantation, associated with substantial morbidity and inferior survival. Risk factors for PTLD include T cell–depleting induction therapy and primary infection or reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus. Possible associations between certain HLA types and the risk of developing PTLD have been reported by other investigators; however, results are conflicting. Methods We conducted a retrospective, population-based study on 4295 Danish solid organ transplant patients from the Scandiatransplant database. Having identified 93 PTLD patients in the cohort, we investigated the association of HLA types with PTLD, Epstein-Barr virus status and time to PTLD onset. The outcomes survival and PTLD were evaluated using Cox regression; mismatching, and the PTLD-specific mortality were evaluated in a competing risk analysis. Results Risk of PTLD was associated with male sex (odds ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-2.71), and, in women, HLA-DR13 conferred an increased risk (odds ratio, 3.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.41-7.31). In multivariate analysis, HLA-B45 and HLA-DR13 remained independent predictive factors of PTLD. Mismatching in the B locus was associated with a reduced risk of PTLD (P < 0.001). Overall survival was poor after a PTLD diagnosis and was significantly worse than that in the remaining transplant cohort (P < 0.001). Conclusions Our data indicate risk-modifying HLA associations, which can be clinically useful after transplantation in personalized monitoring schemes. Given the strong linkage disequilibrium in the HLA region, the associations must be interpreted carefully. The large size, virtually complete ascertainment of cases and no loss to follow-up remain important strengths of the study. PMID:27500227

  2. Viral induction and targeted inhibition of galectin-1 in EBV+ posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Jing; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Rodig, Scott J; Green, Michael R; O'Donnell, Evan; Currie, Treeve; Armant, Myriam; Takeyama, Kunihiko; Monti, Stefano; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Ritz, Jerome; Kutok, Jeffery L; Shipp, Margaret A

    2011-04-21

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are potentially fatal, EBV-driven B-cell malignancies that develop in immunocompromised solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell recipients. In PTLD, the expression of EBV proteins, including latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and LMP2A, viral immune evasion strategies, and impaired host immune surveillance foster the proliferation of EBV-transformed B cells. Current PTLD treatment strategies include reduction of immunosuppression, which increases the risk of graft rejection, anti-CD20 treatment, combination chemotherapy, and administration of EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells. In the present study, we report that EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid B-cell lines (LCLs) and primary PTLDs overexpress galectin-1 (Gal1), a carbohydrate-binding lectin that induces tolerogenic dendritic cells and triggers the selective apoptosis of CD4(+) Th1 and Th17 cells and cytotoxic T cells. In transcriptional reporter assays, LMP2A and LMP1 each increased Gal1-driven luciferase expression, and the combination of LMP2A and LMP1 was additive. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of LMP2A decreased Gal1 protein abundance in EBV-transformed LCLs. Gal1 expression in LCLs was dependent on both activating protein 1 (AP-1) and PI3K. A newly developed neutralizing Gal1 mAb selectively inhibited Gal1-mediated apoptosis of EBV-specific CD8(+) T cells. Given the tolerogenic and immunosuppressive function of Gal1, antibody-mediated Gal1 neutralization may represent a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for PTLD and other Gal1-expressing tumors.

  3. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in lymphoproliferative disorders and rituximab-related secondary hypogammaglobulinemia: a single-center experience in 61 patients.

    PubMed

    Compagno, Nicolò; Cinetto, Francesco; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Agostini, Carlo

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy represents the standard treatment for hypogammaglobulinemia secondary to B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin infusion is an effective, safe and well-tolerated treatment approach in primary immunodeficiencies but no extensive data are available on their use in secondary hypogammaglobulinemia, a frequent phenomenon occurring after treatment with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies in lymphoproliferative disorders. In this retrospective study we evaluated efficacy (serum IgG trough levels, incidence of infections per year, need for antibiotics) and safety (number of adverse events) of intravenous (300 mg/kg/4 weeks) versus subcutaneous (75 mg/kg/week) immunoglobulin replacement therapy in 61 patients. In addition, the impact of the infusion methods on quality of life was compared. All patients were treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin, and 33 out of them had been previously treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Both treatments appeared to be effective in replacing Ig production deficiency and in reducing the incidence of infectious events and the need for antibiotics. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin obtained a superior benefit when compared to intravenous immunoglobulin achieving higher IgG trough levels, lower incidence of overall infection and need for antibiotics. The incidence of serious bacterial infections was similar with both infusion ways. As expected, a lower number of adverse events was registered with subcutaneous immunoglobulin, compared to intravenous immunoglobulin, with no serious adverse events. Finally, we observed an improvement in health-related quality of life parameters after the switch to subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Our results suggest that subcutaneous immunoglobulin is safe and effective in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia associated to lymphoproliferative disorders.

  4. PCR Analysis of IgH and TCR-γ Gene Rearrangements as a Confirmatory Diagnostic Tool for Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Poopak, Behzad; Valeshabad, Ali Kord; Elahi, Fazel; Rezvani, Hamid; Khosravipour, Gelareh; Jahangirpour, Mohammad Ali; Bolouri, Shirin; Golkar, Tolou; Salari, Fatemeh; Shahjahani, Mohammad; Saki, Najmaldin

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates PCR analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) and T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements on paraffin-embedded tissue sections and bone marrow aspirates of patients suspected to have lymphoproliferative disorders but with inconclusive diagnosis in histopathological examination. 130 samples of patients with inconclusive immunohistochemistry results were evaluated for clonal rearrangement of IgH and TCR genes. Based on histopathology examination, the patients were divided into three groups: the first group without any definite diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders (60 cases, 46.2 %), the second group suspected to have a lymphoproliferative disorder but in favor of benign disorders (19 cases, 14.6 %) and the third group suspect to lymphoproliferative disorders but relatively in favor of malignant disorders (51 cases, 39.2 %). After DNA extraction and quality control, semi-nested PCR was performed using consensus primers for amplification of TCR-γ and CDR-3 regions of IgH genes. PCR products were analyzed after heteroduplex analysis using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and were subject to silver staining. Totally, in over half of the cases (55.4 %), a monoclonal pattern was found in IgH or TCR-γ genes rearrangements. Monoclonal IgH gene rearrangement was detected in 48.1 % of patients, whereas monoclonal TCR-γ gene rearrangement was found in 33.6 % of them, which was not statistically significant (P = 0.008). Only in 32 patients (24.6 %) were the results of TCR-γ and IgH gene rearrangements consistent with respect to the presence (2.3 %) or absence (22.3 %) of monoclonality. Finally, PCR analysis of TCR-γ and IgH gene rearrangements led to definite diagnosis in 105 patients (80.8 %), and only 25 cases (19.2 %) remained inconclusive. Our results emphasize the usefulness of gene rearrangement study in cases without a definite diagnosis in immunohistochemistry studies. Multiple PCR analysis results when combined

  5. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: response to mycophenolate mofetil and pyrimethamine/sulfadoxine in a 5-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sunaina; Singh, Neeraj; Chaudhary, Gurmeet Kaur; John, M Joseph

    2011-06-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is a rare inherited disorder of disrupted lymphocyte homeostasis characterized by chronic splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy of early onset, hypergammaglobulinemia (Ig G and Ig A), autoimmune phenomena, and expanded populations of TCR-α/β+, CD3+, CD4-, CD8-T cells (Fisher et al. Cell 81:935-946; 1995), called double negative T-cells [(DN) T cells]. We discuss a case of ALPS which showed good response to immunosuppressant drug Mycophenolate-Mofetil in combination with Pyrimethamine/Sulfadoxine.

  6. Use of Sirolimus (Rapamycin) for Treatment of Cytopenias and Lymphoproliferation Linked to Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS). Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Cayrol, Julie; Garrido Colino, Carmen

    2017-02-23

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of lymphocyte apoptosis. Children present with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and autoimmune cytopenias. Recent advances show efficacy of treatment with immunosuppressive drugs. Sirolimus, an mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, improves autoimmune cytopenias and lymphoproliferation, with a safe profile. We present 2 patients, a 5-year-old girl and 15-year-old boy, diagnosed with ALPS with initial partial response to steroid treatment. Autoimmune cytopenias and lymphoproliferation then became refractory to treatment, with recurrence of symptoms. In both cases, treatment with sirolimus was started, with a rapid response, complete remission of cytopenias, and resolution of lymphoproliferation, with no significant adverse effects.

  7. Protective efficacy of a recombinant bacterial artificial chromosome clone of a very virulent Marek’s disease virus containing a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV), an alphaherpesvirus, causes Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease in poultry characterized by T-cell lymphomas, nerve lesions and mortality. Vaccination is used worldwide to control MD, but increasingly virulent field strains can overcome this protection, d...

  8. Epstein-Barr viral load in whole blood of adults with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after solid organ transplantation does not correlate with clinical course.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Stephan; Trappe, Ralf Ulrich; Zeidler, Kristin; Babel, Nina; Reinke, Petra; Hummel, Manfred; Jonas, Sven; Papp-Vary, Matthias; Subklewe, Marion; Dörken, Bernd; Riess, Hanno; Gärtner, Barbara

    2006-07-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is closely linked to primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. A defect of EBV specific cellular immunity is postulated to play a pivotal role in the etiology of PTLD, but there is some debate as to whether EBV load in the peripheral blood of transplant patients predicts onset of PTLD or relapse after treatment. The current prospective, single-center study was undertaken to investigate the impact of therapy on EBV load in adult patients with PTLD. Fifteen patients with PTLD after solid organ transplantation were included and of these, seven had EBV-associated PTLD. All 15 patients received Rituximab as primary therapy. In cases of treatment failure or relapse after Rituximab treatment, patients received polychemotherapy according to the cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and prednisone regimen. At onset of PTLD, the median EBV load in the peripheral blood of patients was higher in EBV-associated PTLD than PTLD with no associated EBV infection. After Rituximab therapy, four of seven patients with EBV-associated PTLD achieved long-lasting complete remissions. However, in two of these patients, EBV load increased to reach levels as high as those recorded at onset of PTLD. Another patient showed a dramatic decline of EBV load after the first dose of Rituximab while suffering from progressive disease. The other patient relapsed after Rituximab monotherapy, but his viral load stayed low. In total, discordance in EBV load and clinical course was observed in five of the seven patients with EBV-associated PTLD. We conclude that in adult patients with PTLD, EBV load does not correlate with treatment response and is not suitable as a predictive marker for PTLD relapse.

  9. Marek's disease virus immunosuppression alters host cellular responses and immune gene expression in the skin of infected chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a highly contagious lymphoproliferative and neuropathic disease of chickens. The feather follicle epithelium (FFE) is the only anatomical site within the host where infectious enveloped cell-free MD virus (MDV) particles are produced and disseminated into the environment. MD ...

  10. Monoclonal gammopathy and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Ana; Peixoto, Daniela; Bogas, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    It is common to find monoclonal gammopathy in the investigation workout for an unrelated disorder. There are studies relating rheumatic diseases and therapies which show an increased risk of monoclonal gammopathy. The specific mechanisms are not well understood but chronic antigen stimulation assumes an important role. Specific rheumatic diseases have consistently been associated with lymphoproliferative disorders but less attention has been paid to the possible association between monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma. We reviewed previous studies regarding monoclonal gammopathy and different rheumatic diseases and treatments associated focusing on prevalence, risk factors and possible pathogenic mechanisms. The clinical approach of a monoclonal gammopathy and its follow-up are explained.

