Science.gov

Sample records for poster presentations chest

  1. Giving effective poster presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, J A

    1998-08-27

    Giving an effective poster presentation can be easy and rewarding with attention to a few proven concepts. Define your audience. Keep the words and graphics clear, concise, and eye-catching. Remember, you have three seconds to attract attention and 30 seconds to get your message across.

  2. Poster Plus Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Forty-five "poster session" papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982) are highlighted. These papers focused on computers in chemistry and chemical education (emphasizing programs) and on instructional innovations (including courses, teaching methods, testing, experiments, and others). (JN)

  3. The art of poster presentation.

    PubMed

    Maltby, H J; Serrell, M

    1998-04-01

    Need to attract attention with a captivating poster? This article provides helpful suggestions for the design and production of a poster. Layout, colour, balance, lettering and the use of pictures are considered. Details are also provided of the Research-poster Appraisal Tool (R-PAT) developed by Bushy (1991). The authors recommend that poster presenters use the tool to self-assess effectiveness prior to presentation. The tool can also be used by conference organisers for rating displayed posters.

  4. Creating an effective poster presentation.

    PubMed

    Taggart, H M; Arslanian, C

    2000-01-01

    One way to build knowledge in nursing is to share research findings or clinical program outcomes. The dissemination of these findings is often a difficult final step in a project that has taken months or years to complete. One method of sharing findings in a relaxed and informal setting is a poster presentation. This method is an effective form for presenting findings using an interactive approach. The milieu of a poster presentation enables the presenters to interact and dialogue with colleagues. Guidelines for size and format require that the poster is clear and informative. Application of design helps to create visually appealing posters. This article summarizes elements of designing and conducting a poster presentation.

  5. Rotating Poster Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagares, Manuel; Reisenleutner, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Oral presentations are a common practice in foreign language classes, often used to assess students' speaking skills. Usually, the presentations are delivered by students in front of the class, often with PowerPoint slides or Prezi as support. However, frequently the audience does not engage with the presentation and thus, the benefits of this…

  6. Poster Presentations: Conceptualizing, Constructing and Critiquing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbrey, Michael G.; Baltezore, Joan M.

    2006-01-01

    Posters are commonly used as tools for disseminating information at scientific meetings, but many students lack an understanding of "good" poster characteristics. We present a set of characteristics for use in constructing posters for scientific meetings and classroom presentations along with tips on critiquing posters to enhance their…

  7. Promoting professional development through poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Durkin, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Poster presentations are commonplace at regional and national nursing conferences, although the development of a poster remains an intimidating task for many staff nurses. The author describes the staff development department's role in implementing in-house poster presentation sessions. Nursing staff are provided support and assistance in presenting posters to their colleagues at yearly sessions. The result has been increased comfort and experience with poster creation, participation in professional development activities, and dissemination of nursing practice innovation.

  8. [How to prepare a poster presentation].

    PubMed

    Cerezal Pesquera, L

    2013-06-01

    Scientific and educational poster presentations in national and international meetings are one of the most effective means of scientific communication. Poster presentations are of particular importance in a mainly visual speciality like radiology, and also play a significant role in continuing medical education in our specialty. However, poster should be no more than an intermediate step on the way to publish our work in a scientific journal. The publication rates of posters prented in courses and conferences is very low in our country. Therefore, we must continue to progress in training in scientific publication, with efforts such as this supplement. This article review how to create an effective poster presentation.

  9. Poster presentations: valuing all forms of evidence.

    PubMed

    Halligan, Phil

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to assist readers who are considering submitting a poster presentation to a conference to appreciate their true worth and demonstrate the important contribution they can make to nursing scholarship and secondly, to provide new insights to conference reviewers who have the task of selecting appropriate contributions for conferences. The author will argue that the use of poster presentations is an ideal opportunity to disseminate research findings and clinical innovations. It offers a new, interesting, and thought-provoking perspective on poster presentations, which includes appraisal of extant literature and reflections about the significance of poster presentations to nursing scholarship. It highlights the benefits of submitting a poster presentation and concludes with some key points for conference reviewers to consider when deciding to select the suitability of abstracts for poster presentations or concurrent sessions.

  10. Ten steps to successful poster presentation.

    PubMed

    Hardicre, Jayne; Devitt, Patric; Coad, Jane

    Receiving a letter confirming acceptance for you to present a poster at a conference can evoke mixed emotions. Joy, panic, fear and dread are among the many possible emotions and this is not exclusive to first time presenters. Developing an effective poster presentation is a skill that you can learn and can provide a rewarding way to present your work in a manner less intimidating than oral presentation (Shelledy, 2004). The key to successful poster presentation is meticulous, timely, well informed preparation. This article outlines ten steps to help guide you through the process to maximize your success.

  11. Poster Presentation (Claudia Hahn, Qianxiang Zhou)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Masamichi

    Presentation of two Posters: Introducing the potential of antimicrobial materials for human and robotic spaceflight activities - Claudia Hahn Study on Performance of Integration control by man and machine in stage of final approaching for spaceship rendezvous and docking - Qianxiang Zhou

  12. Applying Technology To Facilitate Poster Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marek, Pam; Christopher, Andrew N.; Koenig, Cynthia S.

    2002-01-01

    Promotes the use of presentation software in psychology courses to teach students technological skills that prepare them for the future. Explains that many graduates in psychology are employed in other fields after graduation. Discusses the use of presentation software with a focus on poster preparation using Microsoft PowerPoint software. (CMK)

  13. Using poster presentations in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Utecht, Cheryl; Tremayne, Penny

    This article outlines how student nurses evaluated the introduction of a poster presentation within a module. It highlights how such a strategy can: make learning more enjoyable; disseminate information to peers and practice staff; and be used as a teaching aid for patients.

  14. A practical guide to designing a poster for presentation.

    PubMed

    Briggs, D J

    Poster presentations are frequently used to disseminate research findings and clinical initiatives at conferences, and present module material for educational courses. However, many nurses lack confidence when it comes to designing posters. This article considers the skills required to design a poster. Aspects of good poster design are also discussed.

  15. Insights on the poster preparation and presentation process.

    PubMed

    Moore, L W; Augspurger, P; King, M O; Proffitt, C

    2001-05-01

    Dissemination of research findings and effective clinical innovations is key to the growth and development of the nursing profession. Several avenues exist for the dissemination of information. One forum for communication that has gained increased recognition over the past decade is the poster presentation. Poster presentations are often a significant part of regional, national, and international nursing conferences. Although posters are frequently used to disseminate information to the nursing community, little is reported about actual poster presenters' experiences with preparation and presentation of their posters. The purpose of this article is to present insights derived from information shared by poster presenters regarding the poster preparation and presentation process. Such insights derived from the personal experiences of poster presenters may assist others to efficiently and effectively prepare and present scholarly posters that disseminate information to the nursing community.

  16. The Process of Poster Presentation: A Valuable Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracher, Lee; Cantrell, Jane; Wilkie, Kay

    1998-01-01

    Describes the formative use of poster presentations in a nursing-education program. Discusses the use of poster presentation as a successful assessment strategy and a motivating experience for students and teachers. (Author/WRM)

  17. A Poster Experience: From Idea to Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hires, Will

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the creation of a poster for the poster session that was part of the ACRL Science and Technology Section program "Federal Friends: Creating Greater Access to and Support for Science and Technology Information," at the American Library Association Annual Conference in June 2010. Details about the making of the poster up to and…

  18. A Poster Experience: From Idea to Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hires, Will

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the creation of a poster for the poster session that was part of the ACRL Science and Technology Section program "Federal Friends: Creating Greater Access to and Support for Science and Technology Information," at the American Library Association Annual Conference in June 2010. Details about the making of the poster up to and…

  19. Poster Presentation: The Key to Communication of Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Clark R.; And Others

    Poster sessions at professional meetings have become popular in recent years. Properly prepared poster presentations not only provide an excellent format for communicating innovative ideas or research results, but also allow for individual communication between the presenter(s) and interested individuals. Furthermore, poster session programs allow…

  20. 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium: poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Cruz, E; Kaveri, S V; Peter, H-H; Durandy, A; Cantoni, N; Quinti, I; Sorensen, R; Bussel, J B; Danieli, M G; Winkelmann, A; Bayry, J; Käsermann, F; Späth, P; Helbert, M; Salama, A; van Schaik, I N; Yuki, N

    2009-12-01

    The posters presented at the 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium covered a wide range of fields and included both basic science and clinical research. From the abstracts accepted for poster presentation, 12 abstracts were selected for oral presentations in three parallel sessions on immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity and basic research. The immunodeficiency presentations dealt with novel, rare class-switch recombination (CSR) deficiencies, attenuation of adverse events following IVIg treatment, association of immunoglobulin (Ig)G trough levels and protection against acute infection in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and the reduction of class-switched memory B cells in patients with specific antibody deficiency (SAD). The impact of intravenous immunoglobulin on fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, pregnancy and postpartum-related relapses in multiple sclerosis and refractory myositis, as well as experiences with subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with multi-focal motor neuropathy, were the topics presented in the autoimmunity session. The interaction of dendritic cell (DC)-SIGN and alpha2,6-sialylated IgG Fc and its impact on human DCs, the enrichment of sialylated IgG in plasma-derived IgG, as wells as prion surveillance and monitoring of anti-measles titres in immunoglobulin products, were covered in the basic science session. In summary, the presentations illustrated the breadth of immunoglobulin therapy usage and highlighted the progress that is being made in diverse areas of basic and clinical research, extending our understanding of the mechanisms of immunoglobulin action and contributing to improved patient care.

  1. Poster Presentations: Finding Alternatives to Written Assignments for Assessing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akister, Jane; Kim, Christine

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of poster presentations as an alternative to written assignments for assessing student learning in a family and marital therapy in social work class at Anglia Polytechnic University (England). Reports positive responses by both students and instructors. Includes two poster examples. (DB)

  2. Poster presentation - a visual medium for academic and scientific meetings.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Nicholas; Ilic, Dragan

    2011-09-01

    Academic poster presentations are used as a medium of knowledge transfer by a wide range of health professional groups. Posters also provide a means of publication for academic and professional contributors. Posters are designed to give a visual representation of an issue that firstly attracts attention, and then conveys an intended message. Whilst the poster medium has become adopted into the publication orthodoxy of the scientific and academic communities, there are acknowledged limitations regarding the depth of knowledge transfer, issues of compilation and production, and the related viewer conception. If treated as a standalone medium, the limitations of a two-dimensional, page limited format may not provide the ideal opportunity to deliver the depth of information required within the academic context. Despite these limitations however, the continued use of posters is justified when supported by author presentation or multi-media resources. This paper aims to provide an overview of the current concept and practicality of academic poster publications. It also outlines by example, some of the wider principles of poster compilation and presentation, for use by those who may utilise the medium at academic and scientific meetings.

  3. Poster Presentations: An Alternative to the Traditional Classroom Lecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Kimberly A.

    1997-01-01

    In a doctoral pharmacy course, student pairs were assigned presentations on topics related to specific anemias or blood disorders, and given one-and-a-half hours to present the material, with posters as visual aids, and to answer questions. The method is seen as promoting active learning, critical thinking, and professional presentation skills,…

  4. Poster Presentations: An Alternative to the Traditional Classroom Lecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Kimberly A.

    1997-01-01

    In a doctoral pharmacy course, student pairs were assigned presentations on topics related to specific anemias or blood disorders, and given one-and-a-half hours to present the material, with posters as visual aids, and to answer questions. The method is seen as promoting active learning, critical thinking, and professional presentation skills,…

  5. Partnering for functional genomics research conference: Abstracts of poster presentations

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This reports contains abstracts of poster presentations presented at the Functional Genomics Research Conference held April 16--17, 1998 in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Attention is focused on the following areas: mouse mutagenesis and genomics; phenotype screening; gene expression analysis; DNA analysis technology development; bioinformatics; comparative analyses of mouse, human, and yeast sequences; and pilot projects to evaluate methodologies.

  6. The Effects of Poster Presentations and Class Presentations on Low-Proficiency Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prichard, Caleb; Ferreira, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Presentation assignments for second language speakers can take several forms, such as a traditional class presentation or a poster presentation. Poster presentations, which are given repeatedly to small groups, seem to have several advantages, including increased speaking opportunities, more interaction between the speaker and the audience, and…

  7. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Warnatz, K; Ballow, M; Stangel, M; Bril, V

    2014-12-01

    The pan-European survey provides useful information on the accessibility and trends of intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IVIg/SCIg) therapy, which is used to treat primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs). Although immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy is the first-line treatment for PIDs, the mechanisms of action of Ig therapy may differ according to the condition it is used to treat. Moreover, intriguing presentations suggest that further investigation is required to understand more clearly both the haematological and immunoregulatory effects of therapeutic immunoglobulin. This can ultimately provide more information on optimizing Ig therapy efficacy, and establish whether individualized dosing regimens for patients will be conducive to better clinical outcomes. In addition to treating autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, there is evidence to suggest that immunoglobulins can potentially play a role in transplantation, which warrants further investigation for future use.

  8. HINTS 2013 Conference Summaries of Presentations and Posters

    Cancer.gov

    Summaries of Presentations and Poster Abstracts for the HINTS 2013 Conference titled A Decade of HINTS: Quantifying the Health Information Revolution through Data Innovation and Collaboration and held on October 2-3, 2013 at the Natcher building on the NIH campus in Bethesda, MD

  9. 7(th) International Immunoglobulin Conference: Poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Warnatz, K; Ballow, M; Stangel, M; Bril, V

    2014-12-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy is the mainstay of treatment for primary antibody deficiency disorders and has proved to be efficacious in specific autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Additionally, due to the role of Ig in complement activation, it is being used increasingly in solid organ transplantation. Furthermore, Ig is the primary or secondary treatment in some immune-mediated neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) or multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). This session discusses trends of Ig use in Europe, proposed mechanisms of action, adverse effects and the potential role of Ig therapy in transplantation. Dr Šedivá reported that Ig therapy is available in all European countries, although dosing is not always optimal, due partly to reimbursement plans. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) has become increasingly accessible in recent years; however, the chosen route of administration still varies widely between countries. Dr Berger's presentation on optimization of Ig therapy in neuropathies, and Dr Rojavin's report on a pharmacometric model to determine the serum IgG levels achieved by different dosing regimens in primary antibody deficiency (PAD) patients, led to the challenging concept of using individualized dosing strategies. Dr Klehmet reported on the potential benefit of using antigen-specific T cell responses as a biomarker of IVIg responsiveness in CIDP patients, while Dr von Gunten provided an insight into the mechanisms of action of Ig preparations, suggesting that the immunoregulatory effects of IgG may be mediated by IgG antibodies against glycans. Dr Basta reported on the potential thrombogenic adverse effects associated with Ig therapy. Although these adverse events are rare, further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between Ig replacement and immunomodulatory therapy and these adverse reactions. In transplantation, Dr Carbone described that prophylactic IVIg treatment was found to decrease the

  10. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Poster Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Warnatz, K; Ballow, M; Stangel, M; Bril, V

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy is the mainstay of treatment for primary antibody deficiency disorders and has proved to be efficacious in specific autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Additionally, due to the role of Ig in complement activation, it is being used increasingly in solid organ transplantation. Furthermore, Ig is the primary or secondary treatment in some immune-mediated neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) or multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). This session discusses trends of Ig use in Europe, proposed mechanisms of action, adverse effects and the potential role of Ig therapy in transplantation. Dr Šedivá reported that Ig therapy is available in all European countries, although dosing is not always optimal, due partly to reimbursement plans. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) has become increasingly accessible in recent years; however, the chosen route of administration still varies widely between countries. Dr Berger's presentation on optimization of Ig therapy in neuropathies, and Dr Rojavin's report on a pharmacometric model to determine the serum IgG levels achieved by different dosing regimens in primary antibody deficiency (PAD) patients, led to the challenging concept of using individualized dosing strategies. Dr Klehmet reported on the potential benefit of using antigen-specific T cell responses as a biomarker of IVIg responsiveness in CIDP patients, while Dr von Gunten provided an insight into the mechanisms of action of Ig preparations, suggesting that the immunoregulatory effects of IgG may be mediated by IgG antibodies against glycans. Dr Basta reported on the potential thrombogenic adverse effects associated with Ig therapy. Although these adverse events are rare, further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between Ig replacement and immunomodulatory therapy and these adverse reactions. In transplantation, Dr Carbone described that prophylactic IVIg treatment was found to decrease the

  11. 3min. poster presentations of B01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    We give a report on recommendations from ILEWG International conferences held at Cape Canaveral in 2008 (ICEUM10), and in Beijing in May 2010 with IAF (GLUC -ICEUM11). We discuss the different rationale for Moon exploration. Priorities for scientific investigations include: clues on the formation and evolution of rocky planets, accretion and bombardment in the inner solar system, comparative planetology processes (tectonic, volcanic, impact cratering, volatile delivery), historical records, astrobiology, survival of organics; past, present and future life. The ILEWG technology task group set priorities for the advancement of instrumenta-tion: Remote sensing miniaturised instruments; Surface geophysical and geochemistry package; Instrument deployment and robotic arm, nano-rover, sampling, drilling; Sample finder and collector. Regional mobility rover; Autonomy and Navigation; Artificially intelligent robots, Complex systems. The ILEWG ExogeoLab pilot project was developed as support for instru-ments, landers, rovers,and preparation for cooperative robotic village. The ILEWG lunar base task group looked at minimal design concepts, technologies in robotic and human exploration with Tele control, telepresence, virtual reality; Man-Machine interface and performances. The ILEWG ExoHab pilot project has been started with support from agencies and partners. We discuss ILEWG terrestrial Moon-Mars campaigns for validation of technologies, research and human operations. We indicate how Moon-Mars Exploration can inspire solutions to global Earth sustained development: In-Situ Utilisation of resources; Establishment of permanent robotic infrastructures, Environmental protection aspects; Life sciences laboratories; Support to human exploration. Co-Authors: ILEWG Task Groups on: Science, Technology, Robotic village, Lunar Bases , Commercial and Societal aspects, Roadmap synergies with other programmes, Public en-gagemnet and Outreach, Young Lunar Explorers.

  12. Posters

    Treesearch

    Yilmaz Balci; William L. MacDonald; Kurt Gottschalk; Elisa Becker; Grace Sumampong; Simon F. Shamoun; Aniko Varga; Saad Masri; Delano James; Karen Bailey; Susan Boyetchko; Maia M. Beh; Kerri Frangioso; Akiko Oguchi; Guillaume J. Bilodeau; Richard C. Hamelin; Francoise Pelletier; C. Andre Levesque; Jennifer Britt; Everett Hansen; Monica Bueno; Janelle Deshais; Leonel Arguello; Gary Chastagner; Annie DeBauw; Kathy Riley; Marianne Elliott; Ellen Crocker; Matteo Garbelotto; John Stuart; Steven Steinberg; Clare R. Elliott; Virginia McDonald; Katie Coats; Niklaus J. Grunwald; Elizabeth Fichtner; Tedmund J. Swiecki; Elizabeth A. Bernhardt; Allison Wickland; David Rizzo; Ross Meentemeyer; S.E. Haas; M. Metz; Timothy L. Widmer; Gary J. Samuels; Paul W. Tooley; Marsha E. Browning; Harvey Timeus; Wendy Sutton; Paul Reeser; Alan Kanaskie; Steven J. Seybold; Tom W. Coleman; Mary Louise Flint; T. Henkel; A. Breitenstein; S. Werres; M. Riedel; S. Julich; M. Kielpinski; R. Möller; W. Fritsche; S. Wagner; Michael Thompson; Ellen Michaels Goheen; Jon Laine; Nathan Rank; Hall Cushman; Jennifer L. Parke; Jay Pscheidt; Richard Regan; Jan Hedberg; Steven W. Oak; Jaesoon Hwang; Steven N. Jeffers; Borys M. Tkacz

    2010-01-01

    Titles found within the Posters section include: Status of California’s Phytophthora ramorum stream survey: p. 283 Sampling cankers and lesions on eastern forest plant species for Phytophthora spp. and associated organisms: p. 285 An evaluation of ...

  13. ASIST 2001. Information in a Networked World: Harnessing the Flow. Part III: Poster Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Topics of Poster Presentations include: electronic preprints; intranets; poster session abstracts; metadata; information retrieval; watermark images; video games; distributed information retrieval; subject domain knowledge; data mining; information theory; course development; historians' use of pictorial images; information retrieval software;…

  14. ASIST 2001. Information in a Networked World: Harnessing the Flow. Part III: Poster Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Topics of Poster Presentations include: electronic preprints; intranets; poster session abstracts; metadata; information retrieval; watermark images; video games; distributed information retrieval; subject domain knowledge; data mining; information theory; course development; historians' use of pictorial images; information retrieval software;…

  15. The Synoptic View as a Model for Poster Presentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, D. D.; Arrowsmith, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Originally referencing the first three chapters of the New Testament, the term "synoptic" has come to mean "a general view of the whole, or of the principal parts of a thing." Large format posters provide an opportunity to present research in synoptic form, rather than as an arrangement of PowerPoint slides and text. In synoptic views, data, analyses, and linkages are presented en masse with the graphical design used as a guide to the linkages. Conclusions about the meanings of the information are largely left to the viewers as they study the information and seek relationships-a natural activity for scientists. Numerous formats produce synoptic views of geoscientific information. Each imposes order on the information through spatial, temporal, or causal connections and provide context for multiple variables. Maps are the most common synoptic presentations. Additional map-sheet information, such as stratigraphic columns and cross sections, gain meaning from and contribute meaning to the areal view. Two and three-dimensional models, including flow charts and organizational diagrams offer a means of portraying complex interactions. Time lines and spatial line (e.g., latitude, depth, distance) diagrams, especially those with additional axes to plot related variables, show temporal or spatial trends, progress, or fluctuation. Some organizational schemes are specific to the sciences. The periodic table is a synoptic portrayal of the elements that designates their chemical behavior by their positions. As an illustration of phenomena, the well designed synoptic poster provides a multi-scale perspective that slices across time, space, or other parameters to expose the significant behaviors of the given system. Bruce Railsback's (2003) reorganization of the periodic table to emphasize the charged species most common in geologic processes is an outstanding example of synoptic design. Edward Tufte's works on graphical style and visual explanations are also excellent guides to

  16. Chest CT examinations in patients presenting with acute chest pain: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Sebastiaan; Kroft, Lucia J; Hidalgo, Alberto L; Leta, Ruben; de Roos, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Acute chest pain (ACP) is one of the most common presenting symptoms at the emergency department. The differential diagnosis is vast. To exclude life-threatening causes, radiologists encounter an increasing amount of thoracic computed tomography (CT) examinations including CT angiography of the heart and great vessels. The dual- and triple-rule CT examinations are currently implemented in clinical practice. We retrospectively identified chest CT examinations in the setting of acute chest pain in our hospitals and collected a variety of common and uncommon cases. In this pictorial essay, we present the most educative cases from patients who presented with acute chest pain in the emergency department of our hospitals and for whom a thoracic CT was ordered. When aortic emergencies, acute coronary syndrome, and pulmonary embolism are excluded, these cases may help the radiologist to suggest alternative diagnoses in the diagnostic challenge of acute chest pain. Teaching Points • The number of chest CT examinations for ACP is increasing.• Chest CT examinations may help suggesting alternative diagnosis in ACP.• Radiologists should be aware of the differential diagnosis of ACP.

  17. Abstracts of the 11th Annual U.S. Geological Survey, Central Region, 1999 Poster Review; Collected Abstracts of Selected Poster Papers Presented at Scientific Meetings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey Central Region had a poster review where USGS scientists showcased posters that had been presented at scientific meetings. This report contains abstracts for selected posters that were presented at this review. Science topics were from several USGS teams with a broad range of topics.

  18. Horner's syndrome in a patient presenting with chest pain.

    PubMed

    van Bree, S H W; van Bree, M D R; Somsen, G A

    2015-07-01

    An altered mental status and peripheral nerve dysfunction are alarming signs in a patient presenting with chest pain. If complicated by acute myocardial infarction, this raises the suspicion of aortic dissection and warrants immediate CT angiography. We report a dramatic case of chest pain in a 79-year-old man with somnolence and Horner's syndrome, subsequently complicated by myocardial infarction. Autopsy demonstrated a type A aortic dissection involving the carotid arteries and the right coronary artery.

  19. Readability and usability of scientific information in the poster presentation format

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The European Geosciences Union convenes an annual international conference that boasts over 13,000 academic presentations of which more than half are poster presentations. This research effort studied a sample of more than 500 posters presented during the 2012 conference to identify best practices f...

  20. A "how-to" guide in preparing abstracts and poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Boullata, Joseph I; Mancuso, Carissa E

    2007-12-01

    The preparation of an abstract or poster to share information from a project or case report with colleagues is a professional goal for many nutrition support practitioners. This paper provides an approach to help practitioners prepare an abstract for submission and subsequently a poster for presentation at a meeting. A nutrition support question that required collecting and evaluating information, or a unique patient case or case series, can serve as the focus of an abstract and subsequent poster. The professional meeting selected should be appropriate for the abstract topic, and the authors should closely adhere to the organization's abstract submission guidelines. The well-prepared abstract will then serve as the outline for the poster content; the visual aspect of the poster is also important to effectively communicate the information to colleagues at the meeting. Adequate time is required to prepare both the abstract and the poster in order to fittingly reflect the value of the information. Efforts in preparing the abstract will be worthwhile once the abstract has been accepted by reviewers for a poster session at the meeting. Likewise, the effort in preparing the poster in advance allows the presenter to enjoy the poster session and discuss the project with colleagues.

  1. Chest Wall Pain as the Presenting Symptom of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Kyoung Bo; Lee, Ho Jun; Park, Jin-Woo; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Chang, Jihea; Kwon, Bum Sun

    2014-01-01

    Leptomeningeal metastasis (LMM), also referred to as leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, results from diffuse infiltration of the leptomeninges by malignant cells originating from extra-meningeal primary tumors. It occurs in approximately 5%-10% of patients with solid tumor. Among solid tumors, the most common types leading to infiltration of the leptomeninges are breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma. Patients with LMM may present various signs and symptoms. Herein, we report a rare case with initial presentation of isolated chest wall pain. Computed tomography of the chest with contrast revealed a 2.5-cm nodule over the left upper lung. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. Later, cerebrospinal fluid cytology exam also confirmed leptomeningeal seeding. It is rare for leptomeningeal carcinomatosis patients to present with chest wall pain. Therefore, a high index of suspicion is mandatory for accurate and prompt diagnosis. PMID:25566489

  2. Poster Presentations: Turning a Lab of the Week into a Culminating Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Jennifer L.; Quin~ones, Rosalynn; Sunderland, Deborah P.

    2015-01-01

    An assignment incorporating posters into a second-year analytical chemistry lab is described. Students work in groups and are assigned one of the application-themed weekly laboratories as a topic. Course data acquired for these weekly laboratories are compiled into spreadsheets that the poster group then analyzes to present in an on-campus poster…

  3. Poster Presentations and Peer Assessment: Novel Forms of Evaluation and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billington, H. L.

    1997-01-01

    Science student assessors evaluated each other's work and ranked posters of major ecosystem processes in the same order as staff assessors. Students ranking highly in poster presentation tended to do poorly in their essay work and vice versa. This would suggest that diversity of assessment strategies is needed. (AIM)

  4. Modeling the Activities of Scientists: Prospective Science Teachers' Poster Presentations in An STS Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Alev; Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Kilic, Ziya; Kilic, Esma; Aydogdu, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    In this study, prospective science teachers' (PSTs) views about their poster presentations were investigated. These posters were developed through PSTs' online and library research and scientific mini-symposiums in chemistry related topics in the framework of science, technology and society course (STS). During the first four weeks of STS course,…

  5. Poster Presentations: Turning a Lab of the Week into a Culminating Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Jennifer L.; Quin~ones, Rosalynn; Sunderland, Deborah P.

    2015-01-01

    An assignment incorporating posters into a second-year analytical chemistry lab is described. Students work in groups and are assigned one of the application-themed weekly laboratories as a topic. Course data acquired for these weekly laboratories are compiled into spreadsheets that the poster group then analyzes to present in an on-campus poster…

  6. In the eye of the beholder: making the most of poster presentations--Part 2.

    PubMed

    Crooks, D L; Kilpatrick, M

    1998-08-01

    Poster presentations are an excellent starting point for novice conference presenters and may be less intimidating than oral presentations because the audience is often one-to-one and discussion can flow readily. The poster presenter has worked with the content over a period of time, knows it well and can explain it with knowledge and enthusiasm. Networking with a number of persons in a similar field at the "work in progress" stage benefits the work. Posters may also be displayed in the home agency to facilitate internal communication about a project or study and the accomplishments achieved. Credit may be given to presenters from peers unable to attend the conference and discussion about the project may stimulate internal interest in the process of research (Lynn, 1989). Before developing a poster presentation, adequate consideration must be given to careful planning. Posters can be time-consuming and expensive unless adequate care is taken in the planning stages. With adequate planning and extensive feedback throughout the planning stage, a poster can be a rewarding presentation.

  7. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum presenting as rhinolalia and chest pain.

    PubMed

    Breakey, R W F; Walker, G; Oldfield, W

    2012-11-01

    This report discusses a case of spontaneous pneumomediastinum in a 25-year-old medical student. The patient presented with chest pain and a tonal change in voice. Symptoms occurred after an episode of stretching and were exacerbated by coughing. There was no history of underlying respiratory disease and he was a non-smoker. Management was conservative. At the four-week follow-up appointment, bronchoscopy and computed tomography of the thorax demonstrated complete resolution. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is uncommon, with rhinolalia being a rare presenting feature. It should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with chest pain associated with a change in voice. A detailed history may reveal preceding activities associated with raised intrathoracic pressure.

  8. Acute right ventricular myocarditis presenting with chest pain and syncope

    PubMed Central

    Mancio, Jennifer; Bettencourt, Nuno; Oliveira, Marco; Pires-Morais, Gustavo; Ribeiro, Vasco Gama

    2013-01-01

    Myocarditis is assumed to involve both ventricles equally. Right ventricular predominant involvement is rarely described. A case of acute viral right ventricular myocarditis presenting with chest pain and syncope, grade 3 atrioventricular block, right ventricular dilatation and free wall hypokinesia is reported. Cardiac MRI showed late enhancement of the right ventricular free wall without involvement of the left ventricle. Anti-Coxsackie A9 virus neutralising IgM-type antibodies titre was elevated. This case emphasises that manifestations of myocarditis can be limited to the right ventricle and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of right ventricular enlargement. PMID:24096068

  9. Poster Archives | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (formerly known as NCI-Frederick) quarterly newsletter, the Poster, is a forum which aims to contribute to a well-informed workforce by presenting information designed to educate, entertain, and enlighten.

  10. Poster Archives | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (formerly known as NCI-Frederick) quarterly newsletter, the Poster, is a forum which aims to contribute to a well-informed workforce by presenting information designed to educate, entertain, and enlighten.

  11. A pilot study: research poster presentations as an educational tool for undergraduate epidemiology students

    PubMed Central

    Deonandan, Raywat; Gomes, James; Lavigne, Eric; Dinh, Thy; Blanchard, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Students in a fourth year epidemiology course were surveyed after participating in a formal Science Research Day in which they presented original research, in poster form, to be judged by scientists from the community. Of 276 participating students, 80 (29%) responded to the study survey. As a result, 19% of respondents were more likely to pursue a career in science, and 27.5% were more likely to pursue a career in epidemiology. Only one respondent reported being less likely to pursue a science career, while seven were less likely to pursue epidemiology. A majority of respondents felt that the poster experience was on par with, or superior to, a comparable research paper, in terms of both educational appeal and enjoyment. Mandatory, formal poster presentations are an innovative format for teaching advanced health sciences, and may more accurately reflect the realities of a science career than do more traditional educational formats. PMID:24101888

  12. Use of a mobile device app: a potential new tool for poster presentations and surgical education.

    PubMed

    Atherton, S; Javed, M; Webster, Sv; Hemington-Gorse, S

    2013-06-01

    Poster presentations are an important part of presenting scientific techniques and represent an integral part of conferences and meetings. Traditionally, paper format is used; however, in recent years electronic posters and other methods, such as incorporating a DVD player as part of a poster, have been successfully used. We describe and demonstrate the use of an augmented reality application for smartphones and tablets as a potential future addition to the presentation of scientific work and surgical techniques in poster format. This method allows the audience to view surgical techniques and research as 3D animation or video by using a trigger image in a poster/journal/text book via their smart device. The author used the free Aurasma© application available on both iOS and Android 2.2 and higher platforms from iTunes App Store and Google Play. Once installed, any user with a 3G or WiFi connection via a smart phone or tablet can subscribe to the Medical Illustration channel for free. The user can then scan the trigger image placed on a poster with a mobile device to view videos, animations or 3D data. Further interaction can direct the user to a website for more content. The author has trialled this method at a regional burns and plastic surgery centre and found it to be highly effective. The use of this novel method adds a new dimension to the presentation of scientific work at surgical and medical conferences and as part of journals and textbooks by permitting users to view scientific data and techniques on mobile devices as videos or as three dimensional environments at their own leisure.

  13. CSM 2017 Sports Physical Therapy Section Poster Presentations (Abstracts SPO1-SPO152).

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    These abstracts are presented here as prepared by the authors. The accuracy and content of each abstract remain the responsibility of the authors. In the identification number above each abstract, SPO designates a Sports Physical Therapy Section poster presentation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(1):A162-A226. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.47.1.A162.

  14. CSM 2017 Orthopaedic Section Poster Presentations (Abstracts OPO1-OPO243).

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    These abstracts are presented here as prepared by the authors. The accuracy and content of each abstract remain the responsibility of the authors. In the identification number above each abstract, OPO designates an Orthopaedic Section poster presentation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(1):A58-A161. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.47.1.A58.

  15. Poster Session Presentation [from the Netherlands] [and] Seen at Close Quarters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergers, Ton

    Two papers examine vocational training, special education, and government services for the disabled in the Netherlands. Originally presented at a convention poster session of the 16th World Congress of Rehabilitation International, the first paper focuses on the national institute at Werkenrode which provides a residential practice-based education…

  16. ICCG-10: Tenth International Conference on Crystal Growth. Poster presentation abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Poster presentation abstracts from the tenth International Conference on Crystal Growth (ICCG) (Aug. 16-21, 1992) are provided. Topics discussed at the conference include crystal growth mechanisms, superconductors, semiconductors, laser materials, optical materials, and biomaterials. Organizing committees, ICCG advisory board and officers, and sponsors of the conference are also included.

  17. Assessing Curriculum Planning for Humanities Inquiry: The Challenges and Opportunities of Poster Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Heather D.; Preston, Lou; Harvie, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    Authentic assessment has been promoted in teacher education as a means of addressing the challenge that pre-service teachers often face in translating theory into practice. In this article, we outline one approach to authentic assessment that utilises a poster format to present a humanities inquiry sequence. Drawing on a practice-based research…

  18. Poster Session Presentation [from the Netherlands] [and] Seen at Close Quarters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergers, Ton

    Two papers examine vocational training, special education, and government services for the disabled in the Netherlands. Originally presented at a convention poster session of the 16th World Congress of Rehabilitation International, the first paper focuses on the national institute at Werkenrode which provides a residential practice-based education…

  19. Limitations of poster presentations reporting educational innovations at a major international medical education conference

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Morris; Darbyshire, Daniel; Saifuddin, Aamir; Vimalesvaran, Kavitha

    2013-01-01

    Background In most areas of medical research, the label of ‘quality’ is associated with well-accepted standards. Whilst its interpretation in the field of medical education is contentious, there is agreement on the key elements required when reporting novel teaching strategies. We set out to assess if these features had been fulfilled by poster presentations at a major international medical education conference. Methods Such posters were analysed in four key areas: reporting of theoretical underpinning, explanation of instructional design methods, descriptions of the resources needed for introduction, and the offering of materials to support dissemination. Results Three hundred and twelve posters were reviewed with 170 suitable for analysis. Forty-one percent described their methods of instruction or innovation design. Thirty-three percent gave details of equipment, and 29% of studies described resources that may be required for delivering such an intervention. Further resources to support dissemination of their innovation were offered by 36%. Twenty-three percent described the theoretical underpinning or conceptual frameworks upon which their work was based. Conclusions These findings suggest that posters presenting educational innovation are currently limited in what they offer to educators. Presenters should seek to enhance their reporting of these crucial aspects by employing existing published guidance, and organising committees may wish to consider explicitly requesting such information at the time of initial submission. PMID:24199272

  20. Augmented reality on poster presentations, in the field and in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawemann, Friedrich; Kolawole, Folarin

    2017-04-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is the direct addition of virtual information through an interface to a real-world environment. In practice, through a mobile device such as a tablet or smartphone, information can be projected onto a target- for example, an image on a poster. Mobile devices are widely distributed today such that augmented reality is easily accessible to almost everyone. Numerous studies have shown that multi-dimensional visualization is essential for efficient perception of the spatial, temporal and geometrical configuration of geological structures and processes. Print media, such as posters and handouts lack the ability to display content in the third and fourth dimensions, which might be in space-domain as seen in three-dimensional (3-D) objects, or time-domain (four-dimensional, 4-D) expressible in the form of videos. Here, we show that augmented reality content can be complimentary to geoscience poster presentations, hands-on material and in the field. In the latter example, location based data is loaded and for example, a virtual geological profile can be draped over a real-world landscape. In object based AR, the application is trained to recognize an image or object through the camera of the user's mobile device, such that specific content is automatically downloaded and displayed on the screen of the device, and positioned relative to the trained image or object. We used ZapWorks, a commercially-available software application to create and present examples of content that is poster-based, in which important supplementary information is presented as interactive virtual images, videos and 3-D models. We suggest that the flexibility and real-time interactivity offered by AR makes it an invaluable tool for effective geoscience poster presentation, class-room and field geoscience learning.

  1. American Association of Dental Schools Annual Session and Exposition. Poster Presentation Abstracts (78th, Chicago, IL, March 3-8, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This issue introduces the poster presentations for the American Association of Dental Schools annual conference. The issue contains a list of poster presentations, poster abstracts for each of four time blocks, a list of poster session authors, and a keyword index. (EV)

  2. Fibrous dysplasia of the rib presenting as a huge chest wall tumor: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Chang, B S; Lee, S C; Harn, H J

    1994-07-01

    Fibrous dysplasia of the rib is not uncommon, but is rarely demonstrated as a huge chest wall mass with severe clinical symptoms. A 59-year-old patient, presenting with a huge, rapidly expanding chest wall tumor compressing the lung, liver and heart accompanied by chest pain and dyspnea, is reported. The tumor was success-fully excised by local radical resection.

  3. Verification of publications, presentations and posters by applicants to a residency in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Gussman, Debra; Blechman, Andrew

    2007-04-01

    To determine if the publications, presentations and posters reported by applicants to the obstetrics and gynecology residency program at Jersey Shore University Medical Center could be verified in electronic databases. We conducted a retrospective review of all applications for obstetrics and gynecology residency positions at Jersey Shore University Medical Center in 2006. A systematic search using electronic databases was performed on the information reported in the application. There were 111 applicants (45%), who reported a total of 490 items. Of these, 119 (24.3%) were confirmed, 359 (73.3%) could not be confirmed, and 12 (2.4%) were misrepresented. The majority of publications, presentations and posters reported by applicants to the obstetrics and gynecology residency program could not be verified in electronic databases.

  4. The poster presentation: what value to the teaching and assessment of research in pre- and post-registration nursing courses?

    PubMed

    Moule, P; Judd, M; Girot, E

    1998-04-01

    Poster presentations have proved to be a popular method of displaying information at conferences, and are being used increasingly as a teaching method. Innovative strategies for teaching and assessing research need to facilitate students' achievement of research skills required for practice. These are outlined by the Department of Health, and emphasize the development of research literacy. Using the poster presentation as a teaching and assessing strategy on diploma level courses (Project 2000 and ENB 870 introduction to the Understanding and Application of Research) has proved to be valuable in developing vital research awareness skills and in harnessing enthusiasm for research. Students imply a sense of achievement gained through the process of developing the poster and the production of the poster itself. Herein lies the value of the poster presentation, for it allows the development of crucial research literacy skills which can be widely used in professional practice and future professional education.

  5. From Poster Presentation to Publication: National Congress of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    MUTLU, Caner; KAYA MUTLU, Ebru; KILIÇOĞLU, Ali Güven; YORBIK, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this study were as follows: 1) to determine publication rate, time to publication, and study design of poster presentations accepted at the National Congress of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (NCCAP) and converted to publication and the degree of first author in a published article and journal index and 2) to investigate the relationship of these data with each other. Methods The poster presentations of four congresses organized between 2005 and 2008 were investigated separately. The presentations were screened by taking into account the title and the first and second author in English and Turkish languages via PubMed and Google Academic databases. Published studies, time between presentation and publishing date, study design, degree of first author, and journal index of these studies were recorded. Results Fifty-four (25.2%) of 214 poster presentations were published in international and national peer-reviewed journals. Of the published articles, 74.1% (n=40) were research type and 61.1% (n=33) were found in the Science Citation Index (SCI) and Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCI-E) peer-reviewed journals. The first author in 42.6% (n=23) of published articles were assistant professors. The average time between presentation and publishing date was 30.72±18.89 months. Statistical differences were not determined between publication rate and study design; between time to publication and study type/study design, degree of first author, and journal index; and between journal index and study design and degree of first author (p>0.05). It was found that research articles were published significantly more by teaching staff than experts and other researchers (p<0.05). Conclusion Compared with literature data, it was found that the time to publication was longer while the publication rate was similar for poster presentations in our congresses. Based on these results, it is important to create necessary conditions and encourage the researchers to

  6. A poster presentation as an evaluation method to facilitate reflective thinking skills in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Chabeli, M M

    2002-08-01

    This article seeks to establish whether the poster presentation of a specific theme can facilitate the student's thinking skills in nursing education. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design where twenty students volunteered to take part in the study by signing an informed consent was followed. Descriptive naïve sketches were used for data collection followed by individual interviews to validate the findings. Data was analysed by means of the descriptive method of open coding of Tesch (in Creswell, 1994:155). DENOSA's ethical standards for research (1998:7) were considered. The findings indicated both positive and negative perceptions. The positive perceptions were: a poster presentation as an evaluation method facilitates creative, critical and reflective thinking skills; group work facilitates student participation; it facilitates problem solving skills; it increases the student's independence and a sense of ownership; and the evaluation is fair. The negative perceptions were that there was a lack of clarity on the student's expectations and that group activity is difficult. Trustworthiness was maintained in accordance with Lincoln and Guba's principles (1985:290-327). It is concluded that a poster presentation, used effectively as an evaluation method, can facilitate the learner's critical and reflective thinking skills. It is recommended that other learner-centred methods of assessment and evaluation be researched for their effective use in facilitating the higher order thinking skills of learners.

  7. Panic Disorder in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Chest Pain: Prevalence and Presenting Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Greenslade, Jaimi H; Hawkins, Tracey; Parsonage, William; Cullen, Louise

    2017-02-16

    Patients with panic disorder experience symptoms such as palpitations, chest pain, dizziness, and breathlessness. Consequently, they may attend the Emergency Department (ED) to be assessed for possible emergency medical conditions. Recognition of panic disorder within the ED is low. We sought to establish the prevalence of panic disorder in patients presenting to the for ED investigation of potential acute coronary syndrome. We also sought to characterise the cohort of patients with panic disorder in terms of presenting symptoms, risk factors, medical history and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). This was an observational study of 338 adult patients presenting to the Emergency Department of a tertiary hospital in Australia. Research nurses collected clinical data using a customised case report form. The outcome was panic disorder, assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The average age of participants was 50.2 years and 37.9% were female. Thirty-day MACE occurred in 7.7% of the cohort. The clinical diagnosis of panic disorder was made in 5.6% (95% CI: 3.4-8.6%) of patients. Compared to patients without panic disorder, patients with panic disorder were slightly more likely to report that their pain felt heavy (48.9% and 73.7% respectively, p=0.04). All other reported symptoms were similar in the two groups. The prevalence of panic disorder was low in patients presenting to an Australian ED with chest pain. Clinical signs or symptoms that are routinely collected as part of the chest pain workup cannot be used to distinguish patients with and without panic disorder. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). All rights reserved.