  11. Concomitant Kaposi sarcoma and multicentric Castleman's disease in a heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ami; Bishburg, Eliahu; Zucker, Mark; Tsang, Patricia; Nagarakanti, Sandhya; Sabnani, Indu

    2014-01-01

    Post-transplant human herpes virus -8 (HHV-8)/Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) infection is associated with neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. Kaposi sarcoma (KS), multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) are the most common HHV-8-associated neoplastic complications described in solid organ transplant (SOT) patients. Concurrent KS and MCD have been previously described after transplantation only twice - once after liver transplantation and once after renal transplantation. We describe a unique heart transplant patient who also developed concurrent KS and MCD. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of a heart transplant recipient presenting with these two HHV-8-mediated complications at the same time.

  12. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome and Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphoma: An Adjunctive Diagnostic Role for Monitoring EBV Viremia?

    PubMed

    Pace, Romina; Vinh, Donald C

    2013-01-01

    Background. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a genetic disorder of lymphocyte homeostasis due to defects in FAS-mediated apoptosis. ALPS is characterized by childhood onset of chronic lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, autoimmunity, an expanded population of double-negative T cells (DNTCs), and an increased risk of lymphoma. This propensity for lymphoma in ALPS is not well understood. It is possible that lymphomagenesis in some of these patients may result from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection exploiting the defective T-cell surveillance resulting from impaired FAS-mediated apoptosis. Case Presentation. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of lymphoma in a patient with ALPS that was clinically heralded by progressively increasing EBV viremia. We discuss its practical implications and the possible immune pathways involved in the increased risk for EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders in ALPS patients. Conclusion. In patients with ALPS, distinguishing chronic lymphadenopathy from emerging lymphoma is difficult, with few practical recommendations available. This case illustrates that, at least for some patients, monitoring for progressively increasing EBV viremia may be useful.

  13. Detection of monoclonal T populations in patients with KIR-restricted chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Gattazzo, Cristina; Teramo, Antonella; Passeri, Francesca; De March, Elena; Carraro, Samuela; Trimarco, Valentina; Frezzato, Federica; Berno, Tamara; Barilà, Gregorio; Martini, Veronica; Piazza, Francesco; Trentin, Livio; Facco, Monica; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Zambello, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of chronic large granular lymphocyte proliferations is largely unknown. Although these disorders are characterized by the expansion of different cell types (T and natural killer) with specific genetic features and abnormalities, several lines of evidence suggest a common pathogenetic mechanism. According to this interpretation, we speculated that in patients with natural killer-type chronic lymphoproliferative disorder, together with natural killer cells, also T lymphocytes undergo a persistent antigenic pressure, possibly resulting in an ultimate clonal T-cell selection. To strengthen this hypothesis, we evaluated whether clonal T-cell populations were detectable in 48 patients with killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-restricted natural killer-type chronic lymphoproliferative disorder. At diagnosis, in half of the patients studied, we found a clearly defined clonal T-cell population, despite the fact that all cases presented with a well-characterized natural killer disorder. Follow-up analysis confirmed that the TCR gamma rearrangements were stable over the time period evaluated; furthermore, in 7 patients we demonstrated the appearance of a clonal T subset that progressively matures, leading to a switch between killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-restricted natural killer-type disorder to a monoclonal T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Our results support the hypothesis that a common mechanism is involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:25193965

  14. A Novel, Non-canonical Splice Variant of the Ikaros Gene Is Aberrantly Expressed in B-cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mancarelli, Maria Michela; Verzella, Daniela; Fischietti, Mariafausta; Di Tommaso, Ambra; Maccarone, Rita; Plebani, Sara; Di Ianni, Mauro; Gulino, Alberto; Alesse, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    The Ikaros gene encodes a Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor involved in hematopoiesis regulation. Ikaros has been established as one of the most clinically relevant tumor suppressors in several hematological malignancies. In fact, expression of dominant negative Ikaros isoforms is associated with adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, acute myeloid leukemia and adult and juvenile chronic myeloid leukemia. Here, we report the isolation of a novel, non-canonical Ikaros splice variant, called Ikaros 11 (Ik11). Ik11 is structurally related to known dominant negative Ikaros isoforms, due to the lack of a functional DNA-binding domain. Interestingly, Ik11 is the first Ikaros splice variant missing the transcriptional activation domain. Indeed, we demonstrated that Ik11 works as a dominant negative protein, being able to dimerize with Ikaros DNA-binding isoforms and inhibit their functions, at least in part by retaining them in the cytoplasm. Notably, we demonstrated that Ik11 is the first dominant negative Ikaros isoform to be aberrantly expressed in B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Aberrant expression of Ik11 interferes with both proliferation and apoptotic pathways, providing a mechanism for Ik11 involvement in tumor pathogenesis. Thus, Ik11 could represent a novel marker for B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:23874502

  15. The MYC/miR-17-92 axis in lymphoproliferative disorders: A common pathway with therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Luis; Gattei, Valter

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding single-stranded RNA molecules acting as master regulators of gene expression post transcriptionally by inhibiting the translation or inducing the degradation of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). In particular, the miR-17-92 cluster is widely expressed in many different cell types and is essential for many developmental and pathogenic processes. As a strong oncogene, miR-17-92 can regulate multiple cellular processes that favor malignant transformation, promoting cell survival, rapid cell proliferation, and increased angiogenesis. The miR-17-92 cluster has been reported to be involved in hematopoietic malignancies including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Given the multiple and potent effects on cellular proliferation and apoptosis exerted by the miR-17-92 cluster, miRNAs belonging to the cluster surely represent attractive targets for cancer therapy also in the context of lymphoproliferative disorders. In the present review, we focus on the role of the miR-17-92 cluster in lymphoproliferative disorders, including diagnostic/prognostic implications, and on the potential applications of anti-miRNAs based therapies targeting miRNAs belonging to the cluster. PMID:26305986

  16. Salvia Hispanica Seed in Reducing Risk of Disease Recurrence in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-26

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; B Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Burkitt Leukemia; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Mycosis Fungoides; Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis-Like T-Cell Lymphoma; Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  17. Subclinical pulmonary function defects following autologous and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: relationship to total body irradiation and graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, R.C.; Burnett, A.K.; Robertson, A.G.; McNee, S.; Riyami, B.M.; Carter, R.; Stevenson, R.D. )

    1991-06-01

    Pulmonary function results pre- and post-transplant, to a maximum of 4 years, were analyzed in 98 patients with haematological disorders undergoing allogeneic (N = 53) or autologous bone marrow transplantation (N = 45) between 1982 and 1988. All received similar total body irradiation based regimens ranging from 9.5 Gy as a single fraction to 14.4 Gy fractionated. FEV1/FVC as a measure of airway obstruction showed little deterioration except in patients experiencing graft-versus-host disease in whom statistically significant obstructive ventilatory defects were evident by 6 months post-transplant (p less than 0.01). These defects appeared to be permanent. Restrictive ventilatory defects, as measured by reduction in TLC, and defects in diffusing capacity (DLCO and KCO) were also maximal at 6 months post-transplant (p less than 0.01). Both were related, at least in part, to the presence of GVHD (p less than 0.01) or use of single fraction TBI with absorbed lung dose of 8.0 Gy (p less than 0.05). Fractionated TBI resulted in less marked restricted ventilation and impaired gas exchange, which reverted to normal by 2 years, even when the lung dose was increased from 11.0 Gy to between 12.0 and 13.5 Gy. After exclusion of patients with GVHD (30% allografts) there was no significant difference in pulmonary function abnormalities between autograft and allograft recipients.

  18. SV40 and p53 as team players in childhood lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Heinsohn, Susanne; Scholz, Roswitha; Kabisch, Hartmut

    2011-05-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) is known to be potently oncogenic and can induce several types of tumours, such as lymphoma. p53 was discovered as a cellular partner of the SV40 large T-antigen, the oncoprotein of this virus. There have not been many studies on SV40 and p53 in lymphomas and the ones that exist, are controversial. A comparison of these two components in lymphoma has not been reported previously. We examined 91 lymphomas [60 B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (B-NHLs), 19 B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALLs), 7 B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias and 5 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias] for the presence of SV40. Overall, 40 samples from 12 B-NHL/19 B-ALL patients were additionally investigated for p53 mutation in the hot-spot exons 5 to 8. Overall, we found 62/91 lymphomas to be SV40-positive, among them 16/19 B-ALLs and 38/60 B-NHLs. SV40 was absent in 147 of the 149 blood control samples. We found 11 p53 mutations in 19 B-ALL patients: 5 in exon 5 (codons 132, 141, 143, 155 and 181), 4 in exon 7 (codons 236, 238 and 248), 2 in exon 8 (codon 273). In B-NHL patients we found p53-mutations in 9/12 samples: 6 of these in 3 lymph nodes (LNs). One LN harboured 3 different p53 mutations: Exon 5 (codon 132), exon 6 (codon 213) and exon 8 (codon 288). Another LN showed 2 different p53 mutations: Exon 6 (codon 213) and exon 8 (codon 285). Except for 1 nonsense mutation in an LN of a B-NHL patient, all 20 mutations were missense mutations, 2 were homozygous, both found in B-NHL-samples, and one of these (codon 175) is known to cause the global denaturation of p53. All occur in the DNA-binding domain of p53. All specimens showing a p53 mutation, were SV40-positive. p53 mutaions found in LNs of B-NHL patients harbour high SV40 copy numbers. Our data strongly support an important role for SV40, as well as a strong association of SV40 and p53 in childhood lympho-proliferative disorders.

  19. Expanded infectious diseases screening program for Hispanic transplant candidates.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, M A; Caicedo, J C; Stosor, V; Ison, M G

    2010-08-01

    Most guidelines for pre-transplant screening recommend enhanced screening among patients with potential exposure to such pathogens as Strongyloides stercoralis and Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of Chagas disease. The incidence of these diseases in the Hispanic immigrant population has not been extensively studied. Transplant candidates who were evaluated by our program's Hispanic Transplant Program were referred for expanded infectious disease screening including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, S. stercoralis, Leishmania, and T. cruzi. Between December 2006 and December 2008, 83 patients were screened. Most were from Mexico but we also screened patients from Ecuador, Puerto Rico, and Peru. Most patients lived in urban locations before moving to the United States. Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) was found in 20%, and 6.7% had serologic evidence of S. stercoralis infection. These patients underwent treatment of latent infection without difficulty. To date, 14 patients have undergone living-donor kidney transplantation. Two of these patients had positive Leishmania titers and are being followed clinically, 1 was treated for S. stercoralis, and 2 were treated for LTBI pre-transplant. All have done well without evidence of screened pathogens an average of 348 days (range 65-766 days) post transplant. Expanded screening identifies endemic infections in the Hispanic immigrant population that can be treated before transplant, thereby minimizing post-transplant infectious complications.

  20. Abnormal thymic maturation and lymphoproliferation in MRL-Faslpr/lpr mice can be partially reversed by synthetic oligonucleotides: implications for systemic lupus erythematosus and autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ashman, R F; Singh, N; Lenert, P S

    2016-11-10

    MRL-Fas (lpr/lpr) mice represent an excellent animal model for studying non-malignant lymphoproliferation, regeneration and systemic autoimmunity. Retro-transposon insertion into the second intron of the pro-apoptotic Fas gene appears to be responsible for both lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity, while other genes are more likely to contribute to the regenerative healing characteristic of this mouse strain. Previous studies have shown that neonatal thymectomy can halt the development of abnormal lymphoproliferation. Whereas at four weeks of age primary and secondary lymphoid organs appear to be grossly intact, vigorous lymphoproliferation and autoantibody production subsequently ensues. This is first noticeable at six weeks of age, at which time lymph nodes, spleens and thymuses, but not the bone marrow, become infiltrated with abnormal B220(+)CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells. Around the same time, thymuses show a significant drop in CD4(+)CD8(+)double-positive T cells generating an abnormal ratio between double-positive and single-positive thymocytes. The objective of current study was to evaluate the effect of synthetic oligonucleotides-toll-like receptor antagonists on early lymphoid development in this strain of mice. Herein, we demonstrate the ability of synthetic oligonucleotides made with the nuclease-resistant phosphorothioate backbone to partially reverse abnormal lymphoproliferation and thymic involution in pre-diseased MRL-Fas (lpr/lpr) mice when administered intraperitoneally starting from week four of age. This curative effect of oligonucleotides was primary sequence/secondary oligonucleotide structure-independent, suggesting an effect through the toll-like receptor 7. A similar approach may potentially benefit patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome who, like MRL-Fas (lpr/lpr) mice, carry a mutation in the Fas gene.

  1. Construction of a YAC contig and STS map spanning 2.5 Mbp in Xq25, the critical region for the X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lanyi, A.; Li, B.F.; Li, S.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is characterized by a marked vulnerability in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Infection of XLP patients with EBV invariably results in fatal mononucleosis, agammaglobulinemia or B-cell lymphoma. The XLP gene lies within a 10 cM region in Xq25 between DXS42 and DXS10. Initial chromosome studies revealed an interstitial, cytogenetically visible deletion in Xq25 in one XLP family (43-004). We estimated the size of the Xq25 deletion by dual laser flow karyotyping to involve 2% of the X chromosome, or approximately 3 Mbp of DNA sequences. To further delineate the deletion we performed a series of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analyses which showed that DXS6 and DXS100, two Xq25-specific markers, are missing from 45-004 DNA. Five yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from a chromosome X specific YAC library containing sequences deleted in patient`s 43-004 DNA were isolated. These five YACs did not overlap, and their end fragments were used to screen the CEPH MegaYAC library. Seven YACs were isolated from the CEPH MegaYAC library. They could be arranged into a contig which spans between DXS6 and DXS100. The contig contains a minimum of 2.5 Mbp of human DNA. A total of 12 YAC end clone, lambda subclones and STS probes have been used to order clones within the contig. These reagents were also used in Southern blot and patients showed interstitial deletions in Xq25. The size of these deletions range between 0.5 and 2.5 Mbp. The shortest deletion probably represents the critical region for the XLP gene.

  2. High-Dose Y-90-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Added to Reduced-Intensity Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Regimen for Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-04

    Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  3. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Children With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  4. Oncornavirus particles in lymphoid cultures from a howler monkey with Herpesvirus saimiri-induced disease.

    PubMed

    Rangan, S R

    1976-10-01

    Budding and extracellular oncornavirus particles were observed in cells of lymphoid cultures derived from the spleen, lymph node, and blood of a howler monkey (Alouatta caraya) that developed a malignant lymphoproliferative disease after infection with Herpesvirus saimiri. The various possible sources of origin of these particles are discussed.

  5. Severe necrotic dermatitis in the combs of line 6-3 chickens is associated with Marek's disease virus-induced immunosuppression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disorder of domestic chickens is characterized by bursal–thymic atrophy and rapid onset of T-cell lymphomas that infiltrate lymphoid tissues, visceral organs, and peripheral nerves. Marek’s disease virus (MDV), the etiological agent of MD, is a highly cel...

  6. The pathological implications of heart transplantation: experience with 50 cases in a single center.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Matsuyama, Taka-Aki; Ohta-Ogo, Keiko; Sato, Takuma; Seguchi, Osamu; Yanase, Masanobu; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Nakatani, Takeshi

    2014-09-01

    Heart transplantation started in Japan in 1999. Since then, 50 transplants have been performed at our center. We performed histopathological analyses of the 50 explanted hearts and the post-transplant biopsy specimens. The median age of recipients was 39 years. The primary diseases before transplant were idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy in 33 patients (66%), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in seven (14%), restrictive cardiomyopathy in one, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in one, and secondary cardiomyopathy in eight (16%). Before transplantation, 47 patients (94%) had left ventricular assist devices. No severe cardiovascular failure due to allograft rejection occurred. The post-transplant survival rate was 97.6% at 1 year and 93.1% at 10 years. One recipient was lost to sepsis from myelodysplastic syndrome in the fourth year, one died of multiple organ failure and peritonitis 8 months after transplant. Another patient died of recurrent post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). Mild cardiac dysfunction occurred in seven recipients in the early postoperative period. Moderate acute cellular rejection occurred in six patients (12%), and antibody-mediated rejection occurred in three (6%). The number of heart transplants performed in Japan is very small. However, the outstanding 10-year survival rate is due to donor evaluation and post-transplant care resulting in low grade rejection. Pathological evaluation has also greatly contributed to the results.

  7. T-cells fighting B-cell lymphoproliferative malignancies: the emerging field of CD19 CAR T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Heijink, D M; Kater, A P; Hazenberg, M D; Hagenbeek, A; Kersten, M J

    2016-05-01

    CAR T-cells are autologous T-cells transduced with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). The CAR contains an antigen recognition part (originating from an antibody), a T-cell receptor transmembrane and cytoplasmic signalling part, and one or more co-stimulatory domains. While CAR T-cells can be directed against any tumour target, most experience thus far has been obtained with targeting of the B-cell antigen CD19 that is expressed by B-cell acute lymphocytic leukaemia, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and other B-cell lymphomas. The first clinical results are promising, although there are profound differences in response between patients with different haematological malignancies. Treatment-related side effects have been observed that require specific management. This review will explain the mechanism of action, summarise the experience to date and point out future directions for this hopeful new addition to the therapeutic armamentarium in the treatment of lymphoproliferative B-cell malignancies.

  8. Methotrexate-associated lymphoproliferative disorder arising in the retromolar triangle and lung of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kudoh, Masanori; Harada, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Koshi; Sato, Yuriko; Omura, Ken; Ishii, Yoshimasa

    2014-10-01

    We report an extremely rare case of massive methotrexate-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (MTX-LPD) arising in the retromolar triangle and lung of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. The patient was a 75-year-old woman who was referred to our department because of severe pain associated with a unilateral ulcer on the left retromolar triangle. The tumor had an extranodal location in the retromolar triangle and in the right lung. A clinicopathologic examination found a lymphocytic infiltrate with increasingly atypical histopathologic features. Atypical large cells were strongly positive in Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA in situ hybridization and in staining with CD20 antibodies. MTX-LPD was diagnosed based on the medical history and histopathologic results. The lesion responded well to withdrawal of MTX followed by R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) chemotherapy. There have been no signs of recurrence for 4 years since withdrawal of MTX.

  9. Defective CD95/APO-1/Fas signal complex formation in the human autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, type Ia.

    PubMed

    Martin, D A; Zheng, L; Siegel, R M; Huang, B; Fisher, G H; Wang, J; Jackson, C E; Puck, J M; Dale, J; Straus, S E; Peter, M E; Krammer, P H; Fesik, S; Lenardo, M J

    1999-04-13

    Heterozygous mutations in the CD95 (APO-1/Fas) receptor occur in most individuals with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) and dominantly interfere with apoptosis by an unknown mechanism. We show that local or global alterations in the structure of the cytoplasmic death domain from nine independent ALPS CD95 death-domain mutations result in a failure to bind the FADD/MORT1 signaling protein. Despite heterozygosity for the abnormal allele, lymphocytes from ALPS patients showed markedly decreased FADD association and a loss of caspase recruitment and activation after CD95 crosslinking. These data suggest that intracytoplasmic CD95 mutations in ALPS impair apoptosis chiefly by disrupting death-domain interactions with the signaling protein FADD/MORT1.

  10. Lymphoproliferative and gamma interferon responses to stress-regulated Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne’s disease in ruminants is a chronic infection of the intestines caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Economic losses associated with Johne’s disease arise due to premature culling, reduced production of milk and wool and mortalities. The disease is characterised by a long inc...

  11. The role of heat shock proteins in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) belong to the family of intracellular proteins that are constitutively expressed and are upregulated by various stressors including heat, oxidative and chemical stress. HSP helps in reparative processes, including the refolding of damaged proteins and the removal of irreparably damaged proteins that would initiate cellular death or apoptosis. A growing body of evidence has expanded the role of HSP and defined their role in diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, ischemic heart disease and kidney diseases. The protective role of HSP in ischemic renal injury has been described and HSP impairment has been noted in other forms of kidney injuries including post-transplant situation. Further research into the role of HSP in prevention of kidney injury is crucial if translation from the laboratory to patient bedside has to occur. This article aims to be a review of heat shock protein, and its relevance to kidney diseases. PMID:28191532

  12. Candidates for liver transplantation with alcoholic liver disease: Psychosocial aspects

    PubMed Central

    Telles-Correia, Diogo; Mega, Inês

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, 30% to 50% of liver transplantations are currently due to alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In the United States, this percentage is 17.2%. Post-transplant survival and other predictors of clinical course do not differ significantly from those in other types of transplanted patients, as long as there is no relapse of drinking. However, 20%-25% of these patients lapse or relapse to heavy drinking post-operatively, which has been associated with an increased risk of liver damage and mortality. It is therefore crucial to design specific selection and follow-up strategies aimed at this particular type of patient. Several good and poor prognosis factors that could help to predict a relapse have been suggested, among them the duration of abstinence, social support, a family history of alcoholism, abuse diagnosis versus alcohol dependence, non-acceptance of diagnosis related to alcohol use, presence of severe mental illness, non-adherence in a broad sense, number of years of alcoholism, and daily quantity of alcohol consumption. In this article, we discuss these and other, more controversial factors in selecting ALD patients for liver transplantation. Abstinence should be the main goal after transplantation in an ALD patient. In this article, we review the several definitions of post-transplant relapse, its monitoring and the psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment. PMID:26494959

  13. Recurrence of diabetic kidney disease in a type 1 diabetic patient after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nyumura, Izumi; Honda, Kazuho; Babazono, Tetsuya; Horita, Shigeru; Murakami, Toru; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2015-07-01

    Post-transplant hyperglycaemia of diabetic patients may cause recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts. We report a patient with slowly progressive DKD with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) toxicity after the kidney transplantation. A 28-year-old female with type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent successful kidney transplantation from her mother in April 2003, and the kidney graft survived for more than 10 years. She was treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy consisting of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. After transplantation, she continued to take insulin injection four times per day, but her glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was above 10%. Protocol allograft kidney biopsies performed 5 and 10 years after transplantation revealed the recurrence of slowly progressive diabetic kidney disease. In addition, arteriolar hyalinosis partly associated with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) was detected with progression. Post-transplant hyperglycaemia causes recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts, but its progression is usually slow. For long-term management, it is important to prevent the progression of the calcineurin inhibitor arteriolopathy, as well as maintain favourable glycaemic control.