  8. The Poster Presentation: What Value to the Teaching and Assessment of Research in Pre- and Post-Registration Nursing Courses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moule, Pam; Judd, Maggie; Girot, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Using conference poster presentations in nursing education is a way to develop students' research-awareness skills and enthusiasm. The method highlights the relevance of research to practice and fosters essential research literacy. (SK)

  9. Trends in safety pharmacology: posters presented at the annual meetings of the Safety Pharmacology Society 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Redfern, William S; Valentin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The inaugural meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS) was in 2001, soon after ICH S7A had been adopted. The 10th anniversary is an appropriate milestone at which to analyse trends in the science and themes of safety pharmacology, as reflected in posters presented at the annual meetings. The source information was the poster abstract booklets from each of the first ten annual meetings. The number of posters rose steadily from 34 in 2001 to 201 in 2010. The proportion of posters containing in vitro data has remained constant throughout the decade at ~30%. In terms of organ functions, themes relating to the cardiovascular system (CVS) have always generated the majority of posters, remaining above 60% of the total for the last 9years. The dominant theme has been around 'QT liability'. This peaked in 2003 at 68% of all posters presented, around the time of the ICHS7B discussions, and has remained above 30% thereafter. Apart from 2003 (dipping to 4%), CNS-related posters have remained steady at 11-17% throughout the decade. Respiratory-related posters have remained at 5-8% over the last 5years. Gastrointestinal (GI)-related posters have contributed 2-6% throughout the decade, and renal-related posters 1-3%. Posters on combined organ assessments have appeared in recent years. The relative emphasis on the different organ functions is broadly proportional to the causes of candidate drug attrition preclinically, whereas both CNS and GI are under-represented when considering their contribution to significant adverse effects during clinical development. Trends are either regulatory-driven (e.g. increase in posters on abuse-dependence liability since EMEA/CHMP/SWP/94227/2004), technology-driven (e.g. automated hERG assay; left ventricular function; non-invasive CVS measurements; stem cells, etc.), or relate to the predictive ability of safety pharmacology data (e.g. clinical translation initiatives; concordance between in vitro and in vivo preclinical data; integrated

  10. Chest Pain as a presenting complaint in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI)

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Muhammad Ajmal; Alam Khan, Shahzad; Safdar, Sohail; Taseer, Ijaz-Ul-Haque

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study various characteristics of chest pain in acute myocardial infarction patients. Methodology: A total of 331 patients of AMI admitted at Cardiology unit Nishtar Hospital Multan and Chaudhry Pervez Elahi Institute of Cardiology Multan, irrespective of the age and gender, were included in this study. The study duration was one year starting from June 2011 to June 2012. Non-probability purposive sampling technique was used in this descriptive study. Informed consent to participate in this study was taken. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS-11. Results: A total number of 331 patients with AMI were included in the study. Mean age was 54.99±11.25 years with minimum age 20 years and maximum age 90 years. It included 264(79.8%) male and 67(20.2%) female patients with male to female ratio of 3.9:1. Out of these 331 patients 308 (93.1%) patients reported chest pain as the presenting complaint. Remaining 23(6.9%) presented with clinical features other than chest pain. There were 127(38.4%) patients with pre-cordial chest pain, 115(34.7%) had retrosternal chest pain, 58(17.5%) were having epigastric pain. Severe chest pain was seen in 281(84.9%) patients while 26(7.9%) had only mild chest discomfort. Radiation of the pain to shoulder, neck and jaw was seen in 75 (22.7%) patients. In 42(12.7%) patients, pain radiated to both sides of chest. Another 55(16.6%) patients had pain radiation to chest, shoulder, upper arm and ulnar side of left forearm. Chest pain radiation to interscapular region along with both sides of chest was present in 10(3.0%) patients. In 11(3.3%) patients’ pain radiated only to left side of chest. Pain persisting for >20 minutes was reported by 298 (90%) patients while only 10(3.1%) had pain persisting for <20 minutes. Conclusion: There is considerable overlap in chest pain of cardiac as well as non cardiac causes. However, vigilant evaluation of characteristics of chest pain in history taking may help to overcome this dilemma

  11. Chest Pain as a presenting complaint in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

    PubMed

    Malik, Muhammad Ajmal; Alam Khan, Shahzad; Safdar, Sohail; Taseer, Ijaz-Ul-Haque

    2013-04-01

    To study various characteristics of chest pain in acute myocardial infarction patients. A total of 331 patients of AMI admitted at Cardiology unit Nishtar Hospital Multan and Chaudhry Pervez Elahi Institute of Cardiology Multan, irrespective of the age and gender, were included in this study. The study duration was one year starting from June 2011 to June 2012. Non-probability purposive sampling technique was used in this descriptive study. Informed consent to participate in this study was taken. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS-11. A total number of 331 patients with AMI were included in the study. Mean age was 54.99±11.25 years with minimum age 20 years and maximum age 90 years. It included 264(79.8%) male and 67(20.2%) female patients with male to female ratio of 3.9:1. Out of these 331 patients 308 (93.1%) patients reported chest pain as the presenting complaint. Remaining 23(6.9%) presented with clinical features other than chest pain. There were 127(38.4%) patients with pre-cordial chest pain, 115(34.7%) had retrosternal chest pain, 58(17.5%) were having epigastric pain. Severe chest pain was seen in 281(84.9%) patients while 26(7.9%) had only mild chest discomfort. Radiation of the pain to shoulder, neck and jaw was seen in 75 (22.7%) patients. In 42(12.7%) patients, pain radiated to both sides of chest. Another 55(16.6%) patients had pain radiation to chest, shoulder, upper arm and ulnar side of left forearm. Chest pain radiation to interscapular region along with both sides of chest was present in 10(3.0%) patients. In 11(3.3%) patients' pain radiated only to left side of chest. Pain persisting for >20 minutes was reported by 298 (90%) patients while only 10(3.1%) had pain persisting for <20 minutes. There is considerable overlap in chest pain of cardiac as well as non cardiac causes. However, vigilant evaluation of characteristics of chest pain in history taking may help to overcome this dilemma. Severe and prolonged precordial chest pain in a

  12. ANMCO-SIMEU Consensus Document: in-hospital management of patients presenting with chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Zuin, Guerrino; Groff, Paolo; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Cassin, Matteo; Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; Del Pinto, Maurizio; Di Tano, Giuseppe; Nardi, Federico; Rossini, Roberta; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Ruggiero, Enrico; Scotto di Uccio, Fortunato; Valente, Serafina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Chest pain is a common general practice presentation that requires careful diagnostic assessment because of its diverse and potentially serious causes. However, the evaluation of acute chest pain remains challenging, despite many new insights over the past two decades. The percentage of patients presenting to the emergency departments because of acute chest pain appears to be increasing. Nowadays, there are two essential chest pain-related issues: (i) the missed diagnoses of acute coronary syndromes with a poor short-term prognosis; and (ii) the increasing percentage of hospitalizations of low-risk cases. It is well known that hospitalization of a low-risk chest pain patient can lead to unnecessary tests and procedures, with an increasing trend of complications and burden of costs. Therefore, the significantly reduced financial resources of healthcare systems induce physicians and administrators to improve the efficiency of care protocols for patients with acute chest pain. Despite the efforts of the Scientific Societies in producing statements on this topic, in Italy there is still a significant difference between emergency physicians and cardiologists in managing patients with chest pain. For this reason, the aim of the present consensus document is double: first, to review the evidence-based efficacy and utility of various diagnostic tools, and, second, to delineate the critical pathways (describing key steps) that need to be implemented in order to standardize the management of chest pain patients, making a correct diagnosis and treatment as uniform as possible across the entire country. PMID:28751843

  13. ANMCO-SIMEU Consensus Document: in-hospital management of patients presenting with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Zuin, Guerrino; Parato, Vito Maurizio; Groff, Paolo; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Cassin, Matteo; Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; Del Pinto, Maurizio; Di Tano, Giuseppe; Nardi, Federico; Rossini, Roberta; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Ruggiero, Enrico; Scotto di Uccio, Fortunato; Valente, Serafina

    2017-05-01

    Chest pain is a common general practice presentation that requires careful diagnostic assessment because of its diverse and potentially serious causes. However, the evaluation of acute chest pain remains challenging, despite many new insights over the past two decades. The percentage of patients presenting to the emergency departments because of acute chest pain appears to be increasing. Nowadays, there are two essential chest pain-related issues: (i) the missed diagnoses of acute coronary syndromes with a poor short-term prognosis; and (ii) the increasing percentage of hospitalizations of low-risk cases. It is well known that hospitalization of a low-risk chest pain patient can lead to unnecessary tests and procedures, with an increasing trend of complications and burden of costs. Therefore, the significantly reduced financial resources of healthcare systems induce physicians and administrators to improve the efficiency of care protocols for patients with acute chest pain. Despite the efforts of the Scientific Societies in producing statements on this topic, in Italy there is still a significant difference between emergency physicians and cardiologists in managing patients with chest pain. For this reason, the aim of the present consensus document is double: first, to review the evidence-based efficacy and utility of various diagnostic tools, and, second, to delineate the critical pathways (describing key steps) that need to be implemented in order to standardize the management of chest pain patients, making a correct diagnosis and treatment as uniform as possible across the entire country.

  14. [ANMCO/SIMEU Consensus document: In-hospital management of patients presenting with chest pain].

    PubMed

    Zuin, Guerrino; Parato, Vito Maurizio; Groff, Paolo; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Cassin, Matteo; Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; Del Pinto, Maurizio; Di Tano, Giuseppe; Nardi, Federico; Rossini, Roberta; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Ruggiero, Enrico; Scotto Di Uccio, Fortunato; Valente, Serafina

    2016-06-01

    Chest pain is a common general practice presentation that requires careful diagnostic assessment because of its diverse and potentially serious causes. However, the evaluation of acute chest pain remains challenging, despite many new insights over the past two decades. The percentage of patients presenting to the emergency departments because of acute chest pain appears to be increasing. Nowadays, there are two essential chest pain-related issues: 1) the missed diagnoses of acute coronary syndromes with a poor short-term prognosis; 2) the increasing percentage of hospitalizations of low-risk cases.It is well known that hospitalization of a low-risk chest pain patient can lead to unnecessary tests and procedures, with an increasing trend of complications and burden of costs. Therefore, the significantly reduced financial resources of healthcare systems induce physicians and administrators to improve the efficiency of care protocols for patients with acute chest pain. Despite the efforts of the Scientific Societies in producing statements on this topic, in Italy there is still a significant difference between emergency physicians and cardiologists in managing patients with chest pain. For this reason, the aim of the present consensus document is double: first, to review the evidence-based efficacy and utility of various diagnostic tools, and, second, to delineate the critical pathways (describing key steps) that need to be implemented in order to standardize the management of chest pain patients, making a correct diagnosis and treatment as uniform as possible across the entire country.

  15. The Virtual Poster Showcase: Opportunities for students to present their research from anywhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, P. M.; Furukawa, H.; Williams, B. M.; Holm Adamec, B.

    2015-12-01

    Although many students conduct research with faculty in organized summer programs or as part of their course work or their degree work, they often face barriers to traveling to present that research, especially at national or international conferences. This is especially true for students who are members of underrepresented minority populations and students studying outside of the United States. A new and exciting opportunity for undergraduate as well as graduate students to showcase their work is now available. AGU piloted three opportunities for an undergraduate and graduate virtual poster showcase in the fall of 2015. Student participants were recruited from a diverse array of groups including minority-serving organizations, two-year colleges, and internship programs at federal agencies and national laboratories. Students uploaded an abstract, poster, and short video explain their research, and then participated in Q&A sessions with peers as well as expert judges. This presentation will share characteristics of participating groups, lessons learned from this new program, and preliminary evaluation findings as well as plans for the future.

  16. Publication Rates of Podium Versus Poster Presentations at the Arthroscopy Association of North America Meetings 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Frank, Rachel M; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Collins, Michael J; Arns, Thomas A; Black, Austin; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Forsythe, Brian

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the publication rate of poster and podium presentations at Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA) annual meetings from 2008 to 2012. An online search using PubMed and Google Scholar for all published manuscripts associated with abstracts presented from 2008 to 2012 AANA annual meetings was performed. Abstracts were classified by presentation type (poster vs podium), and the journal and publication date were recorded for all published abstracts. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and Fisher's exact tests were performed, with P < .05 considered significant. A total of 1,508 abstracts were submitted to AANA annual meetings from 2008 to 2012, with 976 abstracts accepted for presentation (65% overall acceptance rate). There were 328 podium (22% acceptance rate) and 648 poster (43% acceptance rate) presentations. Of the 976 accepted abstracts, 479 (49%) were published within 3 years in peer-reviewed journals. The overall publication rates for podium and poster presentations were 59% (n = 193) and 44% (n = 286), respectively. Podium presentations were significantly more likely to be published within 3 years compared with poster presentations (P < .0001; odds ratio 1.8095, confidence interval 1.3826-2.3682). There were no differences in time to publication between podium and poster presentations (1.3 ± 1.2 vs 1.1 ± 1.3 years, P = .0633). Over the 5-year study period, the overall abstract acceptance rate (P < .0001) and the rate of abstracts accepted for poster presentation (P < .0001) increased significantly over time, whereas there was no increase in the rate of abstracts accepted for podium presentation (P = .5638). The most common journals of publication were Arthroscopy (n = 157, 32.7%) followed by American Journal of Sports Medicine (n = 93, 19.4%). The overall publication rate of abstracts presented at AANA annual meetings is 49%, with podium presentations 1.8 times more likely to be published than poster presentations. The

  17. Chest auscultatory signs in infants presenting to A&E with bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Kirsty E; Schwarze, Jürgen; Beattie, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Anecdotally it has been noted that the traditional chest signs associated with bronchiolitis appear inconsistently in infants clinically diagnosed with bronchiolitis. We wished to explore this more formally. The aim of this study was to assess whether the auscultatory chest signs at presentation in infants with bronchiolitis were influenced by age or by the underlying pathogen. We conducted a prospective opportunistic cohort study, recruiting infants less than 12 months old who presented with bronchiolitis to the Emergency Department of the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Edinburgh. Eighty-six infants were recruited. Infants who presented with wheeze were significantly older [26.6 (±1.9) weeks] than those without wheeze [17.3 (±2.1) weeks] (analysis of variance, P=0.002). Those who presented without any chest signs on auscultation were younger than those with chest signs [15.1 (±2.6) weeks compared with 24.4 (±1.7) weeks] (analysis of variance, P=0.006). We did not detect any difference in any of the auscultatory chest signs (crackles, wheeze or absence of signs) depending on the virus responsible for bronchiolitis. Clinical signs associated with bronchiolitis vary according to age. Infants older than 6 months are more likely to present with wheeze and infants less than 4 months old are likely to present without chest signs on auscultation.

  18. Poster papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Michael

    In many scientific societies, presentation by poster has become a popular alternative to oral delivery for contributed papers at major meetings. This has not been so in the AGU. My purpose in this 'editorial' is to acquaint the AGU membership with some of the advantages of the poster paper as an occasional alternative to the 10-minute talk.The main advantage for the author of a poster paper is the opportunity for interaction with an interested audience for a 3 hour period. Significant feedback from the audience is a bonus that gives the author a better understanding of his own work and how to explain it, both orally and in print. Those of us who have tried poster presentation have found it to be a very positive experience.

  19. Comptational comparison of asbestos fibers: Dosimetry model simulations to characterize variabilty and potency (Presentation poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled asbestos fibers result in respiratory diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma, but different asbestos fibers exhibit different potency. We applied a recently developed dosimetry model (Asgharian et al., Poster # 104) that describes th...

  20. Comptational comparison of asbestos fibers: Dosimetry model simulations to characterize variabilty and potency (Presentation poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled asbestos fibers result in respiratory diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma, but different asbestos fibers exhibit different potency. We applied a recently developed dosimetry model (Asgharian et al., Poster # 104) that describes th...

  1. Publication rates of podium versus poster presentations at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine meetings: 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, Stuart D; Menge, Travis J; Anderson, Allen F; Spindler, Kurt P

    2015-05-01

    Presentations at scientific meetings are often used to influence clinical practice, yet many presentations are not ultimately published in peer-reviewed journals. Previously reported publication rates for orthopaedic specialties have varied from 34% to 52%. In addition, the publication rate of accepted abstracts is a strong indicator of meeting quality, and it has a potential effect on clinical practice. To date, no studies have investigated publication rates in the field of sports medicine, and specifically for abstracts presented at American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) meetings. To determine the overall publication rate of abstracts presented at AOSSM annual meetings and whether there were differences in publication rates between poster and podium presentations. Descriptive epidemiology study. A comprehensive search was performed using PubMed and Google Scholar for all published manuscripts pertaining to abstracts presented at the 2006 to 2010 AOSSM annual meetings. Abstracts were classified according to presentation type (podium, poster) and subsequently were categorized into subspecialty area and study design. For published abstracts, the journal and publication date were recorded. A total of 1665 abstracts were submitted to AOSSM annual meetings from 2006 to 2010, with 444 abstracts accepted (26.7% overall acceptance rate); there were 277 podium presentations and 167 posters. Of these 444 abstracts, 298 (67.1%) were published within 3 years in peer-reviewed journals. The overall publication rates for podium and poster presentations were 73.3% and 56.9%, respectively. For the combined years of 2006 to 2010, podium presentations were 2.08 (95% CI, 1.39-3.11) times more likely to be published compared with poster presentations. The overall publication rate of abstracts presented at AOSSM annual meetings (67.1%) was much higher than that reported for other orthopaedic meetings (34%-52%), highlighting the overall educational value and

  2. Publication rates of poster presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons annual scientific conference between 1999 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Abicht, Bradley P; Donnenwerth, Michael P; Borkosky, Sara L; Plovanich, Elizabeth J; Roukis, Thomas S

    2012-01-01

    Publication is the desired end point of scientific research. Ultimately, it is desired that research presented in poster format at a scientific conference will be developed into a report and become published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Moreover, poster presentations of research studies are often referenced and, as a result, influence treatment care plans. No data exist for the actual publication rate of podiatric foot and ankle surgery poster presentations. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the actual publication rates of poster presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) annual scientific conference (ASC) during a 10-year period. Print or electronic media for the ACFAS ASC official program from 1999 to 2008 were obtained. Each year's official program was manually searched for any poster presentation and, when identified, the authors and title were individually searched using Internet-based search engines to determine whether a poster presentation had been followed by publication. Of the 825 posters, 198 (24%) poster presentations were ultimately published in 1 of 32 medical journals within a weighted mean of 17.6 months. Of the 32 journals, 25 (78.1%) represented peer-reviewed journals. The publication rate of poster presentations at the ACFAS ASC was less than that of oral manuscripts presented at the same meeting during the same period and was also less than the orthopedic subspecialty poster presentation publication rates. Therefore, attendees of the ACFAS ASC should be aware that only a few of the posters presented at the ACFAS ASC will be valid because they will not survive the rigors of publication 76% of the time. Additionally, more stringent selection criteria should be used so that the selected poster presentations can ultimately withstand the publication process. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Electromagnetic oil field mapping for improved process monitoring and reservoir characterization: A poster presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, J.R.; Mansure, A.J.

    1992-02-01

    This report is a permanent record of a poster paper presented by the authors at the Third International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference in Tulsa, Oklahoma on November 3--5, 1991. The subject is electromagnetic (EM) techniques that are being developed to monitor oil recovery processes to improve overall process performance. The potential impact of EM surveys is very significant, primarily in the areas of locating oil, identifying oil inside and outside the pattern, characterizing flow units, and pseudo-real time process control to optimize process performance and efficiency. Since a map of resistivity alone has little direct application to these areas, an essential part of the EM technique is understanding the relationship between the process and the formation resistivity at all scales, and integrating this understanding into reservoir characterization and simulation. First is a discussion of work completed on the core scale petrophysics of resistivity changes in an oil recovery process; a steamflood is used as an example. A system has been developed for coupling the petrophysics of resistivity with reservoir simulation to simulate the formation resistivity structure arising from a recovery process. Preliminary results are given for an investigation into the effect of heterogeneity and anisotropy on the EM technique, as well as the use of the resistivity simulator to interpret EM data in terms of reservoir and process parameters. Examples illustrate the application of the EM technique to improve process monitoring and reservoir characterization.

  4. New Poster Puzzler | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Your challenge is to correctly identify the item and its location from the picture below. Clue: It’s somewhere at the NCI campus at Frederick or Fort Detrick. Win a framed photograph of the Poster Puzzler and have your photo featured on the Poster website by e-mailing your guess, along with your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number, to poster@mail.nih.gov.

  5. New Poster Puzzler | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Your challenge is to correctly identify the item and its location from the picture below. Clue: It’s somewhere at the NCI campus at Frederick or Fort Detrick. Win a framed photograph of the Poster Puzzler and have your photo featured on the Poster website by e-mailing your guess, along with your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number, to poster@mail.nih.gov.

  6. New Poster Puzzler | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Your challenge is to correctly identify the item and its location from the picture below. Clue: It’s somewhere at the NCI campus at Frederick or Fort Detrick. Win a framed photograph of the Poster Puzzler and have your photo featured on the Poster website by e-mailing your guess, along with your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number, to poster@mail.nih.gov.

  7. New Poster Puzzler | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Your challenge is to correctly identify the item and its location from the picture below. Clue: It’s somewhere at the NCI campus at Frederick or Fort Detrick. Win a framed photograph of the Poster Puzzler and have your photo featured on the Poster website by e-mailing your guess, along with your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number, to poster@mail.nih.gov.

  8. Metastatic breast cancer presenting as air-space consolidation on chest computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Haruta, Yoshinori; Yokoyama, Akihito; Nakashima, Taku; Hattori, Noboru; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2009-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman suffered from hepatic and bone metastases of breast cancer. Two months after starting combination chemotherapy with trastuzumab and docetaxel, air-space consolidation was observed in the right lower lung lobe on a chest computed tomography (CT) and a high serum KL-6 level was detected. Drug-induced pneumonitis with organizing pneumonia type was suspected, however, a transbronchial lung biopsy and cytological examination of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid provided evidence of metastatic breast cancer. While the lung is a frequently affected site from metastasis of breast cancer, we report a rare case presenting as air-space consolidation on a chest CT.

  9. Educational poster session

    Treesearch

    Deborah Chavez

    1995-01-01

    The educational poster session provided a way of increasing the ordinarily limited time available for discussion of papers, while simultaneously making it easier to communicate visual materials not well suited to oral presentations. Poster presenters were available for 2 hours to discuss their displays. Poster presentations were divided into five categories: user...

  10. Revising Psychology Misconceptions by Integrating a Refutation-Style Text Framework into Poster Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassonde, Karla A.; Kolquist, Molly; Vergin, Megan

    2017-01-01

    Refutation-style texts have been considered a viable strategy for changing psychological misconceptions. The current study aims to integrate refutation-style texts into a classroom-based method of learning. Psychology students were administered a true/false misconception survey and then viewed several refutation-style poster presentations…

  11. New Poster Puzzler | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Your challenge is to correctly identify the item and its location from the picture. Clue: It’s somewhere at the NCI campus at Frederick or Fort Detrick. Win a framed photograph of the Poster Puzzler and have your photo featured on the Poster website by e-mailing your guess, along with your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number, to poster@mail.nih.gov. All entries must be received by Friday, February 12, 2016, and the winner will be drawn from all correct answers received by that date. Good luck and good hunting!

  12. New Poster Puzzler | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Your challenge is to correctly identify the item and its location from the picture. Clue: It’s somewhere at the NCI campus at Frederick or Fort Detrick. Win a framed photograph of the Poster Puzzler and have your photo featured on the Poster website by e-mailing your guess, along with your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number, to poster@mail.nih.gov. All entries must be received by Friday, February 12, 2016, and the winner will be drawn from all correct answers received by that date. Good luck and good hunting!

  13. Investigation in patients with previous myocardial infarction who present with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, A.P.; Fox, K.; Forse, G.; Pratt, T.; Steiner, R.

    1981-12-01

    Thirty-five patients who presented with chest pain underwent mapping of the ECG with exercise and angiocardiography. Krypton-81m was used to assess regional myocardial perfusion before, during and after atrial pacing. Twelve of the 35 patients had negative exercise tests. Eight of these 12 had normal coronary arteries and four had less than or equal to 50% stenosis of at least one major coronary artery. All 12 patients had uniform increases in regional myocardial perfusion (98 plus/minus 14.0%) during atrial pacing. Thirteen of the 35 patients had a history of myocardial infarction and precordial areas of Q waves. During exercise, all 13 patients complained of chest pain and showed precordial areas of both ST-segment elevation and depression. These 13 patients had greater than or equal to 70% stenosis of at least one major coronary artery. Myocardial blood flow studies showed fixed defects of perfusion corresponding to the Q waves and ST-segment elevation. In addition, there were separate transient decreases of regional myocardial perfusion (70 plus/minus 9.0%) during atrial pacing corresponding to ST-segment depression and chest pain. Ten of the 35 patients had a history of myocardial infarction and precordial areas of Q waves. These areas showed no changes during atrial pacing. All the patients showed at least one remote region of myocardium that increased perfusion (74 plus/minus 170%) throughout pacing. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction may present with chest pain. In this study, ST-segment elevation during an exercise ECG was not associated with chest pain or detectable myocardial ischemia. Regional perfusion in infarcted segments of myocardium did not change with atrial pacing.

  14. First experience with x-ray dark-field radiography for human chest imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Peter B.; Willer, Konstantin; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Gromann, Lukas B.; De Marco, Fabio; Scherer, Kai H.; Herzen, Julia; Achterhold, Klaus; Gleich, Bernhard; Münzel, Daniela; Renz, Martin; Renger, Bernhard C.; Fischer, Florian; Braun, Christian; Auweter, Sigrid; Hellbach, Katharina; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Schröter, Tobias; Mohr, Jürgen; Yaroshenko, Andre; Maack, Hanns-Ingo; Pralow, Thomas; van der Heijden, Hendrik; Proksa, Roland; Köhler, Thomas; Wieberneit, Nataly; Rindt, Karsten; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of an experimental X-ray dark-field radiography system for chest imaging in humans and to compare with conventional diagnostic imaging. Materials and Methods: The study was institutional review board (IRB) approved. A single human cadaver (52 years, female, height: 173 cm, weight: 84 kg, chest circumference: 97 cm) was imaged within 24 hours post mortem on the experimental x-ray dark-field system. In addition, the cadaver was imaged on a clinical CT system to obtain a reference scan. The grating-based dark-field radiography setup was equipped with a set of three gratings to enable grating-based dark-field contrast x-ray imaging. The prototype operates at an acceleration voltage of up to 70 kVp and with a field-of-view large enough for clinical chest x-ray (>35 x 35 cm2). Results: It was feasible to extract x-ray dark-field signal of the whole human thorax, clearly demonstrating that human x-ray dark-field chest radiography is feasible. Lung tissue produced strong scattering, reflected in a pronounced x-ray dark-field signal. The ribcage and the backbone are less prominent than the lung but are also distinguishable. Finally, the soft tissue is not present in the dark-field radiography. The regions of the lungs affected by edema, as verified by CT, showed less dark-field signal compared to healthy lung tissue. Conclusion: Our results reveal the current status of translating dark-field imaging from a micro (small animal) scale to a macro (patient) scale. The performance of the experimental x-ray dark-field radiography setup offers, for the first time, obtaining multi-contrast chest x-ray images (attenuation and dark-field signal) from a human cadaver.

  15. Quark Matter 2001 - Final report [Program and list of poster presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, Michael D.

    2002-02-01

    The Fifteenth International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (QM2001) was held on Long Island, New York on January 15-20, 2001. The main site of the conference was the campus of the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The conference included an afternoon of parallel sessions and tours of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. There were nearly 700 paid attendees. The conference program and a list of poster exhibits is included.

  16. Poor prognosis of patients presenting with symptomatic myocardial infarction but without chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Dorsch, M; Lawrance, R; Sapsford, R; Durham, N; Oldham, J; Greenwood, D; Jackson, B; Morrell, C; Robinson, M; Hall, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To describe the clinical features, prognosis, and treatment of patients presenting with atypical forms of acute myocardial infarction.
DESIGN—Consecutive cases of possible acute myocardial infarction were sought from coronary care registers, biochemistry records, and hospital management systems. Case notes were reviewed and predefined epidemiological and clinical variables were abstracted.
SETTING—20 adjacent hospitals in the former Yorkshire region.
PATIENTS—3684 consecutive cases of possible acute myocardial infarction admitted in a three month period were identified, of whom 2096 had a first episode of confirmed acute myocardial infarction.
RESULTS—20.2% of all patients admitted with an eventual diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction presented with symptoms other than chest pain. Compared with the group presenting with chest pain, these patients were older (76.6 v 69.1 years, p < 0.001), were more often women (54.6% v 35.3%, p < 0.001), and were more likely to have a history of heart failure (18.6% v 6.9%, p < 0.001). They had a higher 30 and 365 day mortality (49.2% and 61.0%, respectively) compared with patients presenting with chest pain (17.9% and 26.2%). In a Cox regression analysis the hazard ratio for presentation without chest pain was 1.60 (95% confidence interval 1.30 to 1.97) (p < 0.001) adjusted for age, heart rate, blood pressure, left ventricular impairment, and infarction with ST segment elevation as covariates. Importantly, they were also less likely to receive treatments with a proven ability to improve prognosis.
CONCLUSIONS—Atypical presentation of myocardial infarction without chest pain is common and associated with increased mortality. This may result in part from a failure to use beneficial treatment strategies.


Keywords: acute myocardial infarction; atypical presentation PMID:11602537

  17. Acute non-traumatic gastrothorax: presentation of a case with chest pain and atypical radiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepwant; Mackeith, Pieter; Gopal, Dipesh Pravin

    2016-03-23

    A previously well 71-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Department with acute-onset left-sided chest pain. She was haemodynamically stable with unremarkable systemic examination. Her electrocardiogram and troponin were within normal limits and her chest radiograph showed a raised left hemi-diaphragm. Two hours after admission, this woman became acutely breathless, and suffered a pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there was a return of spontaneous circulation and regained consciousness. A repeat clinical assessment revealed a new left-sided dullness to percussion with contralateral percussive resonance on respiratory examination. CXR revealed a left pan-hemi-thoracic opacity whilst better definition using CT-pulmonary angiography (CTPA) indicated an acute tension gastrothorax secondary to a large left-sided diaphragmatic hernia. Nasogastric (NG) tube insertion was used to decompress the stomach and the patient underwent uncomplicated emergency laparoscopic hernia reduction. She remained well at 1-year follow-up.

  18. New Poster Puzzler | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Your challenge is to correctly identify the item and its location from the picture at left. Clue: It’s somewhere at the NCI campus at Frederick or Fort Detrick. All entries must be received by Wednesday, July 1, 2015, and the winner will be drawn from all correct answers received by that date. Kids can win a McDonald’s gift certificate, and parents can win a framed photograph of the Poster Puzzler, and have your photo featured on the Poster website!

  19. New Poster Puzzler | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Your challenge is to correctly identify the item and its location from the picture at left. Clue: It’s somewhere at the NCI campus at Frederick or Fort Detrick. All entries must be received by Wednesday, July 1, 2015, and the winner will be drawn from all correct answers received by that date. Kids can win a McDonald’s gift certificate, and parents can win a framed photograph of the Poster Puzzler, and have your photo featured on the Poster website!

  20. Primary Cosmic Rays with Energies above 1015 eV - Rapporteur Review of Poster Presentations at the 23rd ECRS - Session PCR 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabelski, Jacek

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of atmospheric Extensive Air Showers (EAS) are the only way of experimental studies of Primary Cosmic Rays (CR) with energies above 1015 eV. The final targets of these studies are search for astrophysical origin of these particles and properties of particle production in high energy particle interaction. Works presented at the PCR 2 session in the form of posters reflected the current progress in this area. In this review presented posters were grouped according to CR energy range, astrophysical significance, relation to high energy physics interaction properties and interaction models, and future experiments. 42 posters were submitted for this session. Some of the presented material in posters overlapped in parts with oral presentations.

  1. Congenital partial defect of the left pericardium presenting as chest pain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heui-Jeong; Seol, Sang-Hoon; Seo, Guang-Won; No, Tae-Hoon; Seo, Min-Gyo; Park, Bo-Min; Song, Pil-Sang; Kim, Dong-Kie; Kim, Ki-Hun; Kim, Doo-Il

    2014-12-01

    Congenital pericardial defect is a rare cardiac defect with variable clinical presentations. It is usually an unexpected finding during cardiac surgery or autopsy. The clinical detection of congenital absence of pericardium is important because of its life-threatening complications such as fatal myocardial strangulation, myocardial ischaemia and sudden death. We present a patient with the incidental finding of left-sided partial defect of the pericardium during evaluation of chest pain. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Welcome to the Poster Website | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Melissa Porter, Executive Editor The Poster newsletter staff is pleased to present you with the all-new Poster website. Now you can access all the latest information from the National Cancer Institute at Frederick from your smart phone, tablet, notebook, or any other device with an Internet connection.

  3. Welcome to the Poster Website | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Melissa Porter, Executive Editor The Poster newsletter staff is pleased to present you with the all-new Poster website. Now you can access all the latest information from the National Cancer Institute at Frederick from your smart phone, tablet, notebook, or any other device with an Internet connection.

  4. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, J.H.M.

    1982-01-01

    This review of chest radiology reexamines normal findings on plain chest radiographs, and presents a new plain film view for detecting metastases in the lungs, and describes new findings on acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Various chest radiologic procedures are examined. (KRM)

  5. Fatal intra-hepatic haemorrhage presenting with cardiac-type chest pain and anaemia.

    PubMed

    Sekaran, Lakshmanan; Ho, John

    2007-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman presented to the accident and emergency department with a short history of central chest pain radiating to the arm and epigastrum, associated with vomiting. There was no history of haematemesis and no recent change of bowel habit or melaena. She had a myocardial infarction 4 months previously and had a metal prosthetic mitral valve replacement for which she was anticoagulated with warfarin, maintaining an INR between 2.5- 3.5. On examination she appeared pale, but there were no other abnormal findings; the liver was not enlarged or tender.

  6. Chest pain in the emergency room-an interesting case presentation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michael C

    2016-12-01

    A 61-year-old woman presented to the emergency room with atypical chest pain, non-diagnostic electrocardiogram, and an initial troponin level that was normal. A coronary computed tomography angio (CCTA) was performed, and on initial review, it appeared to be normal. Subsequent review including evaluation of functional data from the retrospective scan identified a distal left anterior descending occlusion and an apical wall-motion abnormality with no other evidence of heart disease. This case illustrates the complementary contribution of anatomic and functional data and serves to remind us that on rare occasions, what looks "normal" is not always normal.

  7. Group marking and peer assessment during a group poster presentation: the experiences and views of midwifery students.

    PubMed

    Ohaja, Magdalena; Dunlea, Margaret; Muldoon, Kathryn

    2013-09-01

    Traditionally, written examination and clinical practice assessments are the main ways of deeming midwifery students fit and competent for practice. Contemporary academics in an effort to engage the students in the learning process have employed alternative teaching and assessment strategies. Among the alternative strategies are group projects after which members of the group are awarded the same grade, and peer assessment. With the purpose of informing the midwifery curricular, we utilised a qualitative descriptive approach to explore midwifery students' experiences and views on the use of group poster presentation for learning and assessment. The participants consisted of a purposive sample of 14 higher diploma midwifery students who were registered in a third level institution in Ireland. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted following the completion of the poster presentation assessment. Permission to undertake the study was obtained from the college ethics committee. In this paper, we focus on the participants' views of group marking and peer assessment which are among the key elements that emerged in this study. While awarding a group mark was overall accepted, peer assessment proved a more contentious issue. Most of the participants found it challenging marking their friends. Reactions to group marks were very much influenced by the group dynamics.

  8. About the Poster | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Poster features the news, local events, and people of the scientific, administrative, and support communities at NCI at Frederick, Frederick, Maryland. It is published by Scientific Publications, Graphics & Media, Leidos Biomedical Research, for NCI at Frederick. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. government.

  9. About the Poster | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Poster features the news, local events, and people of the scientific, administrative, and support communities at NCI at Frederick, Frederick, Maryland. It is published by Scientific Publications, Graphics & Media, Leidos Biomedical Research, for NCI at Frederick. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. government.

  10. Aspergillus and mucormycosis presenting with normal chest X-ray in an immunocompromised host.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipin; Rajagopalan, Natarajan; Patil, Mahantesh; Shivaprasad, C

    2014-04-09

    Invasive aspergillus and mucormycosis infection are not uncommon in immunocompromised individuals. Endobronchial fungal infections have been reported in the literature, especially in patient's with diabetes complicated by diabetic ketoacidosis, but end bronchial coinfection with aspergillus and mucormycosis without pulmonary involvement has not been described in the literature. We report the case of a woman with diabetes who presented with gastrointestinal symptoms, ketoacidosis and respiratory distress, with an apparently normal chest X-ray. Investigations revealed a cavitatory lesion in the left lower lobe of the lungs on CT scan. Bronchoscopy revealed intense mucosal oedema and whitish plaques at the lower end of the trachea and right main stem bronchus with a normal left bronchial tree. Microbiological and pathological results confirmed aspergillus and mucormycosis. Despite aggressive medical management, the patient deteriorated and died of respiratory failure. Strong suspicion of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients with respiratory failure and minimal chest infiltrates, early fibreoptic bronchoscopy and early aggressive treatment is crucial for the patient's survival.

  11. Quality improvement in the door-to-balloon times for ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients presenting without chest pain.

    PubMed

    Borden, William B; Fennessy, Michelle M; O'Connor, Anne M; Mulliken, Robert A; Lee, Linda; Nathan, Sandeep; Nichols, Jearlyn; Lopez, John J

    2012-05-01

    To assess a quality improvement initiative aimed at minimizing door-to-balloon (DTB) times for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients presenting without chest pain. Timely percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is the cornerstone of STEMI care. The absence of chest pain delays PCI. Improvements in DTB times may need to focus on atypical presentation patients. We compared DTB times on all STEMI patients admitted through the emergency department who underwent PCI before (Phase I; October 2004-June 2007) and after (Phase II; July 2007-October 2009) the quality improvement effort, which mandated rapid electrocardiogram (ECG) triage for an expanded list of presenting symptoms. In Phase I (69 patient, 60 with chest pain), patients with chest pain had a shorter mean time to first ECG (ECG Interval) by 32.0 min (P < 0.01) and nonsignificantly faster mean DTB time by 42.0 min (P = 0.07) compared to patients who presented without chest pain. In Phase II (62 patients, 56 with chest pain) compared to Phase I, mean ECG interval decreased by 44 min (P = 0.02) and mean DTB time by 99 min (P = 0.01) in patients without chest pain, eliminating the differences in ECG intervals between typical and atypical presentations (12 min vs. 11 min, P = 0.91). Multivariable analysis controlling for on/off hours and patient characteristics confirmed these findings. A simple modification of emergency room ECG triage protocol, which expands indications for rapid ECG performance, was successful in improving rapid reperfusion for patients with STEMI presenting without chest pain. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Propaganda Posters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahaney, Darlene C.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a lesson that utilizes propaganda posters in order to teacher students about the U.S. homefront and war effort during World War II. Provides background information and posters for the teacher's use and explains that the students can use this information when creating their own propaganda posters. (CMK)

  13. Propaganda Posters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahaney, Darlene C.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a lesson that utilizes propaganda posters in order to teacher students about the U.S. homefront and war effort during World War II. Provides background information and posters for the teacher's use and explains that the students can use this information when creating their own propaganda posters. (CMK)

  14. A Radical Poster Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Paul A., Jr.; Camp, Cameron J.

    1987-01-01

    Presents the use of a poster session as an integral part of an experimental design course. Describes how the principles of experimental design are demonstrated when undergraduates design and conduct original experiments, using radishes as subjects, and present their results in a poster session. Discusses the benefits of using radishes as subjects.…

  15. Student Poster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Erin

    2004-01-01

    Poster presentations are one way scientists present their latest research findings at professional meetings. This format also works well in the classroom and gives students the opportunity to communicate the results of their experiments (perhaps the most critical portion of their studies). In a performance-based task such as a poster session,…

  16. Student Poster Days Showcase Young Researchers | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Student interns presented their research to the NCI at Frederick community during the annual Student Poster Days event, held in the Building 549 lobby and the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) atrium over two days.

  17. Summary of Educational Poster Session

    Treesearch

    1992-01-01

    The educational poster session provided a way of increasing the ordinarily limited time available for discussion of papers, while simultaneously making it easier to communicate visual materials not well suited to oral presentations. Poster presenters were available for 3 hours to discuss their displays. Poster presentations were divided into two categories: minority...

  18. Apportioning our time and energy: oral presentation, poster, journal article or other?

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Walter, Garry

    2004-09-01

    There is a general expectation for health service employees to present their work in oral or written format to showcase clinical ideas, innovations, service developments, and quality and research initiatives. This research note outlines the types of forums where work can be presented and highlights their relative merits. It is anticipated that this discussion will be of interest to clinicians, managers and researchers when considering where best to present their work.

  19. How to present, summarize, and defend your poster at the meeting.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Robert S

    2004-10-01

    For many people public speaking induces stress and fear, but with adequate planning, practice, and understanding of the "dos and don'ts" you can deliver presentations that will communicate your research clearly, succinctly, and with a professional and confident demeanor. This article provides a guide for the novice researcher to develop the skills to deliver several types of presentation and to minimize (and even make use of) the stress and fear. Planning and practice are the key to success.

  20. Utility of Chest Radiography in Emergency Department Patients Presenting with Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew L.; Chiu, David; Shapiro, Nathan I; Grossman, Shamai A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Syncope has myriad etiologies, ranging from benign to immediately life threatening. This frequently leads to over testing. Chest radiographs (CXR) are among these commonly performed tests despite their uncertain diagnostic yield. The objective is to study the distribution of normal and abnormal chest radiographs in patients presenting with syncope, stratified by those who did or did not have an adverse event at 30 days. Methods We performed a post-hoc analysis of a prospective cohort of consecutive patients presenting to an urban tertiary care academic medical center with a chief complaint of syncope from 2003–2006. The frequency and findings for each CXR were reviewed, as well as emergency department and hospital discharge diagnoses, and 30-day outcome. Results There were 575 total subjects, 39.7% were male, and the mean age was 57.2 (SD 24.6). Of the 575 subjects, 403 (70.1%) had CXRs performed, and 116 (20.2%) had an adverse event after their syncope. Of the 116 people who had an adverse event, 15 (12.9%) had a positive CXR, 81 (69.8%) had a normal CXR, and 20 (17.2%) did not have a CXR as part of the initial evaluation. Among the 459 people who did not have an adverse event, 3 (0.7%) had a positive CXR, 304 (66.2%) had a normal CXR, and 152 (33.1%) did not have a CXR performed. Fifteen of the 18 patients (83.4%) with an abnormal CXR had an adverse event. Eighty-one of the 385 patients (21.0%) with a normal CXR had an adverse event. Among those who had a CXR performed, an abnormal CXR was associated with increased odds of adverse event (OR: 18.77 (95% CI= [5.3–66.4])). Conclusion Syncope patients with abnormal CXRs are likely to experience an adverse event, though the majority of CXRs performed in the work up of syncope are normal. PMID:27833675

  1. Publication rate of abstracts of papers and posters presented at Medical Library Association annual meetings*†

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Sally A; Wandersee, Janene R

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to ascertain the publication rate of abstracts presented at the annual meetings of the Medical Library Association (MLA) for the years of 2002 and 2003. The secondary objectives were to examine possible reasons for non-publication and factors influencing publication. Methods: A total of 442 abstracts from both meeting years, consisting of presented papers and posters, were examined. The 2 methods used to obtain a publication rate were literature searches and an online questionnaire sent to first authors. The questionnaire also asked abstract authors about reasons for non-publication and other factors that might have influenced their decisions about whether or not to submit the project for publication. Results: The overall publication rate from the survey was 26.5%, and the publication rate found via literature searching was 27.6%. The most common reason given for non-publication was time restrictions. Also notable was the large proportion of abstracts written by librarians working at universities and those having 25 or more years in the library profession. Discussion: Publication rates for abstracts presented at the Medical Library Association meetings for the years studied rank at the low end in comparison with other medical professional associations. Further research into factors affecting publication may reveal ways to increase this rate. PMID:20648260

  2. Prognostic value of exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Guiney, T.E.; Newell, J.B.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Accurate prognostic information is important in determining optimal management of patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain. In this study, the ability of exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging to predict future cardiac events (cardiovascular death or nonfatal myocardial infarction) was correlated with clinical, coronary and left ventricular angiographic and exercise electrocardiographic data in 139 consecutive, nonsurgically managed patients followed-up over a 3 to 5 year period (mean follow-up, 3.7 +/- 0.9), using a logistic regression analysis. Among patients without prior myocardial infarction (100 of 139), the number of myocardial segments with transient thallium-201 defects was the only statistically significant predictor of future cardiac events when all patient variables were evaluated. Among patients with myocardial infarction before evaluation (39 of 139), angiographic ejection fraction was the only significant predictor of future cardiac events when all variables were considered. This study suggests an approach to evaluate the risk of future cardiac events in patients with possible ischemic heart disease.