  14. Hydrogen, a potential safeguard for graft-versus-host disease and graft ischemia-reperfusion injury?

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lijuan; Shen, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant complications such as graft-versus-host disease and graft ischemia-reperfusion injury are crucial challenges in transplantation. Hydrogen can act as a potential antioxidant, playing a preventive role against post-transplant complications in animal models of multiple organ transplantation. Herein, the authors review the current literature regarding the effects of hydrogen on graft ischemia-reperfusion injury and graft-versus-host disease. Existing data on the effects of hydrogen on ischemia-reperfusion injury related to organ transplantation are specifically reviewed and coupled with further suggestions for future work. The reviewed studies showed that hydrogen (inhaled or dissolved in saline) improved the outcomes of organ transplantation by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation at both the transplanted organ and the systemic levels. In conclusion, a substantial body of experimental evidence suggests that hydrogen can significantly alleviate transplantation-related ischemia-reperfusion injury and have a therapeutic effect on graft-versus-host disease, mainly via inhibition of inflammatory cytokine secretion and reduction of oxidative stress through several underlying mechanisms. Further animal experiments and preliminary human clinical trials will lay the foundation for hydrogen use as a drug in the clinic. PMID:27652837

  15. Hepatitis C virus upregulates B-cell receptor signaling: a novel mechanism for HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dai, B; Chen, A Y; Corkum, C P; Peroutka, R J; Landon, A; Houng, S; Muniandy, P A; Zhang, Y; Lehrmann, E; Mazan-Mamczarz, K; Steinhardt, J; Shlyak, M; Chen, Q C; Becker, K G; Livak, F; Michalak, T I; Talwani, R; Gartenhaus, R B

    2016-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for the development of B cells and has a critical role in B-cell neoplasia. Increasing evidence indicates an association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell lymphoma, however, the mechanisms by which HCV causes B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder are still unclear. Herein, we demonstrate the expression of HCV viral proteins in B cells of HCV-infected patients and show that HCV upregulates BCR signaling in human primary B cells. HCV nonstructural protein NS3/4A interacts with CHK2 and downregulates its activity, modulating HuR posttranscriptional regulation of a network of target mRNAs associated with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Interestingly, the BCR signaling pathway was found to have the largest number of transcripts with increased association with HuR and was upregulated by NS3/4A. Our study reveals a previously unidentified role of NS3/4A in regulation of host BCR signaling during HCV infection, contributing to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26434584

  16. The histologic classification of 602 cases of feline lymphoproliferative disease using the National Cancer Institute working formulation.

    PubMed

    Valli, V E; Jacobs, R M; Norris, A; Couto, C G; Morrison, W B; McCaw, D; Cotter, S; Ogilvie, G; Moore, A

    2000-07-01

    Case information and histologic slides for 688 admissions of feline tissues from 12 veterinary institutions were assembled and reviewed to determine tissues obtained by biopsy or necropsy, age and sex of cat, tumor topography, feline leukemia viral antigen status, histologic frequency of mitoses, diagnosis, presence of necrosis, and presence and degree of sclerosis. Histologic sections were examined to place the lesions in one of the diagnostic categories of the National Cancer Institute working formulation (NCI WF) for lymphomas or lymphoid leukemia. Correlations between the various factors determined were tested using contingency tables and chi-square analysis to provide a statistical comparison between the levels of observations determined by case examination with the numbers expected from chance alone. Significant correlations (P < or = 0.05) were found between diagnosis and tumor topography, the frequency of mitoses, necrosis, sclerosis, and age, between mitoses and necrosis, topography, age, and feline leukemia viral infection status, between topography and necrosis and age, and between leukemia viral status and age. Significant correlations between diagnosis and tumor topography included a greater than expected number of cases of acute and chronic lymphoid leukemia and multicentric distribution of tumor. Small cell lymphomas were more frequent than expected in enteric and cutaneous areas and less frequent than expected in mediastinal, renal, and multicentric areas. In contrast, the high-grade small noncleaved type of lymphomas was found significantly more frequently than expected in the mediastinum and less frequently than expected in enteric tissues. In comparing diagnosis and frequency of mitoses, the lymphomas classified as low grade by the NCI WF were significantly more frequent than expected in the lower categories (0-2/100x) of mitoses, and those classified as high-grade lymphomas were more frequent than expected in the higher categories (4-8/1OOx) of mitoses. In comparing diagnosis and sclerosis, diffuse sclerosis was more frequent than expected for the intermediate grade lymphomas of mixed cell type and for the high-grade lymphomas of the immunoblastic polymorphous type. In comparing diagnosis and locally extensive necrosis, this feature was more frequently observed than expected for cases of intermediate grade lymphoma of the small-cleaved cell category and for the high-grade lymphoma of the immunoblastic cell type. In comparing mitoses and necrosis, the lower grade lymphomas were, in general, characterized by a lower frequency of mitoses and a lower incidence of necrosis then would be expected from chance alone. In contrast, the higher grade lymphomas were characterized by more frequent mitoses and a higher incidence of necrosis. In tests comparing mitoses and tumor topography, lymphomas of the alimentary tract were more frequently observed than expected in the category with the lowest level of mitoses (0-1/100x), whereas lymphomas of the mediastinum and kidney were more frequently observed than expected in the categories with a higher level (4-20/ 100x) of mitoses.

  17. Experimental models of lymphoproliferative disease. The mouse as a model for human non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and related leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Pattengale, P. K.; Taylor, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The present review focuses on the mouse as an experimental immunopathologic model for human non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and related leukemias. Immunomorphologic evidence is presented that clearly demonstrates that B- and T-cell subtypes of mouse (murine) lymphoma/leukemia closely resemble and are analogous to B- and T-cell subtypes of human lymphoma/leukemia as defined by recently proposed immunomorphologic classifications. Further evidence is presented that favors the hypothesis that certain types of murine and human B-cell lymphoma develop out of prodromal, prelymphomatous states, which exhibit antecedent morphologic and immunologic abnormalities. The many experimental advantages of the murine systems are stressed, as well as the concept that the presently defined immunomorphologic approach should be effectively combined with molecular and cytogenetic parameters. Images Table 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Table 9 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6605691

  18. Methotrexate-Related Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disorder—So-Called “Hodgkin-Like Lesion”—of the Oral Cavity in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yuji; Tanaka, Akio; Shigematu, Hisao; Kojima, Masaru; Sakashita, Hideaki; Kusama, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    Patients affected by autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, dermatomyositis) who are treated with methotrexate (MTX) sometimes develop lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). In approximately 40% of reported cases, the affected sites have been extranodal, and have included the gastrointestinal tract, skin, lung, kidney, and soft tissues. However, MTX-associated LPD (MTX-LPD) is extremely rare in the oral cavity. Here we report a 69-year-old Japanese woman with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who developed MTX-LPD resembling Hodgkin’s disease—so-called “Hodgkin-like lesion”—in the left upper jaw. Histopathologically, large atypical lymphoid cells including Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells were found to have infiltrated into granulation tissue in the ulcerative oral mucosa. Immunohistochemistry showed that the large atypical cells were positive for CD20, CD30 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-latent infection membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) and negative for CD15. EBV was detected by in situ hybridization (ISH) with EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for LMP-1 and EBNA-2 in material taken from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimen. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MTX-related EBV-associated LPD (MTX-EBVLPD), “Hodgkin-like lesion”, of the oral cavity in a patient with RA. PMID:20676828

  19. Cytogenetics in the management of lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders in adults and children: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH).

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Christine; Callet-Bauchu, Evelyne; Chapiro, Elise; Nadal, Nathalie; Penther, Dominique; Poirel, Hélène-Antoine

    2016-10-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders include a high number of heterogeneous entities, described in the 2008 WHO classification. This classification reflects the crucial role of a multidisciplinary approach which integrates cytogenetic results both for the notion of clonality and for differential diagnosis between these entities. The prognostic impact of some cytogenetic abnormalities or genome complexity is also confirmed for many of these entities. Novel provisional entities have been described, such as BCLU (B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma) for which karyotype is critical to distinguish BCLU from Burkitt's lymphoma. The karyotype can be established from any tumour or liquid infiltrated by lymphoma cells. Recent adaptations of technics for cellular cultures according to the subtype of known (or suspected) lymphoma have significantly improved the percentage of informative karyotypes. Conventional karyotypes remain the best technical approach recommended for most of these subtypes. Interphase and/or metaphase FISH also represents a solid and rapid approach, because of the significant number of recurrent (sometimes specific) rearrangements of these entities. Next generation sequencing technologies contribute to enrich genomic data and substantially improve the understanding of oncogenic mechanisms underlying these lymphoid malignancies. Some molecular biomarkers are already part of the diagnostic process (for example, somatic mutation of MYD88 in Waldenström disease) thus reinforcing the essential principle of a multidisciplinary approach for the diagnosis of all the mature lymphoid malignancies.

  20. B7-H1 (PD-L1, CD274) suppresses host immunity in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Ryan A; Feldman, Andrew L; Wada, David A; Yang, Zhi-Zhang; Comfere, Nneka I; Dong, Haidong; Kwon, Eugene D; Novak, Anne J; Markovic, Svetomir N; Pittelkow, Mark R; Witzig, Thomas E; Ansell, Stephen M

    2009-09-03

    Stromal elements present within the tumor microenvironment may suppress host immunity and promote the growth of malignant lymphocytes in B cell-derived non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In contrast, little is known about the microenvironment's role in T cell-derived NHL. B7-H1 (PD-L1, CD274), a member of the B7 family of costimulatory/co-inhibitory ligands expressed by both malignant cells and stromal cells within the tumor microenvironment, has emerged as an important immune modulator capable of suppressing host immunity. Therefore, B7-H1 expression and function were analyzed in cutaneous and peripheral T-cell NHL. B7-H1 was expressed by tumor cells, monocytes, and monocyte-derived cells within the tumor microenvironment in T-cell NHL and was found to inhibit T-cell proliferation and promote the induction of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Collectively, the data presented provide the first evidence implicating B7-H1 in the suppression of host immunity in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and suggest that the targeting of B7-H1 may represent a novel therapeutic approach.

  1. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C.; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W.; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56low NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56low NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94hi/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality. PMID:26556869

  2. Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disorders following bone marrow transplantation: an immunologic and genotypic analysis.

    PubMed

    Davey, D D; Kamat, D; Laszewski, M; Goeken, J A; Kemp, J D; Trigg, M E; Purtilo, D T; Davis, J; Dick, F R

    1989-01-01

    Four patients from 1.5 to 18 yr of age who had received partially matched T-cell-depleted bone marrow transplants for acute leukemia succumbed to a widespread lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) at 56 to 147 days after transplant. Premortem diagnosis of LPD was suggested in two because plasmacytoid cells were observed in the blood and bone marrow, and in the cerebrospinal fluid of one of these patients. Serum clonal immunoglobulins (Igs) were also demonstrated in these two patients premortem, while the other two had clonal Igs in serum obtained at autopsy. Autopsies revealed a plasmacytoid infiltrate or immunoblastic lymphoma involving lymph nodes, spleen, liver, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and kidneys. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement studies performed in three revealed B-cell clonality. Both immunohistochemical and DNA gene rearrangement studies were useful in differentiating the LPD from the pretransplant leukemia. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome was found in the tissues of the three patients studied. The diagnosis of EBV-induced LPD must be considered in bone marrow transplant patients who deteriorate and who exhibit serum clonal Igs or prominent plasmacytoid cells in laboratory specimens.

  3. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

    PubMed

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2015-12-15

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56(low) NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56(low) NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94(hi)/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

  4. Age-related Epstein-Barr Virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorders of the orbit and maxillary sinus : a case report.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takeki; Mawatari, Momoko; Koiso, Hiromi; Yokohama, Akihiko; Uchiumi, Hideki; Saitoh, Takayuki; Handa, Hiroshi; Hirato, Junko; Karasawa, Masamitsu; Murakami, Hirokazu; Kojima, Masaru; Nakamura, Shigeo; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Tsukamoto, Norifumi

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare case of age-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (aEBVBLPD) primarily involving the orbit and maxillary sinus. Lesions in the left orbit and maxillary sinus were observed in a 59-year-old man presenting with pain in the left orbit and maxilla. Owing to the presence of Reed-Sternberg-like cells, the initial diagnosis was nodular sclerosis-type Hodgkin's lymphoma. Clinical stage was IIAE, and response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy was favorable. Further immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization analyses of the Reed-Sternberg-like giant cells revealed CD30, CD15, CD20, Bob-1, Oct-2, EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) and latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) expression. The characteristics of the present case, which included immunohistochemical findings, sites of primary lesions, absence of other lymph node lesions and relatively old age, suggested aEBVBLPD. Owing to the similarity in morphology, higher frequency at extranodal sites and poor prognosis, aEBVBLPD represents a differential diagnostic issue from classical Hodgkin's lymphoma when Reed-Sternberg cells are positive for EBV.

  5. Gene expression profiling reveals clear differences between EBV-positive and EBV-negative posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Morscio, J; Dierickx, D; Ferreiro, J F; Herreman, A; Van Loo, P; Bittoun, E; Verhoef, G; Matthys, P; Cools, J; Wlodarska, I; De Wolf-Peeters, C; Sagaert, X; Tousseyn, T

    2013-05-01

    Posttransplant patients are at risk of developing a potentially life-threatening posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), most often of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) morphology and associated with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinicopathological and molecular-genetic characteristics of posttransplant DLBCL and to elucidate whether EBV(+) and EBV(-) posttransplant DLBCL are biologically different. We performed gene expression profiling studies on 48 DLBCL of which 33 arose posttransplantation (PT-DLBCL; 72% EBV+) and 15 in immunocompetent hosts (IC-DLBCL; none EBV+). Unsupervised hierarchical analysis showed clustering of samples related to EBV-status rather than immune status. Except for decreased T cell signaling these cases were inseparable from EBV(-) IC-DLBCL. In contrast, a viral response signature clearly segregated EBV(+) PT-DLBCL from EBV(-) PT-DLBCL and IC-DLBCL cases that were intermixed. The broad EBV latency profile (LMP1+/EBNA2+) was expressed in 59% of EBV(+) PT-DLBCL and associated with a more elaborate inflammatory response compared to intermediate latency (LMP1+/EBNA2-). Inference analysis revealed a role for innate and tolerogenic immune responses (including VSIG4 and IDO1) in EBV(+) PT-DLBCL. In conclusion we can state that the EBV signature is the most determining factor in the pathogenesis of EBV(+) PT-DLBCL.

  6. BCA-1, A B-cell chemoattractant signal, is constantly expressed in cutaneous lymphoproliferative B-cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Mori, M; Manuelli, C; Pimpinelli, N; Bianchi, B; Orlando, C; Mavilia, C; Cappugi, P; Maggi, E; Giannotti, B; Santucci, M

    2003-07-01

    We analysed the immunophenotypic and molecular expression of BCA-1 (B-cell-specific chemokine) and CXCR5 (BCA-1 receptor) in normal skin and different cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL); cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL); cutaneous B-cell pseudolymphoma (PCBCL)), with the aim of investigating their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of cutaneous B-cell disorders. BCA-1 and CXCR5 were constantly expressed in CBCL and PCBCL, but not in normal skin and CTCL. BCA-1 and CXCR5 were constantly coexpressed by CD22+ B-cells, while CD35+ follicular dendritic cells coexpressed BCA-1 in PCBCL cells only. In low grade CBCL, as compared with high grade CBCL, the intensity of CXCR5 expression on neoplastic CD22+ cells was lower than that of BCA-1. The image analysis of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) products showed a significant quantitative difference between PCBCL/low grade CBCL and high grade CBCL. The above findings, although only observed in a small series of patients, are in keeping with findings in MALT gastric and gastric MALT lymphomas, adding further evidence of the close similarities between CBCL and MALT lymphomas.

  7. Complete absence of KSHV/HHV-8 in posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders: an immunohistochemical and molecular study of 52 cases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Huang, Qin; Zuppan, Craig W; Rowsell, Edward H; Cao, Jeffrey D; Weiss, Lawrence M; Wang, Jun

    2009-05-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs), a heterogeneous group of monoclonal or polyclonal lesions, occur in immunosuppressed patients after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. Although most PTLDs are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)+ and seem to represent EBV-induced proliferations of monoclonal (or less often polyclonal) B, T, or plasma cells, a subset of PTLDs is EBV-. Because Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 (KSHV/HHV-8) has been described in association with the development of hematolymphoid and nonhematolymphoid neoplasms in HIV+ patients, we investigated whether there is an association between KSHV/HHV-8 and PTLDs. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 52 confirmed PTLD cases were analyzed immunohistochemically for expression of KSHV/HHV-8 latent nuclear antigen (LNA)-1 protein and by polymerase chain reaction-hybridization analysis for the KSHV/HHV-8 genome. The PTLD subtypes included 12 with early lesions (1 plasmacytic hyperplasia and 11 infectious mononucleosis-like), 10 polymorphic, 23 monomorphic (5 Burkitt, 14 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 1 plasmacytoma, 1 multiple myeloma, and 2 T-cell), 1 Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), 5 HL-like lesions, and 1 unclassified or other. None of the 51 tested specimens showed expression of KSHV/HHV-8 LNA-1. Furthermore, all 46 specimens tested demonstrated complete absence of the KSHV/HHV-8 genome. Our data clearly indicated that KSHV/HHV-8 is not associated with PTLDs.

  8. EBV-associated B- and T-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders following primary EBV infection in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Yin, C Cameron; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Abruzzo, Lynne V; Jones, Dan; Farhood, Anwar I; Thomazy, Vilmos A

    2005-02-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) usually are of B-cell lineage and associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). PTLDs of T-cell lineage are much less common and infrequently associated with EBV. We report a rare case of a girl in whom B-cell and T-cell PTLDs developed following 2 EBV-negative kidney transplants. Within 2 years of the second transplantation, the originally EBV-negative patient developed both an EBV-associated clonal B-cell PTLD involving lymph nodes and an EBV-positive T-cell PTLD involving bone marrow and liver. These proliferations occurred concurrently with evidence of primary EBV infection and high plasma viral load. The patient eventually died of multiorgan failure 5 years after the initial transplant (3 years after the second transplant). To our knowledge, only 4 cases of both B-cell and T-cell PTLDs have been reported. Only 2 cases have been proven to be monoclonal and EBV-associated, as in this case, the first following kidney transplantation.

  9. Impact of Pulmonary Vascular Resistances in Heart Transplantation for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, Avihu Z; Canter, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is one of the major diagnoses in pediatric heart transplantation recipients of all age groups. Assessment of pulmonary vascular resistance in these patients prior to transplantation is crucial to determine their candidacy, however, it is frequently inaccurate because of their abnormal anatomy and physiology. This problem places them at significant risk for pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure post transplantation. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease depends on their pulmonary blood flow patterns, systemic ventricle function, as well as semilunar valves and atrioventricular valves structure and function. In our review we analyze the pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease and end-stage heart failure, and outline the state of the art pre-transplantation medical and surgical management to achieve reverse remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature by using pulmonary vasodilators and mechanical circulatory support. PMID:22548028

  10. Recurrent atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome post kidney transplant due to a CD46 mutation in the setting of SMARCAL1-mediated inherited kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chan, Samuel; Mallett, Andrew J; Patel, Chirag; Francis, Ross S; Johnson, David W; Mudge, David W; Isbel, Nicole M

    2017-02-01

    Disorders in the regulation of the alternate complement pathway often result in complement-mediated damage to the microvascular endothelium and can be associated with both glomerulonephritis and atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Inherited defects in complement regulatory genes or autoantibodies against complement regulatory proteins are predictive of the severity of the disease and the risk of recurrence post kidney transplantation. Heterozygous mutations in CD46, which codes for a transmembrane cofactor glycoprotein membrane cofactor protein, usually have a lower incidence of end-stage kidney disease and decreased risk of recurrent disease post transplant, as wild-type membrane cofactor protein is present in the transplanted kidney. However, some patients with CD46 mutations have a second variant in other complement regulatory genes increasing the severity of disease. The following case report illustrates the course of a young adult patient with end-stage kidney disease initially ascribed to seronegative systemic lupus erythematosus, who presented with biopsy-proven thrombotic microangiopathy following kidney transplantation. It highlights the complexity associated with disorders of complement regulation and the need for a high index of suspicion and genetic testing in patients who present with thrombotic microangiopathy post-transplant.

  11. Keep in Mind Quality of Life: Outcome of a Ten-Year Series of Post-Transplantation Early Relapses in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia-A Report from the Grand Ouest Oncology Study Group for Children in France.

    PubMed

    Haro, Sophie; Tavenard, Aude; Rialland, Fanny; Taque, Sophie; Guillerm, Gaelle; Blouin, Pascale; Esvan, Maxime; Pellier, Isabelle; Gandemer, Virginie

    2016-05-01

    Relapses of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) early after hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in children are uncommon but associated with a very poor prognosis. Whereas there are no current recommendations for the management of these relapses, the children's quality of life is an important issue. We studied the outcomes, including 1-year overall survival, complete remission, and quality of life, of 19 children with ALL who relapsed within the first year after their transplantation treated in the 5 participating centers between 2000 and 2011 Patients were distributed as follows: supportive care only (group A), outpatient treatment (mainly steroid and vincristine, group B), or intensive inpatient treatment (group C). There were no significant differences in 1-year overall survival (31.5% for the entire cohort) or remission rate for time between transplantation and relapse (< 6 months or 6 to 12 months), transplantation or disease characteristics, or treatment group. However, time spent in hospital (for treatment and complications) significantly differed between treatment groups B and C (20.8% ± 13.0 versus 59.1% ± 32.9, respectively; P < .05). No differences in organ toxicities, school attendance, or Lansky scores were found between treatment groups. Our sample size-limited data indicate, in a prepersonalized medicine era, that children treated with steroid and vincristine have the same prognosis as those treated with intensive therapy, but they may benefit from improved quality of life. Nevertheless, new therapeutic strategies are required and future prospective trials would help to establish recommendations.