  3. Melioidosis with a Pericardial Effusion, which Relapsed as a Chest Wall Abscess: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mathai K., Rashmi Teresa; Bhat, K. Sundara; Ashraf, Mohammed; Sarawag, Mayank; K.P., Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis, which is caused by a soil saprophyte, Burkholderia pseudomallei, is most prevalent in the south–west coast of India. Although it is frequently seen in immunocompromised patients, melioidosis can occur in apparently normal individuals. Melioidosis can involve almost any organ. A relapse of melioidosis is usually associated with a poor adherence to the eradication therapy, a multifocal involvement and bacteraemia. A relapsing melioidosis is usually known to follow a similar pattern of organ involvement in the first and second episodes of the infection. We are discussing here, a rare case of melioidosis in a 38-year-old construction-worker, with no risk factors, who presented initially with a pericardial effusion. It relapsed 6 months after he completed the prescribed eradication therapy for 3 months, as an anterior chest wall abscess. The author recommends a high index of suspicion for the relapsed melioidosis cases, inspite of the primary episode being non-bacteraemic and compliant with the recommended therapy, in order to avoid further complications. PMID:23730667

  4. Nobel Prize Recipient Eric Betzig Presents Lecture on Efforts to Improve High-Resolution Microscopy | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Eric Betzig, Ph.D., a 2014 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and a scientist at Janelia Research Campus (JRC), Howard Hughes Medical Institute, in Ashburn, Va., visited NCI at Frederick on Sept. 10 to present a Distinguished Scientist lecture and discuss the latest high-resolution microscopy techniques. Betzig co-invented photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) in collaboration with scientists at NIH. PALM achieves 10-fold improvement in spatial resolution of cells, going from the resolution limit of approximately 250 nm in standard optical microscopy down to approximately 20 nm, thus producing a so-called “super-resolution” image. Spatial resolution refers to the clarity of an image or, in other words, the smallest details that can be observed from an image.

  5. Nobel Prize Recipient Eric Betzig Presents Lecture on Efforts to Improve High-Resolution Microscopy | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Eric Betzig, Ph.D., a 2014 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and a scientist at Janelia Research Campus (JRC), Howard Hughes Medical Institute, in Ashburn, Va., visited NCI at Frederick on Sept. 10 to present a Distinguished Scientist lecture and discuss the latest high-resolution microscopy techniques. Betzig co-invented photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) in collaboration with scientists at NIH. PALM achieves 10-fold improvement in spatial resolution of cells, going from the resolution limit of approximately 250 nm in standard optical microscopy down to approximately 20 nm, thus producing a so-called “super-resolution” image. Spatial resolution refers to the clarity of an image or, in other words, the smallest details that can be observed from an image.

  6. L-band Dielectric Constant Measurements of Seawater (Oral presentation and SMOS Poster)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Roger H.; Utku, Cuneyt; LeVine, David M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a resonant cavity technique for the measurement of the dielectric constant of seawater as a function of its salinity. Accurate relationships between salinity and dielectric constant (which determines emissivity) are needed for sensor systems such as SMOS and Aquarius that will monitor salinity from space in the near future. The purpose of the new measurements is to establish the dependence of the dielectric constant of seawater on salinity in contemporary units (e.g. psu) and to take advantage of modern instrumentation to increase the accuracy of these measurements. The measurement device is a brass cylindrical cavity 16cm in diameter and 7cm in height. The seawater is introduced into the cavity through a slender glass tube having an inner diameter of 0.1 mm. By assuming that this small amount of seawater slightly perturbs the internal fields in the cavity, perturbation theory can be employed. A simple formula results relating the real part of the dielectric constant to the change in resonant frequency of the cavity. In a similar manner, the imaginary part of the dielectric constant is related to the change in the cavity s Q. The expected accuracy of the cavity technique is better than 1% for the real part and 1 to 2% for the imaginary part. Presently, measurements of methanol have been made and agree with precision measurements in the literature to within 1% in both real and imaginary parts. Measurements have been made of the dielectric constant of seawater samples from Ocean Scientific in the United Kingdom with salinities of 10, 30, 35 and 38 psu. All measurements were made at room temperature. Plans to make measurements at a range of temperatures and salinities will be discussed.

  7. L-band Dielectric Constant Measurements of Seawater (Oral presentation and SMOS Poster)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Roger H.; Utku, Cuneyt; LeVine, David M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a resonant cavity technique for the measurement of the dielectric constant of seawater as a function of its salinity. Accurate relationships between salinity and dielectric constant (which determines emissivity) are needed for sensor systems such as SMOS and Aquarius that will monitor salinity from space in the near future. The purpose of the new measurements is to establish the dependence of the dielectric constant of seawater on salinity in contemporary units (e.g. psu) and to take advantage of modern instrumentation to increase the accuracy of these measurements. The measurement device is a brass cylindrical cavity 16cm in diameter and 7cm in height. The seawater is introduced into the cavity through a slender glass tube having an inner diameter of 0.1 mm. By assuming that this small amount of seawater slightly perturbs the internal fields in the cavity, perturbation theory can be employed. A simple formula results relating the real part of the dielectric constant to the change in resonant frequency of the cavity. In a similar manner, the imaginary part of the dielectric constant is related to the change in the cavity s Q. The expected accuracy of the cavity technique is better than 1% for the real part and 1 to 2% for the imaginary part. Presently, measurements of methanol have been made and agree with precision measurements in the literature to within 1% in both real and imaginary parts. Measurements have been made of the dielectric constant of seawater samples from Ocean Scientific in the United Kingdom with salinities of 10, 30, 35 and 38 psu. All measurements were made at room temperature. Plans to make measurements at a range of temperatures and salinities will be discussed.

  8. Publication patterns of oral and poster presentations at the annual meetings of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Akash J; Cherian, Jacob; Fox, Benjamin D; Whitehead, William E; Curry, Daniel J; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    National and international meetings, such as the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) meetings, provide a central location for the gathering and dissemination of research. The purpose of this study was to determine the publication rates of both oral and poster presentations at CNS and AANS meetings in peer-reviewed journals. The authors reviewed all accepted abstracts, presented as either oral or poster presentations, at the CNS and AANS meetings from 2003 to 2005. This information was then used to search PubMed to determine the rate of publication of the abstracts presented at the meetings. Abstracts were considered published if the data presented at the meeting was identical to that in the publication. The overall publication rate was 32.48% (1243 of 3827 abstracts). On average, 41.28% of oral presentations and 29.03% of poster presentations were eventually published. Of those studies eventually published, 98.71% were published within 5 years of presentation at the meeting. Published abstracts were published most frequently in the Journal of Neurosurgery and Neurosurgery. Approximately one-third of all presentations at the annual CNS and AANS meetings will be published in peer-reviewed, MEDLINE-indexed journals. These meetings are excellent forums for neurosurgical practitioners to be exposed to current research. Oral presentations have a significantly higher rate of eventual publication compared with poster presentations, reflecting their higher quality. The Journal of Neurosurgery and Neurosurgery have been the main outlets of neurosurgical research from these meetings.

  9. Poster Day Showcases Student Work | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nathalie Walker, Guest Writer, and Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On July 31, NCI at Frederick hosted Student Poster Day, an annual event in which student interns can showcase the work they do in their various positions in NCI at Frederick labs and offices. Participating students are interns in the Student Internship Program, a program designed for undergraduate and graduate students during their summer breaks, as well as interns in the Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship Program (WHK SIP), a program for high school seniors. All the students have an opportunity to present their scientific posters.

  10. Poster Day Showcases Student Work | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nathalie Walker, Guest Writer, and Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On July 31, NCI at Frederick hosted Student Poster Day, an annual event in which student interns can showcase the work they do in their various positions in NCI at Frederick labs and offices. Participating students are interns in the Student Internship Program, a program designed for undergraduate and graduate students during their summer breaks, as well as interns in the Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship Program (WHK SIP), a program for high school seniors. All the students have an opportunity to present their scientific posters.

  11. Long-Term Prognosis of Low-Risk Women Presenting to the Emergency Department with Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Eddin, Moneer; Venugopal, Sandhya; Chatterton, Brittany; Thinda, Angela; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2017-04-29

    Prognosis of low-risk women presenting to the emergency department (ED) with chest pain has not been clarified. We assessed early and long-term outcomes of such patients and determined the need for predischarge testing. Retrospective assessment of consecutive low-risk women presenting to the ED with chest pain evaluated in a chest pain unit (CPU). Criteria of low risk: age ≤51 years; no history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or smoking; negative initial electrocardiogram (ECG); and cardiac troponin. Predischarge testing (treadmill or stress imaging) was performed at the discretion of the CPU attending physician. The study group comprised 214 consecutive women. Predischarge testing was performed in 142 patients (66%, age 43.9 years) and 72 patients (34%, age 43.1 years) had no predischarge testing. Predischarge testing comprised exercise treadmill (n = 102, 72%) or stress imaging (n = 40, 28%). Length of stay with no predischarge testing was 4.1 hours, compared with 8.6 hours with predischarge testing (P = .04). There were no cardiovascular events in the index presentation; during a 5-year interval (100% follow-up), there were 2 cardiovascular events (fatal heart failure, 1 patient; fatal stroke, 1 patient [total, 2/214, 0.93%]). Low-risk women presenting to the ED with chest pain have an excellent short- and long-term prognosis. A majority of patients did not receive predischarge testing, and their length of stay was reduced by >50% compared with those with predischarge testing. These findings suggest that such patients may not require predischarge testing for disposition from a CPU, which can reduce length of stay, decrease cost, and improve resource utilization. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Tuberculosis of the manubriosternal joint and concurrent asymptomatic active pulmonary tuberculosis in a patient presenting with a chest wall mass.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Luis; Ayala-Carbonero, Ana María; Rodríguez-Díaz, Ricardo; García Latorre, Raquel; Muñoz-Molina, Gemma María; Cabañero-Sánchez, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman presented to our hospital with an anterior chest wall swelling. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging showed findings consistent with an infectious arthritis of the manubriosternal joint, and CT images also demonstrated multiple centrilobular nodules in both lungs, suggesting an infectious bronchiolitis. A CT-guided fine needle aspiration of a presternal mass yielded growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage confirmed an active pulmonary tuberculosis. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint is exceedingly rare.

  13. Severe coronary artery disease after radiation therapy of the chest and mediastinum: clinical presentation and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Orzan, F; Brusca, A; Conte, M R; Presbitero, P; Figliomeni, M C

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To define the clinical and angiographic features and the therapeutic problems in patients with coronary artery disease after therapeutic irradiation of the chest. DESIGN--An observational retrospective study. SETTING--The cardiac catheterisation laboratory, university medical school. PATIENTS--15 subjects (8 men and 7 women, aged 25-56 years, mean 44) examined in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory, who had significant coronary artery disease years after having radiation treatment to the chest and anterior mediastinum. In the early stages of the study angiography was performed because of typical symptoms of ischaemic heart disease. Later on it was performed because of a high index of suspicion in people with signs of extensive radiation heart damage. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Clinical and electrocardiographic evidence of ischaemic heart disease; echocardiographic signs of pericardial, myocardial or valvar involvement; angiographic evidence of coronary arterial stenosis, with special attention to the ostia; haemodynamic and angiographic signs of pericardial, myocardial, and valvar disease. Survival and symptomatic and functional status were ascertained after medical or surgical treatment. RESULTS--The patients were relatively young and had no risk factors. Seven patients had no signs or symptoms of ischaemic heart disease. Ten patients had ostial stenosis, which was associated with extensive involvement of other cardiac structures in nine of them. Seven required surgical treatment for coronary artery disease. Two died, one at surgery and the other one six months later. Five patients had complications associated with irradiation. CONCLUSIONS--Coronary arterial disease can be reasonably ascribed to the effects of chest irradiation when the patients are young and free from risk factors, especially if the obstructions are ostial and there is important damage to other cardiac structures. In patients with damage to other cardiac structures angina and infarction

  14. Dual prosthetic heart valve presented with chest pain: a case report of coronary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Wongrakpanich, Supakanya; Thamcharoen, Natanong; Chongsathidkiet, Pakawat; Siwamogsatham, Sarawut

    2015-01-01

    Coronary embolism from a prosthetic heart valve is a rare but remarkable cause of acute coronary syndrome. There is no definite management of an entity like this. Here we report a case of 54-year-old male with a history of rheumatic heart disease with dual prosthetic heart valve and atrial fibrillation who developed chest pain from acute myocardial infarction. The laboratory values showed inadequate anticoagulation. Cardiac catheterization and thrombectomy with the aspiration catheter were chosen to be the treatment for this patient, and it showed satisfactory outcome.

  15. Dual Prosthetic Heart Valve Presented with Chest Pain: A Case Report of Coronary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Siwamogsatham, Sarawut

    2015-01-01

    Coronary embolism from a prosthetic heart valve is a rare but remarkable cause of acute coronary syndrome. There is no definite management of an entity like this. Here we report a case of 54-year-old male with a history of rheumatic heart disease with dual prosthetic heart valve and atrial fibrillation who developed chest pain from acute myocardial infarction. The laboratory values showed inadequate anticoagulation. Cardiac catheterization and thrombectomy with the aspiration catheter were chosen to be the treatment for this patient, and it showed satisfactory outcome. PMID:25785203

  16. Comparing two brief psychological interventions to usual care in panic disorder patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Marie-Josée; Marchand, André; Pelland, Marie-Ève; Belleville, Geneviève; Vadeboncoeur, Alain; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Poitras, Julien; Dupuis, Gilles; Fleet, Richard; Foldes-Busque, Guillaume; Lavoie, Kim L

    2012-03-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a common, often unrecognized condition among patients presenting with chest pain to the emergency departments (ED). Nevertheless, psychological treatment is rarely initiated. We are unaware of studies that evaluated the efficacy of brief cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for this population. Evaluate the efficacy of two brief CBT interventions in PD patients presenting to the ED with chest pain. Fifty-eight PD patients were assigned to either a 1-session CBT-based panic management intervention (PMI) (n = 24), a 7-session CBT intervention (n = 19), or a usual-care control condition (n = 15). A structured diagnostic interview and self-reported questionnaires were administered at pre-test, post-test, 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Statistical analysis showed significant reduction in PD severity following both interventions compared to usual care control condition, but with neither showing superiority compared to the other. CBT-based interventions as brief as a single session initiated within 2 weeks after an ED visit for chest pain appear to be effective for PD. Given the high prevalence of PD in emergency care settings, greater efforts should be made to implement these interventions in the ED and/or primary care setting.

  17. Compliance with outpatient stress testing in low-risk patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Milano, Peter; Carden, Donna L; Jackman, Kelly M; Rongkavilit, Arada; Groves, Kevin; Tyndall, Joseph; Moll, Joel

    2011-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that stress testing prior to emergency department (ED) release in low-risk chest pain patients identifies those who can be safely discharged home. When immediate stress testing is not feasible, rapid outpatient stress testing has been recommended. The objective of this study was to determine compliance rate and incidence of adverse cardiac events in patients presenting to the ED with low-risk chest pain referred for outpatient stress testing. Retrospective chart and social security death index review were conducted in 448 consecutive chest pain patients who presented to a university hospital and level I trauma center between April 30 and December 31, 2007. Patients were evaluated with an accelerated chest pain protocol defined as a 4-hour ED rule out and referral for outpatient stress testing within 72 hours of ED release. Only patients without known cardiac disease, a thrombolysis in myocardial infarction risk score ≤2, negative serial ECGs and cardiac biomarkers, and benign ED course were eligible for the protocol. Primary outcome measures included compliance with outpatient stress testing and documented 30-day incidence of adverse cardiac events following ED release. The social security death index was queried to determine 12-month incidence of all-cause mortality in enrolled patients. Logistic regression analysis of characteristics associated with outpatient stress test compliance was determined and incidence of adverse cardiac events in those who were and were not compliant with outpatient stress testing was compared. Significance was set at P < 0.05. A total of 188 patients (42%) completed outpatient stress testing, but only 27 (6%) completed testing within 72 hours of ED discharge. Compliance was correlated with insurance and race, but not patient age, gender, or thrombolysis in myocardial infarction risk score. No significant differences in adverse cardiac events were documented in patients who did and did not comply with

  18. Evaluation of prediagnosis emergency department presentations in patients with active tuberculosis: the role of chest radiography, risk factors and symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Appleton, S C; Connell, D W; Singanayagam, A; Bradley, P; Pan, D; Sanderson, F; Cleaver, B; Rahman, A; Kon, O M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction London has a high rate of tuberculosis (TB) with 2572 cases reported in 2014. Cases are more common in non-UK born, alcohol-dependent or homeless patients. The emergency department (ED) presents an opportunity for the diagnosis of TB in these patient groups. This is the first study describing the clinico-radiological characteristics of such attendances in two urban UK hospitals for pulmonary TB (PTB) and extrapulmonary TB (EPTB). Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the London TB Register (LTBR) and hospital records to identify patients who presented to two London ED's in the 6 months prior to their ultimate TB diagnosis 2011–2012. Results 397 TB cases were identified. 39% (154/397) had presented to the ED in the 6 months prior to diagnosis. In the study population, the presence of cough, weight loss, fever and night sweats only had prevalence rates of 40%, 34%, 34% and 21%, respectively. Chest radiography was performed in 76% (117/154) of patients. For cases where a new diagnosis of TB was suspected, 73% (41/56) had an abnormal radiograph, compared with 36% (35/98) of patients where it was not. There was an abnormality on a chest radiograph in 73% (55/75) of PTB cases and also in 40% (21/52) of EPTB cases where a film was requested. Conclusions A large proportion of patients with TB present to ED. A diagnosis was more likely in the presence of an abnormal radiograph, suggesting opportunities for earlier diagnosis if risk factors, symptoms and chest radiograph findings are combined. PMID:28123749

  19. Evaluation of prediagnosis emergency department presentations in patients with active tuberculosis: the role of chest radiography, risk factors and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Appleton, S C; Connell, D W; Singanayagam, A; Bradley, P; Pan, D; Sanderson, F; Cleaver, B; Rahman, A; Kon, O M

    2017-01-01

    London has a high rate of tuberculosis (TB) with 2572 cases reported in 2014. Cases are more common in non-UK born, alcohol-dependent or homeless patients. The emergency department (ED) presents an opportunity for the diagnosis of TB in these patient groups. This is the first study describing the clinico-radiological characteristics of such attendances in two urban UK hospitals for pulmonary TB (PTB) and extrapulmonary TB (EPTB). We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the London TB Register (LTBR) and hospital records to identify patients who presented to two London ED's in the 6 months prior to their ultimate TB diagnosis 2011-2012. 397 TB cases were identified. 39% (154/397) had presented to the ED in the 6 months prior to diagnosis. In the study population, the presence of cough, weight loss, fever and night sweats only had prevalence rates of 40%, 34%, 34% and 21%, respectively. Chest radiography was performed in 76% (117/154) of patients. For cases where a new diagnosis of TB was suspected, 73% (41/56) had an abnormal radiograph, compared with 36% (35/98) of patients where it was not. There was an abnormality on a chest radiograph in 73% (55/75) of PTB cases and also in 40% (21/52) of EPTB cases where a film was requested. A large proportion of patients with TB present to ED. A diagnosis was more likely in the presence of an abnormal radiograph, suggesting opportunities for earlier diagnosis if risk factors, symptoms and chest radiograph findings are combined.

  20. Quality Improvement Poster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-30

    FROM: 59 MDW/SGYU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 9 MAR 2017 1. Your paper, entitled Quality Improvement Poster presented at/published...authorization from the SGH. On 3 Mar 20 17, Col Joseph Richards, SGH, sent an e-mail approving the release of the poster presentation. 30. PRINTED NAME, RANK...JERlL YN QUINTANILLA, SSGT, 59 MOW/PA -11-’::f;./f. ~~~·::::::--.:.~....:-~ ~::::::."-::,-·· ,_....., 8 MAR 2017 3rd ENDORSEMENT (59 MOW/PA Use Only

  1. Value of serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein A for predicting cardiovascular events among patients presenting with cardiac chest pain

    PubMed Central

    von Haehling, Stephan; Doehner, Wolfram; Jankowska, Ewa A.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Stellos, Konstantinos; Puntmann, Valentina O.; Nagel, Eike; Anker, Stefan D.; Gawaz, Meinrad; Bigalke, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) has been suggested as a candidate marker for the identification of unstable plaques in coronary arteries. We assessed the value of PAPP-A for predicting short-term cardiovascular events in a large cohort of patients presenting with cardiac chest pain. Methods: We included consecutive patients who presented to a teaching hospital in Germany with chest pain of cardiac origin confirmed by coronary angiography. We analyzed PAPP-A levels from serum samples drawn within 30 minutes after arrival in the emergency department or in the catheterization laboratory. Patients were followed for 90 days or until death for major adverse cardiovascular events, defined as the combined outcome of stent thrombosis, myocardial (re)infarction, ischemic stroke or cardiovascular-related death. Results: A total of 2568 patients (mean age [± standard deviation (SD)] 68 ± 11 years; 74% male) presented with cardiac chest pain: 55% had stable angina and 45% had acute coronary syndrome. The PAPP-A levels ranged from 4 to 2154 mIU/L (median 14.0 mIU/L, interquartile range 9.3–25.2 mIU/L). Major adverse cardiovascular events occurred in 203 patients (7.9%). The mean PAPP-A level was higher among patients who had an event than among those who did not (62 ± 156 v. 21 ± 23 mIU/L, p < 0.001). In a multivariable analysis, PAPP-A remained a significant independent predictor of the primary outcome within 90 days (hazard ratio per 1 SD increase in PAPP-A level 1.96, 95% confidence interval 1.74–2.21). The optimal prognostic cutoff value was a PAPP-A level of 34.6 mIU/L. Interpretation: Higher levels of serum PAPP-A were independently associated with an increased short-term risk of cardiovascular events in patients presenting with cardiac chest pain. Further studies are required to validate the use of PAPP-A in routine clinical practice to predict future cardiovascular events. PMID:23509133

  2. Chest Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Balmes, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The Council on Scientific Affairs of the California Medical Association presents the following inventory of items of progress in chest diseases. Each item, in the judgment of a panel of knowledgeable physicians, has recently become reasonably firmly established, both as to scientific fact and important clinical significance. The items are presented in simple epitome, and an authoritative reference, both to the item itself and to the subject as a whole, is generally given for those who may be unfamiliar with a particular item. The purpose is to assist busy practitioners, students, researchers, or scholars to stay abreast of these items of progress in chest diseases that have recently achieved a substantial degree of authoritative acceptance, whether in their own field of special interest or another. The items of progress listed below were selected by the Advisory Panel to the Section on Chest Diseases of the California Medical Association, and the summaries were prepared under its direction. PMID:1441468

  3. ELAF posters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus, Renato

    2014-01-01

    El Colegio Nacional is a Mexican honorary academy with a strictly limited membership created in 1943. Thus it is integrated by the most distinguished personalities of the mexican community, in several fields of knowledge. Since 1995 the Latin American School of Physics (ELAF) has been realized in its installations. To celebrate El Colegio Nacional, we reproduce the main posters related with the announcement of the schools.

  4. Engagement Scholarship Consortium Poster Awards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargerstock, Burton A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Outreach Scholarship Conference has long provided a venue for the presentation of posters representing innovative research, effective practices, and impactful programs. In 2011, conference planners developed a series of measures focused on enriching the poster session as a platform for showcasing community-based scholarship and…

  5. Immediate chest X-ray for patients at risk of lung cancer presenting in primary care: randomised controlled feasibility trial.

    PubMed

    Neal, Richard D; Barham, Allan; Bongard, Emily; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Fitzgibbon, Jim; Griffiths, Gareth; Hamilton, Willie; Hood, Kerenza; Nelson, Annmarie; Parker, David; Porter, Cath; Prout, Hayley; Roberts, Kirsty; Rogers, Trevor; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Tod, Angela; Yeo, Seow Tien; Hurt, Chris N

    2017-01-01

    Achieving earlier stage diagnosis is one option for improving lung cancer outcomes in the United Kingdom. Patients with lung cancer typically present with symptoms to general practitioners several times before referral or investigation. We undertook a mixed methods feasibility individually randomised controlled trial (the ELCID trial) to assess the feasibility and inform the design of a definitive, fully powered, UK-wide, Phase III trial of lowering the threshold for urgent investigation of suspected lung cancer. Patients over 60, with a smoking history, presenting with new chest symptoms to primary care, were eligible to be randomised to intervention (urgent chest X-ray) or usual care. The trial design and materials were acceptable to GPs and patients. We randomised 255 patients from 22 practices, although the proportion of eligible patients who participated was lower than expected. Survey responses (89%), and the fidelity of the intervention (82% patients X-rayed within 3 weeks) were good. There was slightly higher anxiety and depression in the control arm in participants aged >75. Three patients (1.2%) were diagnosed with lung cancer. We have demonstrated the feasibility of individually randomising patients at higher risk of lung cancer, to a trial offering urgent investigation or usual care.

  6. Chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Budassi, S A

    1978-09-01

    For any patient with obvious or suspected chest trauma, one must first assure an adequate airway and adequate ventilation. One should never hesitate to administer oxygen to a victim with a chest injury. The nurse should be concerned with adequate circulation--this may mean the administration of intravenous fluids, specifically volume expanders, via large-bore cannulae. Any obvious open chest wound should be sealed, and any fractures should be splinted. These patients should be rapidly transported to the nearest Emergency Department capable of handling this type of injury. The majority of patients who arrive in the Emergency Department following blunt or penetrating trauma should be considered to be in critical condition until proven otherwise. On presentation, it is essential to recognize those signs, symptoms, and laboratory values that identify the patient's condition as life-threatening. Simple recognition of these signs and symptoms and early appropriate intervention may alter an otherwise fatal outcome.

  7. The Inflatable Poster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, P. J.

    2004-12-01

    Inflatable devices are frequently used in advertising in order to grab the attention of consumers: one sees, for example, 20 foot tall inflatable drink containers, inflatable cell phones, inflatable bubble gum packets, as well as blimps wafting majestically over major sports events. More usefully, inflatable representations of scientifically-interesting items are widely available, including astronauts, space shuttles, dinosaurs and globes and can help to build and inspire the interest of the general public, and in particular children, in such ideas. How can such concepts be adapted to improve poster presentations? Possibility one is to use relevant existing commercially-available inflatables to dress the poster: skeletons, astronauts, globes and so forth. More exciting is to develop custom inflatables that represent three-dimensional renderings of objects that the poster is describing. Examples of individual objects might be an inflatable slab, inflatable avalanche, inflatable plume, or it's larger cousin, the 10 foot high inflatable superplume or 20 foot high inflatable megaplume. More elaborately, inflatables might represent isosurfaces in three-dimensional spherical convection, although other fabrication methods may be more suitable. More simply, inflatable spheres could be imprinted with the planform of convection, geoid, or other spherical fields of geophysical interest. Finally, it should be possible to put an entire poster on an inflatable object, possibly small ones (balloons) to hand out. A major concern, however, is that the presenter may use such techniques to inflate their scientific findings, or to present overblown ideas.

  8. How to make an effective poster.

    PubMed

    Shelledy, David C

    2004-10-01

    Poster presentations given at scientific meetings are widely used in medicine, nursing, and allied health professions to communicate research findings. A good poster presentation can be an effective way to share the results of your research with your peers, in a collegial and non-threatening atmosphere. Feedback received during a poster session can be invaluable in refining your research and preparing for publication in a peer reviewed journal. A typical poster presentation follows the same format as a scientific paper. Poster sections include a title banner, the abstract, introduction, method, results, discussion, conclusions, and tables and figures. Technical details of poster production include decisions on what materials and methods to use to print and display your poster, font size, whether to use a professional graphics department for production, and cost. Presentation of your research at a professional meeting can be a rewarding experience, and is a useful step toward publishing your research in a respected science journal.

  9. Poster Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Poster Session, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Development of correlative measures for the assessment of attention and memory; Biodynamical Responses of the Crewmember Head/Neck System During Emergence Ejection; Fecundation in the Sky, a Ten Years Old Experiment in Microgravity; A Modified Botex Incubator as a Transport System For Developing Crickets into Space; Chromosomal Aberrations in Peripheral Lymphocytes of Cosmonauts and Astronauts after Space Flights; Method for Establishing Long term Bone Marrow; Cultures Under Microgravity Conditions Reproduction Under Simulated Weightlessness --Mammalian in vivo Experiments Under Suspension; Towards Human Movement Analysis Without the Use of Markers; Habitability Requirements For a Cogent Mars Mission; The Saucer Concept for Space Habitats; New Way In Modeling the Growth of the Organism; The Fractionation of Hydrogen and Oxygen Stable Isotopes By Life Support Systems of Space Station "MIR"; and Effect of Space Flight on Neutrophil Function.

  10. Poster Sessions in Marketing Education: An Empirical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegemann, Nicole; Sutton-Brady, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Poster sessions provide a creative and stimulating alternative to traditional assessment methods in marketing. Poster sessions, as a means of assessment, have long been used in science fields. This article presents the successful implementation of poster sessions as a means of assessment in a postgraduate unit of study. Poster sessions in…

  11. Clinical presentation and chiropractic treatment of Tietze syndrome: A 34-year-old female with left-sided chest pain.

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, Eefje; Knaap, Simone F C

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe the clinical presentation and chiropractic management of Tietze syndrome. A 34-year-old woman presented with unexplained left-sided chest pain. Electrocardiogram and radiographs were taken at a medical emergency department to rule out cardiovascular and pulmonary causes, and pain medication did not relieve her pain. Physical examination showed tenderness on palpation and swelling of the second and third chondrosternal joints, as well as thoracic joint dysfunction. Heart and lung pathology was ruled out, and chondrosternal joint swelling was present, Tietze syndrome was diagnosed. A treatment plan aimed at restoring normal thoracic and rib joint movement and decreasing inflammation of the chondrosternal joints resulted in lower pain levels. Treatment consisted of diversified high-velocity, low-amplitude chiropractic manipulation; activator technique; and cryotherapy. Chiropractic management of Tietze syndrome was successful in reducing pain levels in this patient's case. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A case of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome, which presented an acute interstitial pneumonia-like image on chest CT scan.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Susaki, Kentaro; Danjo, Junichi; Nakashima, Shusaku; Shimada, Hiromi; Izumikawa, Miharu; Takeuchi, Yohei; Mitsunaka, Hiroki; Bandoh, Shuji; Imataki, Osamu; Nose, Masato; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) complicated with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). A female patient was diagnosed with acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) with MCTD by chest CT scan. Corticosteroid therapy was refractory for lung involvement, and she died due to acute respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed that AIP was compatible with lung involvement of CAPS. We therefore suggest that chest CT might reveal AIP-like findings in CAPS patients whose condition is complicated with pulmonary manifestations.

  13. Presenting characteristics and processing times for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients with chest pain in an emergency department: Time, Ethnicity, and Delay (TED) Study II.

    PubMed

    Wechkunanukul, Kannikar; Grantham, Hugh; Teubner, David; Hyun, Karice K; Clark, Robyn A

    2016-10-01

    To date there has been limited published data presenting the characteristics and timeliness of the management in an Emergency Department (ED) for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients presenting with chest pain. This study aimed to describe the presenting characteristics and processing times for CALD patients with chest pain compared to the Australian-born population, and current guidelines. This study was a cross sectional analysis of a cohort of patients who presented with chest pain to the metropolitan hospital between 1 July 2012 and 30 June 2014. Of the total study population (n=6640), 1241 (18.7%) were CALD and 5399 (81.3%) were Australian-born. CALD patients were significantly older than Australian-born patients (mean age 62 vs 56years, p<0.001). There were no differences in the proportion of patients who had central chest pain (74.9% vs 75.7%, p=0.526); ambulance utilisation (41.7% vs 41.1%, p=0.697); and time to initial treatment in ED (21 vs 22min, p=0.375). However, CALD patients spent a significantly longer total time in ED (5.4 vs 4.3h, p<0.001). There was no difference in guideline concordance between the two groups with low rates of 12.5% vs 13%, p=0.556. Nonetheless, CALD patients were 22% (95% CI, 0.65, 0.95, p=0.015) less likely to receive the guideline management for chest pain. The initial emergency care was equally provided to all patients in the context of a low rate of concordance with three chest pain related standards from the two guidelines. Nonetheless, CALD patients spent a longer time in ED compared to the Australian-born group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Incidental detection of late presenting co-arctation of the aorta on chest x-ray: the importance of rib notching

    PubMed Central

    Warne, Richard Roger; Ong, Jeremy Sze Luong; Murray, Conor P

    2012-01-01

    A 31-year-old obese male presented to the emergency department with symptoms and signs suggestive of a viral upper respiratory tract illness with a background of low exercise tolerance. Rib notching was identified on plain film chest radiography and subsequent CT of the thorax identified a moderately tight 2-mm juxta-ductal co-arctation of the aorta with multiple enlarged chest wall collaterals. The patient underwent a two-stage percutaneous procedure involving stent insertion and angioplasty up to 16 mm with significant improvement in exercise capacity and a modest reduction in blood pressure. PMID:22665915

  15. Angina-like chest pain and syncope as the clinical presentation of left ventricular endomyocardial fibrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Corbucci, Helio A R; Fornitano, Luis D; Godoy, Moacyr F; Cury, Patricia M; Villafanha, Daniel; Santana, Domingos A; Soares, Marcelo J F; Braile, Domingo M

    2005-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman complained of angina-like chest pain, near-syncope, and syncopal episodes of 17 years' duration. Physical examination was unremarkable. A 12-lead resting ECG showed symmetrically inverted T waves in the inferior and anterolateral leads. A graded treadmill exercise stress test precipitated angina-like chest pain accompanied by a near-syncopal episode associated with a systemic arterial pressure of 60/40 mm Hg. Echocardiography disclosed left ventricular apical obliteration. Left ventriculogram showed a typical "ace of heart'' shadow as well as filling defects and apical obliteration. Endomyocardial biopsy of the left ventricle diagnosed left ventricular endomyocardial fibrosis. Thus, angina-like chest pain and near-syncopal episodes should be added to the list of clinical manifestations of pure left ventricular endomyocardial fibrosis.

  16. Prospective validation of a clinical decision rule to identify patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain who can safely be removed from cardiac monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Shahbaz; Gatien, Mathieu; Perry, Jeffrey J.; Chaudry, Hina; Kim, Soo-Min; Kwong, Kenneth; Mukarram, Muhammad; Thiruganasambandamoorthy, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most patients with chest pain in the emergency department are assigned to cardiac monitoring for several hours, blocking access for patients in greater need. We sought to validate a previously derived decision rule for safe removal of patients from cardiac monitoring after initial evaluation in the emergency department. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled adults (age ≥ 18 yr) who presented with chest pain and were assigned to cardiac monitoring at 2 academic emergency departments over 18 months. We collected standardized baseline characteristics, findings from clinical evaluations and predictors for the Ottawa Chest Pain Cardiac Monitoring Rule: whether the patient is currently free of chest pain, and whether the electrocardiogram is normal or shows only nonspecific changes. The outcome was an arrhythmia requiring intervention in the emergency department or within 8 hours of presentation to the emergency department. We calculated diagnostic characteristics for the clinical prediction rule. RESULTS: We included 796 patients (mean age 63.8 yr, 55.8% male, 8.9% admitted to hospital). Fifteen patients (1.9%) had an arrhythmia, and the rule performed with the following characteristics: sensitivity 100% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.2%–100%) and specificity 36.4% (95% CI 33.0%–39.6%). Application of the Ottawa Chest Pain Cardiac Monitoring Rule would have allowed 284 out of 796 patients (35.7%) to be safely removed from cardiac monitoring. INTERPRETATION: We successfully validated the decision rule for safe removal of a large subset of patients with chest pain from cardiac monitoring after initial evaluation in the emergency department. Implementation of this simple yet highly sensitive rule will allow for improved use of health care resources. PMID:28246315

  17. Hypertensive Crisis in A Young Woman: A Rare Presentation of an Uncommon Disease (Poster), New Nerve racking Neurologic Symptoms (Podium)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-26

    Ile p’:llced In Ille ::>efense Tedhri’cal lntcrm 111Son ~-1er (O’i’IC). DATE 10 Apri] 2017 14. ~9 MOW PFU.\\AARY POIN- Cf’ CO Ni ACT 1Ust N11me, Flm...is a large vessel vascu litis affecting young fe males classical ly presenting with claudication, systemic illness and asymmetric blood pressures. We...describe a young, African American female who presented with hyper1ensive emergency, altered mental status and se izure then found to have abdomina

  18. Discrepancies between proceedings abstracts and posters at a scientific meeting.

    PubMed

    Zelle, Boris A; Zlowodzki, Michael; Bhandari, Mohit

    2005-06-01

    The proceedings handbook of abstracts from scientific meetings aims to provide meeting attendees with an accurate summary of scientific presentations. Given that posters are prepared closer to the meeting than the abstracts for the proceedings book, we hypothesized that there is a high rate of inconsistency between abstracts in the proceedings handbook and the corresponding posters. We compared the poster abstracts printed in the proceedings handbook with the actual posters at the 71st annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons in 2004. Our comparison included all 50 trauma posters and 52 adult reconstruction knee posters. This comparison revealed discrepancies in 76% of the presented posters. These changes were detected in all parts of the posters including titles (33%), authorship (49%), methods (8%), results (30%), and conclusions (2%). The sample size changed in 15% of the studies. Discrepancies between the trauma posters versus the adult reconstruction knee posters were similar. Our findings suggest that discrepancies between the poster abstracts in the proceedings handbook and actual poster presentations are common, but changes in conclusions are rare. Meeting attendees should not assume that the proceedings handbook provides an accurate reflection of poster presentations. Visiting the poster section is recommended.

  19. The Public Poster Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine-Rasky, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This note describes the use of a student poster session as an innovative approach to student learning. The local context for the assignment is provided, followed by a description of the course for which the poster was prepared, details about the assignment including its evaluation, and practical considerations for planning a poster session. The…

  20. Clinical risk stratification in the emergency department predicts long-term cardiovascular outcomes in a population-based cohort presenting with acute chest pain: primary results of the Olmsted county chest pain study.

    PubMed

    Farkouh, Michael E; Aneja, Ashish; Reeder, Guy S; Smars, Peter A; Bansilal, Sameer; Lennon, Ryan J; Wiste, Heather J; Razzouk, Louai; Traverse, Kay; Holmes, David R; Mathew, Verghese

    2009-09-01

    The long-term cardiovascular outcomes of a population-based cohort presenting to the emergency department (ED) with chest pain and classified with a clinical risk stratification algorithm are not well documented. The Olmsted County Chest Pain Study is a community-based study that included all consecutive patients presenting with chest pain consistent with unstable angina presenting to all EDs in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Patients were classified according to the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) criteria. Patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction and chest pain of noncardiac origin were excluded. Main outcome measures were major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) at 30 days and at a median follow-up of 7.3 years, and mortality through a median of 16.6 years.The 2271 patients were classified as follows: 436 (19.2%) as high risk, 1557 (68.6%) as intermediate risk, and 278 (12.2%) as low risk. Thirty-day MACCE occurred in 11.5% in the high-risk group, 6.2% in the intermediate-risk group, and 2.5% in the low-risk group (p < 0.001). At 7.3 years, significantly more MACCE were recorded in the intermediate-risk (hazard ratio [HR], 1.91; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.33-2.75) and high-risk groups (HR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.67-3.58). Intermediate- and high-risk patients demonstrated a 1.38-fold (95% CI, 0.95-2.01; p = 0.09) and a 1.68-fold (95% CI, 1.13-2.50; p = 0.011) higher mortality, respectively, compared to low-risk patients at 16.6 years. At 7.3 and at 16.6 years of follow-up, biomarkers were not incrementally predictive of cardiovascular risk.In conclusion, a widely applicable rapid clinical algorithm using AHCPR criteria can reliably predict long-term mortality and cardiovascular outcomes. This algorithm, when applied in the ED, affords an excellent opportunity to identify patients who might benefit from a more aggressive cardiovascular risk factor management strategy.

  1. Undergraduate Researchers and the Poster Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Gail; Green, Raymond

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduates presented original research in classroom poster sessions open to students, faculty, and friends. We assessed the reaction of the students to the experience and their reported change in their interest in presenting at conferences. Students enjoyed the poster session experience and indicated they preferred this method over other…

  2. Students Share Their Research at Student Poster Day | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Students Share Their Research at Student Poster Day  By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer More than 50 Werner H. Kirsten student interns and college interns presented their research at Summer Student Poster Day on August 6 in the Building 549 lobby.  Joseph Bergman, a high school intern in the Center for Cancer Research Nanobiology Laboratory, participated in the event “for the opportunity to present my summer research. It allowed me to meet people and get the experience of sharing and explaining my work.”

  3. Students Share Their Research at Student Poster Day | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Students Share Their Research at Student Poster Day  By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer More than 50 Werner H. Kirsten student interns and college interns presented their research at Summer Student Poster Day on August 6 in the Building 549 lobby.  Joseph Bergman, a high school intern in the Center for Cancer Research Nanobiology Laboratory, participated in the event “for the opportunity to present my summer research. It allowed me to meet people and get the experience of sharing and explaining my work.”

  4. HEART score and clinical gestalt have similar diagnostic accuracy for diagnosing ACS in an unselected population of patients with chest pain presenting in the ED.

    PubMed

    Visser, Anniek; Wolthuis, Albert; Breedveld, Rob; ter Avest, Ewoud

    2015-08-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) can be a diagnostic challenge in the emergency department (ED). Recently, the HEART score was developed, a simple bedside scoring system that quantifies risk of ischaemic events in patients with undifferentiated chest pain presenting in the ED. In this prospective cohort study, we compared the diagnostic accuracy of HEART score and clinical gestalt (clinical judgement) for diagnosing ACS in an unselected population of patients with chest pain presenting to the ED. HEART score (0-10) and clinical gestalt (low risk, intermediate risk or high risk of ACS) were prospectively determined in the ED in 255 patients presenting with chest pain by the treating physician. The reference standard was the presence of ACS, which was defined as either acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or the occurrence of a major adverse cardiac event within 6 weeks after presentation in the ED. 75 out of 255 patients (29%) had an ACS. A HEART score ≤3 had a lower negative likelihood ratio (0.15 (0.06-0.36)) for ACS than a low risk based on clinical gestalt (0.35 (0.19-0.64)), whereas a high HEART score ≥7 had a higher positive likelihood ratio (5.2 (3.2-8.5) vs 3.1 (2.2-4.4)). However, c-statistic of HEART score was not significantly different from clinical gestalt (0.81 (0.76-0.86) vs 0.79 (0.73-0.84), p=0.13). Our study demonstrates that HEART score and clinical gestalt have similar diagnostic accuracy for diagnosing ACS in an unselected population of patients with chest pain presenting in the ED. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. The Poster Puzzler Is Back | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Your challenge is to correctly identify the item and its location from the picture below. Clue: It’s somewhere at the NCI campus at Frederick or Fort Detrick. Win a framed photograph of the Poster Puzzler and have your photo featured on the Poster website by e-mailing your guess, along with your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number, to poster@mail.nih.gov. All entries must be received by Friday, June 27, 2014, and the winner will be drawn from all correct answers received by that date.

  6. The Poster Puzzler Is Back | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Your challenge is to correctly identify the item and its location from the picture below. Clue: It’s somewhere at the NCI campus at Frederick or Fort Detrick. Win a framed photograph of the Poster Puzzler and have your photo featured on the Poster website by e-mailing your guess, along with your name, e-mail address, and daytime phone number, to poster@mail.nih.gov. All entries must be received by Friday, June 27, 2014, and the winner will be drawn from all correct answers received by that date.

  7. Document of the Month: A Poster on Inflation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nadine; Walker, Samuel J.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an inflation poster as an example of the Office of Price Administration's (OPA) campaign to convince American people to control inflation during World War II. Suggestions for teaching and discussion questions based on the poster are included. (KC)

  8. Diagnostic contributions of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients presenting with elevated troponin, acute chest pain syndrome and unobstructed coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Leurent, Guillaume; Langella, Bernard; Fougerou, Claire; Lentz, Pierre-Axel; Larralde, Antoine; Bedossa, Marc; Boulmier, Dominique; Le Breton, Hervé

    2011-03-01

    Myocardial infarction with unobstructed coronary artery disease represents a serious diagnostic challenge. The role of cardiac magnetic resonance in the management of cardiomyopathies is increasing. We examined the diagnostic contributions of cardiac magnetic resonance in patients presenting with acute chest pain syndrome, elevated serum cardiac troponin concentrations and no significant coronary artery stenoses. Over a 3-year period, 107 consecutive patients (mean age 43.5 years; 62% men) presented to our institution with acute onset of chest pain, elevated serum troponin concentration and unobstructed coronary arteries, and underwent 3-tesla cardiac magnetic resonance at a mean delay of 6.9 days. A diagnosis was made based on: wall motion abnormalities and pericardial effusion on cine mode; myocardial oedema on T2-weighted imaging; abnormalities on first-pass perfusion imaging; and late gadolinium enhancement on T1-weighted imaging. Cardiac magnetic resonance was normal in 10.3% of patients and contributed a diagnosis in 89.7%, including myocarditis in 59.9%, stress cardiomyopathy (takotsubo syndrome) in 14% and myocardial infarction in 15.8%. Patients with normal cardiac magnetic resonance had a significantly lower mean peak troponin concentration (2.6ng/mL) than patients with diagnostic cardiac magnetic resonance (9.7ng/mL; P=0.01). Cardiac magnetic resonance contributed a diagnosis in nearly 90% of patients presenting with acute chest pain, elevated serum troponin and unobstructed coronary arteries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Coronary computed tomographic angiography for detection of coronary artery disease in patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Cerrato, Enrico; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Omedè, Pierluigi; Sciuto, Filippo; Presutti, Davide Giacomo; Quadri, Giorgio; Raff, Gilbert L; Goldstein, James A; Litt, Harold; Frati, Giacomo; Reed, Matthew J; Moretti, Claudio; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2013-08-01

    Assessment of chest pain patients remains a clinical challenge in the emergency department (ED). Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have shown the additive value of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) compared with standard care. Not all of them, however, had enough power to detect differences in clinical outcomes like revascularization. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to test the safety and efficacy of this non-invasive diagnostic approach in low- and intermediate-risk chest pain patients. MEDLINE/PubMed was systematically screened for RCTs comparing CCTA and non-CCTA approaches for ED patients presenting with chest pain. Baseline features, diagnostic strategies, and outcome data were appraised and pooled with random-effect methods computing summary estimates [95% confidence intervals (CIs)]. A total of four RCT studies including 2567 patients were identified, with similar inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients in the CCTA group were more likely to undergo percutaneous or surgical revascularization during their index visit, with an odd ratio of 1.88 (1.21-2.92). Time to diagnosis was reduced with CCTA (-7.68 h;-12.70 to 2.66) along with costs of care in the ED (-$680; -1.060 to -270: all CI 95%). The present meta-analysis shows that a strategy with CCTA used as first imaging test for low- and intermediate-risk patients presenting to the ED with chest pain appears safe and seems not to increase subsequent invasive coronary angiographies. The approach is cost-effective although limited data and incomplete cost analyses have been performed. CCTA increases coronary revascularizations, with still an unknown effect on prognosis, especially in the long term.

  10. Is the self-report of recent cocaine or methamphetamine use reliable in illicit stimulant drug users who present to the Emergency Department with chest pain?

    PubMed

    Lee, Moon O; Vivier, Patrick M; Diercks, Deborah B

    2009-08-01

    Use of illicit drugs results in an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, which is often seen in the Emergency Department (ED). Chest pain is frequently associated with cocaine and methamphetamine use. To determine if the self-report of recent cocaine or methamphetamine use is reliable in illicit stimulant drug users who present to the ED with chest pain. A retrospective review of patients presenting to the ED from July 1, 2004 through June 30, 2006 was undertaken. Inclusion criteria were: age >or= 18 years, chief complaint of chest pain, documented social history of drug abuse, positive urine toxicology screen and myoglobin and troponin levels measured, sent from the ED. For the 318 patients who met the inclusion criteria, the self-report rate of cocaine or methamphetamine use was 51.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46-0.57). No difference was found in the self-report rate between users of methamphetamine vs. cocaine (odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% CI 0.7-1.7). There also was no difference in the self-report rate by patient age < 50 years compared to patient age >or= 50 years (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.42-1.08). The self-report rate for males compared to females was not significantly different (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.54-1.4). Patients who had a positive troponin were not significantly more likely to self-report drug use than patients who did not have a positive troponin (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.55-2.2). The self-report rate among cocaine- or methamphetamine-using patients presenting to the ED with chest pain was 51.8%. There seems to be no significant difference in the self-report rate among those who use methamphetamine vs. those who use cocaine, nor by gender, nor stratified by age over 50 years.

  11. DIESEL ENGINE RETROFIT TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (POSTER)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETV is presenting a poster at the EPA's 2005 Science Forum from May 16-18, 2005 in Washington, DC. This poster will contain a summary of the performance results realized by the six verified diesel retrofit technologies, as well as potential impacts that could be realized if sigi...

  12. Undergraduate Seminars: The Poster Session Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chute, Douglas L.; Bank, Barry

    1983-01-01

    A good alternative to the undergraduate psychology seminar is the poster session. During the course each student wrote a review paper. For use in his/her class presentation, the student provided the following information on poster paper: title, author, abstract, a few graphs or illustrations from the literature, conclusions, and references. (RM)

  13. A Recipe for Successful Poster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazard, Brenda L.

    2007-01-01

    Poster sessions are frequently on the menu at professional conferences and meetings. They offer an opportunity to share an idea, a solution, an experiment (successful or failed), or a discovery. Poster sessions tell a short visual story and include a frequently repeated, brief presentation (5-10 minutes), accompanying materials, and informal…

  14. Poster Puzzler Solution: Chill Out | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A winner has emerged in the most recent Poster Puzzler contest! Congratulations are in order for Rose Bradley, secretary III, Cancer Research Technology Program. The current Poster Puzzler image shows the refrigerant condensers for the two story freezers in the Building 1073 repository, which are used to store samples at -20°C. Put simply, the condensers act like the outdoor unit on a home AC system.

  15. Student Poster Days Showcase Young Minds | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Each year, two Student Poster Days—one at the NCI at Frederick campus and one on the Bethesda campus—give students a chance to showcase the work they do in NCI and NIH labs and offices. NCI at Frederick’s event was held in the Building 549 lobby, while the Bethesda poster day was held at the Natcher Conference Center in Building 45 on NIH’s main campus.

  16. Poster Puzzler Solution: Chill Out | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A winner has emerged in the most recent Poster Puzzler contest! Congratulations are in order for Rose Bradley, secretary III, Cancer Research Technology Program. The current Poster Puzzler image shows the refrigerant condensers for the two story freezers in the Building 1073 repository, which are used to store samples at -20°C. Put simply, the condensers act like the outdoor unit on a home AC system.

  17. Student Poster Days Showcase Young Minds | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Each year, two Student Poster Days—one at the NCI at Frederick campus and one on the Bethesda campus—give students a chance to showcase the work they do in NCI and NIH labs and offices. NCI at Frederick’s event was held in the Building 549 lobby, while the Bethesda poster day was held at the Natcher Conference Center in Building 45 on NIH’s main campus.

  18. The influence of poster prompts on stair use: The effects of setting, poster size and content.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Eves, Frank F.; Carroll, Douglas

    2001-11-01

    OBJECTIVES: There is evidence that poster prompts increase stair use. The present study was concerned with the effects of poster size, poster message, and setting on stair use. DESIGN: Using a quasi-experimental design, four observational studies were undertaken in which stair and escalator use were logged during 2-week baseline periods and 2-week intervention periods. METHODS: In the first two studies, observations were undertaken in two shopping centres (total N = 30,018) with the size of poster varying. In the other two studies (total N = 37,907), one in a shopping centre and one in a train station, two poster messages were tested in both sites. RESULTS: Pedestrian traffic volume was controlled for statistically. There were significant increases in stair use with A1- and A2-, but not A3-size posters. Overall, the two different poster messages were both effective in encouraging stair use. Interactions between gender and message setting, however, reflected the fact that the 'stay healthy, save time' poster had little impact on female shoppers but was highly effective for female commuters. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that developers of health-promotion posters pay attention to poster size. They also indicate that it is insufficient to segment audiences by gender without considering the setting and motivational context.

  19. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a fever or a cough that produces yellow-green phlegm. You have chest pain that is severe and does not go away. You are having problems swallowing. Chest pain lasts longer than 3 to 5 days. What to Expect at Your Office Visit ...

  20. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability.

  1. Poster Sessions. [Concurrent Poster Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains presentations from four poster sessions at a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Human Resource and Organization Development Program Brochures: What Prospective Students Want" (Rose Opengart, Mary Wilson Callahan) reports on a study of promotional materials of graduate programs in the field of human…

  2. Posters that foster cognition in the classroom: Multimedia theory applied to educational posters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubenthal, M.; O'Brien, T.; Taber, J.

    2011-12-01

    Despite a decline in popularity within U.S. society, posters continue to hold a prominent place within middle and high school science classrooms. Teachers' demand for posters is largely satisfied by governmental and non-profit science organizations' education and public outreach (EPO) efforts. Here, posters are produced and disseminated as both tangible products resulting from the organization's research, and instruments to communicate scientific content to teachers and students. This study investigates the taken-for-granted good of posters through a survey/interview of science teachers who received sample posters at professional development workshops. The design of sample EPO posters were also examined for their implied, underlying assumptions about learning and their alignment to the setting of the classroom, which is unique for the genera of posters. Based on this analysis we found that rates of poster use were as low as 43% and that many EPO posters fail to achieve their potential as an instructional instrument. As a result, many EPO posters are relegated to merely a collection of pretty pictures on the wall. Leveraging existing research in both cognition and the cognitive theory of Multimedia learning, we propose a design framework for educational posters that is likely to activate students' attention, catalyze cognitive processing, provide a framework to guide students' construction of knowledge, and connect to extended learning through live or web-based exploration of phenomenon. While work to examine the implications of this framework is still on-going, we present a prototype poster and supporting website developed using the framework as a guide, as well as results from focus group discussions with classroom practitioners regarding the prototype poster and its potential in the classroom.

  3. Feasibility of an automatic computer-assisted algorithm for the detection of significant coronary artery disease in patients presenting with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki-woon; Chang, Hyuk-jae; Shim, Hackjoon; Kim, Young-jin; Choi, Byoung-wook; Yang, Woo-in; Shim, Jee-young; Ha, Jongwon; Chung, Namsik

    2012-04-01

    Automatic computer-assisted detection (auto-CAD) of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) has been shown to have relatively high accuracy. However, to date, scarce data are available regarding the performance of auto-CAD in the setting of acute chest pain. This study sought to demonstrate the feasibility of an auto-CAD algorithm for cCTA in patients presenting with acute chest pain. We retrospectively investigated 398 consecutive patients (229 male, mean age 50±21 years) who had acute chest pain and underwent cCTA between Apr 2007 and Jan 2011 in the emergency department (ED). All cCTA data were analyzed using an auto-CAD algorithm for the detection of >50% CAD on cCTA. The accuracy of auto-CAD was compared with the formal radiology report. In 380 of 398 patients (18 were excluded due to failure of data processing), per-patient analysis of auto-CAD revealed the following: sensitivity 94%, specificity 63%, positive predictive value (PPV) 76%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 89%. After the exclusion of 37 cases that were interpreted as invalid by the auto-CAD algorithm, the NPV was further increased up to 97%, considering the false-negative cases in the formal radiology report, and was confirmed by subsequent invasive angiogram during the index visit. We successfully demonstrated the high accuracy of an auto-CAD algorithm, compared with the formal radiology report, for the detection of >50% CAD on cCTA in the setting of acute chest pain. The auto-CAD algorithm can be used to facilitate the decision-making process in the ED.

  4. Preparing a poster.

    PubMed

    White, Adrian; White, Leon

    2003-06-01

    Well prepared posters are an effective means to communicate a simple message and stimulate discussion. A good poster requires considerable effort in identifying the vital ingredients and rejecting any superfluous material. The conventional structure for papers and abstracts is a suitable basis for posters on many subjects, with modification if necessary. Suitable topics include clinical trials, surveys, qualitative studies and case reports. Suggestions are made for contents that should be considered for each section. Careful planning of size, shape, flow and content will save time in preparation, and several technical graphical points are made, which may improve the attractiveness and readability of the poster.

  5. The Poster and Other Forms of Scientific Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffran, Murray

    1987-01-01

    Explores the use of the poster as a form of scientific communication, and its relationship to the published paper, the abstract, and the oral communication. Suggestions for size, format, and layout for posters are presented. Reviews of two booklets on posters are printed at the end of this article. (TW)

  6. Pulmonary imaging of pandemic influenza H1N1 infection: relationship between clinical presentation and disease burden on chest radiography and CT

    PubMed Central

    Abbo, L; Quartin, A; Morris, M I; Saigal, G; Ariza-Heredia, E; Mariani, P; Rodriguez, O; Muñoz-Price, L S; Ferrada, M; Ramee, E; Rosas, M I; Gonzalez, I A; Fishman, J

    2010-01-01

    The potential for pulmonary involvement among patients presenting with novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) is high. To investigate the utility of chest imaging in this setting, we correlated clinical presentation with chest radiographic and CT findings in patients with proven H1N1 cases. Subjects included all patients presenting with laboratory-confirmed H1N1 between 1 May and 10 September 2009 to one of three urban hospitals. Clinical information was gathered retrospectively, including symptoms, possible risk factors, treatment and hospital survival. Imaging studies were re-read for study purposes, and CXR findings compared with CT scans when available. During the study period, 157 patients presented with subsequently proven H1N1 infection. Hospital admission was necessary for 94 (60%) patients, 16 (10%) were admitted to intensive care and 6 (4%) died. An initial CXR, carried out for 123 (78%) patients, was abnormal in only 40 (33%) cases. Factors associated with increased likelihood for radiographic lung abnormalities were dyspnoea (p<0.001), hypoxaemia (p<0.001) and diabetes mellitus (p = 0.023). Chest CT was performed in 21 patients, and 19 (90%) showed consolidation, ground-glass opacity, nodules or a combination of these findings. 4 of 21 patients had negative CXR and positive CT. Compared with CT, plain CXR was less sensitive in detecting H1N1 pulmonary disease among immunocompromised hosts than in other patients (p = 0.0072). A normal CXR is common among patients presenting to the hospital for H1N1-related symptoms without evidence of respiratory difficulties. The CXR may significantly underestimate lung involvement in the setting of immunosuppression. PMID:20551254

  7. Are Posters Worth the Paper They Are Printed On?: The Pedagogy of Posters in Hospitality and Tourism Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legget, Jane A.; Losekoot, Erwin; Neill, Lindsay; Wood, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers what is known and extends the knowledge about the value of using posters in tertiary student assessment. It carries out a literature review before considering academic staff and student feedback on poster presentations, highlighting the rationale for using them, challenges in implementing posters as a form of assessment, and…

  8. Are Posters Worth the Paper They Are Printed On?: The Pedagogy of Posters in Hospitality and Tourism Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legget, Jane A.; Losekoot, Erwin; Neill, Lindsay; Wood, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers what is known and extends the knowledge about the value of using posters in tertiary student assessment. It carries out a literature review before considering academic staff and student feedback on poster presentations, highlighting the rationale for using them, challenges in implementing posters as a form of assessment, and…

  9. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes Chest pain can also be caused by: Panic attack. If you have periods of intense fear accompanied ... fear of dying, you may be experiencing a panic attack. Shingles. Caused by a reactivation of the chickenpox ...

  10. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very ... limitations of Chest Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the ...

  11. Poster: "Energy Search."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Contains a poster dealing with energy uses for use in secondary-level classes. On the reverse side of the poster, there is a discussion of alternative energy resources. Activities in which students calculate the operating costs of solar-powered cars and the size of solar collectors needed to heat water are included. (AM)

  12. Poster: "Energy Search."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Contains a poster dealing with energy uses for use in secondary-level classes. On the reverse side of the poster, there is a discussion of alternative energy resources. Activities in which students calculate the operating costs of solar-powered cars and the size of solar collectors needed to heat water are included. (AM)

  13. Information Power Grid Posters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi

    2003-01-01

    This document is a summary of the accomplishments of the Information Power Grid (IPG). Grids are an emerging technology that provide seamless and uniform access to the geographically dispersed, computational, data storage, networking, instruments, and software resources needed for solving large-scale scientific and engineering problems. The goal of the NASA IPG is to use NASA's remotely located computing and data system resources to build distributed systems that can address problems that are too large or complex for a single site. The accomplishments outlined in this poster presentation are: access to distributed data, IPG heterogeneous computing, integration of large-scale computing node into distributed environment, remote access to high data rate instruments,and exploratory grid environment.

  14. Do sanitary ceramic workers have a worse presentation of chest radiographs or pulmonary function tests than other ceramic workers?

    PubMed

    Tsao, Yu-Chung; Liu, Su-Hsun; Tzeng, I-Shiang; Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Chen, Jau-Yuan; Luo, Jiin-Chyuan John

    2017-03-01

    Silicosis remains the most prevalent occupational disease worldwide. There have been no specific studies focusing on the association between exposure settings at work and the clinical severity in silicosis patients. In this study, we describe and compare the clinical characteristics and silicosis-associated exposure history at work among workers from several types of ceramic production facilities in Taiwan. We reviewed the medical records of 221 patients who were first diagnosed with silicosis at the Occupational Medicine Clinic of Northern Taiwan in 2012. For each patient, we collected data on demographic characteristics, smoking habits, working history, duration of exposure, and years on the first relevant job. We also retrieved clinical reports of the pulmonary function test and the baseline chest radiography used for silicosis staging. As compared to other ceramic workers, sanitary ceramic workers had a worse X-ray type (p=0.044), more advanced age (p<0.001), longer working duration (p=0.029), and a higher proportion of starting the first relevant job prior to the year 1975 (p=0.003). However, after adjusting for age, work duration, and an initial occupational exposure prior to 1975, sanitary ceramic workers showed a comparable risk for worse X-ray findings to other ceramic workers (adjusted odds ratio=1.18, p=0.704). Results of multivariable regression models on individual lung function parameter also suggested comparably impaired lung function tests between sanitary and other ceramic workers (p>0.05). In this study, we found that sanitary ceramic workers were at a similar risk to other ceramic workers for moderate to severe silicosis when older age and longer working duration were accounted for. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Posters. [Poster Session at AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    The first of the papers in this poster session, "Developing the Employment Brand: Targeting MBA Campus Hires" (Diane M. Bergeron), posits that employment branding benefits both individuals and organizations. It functions as a campus recruiting tool in a competitive labor market and communicates the organization's values and work…

  16. [Hugo von Ziemssen poster award 2015].

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Prize winner: Herr Dr. Stefano Bordignon, for the poster presentation "The SCAR-AF study: electroanatomial scar distribution and left atrial conduction delay in patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation".

  17. A Young Man Presenting with Pleuritic Chest Pain and Fever after Electrophysiological Study and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement: Diagnostic Difficulties and Value of Bedside Thoracic Sonography.

    PubMed

    Faraone, Antonio; Fortini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 23-year-old man presenting with recurrent pleuritic chest pain and prolonged fever after electrophysiology testing and placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator because of a suspected arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. The clinical suspicion was initially directed toward pneumonia with pleural effusion and later toward an infection of the cardiac device complicated by septic pulmonary embolism. The definitive diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and infarction was suggested by a point-of-care thoracic sonography, performed at the bedside by a clinician caring for the patient, and then confirmed by contrast enhanced computed tomography, which also showed thrombosis of the left iliofemoral vein, site of percutaneous puncture for cardiac catheterization. Prolonged fever was attributable to a concomitant Epstein-Barr virus primary infection that acted as confounding factor. The present report confirms the value of bedside thoracic sonography in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with nonspecific respiratory symptoms.

  18. A Young Man Presenting with Pleuritic Chest Pain and Fever after Electrophysiological Study and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement: Diagnostic Difficulties and Value of Bedside Thoracic Sonography

    PubMed Central

    Faraone, Antonio; Fortini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 23-year-old man presenting with recurrent pleuritic chest pain and prolonged fever after electrophysiology testing and placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator because of a suspected arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. The clinical suspicion was initially directed toward pneumonia with pleural effusion and later toward an infection of the cardiac device complicated by septic pulmonary embolism. The definitive diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and infarction was suggested by a point-of-care thoracic sonography, performed at the bedside by a clinician caring for the patient, and then confirmed by contrast enhanced computed tomography, which also showed thrombosis of the left iliofemoral vein, site of percutaneous puncture for cardiac catheterization. Prolonged fever was attributable to a concomitant Epstein-Barr virus primary infection that acted as confounding factor. The present report confirms the value of bedside thoracic sonography in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with nonspecific respiratory symptoms. PMID:26576159

  19. Preparing Scientific Papers, Posters, and Slides.

    PubMed

    Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Maeno, Misato

    2016-01-01

    Publications and presentations are important in academic medicine. The ability to present information in a standard fashion is critically important. Papers, posters, and slides must be prepared appropriately to maximize their chance of being accepted. The first step is to use word processing software correctly. English language usage must conform to standard scientific English usage. Abbreviations should be avoided as much as possible. Numerical data must be presented with the appropriate number of significant figures. The first step in preparing a paper is to decide the target journal. Papers should always be written in 12 point Times New Roman font, while slides and posters should be in Arial or Helvetica. The Results section must contain actual data with appropriate statistical analysis. Take great care to prepare figures and tables according to the journal's instructions. Posters must be prepared to allow easy reading at a distance of 2m. Use a white background and dark letters. The majority of the area of your poster should be Results, and there is no need to include the abstract or references on a poster. Slide presentations should be limited to about one slide for each minute of the talk. Avoid the use of animations and excessive use of color. Do not use abbreviations on slides. Following these simple guidelines will meet the requirements of most journals and allow your audience to appreciate the data on your posters and slides.

  20. Accuracy of dual-source CT to identify significant coronary artery disease in patients with uncontrolled hypertension presenting with chest pain: comparison with coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Pflederer, Tobias; Schepis, Tiziano; Seltmann, Martin; Klinghammer, Lutz; Muschiol, Gerd; Ropers, Dieter; Daniel, Werner G; Achenbach, Stephan

    2012-06-01

    It has been previously reported that the sensitivity and specificity of multislice CT for detecting significant CAD (coronary artery disease) is high. Chest pain is a common presentation in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. We investigated the sensitivity and specificity of dual-source CT to detect and rule out significant CAD in patients presenting with uncontrolled hypertension accompanied by chest pain. 260 consecutive patients presenting with acute chest pain in the context of stage 2 hypertension (systolic pressure ≥160 and/or diastolic pressure ≥100) were enrolled in the study. After admission, control of blood pressure and risk stratification, 82 patients were excluded due to renal insufficiency, prior coronary revascularisation or refused participation in the study. 90 further patients with low pre-test probability of CAD were also excluded. 88 remaining patients were subjected to CT coronary angiography using dual-source CT (Definition, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) within 24 h before invasive coronary angiography. A contrast-enhanced volume dataset was acquired (120 kV, 400 mAs/rot, collimation 2 × 64 × 0.6 mm, retrospective ECG gating). Data sets were evaluated concerning the presence or absence of significant coronary stenoses and validated against invasive coronary angiography. A significant stenosis was assumed if the diameter reduction was ≥50%. 88 patients (mean age 66 ± 11 years, mean heart rate 61 ± 9 bpm) were evaluated regarding the presence or absence of significant CAD (at least one stenosis ≥50% diameter reduction). Mean systolic blood pressure on presentation was 203 ± 20 mmHg and mean diastolic blood pressure was 103 ± 13 mmHg. On a per patient basis, the sensitivity and specificity for dual-source CT to detect significant CAD in vessels >1.5 mm diameter was 100% (36/36, 95% CI 90-100) and 90% (47/52, 95% CI 79-97), respectively with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% (47/47, 95% CI 92-100) and a

  1. Comparison Between Soluble ST2 and High-Sensitivity Troponin I in Predicting Short-Term Mortality for Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Rossella; Magrini, Laura; Orsini, Francesca; Russo, Veronica; Cardelli, Patrizia; Salerno, Gerardo; Hur, Mina

    2017-01-01

    Background High-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI) and the soluble isoform of suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) are useful prognostic biomarkers in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim of this study was to test the short term prognostic value of sST2 compared with hs-cTnI in patients with chest pain. Methods Assays for hs-cTnI and sST2 were performed in 157 patients admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) for chest pain at arrival. In-hospital and 30-day follow-up mortalities were assessed. Results The incidence of ACS was 37%; 33 patients were diagnosed with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), and 25 were diagnosed with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Compared with the no acute coronary syndrome (NO ACS) group, the median level of hs-cTnI was higher in ACS patients: 7.22 (5.24-14) pg/mL vs 68 (15.33-163.50) pg/mL (P<0.0001). In all patients, the sST2 level at arrival showed higher independent predictive power than hs-cTnI (odds ratio [OR] 20.13, P<0.0001 and OR 2.61, P<0.0008, respectively). sST2 at ED arrival showed a greater prognostic value for cardiovascular events in STEMI (area under the curve [AUC] 0.80, P<0.001) than NSTEMI patients (AUC 0.72, P<0.05). Overall, 51% of the STEMI patients with an sST2 value>35 ng/mL at ED arrival died during the 30-day follow-up. Conclusions sST2 has a greater prognostic value for 30-day cardiac mortality after discharge in patients presenting to the ED for chest pain compared with hs-cTnI. In STEMI patients, an sST2 value >35 ng/mL at ED arrival showed the highest predictive power for short-term mortality. PMID:28029000

  2. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  3. [Chest pain evaluation project].

    PubMed

    Filippo, Ottani; Nicola, Binetti; Casagranda, Ivo; Cassin, Matteo; Cavazza, Mario; Grifoni, Stefano; Lenzi, Tiziano; Lorenzoni, Roberto; Sbrojavacca, Rodolfo; Tanzi, Pietro; Vergara, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of acute chest pain remains challenging, despite many insights and innovations over the past two decades. The percentage of patients presenting at the emergency department with acute chest pain who are subsequently admitted to the hospital appears to be increasing. Patients with acute coronary syndromes who are inadvertently discharged from the emergency department have an adverse short-term prognosis. However, the admission of a patient with chest pain who is at low risk for acute coronary syndrome can lead to unnecessary tests and procedures, with their burden of costs and complications. Therefore, with increasing economic pressures on health care, physicians and administrators are interested in improving the efficiency of care for patients with acute chest pain. Since the emergency department organization (i.e. the availability of an intensive observational area) and integration of care and treatment between emergency physicians and cardiologists greatly differ over the national territory, the purpose of the present position paper is two-fold: first, to review the evidence-based efficacy and utility of various diagnostic tools, and, second, to delineate the basic critical pathways (describing key steps for care and treatment) that need to be implemented in order to standardize and expedite the evaluation of chest pain patients, making their diagnosis and treatment as uniform as possible across the country.

  4. Reflections on preparing a poster for an RCN conference.

    PubMed

    Hand, Helen

    2010-01-01

    The acceptance letter for the RCN Annual International Nursing Research Conference signalled the start of my doctoral research dissemination process and my first attempt at presenting a poster. The poster is potentially an excellent springboard for discussion, since information provided on the poster will, by necessity, be superficial, leaving the interested reader to access the detail from the person most passionate, insightful, enthusiastic and knowledgeable about the research--the presenter. This paper describes the planning, preparation and presentation of the poster followed by a critical reflection on the process in the light of literature.

  5. Evaluation of myocardial CT perfusion in patients presenting with acute chest pain to the emergency department: comparison with SPECT-myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Plank, Fabian; Pena, Constantino; Battle, Juan; Min, James; Leipsic, Jonathon; Labounty, Troy; Janowitz, Warren; Katzen, Barry; Ziffer, Jack; Cury, Ricardo C

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether evaluation of resting myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) from coronary CT angiography (CTA) datasets in patients presenting with chest pain (CP) to the emergency department (ED), might have added value to coronary CTA. 76 Patients (age 54.9 y±13; 32 (42%) women) presenting with CP to the ED underwent coronary 64-slice CTA. Myocardial perfusion defects were evaluated for CTP (American Heart Association 17-segment model) and compared with rest sestamibi single-photon emission CT myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI). CTA was assessed for >50% stenosis per vessel. CTP demonstrated a sensitivity of 92% and 89%, specificity of 95% and 99%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 80% and 82% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 98% and 99% for each patient and for each segment, respectively. CTA showed an accuracy of 92%, sensitivity of 70.4%, specificity of 95.5%, PPV 67.8%, and NPV of 95% compared with SPECT-MPI. When CTP findings were added to CTA the PPV improved from 67% to 90.1%. In patients presenting to the ED with CP, the evaluation of rest myocardial CTP demonstrates high diagnostic performance as compared with SPECT-MPI. Addition of CTP to CTA improves the accuracy of CTA, primarily by reducing rates of false-positive CTA.

  6. The effectiveness of emergency nurse practitioner service in the management of patients presenting to rural hospitals with chest pain: a multisite prospective longitudinal nested cohort study.

    PubMed

    Roche, Tina E; Gardner, Glenn; Jack, Leanne

    2017-06-27

    Health reforms in service improvement have included the use of nurse practitioners. In rural emergency departments, nurse practitioners work to the full scope of their expanded role across all patient acuities including those presenting with undifferentiated chest pain. Currently, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness of emergency nurse practitioner service in rural emergency departments. Inquiry into the safety and quality of the service, particularly regarding the management of complex conditions is a priority to ensure that this service improvement model meets health care needs of rural communities. This study used a prospective, longitudinal nested cohort study of rural emergency departments in Queensland, Australia. Sixty-one consecutive adult patients with chest pain who presented between November 2014 and February 2016 were recruited into the study cohort. A nested cohort of 41 participants with suspected or confirmed acute coronary syndrome were identified. The primary outcome was adherence to guidelines and diagnostic accuracy of electrocardiograph interpretation for the nested cohort. Secondary outcomes included service indicators of waiting times, diagnostic accuracy as measured by unplanned representation rates, satisfaction with care, quality-of-life, and functional status. Data were examined and compared for differences for participants managed by emergency nurse practitioners and those managed in the standard model of care. The median waiting time was 8.0 min (IQR 20) and length-of-stay was 100.0 min (IQR 64). Participants were 2.4 times more likely to have an unplanned representation if managed by the standard service model. The majority of participants (91.5%) were highly satisfied with the care that they received, which was maintained at 30-day follow-up measurement. In the evaluation of quality of life and functional status, summary scores for the SF-12 were comparable with previous studies. No differences were

  7. Effective Poster Teaching Strategy Towards Risk in Studying Fraud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Rozainun Haji Abdul; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an alternative method and strategy in teaching and learning for the higher institution of learning. Poster presentation is an approach to introduce and deliver a lecture to create a different mood enticed by the visuals given. This poster presents a new approach of creativity as a method of teaching and learning…

  8. Poster Session- Extended Abstracts

    Treesearch

    Jack D. Alexander III; Jean Findley; Brenda K. Kury; Jan L. Beyers; Douglas S. Cram; Terrell T. Baker; Jon C. Boren; Carl Edminster; Sue A. Ferguson; Steven McKay; David Nagel; Trent Piepho; Miriam Rorig; Casey Anderson; Jeanne Hoadley; Paulette L. Ford; Mark C. Andersen; Ed L. Fredrickson; Joe Truett; Gary W. Roemer; Brenda K. Kury; Jennifer Vollmer; Christine L. May; Danny C. Lee; James P. Menakis; Robert E. Keane; Zhi-Liang Zhu; Carol Miller; Brett Davis; Katharine Gray; Ken Mix; William P. Kuvlesky Jr.; D. Lynn Drawe; Marcia G. Narog; Roger D. Ottmar; Robert E. Vihnanek; Clinton S. Wright; Timothy E. Paysen; Burton K. Pendleton; Rosemary L. Pendleton; Carleton S. White; John Rogan; Doug Stow; Janet Franklin; Jennifer Miller; Lisa Levien; Chris Fischer; Emma Underwood; Robert Klinger; Peggy Moore; Clinton S. Wright

    2008-01-01

    Titles found within Poster Session-Extended Abstracts include:Assessment of emergency fire rehabilitation of four fires from the 2000 fire season on the Vale, Oregon, BLM district: review of the density sampling materials and methods: p. 329 Growth of regreen, seeded for erosion control, in the...

  9. Poetry Workshop & Poster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullinan, Bee

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that Judith Nicholls'"Polar Cub" is a good wintery poem to share with students. In it, the poet invites the cub to come out of its cave and explore in the snow, just as teachers invite children to explore words and ideas in poetry. The article explains how to read the poem to students. A poster is included. (SM)

  10. Poetry Workshop & Poster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullinan, Bee

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that Judith Nicholls'"Polar Cub" is a good wintery poem to share with students. In it, the poet invites the cub to come out of its cave and explore in the snow, just as teachers invite children to explore words and ideas in poetry. The article explains how to read the poem to students. A poster is included. (SM)

  11. Poster Puzzler Solution: Taking in Air | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The current Poster Puzzler image shows the top of Building 560, where a new supply air handler was recently installed by Facilities Maintenance and Engineering (FME) staff, as part of lab renovations in wing 1, floor 1. FME staff enlarged the attic of the building to make space for the air handler. Building 560, the largest building at the NCI at Frederick campus, houses about 120 labs and has 19 air handlers. A supply air handler draws in outside air, filters it, cools or heats it, and adjusts the humidity to provide clean conditioned air to the laboratories. The Building 560 air handler weighs approximately 22,500 pounds and moves 22,000 cubic feet of air per minute.

  12. Poster Puzzler Solution: Taking in Air | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The current Poster Puzzler image shows the top of Building 560, where a new supply air handler was recently installed by Facilities Maintenance and Engineering (FME) staff, as part of lab renovations in wing 1, floor 1. FME staff enlarged the attic of the building to make space for the air handler. Building 560, the largest building at the NCI at Frederick campus, houses about 120 labs and has 19 air handlers. A supply air handler draws in outside air, filters it, cools or heats it, and adjusts the humidity to provide clean conditioned air to the laboratories. The Building 560 air handler weighs approximately 22,500 pounds and moves 22,000 cubic feet of air per minute.

  13. Penetrating chest trauma caused by a blank cartridge actuated rubber ball projectile: case presentation and ballistic investigation of an uncommon weapon type.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Peters, Dieter; Klemm, Wolfram; Grossjohann, Rico; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Bockholdt, Britta; Seifert, Julia

    2017-05-23

    Recently, an increasing number of an uncommon weapon type based on a caliber 6-mm Flobert blank cartridge actuated revolver which discharges 10-mm-diameter rubber ball projectiles has been confiscated by police authorities following criminal offenses. A recent trauma case presenting with a penetrating chest injury occasioned an investigation into the basic ballistic parameters of this type of weapon. Kinetic energy E of the test projectiles was calculated between 5.8 and 12.5 J. Energy density ED of the test projectiles was close to or higher than the threshold energy density of human skin. It can be concluded that penetrating skin injuries due to free-flying rubber ball projectiles discharged at close range cannot be ruled out. However, in case of a contact shot, the main injury potential of this weapon type must be attributed to the high energy density of the muzzle gas jet which may, similar to well-known gas or alarm weapons, cause life-threatening or even lethal injuries.

  14. Writing Abstracts and Developing Posters for National Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, R. Sean

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Presenting posters at national meetings can help fellows and junior faculty members develop a national reputation. They often lead to interesting and fruitful networking and collaboration opportunities. They also help with promotion in academic medicine and can reveal new job opportunities. Practically, presenting posters can help justify funding to attend a meeting. Finally, this process can be invaluable in assisting with manuscript preparation. This article provides suggestions and words of wisdom for palliative care fellows and junior faculty members wanting to present a poster at a national meeting describing a case study or original research. It outlines how to pick a topic, decide on collaborators, and choose a meeting for the submission. It also describes how to write the abstract using examples that present a general format as well as writing tips for each section. It then describes how to prepare the poster and do the presentation. Sample poster formats are provided as are talking points to help the reader productively interact with those that visit the poster. Finally, tips are given regarding what to do after the meeting. The article seeks to not only describe the basic steps of this entire process, but also to highlight the hidden curriculum behind the successful abstracts and posters. These tricks of the trade can help the submission stand out and will make sure the reader gets the most out of the hard work that goes into a poster presentation at a national meeting. PMID:21241194

  15. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  16. Chest X Ray?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test that ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are working ...

  17. An update from AGU about the Virtual Poster Showcase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, P. M.; Furukawa, H.; Brown, V.

    2016-12-01

    The Virtual Poster Showcase (VPS), now in its second year of implementation, has garnered a lot of interest from the geoscience community. The platform enables both undergraduate and graduate students to present their research from anywhere in the world without having to travel to a national or international conference. The VPS platform is simple to use and consists of three steps which include submission of an abstract, uploading a poster and a short video presentation explaining the work, and judging three peer posters online and receiving feedback/comments on their own posters. Based on the completed showcases from 2015 and now 2016, students reported gains in confidence in both preparing and presenting research posters as well as the impact on their careers based on post-showcase evaluations. This presentation will discuss some statistics about the showcases and participants, student evaluation results, stories and anecdotes about the showcases impact on individual students and faculty, as well as plans for the coming year.

  18. Elements and Principles of Design Posters. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This book accompanies a poster series and allows the teacher to pre-plan a lesson or activity for students with the objectives shown for each element or principle of design to be presented. Along with a black-and-white reproduction of each poster, major concepts are discussed. Suggested student activities relating to a particular element or…

  19. Chest Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... inside of the chest cavity. Chest injuries and disorders include Heart diseases Lung diseases and collapsed lung Pleural disorders Esophagus disorders Broken ribs Thoracic aortic aneurysms Disorders ...

  20. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  1. Research and Teaching: Using Models from the Literature and Iterative Feedback to Teach Students to Construct Effective Data Figures for Poster Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Christine E.; Contreras-Shannon, Veronica E.

    2017-01-01

    Analyzing, interpreting, and clearly presenting real data are skills we hope to develop in all students, majors and nonmajors alike. These process skills require lots of practice coupled with targeted feedback from instructors or mentors. Here we present a pedagogy implemented within a course-based research experience that is designed to help…

  2. Research and Teaching: Using Models from the Literature and Iterative Feedback to Teach Students to Construct Effective Data Figures for Poster Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Christine E.; Contreras-Shannon, Veronica E.

    2017-01-01

    Analyzing, interpreting, and clearly presenting real data are skills we hope to develop in all students, majors and nonmajors alike. These process skills require lots of practice coupled with targeted feedback from instructors or mentors. Here we present a pedagogy implemented within a course-based research experience that is designed to help…

  3. Provider-directed imaging stress testing reduces health care expenditures in lower-risk chest pain patients presenting to the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chadwick D; Hoekstra, James W; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hamilton, Craig A; Harper, Erin N; Mahler, Simon; Diercks, Deborah B; Neiberg, Rebecca; Hundley, W Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Among intermediate- to high-risk patients with chest pain, we have shown that a cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) stress test strategy implemented in an observation unit (OU) reduces 1-year health care costs compared with inpatient care. In this study, we compare 2 OU strategies to determine among lower-risk patients if a mandatory CMR stress test strategy was more effective than a physicians' ability to select a stress test modality. On emergency department arrival and referral to the OU for management of low- to intermediate-risk chest pain, 120 individuals were randomly assigned to receive (1) a CMR stress imaging test (n=60) or (2) a provider-selected stress test (n=60: stress echo [62%], CMR [32%], cardiac catheterization [3%], nuclear [2%], and coronary CT [2%]). No differences were detected in length of stay (median CMR=24.2 hours versus 23.8 hours, P=0.75), catheterization without revascularization (CMR=0% versus 3%), appropriateness of admission decisions (CMR 87% versus 93%, P=0.36), or 30-day acute coronary syndrome (both 3%). Median cost was higher among those randomly assigned to the CMR-mandated group ($2005 versus $1686, P<0.001). In patients with lower-risk chest pain receiving emergency department-directed OU care, the ability of a physician to select a cardiac stress imaging modality (including echocardiography, CMR, or radionuclide testing) was more cost-effective than a pathway that mandates a CMR stress test. Contrary to prior observations in individuals with intermediate- to high-risk chest pain, in those with lower-risk chest pain, these results highlight the importance of physician-related choices during acute coronary syndrome diagnostic protocols. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00869245.

  4. Multimedia Presentations on the Human Genome: Implementation and Assessment of a Teaching Program for the Introduction to Genome Science Using a Poster and Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kano, Kei; Yahata, Saiko; Muroi, Kaori; Kawakami, Masahiro; Tomoda, Mari; Miyaki, Koichi; Nakayama, Takeo; Kosugi, Shinji; Kato, Kazuto

    2008-01-01

    Genome science, including topics such as gene recombination, cloning, genetic tests, and gene therapy, is now an established part of our daily lives; thus we need to learn genome science to better equip ourselves for the present day. Learning from topics directly related to the human has been suggested to be more effective than learning from…

  5. Multimedia Presentations on the Human Genome: Implementation and Assessment of a Teaching Program for the Introduction to Genome Science Using a Poster and Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kano, Kei; Yahata, Saiko; Muroi, Kaori; Kawakami, Masahiro; Tomoda, Mari; Miyaki, Koichi; Nakayama, Takeo; Kosugi, Shinji; Kato, Kazuto

    2008-01-01

    Genome science, including topics such as gene recombination, cloning, genetic tests, and gene therapy, is now an established part of our daily lives; thus we need to learn genome science to better equip ourselves for the present day. Learning from topics directly related to the human has been suggested to be more effective than learning from…

  6. Male chest enhancement: pectoral implants.

    PubMed

    Benito-Ruiz, J; Raigosa, J M; Manzano-Surroca, M; Salvador, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the pectoral muscle implant for male chest enhancement in 21 patients. The markings and technique are thoroughly described. The implants used were manufactured and custom made. The candidates for implants comprised three groups: group 1 (18 patients seeking chest enhancement), group 2 (1 patient with muscular atrophy), and group 3 (2 patients with muscular injuries). Because of the satisfying results obtained, including significant enhancement of the chest contour and no major complications, this technique is used for an increasing number of male cosmetic surgeries.

  7. Early Adolescence: Experiment with Poster Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Michael J.; Shaw, Edward

    1983-01-01

    In a poster session, students explain an experiment with the help of a poster that outlines the experimental procedures followed. Suggestions for preparing posters and conducting poster sessions are provided. A sample poster on the strength of electromagnets is also provided. (JN)

  8. Early Adolescence: Experiment with Poster Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Michael J.; Shaw, Edward

    1983-01-01

    In a poster session, students explain an experiment with the help of a poster that outlines the experimental procedures followed. Suggestions for preparing posters and conducting poster sessions are provided. A sample poster on the strength of electromagnets is also provided. (JN)

  9. Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Kutchenreiter, M.; Wilcox, S.