  12. Ex vivo rapamycin generates Th1/Tc1 or Th2/Tc2 Effector T cells with enhanced in vivo function and differential sensitivity to post-transplant rapamycin therapy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Unsu; Foley, Jason E; Erdmann, Andreas A; Toda, Yoko; Borenstein, Todd; Mariotti, Jacopo; Fowler, Daniel H

    2006-09-01

    Rapamycin prevention of murine graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is associated with a shift toward Th2- and Tc2-type cytokines. Recently, we found that use of rapamycin during ex vivo donor Th2 cell generation enhances the ability of adoptively transferred Th2 cells to prevent murine GVHD. In this study, using a method, without antigen-presenting cells, of T-cell expansion based on CD3,CD28 costimulation, we evaluated whether (1) rapamycin preferentially promotes the generation of Th2/Tc2 cells relative to Th1/Tc1 cells, (2) rapamycin-generated T-cell subsets induce cytokine skewing after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), and (3) such in vivo cytokine skewing is sensitive to post-BMT rapamycin therapy. Contrary to our hypothesis, rapamycin did not preferentially promote Th2/Tc2 cell polarity, because rapamycin-generated Th1/Tc1 cells secreted type I cytokines (interleukin [IL]-2 and interferon-gamma) did not secrete type II cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, or IL-13) and mediated fasL-based cytolysis. Rapamycin influenced T-cell differentiation, because each of the Th1, Th2, Tc1, and Tc2 subsets generated in rapamycin had increased expression of the central-memory T-cell marker, L-selectin (CD62L). Rapamycin-generated Th1/Tc1 and Th2/Tc2 cells were not anergic but instead had increased expansion after costimulation in vitro, increased expansion in vivo after BMT, and maintained full capacity to skew toward type I or II cytokines after BMT, respectively; further, rapamycin-generated Th1/Tc1 cells mediated increased lethal GVHD relative to control Th1/Tc1 cells. Rapamycin therapy after BMT in recipients of rapamycin-generated Th1/Tc1 cells greatly reduced Th1/Tc1 cell number, greatly reduced type I cytokines, and reduced lethal GVHD; in marked contrast, rapamycin therapy in recipients of rapamycin-generated Th2/Tc2 cells nominally influenced the number of Th2/Tc2 cells in vivo and did not abrogate post-BMT type II cytokine skewing. In conclusion, ex vivo and

  13. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder of the Thorax: CT and FDG-PET Features in a Single Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ga Young; Kim, Mi Young; Huh, Joo Rryung; Jo, Kyung-Wook; Shim, Tae Sun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the chest computed tomography (CT) and F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomographic (FDG-PET) findings of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in the thorax. From November 2004 to February 2013, the cases of 12 adult patients (3 female and 9 male, age range 34–68, and median age 46 years) with proven PTLD were retrospectively reviewed. The transplanted organs included the kidney (5/12), liver (4/12), heart (1/12), combined kidney and pancreas (1/12), and hematopoietic stem cell (1/12). We investigated the relationship of the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) to the patients’ long-term follow-up, and evaluated the characteristics of the lesions on the chest CT and FDG-PET. The lesions were classified into 2 patterns: that of lymph node and lung involvement. The interval between the transplantation and the onset of PTLD was 2 to 128 months (median, 49). Positive EBV-encoded RNA in the pathologic specimens was found in 10 patients (83.3%). Eight patients were positive for EBV PCR in their blood, and 3 patients showed seroconversion without antiviral therapy. The responses to treatment were complete in 7 cases (58.3%), partial remission in 4 cases (33.3%), and undetermined in 1 case (8.3%). The more common chest CT patterns showed lymph node involvement (10/12) rather than lung involvement (3/12). The median maximum-standardized uptake value on the FDG-PET scans was 7.7 (range, 2.7–25.5). In patients with PTLD involving the thorax, lymphadenopathy was the more common manifestation on the chest CT rather than lung involvement. The lesions showed hypermetabolism on FDG-PET. PMID:26252295

  14. Expression of SHP-1 phosphatase indicates post-germinal center cell derivation of B-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Paessler, Michele; Kossev, Plamen; Tsai, Donald; Raghunath, Puthiaveetil; Majewski, Miroslaw; Zhang, Qian; Ramalingam, Preetha; Schuster, Stephen; Tomaszewski, John; Arber, Daniel A; Hsi, Eric; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2002-11-01

    SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase acts as a negative regulator of signaling by receptors for growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines and by receptors involved in immune response. Our recent study showed that SHP-1 is tightly regulated at various stages of B-cell differentiation and is expressed in the mantle and marginal zones, interfollicular B cells, and plasma cells, whereas it is nondetectable in germinal center cells. In this study we evaluated expression of SHP-1 in vitro and in vivo in nine cell lines representing three different types of EBV+ B-cell populations closely resembling or derived from posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). Furthermore, we examined tissue samples from 58 patients with B-cell PTLDs, both EBV+ (85% of the cases analyzed) and EBV- (15%). SHP-1 protein was strongly expressed in all cell lines and PTLD cases. In addition, the PTLD cases were essentially negative for germinal center B-cell markers: none expressed CD10 and only one expressed BCL-6. More than 40% expressed a late post-germinal B-cell marker, CD138. The universal expression of SHP-1, lack of expression of CD10 and BCL-6, and frequent expression of CD138 suggest that PTLDs are derived from post-germinal center B cells regardless of the EBV cell infection status. Based on the immunophenotype, B-cell PTLDs could be divided into two broad categories corresponding to the early (CD10-/BCL-6-/SHP-1+/CD138-) and late (CD10-/BCL-6-/SHP-1+/CD138+) post-germinal center cells. By being expressed earlier, SHP-1 is a more sensitive marker of post-germinal center B cells than CD138, which is seen on the terminally differentiated immunoblasts and plasma cells.

  15. Three Rwandan Children With Massive Splenomegaly and Epstein-Barr Virus-associated Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Case Presentations and the Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Friedman-Klabanoff, DeAnna; Ball, Allison; Rutare, Samuel; McCall, Natalie; Blackall, Douglas P

    2016-07-01

    This report describes 3 Rwandan children with massive splenomegaly and pancytopenia who underwent splenectomy. Each was diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV LPD) based on lymphocyte morphology, lymphocyte immunophenotype, and the results of EBV in situ hybridization studies. The differential diagnosis of splenomegaly, with a special emphasis on the sub-Saharan African context, is discussed along with EBV and associated disorders. These cases serve as a call to consider EBV LPD in the differential diagnosis of splenomegaly in children in whom common causes have been ruled out.

  16. The management of perioperative nutrition in patients with end stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is found in almost 100% of patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) awaiting transplantation and malnutrition before transplantation leads to higher rates of post-transplant complications and worse graft survival outcomes. Reasons for protein energy malnutrition include several metabolic alterations such as inadequate intake, malabsorption, and overloaded expenditure. And also, stress from surgery, gastrointestinal reperfusion injury, immunosuppressive therapy and corticosteriods use lead to delayed bowl function recovery and disorder of nutrients absorption. In the pretransplant phase, nutritional goals include optimization of nutritional status and treatment of nutrition-related symptoms induced by hepatic decompensation. During the acute post-transplant phase, adequate nutrition is required to help support metabolic demands, replenish lost stores, prevent infection, arrive at a new immunologic balance, and promote overall recovery. In a word, it is extremely important to identify and correct nutritional deficiencies in this population and provide an adequate nutritional support during all phases of liver transplantation (LT). This study review focuses on prevalence, nutrition support, evaluation, and management of perioperative nutrition disorder in patients with ESLD undergoing LT. PMID:26605281

  17. The management of perioperative nutrition in patients with end stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Kun; Wang, Meng-Long

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition is found in almost 100% of patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) awaiting transplantation and malnutrition before transplantation leads to higher rates of post-transplant complications and worse graft survival outcomes. Reasons for protein energy malnutrition include several metabolic alterations such as inadequate intake, malabsorption, and overloaded expenditure. And also, stress from surgery, gastrointestinal reperfusion injury, immunosuppressive therapy and corticosteriods use lead to delayed bowl function recovery and disorder of nutrients absorption. In the pretransplant phase, nutritional goals include optimization of nutritional status and treatment of nutrition-related symptoms induced by hepatic decompensation. During the acute post-transplant phase, adequate nutrition is required to help support metabolic demands, replenish lost stores, prevent infection, arrive at a new immunologic balance, and promote overall recovery. In a word, it is extremely important to identify and correct nutritional deficiencies in this population and provide an adequate nutritional support during all phases of liver transplantation (LT). This study review focuses on prevalence, nutrition support, evaluation, and management of perioperative nutrition disorder in patients with ESLD undergoing LT.

  18. [Disorders of carbohydrate metabolism, dyslipidemia, and bone metabolic disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Wędrychowicz, Anna; Starzykk, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Among long-term survivors after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) late endocrine complications are observed in 20-50%. Very often these complications influence significantly the patient´s life and have to be treated till the end of life. Their proper prevention and monitoring are extremely important in patients who underwent HSCT during childhood. Since the 90s of the last millennium/century, thyroid dysfunction, disorders of somatic and sexual development, and disturbances of fertility have been presented in several publications. In the paper, less known endocrine complications after HSCT published in the last years are discussed. Disorders of carbohydrate metabolism, post-transplant diabetes and insulin resistance are presented. Moreover, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and post-transplant bone metabolic disease are demonstrated/shown. The paper describes the etiopathogenesis, methods of prevention as well as treatment and the results of the treatment of these endocrine complications after HSCT. Moreover, actual recommendations for screening and prevention of endocrine complications in long-term HCT survivors are presented.

  19. Lack of evidence of HTLV-I/II infection in T CD8 malignant or reactive lymphoproliferative disorders in France: a serological and/or molecular study of 169 cases.

    PubMed

    Fouchard, N; Flageul, B; Bagot, M; Avril, M F; Hermine, O; Sigaux, F; Merle-Beral, H; Troussard, X; Delfraissy, J F; de Thé, G

    1995-12-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II), originally isolated in 1982 from a patient with a "T hairy cell leukemia", has not yet been proven to be the causative agent of any specific hematological disease. In order to screen for such an event, and because HTLV-II has a preferential tropism for OKT8 (CD8) T cells (both in vivo and in vitro), we searched for the presence of HTLV-II in lymphoproliferative diseases (LP) of CD8+ T cells. We report a serological and/or molecular study of 169 patients with a T CD8 LP, including 76 patients with malignant or reactive T CD8 LP (34 lymphomas, 27 large granular leukemias, three prolymphocytic leukemias, one hairy cell leukemia, 11 reactive T CD8 LP) and 93 HIV-1+ patients with a T CD8 peripheral lymphocytosis ( > 1500/mm3) from a prospective HIV cohort involving 1264 individuals. In the first series, the 40 sera available were all HTLV-I/II negative, except a 67-year-old French Guyanan man, with a cutaneous large T CD8 cell lymphoma, HTLV-I+. Furthermore, the molecular analysis of the 69 available DNA samples by PCR failed to detect any proviral HTLV-I/II sequences, except for the HTLV-I+ patient. The serological study of the 93 HIV-1+ individuals with CD8 lymphocytosis, showed that three patients were HTLV-I+, but none was HTLV-II+. Thus, in contrast to HTLV-I, whose etiological role in adult T cell leukemia is now well established, there is neither epidemiological nor molecular evidence that prototypic HTLV-II may be etiologically associated specifically with any of the CD8+ T cell LP investigated in this report.