    2012-07-01

    SunShot Initiative awardee posters describing the different technologies within the four subprograms of the DOE Solar Program (Photovoltaics, Concentrating Solar Power, Soft Costs, and Systems Integration).

  10. Foundational Solar Resource Research (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Orwig, K.; Wilcox, S.; Sengupta, M.; Habte, A.; Anderberg, M.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-07-01

    SunShot Initiative awardee posters describing the different technologies within the four subprograms of the DOE Solar Program (Photovoltaics, Concentrating Solar Power, Soft Costs, and Systems Integration).

  11. Teaching Strategy: Using the Human Rights Poster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Law-Related Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Describes a lesson focusing on a human-rights poster that provides visual reinforcement of the second article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that enforces freedom from discrimination. Presents students with examples of human-rights situations to assist them in understanding that all people are entitled to human rights. (CMK)

  12. Communicating Scholarly Research via the Poster Session: The Experience at a National Convention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aust, Charles F.; Kinnick, Katherine N.

    As academic associations and their annual conventions have grown in size, the poster session has become a common format for presentation of scholarly work. Little is known, however, about how communication educators perceive poster sessions and their value to career advancement. Poster sessions have been criticized as poorly structured and…

  13. Proceedings: 1995 water quality technology conference. Part I - Sunday seminars through Session 3E includes poster presentations. Part II - Session 4A through ST7

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This document contains the Proceedings of the 1995 Water Quality Technology Conference sponsored by the American Water Works Association held November 12-16, 1995 in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Topics covered in the presentations include technology developments in improved treatment of drinking water, management and protection of municipal drinking water supplies, laboratory analytical methods for detection of various contaminants and impurities, and quality control and quality assurance in environmental laboratories. Many other topics concerning treatment technologies of waste water, drinking water, and contaminated ground and surface waters are also included.

  14. Wind for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2010-05-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

  15. X-34 Poster Art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Pictured is NASA's poster art for the X-34 technology Demonstrator. The X-34 was part of NASA's Pathfinder Program which demonstrated advanced space transportation technologies through the use of flight experiments and experimental vehicles. These technology demonstrators and flight experiments would support the Agency's goal of dramatically reducing the cost of access to space and would define the future of space transportation pushing technology into a new era of space development and exploration at the dawn of the new century. The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  16. NACA Wartime Safety Poster

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1945-04-21

    One of many safety posters produced by NACA artists during World War II. The Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory established a Safety Office in 1942 to coordinate and oversee safety-related activities. The lab struggled to maintain a full staff during the war when military research projects were at a peak. NACA management mandated six-day work weeks without overtime and the elimination of holidays. As such, workplace injuries were a serious threat to maintaining productivity needed to sustain the military’s aeronautics efforts.

  17. Position Posters: An Alternative Take on Science Posters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorner, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Research shows the importance of active learning, especially within science classes. One way to achieve this goal is to incorporate student-driven projects into the course (e.g., posters). Traditionally, science-poster assignments follow the spirit of the science fair in which a student conducts an experiment and analyzes the results. This article…

  18. Position Posters: An Alternative Take on Science Posters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorner, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Research shows the importance of active learning, especially within science classes. One way to achieve this goal is to incorporate student-driven projects into the course (e.g., posters). Traditionally, science-poster assignments follow the spirit of the science fair in which a student conducts an experiment and analyzes the results. This article…

  19. Accessing SDO Data : The Poster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourcle, Joseph; Addison, K.; Bogart, R.; Chamberlin, P.; Freeland, S.; Hughitt, V. K.; Ireland, J.; Maddox, M.; Mueller, D.; Somani, A.; Sommers, J.; Thompson, B.; solar physics data community, The

    2011-05-01

    As the data from SDO are useful for a variety of purposes, including solar physics, helioseismology, atmospheric science, space weather forecasting, education and public outreach, a wide variety of tools have been development to cater to the different needs of the various groups. Systems have been developed for pipeline processing, searching, browsing, subsetting, or simply just moving around large volumes of data. We present a quick overview of the different systems that can be used to access SDO data including (J)Helioviewer, the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK), the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO), the Integrated Space Weather Analysis System (iSWA), the Data Record Management System (DRMS), and various websites. We cover web-based applications, application programming interfaces (APIs), and IDL command line tools. This poster serves as a supplement to the oral presentation as a place to distribute information about the various interfaces and to collect feedback about any unmet needs for data access.

  20. 2016 Oncology Nursing Society Annual Congress: Podium, E-Poster, and Poster Session Abstracts.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Abstracts appear as they were submitted and have not undergone editing or the Oncology Nursing Forum's review process. Only abstracts that will be presented appear online. Poster numbers are subject to change. For updated poster numbers, visit congress.ons.org or check the Congress guide. Data published in abstracts presented at ONS's Annual Congress are embargoed until the conclusion of the presentation. Coverage and/or distribution of an abstract, poster, or any of its supplemental material to or by the news media, any commercial entity, or individuals, including the authors of said abstract, is strictly prohibited until the embargo is lifted. Promotion of general topics and speakers is encouraged within these guidelines.

  1. Multicultural Mathematics Posters and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle Public Schools, WA. Mathematics Office.

    A set of 18 posters, each 28 cm x 43 cm and printed on parchmentlike paper, and an activity book for teachers in middle and secondary schools make up this publication. The posters illustrate the ideas that mathematics spans centuries and cultures, and is both useful and enjoyable. The activity book emphasizes problem solving, with a focus on…

  2. 2016 National Training Conference Exhibit Booths and Poster Displays

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exhibit Booths and Poster Displays for the 2016 National Training Conference on the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) and Environmental Conditions in Communities. Identifies presentation topics and speakers for October 19 and 20.

  3. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Initial Results (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, A.; Townsend, A.; Hummon, M.; Weekley, A.; Clark, K.; King, J.

    2013-10-01

    This poster presents an overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study, which aims to answer critical questions about the future of the Eastern Interconnection under high levels of solar and wind generation penetration.

  4. Ten NCI Researchers Among Spring Research Festival Award Winners | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    In a ceremony at the Fort Detrick Community Activities Center earlier this week, Maj. Gen. Barbara R. Holcomb, the commanding officer of the Fort Detrick garrison, distributed the awards for outstanding presentations and posters at the 2017 Spring Research Festival.

  5. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  6. The association between panic disorder and coronary artery disease among primary care patients presenting with chest pain: an updated literature review.

    PubMed

    Katerndahl, David A

    2008-01-01

    Although panic disorder is linked to hypertension and smoking, the relationship between panic disorder and coronary artery disease (CAD) is unclear. To extend our understanding about the strength of the association between panic disorder and coronary artery disease and known cardiovascular risk factors. Potential studies were identified via a computerized search of MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases and review of bibliographies. MeSH headings used included panic disorder with chest pain, panic disorder with coronary disease or cardiovascular disorders or heart disorders, and panic disorder with cholesterol or essential hypertension or tobacco smoking. The diagnosis of panic disorder in eligible studies was based on DSM-IV criteria, and studies must have used objective criteria for CAD and risk factors. Only case-control and cohort studies were included. Concerning the relationship between panic disorder and CAD, studies conducted in emergency departments found a relative risk [RR] of 1.25 (95% CI = 0.87 to 1.80), while those conducted in cardiology settings found an inverse relationship (RR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.37). However, there is an inverse relationship between the prevalence of CAD in the study and the RR (r = -.554, p = .097), suggesting that, in primary care settings in which the prevalence of CAD is low, there may be a significant association between panic disorder and CAD. The association between panic disorder and CAD has several implications for primary care physicians managing patients with chest pain. When comorbid, the panic attacks may cause the patient with coronary disease to seek care but could also provoke a cardiac event. If one condition is recognized, a search for the other may be warranted because of the potential consequences if left undetected. The treatment approach to the panic disorder should be adjusted in the presence of comorbid CAD.

  7. Entropy, materials, and posterity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloud, P.

    1977-01-01

    with little industry. The theory also discounts posterity, the more so as population density and percapita rates of consumption continue to grow. A new social, economic, and ecologic norm that leads to population control, conservation, and an apportionment of low-entropy states across the generations is needed to assure to posterity the options that properly belong to it as an important but voiceless constituency of the collectivity we call mankind. ?? 1977 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  8. ASIST 2003: Part III: Posters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-three posters address topics including access to information; metadata; personal information management; scholarly information communication; online resources; content analysis; interfaces; Web queries; information evaluation; informatics; information needs; search effectiveness; digital libraries; diversity; automated indexing; e-commerce;…

  9. EPA's National Stormwater Calculator (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster will demonstrate how EPA's National Stormwater Calculator works. The National Stormwater Calculator (SWC) estimates the amount of stormwater runoff generated from a site under different development and control scenarios over a long period of historical rainfall. The a...

  10. ASIST 2003: Part III: Posters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-three posters address topics including access to information; metadata; personal information management; scholarly information communication; online resources; content analysis; interfaces; Web queries; information evaluation; informatics; information needs; search effectiveness; digital libraries; diversity; automated indexing; e-commerce;…

  11. EPA's National Stormwater Calculator (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster will demonstrate how EPA's National Stormwater Calculator works. The National Stormwater Calculator (SWC) estimates the amount of stormwater runoff generated from a site under different development and control scenarios over a long period of historical rainfall. The a...

  12. 48 CFR 52.203-14 - Display of Hotline Poster(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Display of Hotline Poster... Clauses 52.203-14 Display of Hotline Poster(s). As prescribed in 3.1004(b), insert the following clause: Display of Hotline Poster(s) (DEC 2007) (a) Definition. United States, as used in this clause, means...

  13. 48 CFR 52.203-14 - Display of Hotline Poster(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Display of Hotline Poster... Clauses 52.203-14 Display of Hotline Poster(s). As prescribed in 3.1004(b), insert the following clause: Display of Hotline Poster(s) (DEC 2007) (a) Definition. United States, as used in this clause, means...

  14. 48 CFR 52.203-14 - Display of Hotline Poster(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Display of Hotline Poster... Clauses 52.203-14 Display of Hotline Poster(s). As prescribed in 3.1004(b), insert the following clause: Display of Hotline Poster(s) (DEC 2007) (a) Definition. United States, as used in this clause, means...

  15. Poster: the macaque genome.

    PubMed

    2007-04-13

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) facilitates an extraordinary range of biomedical and basic research, and the publication of the genome only makes it a more powerful model for studies of human disease; moreover, the macaque's position relative to humans and chimpanzees affords the opportunity to learn about the processes that have shaped the last 25 million years of primate evolution. To allow users to explore these themes of the macaque genome, Science has created a special interactive version of the poster published in the print edition of the 13 April 2007 issue. The interactive version includes additional text and exploration, as well as embedded video featuring seven scientists discussing the importance of the macaque and its genome sequence in studies of biomedicine and evolution. We have also created an accompanying teaching resource, including a lesson plan aimed at teachers of advanced high school life science students, for exploring what a comparison of the macaque and human genomes can tell us about human biology and evolution. These items are free to all site visitors.

  16. Developing a professional poster: four "ps" for advanced practice nurses to consider.

    PubMed

    Bindon, Susan L; Davenport, Joan M

    2013-01-01

    Professional posters play an important role in the dissemination of knowledge and the professional development of advanced practice nurses, graduate students, and clinical faculty. Posters should be considered an integral component in communication of professional work in practice, research, and education. The invitation to submit a poster abstract is an important opportunity for clinicians and faculty alike to consider. Though sometimes misperceived as less prestigious than a podium presentation, posters add a unique element to professional and academic events. The argument is made for posters as an equal among scholarly presentation formats. The poster serves as a tremendous opportunity for collaboration between partners and a way to communicate important findings and advertise the presenters' work. For the advanced practice nurse who is a novice in presenting best practice or evidence from research trials, the poster format may be less intimidating while allowing the invaluable sharing of results. Four critical elements of professional poster development are deciding on a clear Purpose, targeting the right People, outlining key steps in the Process, and delivering a memorable Presentation. Using the "4 Ps" as cornerstones for the work of developing, preparing, and delivering the poster to an audience, the authors aim to help organize the entire process into these essential considerations. The poster, as a means of scholarly work, is a viable and essential activity, as interdisciplinary collaboration and sharing of best practice becomes the expectation for all professional development.

  17. Safe and rapid disposition of low-to-intermediate risk patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain: a 1-year high-volume single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald L; Thomas, Dustin M; Barnwell, Megan L; Fentanes, Emilio; Young, Adam N; Barnwell, Robert; Foley, Austin T; Hilliard, Michael; Hulten, Edward A; Villines, Todd C; Cury, Ricardo C; Slim, Ahmad M

    2014-01-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CTA) is a powerful tool for the evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department (ED). Some debate persists regarding its cost-effectiveness in a low-to-intermediate risk population. This study sought to evaluate the safety and cost-effectiveness of coronary CTA for low-to-intermediate risk patients presenting to the ED with chest pain in a closed-loop referral system. Chest pain patients were evaluated in the ED via a local rapid coronary CTA protocol and tracked prospectively for ED throughput, disposition, chest pain recidivism, and cost utilization as compared with an age-matched cohort evaluated for chest pain treated with usual care. One hundred eighty-three patients underwent the rapid coronary CTA protocol compared with an age-matched cohort of 184 patients treated with usual care. The median follow-up period for major adverse cardiovascular events in the coronary CTA group was 9.0 months (range, 1.8-14.5 months) and 11.1 months (range, 0-14.0 months) for the age-matched cohort. The median ED length of stay (LOS) was 5.8 hours (range, 2.6-12.3 hours) for the rapid coronary CTA cohort and 12.2 hours (range, 1.7-40.3 hours) for the age-matched cohort (P < .001). The median time to performance of coronary CTA was 2.5 hours (range, 0.4-8.7 hours) with a median time from coronary CTA performance to disposition of 2.9 hours (range, 0.8-8.6 hours). Total median hospital LOS was 5.9 hours (range, 2.7-124 hours) in the rapid coronary CTA cohort compared with 25.0 hours (range, 1.2-208 hours) in the age-matched cohort (P < .001). Hospital admission was more common in the age-matched cohort (98.9% vs 9.3%; P < .001). There was a significant reduction in total payer cost in coronary CTA group when compared to usual care ($182,064.55 vs $685,190.77; P < .001). Coronary CTA for ED risk stratification and disposition within a closed referral system resulted in the shortest ED LOS published to date while being safe and cost-effective. Published

  18. Blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Adegboye, V O; Ladipo, J K; Brimmo, I A; Adebo, A O

    2002-12-01

    A retrospective study was conducted at the cardiothoracic surgical unit of the University College Hospital, Ibadan on all consecutive, blunt chest injury patients treated between May 1975 and April 1999. The period of study was divided into 2 periods: May 1975-April 1987, May 1987-April 1999. The aim was to determine the pattern of injury, the management and complications of the injury among the treated. Blunt chest trauma patients were 69% (1331 patients) of all chest injury patients (1928 patients) treated. Mean age for the 2 periods was 38.3 +/- 15 years and 56.4 +/- 6.2 years, the male:female ratio was 4:1 and 2:1 respectively. The incidence of blunt chest trauma tripled in the second period. Blunt chest trauma was classified as involving bony chest wall or without the involvement of bony chest wall. Majority of the blunt chest injuries were minor chest wall injuries (68%, 905 patients), 7.6% (101 patients) had major but stable chest wall injuries, 10.8% (144 patients) had flail chest injuries. Thoracic injuries without fractures of bony chest wall occurred in 181 patients (13.6%). Seven hundred and eighty-seven patients (59.1%) had associated extra-thoracic injuries, in 426 patients (54.1%) two or more extra-thoracic systems were involved. While orthopaedic injury was the most frequent extra-thoracic injury (69.5%) associated with blunt chest trauma, craniospinal injury (31.9%) was more common injury among the patients with severe or life threatening chest trauma. The most common extra-thoracic operation was laparotomy (221 patients). Nine hundred and seventy patients (72.9%) had either closed thoracostomy drainage or clinical observation, 361 patients (27.1%) had major thoracic surgical intervention (emergent in 134 patients, late in 227 patients). Most of the severe lung contusion that needed ventilatory care (85 patients) featured among patients with bony chest wall injury, 15 were without chest wall injury. Majority of patients 63.2% (835 patients) had no

  19. Is it safe to discharge patients from accident and emergency using a rapid point of care Triple Cardiac Marker test to rule out acute coronary syndrome in low to intermediate risk patients presenting with chest pain?

    PubMed

    Rathore, S; Knowles, P; Mann, A P S; Dodds, P A

    2008-11-01

    To determine whether patients presenting with chest pain who are at low to intermediate risk for ACS can safely be discharged from Accident and Emergency using Triple Cardiac Marker [TCM] [CK-MB, myoglobin, troponin I] without increasing risk and cost effective use of coronary care facilities. Retrospective review of consecutive patients presented to A&E between Dec 2003 and July 2004 was performed and these patients were prospectively followed for six months for future coronary events and hospital admissions. A total of 325 patients presented to A&E with chest pain that were at low to intermediate risk for ACS. Paired TCM and ECGs were performed 2 h apart and the results were used to determine whether hospital admission was required. Follow up data was collected from hospital records, hospital database, GPS and patient interviews. 325 consecutive patients [225 men, 100 women; aged 18-97 years, median-68 years] were included in the study. Paired TCM was negative in 100 patients [30%] and they were discharged from A&E. The re-admission rate for this group of patients was 1% with ACS and no deaths from cardiac cause at six months. 36 [11%] had single TCM negative and were sent home with 3% re-admission rate with ACS and no death at six months. Subgroup analysis shows sensitivity and specificity of 85.7% and 96.5% respectively for TCM to diagnose ACS in this setting. Almost one third of patients who presented with chest pain and low to intermediate probability of ACS were safely discharged from A&E following paired negative TCM. Six month re-admission rate with ACS in this group of patients was only 1% with no death. Therefore paired TCM can be used to safely discharge this group of patients. This marker has the potential to significantly reduce hospital admissions.

  20. Chest wall hypoplasia--principles and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Oscar Henry

    2015-01-01

    The chest is a dynamic structure. For normal movement it relies on a coordinated movement of the multiple bones, joints and muscles of the respiratory system. While muscle weakness can have clear impact on respiration by decreasing respiratory motion, so can conditions that cause chest wall hypoplasia and produce an immobile chest wall. These conditions, such as Jarcho-Levin and Jeune syndrome, present significantly different challenges than those faced with early onset scoliosis in which chest wall mechanics and thoracic volume may be much closer to normal. Because of this difference more aggressive approaches to clinical and surgical management are necessary.

  1. Chest Wall Trauma.

    PubMed

    Majercik, Sarah; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2017-05-01

    Chest wall trauma is common, and contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality of trauma patients. Early identification of major chest wall and concomitant intrathoracic injuries is critical. Generalized management of multiple rib fractures and flail chest consists of adequate pain control (including locoregional modalities); management of pulmonary dysfunction by invasive and noninvasive means; and, in some cases, surgical fixation. Multiple studies have shown that patients with flail chest have substantial benefit (decreased ventilator and intensive care unit days, improved pulmonary function, and improved long-term functional outcome) when they undergo surgery compared with nonoperative management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Chest pain in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Raiola, G; Galati, M C; De Sanctis, V; Salerno, D; Arcuri, V M; Mussari, A

    2002-12-01

    In children and in adolescents, chest pain is relatively common and self-limiting. The close association between chest pain, cardiopathies and sudden death is the cause of intense anxiety in boys and their parents and even doctors. The most frequent causes of chest pain, the diagnosis and the eventual treatment are examined. Finally, the causes of chest pain due to drug abuse (in particular cocaine) and to CO poisoning are also examined. Good knowledge of the problem, an accurate anamnesis and a careful objective exam are useful to choose the most suitable treatment.

  3. Pop Goes the Poster! Tips for Effective Poster Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helmken, Charles M.

    1979-01-01

    Posters' power in academic advertising to persuade and inform is successful when message and graphics are combined. Design principles and techniques are identified: symbolism, symbiosis, substitution, sequence, scale, silhouette, script, spectrum, and simplicity. Designers should avoid: typographic fog, color confusion, excessive elements, and…

  4. Pop Goes the Poster! Tips for Effective Poster Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helmken, Charles M.

    1979-01-01

    Posters' power in academic advertising to persuade and inform is successful when message and graphics are combined. Design principles and techniques are identified: symbolism, symbiosis, substitution, sequence, scale, silhouette, script, spectrum, and simplicity. Designers should avoid: typographic fog, color confusion, excessive elements, and…

  5. Ecoregions of Arizona (poster)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, Glenn E.; Omernik, James M.; Johnson, Colleen Burch; Turner, Dale S.

    2014-01-01

    peaks, and river alluvial floodplains. Ecological diversity is remarkably high. There are 7 level III ecoregions and 52 level IV ecoregions in Arizona and many continue into ecologically similar parts of adjacent states. This poster is part of a collaborative project primarily between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (Corvallis, Oregon), USEPA Region IX, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)–Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), The Nature Conservancy, and several Arizona state agencies. The project is associated with an interagency effort to develop a common national framework of ecological regions. Reaching that objective requires recognition of the differences in the conceptual approaches and mapping methodologies applied to develop the most common ecoregion-type frameworks, including those developed by the USDA–Forest Service, the USEPA, and the NRCS. As each of these frameworks is further refined, their differences are becoming less discernible. Collaborative ecoregion projects, such as this one in Arizona, are a step toward attaining consensus and consistency in ecoregion frameworks for the entire nation.

  6. 48 CFR 252.203-7004 - Display of fraud hotline poster(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Display of fraud hotline... of Provisions And Clauses 252.203-7004 Display of fraud hotline poster(s). As prescribed in 203.1004(b)(2)(ii), use the following clause: Display of Fraud Hotline Poster(s) (SEP 2011) (a)...

  7. 48 CFR 252.203-7004 - Display of fraud hotline poster(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Display of fraud hotline... of Provisions And Clauses 252.203-7004 Display of fraud hotline poster(s). As prescribed in 203.1004(b)(2)(ii), use the following clause: Display of Fraud Hotline Poster(s) (DEC 2012) (a)...

  8. 48 CFR 252.203-7004 - Display of fraud hotline poster(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Display of fraud hotline... of Provisions And Clauses 252.203-7004 Display of fraud hotline poster(s). As prescribed in 203.1004(b)(2)(ii), use the following clause: Display of Fraud Hotline Poster(s) (DEC 2012) (a) Definition...

  9. 48 CFR 52.203-14 - Display of Hotline Poster(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... maintains a company website as a method of providing information to employees, the Contractor shall display an electronic version of the poster(s) at the website. (3) Any required posters may be obtained as... title of applicable Department of Homeland Security fraud hotline poster); and (ii) The website(s)...

  10. 48 CFR 52.203-14 - Display of Hotline Poster(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... maintains a company website as a method of providing information to employees, the Contractor shall display an electronic version of the poster(s) at the website. (3) Any required posters may be obtained as... title of applicable Department of Homeland Security fraud hotline poster); and (ii) The website(s)...

  11. 48 CFR 252.203-7004 - Display of fraud hotline poster(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Display of fraud hotline... of Provisions And Clauses 252.203-7004 Display of fraud hotline poster(s). As prescribed in 203.1004(b)(2)(ii), use the following clause: Display of Fraud Hotline Poster(s) (Sep 2011) (a)...

  12. Poster Session A

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    groups and an alkyne moiety. The formyl groups react with lysine residues in the presence of a reducing agent via a reductive amination mechanism. “Dead-end” modified peptides therefore contain an aldehyde moiety that can be used as a chemical handle to deplete these peptides. Cross-linked peptides can then be enriched by Copper catalyzed Huisgen cylcoaddition of the alkyne handle with a cleavable azido-biotin reagent. This poster presents optimization of reaction conditions to effect this discrimination in both model proteins and in E. coli cell lysates. Research support was provided by the Bio-Organic Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Resource (A. L. Burlingame, Director) through the Biomedical Research Technology Program of the NIH National Center for Research Resources, NIH NCRR P41RR001614. A.12 Rapid MRM Assay Development Strategies — Intelligent Software and Acquisition Strategies for Highest Productivity S. Mollah, M. M. Champion, and C. L. Hunter Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA Targeted peptide quantitation is a rapidly growing application within proteomics mass spectrometry due to its widespread utility in biomarker verification, protein/peptide confirmation and characterization, as well as pathway mapping. As more extensive protein panels need to be monitored in a targeted way across multiple samples, higher throughput is becoming essential. The need for rapid assay development, higher multiplexing and more robust assays are some of the key challenges. In this work, the combination of unique workflows on the hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer and automated softwares, MRMPilot™ Software and MultiQuant™ Software, have been used to automate and simplify creation of highly multiplexed MRM assays. The complete workflow of taking proteomics discovery data, to refinement of MRM transitions, resulting in creation of a final MRM assay of >1000 MRM transitions can now take just a matter of days. In this study, E. coli samples grown in

  13. [Chest trauma: a report of 596 cases].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H

    1992-02-01

    The study presented 596 cases with chest injuries, experienced for 4 years in our trauma and critical care center. Cases with chest injuries account for approximately 40% of all traumatized patients. Cases dead on arrival (DOA) show more significant frequency (87% of all traumatized DOA patients). To grasp the significance and the severity of chest injuries, we designed a new classification by the site where abnormality exists; 1) the chest wall, 2) the pleural cavity, 3) the airway, 4) the mediastinum, 5) the intrapericardial space, and 6) cardiac function. An application of the classification may clearly identify the initial direction for the treatment of chest injuries, including some examination which should be given priority. It is also suspected that a more exact decision making should be possible by an utilization of the classification.

  14. Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics Poster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozusko, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    This is a simple poster for Community Day at the Visitor Center. It describes, as an overview, an example of the use of GPS and LiDAR data to determine the loss of scrubjay habitat due to a change in water table.

  15. Dynamic Impregnator Reactor System (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    IBRF poster developed for the IBRF showcase. Describes the multifarious system designed for complex feedstock impregnation and processing. IBRF feedstock system has several unit operations combined into one robust system that provides for flexible and staged process configurations, such as spraying, soaking, low-severity pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, concentration/evaporation, and distillation.

  16. Meteor Terminology poster translated into different languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlerin, Vincent; Hankey, Mike

    2014-02-01

    The American Meteor Society (AMS) has created an educational poster that defines the major terms of the meteor terminology. This poster is an educational tool made available for free on the AMS website. We offer this poster to be translated and shared among the IMO members.

  17. Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, H. Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D.; Wu, Carol C.; Cushing, Matthew S.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P < .001) and positive smoking history (P = .001) were associated with increased likelihood of a recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in

  18. List of Posters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List of Posters: Dark matter annihilation in the Galactic galo, by Dokuchaev Vyacheslav, et al. NEMO developments towards km3 telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. The NEMO project. Neutrino Mediterranean Observatory By Antonio Capone, NEMO Collaboration. Alignment as a result from QCD jet production or new still unknown physics at LHC? By Alexander Snigirev. Small-scale fluctuations of extensive air showers: systematics in energy and muon density estimation By Grigory Rubtsov. SHINIE: Simulation of High-Energy Neutrino Interacting with the Earth By Lin Guey-Lin, et al.. Thermodynamics of rotating solutions in n+1 dimensional Einstein - Maxwell -dilation gravity By Ahmad Sheykhi, et al.. Supernova neutrino physics with future large Cherenkov detectors By Daniele Montanino. Crossing of the Cosmological Constant Barrier in the string Inspired Dark Energy Model By S. Yu. Vernov. Calculations of radio signals produced by ultra-high and extremely high energy neutrino induced cascades in Antarctic ice By D. Besson, et al.. Inflation, Cosmic Acceleration and string Gravity By Ischwaree Neupane. Neutrino Physics: Charm and J/Psi production in the atmosphere By Liudmila Volkova. Three generation flavor transitions and decays of supernova relic neutrinos By Daniele Montanino. Lattice calculations & computational quantum field theory: Sonification of Quark and Baryon Spectra By Markum Harald, et al.. Generalized Kramers-Wannier Duality for spin systems with non-commutative symmetry By V. M. Buchstaber, et al.. Heavy ion collisions & quark matter: Nuclear matter jets and multifragmentation By Danut Argintaru, et al.. QCD hard interactions: The qT-spectrum of the Higgs and Slepton-pairs at the LHC By Guiseppe Bozzi. QCD soft interactions: Nonperturbative effects in Single-Spin Asymmetries: Instantons and TMD-parton distributions By Igor Cherednikov, et al.. Gluon dominance model and high multiplicity By Elena Kokoulina. Resonances in eta pi- pi- pi+ system By Dmitry Ryabchikov

  19. Embed dynamic content in your poster.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, B Ian

    2013-01-29

    A new technology has emerged that will facilitate the presentation of dynamic or otherwise inaccessible data on posters at scientific meetings. Video, audio, or other digital files hosted on mobile-friendly sites can be linked to through a quick response (QR) code, a two-dimensional barcode that can be scanned by smartphones, which then display the content. This approach is more affordable than acquiring tablet computers for playing dynamic content and can reach many users at large conferences. This resource details how to host videos, generate QR codes, and view the associated files on mobile devices.

  20. Diagnostic performance and comparative cost-effectiveness of non-invasive imaging tests in patients presenting with chronic stable chest pain with suspected coronary artery disease: a systematic overview.

    PubMed

    van Waardhuizen, Claudia N; Langhout, Marieke; Ly, Felisia; Braun, Loes; Genders, Tessa S S; Petersen, Steffen E; Fleischmann, Kirsten E; Nieman, Koen; Hunink, M G Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Several non-invasive imaging techniques are currently in use for the diagnostic workup of adult patients with stable chest pain suspected of having coronary artery disease (CAD). In this paper, we present a systematic overview of the evidence on diagnostic performance and comparative cost-effectiveness of new modalities in comparison to established technologies. A literature search for English language studies from 2009 to 2013 was performed, and two investigators independently extracted data on patient and study characteristics. The reviewed published evidence on diagnostic performance and cost-effectiveness support a strategy of CTCA as a rule out (gatekeeper) test of CAD in low- to intermediate-risk patients since it has excellent diagnostic performance and as initial imaging test is cost-effective under different willingness-to-pay thresholds. More cost-effectiveness research is needed in order to define the role and choice of cardiac stress imaging tests.

  1. Chest Pain: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition. Seek emergency medical assistance immediately. Pneumonia with pleurisy Frequent signs and symptoms of pneumonia are chest ... a breath or coughing. This condition is called pleurisy. One sign of pleurisy is that the pain ...

  2. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... inside the scanner. For some diagnoses, a contrast dye, often iodine-based, may be injected into a ... your arm before the imaging test. This contrast dye highlights areas inside your chest and creates clearer ...

  3. Chest tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics Chest Injuries and Disorders Collapsed Lung Critical Care Lung Diseases Pleural Disorders A.D.A. ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  4. Packaging for Posterity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sias, Jim

    1990-01-01

    A project in which students designed environmentally responsible food packaging is described. The problem definition; research on topics such as waste paper, plastic, metal, glass, incineration, recycling, and consumer preferences; and the presentation design are provided. (KR)

  5. Packaging for Posterity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sias, Jim

    1990-01-01

    A project in which students designed environmentally responsible food packaging is described. The problem definition; research on topics such as waste paper, plastic, metal, glass, incineration, recycling, and consumer preferences; and the presentation design are provided. (KR)

  6. [Chest injuries (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Elert, O; Satter, P

    1979-04-01

    The mortality rate of chest injuries sustained during work or in road accidents stands now at 15-20%. The considerable force of the impact in road accidents is, in 60-80% of the cases, responsible for chest injuries which involve not only the chest wall but also the lungs. The extent and course of the lung damage must be assessed by repeated X-ray examinations, blood gas analyses and clinical observations. The decision to intubate and apply artificial ventilation should be made at an early stage. Fracture of a single rib needs only pain killers. If a rib is broken in several places or if several ribs are fractured instability of the chest wall is apt to develop in 15-20% of the cases. It manifests itself in paradoxical breathing and ensuing increase in the dead space. These cases require prompt "internal pneumatic splinting" in the form of positive pressure respiration and intubation. In recent years surgical stabilization of the chest wall has regained favour. Plate osteosynthesis, screw-less rib plates, self-gripping steel plates and steel splints are being used (Brunner, Hofmeister, Koncz). Primary osteosynthetic stabilization of the chest wall is indicated only if artificial ventilation has proved inadequate and there are other reasons for performing a thoracotomy. In these circumstances surgical intervention ensures that prolonged artificial ventilation and its attendent risks and complications and the demands made on the nursing staff are reduced to a minimum.

  7. Programming, Managing, and Judging Science Symposium Poster Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    The Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium has operated for 14 years as a region of the National Junior Science and Humanities Symposium. In response to the trend among professional science and science education societies to include both formal research report presentations and informal poster presentations, the Pacific Region…

  8. Podium versus poster publication rates at the Orthopaedic Trauma Association.

    PubMed

    Preston, Charles F; Bhandari, Mohit; Fulkerson, Eric; Ginat, Danial; Koval, Kenneth J; Egol, Kenneth A

    2005-08-01

    Original studies at orthopaedic meetings are presented on the podium and in poster format. Publication of those studies in peer-reviewed journals is the standard of communicating scientific data to colleagues. Investigators of previous studies have reported publication rates, but never differentiated between the modes of presentation. We evaluated the annual meeting of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association from 1994-1998 and found that studies presented on the podium were 1.3 times more likely to be published than those presented in a poster format (67% versus 52%). The mean time to publication was similar, 21.6 months for poster presentations and 24.8 months for podium presentations. Podium presentations were more likely to be published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, and the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American and British editions). Our findings suggest different rates and distribution of publication between podium and poster presentations at an international trauma meeting. These findings should be considered when evaluating studies of interest at the Orthopaedic Trauma Association meeting.

  9. Celebrating Achievement and Fostering Collaboration at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The 20th annual Spring Research Festival (SRF) took place at Fort Detrick on May 3 and 4. The event included two seminar sessions, a keynote speaker, a Poster Blitz, and two poster sessions. During the event, scientific staff, including students, technical support staff, postdoctoral fellows, and principal investigators, had the opportunity to present their research to the joint scientific communities.

  10. Celebrating Achievement and Fostering Collaboration at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The 20th annual Spring Research Festival (SRF) took place at Fort Detrick on May 3 and 4. The event included two seminar sessions, a keynote speaker, a Poster Blitz, and two poster sessions. During the event, scientific staff, including students, technical support staff, postdoctoral fellows, and principal investigators, had the opportunity to present their research to the joint scientific communities.

  11. Spotlight on Research at Center Stage: Using Poster Sessions to Showcase Student Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ello, Linda M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of poster sessions to showcase and celebrate student research efforts. Poster presentations provide an opportunity for students to display and discuss research completed during the course of their graduate social work education. The author provides a descriptive analysis of data compiled during four years of teaching…

  12. Spring Research Festival Features Visit from FCPS Superintendent | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    One of the highlights of the 19th annual Spring Research Festival (SRF), held May 4–7, was a visit from Terry Alban, Ph.D., superintendent of Frederick County Public Schools (FCPS), and Mike Markoe, deputy superintendent, FCPS. They toured the event on May 7, talking to researchers and students about their posters. “Dr. Alban was very interested in hearing what the Werner H. Kirsten students were presenting at their posters,” said Andrea Frydl, public affairs specialist, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick. “Many WHK students are also FCPS students, some of whom Dr. Alban and Dr. Markoe knew personally.” Alban tweeted (@FCPSMDSuper) photos and information about four of the students whose posters she visited during the tour.

  13. Spring Research Festival Features Visit from FCPS Superintendent | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    One of the highlights of the 19th annual Spring Research Festival (SRF), held May 4–7, was a visit from Terry Alban, Ph.D., superintendent of Frederick County Public Schools (FCPS), and Mike Markoe, deputy superintendent, FCPS. They toured the event on May 7, talking to researchers and students about their posters. “Dr. Alban was very interested in hearing what the Werner H. Kirsten students were presenting at their posters,” said Andrea Frydl, public affairs specialist, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick. “Many WHK students are also FCPS students, some of whom Dr. Alban and Dr. Markoe knew personally.” Alban tweeted (@FCPSMDSuper) photos and information about four of the students whose posters she visited during the tour.

  14. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Newman, Beverley; Krane, Elliot J; Gawande, Rakhee; Holmes, Tyson H; Robinson, Terry E

    2014-02-01

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  15. Who Needs Statistics? | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    You may know the feeling. You have collected a lot of new data on an important experiment. Now you are faced with multiple groups of data, a sea of numbers, and a deadline for submitting your paper to a peer-reviewed journal. And you are not sure which data are relevant, or even the best way to present them. The statisticians at Data Management Services (DMS) know how to help. This small group of experts provides a wide array of statistical and mathematical consulting services to the scientific community at NCI at Frederick and NCI-Bethesda.

  16. Getting the Picture | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ken Michaels, Guest Writer Recently, I attended the annual meeting of the BioCommunications Association in Asilomar, Calif. Not surprisingly, the speakers, all professional communicators, were very good and spoke knowledgeably on their various topics. But something else impressed me during the informal times between presentations, and at mealtimes. These folks not only tended to speak well, but they also tended to listen well. And there’s a very strong case to be made for the importance of listening in effective communication.

  17. Getting the Picture | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ken Michaels, Guest Writer Recently, I attended the annual meeting of the BioCommunications Association in Asilomar, Calif. Not surprisingly, the speakers, all professional communicators, were very good and spoke knowledgeably on their various topics. But something else impressed me during the informal times between presentations, and at mealtimes. These folks not only tended to speak well, but they also tended to listen well. And there’s a very strong case to be made for the importance of listening in effective communication.

  18. Who Needs Statistics? | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    You may know the feeling. You have collected a lot of new data on an important experiment. Now you are faced with multiple groups of data, a sea of numbers, and a deadline for submitting your paper to a peer-reviewed journal. And you are not sure which data are relevant, or even the best way to present them. The statisticians at Data Management Services (DMS) know how to help. This small group of experts provides a wide array of statistical and mathematical consulting services to the scientific community at NCI at Frederick and NCI-Bethesda.

  19. Panic Disorder and Chest Pain: Mechanisms, Morbidity, and Management.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Jeff C.; Pollack, Mark H.; Stern, Theodore A.

    2002-04-01

    Approximately one quarter of patients who present to physicians for treatment of chest pain have panic disorder. Panic disorder frequently goes unrecognized and untreated among patients with chest pain, leading to frequent return visits and substantial morbidity. Panic attacks may lead to chest pain through a variety of mechanisms, both cardiac and noncardiac in nature, and multiple processes may cause chest pain in the same patient. Panic disorder is associated with elevated rates of cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and, possibly, sudden cardiac death. Furthermore, patients with panic disorder and chest pain have high rates of functional disability and medical service utilization. Fortunately, panic disorder is treatable; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy all effectively reduce symptoms. Preliminary studies have also found that treatment of patients who have panic disorder and chest pain with benzodiazepines results in reduction of chest pain as well as relief of anxiety.

  20. The Role of Posters in Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osa, Justina O.; Musser, Linda R.

    2004-01-01

    Posters abound in education libraries as decorative objects yet few libraries realize the educational potential of the poster. Posters are colorful, attractive learning media which can enhance the learning environment. This paper describes the value of posters in the educational setting, offers suggestions on selecting posters for learning, and…

  1. 24 CFR 110.20 - Availability of posters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... offices. A facsimile may be used if the poster and the lettering are equivalent in size and legibility to... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Availability of posters. 110.20... HOUSING FAIR HOUSING POSTER Requirements for Display of Posters § 110.20 Availability of posters....

  2. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  3. Restrictive chest wall disorders.

    PubMed

    Donath, Joseph; Miller, Albert

    2009-06-01

    Hypoventilation can be caused by diseases of the chest wall. Any anatomical or functional abnormality of the bony thorax increases dead space ventilation and the work of breathing, whether congenital or acquired, acute or chronic, and whether its cause is infectious, traumatic, environmental, iatrogenic, or unknown. In this article, we discuss these heterogeneous disorders from the viewpoint of the practicing nonpediatric pulmonary physician, only briefly touching on surgical, pediatric, rheumatologic, and other nonpulmonary ramifications. Emphasis is on the most common and the best researched forms of chest wall restriction, including kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, flail chest, and ankylosing spondylitis. Other diseases such as osteoporosis with its less well known pulmonary effects, and some rarely seen entities, are briefly discussed.

  4. Tactical Checkpoint: Hail/Warn Suppress/Stop (Poster)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-15

    distractor , optical suppression , human behavior, checkpoint, ambient light, driver suppression , human experimentation, light, paintball, obscuration...HAIL/WARN AND - SUPPRESS /STOP Poster Presented at the 2010 Directed Energies Professional Society Meeting, 15-19 November 2010. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...warning to a driver that is approaching a checkpoint. The laser, MCNC light, and the windshield obscuration were evaluated for their suppression

  5. Poster Session A

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A.1 Lessons Learned During Eight Years of Using iTRAQ in the Proteomic Study of Pathology Mia Jullig1, Martin Middleditch1, Garth Cooper1,2 1Maurice Wilkins Centre, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 2University of Manchester, UK Our research team has long held the view that proteomics holds the key to unlock pathology. During the past eight years we have increasingly used the LC-MS/MS based iTRAQ labeling approach to further our understanding of a number of pathologies in various tissues of interest. From our very first project utilizing iTRAQ, it became clear that manual processing of the LC-MS/MS output to obtain protein ratios is preferable to using the ratios automatically generated by proprietary quantitative proteomic software. For example, we have identified two relatively common amino acid patterns which generate MS/MS m/z values overlapping with those of certain iTRAQ reporter ions and, if not accounted for, may interfere with the quantitative results. Furthermore, systematically different degrees of missed tryptic cleavages between study groups may skew the results since miscleaved peptides are often less suitable for detection through LC-MS/MS. Other factors which may compromise the relative quantitation include variable success in depleting biofluids e.g. plasma of highly abundant proteins, and large change in abundance of one or more highly abundant proteins in disease. We are continually developing strategies to overcome these issues. It is however clear that each new tissue and pathology comes with its own challenges, highlighting the need for a tailored approach for each project rather than the application of a general formula. We here present our current approach to manual handling of LC-MS/MS data from iTRAQ labeled samples, along with a number of cases illustrating the potential pitfalls above and demonstrate how these can be managed. A.2 Whole Animal 15N Metabolic Pulse Chase Labeling Shows which Proteins are Built to Last Jeffrey

  6. [Cardiac causes of chest pain].

    PubMed

    Wächter, C; Markus, B; Schieffer, B

    2017-01-01

    Because of the life-threatening character and a high prevalence in emergency rooms, cardiac causes are important differential diagnoses of acute chest pain with the need for rapid clarification. In this context the working diagnosis "acute coronary syndrome" (ACS) plays a major role. In a synopsis of the clinical presentation, medical history, electrocardiogram and analysis of cardiac biomarkers, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and unstable angina pectoris can be specified as entities of ACS. The treatment of ACS consists of an immediate anti-ischemic therapy, anti-thrombotic therapy and invasive coronary diagnostics with subsequent interventional or operative revascularization therapy. The timing of invasive management is essentially determined by the individual patient risk, with the exception of STEMI where interventional revascularization must be undertaken within 120 min of diagnosis. In this context the GRACE 2.0 and TIMI risk score have become established as reliable tools. Another rare but fatal cause of acute chest pain is aortic dissection. An abrupt onset of tearing and sharp chest pains, deficits in pulse as well as the presence of high-risk factors, such as advanced age, arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, known collagenosis and previous aortic or coronary artery procedures are highly indicative for aortic dissection and additional diagnostic imaging and the highly sensitive D‑dimer should be undertaken. Additionally, inflammatory diseases, such as pericarditis and myocarditis can be associated with chest pains and mimic the character of ACS and should also be considered in the differential diagnostics.

  7. Video Now Available to Help You Navigate the Poster Website | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Having trouble finding a Poster article on a specific topic? Don’t know where to look for the Poster Puzzler? Want to comment on an article that you especially liked? Now you can learn how to navigate the Poster newsletter by viewing a video that walks you through all the features of the newsletter site.

  8. Video Now Available to Help You Navigate the Poster Website | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Having trouble finding a Poster article on a specific topic? Don’t know where to look for the Poster Puzzler? Want to comment on an article that you especially liked? Now you can learn how to navigate the Poster newsletter by viewing a video that walks you through all the features of the newsletter site.

  9. Identifying Key Components for an Effective Case Report Poster: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Paranjape, Anuradha; Estrada, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Residents demonstrate scholarly activity by presenting posters at academic meetings. Although recommendations from national organizations are available, evidence identifying which components are most important is not. OBJECTIVE To develop and test an evaluation tool to measure the quality of case report posters and identify the specific components most in need of improvement. DESIGN Faculty evaluators reviewed case report posters and provided on-site feedback to presenters at poster sessions of four annual academic general internal medicine meetings. A newly developed ten-item evaluation form measured poster quality for specific components of content, discussion, and format (5-point Likert scale, 1 = lowest, 5 = highest). Main outcome measure(s): Evaluation tool performance, including Cronbach alpha and inter-rater reliability, overall poster scores, differences across meetings and evaluators and specific components of the posters most in need of improvement. RESULTS Forty-five evaluators from 20 medical institutions reviewed 347 posters. Cronbach’s alpha of the evaluation form was 0.84 and inter-rater reliability, Spearman’s rho 0.49 ( < 0.001). The median score was 4.1 (Q1 -Q3, 3.7-4.6)(Q1 = 25th, Q3 = 75th percentile). The national meeting median score was higher than the regional meetings (4.4 vs, 4.0,  < 0.001). We found no difference in faculty scores. The following areas were identified as most needing improvement: clearly state learning objectives, tie conclusions to learning objectives, and use appropriate amount of words. CONCLUSIONS Our evaluation tool provides empirical data to guide trainees as they prepare posters for presentation which may improve poster quality and enhance their scholarly productivity. PMID:19089510

  10. Identifying key components for an effective case report poster: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Willett, Lisa L; Paranjape, Anuradha; Estrada, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    Residents demonstrate scholarly activity by presenting posters at academic meetings. Although recommendations from national organizations are available, evidence identifying which components are most important is not. To develop and test an evaluation tool to measure the quality of case report posters and identify the specific components most in need of improvement. Faculty evaluators reviewed case report posters and provided on-site feedback to presenters at poster sessions of four annual academic general internal medicine meetings. A newly developed ten-item evaluation form measured poster quality for specific components of content, discussion, and format (5-point Likert scale, 1 = lowest, 5 = highest). Evaluation tool performance, including Cronbach alpha and inter-rater reliability, overall poster scores, differences across meetings and evaluators and specific components of the posters most in need of improvement. Forty-five evaluators from 20 medical institutions reviewed 347 posters. Cronbach's alpha of the evaluation form was 0.84 and inter-rater reliability, Spearman's rho 0.49 (p < 0.001). The median score was 4.1 (Q1 -Q3, 3.7-4.6)(Q1 = 25th, Q3 = 75th percentile). The national meeting median score was higher than the regional meetings (4.4 vs, 4.0, P < 0.001). We found no difference in faculty scores. The following areas were identified as most needing improvement: clearly state learning objectives, tie conclusions to learning objectives, and use appropriate amount of words. Our evaluation tool provides empirical data to guide trainees as they prepare posters for presentation which may improve poster quality and enhance their scholarly productivity.

  11. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Anal Cancer Facet Joint Block Video: Lung Cancer Screening Video: Upper GI Tract X-ray Video: ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  12. Serial Sampling of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T May Not Be Required for Prediction of Acute Myocardial Infarction Diagnosis in Chest Pain Patients with Highly Abnormal Concentrations at Presentation.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Hennessen, Matthias; Mueller, Christian; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Biener, Moritz; Vafaie, Mehrshad; deFilippi, Christopher R; Christ, Michael; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jorge; Panteghini, Mauro; Plebani, Mario; Verschuren, Franck; Melki, Dina; French, John K; Christenson, Robert H; Body, Richard; McCord, James; Dinkel, Carina; Katus, Hugo A; Lindahl, Bertil

    2017-02-01

    Guidelines for diagnosing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) recommend adding kinetic changes to the initial cardiac troponin (cTn) blood concentration to improve AMI diagnosis. We hypothesized that kinetic changes may not be required in patients presenting with highly abnormal cTn. Patients presenting with suspected AMI to the emergency department were enrolled in a prospective diagnostic study. We assessed the positive predictive value (PPV) of initial high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) blood concentrations alone and in combination with kinetic changes for AMI. Predefined relative changes (δ change of ≥20%) and absolute changes (Δ change ≥9.2 ng/L) within different time intervals (1 h, 2 h, and 4-14 h after presentation) were assessed. The final diagnosis was adjudicated by 2 independent cardiologists. Among 1282 patients, 213 (16.6%) patients had a final diagnosis of AMI. For AMI prediction, PPVs increased from 48.8% for an initial hs-cTnT >14 ng/L to 87.2% for >60 ng/L, whereas PPVs remained unchanged for higher hs-cTnT concentrations at baseline (87.1% for both >80 ng/L and >100 ng/L). With addition of 20% relative Δ change, PPVs were not further improved in patients with baseline hs-cTnT >80 ng/L using the 1-h (84.0%) and 2-h (88.9%) intervals, and only minimally when extending the interval to 4-14 h (91.2% for >80 ng/L and 90.4% for >100 ng/L, respectively). Similar findings were observed when applying absolute changes. In chest pain patients with highly abnormal hs-cTnT concentrations at presentation, subsequent blood draws may not be required, as they do not provide incremental diagnostic value for prediction of AMI diagnosis. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  13. Using Practice Posters to Address EFL Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Practice posters, with pictures and captions, are useful for controlled practice of vocabulary and structures in an EFL context. The author has found many advantages of using posters with beginners in a high school setting. Student led review gets students active, increases autonomy and improves confidence. The use of small groups is effective…

  14. Poster Project Maps Out Design Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Creating poster portfolios can increase the quality of work that students put into planning projects. This article describes an activity developed by the author that involves the use of poster portfolio projects. The activity helps students produce better-organized, higher quality work, and allows them to enjoy the opportunity it gives them for…

  15. Poster Project Maps Out Design Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Creating poster portfolios can increase the quality of work that students put into planning projects. This article describes an activity developed by the author that involves the use of poster portfolio projects. The activity helps students produce better-organized, higher quality work, and allows them to enjoy the opportunity it gives them for…

  16. Using Poster Sessions as an Alternative to Written Examination--The Poster Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Pamela; Demeo, Stephen; Sweeney, William V.; Marino, Robert; Clarkson, Sandra

    2000-09-01

    Poster sessions are effective communication tools common at scientific meetings. The adaptations of poster sessions to the classroom have been reported to be effective evaluation and learning tools in chemistry and other disciplines. However, poster sessions have never been used to replace a standard hourly exam. We report here the use of a poster session as an oral examination in our introductory Integrated Chemistry/Physics/Mathematics course for entering freshmen. The poster exam replaces one traditional, in-class written examination, providing an alternate method of student assessment. Students' communication and organizational skills, their depth of knowledge of a particular topic, and their conceptual understanding of the topic are probed by the poster exam. Students report that the poster exam is more enjoyable and a more effective learning tool than traditional exams.

  17. Noncardiac chest pain: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Schey, Ron; Villarreal, Autumn; Fass, Ronnie

    2007-04-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is very common, affecting up to 25% of the adult population in the United States. Treatment for NCCP has markedly evolved in the past decade and is presently focused on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and visceral hypersensitivity. Aggressive treatment with proton pump inhibitors has become the standard of care for GERD-related NCCP. Pain modulators such as tricyclics, trazodone, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are considered the mainstay of therapy for non-GERD-related NCCP Other therapeutic modalities such as botulinum toxin injections and hypnotherapy have demonstrated promise in small clinical trials.

  18. [Detection of pleural plaques on chest X-ray film by chest physicians].

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Tatsuji; Matsumoto, Aki; Saito, Hitoshi; Narato, Ritsuko; Shingu, Akiko; Sugisaki, Midori; Nakamura, Seiichi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Nomura, Koichiro

    2010-04-01

    With increasing awareness about health damage due to asbestos exposure, the number of people presenting with non-occupational exposure has increased remarkably. Consequently, chest physicians in general hospitals must read the chest X-ray films of patients with asbestos exposure. Can non-specialized chest physicians, who may have little experience of occupational medicine, diagnose pleural plaques accurately? The study subjects were 44 consecutive patients who were admitted to our hospital, under the Japanese medical health check system for workers employed in dangerous work. Their chest X-ray films were checked by 4 chest physicians, who were independently informed that the patients had a high suspicion of asbestos exposure. The detection rate of chest Xray for pleural plaques was compared with computed tomography (CT) results as the gold standard. The sensitivity was 0.818 and the specificity was 0.393. The sensitivity of the presence of pleural plaques was lower in anterior and posterior sites, and on the pleura adjacent to the mediastinum, pericardium and vertebral (0.429, 0.348, 0.217), while specificity was lower on lateral sites (0.610). Chest physicians in general hospitals must be trained in the manifestation of asbestos-related diseases.

  19. Angina - when you have chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain; ACS - chest pain; Heart attack - chest pain; Myocardial infarction - chest pain; MI - chest pain ... AHA guideline for the management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction: executive summary: a report of the American College ...

  20. Which Disposable Chest Electrode?

    PubMed Central

    Hubner, P. J. B.

    1969-01-01

    Chest electrodes are preferred to limb electrodes for cardiac monitoring, as limb movements are not restricted and produce less interference of the E.C.G. trace. Eight types of disposable chest electrodes were investigated to compare their performance, skin reactions, cost, ease of application, size, and skin–electrode impedance. Elema-Schonander electrodes were found to be the most efficient and the most expensive. In their application care was required to avoid severe skin reactions. Dracard electrodes were simple to attach, worked well without severe skin reactions, and were cheap. They are recommended for routine use. Smith and Nephew electrodes, a type of “multipoint electrodes” which do not require electrode jelly, frequently produced severe skin reactions, making them unsuitable for monitoring for periods exceeding 12 hours. PMID:5801347

  1. Evaluation of Hydrogen Storage System Characteristics for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, M.; Day, K.; Brooker, A.

    2010-05-01

    This poster presentation demonstrates an approach to evaluate trade-offs among hydrogen storage system characteristic across several vehicle configurations and estimates the sensitivity of hydrogen storage system improvements on vehicle viability.

  2. Original Research: How to Create a Poster That Attracts an Audience.

    PubMed

    Siedlecki, Sandra L

    2017-03-01

    : Background: Nurses developing a poster presentation for the first time who look for guidance in the literature will find many articles offering recommendations on format and style, but these are based on opinion rather than evidence.

  3. Graduate Students' Poster Session Experiences: Do Levels of Academic Self-Efficacy and Individual Characteristics Play a Role?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipova, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study assesses the effectiveness of poster session presentations as an alternative to traditional presentations in the public administration classroom. It also determined if graduate students' college academic self-efficacy and background characteristics impacted poster performance outcomes. Data were collected over four…

  4. Graduate Students' Poster Session Experiences: Do Levels of Academic Self-Efficacy and Individual Characteristics Play a Role?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipova, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study assesses the effectiveness of poster session presentations as an alternative to traditional presentations in the public administration classroom. It also determined if graduate students' college academic self-efficacy and background characteristics impacted poster performance outcomes. Data were collected over four…

  5. Colon in the Chest: An Incidental Dextrocardia

    PubMed Central

    Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek; Shehab, Abdullah; Elnour, Asim A.; Al Nuaimi, Saif K.; Baghdady, Shazly

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diaphragmatic injury is an uncommon traumatic injury (<1%). Although most diaphragmatic injuries can be obvious (eg, herniation of abdominal contents on chest radiograph), some injuries may be subtle and imaging studies can be nondiagnostic in many situations. Patients with diaphragmatic hernia either traumatic or nontraumatic may initially have no symptoms or signs to suggest an injury to the diaphragm. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old woman diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome –associated dominant constipation, presented with shortness of breath, cough, expectoration, tachycardia, and chest pain. Dextrocardia was an incidental finding, diagnosed by electrocardiography, chest radiograph, and CT chest. Parts of the colon, small intestine, and stomach were within the thorax in the left side due to left diaphragmatic hernia of a nontraumatic cause. Acquired incidental dextrocardia was the main problem due to displacement of the heart to contralateral side by the GI (gastrointestinal) viscera (left diaphragmatic hernia). The patient was prepared for the laparoscopic surgical repair, using a polyethylene mesh 20 cm to close the defect, and the patient recovered with accepted general condition. However, 5 days postoperative, the patient passed away suddenly due to unexplained cardiac arrest. Intrathoracic herniation of abdominal viscera should be considered in patients presented with sudden chest pain concomitant with a history of increased intra-abdominal pressure. PMID:25674744

  6. Epigenetic Effects of Cadmium [Abstract and Poster 2014] ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We have reviewed the literature on in vitro and in vivo experiments as well as human studies on cadmium to understand the epigenetic mechanisms involved in cadmium- induced toxicity and carcinogenicity. This presentation will identify gaps in our current understanding and suggest future studies to further our knowledge. The abstract and poster are to be presented at the 45th Annual Meeting of the Environmental Mutagenesis and Genomics Society (EMGS) to be held from Septmeber 13 to 17, 2014.

  7. What impact do posters have on academic knowledge transfer? A pilot survey on author attitudes and experiences

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Research knowledge is commonly facilitated at conferences via oral presentations, poster presentations and workshops. Current literature exploring the efficacy of academic posters is however limited. The purpose of this initial study was to explore the perceptions of academic poster presentation, together with its benefits and limitations as an effective mechanism for academic knowledge transfer and contribute to the available academic data. Methods A survey was distributed to 88 delegates who presented academic posters at two Releasing Research and Enterprise Potential conferences in June 2007 and June 2008 at Bournemouth University. This survey addressed attitude and opinion items, together with their general experiences of poster presentations. Descriptive statistics were performed on the responses. Results A 39% return was achieved with the majority of respondents believing that posters are a good medium for transferring knowledge and a valid form of academic publication. Visual appeal was cited as more influential than subject content, with 94% agreeing that poster imagery is most likely to draw viewer's attention. Respondents also believed that posters must be accompanied by their author in order to effectively communicate the academic content. Conclusion This pilot study is the first to explore perceptions of the academic poster as a medium for knowledge transfer. Given that academic posters rely heavily on visual appeal and direct author interaction, the medium requires greater flexibility in their design to promote effective knowledge transfer. This paper introduces the concept of the IT-based 'MediaPoster' so as to address the issues raised within published literature and subsequently enhance knowledge-transfer within the field of academic medicine. PMID:19995448

  8. Drug induced chest pain—rare but important

    PubMed Central

    Davey, P.; Lalloo, D.

    2000-01-01

    Pericarditis, usually viral in origin, is an infrequent cause of chest pain. Pericarditis due to drug allergy is even less frequent and is thus rarely considered in the differential diagnosis. A case is reported of a woman who presented with severe chest pain, caused by minocycline induced pericarditis. Such allergy may be more common than reported. It is suggested that drug induced pericarditis should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain.


Keywords: chest pain; pericarditis; minocycline; drug allergy PMID:10878205

  9. Recent research efforts in the area of biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Poster session papers

    SciTech Connect

    Antonopoulos, A.A. ); Grohmann, K. )

    1992-01-01

    This report presents research presented at the poster session of the Symposium covering a wide spectrum of current biotechnological research activities. Research focused mostly on ethanol production and methane generation from biomass material via microbial processing, as well as on enhanced hydrogen yield from algae. Several of the posters dealt with the pretreatment of cellulosic materials, and enzyme production/characterization, while a good number of papers displayed research efforts on bioremediation, photosynthesis, production of various useful chemicals from biomass by bioprocessing, and on other miscellaneous subjects. One of the papers treated a very interesting topic of cellulose-cellulase complexes. Many of the poster papers are included in this volume, and a synopsis of all the poster/papers presented is the subject of this article.

  10. Recent research efforts in the area of biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Poster session papers

    SciTech Connect

    Antonopoulos, A.A.; Grohmann, K.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents research presented at the poster session of the Symposium covering a wide spectrum of current biotechnological research activities. Research focused mostly on ethanol production and methane generation from biomass material via microbial processing, as well as on enhanced hydrogen yield from algae. Several of the posters dealt with the pretreatment of cellulosic materials, and enzyme production/characterization, while a good number of papers displayed research efforts on bioremediation, photosynthesis, production of various useful chemicals from biomass by bioprocessing, and on other miscellaneous subjects. One of the papers treated a very interesting topic of cellulose-cellulase complexes. Many of the poster papers are included in this volume, and a synopsis of all the poster/papers presented is the subject of this article.

  11. Chest physiotherapy for pneumonia in children.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Gabriela S S; Fregonezi, Guilherme A F; Dias, Fernando A L; Ribeiro, Cibele T D; Guerra, Ricardo O; Freitas, Diana A; Parreira, Veronica F; Mendonca, Karla M P P

    2013-09-20

    respiratory rate and oxygen saturation whereas the other included study failed to show that standardised respiratory physiotherapy and positive expiratory pressure decrease the time to clinical resolution and the duration of hospital stay. No adverse effects related to the interventions were described. Due to the different characteristics of the trials, such as the duration of treatment, levels of severity, types of pneumonia and the techniques used in children with pneumonia, as well as differences in their statistical presentation, we were not able to pool data. Two included studies had an overall low risk of bias whereas one included study had an overall unclear risk of bias. Our review does not provide conclusive evidence to justify the use of chest physiotherapy in children with pneumonia due to a lack of data. The number of included studies is small and they differed in their statistical presentation.

  12. Satisfaction of Search in Chest Radiography 2015.

    PubMed

    Berbaum, Kevin S; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Schartz, Kevin M; Caldwell, Robert T; Madsen, Mark T; Hur, Seung; Laroia, Archana T; Thompson, Brad H; Mullan, Brian F; Franken, Edmund A

    2015-11-01

    Two decades have passed since the publication of laboratory studies of satisfaction of search (SOS) in chest radiography. Those studies were performed using film. The current investigation tests for SOS effects in computed radiography of the chest. Sixty-four chest computed radiographs half demonstrating various "test" abnormalities were read twice by 20 radiologists, once with and once without the addition of a simulated pulmonary nodule. Receiver-operating characteristic detection accuracy and decision thresholds were analyzed to study the effects of adding the nodule on detecting the test abnormalities. Results of previous studies were reanalyzed using similar modern techniques. In the present study, adding nodules did not influence detection accuracy for the other abnormalities (P = .93), but did induce a reluctance to report them (P < .001). Adding nodules did not affect inspection time (P = .58) so the reluctance to report was not associated with reduced search. Reanalysis revealed a similar decision threshold shift that had not been recognized in the early studies of SOS in chest radiography (P < .01) in addition to reduced detection accuracy (P < .01). The nature of SOS in chest radiography has changed, but it is not clear why. SOS may be changing as a function of changes in radiology education and practice. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2012-12-12

    This poster introduces the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR), an electronic database with demographic, health outcome, and exposure information for over a million DOE nuclear plant and laboratory workers.

  14. The Science behind a NASA Poster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Susanne

    2002-01-01

    Uses National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) posters and the information behind them as instructional materials to connect real world science to the classroom. Provides a list of resources. (YDS)

  15. The Science behind a NASA Poster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Susanne

    2002-01-01

    Uses National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) posters and the information behind them as instructional materials to connect real world science to the classroom. Provides a list of resources. (YDS)

  16. Twittering About Research: A Case Study of the World's First Twitter Poster Competition.

    PubMed

    Randviir, Edward P; Illingworth, Samuel M; Baker, Matthew J; Cude, Matthew; Banks, Craig E

    2015-01-01

    The Royal Society of Chemistry held, to our knowledge, the world's first Twitter conference at 9am on February 5 (th), 2015. The conference was a Twitter-only conference, allowing researchers to upload academic posters as tweets, replacing a physical meeting. This paper reports the details of the event and discusses the outcomes, such as the potential for the use of social media to enhance scientific communication at conferences. In particular, the present work argues that social media outlets such as Twitter broaden audiences, speed up communication, and force clearer and more concise descriptions of a researcher's work. The benefits of poster presentations are also discussed in terms of potential knowledge exchange and networking. This paper serves as a proof-of-concept approach for improving both the public opinion of the poster, and the enhancement of the poster through an innovative online format that some may feel more comfortable with, compared to face-to-face communication.

  17. Prephonatory chest wall posturing in stutterers.

    PubMed

    Baken, R J; McManus, D A; Cavallo, S A

    1983-09-01

    The possibility that prephonatory chest wall posturing is abnormal in stutterers was explored by observing rib cage and abdominal hemicircumference changes during the interval between the presentation of a stimulus and the production of/alpha/by a group of stutterers (N = 5). It was found that the patterns of chest wall adjustment for phonation were qualitatively identical in the stutterers and in a comparable group of normal men studied previously. There was, however, a significant difference in the way in which lung volume changed during the execution of the chest wall adjustment. This was considered to be indicative of delayed glottal closure among the stutterers rather than representative of a primary ventilatory disturbance.

  18. Educational posters to reduce antibiotic use.

    PubMed

    Ashe, David; Patrick, Patricia A; Stempel, Michelle M; Shi, Qiuhu; Brand, Donald A

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotic overuse promotes resistant strains of bacteria and puts patients at risk for adverse reactions. Given the use of educational posters in government-sponsored public health campaigns, this study examined the effectiveness of a waiting room poster in reducing excessive antibiotic use in clinical practice. Investigators conducted a 1-month trial of an educational poster with historical controls using three private pediatric group practices in Westchester County, New York. Children between the ages of 6 months and 10 years at the time of a visit to diagnose and treat symptoms of respiratory illness were enrolled as subjects. Antibiotic prescriptions for children with respiratory illnesses seen during the poster month were compared with prescriptions written during three 1-month historical control periods. The proportion of visits that resulted in a prescription for an antibiotic served as the outcome measure. Overall, 326 of the 720 patients (45.2%) enrolled in the study were treated with an antibiotic. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed no statistically significant difference in the proportion of visits resulting in an antibiotic prescription among the 4 study months (P = .79), indicating that the educational poster had no effect on antibiotic use. Public education in the form of a waiting room poster was not sufficient to decrease antibiotic prescriptions. This finding has implications for current large-scale programs and for health care providers as they continue to attempt to educate patients on the appropriate use of antibiotics.

  19. NICBR Events at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Poster Staff May 5 NICBR Scientific Symposium 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Building 549 Auditorium The National Interagency Confederation for Biomedical Research (NICBR) Scientific Symposium is open to postdocs, postbacs, graduate students, and technical support staff. The theme of this day-long symposium is “The Microbiome: Host Response to Disease”; however, presentations can cover any area of research being conducted by NICBR member organizations.  

  20. NICBR Events at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Poster Staff May 5 NICBR Scientific Symposium 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Building 549 Auditorium The National Interagency Confederation for Biomedical Research (NICBR) Scientific Symposium is open to postdocs, postbacs, graduate students, and technical support staff. The theme of this day-long symposium is “The Microbiome: Host Response to Disease”; however, presentations can cover any area of research being conducted by NICBR member organizations.  

  1. Acute posteroinferior wall myocardial infarction secondary to football chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, R; Badui, E; Castaño, R; Madrid, R

    1985-12-01

    Myocardial infarction secondary to nonpenetrating chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a sportsman who developed an acute transmural posteroinferior wall myocardial infarction due to chest trauma by a football. The angiographic study revealed total obstruction of the proximal right coronary artery.

  2. Penetrating cardiac injuries in blunt chest wall trauma.

    PubMed

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Menezes, Ritesh G; Sirohi, Parmendra

    2012-08-01

    The present photocase illustrates the possible mechanism of direct cardiac injuries from broken sharp jagged fractured ends of ribs in blunt force trauma to the chest in run over traffic mishaps. We propose that the projecting fractured ends of the ribs penetrate the underlying thoracic organs due to the transient phenomenon of deformation of chest cavity under pressure in run over traffic mishaps.

  3. Academic poster design at a national conference: a need for standardised guidance?

    PubMed

    Gopal, Alan; Redman, Melody; Cox, David; Foreman, David; Elsey, Elizabeth; Fleming, Simon

    2017-10-01

    Academic posters are a common means of disseminating information at conferences. Presentation at conferences is frequently given weight in postgraduate training programme recruitment. Some conferences provide guidance for visual presentation of posters. For the Association of the Study of Medical Education (ASME) Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM) 2015, poster abstract guidance was provided; however, the guidance on poster design was limited to size and orientation. The aim of this study was to investigate academic poster quality at a national medical education conference to identify where standards could be promoted and improved. Presentation at conferences is frequently given weight in postgraduate training programme recruitment METHODS: Six auditors assessed all posters displayed at the ASME ASM (15-17 July 2015) using guidelines based upon a modified checklist for academic posters. Ten criteria were agreed as assessment standards for poster design quality. One-hundred-and-eighty posters were assessed: 29 per cent had appropriate copyright for the materials displayed (n = 52); 41 per cent included suitable contact details (n = 73); 48 per cent (n = 87) had a text to graphic ratio of 50 : 50; 72 per cent (n = 130) met ASME guidance for layout and orientation; 76 per cent (n = 137) had appropriate referencing; 78 per cent showed evidence of proofreading for grammar and spelling (n = 140); 79 per cent (n = 142) were readable at a distance of 2 metres; and 87 per cent used appropriate academic logos (n = 156). There was variability in design quality as assessed by these criteria. We recommend that detailed guidance should be produced and disseminated by the organising conference. This may improve poster quality and aid in the communication of presented material. We aim to re-audit following the production and dissemination of poster presentation guidance. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical

  4. Developing great abstracts and posters: how to use the tools of science communication.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Raymond; O'Neal, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    All nurses, clinicians and researchers are encouraged to share information on the programs they develop or the studies they conduct. This communication serves to advance the knowledge and clinical wisdom of the nursing and other health care professions. One way to do this is to submit an abstract or poster to a conference, where you can present your findings to other health care professionals. This article gives useful tips for developing successful abstracts and posters.

  5. [History of chest percussion].

    PubMed

    Chrobák, L

    2001-01-01

    Although percussion of the abdomen was already known to the Greek physician Galenos (2nd century A. D.) who used it to distinguish between ascites and meteorism, the Viennese physician Leopold Auenbrugger (1722-1809) started to use, the percussion of the chest as a diagnostic tool. In 1761 he published his experience in a treatise called "New Method for Detecting Hidden Ailments of the Chest by Percussion of the Thorax" (Inventum novum ex percussione thoracis hummani ut signo abstruso interni pectoris morbos detergendi). However, this method was introduced into practice only 50 years later by Jean Nicolas Corvisart, who translated Auenbrugger's book in 1808 into French. The famous Vinnese internist of Czech origin Joseph Skoda (1805-1881) set the teaching about percussion and auscultation on a firm physical basis. Skoda confronted the physical findings with dissection materials in close cooperation with the renowned Vinnese pathologist Karl Rokitansky (1804-1878), who was born in Hradec Králové. The Medical School in Prague became famous for its excellent command of methods based on physical examination and surpassed even the Viennese School.

  6. Drupal as the platform of choice for the Skolr digital meeting poster service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, B. R.

    2011-12-01

    In the Winter of 2011, a small team received funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to build a pilot digital science meeting poster service (working name: Skolr). Skolr was successfully tested at the summer ESIP Federation meeting in Santa Fe. This talk will outline the issues for building out this service within Drupal. The use of Drupal as the framework/platform for Skolr is expected to facilitate the rapid development of the code base, an ability to then develop a mobile device application for meetings, and improved data-mining and searching. Each year in the USA (and elsewhere), professional academic societies host academic meetings where they provide for a poster session. Collectively, it is not difficult to imagine upwards of a quarter-million posters created, displayed, and discarded in a single year in the U.S. The Skolr service does not propose to replace the current poster activity with a digital activity, the direct person-to-person conversational aspects of these events remain worthwhile. When fully built, Skolr promises to enhance current poster session activities at academic meetings in several ways. For the poster presenter, Skolr offers the following opportunities: 1. Easy upload into an archive where the poster can be viewed by researchers across the globe. 2. Support for a wide range of metadata to improve search-ability. 3. Search and browse capabilities, combined with ratings and other user-generated value added capabilities (tagging and commenting). 4. The poster remains visible and findable for as long as the presenter wishes. 5. The presenter's profile and other information becomes available to those who view her poster, increasing the networking potential. 6. The presenter can activate their own RSS feeds to view similar posters from meetings across the planet and over years. For the meeting host organization, Skolr offers the following opportunities: 1. Social networking for meeting attendees/organizataion members. 2. Poster session

  7. The Convergent Evolution of a Chemistry Project: Using Laboratory Posters as a Platform for Web Page Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigeman, Sally

    1998-01-01

    Argues that evolution is a process that occurs within the curriculum as well as within the physical universe. Provides an example that involves student presentations. Discusses the transition from poster presentations to electronic presentations via the World Wide Web. (DDR)

  8. The Convergent Evolution of a Chemistry Project: Using Laboratory Posters as a Platform for Web Page Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigeman, Sally

    1998-01-01

    Argues that evolution is a process that occurs within the curriculum as well as within the physical universe. Provides an example that involves student presentations. Discusses the transition from poster presentations to electronic presentations via the World Wide Web. (DDR)

  9. Quiescent Volcano-Chest Wall Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, Elroy; Martis, John J S; Kumar, B Vinod; D'Cunha, Rithesh J; Vijin, V

    2017-08-01

    Chest wall hemangiomas are rare tumors that may originate within the soft tissue or from the ribs. Intramuscular hemangioma is infrequent, representing less than 1 % of all hemangiomas, and the localization in the chest wall is even less frequent. They are typically cutaneous in location, large, and poorly circumscribed and can be locally destructive. We present a case of a 34-year-old lady presented with firm lump 3 × 3 cm in left upper and inner quadrant of left breast well defined borders, non-pulsatile and restricted mobility. Sono-mammogram was suggestive of ill-defined lesion at 10 o'clock position. CT chest was conclusive of chest wall hemangioma. The patient underwent excision of the lump. HPE was suggestive of cavernous hemangioma. Cavernous hemangioma typically manifest at birth or before the age of 30 years. CT is more sensitive than plain radiography in detecting phleboliths, which are present in approximately 30 % of cavernous hemangiomas. Surgical excision would be treatment of choice. In this case, the site of the lesion was in the breast clinically mimicking that of a fibroadenoma which warrants hemangioma as a differential diagnosis.

  10. Communicating Earth Science Applications through Virtual Poster Sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favors, J. E.; Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Ross, K. W.; Ruiz, M. L.; Rogers, L.

    2013-12-01

    The DEVELOP National Program addresses environmental and public policy issues through interdisciplinary research projects that apply the lens of NASA Earth observations to community concerns around the globe. Part of NASA's Applied Sciences' Capacity Building Program, DEVELOP bridges the gap between NASA Earth Science and society, building capacity in both participants and partner organizations to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Teams of DEVELOP participants partner with decision makers to conduct rapid feasibility projects that highlight fresh applications of NASA's suite of Earth observing sensors, cultivate advanced skills, and increase understanding of NASA Earth Science data and technology. Part of this process involves the creation of short introductory videos that demonstrate the environmental concerns, project methodologies and results, and an overview of how this work will impact decision makers. These videos are presented to the public three times a year in 'virtual poster sessions' (VPS) that provide an interactive way for individuals from around the globe to access the research, understand the capabilities and applications of NASA's Earth science datasets, and interact with the participants through blogging and dialogue sessions. Virtual poster sessions have allowed DEVELOP to introduce NASA's Earth science assets to thousands of viewers around the world. For instance, one fall VPS had over 5,000 visitors from 89 different countries during the two week session. This presentation will discuss lessons learned and statistics related to the series of nine virtual poster sessions that DEVELOP has conducted 2011-2013.

  11. Effective dose to patients from chest examinations with tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Båth, Magnus; Svalkvist, Angelica; von Wrangel, Alexa; Rismyhr-Olsson, Heidi; Cederblad, Ake

    2010-01-01

    Chest tomosynthesis, which refers to the principle of collecting low-dose projections of the chest at different angles and using these projections to reconstruct section images of the chest, is an imaging technique recently introduced to health care. The main purpose of the present work was to determine the average effective dose to patients from clinical use of chest tomosynthesis. Exposure data for two chest radiography laboratories with tomosynthesis option (Definium 8000 with VolumeRAD option, GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, UK) were registered for 20 patients with a weight between 60 and 80 kg (average weight of 70.2 kg). The recorded data were used in the Monte Carlo program PCXMC 2.0 (STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki, Finland) to determine the average effective dose for each projection. The effective dose for the chest tomosynthesis examination, including a scout view and the tomosynthesis acquisition, was finally obtained by adding the effective doses from all projections. Using the weighting factors given in ICRP 103, the average effective dose for the examination was found to be 0.13 mSv, whereas the average effective dose for the conventional two-view chest radiography examination was 0.05 mSv. A conversion factor of 0.26 mSv Gy(-1) cm(-2) was found suitable for determining the effective dose from a VolumeRAD chest tomosynthesis examination from the total registered kerma-area product. In conclusion, the effective dose to a standard-sized patient (170 cm/70 kg) from a VolumeRAD chest tomosynthesis examination is ~2 % of an average chest CT and only two to three times the effective dose from the conventional two-view chest radiography examination.

  12. Unsupervised segmentation of lungs from chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Payel; Antani, Sameer K.; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes our preliminary investigations for deriving and characterizing coarse-level textural regions present in the lung field on chest radiographs using unsupervised grow-cut (UGC), a cellular automaton based unsupervised segmentation technique. The segmentation has been performed on a publicly available data set of chest radiographs. The algorithm is useful for this application because it automatically converges to a natural segmentation of the image from random seed points using low-level image features such as pixel intensity values and texture features. Our goal is to develop a portable screening system for early detection of lung diseases for use in remote areas in developing countries. This involves developing automated algorithms for screening x-rays as normal/abnormal with a high degree of sensitivity, and identifying lung disease patterns on chest x-rays. Automatically deriving and quantitatively characterizing abnormal regions present in the lung field is the first step toward this goal. Therefore, region-based features such as geometrical and pixel-value measurements were derived from the segmented lung fields. In the future, feature selection and classification will be performed to identify pathological conditions such as pulmonary tuberculosis on chest radiographs. Shape-based features will also be incorporated to account for occlusions of the lung field and by other anatomical structures such as the heart and diaphragm.

  13. The Poster: A Petrologic Exercise For The Resource-Challenged

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, T. P.

    2003-12-01

    The scientific poster is a common format for transmitting information and can be used as a petrologic exercise that may be particularly beneficial for those programs with limited resources. For example, the Saint Norbert College geology program was founded in 1987 and a traditional geology major established in 1994. We have high quality petrographic microscopes and excellent on-campus computing resources but otherwise lack common facilities such as a rock preparation room and instrumentation for obtaining research quality geochemical data such as XRF or SEM. The petrology poster exercise is designed to mimic the formative stages of a research project from fieldwork through geochemical analysis. A background literature search on a regional rock assemblage, usually suggested by the instructor, is conducted by the students. A specific petrologic aspect, such as the troctolitic portion of the Duluth Complex, is selected for investigation. Fieldwork consists of detailed outcrop and handsample descriptions, with approximately ten samples collected for thin section analysis. Geochemical data is culled from the literature by the instructor and computer modeled by the students using standard petrologic modeling programs such as IGPET. Having characterized the rock in detail, the students make interpretations of their data and more importantly, formulate research questions for future investigation. The final poster summarizes a student's work and is presented to their peers for critique. The goal of this semester-long exercise is to provide a near-professional research experience to the students for limited costs (i.e. site field trip and professional preparation of the thin sections). Additional benefits include: in-depth instruction related to writing an abstract, enhanced computer graphic skills related to poster construction, and a final product that makes an excellent springboard to a senior thesis.

  14. [Musculoskeletal-related chest pain].

    PubMed

    Sturm, C; Witte, T

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 10-50% of chest pains are caused by musculoskeletal disorders. The association is twice as frequent in primary care as in emergency admissions. This article provides an overview of the most important musculoskeletal causes of chest pain and on the diagnostics and therapy. A selective search and analysis of the literature related to the topic of musculoskeletal causes of chest pain were carried out. Non-inflammatory diseases, such as costochondritis and fibromyalgia are frequent causes of chest pain. Inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus are much less common but are more severe conditions and therefore have to be diagnosed and treated. The diagnostics and treatment often necessitate interdisciplinary approaches. Chest pain caused by musculoskeletal diseases always represents a diagnosis by exclusion of other severe diseases of the heart, lungs and stomach. Physiotherapeutic and physical treatment measures are particularly important, including manual therapy, transcutaneous electrical stimulation and stabilization exercises, especially for functional myofascial disorders.

  15. A rare cause of misdiagnosis in chest X-ray

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Mendoza, Carlos Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Chest X-ray is a usual tool for family physicians; however, unexpected findings in chest X-ray are a frequent challenge. We present a rare case of pulmonary hilar nodule misdiagnosis in a chest X-ray. An 84-year-old woman was sent with a diagnosis of a right pulmonary hilum nodule. She had a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; so in a chest X-ray, her family physician discovered a “nodule” in her right lung hilum. Her physical exam was not relevant. In our hospital, a thoracic computed tomography (CT) scan verified the mass in the right pulmonary hilum; nevertheless, in a coronal CT scan, the “hilum lump” was the tortuous descending aorta that created an angle. This case illustrates how anatomical changes associated with vascular aging may cause this exceptional pitfall in chest X-ray. PMID:28217605

  16. Tamponade Relief by Active Clearance of Chest Tubes.

    PubMed

    Vistarini, Nicola; Gabrysz-Forget, Fanny; Beaulieu, Yanick; Perrault, Louis P

    2016-03-01

    Chest tubes are used in every case of cardiac surgery to evacuate shed blood from around the heart and lungs. Chest tubes can become partially or totally occluded, leading to tamponade. The purpose of this article is to discuss a novel method of maintaining chest tube patency in the early recovery after cardiothoracic surgery. The PleuraFlow Active Clearance Technology is a system to prevent chest tube clogging that can be used to help routinely maintain chest tube patency at the bedside in the intensive care unit. A patient exhibited physiologic tamponade that was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. The chest tube was successfully reopened by actively clearing the chest tube using Active Clearance Technology, resulting in resolution of the tamponade. The present study reports the case of a patient with massive postoperative pericardial effusion with tamponade, successfully managed by active clearance chest tube. Further studies will help define the role for this technology in routine cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Failure of chest X-rays to diagnose pneumothoraces after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Collins, J A; Samra, G S

    1998-01-01

    We report four cases of occult pneumothorax in patients who had suffered blunt trauma. In each case supine chest X-rays failed to diagnose an anterior pneumothorax. Subsequent spiral computerised tomography scans of the chest showed anterior pneumothoraces in all cases. In two of the cases anterior pneumothoraces were present in spite of a chest drain having been placed in the pleural cavity. We recommend the insertion of anteriorly positioned chest drains to relieve pneumothoraces in severely injured trauma patients.

  18. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be involved as well. Case Report: We describe a case of invasive salmonellosis caused by Salmonella typhimurium involving the chest wall in a 73-year-old man. The patient had suffered from gastroenteritis followed by left basal pneumonia with pleural effusion 7 weeks before. The CT scan of the chest wall showed a pericostal abscess with shirt-stud morphology near the left last cartilaginous arch. The abscess was surgically drained and patient was cured after a 40-day ciprofloxacin treatment. Conclusions: A review of the literature on extra-intestinal non-typhoid salmonellosis shows that pleuropulmonary and soft-tissue infections are uncommon. We argue that non-typhoid Salmonella might be considered as a possible cause of chest wall abscess in individuals with recent history of gastroenteritis complicated by pneumonia and pleural effusion. PMID:24298305

  19. The Interdisciplinary Management of Acute Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Raphael R; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Söllner, Wolfgang; Frieling, Thomas; Müller, Christian; Christ, Michael

    2015-11-06

    Acute chest pain of non-traumatic origin is a common reason for presentation to physician's offices and emergency rooms. Coronary heart disease is the cause in up to 25% of cases. Because acute chest pain, depending on its etiology, may be associated with a high risk of death, rapid, goal-oriented management is mandatory. This review is based on pertinent articles and guidelines retrieved by a selective search in PubMed. History-taking, physical examination, and a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) are the first steps in the differential diagnostic process and generally allow the identification of features signifying a high risk of lifethreatening illness. If the ECG reveals ST-segment elevation, cardiac catheterization is indicated. The timedependent measurement of highly sensitive troponin values is a reliable test for the diagnosis or exclusion of acute myocardial infarction. A wide variety of other potential causes (e.g., vascular, musculoskeletal, gastroenterologic, or psychosomatic) must be identified from the history if they are to be treated appropriately. Elderly patients need special attention. Acute chest pain is a major diagnostic challenge for the physician. Common errors are traceable to non-recognition of important causes and to an inadequate diagnostic work-up. Future studies should be designed to help optimize the interdisciplinary management of patients with chest pain.

  20. [The poster as a communication medium].

    PubMed

    Tovar Samanez, C

    1987-01-01

    The poster as a medium of communication serves to transmit a message by means of a graphical synthesis. It elicits attention by its originality, contrast, and focus on the center of interest. The poster is effective if the images and slogans can be identified easily. Its visual attractiveness is also essential. The understanding of the message is the function of the cultural characteristics of the public with symbols, metaphors, gestures, and detailed description. The appeal of the message allows the public to accept it on sensorial, emotional, social, intellectual, and economical levels. Adverse motivations should not be confused with the positive appeal (prejudice, preconceived ideas, and bias). Confusion and ambiguity can carry conflicting messages, therefore negative examples should be avoided. The force of the message targets the memory carrying conviction and calling to action. The target group and objective must be defined as to age, occupation, location, and sex. The message also has to be defined precisely for the target audience. It is in the analysis of the context whereby the poster is received as to notions of the target topic, alternative attitudes relative to the promotion of the message, obstacles that are encountered in the mentality of the target, and cultural characteristics of the target audience. The text of the slogan must be given before drawing the poster. The designing of the poster should be creative with association of ideas, metaphors and symbols, descriptive images, fusion of symbolic and descriptive forms, humor, the fusion of graphics with letters, and the fusion of letters with images. Completed forms of the poster use illustration, photography, typography, calligraphy, and photo montage.

  1. Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA) Poster Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment tool (AGWA, see: www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/agwa or http://www.epa.gov/esd/land-sci/agwa/) is a GIS interface jointly developed by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Arizona...

  2. PHOTOCATALYTIC REACTORS AND KINETICS FOR CLEAN CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS [POSTER PRESENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semiconductor photocatalysis has been tested at a potential technology for synthesizing alcohols, ketones and aldehydes from linear and cyclic hydrocarbons. The technology couples UV light with photocatalyst overcoming many of the drawbacks of conventional reacors. Various hydr...

  3. PHOTOCATALYTIC REACTORS AND KINETICS FOR CLEAN CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS [POSTER PRESENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semiconductor photocatalysis has been tested at a potential technology for synthesizing alcohols, ketones and aldehydes from linear and cyclic hydrocarbons. The technology couples UV light with photocatalyst overcoming many of the drawbacks of conventional reacors. Various hydr...

  4. Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA) Poster Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment tool (AGWA, see: www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/agwa or http://www.epa.gov/esd/land-sci/agwa/) is a GIS interface jointly developed by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Arizona...

  5. Poster Presentation: Optical Test of NGST Developmental Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Geary, Joseph; Reardon, Patrick; Peters, Bruce; Keidel, John; Chavers, Greg

    2000-01-01

    An Optical Testing System (OTS) has been developed to measure the figure and radius of curvature of NGST developmental mirrors in the vacuum, cryogenic environment of the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The OTS consists of a WaveScope Shack-Hartmann sensor from Adaptive Optics Associates as the main instrument, a Point Diffraction Interferometer (PDI), a Point Spread Function (PSF) imager, an alignment system, a Leica Disto Pro distance measurement instrument, and a laser source palette (632.8 nm wavelength) that is fiber-coupled to the sensor instruments. All of the instruments except the laser source palette are located on a single breadboard known as the Wavefront Sensor Pallet (WSP). The WSP is located on top of a 5-DOF motion system located at the center of curvature of the test mirror. Two PC's are used to control the OTS. The error in the figure measurement is dominated by the WaveScope's measurement error. An analysis using the absolute wavefront gradient error of 1/50 wave P-V (at 0.6328 microns) provided by the manufacturer leads to a total surface figure measurement error of approximately 1/100 wave rms. This easily meets the requirement of 1/10 wave P-V. The error in radius of curvature is dominated by the Leica's absolute measurement error of VI.5 mm and the focus setting error of Vi.4 mm, giving an overall error of V2 mm. The OTS is currently being used to test the NGST Mirror System Demonstrators (NMSD's) and the Subscale Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (SBNM).

  6. Poster Presentation: Optical Test of NGST Developmental Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Geary, Joseph; Reardon, Patrick; Peters, Bruce; Keidel, John; Chavers, Greg

    2000-01-01

    An Optical Testing System (OTS) has been developed to measure the figure and radius of curvature of NGST developmental mirrors in the vacuum, cryogenic environment of the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The OTS consists of a WaveScope Shack-Hartmann sensor from Adaptive Optics Associates as the main instrument, a Point Diffraction Interferometer (PDI), a Point Spread Function (PSF) imager, an alignment system, a Leica Disto Pro distance measurement instrument, and a laser source palette (632.8 nm wavelength) that is fiber-coupled to the sensor instruments. All of the instruments except the laser source palette are located on a single breadboard known as the Wavefront Sensor Pallet (WSP). The WSP is located on top of a 5-DOF motion system located at the center of curvature of the test mirror. Two PC's are used to control the OTS. The error in the figure measurement is dominated by the WaveScope's measurement error. An analysis using the absolute wavefront gradient error of 1/50 wave P-V (at 0.6328 microns) provided by the manufacturer leads to a total surface figure measurement error of approximately 1/100 wave rms. This easily meets the requirement of 1/10 wave P-V. The error in radius of curvature is dominated by the Leica's absolute measurement error of VI.5 mm and the focus setting error of Vi.4 mm, giving an overall error of V2 mm. The OTS is currently being used to test the NGST Mirror System Demonstrators (NMSD's) and the Subscale Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (SBNM).

  7. On-Orbit Engineering and Vehicle Integration Poster Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerdinger, Madison

    2014-01-01

    One of the duties of the MER Managers is getting the consoles to review and sign Electronic Flight Notes (EFN) and Mission Action Requests (Chit) before they are due. Chits and EFNs and are accessible through the Mission Control Center - Houston (MCC-H) Gateway. Chits are the official means of documenting questions and answers, technical direction, real-time changes to Flight Rules (FR) and procedures, request for analysis, etc. between various consoles concerning on-orbit operations. EFNs are documents used by the Flight Control Team (FCT) to communicate precise details between console positions and manage real time changes to FR and Systems Operation Data File (SODF) procedures. On GMT 2013/345 the External Active Thermal Control System (EATCS) on the Columbus (COL) Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) Interface Heat Exchanger (IFHX) shut down due to low temperatures. Over the next couple of days, the core temperature of COL MT IFHX dropped due to the failure of the Flow Control Valve (FCV). After the temperature drop was discovered, heaters were turned on to bring the temperatures back to nominal. After the incident occurred, a possible freeze threat was discovered that could have ruptured the heat exchanger. The COL MT IFHX rupturing would be considered a catastrophic failure and potentially result in a loss of the vehicle and/or the lives of the International Space Station (ISS) crew members

  8. Permeable Pavement Demonstration at the Edison Environmental Center - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    Poster for the SAB Review detailing the porous pavement parking lot project. The poster describes the design of the parking lot, the research components that were incorporated into the design, and the monitoring plan.

  9. Bone suppression technique for chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Jane; Zhao, Hui; Hobbs, Susan K.; Wandtke, John C.; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Paul, Narinder; Foos, David

    2014-03-01

    High-contrast bone structures are a major noise contributor in chest radiographic images. A signal of interest in a chest radiograph could be either partially or completely obscured or "overshadowed" by the highly contrasted bone structures in its surrounding. Thus, removing the bone structures, especially the posterior rib and clavicle structures, is highly desirable to increase the visibility of soft tissue density. We developed an innovative technology that offers a solution to suppress bone structures, including posterior ribs and clavicles, on conventional and portable chest X-ray images. The bone-suppression image processing technology includes five major steps: 1) lung segmentation, 2) rib and clavicle structure detection, 3) rib and clavicle edge detection, 4) rib and clavicle profile estimation, and 5) suppression based on the estimated profiles. The bone-suppression software outputs an image with both the rib and clavicle structures suppressed. The rib suppression performance was evaluated on 491 images. On average, 83.06% (±6.59%) of the rib structures on a standard chest image were suppressed based on the comparison of computer-identified rib areas against hand-drawn rib areas, which is equivalent to about an average of one rib that is still visible on a rib-suppressed image based on a visual assessment. Reader studies were performed to evaluate reader performance in detecting lung nodules and pneumothoraces with and without a bone-suppression companion view. Results from reader studies indicated that the bone-suppression technology significantly improved radiologists' performance in the detection of CT-confirmed possible nodules and pneumothoraces on chest radiographs. The results also showed that radiologists were more confident in making diagnoses regarding the presence or absence of an abnormality after rib-suppressed companion views were presented

  10. 2009 Gordon Research Conference on Photochemistry: Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, Michael

    2009-07-05

    The impact of photochemistry on diverse fields ranging from materials and environmental science to biology and medicine has never been greater. The 2009 Gordon Conference on Photochemistry will highlight recent advances in these key areas while also presenting the latest research on new photochemical reactions and mechanistic studies. Session topics will include: development of new chromophores, light harvesting materials, solar energy conversion, photocontrolled biomolecules, light-triggered amplification reactions, and advanced bioimaging techniques. The Conference will continue its 45 year history of promoting interactions between fundamental and applied scientists, a hallmark of the Gordon Conferences. In addition, oral presentations, poster sessions and informal discussions will provide opportunities for junior scientists and students to present their own work and discuss their results with leaders in the field. Applicants to the Conference are encouraged to submit abstracts for poster presentations in order to gain visibility and feedback on their research. In addition, a number of poster abstracts will be selected for presentation as short talks.

  11. Scientific Posters: A Plea from a Conference Attendee

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conferences provide lots of opportunities to learn and poster sessions are supposed to be one of these venues. However, it seems most posters are not designed considering the reader or the venue; they are designed to reflect a potential manuscript. In this commentary, I provide a rationale why posters should be an illustrated abstract and provide some design tips to make the poster more reader friendly based on available research. PMID:28179711

  12. Editor's Choice-The organization of chest pain units: Position statement of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association.

    PubMed

    Claeys, Marc J; Ahrens, Ingo; Sinnaeve, Peter; Diletti, Roberto; Rossini, Roberta; Goldstein, Patrick; Czerwińska, Kasia; Bueno, Héctor; Lettino, Maddalena; Münzel, Thomas; Zeymer, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Chest pain units are defined as organizational short stay units with specific management protocols designed to facilitate and optimize the diagnosis of patients presenting with chest pain in the emergency department. The present document is intended to standardize and facilitate the installation of chest pain units nearby to the emergency department or as an integral part of the emergency department. Recommendations on organizational structure, physical and technical requirements and on disease management are presented. More standardized installation and implementation of chest pain units will enhance the quality of chest pain units and improve the quality of care of our chest pain patients.

  13. Chest drainage systems in use

    PubMed Central

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  14. Ebola: Where Are the Facts? | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Since the first outbreak of Ebola in western Africa and the subsequent cases in the United States, a lot of information has been circulating about the virus. To keep NCI at Frederick employees informed, the Poster staff has compiled the following list of reputable websites that provide accurate and up-to-date information about Ebola: Global

  15. Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Quality Program (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a poster created for the ETV Quality Program. The EPA Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) develops test protocols and verifies the performance of innovative technologies that have the potential to improve protection of human health and the environment. The...

  16. Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Quality Program (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a poster created for the ETV Quality Program. The EPA Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) develops test protocols and verifies the performance of innovative technologies that have the potential to improve protection of human health and the environment. The...

  17. Making a Difference with Poster Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterer, Irv

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art project that gives students an opportunity to contribute to a very worthy cause. Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) encourages schools to participate in their annual fundraising campaign by submitting designs to their poster contest. Each year, this is assigned to the author's junior class art students. A…

  18. Making a Difference with Poster Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterer, Irv

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art project that gives students an opportunity to contribute to a very worthy cause. Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) encourages schools to participate in their annual fundraising campaign by submitting designs to their poster contest. Each year, this is assigned to the author's junior class art students. A…

  19. Workforce Development and Wind for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, C.; Baring-Gould, I.

    2012-06-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is faced with the need to quickly develop a skilled workforce and to address public acceptance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these challenges. This poster, produced for the American Wind Energy Association's annual WINDPOWER conference, provides an overview of the project, including objectives, methods, and results.

  20. Economic Development Impacts of 20% Wind (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, M.; Tegen, S.

    2007-06-01

    Meeting 20% of the nation's electricity demand with wind energy will require enourmous investment in wind farms, manufacturing, and infrastructure. This investment will create substantial economic development impacts on local, regional, and national levels. This conference poster for Windpower 2007 outlines the various economic development impacts from a 20% wind scenario.

  1. Ebola: Where Are the Facts? | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Since the first outbreak of Ebola in western Africa and the subsequent cases in the United States, a lot of information has been circulating about the virus. To keep NCI at Frederick employees informed, the Poster staff has compiled the following list of reputable websites that provide accurate and up-to-date information about Ebola: Global

  2. The Eggen Card Project (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvis, G.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) At the 2013 meeting we kicked off the Eggen Card project. This project was to make the huge collection of photometric observations made by Olin Eggen accessible to researchers. My poster this year is to report progress and encourage more members to participate.

  3. Cervical angina: an overlooked source of noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Walter I; Makovitch, Steven A; Merchant, Shabbir Hussain I; Phadke, Jayant

    2015-01-01

    Cervical angina has been widely reported as a cause of chest pain but remains underrecognized. This series demonstrates the varied clinical presentation of patients with cervical angina, the delay in diagnosis, and the extensive cardiac examinations patients with this condition typically undergo prior to a definitive diagnosis. Recognition of this condition in patients with acute chest pain requires a high index of suspicion and an awareness of the common presenting features and clinical findings of cervical angina.

  4. 2013 SYR Accepted Poster Abstracts.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    SYR 2013 Accepted Poster abstracts: 1. Benefits of Yoga as a Wellness Practice in a Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Care Setting: If You Build It, Will They Come? 2. Yoga-based Psychotherapy Group With Urban Youth Exposed to Trauma. 3. Embodied Health: The Effects of a Mind�Body Course for Medical Students. 4. Interoceptive Awareness and Vegetable Intake After a Yoga and Stress Management Intervention. 5. Yoga Reduces Performance Anxiety in Adolescent Musicians. 6. Designing and Implementing a Therapeutic Yoga Program for Older Women With Knee Osteoarthritis. 7. Yoga and Life Skills Eating Disorder Prevention Among 5th Grade Females: A Controlled Trial. 8. A Randomized, Controlled Trial Comparing the Impact of Yoga and Physical Education on the Emotional and Behavioral Functioning of Middle School Children. 9. Feasibility of a Multisite, Community based Randomized Study of Yoga and Wellness Education for Women With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy. 10. A Delphi Study for the Development of Protocol Guidelines for Yoga Interventions in Mental Health. 11. Impact Investigation of Breathwalk Daily Practice: Canada�India Collaborative Study. 12. Yoga Improves Distress, Fatigue, and Insomnia in Older Veteran Cancer Survivors: Results of a Pilot Study. 13. Assessment of Kundalini Mantra and Meditation as an Adjunctive Treatment With Mental Health Consumers. 14. Kundalini Yoga Therapy Versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Co-Occurring Mood Disorder. 15. Baseline Differences in Women Versus Men Initiating Yoga Programs to Aid Smoking Cessation: Quitting in Balance Versus QuitStrong. 16. Pranayam Practice: Impact on Focus and Everyday Life of Work and Relationships. 17. Participation in a Tailored Yoga Program is Associated With Improved Physical Health in Persons With Arthritis. 18. Effects of Yoga on Blood Pressure: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. 19. A Quasi-experimental Trial of a Yoga based Intervention to Reduce Stress and

  5. [Adolescent with chest pain: the importance of clinical suspicion].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Andreia; Silva, Cármen; Mota, Teresa; Baptista, Maria João

    2013-06-01

    Introduction. Chest pain is a common complaint in children visiting the emergency department and is mostly associated with benign conditions. Although genuine cardiac causes are uncommon, potentially life threatening conditions such as the pulmonary embolism should be suspected by clinical symptoms such as dyspnoea, chest pain and syncope, either singly or in combination. The authors report a case of a pulmonary embolism with deep venous thrombosis following immobilization in a 15- year-old adolescent with limb fracture. This case illustrates the importance of considering pulmonary embolism in the differential diagnosis of a patient who presents at a paediatric emergency department with sudden onset of chest pain and dyspnoea.

  6. Primitive chest wall neuroectodermal tumor in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengcheng; Zou, Wei; Ma, Guodong; Pan, Yanqing

    2011-10-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the chest wall is presented. After four cycles of chemotherapy, a computed tomography scan of his chest showed a larger mass invading the left upper lobe of the lung. He underwent resection of the left chest wall from the left fourth to sixth ribs, including the tumor, combined with left upper lobectomy and lymph node dissection. A diagnosis of primitive neuroectodermal tumor was confirmed histopathologically and immunohistochemically. After surgery, four cycles of chemotherapy with ifosfamide and etoposide were given. One year after treatment, the patient is currently doing well without evidence of recurrence.

  7. Chest radiographic manifestations of scrub typhus

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, KPP; Mannam, PR; Rajendran, K; John, RA; Ramasami, P

    2016-01-01

    Background and Rationale: Respiratory system involvement in scrub typhus is seen in 20–72% of patients. In endemic areas, good understanding and familiarity with the various radiologic findings of scrub typhus are essential in identifying pulmonary complications. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to a tertiary care center with scrub typhus between October 2012 and September 2013 and had a chest X ray done were included in the analysis. Details and radiographic findings were noted and factors associated with abnormal X-rays were analyzed. Results: The study cohort contained 398 patients. Common presenting complaints included fever (100%), generalized myalgia (83%), headache (65%), dyspnea (54%), cough (24.3%), and altered sensorium (14%). Almost half of the patients (49.4%) had normal chest radiographs. Common radiological pulmonary abnormalities included pleural effusion (14.6%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (14%), airspace opacity (10.5%), reticulonodular opacities (10.3%), peribronchial thickening (5.8%), and pulmonary edema (2%). Cardiomegaly was noted in 3.5% of patients. Breathlessness, presence of an eschar, platelet counts of <20,000 cells/cumm, and total serum bilirubin >2 mg/dL had the highest odds of having an abnormal chest radiograph. Patients with an abnormal chest X-ray had a higher requirement of noninvasive ventilation (odds ratio [OR]: 13.98; 95% confidence interval CI: 5.89–33.16), invasive ventilation (OR: 18.07; 95% CI: 6.42–50.88), inotropes (OR: 8.76; 95% CI: 4.35–17.62), higher involvement of other organ systems, longer duration of hospital stay (3.18 ± 3 vs. 7.27 ± 5.58 days; P < 0.001), and higher mortality (OR: 4.63; 95% CI: 1.54–13.85). Conclusion: Almost half of the patients with scrub typhus have abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiography should be included as part of basic evaluation at presentation in patients with scrub typhus, especially in those with breathlessness, eschar, jaundice, and severe

  8. Pleuritic Chest Pain: Sorting Through the Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Reamy, Brian V; Williams, Pamela M; Odom, Michael Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Pleuritic chest pain is characterized by sudden and intense sharp, stabbing, or burning pain in the chest when inhaling and exhaling. Pulmonary embolism is the most common serious cause, found in 5% to 21% of patients who present to an emergency department with pleuritic chest pain. A validated clinical decision rule for pulmonary embolism should be employed to guide the use of additional tests such as d-dimer assays, ventilation-perfusion scans, or computed tomography angiography. Myocardial infarction, pericarditis, aortic dissection, pneumonia, and pneumothorax are other serious causes that should be ruled out using history and physical examination, electrocardiography, troponin assays, and chest radiography before another diagnosis is made. Validated clinical decision rules are available to help exclude coronary artery disease. Viruses are common causative agents of pleuritic chest pain. Coxsackieviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, parainfluenza, mumps, adenovirus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus are likely pathogens. Treatment is guided by the underlying diagnosis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are appropriate for pain management in those with virally triggered or nonspecific pleuritic chest pain. In patients with persistent symptoms, persons who smoke, and those older than 50 years with pneumonia, it is important to document radiographic resolution with repeat chest radiography six weeks after initial treatment.

  9. Iatrogenic Perforation of the Left Ventricle during Insertion of a Chest Drain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongmin; Lim, Seong-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Chest draining is a common procedure for treating pleural effusion. Perforation of the heart is a rare often fatal complication of chest drain insertion. We report a case of a 76-year-old female patient suffering from congestive heart failure. At presentation, unilateral opacity of the left chest observed on a chest X-ray was interpreted as massive pleural effusion, so an attempt was made to drain the left pleural space. Malposition of the chest drain was suspected because blood was draining in a pulsatile way from the catheter. Computed tomography revealed perforation of the left ventricle. Mini-thoracotomy was performed and the drain extracted successfully. PMID:23772413

  10. Science Skills Boot Camp Gets Interns Ready for Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Summer interns learned how to read a scientific paper, present a poster, maintain a laboratory notebook, and much more, at the Science Skills Boot Camp in June. “It was a great experience, and it was a great opportunity to meet some of the other interns also working on the campus,” said Alyssa Klein, a Werner H. Kirsten student intern in the Cellular Immunology Group, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation. “The boot camp covered many topics essential to being a good scientist and science researcher.”

  11. Science Skills Boot Camp Gets Interns Ready for Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Summer interns learned how to read a scientific paper, present a poster, maintain a laboratory notebook, and much more, at the Science Skills Boot Camp in June. “It was a great experience, and it was a great opportunity to meet some of the other interns also working on the campus,” said Alyssa Klein, a Werner H. Kirsten student intern in the Cellular Immunology Group, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation. “The boot camp covered many topics essential to being a good scientist and science researcher.”

  12. A Rare Case of Hamartoma Chest Wall Following Trauma in a 42-year-old Man

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Mojtaba; Pour, Asghar Alie; Hosseini, Peyman Khadem; Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Ahmadi, Koorosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma (CWH) is a distinct and extremely rare tumor-like lesion of the thorax. It usually presents in the neonatal period or in infancy. The common presentation is in the form of a visible chest wall mass with or without respiratory distress. Case presentation: A 42-year-old man with a history of chest wall trauma since 5 years ago was admitted with a swelling of the anterior of the chest wall and during this period has grown slowly. Physical examination showed a left anterior chest wall deformity. Chest radiographs and chest CT showed a left anterolateral chest wall mass involving the fourth and fifth ribs. Thoracotomy was performed. The tumor and involved ribs were resected with a 5cm safe margin. The histopathologic examination showed hamartoma. The patient has been fallowed up since 60 month ago, and has not had any complaints in this time. Result: Despite the rarity of chest wall hematoma, this side effect must always be taken into consideration while studying the chest wall injuries especially in the case of trauma history due to other differential diagnosis and her side effects such as respiratory problems. Conclusion: Although rare, this condition ought to be kept in mind while dealing with hamartoma Chest wall following trauma in order to avoid its complications such as respiratory problems. Surgical excision is usually curative in combination with conservative therapy if possible. PMID:27994306

  13. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum: an important differential in acute chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Francesca; McCullough, Chris; Rahman, Asif

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with pleuritic chest pain that was present on waking and localised to the left costal margin with no radiation. He was otherwise asymptomatic and denied preceding trauma, heavy lifting, coughing or recent vomiting. Observations and examination were unremarkable; however, a chest radiograph showed a pneumomediastinum. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a rare condition that tends to follow a benign clinical course. A CT of the chest is generally only indicated if the chest X-ray fails to show an SPM in patients for whom there is a high index of clinical suspicion. A contrast-enhanced swallow study is only indicated if there is suspicion of an oesophageal tear or rupture. Evidence suggests that patients with SPM can be managed conservatively and observed for 24 h. PMID:25432910

  14. The Effect of Using an Educational Poster on Elementary School Health Teachers’ Knowledge of Emergency Management of Traumatic Dental Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ghadimi, Sara; Seraj, Bahman; Keshavarz, Hooman; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Abiri, Razieh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an educational poster on elementary school health teachers’ knowledge about emergency management of traumatic dental injuries. Materials and Methods: Before poster presentation, a questionnaire was distributed to 40 health teachers (30 in the study group and 10 in the control group). One month after poster distribution, the subjects were re-evaluated in both groups using the same questionnaire. Results: The percentage of participating health teachers who answered the questions correctly after poster distribution regarding crown fracture was 93.3% in the test group vs. 60% in controls; for management of luxation and avulsion, the percentages for cases and controls were 63.3% vs. 40% and 100% vs. 60%, respectively. One month after distribution of the educational poster, rate of correct responses increased in management of crown fracture, luxation, and avulsion in the test group, but there was no improvement in controls (P<0.001). Conclusion: Use of an educational poster enhanced the knowledge of health teachers. Use of posters is an effective way to inform teachers of the management of traumatic dental injuries. PMID:25628691

  15. The effect of using an educational poster on elementary school health teachers' knowledge of emergency management of traumatic dental injuries.

    PubMed

    Ghadimi, Sara; Seraj, Bahman; Keshavarz, Hooman; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Abiri, Razieh

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an educational poster on elementary school health teachers' knowledge about emergency management of traumatic dental injuries. Before poster presentation, a questionnaire was distributed to 40 health teachers (30 in the study group and 10 in the control group). One month after poster distribution, the subjects were re-evaluated in both groups using the same questionnaire. The percentage of participating health teachers who answered the questions correctly after poster distribution regarding crown fracture was 93.3% in the test group vs. 60% in controls; for management of luxation and avulsion, the percentages for cases and controls were 63.3% vs. 40% and 100% vs. 60%, respectively. One month after distribution of the educational poster, rate of correct responses increased in management of crown fracture, luxation, and avulsion in the test group, but there was no improvement in controls (P<0.001). Use of an educational poster enhanced the knowledge of health teachers. Use of posters is an effective way to inform teachers of the management of traumatic dental injuries.

  16. Pulmonary embolism findings on chest radiographs and multislice spiral CT.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Verschuren, Franck; Hainaut, Philippe; Goncette, Louis

    2004-07-01

    Multislice spiral CT is becoming an increasingly important tool for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. However, in many instances, a chest radiograph is usually performed as a first-line examination. Many parenchymal, vascular, and other ancillary findings may be observed on both imaging modalities with a highly detailed depiction of abnormalities on multislice CT. A comprehensive review of chest radiograph findings is presented with side-by-side correlations of CT images reformatted mainly in the frontal plane.

  17. Role of Cross Sectional Imaging in Isolated Chest Wall Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Shantiranjan; Sharma, Barun K.; Prakash, Arjun; Dhingani, Dhabal D.; Bora, Karobi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Isolated chest wall tuberculosis though a rare entity, the incidence of it has been on rise among immunocompromised population making it an important challenging diagnosis for the physicians. Its clinical presentation may resemble pyogenic chest wall abscess or chest wall soft tissue tumour. Sometimes it is difficult to detect clinically or on plain radiograph. Aim The present study was conducted with an aim to evaluate the common sites and varying appearances of isolated chest wall tuberculosis. Materials and Methods A hospital based cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted in Assam Medical College and Hospital, a tertiary care centre in North East India. The study group comprise of 21 patients (n=15 male and n=6 females) with isolated chest wall tuberculosis without associated pulmonary or spinal involvement who were subjected to Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CT/MRI) of the thorax following initial Ultrasonogram (USG) evaluation of the local site. Pathological correlation was done from imaging guided sampling of the aspirate or surgery. Results Variable sites of involvement were seen in the chest wall in our patients (n=21), with chest wall abscess formation being the most common presentation and rib being the most common bony site affected in the thoracic cage. Bony sclerosis was noted in 11 patients (52.4%), periosteal reaction in 10 patients (47.6%) and sequestration in five patients (23.8%). CT/MRI not only localized the exact site and extent of the abscesses which facilitated guided aspirations, but also helped in detecting typical bony lesions thereby, differentiating from pyogenic osteomyelitis besides ruling out associated pulmonary or pleural involvement in such patients. Conclusion Cross-sectional imaging plays an important role by giving a wholesome picture of both soft tissue and bony pathology. It is important to have adequate understanding of the radiologic manifestations of the chest wall involvement and

  18. What Are Altmetrics? Are They Important? | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Altmetrics, also known as alternative metrics, offer a way to gauge the attention that research output (such as articles, data sets, program code, slide decks, and posters) is generating on social media, reference sharing sites (such as Mendeley), blogs, and other online media.? The term “altmetrics” was coined on Twitter in 2010 by Jason Priem, then a graduate student at the University of North Carolina’s School of Information and Library...

  19. What Are Altmetrics? Are They Important? | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Altmetrics, also known as alternative metrics, offer a way to gauge the attention that research output (such as articles, data sets, program code, slide decks, and posters) is generating on social media, reference sharing sites (such as Mendeley), blogs, and other online media.? The term “altmetrics” was coined on Twitter in 2010 by Jason Priem, then a graduate student at the University of North Carolina’s School of Information and Library...

  20. Infections and radiation injuries involving the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Blasberg, Justin D; Donington, Jessica S

    2010-11-01

    Soft tissue necrosis secondary to infection and radiation injury account for the majority of chest wall resections performed today that are unrelated to malignancy. Principles of treatment for chest wall infection and necrosis rely partially on the underlying cause and overall health of the patient but, in general, are based on wide resection of devitalized tissue and subsequent reconstruction with soft tissue coverage. Unlike resection for malignancy, fibrosis of underlying tissues often precludes skeletal reconstruction without concurrent loss of chest wall integrity or pulmonary function. Although the surgical intervention of these processes is similar, the underlying pathology differs significantly. This article addresses the risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of chest wall and sternoclavicular joint infections, necrotizing processes, and radiation injury.

  1. Heimlich valve for chest drainage.

    PubMed

    Heimlich, H J

    1983-01-01

    The Heimlich chest drainage valve was developed so that the process of draining the pleural cavity could be accomplished in a safe, relatively simple, and efficient manner. Replacing the cumbersome underwater drainage bottle system, the Heimlich valve connects to chest tubing and allows fluid and air to pass in one direction only. The valve, which functions in any position, need never be clamped, and regulated suction can be attached to it if necessary. The valve drains into a plastic bag that can be held at any level, allowing the patient undergoing chest drainage to be ambulatory simply by carrying the bag. The construction and function of the valve is easily understood by medical and nursing staffs. It is presterilized, stored in a sterile package, and readily utilized on emergency vehicles and in the operating room.

  2. [Chest ultrasonography in pleurapulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gallego Gómez, M P; García Benedito, P; Pereira Boo, D; Sánchez Pérez, M

    2014-01-01

    Although the initial diagnosis and follow-up of pleuropulmonary disease are normally done with plain chest films and the gold standard for chest disease is computed tomography, diverse studies have established the usefulness of chest ultrasonography in the diagnosis of different pleuropulmonary diseases like pleural effusion and lung consolidation, among others. In this article, we show the different ultrasonographic patterns for pleuropulmonary disease. The availability of ultrasonography in different areas (ICU, recovery areas) makes this technique especially important for critical patients because it obviates the need to transfer the patient. Moreover, ultrasonography is noninvasive and easy to repeat. On the other hand, it enables the direct visualization of pleuropulmonary disease that is necessary for interventional procedures. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Chest Pain Associated with Moderator Band Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Kaszala, Karoly; Osman, Mohammed N.; Lucke, John; Carrillo, Roger

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old man was evaluated for chronic chest pain that had been present for 8 years after placement of a dual-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator to treat inducible ventricular tachycardia. Previous coronary angiography had revealed nonobstructive coronary artery disease and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.45 to 0.50, consistent with mild idiopathic nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Evaluation with chest radiography and transthoracic echocardiography showed the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead to be embedded within the right ventricle at the moderator band, which had mild calcification. Treatment included extraction of the dual-coil lead and placement of a new single-coil right ventricular lead at the mid septum. The patient had complete relief of symptoms after the procedure. This case shows that chest pain can be associated with the placement of a right ventricular implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead in the moderator band and that symptomatic relief can occur after percutaneous lead extraction and the implantation of a new right ventricular lead to the mid septal region. PMID:25425994

  4. Chest Tomosynthesis: Technical Principles and Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Dobbins, James T.; McAdams, H. Page

    2009-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a radiographic technique that can produce an arbitrary number of section images of a patient from a single pass of the x-ray tube. It utilizes a conventional x-ray tube, a flat-panel detector, a computer-controlled tube mover, and special reconstruction algorithms to produce section images. While it does not have the depth resolution of computed tomography (CT), tomosynthesis provides some of the tomographic benefits of CT but at lower cost and radiation dose than CT. Compared to conventional chest radiography, chest tomosynthesis results in improved visibility of normal structures such as vessels, airway and spine. By reducing visual clutter from overlying normal anatomy, it also enhances detection of small lung nodules. This review article outlines the components of a tomosynthesis system, discusses results regarding improved lung nodule detection from the recent literature, and presents examples of nodule detection from a clinical trial in human subjects. Possible implementation strategies for use in clinical chest imaging are discussed. PMID:19616909

  5. Striving for Excellence. The International Conference of the Learning Disabilities Association of America (Atlanta, Georgia, March 4-7, 1992). Research Poster Session Abstract. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Steven C., Comp.

    Eleven abstracts of research projects related to individuals with learning disabilities are compiled in this booklet. The research projects were presented in poster sessions at the March 1992 International Conference of the Learning Disabilities Association of America. Titles and authors of poster sessions include: "Perceptual and Verbal Skills of…

  6. Poster session: Fifth users meeting for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), which is currently under construction as a national user facility at Argonne National Laboratory is a third-generation synchrotron x-ray source, one of only three in the world. It is expected to produce x-rays that are 10,000 times brighter than any currently produced elsewhere for use in research in a wide range of scientific areas. Users from industry, national laboratories, universities, and business will be able to come to the APS to conduct research either as members of Collaborative Access Teams (CATS) or as Independent Investigators. Principal users will be members of CATS, which will be building and operating all of the beamlines present in the first phase of APS beamline development. The first set of CATs has been selected through a competitive proposal process involving peer scientific review, thorough technical evaluation, and significant management oversight by the APS. This document is a compilation of posters presented at the Fifth Users Meeting for the Advanced Photon Source, held at Argonne National Laboratory on October 14--15, 1992. All CATs whose scientific cases were approved by the APS Proposal Evaluation Board are included. In addition, this document contains a poster from the Center for Synchrotron Radiation and Research and Instrumentation at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

  7. Poster session: Fifth users meeting for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), which is currently under construction as a national user facility at Argonne National Laboratory is a third-generation synchrotron x-ray source, one of only three in the world. It is expected to produce x-rays that are 10,000 times brighter than any currently produced elsewhere for use in research in a wide range of scientific areas. Users from industry, national laboratories, universities, and business will be able to come to the APS to conduct research either as members of Collaborative Access Teams (CATS) or as Independent Investigators. Principal users will be members of CATS, which will be building and operating all of the beamlines present in the first phase of APS beamline development. The first set of CATs has been selected through a competitive proposal process involving peer scientific review, thorough technical evaluation, and significant management oversight by the APS. This document is a compilation of posters presented at the Fifth Users Meeting for the Advanced Photon Source, held at Argonne National Laboratory on October 14--15, 1992. All CATs whose scientific cases were approved by the APS Proposal Evaluation Board are included. In addition, this document contains a poster from the Center for Synchrotron Radiation and Research and Instrumentation at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

  8. An Innovative Model: Undergraduate Poster Sessions by Health Professional Majors as a Method for Communicating Chemistry in Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunstan, Marie; Bassinger, Pat

    1997-09-01

    This paper develops the methods used to conduct poster sessions for undergraduate health professional majors. There are two main goals of the project. The first goal is to learn chemistry in the context of health professions, everyday activities and contemporary issues. The second goal is to continue to develop research and written and oral communication skills. The topics are chosen after a classroom discussion of organic chemistry. The students then attend a library instruction class for introduction to appropriate research tools. Students are also taught the mechanics of poster preparation. The sessions are presented during a laboratory class period and are open to the college and public at large. Evaluation criteria include comprehension of the chemistry, the level and accuracy of the discussion and the appropriateness of the poster design for information exchange, All levels of the college community are invited to participate and greatly contribute to the success of the poster sessions.

  9. Acute fatal chest pain: optimized procedure in emergency department.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Ming; Tong, Lianying; Lin, Shouyu

    2013-01-01

    To explore the diagnostic procedure of acute fatal chest pain in emergency department (ED) in order to decrease the misdiagnosis rate and shorten the definite time to diagnosis. The ultimate aim is to rescue the patients timely and effectively. Three hundreds and two patients (56.9 ± 11.8 Years, 72% men) complained with acute chest pain and chest distress presenting to our ED were recruited. They were divided into two groups according to visiting time (Group I: from October 2010 to March 2011, Group II: from October 2011 to March 2012). The misdiagnosis rate, definite time for diagnosis and medical expense were analyzed. Patients of Group I were diagnosed by initial doctors who made their diagnosis according to personal experience in outpatient service or rescue room in ED. While patients of Group II were all admitted to rescue room and were diagnosed and rescued according to the acute chest pain screening flow-process diagram. Differences inter-group was compared. The misdiagnosis rate of fatal chest pain in Group I and Group II was 6.8% and 0% respectively, and there was statistic difference (P=0.000). The definite time to diagnosis was 65.3 min and 40.1 min in control and Group II respectively, the difference had statistic significance (P=0.000). And the mean cost for treatment was 787.5/124.5 ¥/$ and 905.5/143.2 ¥/$ respectively, and there was statistic difference too (P=0.012). Treating emergency patients with acute chest pain according to the acute chest pain screening flow-process diagram in rescue room will decrease misdiagnosis apparently, and it can also shorten the definite time to correct diagnosis. It has a remarkable positive role in rescuing patients with acute chest pain timely and effectively.

  10. Chest physiotherapy in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, A; Shivbalan, So; Thangavelu, S

    2005-06-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CPT) in children is generally considered as a separate and specialized treatment modality that should be rendered only by a physiotherapist. Actually this is not difficult if one has a proper understanding of the basic concept and principle behind the maneuver. This article aims at making CPT simple, so that it could be incorporated in routine pediatric practice for managing respiratory ailments.

  11. Interpretations of the chest roentgenogram

    SciTech Connect

    Landay, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Sixteen brief chapters cover basic principles, techniques, and normal appearance of the lungs, hili, mediastinum, pleura, thoracic cage, and extrathoracic structures as seen in chest radiographs. Common pathologic findings are described and copiously illustrated. Four brief concluding chapters highlight findings in the neck, intensive care radiographs with special reference to tubes and catheters, clues to indicate site of disease, and a brief summary.

  12. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  13. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  14. Reconstruction of chest wall defects.

    PubMed

    Hasse, J

    1991-12-01

    A series of 61 consecutive procedures of chest wall resection and reconstruction in 58 patients during the period between August, 1986 and December, 1990 is reported. The ages ranged between 6-77 years. The chest wall resection was indicated for malignant affections in 54 cases. Among these, there were 24 patients with bronchial carcinoma invading the chest wall, 17 patients with primary or metastatic sarcoma, 11 patients with recurrent breast cancer and 3 with cancer metastases of varying origin. Pulmonary resection included pneumonectomy in 8 cases, lobectomy in 19, segmental and wedge resections in 26. In the majority of resections, the reconstruction was accomplished without implants. In cases with full thickness removal of the chest wall, the plane of the rib cage and/or the sternum was reconstructed using Vicryl mesh (n = 7), PTFE soft tissue patch (n = 11), marlex-mesh (n = 1), or methyl-methacrylate (n = 3). There was one case of hospital mortality, 6 weeks postoperatively, due to neurological failure from an independent preoperatively undiagnosed brain tumor. There were 4 reoperations: one early and one late (4 months) infection, one case of limited superficial necrosis of a flap and one with chronic lymphous drainage from a large myocutaneous flap. In no instance was primary postoperative ventilation therapy necessary. Mechanical ventilation was instituted only on day 8 in the patient who accounts for the mortality in this series. In the presence of primary infection, the greater omentum was used for the restoration of the integument.

  15. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Diagnosing pulmonary edema: lung ultrasound versus chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Jennifer L; Noble, Vicki E; Liteplo, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Diagnosing the underlying cause of acute dyspnea can be challenging. Lung ultrasound may help to identify pulmonary edema as a possible cause. To evaluate the ability of residents to recognize pulmonary edema on lung ultrasound using chest radiographs as a comparison standard. This is a prospective, blinded, observational study of a convenience sample of resident physicians in the Departments of Emergency Medicine (EM), Internal Medicine (IM), and Radiology. Residents were given a tutorial on interpreting pulmonary edema on both chest radiograph and lung ultrasound. They were then shown both ultrasounds and chest radiographs from 20 patients who had presented to the emergency department with dyspnea, 10 with a primary diagnosis of pulmonary edema, and 10 with alternative diagnoses. Cohen's κ values were calculated to describe the strength of the correlation between resident and gold standard interpretations. Participants included 20 EM, 20 IM, and 20 Radiology residents. The overall agreement with gold standard interpretation of pulmonary edema on lung ultrasound (74%, κ = 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.55) was superior to chest radiographs (58%, κ = 0.25, 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.30) (P < 0.0001). EM residents interpreted lung ultrasounds more accurately than IM residents. Radiology residents interpreted chest radiographs more accurately than did EM and IM residents. Residents were able to more accurately identify pulmonary edema with lung ultrasound than with chest radiograph. Physicians with minimal exposure to lung ultrasound may be able to correctly recognize pulmonary edema on lung ultrasound.

  17. Is the chest x-ray an appropriate screening exam for ER patients with AMS?

    PubMed

    Birkemeier, Krista L; Nipper, Michael L; Williams, Jonathan M

    2008-11-01

    Emergency department patients with altered mental status (AMS) regularly undergo a routine chest radiograph at our institution. While there are many causes of chest pathology seen on the chest radiograph that may cause an altered mental status, it is not clear that a routine chest radiograph for these patients affects management. The goal of this study is to determine if a chest radiograph is an appropriate screening examination for AMS. This is a retrospective review of 100 consecutive patients who underwent head computed tomography for altered mental status in the emergency department and had a chest radiograph during the same visit. Of 100 patients undergoing a routine chest radiograph for AMS, 17 had findings which altered patient care, 15 of those had signs/symptoms which clearly indicated that a chest radiograph was needed, and the other two had leukocytosis. The routine performance of a chest radiograph in the setting of a patient presenting to the emergency department with altered mental status affected medical management in 17%, a modest benefit. The positive predictive value of a chest x-ray in these patients may be improved if certain symptomatologies are present.

  18. The APECS Virtual Poster Session: a virtual platform for science communication and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, A.; Jochum, K.; Jullion, L.; Pavlov, A.; Liggett, D.; Fugmann, G.; Baeseman, J. L.; Apecs Virtual Poster Session Working Group, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Virtual Poster Session (VPS) of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) was developed by early career scientists as an online tool for communicating and discussing science and research beyond the four walls of a conference venue. Poster sessions often are the backbone of a conference where especially early career scientists get a chance to communicate their research, discuss ideas, data, and scientific problems with their peers and senior scientists. There, they can hone their 'elevator pitch', discussion skills and presentation skills. APECS has taken the poster session one step further and created the VPS - the same idea but independent from conferences, travel, and location. All that is needed is a computer with internet access. Instead of letting their posters collect dust on the computer's hard drive, scientists can now upload them to the APECS website. There, others have the continuous opportunity to comment, give feedback and discuss the work. Currently, about 200 posters are accessible contributed by authors and co-authors from 34 countries. Since January 2010, researchers can discuss their poster with a broad international audience including fellow researchers, community members, potential colleagues and collaborators, policy makers and educators during monthly conference calls via an internet platform. Recordings of the calls are available online afterwards. Calls so far have included topical sessions on e.g. marine biology, glaciology, or social sciences, and interdisciplinary calls on Arctic sciences or polar research activities in a specific country, e.g. India or Romania. They attracted audiences of scientists at all career stages and from all continents, with on average about 15 persons participating per call. Online tools like the VPS open up new ways for creating collaborations and new research ideas and sharing different methodologies for future projects, pushing aside the boundaries of countries and nations, conferences

  19. Working with U.S. Manufacturers to Succeed in Global Markets (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    Poster created for the Advanced Manufacturing Office to be used at meetings, presentations, and exhibits. The Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) fosters advanced manufacturing innovation, facilitates public and private partnerships, and drives rapid deployment of technologies to help manufacturers: Save energy and money, Reduce environmental impacts, Enhance workforce development, and Improve national energy security and competitiveness throughout the supply chain.

  20. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Work Motivators: Implications for the Incoming Air Force Officer Workforce. Posters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stephanie K.; Davis, Jason J.; Rate, Christopher

    This document contains three poster presentations from a conference on human resource development. "Intrinsic and Extrinsic Work Motivators: Implications for the Incoming Air Force Officer Workforce" (Stephanie K. Johnson, Jason J. Davis, Christopher Rate) reports on a study that explored the literature relating to work motivators to…

  1. Providing Students with Interdisciplinary Support to Improve Their Organic Chemistry Posters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widanski, Bozena; Thompson, Jo Ann; Foran-Mulcahy, Katie; Abafo, Amy

    2016-01-01

    A two-semester-long interdisciplinary support effort to improve student posters in organic chemistry lab is described. In the first semester, students' literature search report is supported by a workshop conducted by an Instruction Librarian. During the subsequent semester, a second workshop is presented by the Instruction Librarian, an English…

  2. ConfChem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Spring 2014 ConfChem Virtual Poster Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belford, Robert E.; Stoltzfus, Matthew; Houseknecht, Justin B.

    2015-01-01

    This communication describes the virtual poster session of the Flipped Classroom online ConfChem conference that was hosted by the ACS CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education (CCCE) from May 9 to June 12, 2014. During the conference's online discussions, it became evident that multiple participants who were not presenting papers had been…

  3. ConfChem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Spring 2014 ConfChem Virtual Poster Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belford, Robert E.; Stoltzfus, Matthew; Houseknecht, Justin B.

    2015-01-01

    This communication describes the virtual poster session of the Flipped Classroom online ConfChem conference that was hosted by the ACS CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education (CCCE) from May 9 to June 12, 2014. During the conference's online discussions, it became evident that multiple participants who were not presenting papers had been…

  4. Providing Students with Interdisciplinary Support to Improve Their Organic Chemistry Posters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widanski, Bozena; Thompson, Jo Ann; Foran-Mulcahy, Katie; Abafo, Amy

    2016-01-01

    A two-semester-long interdisciplinary support effort to improve student posters in organic chemistry lab is described. In the first semester, students' literature search report is supported by a workshop conducted by an Instruction Librarian. During the subsequent semester, a second workshop is presented by the Instruction Librarian, an English…

  5. Stretch Your Legs—And Your Mind—With the Take a Hike Poster Puzzler | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A Poster Puzzler has been added to this year’s fall Take a Hike event at NCI at Frederick, giving participants a chance to exercise both body and mind—and win prizes—as they walk around the NCI at Frederick campus.

  6. Effective visual design and communication practices for research posters: Exemplars based on the theory and practice of multimedia learning and rhetoric.