  20. Proposed categorization of pathological states of EBV-associated T/natural killer-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) in children and young adults: overlap with chronic active EBV infection and infantile fulminant EBV T-LPD.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Koichi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Yoshino, Tadashi; Kim, Chul Woo; Ko, Young H; Lee, Seung-Suk; Peh, Suat-Cheng; Chan, John K C

    2008-04-01

    EBV-associated T/natural killer (NK)-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV-T/NK LPD) of children and young adults is generally referred to with the blanket nosological term of severe chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV). This disease is rare, associated with high morbidity and mortality, and appears to be more prevalent in East Asian countries. But because there is no grading or categorization system for CAEBV, pathologists and clinicians often disagree regarding diagnosis and therapy. EBV-T/NK LPD includes polyclonal, oligoclonal, and monoclonal proliferation of cytotoxic T and/or NK cells. Moreover, a unique disease previously described as infantile fulminant EBV-associated T-LPD has been identified and overlaps with EBV-T/NK LPD. In the present review a clinicopathological categorization of EBV-T/NK LPD is proposed, based on pathological evaluation and molecular data, as follows: (i) category A1, polymorphic LPD without clonal proliferation of EBV-infected cells; (ii) category A2, polymorphic LPD with clonality; (iii) category A3, monomorphic LPD (T-cell or NK cell lymphoma/leukemia) with clonality; and (iv) category B, monomorphic LPD (T-cell lymphoma) with clonality and fulminant course. Categories A1, A2, and A3 possibly constitute a continuous spectrum and together are equivalent to CAEBV. Category B is the exact equivalent of infantile fulminant EBV-associated T-LPD. It is expected that this categorization system will provide a guide for the better understanding of this disorder. This proposal was approved at the third meeting of the Asian Hematopathology Association (Nagoya, 2006).

  1. Genetic Diversity of the KIR/HLA System and Susceptibility to Hepatitis C Virus-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    De Re, Valli; Caggiari, Laura; De Zorzi, Mariangela; Repetto, Ombretta; Zignego, Anna Linda; Izzo, Francesco; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Buonaguro, Franco Maria; Mangia, Alessandra; Sansonno, Domenico; Racanelli, Vito; De Vita, Salvatore; Pioltelli, Pietro; Vaccher, Emanuela; Beretta, Massimiliano; Mazzaro, Cesare; Libra, Massimo; Gini, Andrea; Zucchetto, Antonella; Cannizzaro, Renato; De Paoli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background The variability in the association of host innate immune response to Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection requires ruling out the possible role of host KIR and HLA genotypes in HCV-related disorders: therefore, we therefore explored the relationships between KIR/HLA genotypes and chronic HCV infection (CHC) as they relate to the risk of HCV-related hepatocarcinoma (HCC) or lymphoproliferative disease progression. Methods and Findings We analyzed data from 396 HCV-positive patients with CHC (n = 125), HCC (118), and lymphoproliferative diseases (153), and 501 HCV-negative patients. All were HIV and HBV negative. KIR-SSO was used to determine the KIR typing. KIR2DL5 and KIR2DS4 variants were performed using PCR and GeneScan analysis. HLA/class-I genotyping was performed using PCR-sequence-based typing. The interaction between the KIR gene and ligand HLA molecules was investigated. Differences in frequencies were estimated using Fisher’s exact test, and Cochran-Armitage trend test. The non-random association of KIR alleles was estimated using the linkage disequilibrium test. We found an association of KIR2DS2/KIR2DL2 genes, with the HCV-related lymphoproliferative disorders. Furthermore, individuals with a HLA-Bw6 KIR3DL1+ combination of genes showed higher risk of developing lymphoma than cryoglobulinemia. KIR2DS3 gene was found to be the principal gene associated with chronic HCV infection, while a reduction of HLA-Bw4 + KIR3DS1+ was associated with an increased risk of developing HCC. Conclusions Our data highlight a role of the innate-system in developing HCV-related disorders and specifically KIR2DS3 and KIR2D genes demonstrated an ability to direct HCV disease progression, and mainly towards lymphoproliferative disorders. Moreover the determination of KIR3D/HLA combination of genes direct the HCV progression towards a lymphoma rather than an hepatic disease. In this contest IFN-α therapy, a standard therapy for HCV-infection and lymphoproliferative

  2. Current diagnosis and treatment of Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    González García, A; Moreno Cobo, M Á; Patier de la Peña, J L

    2016-04-01

    Castleman's disease is not just a single disease but rather an uncommon, heterogeneous group of nonclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, which have a broad spectrum of clinical expression. Three histological types have been reported, along with several clinical forms according to clinical presentation, histological substrate and associated diseases. Interleukin-6, its receptor polymorphisms, the human immunodeficiency virus and the human herpes virus 8 are involved in the etiopathogenesis of Castleman's disease. The study of this disease has shed light on a syndrome whose incidence is unknown. Despite recent significant advances in our understanding of this disease and the increasing therapeutic experience with rituximab, tocilizumab and siltuximab, there are still difficult questions concerning its aetiology, prognosis and optimal treatment.

  3. Real-world experience with daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir ± ribavirin for post-liver transplant HCV recurrence and severe liver disease.

    PubMed

    Herzer, Kerstin; Welzel, Tania M; Spengler, Ulrich; Hinrichsen, Holger; Klinker, Hartwig; Berg, Thomas; Ferenci, Peter; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Inderson, Akin; Zhao, Yue; Jimenez-Exposito, Maria Jesus; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Optimizing therapy of post-transplant HCV recurrence remains important, especially in advanced liver disease. We evaluated daclatasvir (DCV) plus sofosbuvir (SOF), with or without ribavirin (RBV), in patients with post-liver transplant recurrence in a real-world European cohort at high risk of decompensation or death within 12 months. Recommended treatment was DCV 60 mg plus SOF 400 mg once daily for 24 weeks; RBV use/shorter treatment duration was at physicians' discretion. Patients (N = 87) were 70% male, 93% white, and mostly infected with HCV genotypes 1b (48%), 1a (32%), or 3 (9%); 37 (43%) had cirrhosis (16 decompensated), five had fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis. Sustained virologic response at post-treatment week 12 (SVR12) was 94% (80/85) in a modified intention-to-treat analysis: 95% (58/61) without RBV and 92% (22/24) with RBV, with no virologic failures. SVR12 was 100% (80/80) in an as-observed analysis excluding five nonvirologic failures. Four patients (5%) discontinued therapy for adverse events (AEs); 16 (18%) experienced serious AEs. One patient died on treatment and five during follow-up. Most AEs were associated with advanced liver disease and unrelated to therapy. No clinically significant drug-drug interactions were observed. DCV + SOF ± RBV was well tolerated and achieved high SVR12 (94%) in patients with post-transplant HCV recurrence, including patients with severe liver disease.

  4. Haploidentical BMT With Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide and Bendamustine

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-14

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Lymphoma,Non-Hodgkin; Lymphoma, Hodgkin; Lymphoma, Follicular; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Large Cell Lymphoma; Mantle-Cell Lymphoma; Gray Zone Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma

  5. A novel homozygous Fas ligand mutation leads to early protein truncation, abrogation of death receptor and reverse signaling and a severe form of the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nabhani, Schafiq; Hönscheid, Andrea; Oommen, Prasad T; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Schaper, Jörg; Kuhlen, Michaela; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Borkhardt, Arndt; Fischer, Ute

    2014-12-01

    We report a novel type of mutation in the death ligand FasL that was associated with a severe phenotype of the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in two patients. A frameshift mutation in the intracellular domain led to complete loss of FasL expression. Cell death signaling via its receptor and reverse signaling via its intracellular domain were completely abrogated. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation induced by weak T cell receptor stimulation could be blocked and cell death was induced by engagement of FasL in T cells derived from healthy individuals and a heterozygous carrier, but not in FasL-deficient patient derived cells. Expression of genes implicated in lymphocyte proliferation and activation (CCND1, NFATc1, NF-κB1) was increased in FasL-deficient T cells and could not be downregulated by FasL engagement as in healthy cells. Our data thus suggest, that deficiency in FasL reverse signaling may contribute to the clinical lymphoproliferative phenotype of ALPS.

  6. A Fashi Lymphoproliferative Phenotype Reveals Non-Apoptotic Fas Signaling in HTLV-1-Associated Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Soraya Maria; Leal, Fabio E.; Dierckx, Tim; Khouri, Ricardo; Decanine, Daniele; Silva-Santos, Gilvaneia; Schnitman, Saul V.; Kruschewsky, Ramon; López, Giovanni; Alvarez, Carolina; Talledo, Michael; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Nixon, Douglas F.; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Brassat, David; Liblau, Roland; Vandamme, Anne Mieke; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Van Weyenbergh, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-1 was the first human retrovirus to be associated to cancer, namely adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), but its pathogenesis remains enigmatic, since only a minority of infected individuals develops either ATL or the neuroinflammatory disorder HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). A functional FAS -670 polymorphism in an interferon (IFN)-regulated STAT1-binding site has been associated to both ATL and HAM/TSP susceptibility. Fashi T stem cell memory (Tscm) cells have been identified as the hierarchical apex of ATL, but have not been investigated in HAM/TSP. In addition, both FAS and STAT1 have been identified in an IFN-inducible HAM/TSP gene signature, but its pathobiological significance remains unclear. We comprehensively explored Fas expression (protein/mRNA) and function in lymphocyte activation, apoptosis, proliferation, and transcriptome, in PBMC from a total of 47 HAM/TSP patients, 40 asymptomatic HTLV-1-infected individuals (AC), and 58 HTLV-1 -uninfected healthy controls. Fas surface expression followed a two-step increase from HC to AC and from AC to HAM/TSP. In HAM/TSP, Fas levels correlated positively to lymphocyte activation markers, but negatively to age of onset, linking Fashi cells to earlier, more aggressive disease. Surprisingly, increased lymphocyte Fas expression in HAM/TSP was linked to decreased apoptosis and increased lymphoproliferation upon in vitro culture, but not to proviral load. This Fashi phenotype is HAM/TSP-specific, since both ex vivo and in vitro Fas expression was increased as compared to multiple sclerosis (MS), another neuroinflammatory disorder. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying non-apoptotic Fas signaling in HAM/TSP, we combined transcriptome analysis with functional assays, i.e., blocking vs. triggering Fas receptor in vitro with antagonist and agonist-, anti-Fas mAb, respectively. Treatment with agonist anti-Fas mAb restored apoptosis, indicating

  7. 'Pseudolymphoma'. A case associated with primary immunodeficiency disease and polyglandular failure syndrome.

    PubMed

    Snover, D C; Filipovich, A H; Dehner, L P; Krivit, W

    1981-01-01

    An atypical lymphoproliferative process occurred in the liver and spleen of a child with combined immunodeficiency disease and polyglandular failure syndrome. The initial pathologic interpretation was that of malignant lymphoma, although the child's subsequent clinical course was complicated by rheumatoid arthritis, thyroiditis, and chronic active hepatitis, with no clear evidence of lymphoid neoplasia. This case illustrates that unusual lymphoid proliferations in patients with immunodeficiencies may simulate malignant lymphoma.

  8. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Alok R.; Peirce, Susan K.; Joshi, Shweta; Durden, Donald L.

    2014-09-10

    -3 kinase inhibitors reverse the lymphoproliferative phenotype in vivo. - Highlights: • First genetic evidence that PTEN controls LPS/TLR4 signaling in B lymphocytes. • Evidence that PTEN regulates LPS induced lymphoproliferation in vivo. • PI-3 kinase inhibitors block LPS induced lymphoproliferation in vivo.