    PubMed

    Pedwell, Rhianna K; Hardy, James A; Rowland, Susan L

    2017-05-01

    Evidence shows that science graduates often do not have the communication skills they need to meet workplace standards and expectations. One common mode of science communication is the poster. In a review of the literature we show that poster design is historically problematic, and that the guidance provided to students as they create posters for assessment is frequently inconsistent. To address this inconsistency we provide some guiding design principles for posters that are grounded in communication theory and the fundamentals of rhetoric. We also present three nondiscipline-specific example posters with accompanying notes that explain why the posters are examples of poor, average, and excellent poster design. The subject matter for the posters is a fabricated set of experiments on a topic that could not actually be the subject of research. Instructors may use these resources with their students, secure in the knowledge that they do not and will never represent an answer set to an extant assessment item. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(3):249-261, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. [Disclosure of conflicts of interest in hospital pharmacy posters in France: we still have a long way to go].

    PubMed

    Édouard, B; Toth, K; Descout, J

    2013-05-01

    Since 1995, disclosure of conflicts of interest in international scientific publications became systematic, but, in France, there is yet no obligation to mention them in oral communications or posters of pharmacy. To assess the rate of posters in hospital pharmacy meetings which mention potential conflicts of interest. A prospective study. All abstracts presented in printed poster format were evaluated during three hospital pharmacy meetings organized in France between November 2011 and March 2012 for the presence of the conflicts of interest disclosure, even if there were no conflicts of interest. The main outcome was the rate of posters with mentions of potential conflicts of interest. A subgroup analysis was conducted about geographic origin of authors. On 294 announced posters, 263 were displayed, 252 did not mention any conflict of interest, 11 mentioned the possibility or not of conflict of interest (4.2%): the rate ranged from 1.1 to 25% according to the meeting. Posters from France disclosed less often conflicts of interest (<2%) than foreign ones (>40%). The rate of spontaneous disclosure of conflicts of interest is very low within French pharmacists. The instructions given by French meeting organizers should be more directive on the matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Chest pain prevalence, causes, and disposition in the emergency department of a regional hospital in Pretoria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest pain is a common clinical syndrome. However, there is a paucity of African studies describing the causes, prevalence, aetiology, and disposition of patients with chest pain presenting in the emergency department (ED). Aim The aim of this retrospective descriptive study was to determine the prevalence, causes, demographics, and disposition of all adult patients with the main complaint of chest pain presenting at the ED of a regional hospital in South Africa. Methods Records of all patients 18 years and older presenting with the complaint of chest pain from 1 December 2011 through 10 April 2012 were assessed. A data collection sheet capturing patient demographics and disposition from the ED was used. The diagnosis was subdivided into groups: cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, psychiatric/psychogenic, other, and unknown. Results Of the 312 patients presenting with chest pain, 210 patient files were retrieved. The prevalence of non-traumatic chest pain was 1.66%. Respiratory disease was the most common cause (36.19%), with pneumonia the most common diagnosis (24.40%). Logistic regression showed diagnoses of acute cardiovascular disease or respiratory disease, older age, and transport by ambulance as being associated with admission. Conclusion The main cause of acute chest pain was found to be respiratory disease, followed by musculoskeletal disorders. In the African context, the aetiology of acute chest pain differs from that in first world countries. Health workers should therefore pay special attention to respiratory conditions during diagnosis and management in African patients with acute chest pain. PMID:27380782

  9. Chest pain prevalence, causes, and disposition in the emergency department of a regional hospital in Pretoria.

    PubMed

    Geyser, Mimi; Smith, Selma

    2016-06-10

    Chest pain is a common clinical syndrome. However, there is a paucity of African studies describing the causes, prevalence, aetiology, and disposition of patients with chest pain presenting in the emergency department (ED). The aim of this retrospective descriptive study was to determine the prevalence, causes, demographics, and disposition of all adult patients with the main complaint of chest pain presenting at the ED of a regional hospital in South Africa. Records of all patients 18 years and older presenting with the complaint of chest pain from 1 December 2011 through 10 April 2012 were assessed. A data collection sheet capturing patient demographics and disposition from the ED was used. The diagnosis was subdivided into groups: cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, psychiatric/psychogenic, other, and unknown. Of the 312 patients presenting with chest pain, 210 patient files were retrieved. The prevalence of non-traumatic chest pain was 1.66%. Respiratory disease was the most common cause (36.19%), with pneumonia the most common diagnosis (24.40%). Logistic regression showed diagnoses of acute cardiovascular disease or respiratory disease, older age, and transport by ambulance as being associated with admission. The main cause of acute chest pain was found to be respiratory disease, followed by musculoskeletal disorders. In the African context, the aetiology of acute chest pain differs from that in first world countries. Health workers should therefore pay special attention to respiratory conditions during diagnosis and management in African patients with acute chest pain.

  10. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Louise; Gates, Alison

    2015-12-21

    Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. This is an updated version of previously published reviews. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 02 June 2015. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical studies in which a form of chest physiotherapy (airway clearance technique) were taken for consideration in people with cystic fibrosis compared with either no physiotherapy treatment or spontaneous cough alone. Both authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included studies. There was heterogeneity in the published outcomes, with variable reporting which meant pooling of the data for meta-analysis was not possible. The searches identified 157 studies, of which eight cross-over studies (data from 96 participants) met the inclusion criteria. There were differences between studies in the way that interventions were delivered, with several of the intervention groups combining more than one treatment modality. One included study looked at autogenic drainage, six considered conventional chest physiotherapy, three considered oscillating positive expiratory pressure, seven considered positive expiratory pressure and one considered high pressure positive expiratory pressure. Of the eight studies, six were single-treatment studies and in two, the treatment intervention was performed over two consecutive days (once daily in one, twice daily in the other). This enormous heterogeneity in the treatment

  11. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Louise; Gates, Alison; van der Schans, Cees P

    2013-09-04

    Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 04 February 2013. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical studies in which a form of chest physiotherapy (airway clearance technique) were taken for consideration in people with cystic fibrosis compared with either no physiotherapy treatment or spontaneous cough alone. Both authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed study quality. There was heterogeneity in the published outcomes, with variable reporting which meant pooling of the data for meta-analysis was not possible. The searches identified 144 studies, of which eight cross-over studies (data from 96 participants) met the inclusion criteria. There were differences between studies in the way that interventions were delivered, with several of the intervention groups combining more than one treatment modality. One included study looked at autogenic drainage, six considered conventional chest physiotherapy, three considered oscillating positive expiratory pressure, seven considered positive expiratory pressure and one considered high pressure positive expiratory pressure. Of the eight studies, six were single-treatment studies and in two, the treatment intervention was performed over two consecutive days (once daily in one, twice daily in the other). This enormous heterogeneity in the treatment interventions prevented any meta-analyses from being performed.Four studies, involving

  12. Management of Congenital Chest Wall Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Felix C.; Elliott, Steven T.; Sandler, Anthony D.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital chest wall deformities are considered to be anomalies in chest wall growth. These can be categorized as either rib cage overgrowth or deformities related to inadequate growth (aplasia or dysplasia). Rib cage overgrowth leads to depression of the sternum (pectus excavatum) or protuberance of the sternum (pectus carinatum) and accounts for greater than 90% of congenital chest wall deformities. The remaining deformities are a result of inadequate growth. Evolution in the management of congenital chest wall deformities has made significant progress over the past 25 years. This article will review chest wall deformities and the current management strategies of these interesting anomalies. PMID:22294949

  13. [The management of chest injuries].

    PubMed

    Reshad, K; Hirata, T; Itoi, K; Takahashi, Y; Muro, K

    1989-10-01

    The mortality from chest injuries is so high due to severe physiologic imbalance that an immediate and accurate diagnosis of the injured organ and prompt treatment can salvage the patient from the strategy. This study comprises 1329 injured cases including 145 patients with crushed chests. The cause of injury was traffic accident in 537 cases (40.5%), fall or degradation in 332 cases (25%). There was a correlation between the cause of injury and age, as that traffic accident was a major one in young aged and fall in elders. Treatment against crushed patients included 150 surgical operations, 206 plaster bandages, 56 drainage of thoracic, peritoneal and cranial cavities. Thoracotomies performed in patients with flail chest (2), lung contusion (4), rupture of the bronchi and diaphragm (each 1) and for evacuation of clotted hemothorax in 3 patients. The prognosis of all these patients was good. Lastly we conclude that since the prognosis of injured patients depends on how fast the patient can be carried to the hospital and how quickly the physician or surgeon can evaluate the trauma and institute a prompt treatment, the education of the primary staff is the most important.

  14. Twittering About Research: A Case Study of the World’s First Twitter Poster Competition

    PubMed Central

    Randviir, Edward P.; Illingworth, Samuel M.; Baker, Matthew J.; Cude, Matthew; Banks, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Society of Chemistry held, to our knowledge, the world’s first Twitter conference at 9am on February 5 th, 2015. The conference was a Twitter-only conference, allowing researchers to upload academic posters as tweets, replacing a physical meeting. This paper reports the details of the event and discusses the outcomes, such as the potential for the use of social media to enhance scientific communication at conferences. In particular, the present work argues that social media outlets such as Twitter broaden audiences, speed up communication, and force clearer and more concise descriptions of a researcher’s work. The benefits of poster presentations are also discussed in terms of potential knowledge exchange and networking. This paper serves as a proof-of-concept approach for improving both the public opinion of the poster, and the enhancement of the poster through an innovative online format that some may feel more comfortable with, compared to face-to-face communication. PMID:26834989

  15. An atypical cause of atypical chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Zaheen, Ahmad; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Gudgeon, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The present report describes a case involving a 57-year-old HIV-positive man who presented with acute retrosternal chest pain accompanied by 24 h of fever. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint was diagnosed based on magnetic resonance imaging findings in addition to Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. To the authors’ knowledge, the present case is only the 12th reported case of manubriosternal septic arthritis, and the first in an HIV-positive patient. Early diagnosis and treatment can circumvent the need for surgical intervention. Based on the present case report and review of the literature, the authors summarize the epidemiology, appropriate imaging and suggestions for antibiotic therapy for this rare presentation. PMID:25371686

  16. Information Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Kritina L.; Thompson, Shelby G.; Sandor, Aniko; McCann, Robert S.; Kaiser, Mary K.; Adelstein, Barnard D.; Begault, Durand R.; Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.; Godfroy, Martine

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. In addition to addressing display design issues associated with information formatting, style, layout, and interaction, the Information Presentation DRP is also working toward understanding the effects of extreme environments encountered in space travel on information processing. Work is also in progress to refine human factors-based design tools, such as human performance modeling, that will supplement traditional design techniques and help ensure that optimal information design is accomplished in the most cost-efficient manner. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within the Information Presentation DRP for FY10 are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. The poster will highlight completed and planned work for each subtask.

  17. Chest wall reconstruction after extended resection

    PubMed Central

    Seder, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive chest wall resection and reconstruction is a challenging procedure that requires a multidisciplinary approach, including input from thoracic surgeons, plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and radiation oncologists. The primary goals of any chest wall reconstruction is to obliterate dead space, restore chest wall rigidity, preserve pulmonary mechanics, protect intrathoracic organs, provide soft tissue coverage, minimize deformity, and allow patients to receive adjuvant radiotherapy. Successful chest wall reconstruction requires the re-establishment of skeletal stability to prevent chest wall hernias, avoids thoracoplasty-like contraction of the operated side, protects underlying viscera, and maintain a cosmetically-acceptable appearance. After skeletal stability is established, full tissue coverage can be achieved using direct closure, skin grafts, local advancement flaps, pedicled myocutaneous flaps, or free flaps. This review examines the indications for chest wall reconstruction and describes techniques for establishment of chest wall rigidity and soft tissue coverage. PMID:27942408

  18. It's Not Your Heart: Group Treatment for Non-Cardiac Chest Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Sherry M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a brief group psychoeducational treatment for non-cardiac chest pain, supplemented with a composite case study. Patients present to emergency rooms for chest pain they believe is a heart attack symptom. When cardiac testing is negative, this pain is usually a panic symptom, often occurring with a cluster of other panic…

  19. It's Not Your Heart: Group Treatment for Non-Cardiac Chest Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Sherry M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a brief group psychoeducational treatment for non-cardiac chest pain, supplemented with a composite case study. Patients present to emergency rooms for chest pain they believe is a heart attack symptom. When cardiac testing is negative, this pain is usually a panic symptom, often occurring with a cluster of other panic…

  20. An unusual case of flail chest: surgical repair using Marlex mesh

    PubMed Central

    Heriot, A. G.; Wells, F. C.

    1997-01-01

    The case history is presented of a patient with neurofibromatosis with a chest wall defect present from birth. Abnormal rib development had resulted in a flail segment with painful paradoxical movement and unsightly costal cartilage protrusion. Chest wall reconstruction using Marlex mesh resulted in an excellent cosmetic and functional repair. 


 PMID:9176546

  1. Herniation of unruptured tuberculous lung abscess into chest wall without pleural or bronchial spillage

    PubMed Central

    Magazine, Rahul; Mohapatra, Aswini K.; Manu, Mohan K.; Srivastava, Rajendra K.

    2011-01-01

    A 22-year-old unmarried man presented to the chest outpatient department with a history of productive cough of two-month duration. He also complained of pain and swelling on the anterior aspect of right side of chest of one-month duration. Imaging studies of the thorax, including chest roentgenography and computerized tomography, revealed an unruptured lung abscess which had herniated into the chest wall. Culture of pus aspirated from the chest wall swelling grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. He was diagnosed to have a tuberculous lung abscess which had extended into the chest wall, without spillage into the pleural cavity or the bronchial tree. Antituberculosis drugs were prescribed, and he responded to the treatment with complete resolution of the lesion. PMID:22084547

  2. Chest CT Features of North American Paragonimiasis

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Travis S.; Lane, Michael A.; Weil, Gary J.; Bailey, Thomas C.; Bhalla, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to characterize the chest CT findings of North American paragonimiasis due to Paragonimus kellicotti in the largest (to our knowledge) case series reported to date and to compare the findings with those reported for paragonimiasis infections in other regions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective review was performed of chest CT examinations of eight patients with North American paragonimiasis treated at our institution between 2006 and 2010. Findings were characterized by site of involvement, including lungs and pleura, heart and pericardium, lymph nodes, and upper abdomen. RESULTS The most common chest CT findings in this case series were pleural effusions and internal mammary and cardiophrenic lymphadenopathy. Pulmonary parenchymal findings included peripheral lung nodules of 1–3.5 cm in size with surrounding ground-glass opacity; many nodules had a linear track to the pleural surface that may correspond to the worm’s burrow tunnel. Pericardial involvement (5/8 patients) and omental inflammation (5/7 patients), which are uncommon in Asian paragonimiasis, were common in this series. CONCLUSION Pleural and pulmonary features of North American paragonimiasis are generally similar to those reported from Asia. The presence of a track between a pulmonary nodule and the pleura may help distinguish paragonimiasis from mimickers, including chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, tuberculosis, fungal infection, or malignancy. Pericarditis, lymphadenopathy, and omental inflammation were more common in our series than in reports on paragonimiasis from other regions. These differences may be related to the infecting parasite species or to the fact that radiologic examinations in the present series were performed relatively early in the course of infection. PMID:22528896

  3. Noninvasive and Nonocclusive Blood Pressure Estimation Via a Chest Sensor.

    PubMed

    Solà, Josep; Proença, Martin; Ferrario, Damien; Porchet, Jacques-André; Falhi, Abdessamad; Grossenbacher, Olivier; Allemann, Yves; Rimoldi, Stefano F; Sartori, Claudio

    2013-12-01

    The clinical demand for a device to monitor blood pressure (BP) in ambulatory scenarios with minimal use of inflation cuffs is increasing. Based on the so-called pulse wave velocity (PWV) principle, this paper introduces and evaluates a novel concept of BP monitor that can be fully integrated within a chest sensor. After a preliminary calibration, the sensor provides nonocclusive beat-by-beat estimations of mean arterial pressure (MAP) by measuring the pulse transit time (PTT) of arterial pressure pulses travelling from the ascending aorta toward the subcutaneous vasculature of the chest. In a cohort of 15 healthy male subjects, a total of 462 simultaneous readings consisting of reference MAP and chest PTT were acquired. Each subject was recorded at three different days: D, D+3, and D+14. Overall, the implemented protocol induced MAP values to range from 80 ± 6 mmHg in baseline, to 107 ± 9 mmHg during isometric handgrip maneuvers. Agreement between reference and chest-sensor MAP values was tested by using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC = 0.78) and Bland-Altman analysis (mean error = 0.7 mmHg, standard deviation = 5.1 mmHg). The cumulative percentage of MAP values provided by the chest sensor falling within a range of ±5 mmHg compared to reference MAP readings was of 70%, within ±10 mmHg was of 91%, and within ±15 mmHg was of 98%. These results point at the fact that the chest sensor complies with the British Hypertension Society requirements of Grade A BP monitors, when applied to MAP readings. Grade A performance was maintained even two weeks after having performed the initial subject-dependent calibration. In conclusion, this paper introduces a sensor and a calibration strategy to perform MAP measurements at the chest. The encouraging performance of the presented technique paves the way toward an ambulatory compliant, continuous, and nonocclusive BP monitoring system.

  4. The Bill of Rights Poster Series. A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Bar Association, Chicago, IL. Special Committee on Youth Education for Citizenship.

    This document is a teacher's guide to a series of mass transit advertisement posters illustrating Bill of Rights topics. The five posters in the series are discussed in five separate sections. Each section is divided into three units, each consisting of a learning activity, one for the secondary level, one for the middle school level, and one…

  5. Food Safety Posters for Safe Handling of Leafy Greens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajagopal, Lakshman; Arendt, Susan W.; Shaw, Angela M.; Strohbehn, Catherine H.; Sauer, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes food safety educational tools depicting safe handling of leafy greens that are available as downloadable posters to Extension educators and practitioners (www.extension.iastate.edu). Nine visual-based minimal-text colored posters in English, Chinese, and Spanish were developed for use when formally or informally educating…

  6. 12 CFR 338.4 - Fair housing poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fair housing poster. 338.4 Section 338.4 Banks... HOUSING Advertising § 338.4 Fair housing poster. (a) Each bank engaged in extending loans for the purpose... Department of Housing and Urban Development's regulations (24 CFR 110.25(a)), in a central location within...

  7. Food Safety Posters for Safe Handling of Leafy Greens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajagopal, Lakshman; Arendt, Susan W.; Shaw, Angela M.; Strohbehn, Catherine H.; Sauer, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes food safety educational tools depicting safe handling of leafy greens that are available as downloadable posters to Extension educators and practitioners (www.extension.iastate.edu). Nine visual-based minimal-text colored posters in English, Chinese, and Spanish were developed for use when formally or informally educating…

  8. 12 CFR 338.4 - Fair housing poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fair housing poster. 338.4 Section 338.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY FAIR HOUSING Advertising § 338.4 Fair housing poster. (a) Each bank engaged in extending loans for the purpose...

  9. 12 CFR 338.4 - Fair housing poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fair housing poster. 338.4 Section 338.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY FAIR HOUSING Advertising § 338.4 Fair housing poster. (a) Each bank engaged in extending loans for the purpose...

  10. 12 CFR 338.4 - Fair housing poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fair housing poster. 338.4 Section 338.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY FAIR HOUSING Advertising § 338.4 Fair housing poster. (a) Each bank engaged in extending loans for the purpose...

  11. 12 CFR 338.4 - Fair housing poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fair housing poster. 338.4 Section 338.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY FAIR HOUSING Advertising § 338.4 Fair housing poster. (a) Each bank engaged in extending loans for the purpose...

  12. [Chest pain in pediatric emergency departments: a usually benign process].

    PubMed

    Gastesi Larrañaga, M; Fernández Landaluce, A; Mintegi Raso, S; Vázquez Ronco, M; Benito Fernández, J

    2003-09-01

    To describe the characteristics and management of the children aged less than 14 years presenting to the pediatric emergency department with chest pain. Retrospective review of all the patients who presented to the pediatric emergency department with chest pain from 15 January 2001 to 14 January 2002. Families received a follow-up telephone call inquiring about the patient's outcome. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for non-parametric data and the Chi-square test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test were used for categorical data. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. In 2001, 161 children presented with chest pain, representing 0.34% of the total number of consultations. Less than half of these patients (48%) had associated symptoms. Physical examination revealed abnormalities in 63% of the patients (39.1%). The most common finding was pain on palpation of the chest wall. Additional diagnostic tests were performed in 129 patients (80%). These included 116 radiographs, 62 electrocardiograms and nine miscellaneous tests. Abnormalities were found in seven chest radiographs. Only one child was admitted to hospital with pneumonia. The most common discharge diagnoses were idiopathic and/or musculoskeletal chest pain in 139 patients, pain of respiratory origin in 14 patients, gastrointestinal disorders in one patient, cardiac problems in one patient and other morbid processes in nine patients. Children with associated symptoms were more likely to receive a diagnosis other than nonspecific chest pain (28% vs 3.2% in children without other symptoms; relative risk: 8.66). Outpatient treatment included analgesics in 105 patients (65.2%). Only two children (1.2%) returned for reevaluation and no important findings were detected. Telephone follow-up was carried out in 117 children (72.6%). The pain lasted for less than 24 hours in 52 patients (32.2%). Thirty percent of the patients missed at least one day of school because of chest pain. Chest pain is an

  13. Bilateral dissemination of malignant pleural mesothelioma via iatrogenic buffalo chest: a rare route of disease progression.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Kohei; Tanaka, Eisaku; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Hashimoto, Seishu; Shindo, Toru; Noma, Satoshi; Kobashi, Yoichiro; Taguchi, Yoshio

    2012-09-01

    Buffalo chest refers to the pleuro-pleural communication that results in a single pleural cavity. Iatrogenic buffalo chest can occur following heart or heart-lung transplantation and other major thoracic surgeries. We present the case of malignant pleural mesothelioma in which iatrogenic buffalo chest after extended thymectomy caused bilateral pneumothoraces and contralateral dissemination of the disease. The free communication between bilateral pleural cavities had facilitated the rapid progression of tumor and the consequent bilateral malignant pleural effusions had made the management of disease much more difficult, leading to the early fatal outcome. To our knowledge, this is the first case of buffalo chest that was associated with bilateral malignant pleural effusions.

  14. Effects of Changing Atmospheric Conditions on Wind Turbine Performance (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, A.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-megawatt, utility-scale wind turbines operate in turbulent and dynamic winds that impact turbine performance in ways that are gradually becoming better understood. This poster presents a study made using a turbulent flow field simulator (TurbSim) and a Turbine aeroelastic simulator (FAST) of the response of a generic 1.5 MW wind turbine to changing inflow. The turbine power output is found to be most sensitive to wind speed and turbulence intensity, but the relationship depends on the wind speed with respect to the turbine's rated wind speed. Shear is found to be poorly correlated to power. A machine learning method called 'regression trees' is used to create a simple model of turbine performance that could be used as part of the wind resource assessment process. This study has used simple flow fields and should be extended to more complex flows, and validated with field observations.

  15. Banking on Solar: Debt Finance in Today's Distributed Market (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Louder, T.

    2014-10-01

    Over the last two years, several entities - from banks to credit unions to solar finance companies -have rolled out distributed solar-specific loan programs in the United States. These solar-specific loans are a distinct loan in that the underwriting, loan terms, lender security interest, and other programmatic aspects are designed exclusively for the financing of solar installations. Until recently, loan financing for distributed solar installations was largely through home equity loans, commercial loans, and other standardized loan products available to homeowners and businesses for general expenditures. However, as the U.S. solar market matures, so too are its financing options, and solar-specific loans stand to gain market share. This poster was presented at the Solar Power International conference in Las Vegas, NV in October 2014.

  16. Chest tube removal: end-inspiration or end-expiration?

    PubMed

    Bell, R L; Ovadia, P; Abdullah, F; Spector, S; Rabinovici, R

    2001-04-01

    Recurrent pneumothorax is the most significant complication after discontinuation of thoracostomy tubes. The primary objective of the present study was to determine which method of tube removal, at the end of inspiration or at the end of expiration, is associated with a lesser risk of developing a recurrent pneumothorax. A secondary objective was to identify potential risk factors for developing recurrence. A prospective study of 102 chest tubes in 69 trauma patients (1.5 tubes per patient) randomly assigned to removal at the end of inspiration (n = 52) or the end of expiration (n = 50). Recurrent pneumothorax or enlargement of a small but stable pneumothorax was observed after the removal of four chest tubes in the end-inspiration group (8%) and after discontinuation of three chest tubes (6%) in the end-expiration group (p = 1.0). Of those, only two tubes in the end-inspiration group and 1 tube in the end-expiration group required repeat closed thoracostomy. Multiple factors were analyzed that did not adversely affect outcome. These included patient age, Injury Severity Score, Revised Trauma Score, mechanism of injury, hemothorax, thoracotomy, thoracostomy, previous lung disease, chest tube duration, the presence of more than one thoracostomy tube in the same hemithorax, or a small (but stable) pneumothorax at the time of tube removal. Discontinuation of chest tubes at the end of inspiration or at the end of expiration has a similar rate of post-removal pneumothorax. Both methods are equally safe.

  17. Chest drain care bundle: Improving documentation and safety.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Joe; Graham, Selina

    2015-01-01

    Chest drain insertion is a common advanced procedure with a significant associated risk of pain, distress, and complications. Nationally, audit and recommendations from leading bodies have highlighted a number of safety concerns around chest drain insertion. Audit work has demonstrated poor levels of documentation; particularly around use of premedication, use of ultrasound guidance and consent. This has obvious potential consequences for patient safety and thus is an important target for improvement work. This project quantifies current standards of documentation and aims to improve this through a combination of accessible and easy to read guidelines, education, and the introduction of a chest drain insertion bundle. National best practice standards were identified through review of national guidance. Drain insertion was prospectively analysed over a three month period to establish baseline standards of documentation. This initial work was presented and a bundle and clinical guidelines produced. Chest drain insertion was then reaudited and assessed for improvement. Results demonstrated an improvement in many areas of documentation, pushing local results above the national average. However, only 40% of cases used the new bundle due to a mixture of staff rotation and an unexpectedly high proportion of drains inserted in non targeted areas including the emergency department, theatre, and intensive care. Despite this, the introduction of accessible guidance and bundle has significantly improved chest drain insertion documentation to the benefit of all.

  18. Computer-assisted diagnosis of chest radiographs for pneumoconioses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, Peter; Pattichis, Marios S.; Ramachandran, Janakiramanan; James, David S.

    2001-07-01

    A Computer-assisted Chest Radiograph Reader System (CARRS) was developed for the detection of pathological features in lungs presenting with pneumoconioses. CARRS applies novel techniques in automatic image segmentation, incorporates neural network-based pattern classification, and integrates these into a graphical user interface. The three aspects of CARRS are described: Chest radiograph digitization and display, rib and parenchyma characterization, and classification. The quantization of the chest radiograph film was optimized to maximize the information content of the digital images. Entropy was used as the benchmark for optimizing the quantization. From the rib-segmented images, regions of interest were selected by the pulmonologist. A feature vector composed of image characteristics such as entropy, textural statistics, etc. was calculated. A laterally primed adaptive resonance theory (LAPART) neural network was used as the classifier. LAPART classification accuracy averaged 86.8 %. Truth was determined by the two pulmonologists. The CARRS has demonstrated potential as a screening device. Today, 90% or more of the chest radiographs seen by the pulmonologist are normal. A computer-based system that can screen 50% or more of the chest radiographs represents a large savings in time and dollars.

  19. Factors Associated with ICU Admission following Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Etteri, Massimiliano; Cantaluppi, Francesca; Pina, Paolo; Guanziroli, Massimo; Bianchi, AnnaMaria; Casazza, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background. Blunt chest wall trauma accounts for over 10% of all trauma patients presenting to emergency departments worldwide. When the injury is not as severe, deciding which blunt chest wall trauma patients require a higher level of clinical input can be difficult. We hypothesized that patient factors, injury patterns, analgesia, postural condition, and positive airway pressure influence outcomes. Methods. The study population consisted of patients hospitalized with at least 3 rib fractures (RF) and at least one pulmonary contusion and/or at least one pneumothorax lower than 2 cm. Results. A total of 140 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Ten patients (7.1%) were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) within the first 72 hours, because of deterioration of the clinical conditions and gas exchange with worsening of chest X-ray/thoracic ultrasound/chest computed tomography. On univariable analysis and multivariable analysis, obliged orthopnea (p = 0.0018) and the severity of trauma score (p < 0.0002) were associated with admission to ICU. Conclusions. Obliged orthopnea was an independent predictor of ICU admission among patients incurring non-life-threatening blunt chest wall trauma. The main therapeutic approach associated with improved outcome is the prevention of pulmonary infections due to reduced tidal volume, namely, upright postural condition and positive airway pressure. PMID:28044070

  20. Chest tomosynthesis: technical and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Ase Allansdotter; Vikgren, Jenny; Bath, Magnus

    2014-02-01

    The recent implementation of chest tomosynthesis is built on the availability of large, dose-efficient, high-resolution flat panel detectors, which enable the acquisition of the necessary number of projection radiographs to allow reconstruction of section images of the chest within one breath hold. A chest tomosynthesis examination obtains the increased diagnostic information provided by volumetric imaging at a radiation dose comparable to that of conventional chest radiography. There is evidence that the sensitivity of chest tomosynthesis may be at least three times higher than for conventional chest radiography for detection of pulmonary nodules. The sensitivity increases with increasing nodule size and attenuation and decreases for nodules with subpleural location. Differentiation between pleural and subpleural lesions is a known pitfall due to the limited depth resolution in chest tomosynthesis. Studies on different types of pathology report increased detectability in favor of chest tomosynthesis in comparison to chest radiography. The technique provides improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography and facilitates the exclusion of pulmonary lesions in a majority of patients, avoiding the need for computed tomography (CT). However, motion artifacts can be a cumbersome limitation and breathing during the tomosynthesis image acquisition may result in severe artifacts significantly affecting the detectability of pathology. In summary, chest tomosynthesis has been shown to be superior to chest conventional radiography for many tasks and to be able to replace CT in selected cases. In our experience chest tomosynthesis is an efficient problem solver in daily clinical work. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the Employee Diversity Team’s display case exhibit “Recognizing the NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team,” in the lobby of Building 549. The Poster staff recognizes that this article does not include everyone who was involved in the response to the Ebola crisis, both at NCI at Frederick and in Africa. When the Ebola crisis broke out in 2014 in West Africa, staff members from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research responded quickly. Members of the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) were instrumental not only in setting up the clinical trials of the vaccine in Liberia, but also in providing training, community outreach, and recruitment strategies for the trials.

  2. Bringing Breast Cancer Technologies to Market | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    CCR research is recognized in novel competition to encourage the commercialization of breast cancer inventions. Editor’s note: This article was originally published in CCR Connections (Volume 8, No. 1). The Breast Cancer Startup Challenge was named one of six finalists in the HHS Innovates Award Competition, and was one of three finalists recognized by HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell and Deputy Secretary Bill Corr. For more information on the Challenge, see previous article on the Poster website. Start-up companies are instrumental in bringing the fruits of scientific research to market. Recognizing an opportunity to bring entrepreneurial minds to bear on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, the Avon Foundation for Women partnered with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation to launch the Breast Cancer Startup Challenge.

  3. A Change to the Platinum Publications | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Please be advised that the Poster will no longer publish the “Platinum Publications” series listing recent NCI at Frederick publications. All published research represents a valuable addition to the fight against cancer, AIDS, and infectious diseases—thus, the “Platinum Publications” did not adequately commend all of the important work done by NCI at Frederick researchers. Going forward, we will highlight a broad cross section of research with more tightly focused stories that should interest the entire NCI at Frederick community. In addition, we encourage readers to visit the Scientific Library's NCI at Frederick Scientific Publications database to see recently published research as well as a list of past NCI at Frederick publications. Thank you.

  4. Bringing Breast Cancer Technologies to Market | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    CCR research is recognized in novel competition to encourage the commercialization of breast cancer inventions. Editor’s note: This article was originally published in CCR Connections (Volume 8, No. 1). The Breast Cancer Startup Challenge was named one of six finalists in the HHS Innovates Award Competition, and was one of three finalists recognized by HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell and Deputy Secretary Bill Corr. For more information on the Challenge, see previous article on the Poster website. Start-up companies are instrumental in bringing the fruits of scientific research to market. Recognizing an opportunity to bring entrepreneurial minds to bear on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, the Avon Foundation for Women partnered with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation to launch the Breast Cancer Startup Challenge.

  5. NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the Employee Diversity Team’s display case exhibit “Recognizing the NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team,” in the lobby of Building 549. The Poster staff recognizes that this article does not include everyone who was involved in the response to the Ebola crisis, both at NCI at Frederick and in Africa. When the Ebola crisis broke out in 2014 in West Africa, staff members from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research responded quickly. Members of the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) were instrumental not only in setting up the clinical trials of the vaccine in Liberia, but also in providing training, community outreach, and recruitment strategies for the trials.

  6. Changes in intracranial pressure associated with chest physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Olson, DaiWai M; Thoyre, Suzanne M; Turner, Dennis A; Bennett, Stacey; Graffagnino, Carmelo

    2007-01-01

    Management of intracranial hypertension is pivotal in the care of brain-injured patients. We report the case of a patient with both a closed head injury and anoxic encephalopathy, who subsequently experienced episodes of refractory intracranial hypertension. The patient's care was complicated by the development of a pneumonia, which required frequent turning of the patient and chest physiotherapy. Conventional wisdom suggests that these interventions may stimulate the patient and worsen intracranial pressure, and therefore should be avoided. Our observations on this patient, however, contradict this belief. This single-subject study presents data to support the use of chest physiotherapy in patients at risk for intracranial hypertension. Further, the evidence is compelling that a randomized-controlled trial is indicated to test the hypothesis that chest physiotherapy may actually result in short-term resolution of high intracranial pressure, and thus provide one more clinical tool in the management of elevated intracranial pressure.

  7. System for definition of the central-chest vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeprasartsit, Pinyo; Higgins, William E.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate definition of the central-chest vasculature from three-dimensional (3D) multi-detector CT (MDCT) images is important for pulmonary applications. For instance, the aorta and pulmonary artery help in automatic definition of the Mountain lymph-node stations for lung-cancer staging. This work presents a system for defining major vascular structures in the central chest. The system provides automatic methods for extracting the aorta and pulmonary artery and semi-automatic methods for extracting the other major central chest arteries/veins, such as the superior vena cava and azygos vein. Automatic aorta and pulmonary artery extraction are performed by model fitting and selection. The system also extracts certain vascular structure information to validate outputs. A semi-automatic method extracts vasculature by finding the medial axes between provided important sites. Results of the system are applied to lymph-node station definition and guidance of bronchoscopic biopsy.

  8. [Chest modelling and automotive accidents].

    PubMed

    Trosseille, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Automobile development is increasingly based on mathematical modeling. Accurate models of the human body are now available and serve to develop new means of protection. These models used to consist of rigid, articulated bodies but are now made of several million finite elements. They are now capable of predicting some risks of injury. To develop these models, sophisticated tests were conducted on human cadavers. For example, chest modeling started with material characterization and led to complete validation in the automobile environment. Model personalization, based on medical imaging, will permit studies of the behavior and tolerances of the entire population.

  9. Flail chest and pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Renata; Calhoon, John H; Baisden, Clinton E

    2008-01-01

    Flail chest is most often accompanied by a significant underlying pulmonary parenchymal injury and can be a life-threatening thoracic injury. Its management is often complicated by the other injuries it is frequently associated with. Similarly, mortality and morbidity are dictated most often by the associated injuries and findings. Its treatment is complex and should first be one of pain management, judicious fluid resuscitation, and excellent pulmonary toilet. In those patients requiring mechanical ventilatory support, or who require ipsilateral thoracocotomy, rib stabilization may be considered depending on a host of potentially conflicting indications and contraindications. At the end of this section are listed the current major recommendations and their levels of evidence.

  10. Chest neoplasms with infectious etiologies.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Chen, Melissa M; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago; Carrillo, Jorge; Restrepo, Catalina

    2011-12-28

    A wide spectrum of thoracic tumors have known or suspected viral etiologies. Oncogenic viruses can be classified by the type of genomic material they contain. Neoplastic conditions found to have viral etiologies include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoid granulomatosis, Kaposi's sarcoma, Castleman's disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, leukemia and lymphomas. Viruses involved in these conditions include Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8, human papillomavirus, Simian virus 40, human immunodeficiency virus, and Human T-lymphotropic virus. Imaging findings, epidemiology and mechanism of transmission for these diseases are reviewed in detail to gain a more thorough appreciation of disease pathophysiology for the chest radiologist.

  11. Sound transmission in the chest under surface excitation - An experimental and computational study with diagnostic applications

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Dai, Zoujun; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Balk, Robert A; Royston, Thomas. J

    2014-01-01

    Chest physical examination often includes performing chest percussion, which involves introducing sound stimulus to the chest wall and detecting an audible change. This approach relies on observations that underlying acoustic transmission, coupling, and resonance patterns can be altered by chest structure changes due to pathologies. More accurate detection and quantification of these acoustic alterations may provide further useful diagnostic information. To elucidate the physical processes involved, a realistic computer model of sound transmission in the chest is helpful. In the present study, a computational model was developed and validated by comparing its predictions with results from animal and human experiments which involved applying acoustic excitation to the anterior chest while detecting skin vibrations at the posterior chest. To investigate the effect of pathology on sound transmission, the computational model was used to simulate the effects of pneumothorax on sounds introduced at the anterior chest and detected at the posterior. Model predictions and experimental results showed similar trends. The model also predicted wave patterns inside the chest, which may be used to assess results of elastography measurements. Future animal and human tests may expand the predictive power of the model to include acoustic behavior for a wider range of pulmonary conditions. PMID:25001497

  12. Sound transmission in the chest under surface excitation: an experimental and computational study with diagnostic applications.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ying; Dai, Zoujun; Mansy, Hansen A; Sandler, Richard H; Balk, Robert A; Royston, Thomas J

    2014-08-01

    Chest physical examination often includes performing chest percussion, which involves introducing sound stimulus to the chest wall and detecting an audible change. This approach relies on observations that underlying acoustic transmission, coupling, and resonance patterns can be altered by chest structure changes due to pathologies. More accurate detection and quantification of these acoustic alterations may provide further useful diagnostic information. To elucidate the physical processes involved, a realistic computer model of sound transmission in the chest is helpful. In the present study, a computational model was developed and validated by comparing its predictions with results from animal and human experiments which involved applying acoustic excitation to the anterior chest, while detecting skin vibrations at the posterior chest. To investigate the effect of pathology on sound transmission, the computational model was used to simulate the effects of pneumothorax on sounds introduced at the anterior chest and detected at the posterior. Model predictions and experimental results showed similar trends. The model also predicted wave patterns inside the chest, which may be used to assess results of elastography measurements. Future animal and human tests may expand the predictive power of the model to include acoustic behavior for a wider range of pulmonary conditions.

  13. Blunt chest trauma: is there a place for rib stabilization?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Rib fractures are a common and highly morbid finding in patients with blunt chest trauma. Over the past decade, a renewed interest in (and instrumentation for) rib fixation in this cohort has occurred. Stabilization of the chest wall in this setting, particularly when a flail segment is present, is associated with significant reductions in the rates of respiratory failure, pneumonia, ICU stay, and mortality. Thoracic surgeons should remain actively involved in this evolving area of our specialty to further optimize patient outcomes. PMID:28446987

  14. Unilateral hypertransparency on chest radiograph: the congenital Poland Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tomos, Ioannis; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Vlami, Aikaterini; Apollonatou, Vasiliki; Manali, Effrosyni D; Papiris, Spyros A

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral hypertransparent hemithorax requires a particular diagnostic approach as it can be the result of diverse pulmonary diseases, including pneumothorax, large pulmonary embolus, unilateral large bullae, mucous plag, airway obstruction and contralateral pleural effusion. Congenital syndromes with chest wall abnormalities, are rare, but often underdiagnosed causes. Poland Syndrome consists of such a rare, congenital anomaly and is characterized by the absence of the pectoralis major muscle and upper limb ipsilateral abnormalities. We present a case of a patient with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and a unilateral hypertransparency on chest radiology, attributed to the underlying Poland Syndrome.

  15. Partial tearing of the interventricular septum after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    López-Ruiz, Nilson; Ramírez Gil, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac trauma after blunt chest trauma is a rare complication of patients arriving alive to an emergency department. We here present the case of patient who had a partial rupture of the interventricular septum after having had a blunt chest trauma in a traffic accident. As there was no ventricular septal defect, conservative management was deemed appropriate. At 3-year follow-up, the patient was free of right heart failure symptoms suggestive of the septal defect progression. Copyright © 2015 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Improvised chest tube drain for decompression of an acute tension pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Vinson, Eric D

    2004-05-01

    A case of a woman presenting with an acute tension pneumothorax during a Navy humanitarian mission in East Timor is presented. The patient was treated at a local rural clinic run by our medical team. Prompt insertion of a chest tube saved the woman's life; however, there were no chest tube drains available. A field chest tube drain constructed out of an IV bag, a sterile water bottle, and tubing provided an adequate underwater seal and drain. Because of the remote location and limited resources, standard prehospital chest tube management had to be modified. A brief review of simple and tension pneumothoraces and management along with a description of the field chest tube drain is presented.

  17. Hydatid disease of the chest

    PubMed Central

    Xanthakis, D.; Efthimiadis, M.; Papadakis, G.; Primikirios, N.; Chassapakis, G.; Roussaki, A.; Veranis, N.; Akrivakis, A.; Aligizakis, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Ninety-one cases of hydatid disease of the chest are reported. Eighty-eight were involving the lung, two the chest wall, and one the mediastinum. All the patients were treated surgically. Conservative operations (simple removal of the parasite and closure of the remaining cavity) were performed in 78 patients, 37 unruptured and 41 ruptured cysts. Late postoperative complications occurred in eleven. In 10 patients, recurrent haemoptysis was the main symptom due to residual cavity in four, bronchiectatic changes in two, and unknown aetiology in four. In one patient, recurrence of multiple cysts occurred in the affected lobe. Radical operations were carried out in 10 patients, including segmental resection in four and lobectomy in six. Conservative operations were performed in all cases of unruptured cysts, with the exception of a giant cyst in which resection was the operation of choice. For ruptured cysts with mild infection conservative operation was also performed. Resection was necessary only in patients with ruptured cysts with suppuration, bronchiectatic changes, and giant cysts replacing a whole lobe. There was no mortality. We believe that conservative operation is the treatment of choice for hydatid disease of the lung. Indications for resection are very limited. Images

  18. Relevant surgical anatomy of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Babu V; Rajesh, Pala B

    2010-11-01

    The chest wall, like other regional anatomy, is a remarkable fusion of form and function. Principal functions are the protection of internal viscera and an expandable cylinder facilitating variable gas flow into the lungs. Knowledge of the anatomy of the whole cylinder (ribs, sternum, vertebra, diaphragm, intercostal spaces, and extrathoracic muscles) is therefore not only important in the local environment of a specific chest wall resection but also in its relation to overall function. An understanding of chest wall kinematics might help define the loss of function after resection and the effects of various chest wall substitutes. Therefore, this article is not an exhaustive anatomic description but a focused summary and discussion.

  19. Picture quiz: a case of sudden severe chest pain.

    PubMed

    Rabia, Mustafa Abu; Sullivan, P; Stivaros, Stavros M

    2007-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with no previous medical history presented to hospital with sudden onset of acute epigastric pain radiating to the anterior chest wall and both shoulders. There was no history of recent trauma and he had not been vomiting.

  20. Galactorrhea and hyperprolactinemia associated with chest wall injury.

    PubMed

    Morley, J E; Dawson, M; Hodgkinson, H; Kalk, W J

    1977-11-01

    A 48 year old premenopausal woman presented with galactorrhea and amenorrhea associated with chest wall burns. Basal serum prolactin levels were raised, and were further elevated by the administration of L-dopa, chlorpromazine and TRH. Intercostal nerve block and bromocryptine treatment reduced prolactin levels to normal, but did not noticably reduce milk secretion.

  1. Chest Fat