  9. Combined immunodeficiency with life-threatening EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in patients lacking functional CD27.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Elisabeth; Daschkey, Svenja; Choo, Sharon; Gombert, Michael; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Ginzel, Sebastian; Schwendinger, Martina; Haas, Oskar A; Fritsch, Gerhard; Pickl, Winfried F; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Borkhardt, Arndt; Boztug, Kaan; Bienemann, Kirsten; Seidel, Markus G

    2013-03-01

    CD27, a tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, interacts with CD70 and influences T-, B- and NK-cell functions. Disturbance of this axis impairs immunity and memory generation against viruses including Epstein Barr virus (EBV), influenza, and others. CD27 is commonly used as marker of memory B cells for the classification of B-cell deficiencies including common variable immune deficiency. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping including expression analysis of CD27 on lymphoid cells was followed by capillary sequencing of CD27 in index patients, their parents, and non-affected siblings. More comprehensive genetic analysis employed single nucleotide polymorphism-based homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing. Analysis of exome sequencing data was performed at two centers using slightly different data analysis pipelines, each based on the Genome Analysis ToolKit Best Practice version 3 recommendations. A comprehensive clinical characterization was correlated to genotype. We report the simultaneous confirmation of human CD27 deficiency in 3 independent families (8 patients) due to a homozygous mutation (p. Cys53Tyr) revealed by whole exome sequencing, leading to disruption of an evolutionarily conserved cystein knot motif of the transmembrane receptor. Phenotypes varied from asymptomatic memory B-cell deficiency (n=3) to EBV-associated hemophagocytosis and lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD; n=3) and malignant lymphoma (n=2; +1 after LPD). Following EBV infection, hypogammaglobulinemia developed in at least 3 of the affected individuals, while specific anti-viral and anti-polysaccharide antibodies and EBV-specific T-cell responses were detectable. In severely affected patients, numbers of iNKT cells and NK-cell function were reduced. Two of 8 patients died, 2 others underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation successfully, and one received anti-CD20 (rituximab) therapy repeatedly. Since homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing did not reveal

  10. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Alok R; Peirce, Susan K; Joshi, Shweta; Durden, Donald L

    2014-09-10

    kinase inhibitors reverse the lymphoproliferative phenotype in vivo.

  11. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Relation to systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T M; Comacchi, C; Ghersetich, I

    1999-01-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis (CNV) is a complex multisystem disease generally involving the skin and mucous membranes, often accompanied by renal, gastrointestinal, pericardial, neurological, and articular signs and symptoms. CNV may be idiopatical or occur in association with a drug, infection, or underlying disease. CNV has been shown in patients with chronic infections (viral, bacterial, protozoa, helminthic), serum sickness, a variety of collagen vascular diseases (systemic lupus erythematous, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Behçet's disease) hyperglobulinemic states, cryoglobulinemia, bowel bypass syndrome, ulcerative colitis, cystic fibrosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and HIV infection. Association with malignancies is not frequent. Lymphoproliferative disorders (Hodgkin's disease, mycosis fungoides, lymphosarcoma, adult T-cell leukemia, multiple mieloma) and solid tumors (lung cancer, colon carcinoma, renal, prostate, head and neck cancer and breast cancer) may be associated with CNV. Whenever possible, treatment is directed at the elimination of the cause. In other cases after adequate laboratory screening local and systemic therapy are recommended.

  12. Localized Castleman's Disease in the Breast in a Young Woman

    PubMed Central

    Guio, José Ismael; López-Correa, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology. It typically occurs in adulthood but it may also develop in childhood. Clinically, this disease may be classified as localized (unicentric) or systemic (multicentric). Six cases of breast CD have been described in the literature, and all have been reported in adults. Herein we describe the case of a 15-year-old female who presented with a slow-growing tumor in the right breast. The tumor was excised and histopathological examination demonstrated hyaline vascular variant CD. After two years of follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic without evidence of cervical or axillary lymphadenopathy. PMID:27073709

  13. The role of danger signals and ectonucleotidases in acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Petya; Zeiser, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents the only curative treatment approach for many patients with benign or malignant diseases of the hematopoietic system. However, post-transplant morbidity and mortality are significantly increased by the development of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). While alloreactive T cells act as the main cellular mediator of the GvH reaction, recent evidence suggests a critical role of the innate immune system in the early stages of GvHD initiation. Danger-associated molecular patterns released from the intracellular space as well as from the extracellular matrix activate antigen-presenting cells and set pro-inflammatory pathways in motion. This review gives an overview about danger signals representing therapeutic targets with a clinical perspective with a particular focus on extracellular nucleotides and ectonucleotidases.

  14. [Autologous stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases: recommendations from the SFGM-TC].

    PubMed

    Farge, D; Terriou, L; Badoglio, M; Cras, A; Desreumaux, P; Hadj-Khelifa, S; Marjanovic, Z; Moisan, A; Dulery, R; Faucher, C; Hij, A; Martin, T; Vermersch, P; Yakoub-Agha, I

    2014-08-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a valid alternative to immunosuppressive treatment in patients with auto-immune disease; however, the role of this approach remains subject to debate. In the attempt to harmonize clinical practices between different French transplantation centers, the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapies (SFGM-TC) set up its fourth annual series of workshops which brought together practitioners from all of its member centers. These workshops took place in September 2013 in Lille. In this article we give an overview regarding the indications of autologous stem cell transplantation in auto-immune diseases as well as recommendations regarding post-transplant follow-up of patients.

  15. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)

    MedlinePlus

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  16. Albuminuria and posttransplant chronic kidney disease stage predict transplant outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ngan N; Tonelli, Marcello; Lentine, Krista L; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Ye, Feng; Wen, Kevin; Klarenbach, Scott

    2017-03-30

    In 2012, the KDIGO guidelines updated the classification system for chronic kidney disease to include albuminuria. Whether this classification system predicts adverse clinical outcomes among kidney transplant recipients is unclear. To evaluate this, we conducted a retrospective study using linked databases in Alberta, Canada to follow kidney transplant recipients from 2002-2011. We examined the association between an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of 60 or more, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and albuminuria (normal, mild, heavy) at one year post-transplant and subsequent mortality and graft loss. There were 900 recipients with a functioning graft and at least one outpatient serum creatinine and urine protein measurement at one year post-transplant. The median age was 51.2 years, 38.7% were female, and 52% had an eGFR of 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or more. The risk of all-cause mortality and death-censored graft loss was increased in recipients with reduced eGFR or heavier albuminuria. The adjusted incidence rate per 1000 person-years of all-cause mortality for recipients with an eGFR of 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and heavy albuminuria vs. an eGFR 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or more and normal protein excretion was 117 (95% confidence interval 38-371) vs. 15 (9-23) (rate ratio 8). Corresponding rates for death-censored graft loss were 273 (88-1203) vs. 6 (3-9) (rate ratio 49). Reduced eGFR and heavier albuminuria in kidney transplant recipients are associated with an increased risk of mortality and graft loss. Thus, eGFR and albuminuria may be used together to identify, evaluate, and manage transplant recipients who are at higher risk of adverse clinical outcomes.

  17. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stromal cells, a new resource in the suppression of acute graft-versus-host disease in haploidentical stem cell transplantation in sublethally irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Xing-Hua; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Lei; Kong, Pei-Yan; Peng, Xian-gui; Liang, Xue; Gao, Li; Gong, Yi; Wang, Qing-Yu

    2011-04-15

    Human umbilical cord blood-derived stromal cells (hUCBDSCs), a novel population isolated from CD34(+) cells by our laboratory, exerted an immunosuppressive effect on xenogenic T cells. This study aimed to investigate whether hUCBDSCs play a critical role in the suppression of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD). The hUCBDSCs were co-cultured with splenocytes (SPCs) of donor C57BL/6 mice. The aGVHD in the recipient (B6×BALB/c) F1 mice was induced by the infusion of bone marrow cells and SPCs from donor mice following sublethal irradiation. The shift in vivo for hUCBDSCs was detected. The proliferation and cell cycle of SPCs were tested by cell counting kit-8 and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of CD49b natural killer (NK) cells and CD3 T cells was detected by flow cytometry in co-culture and post-transplantation. IL-4, and IFN-γ were detected by ELISA in the serum of co-culture and post-transplantation. The survival time, body weight, clinical score, and histopathological score were recorded for mice post-transplantation. The hUCBDSCs promoted the proliferation of SPCs and significantly increased the ratio of the S and G(2)/M phase (p < 0.05). The hUCBDSCs significantly increased the expression of CD49b NK cells and IL-4 protein and decreased the expression of CD3 T cells and IFN-γ protein both in vitro and in vivo. The survival time of mice with co-transplantation of hUCBDSCs was significantly prolonged, and decreased clinical and histopathological scores were also observed. The hUCBDSCs were continually detected in the target organs of GVHD. These results suggest that hUCBDSCs possess the capability of suppressing aGVHD, possibly via their influence on CD3 T cells, NK cells, and cytokines.

  18. Differences in HTLV-I integration patterns between skin lesions and peripheral blood lymphocytes of HTLV-I seropositive patients with cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Hamada, T; Setoyama, M; Katahira, Y; Furuno, T; Fujiyoshi, T; Sonoda, S; Tashiro, M

    1992-09-01

    We examined HTLV-I integration patterns in nine cases of HTLV-I-seropositive patients with cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders. The Southern blot on EcoRI digests of DNA revealed a discrete band of HTLV-I provirus (monoclonal integration) in either skin lesions or peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Four cases showed the monoclonal integration of HTLV-I provirus only in skin lesions: one case showed only in PBL and two cases showed in both skin and PBL. The Southern blot on PstI digests of DNA revealed a 2.4 Kb band of the internal construct of HTLV-I provirus (polyclonal integration) in the PBL of EcoRI-negative samples. The difference in HTLV-I integration patterns between skin lesions and PBL in these cases suggests that the monoclonal outgrowth of HTLV-I-infected cells in the skin is causatively associated with the pathogenesis of cutaneous ATL.

  19. Somatic loss of heterozygosity, but not haploinsufficiency alone, leads to full-blown autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in 1 of 12 family members with FAS start codon mutation.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Fabian; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Vicca, Stephanie; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Roesen-Wolff, Angela; Roesler, Joachim; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2013-04-01

    We describe a family with 12 members carrying a heterozygous germline FAS c.3G>T start codon mutation leading to FAS haploinsufficiency. One patient had autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), one had recovered from ALPS, and ten mutation-positive relatives (MPRs) were healthy. FAS-mediated apoptosis and surface expression of FAS in single-positive T cells were lower for MPRs but did not discriminate between them and the ALPS patient. However, double-negative (DN) T cells of the ALPS patient had no FAS expression due to somatic loss of heterozygosity. Our results in this kindred suggest that FAS haploinsufficiency does not cause ALPS-FAS, but that modifying genetic events are crucial for its pathogenesis. FAS surface expression on DN T cells should be assessed routinely and FAS haploinsufficient patients should be followed as its potential for lymphomagenesis is not well defined and a second hit might occur later on.

  20. Oral cyclophosphamide was effective for Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia in CD16+CD56- chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK-cells.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Nishina, Sayaka; Kawakami, Toru; Sakai, Hitoshi; Senoo, Noriko; Senoo, Yasushi; Ito, Toshiro; Saito, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2016-12-27

    An 84-year-old woman was referred to our hospital presenting anemia. Her hemoglobin level was 5.8 g/dL, and white blood cell count was 9400/μL, consisting of 82% lymphocytes. Given the lymphocyte phenotype (CD2+, CD3-, CD16+, and CD56-) and negative whole blood EBV viral load, we made a diagnosis of chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells (CLPD-NK). We suspected hemolytic anemia because of the high levels of reticulocytes in the peripheral blood and the low haptoglobin value. Although the direct Coombs test was negative and there was no cold agglutination, we examined her red-blood-cell-bound IgG (RBC-IgG), which was elevated. She was diagnosed as having as Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report the effectiveness of oral cyclophosphamide for Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia in CLPD-NK.

  1. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart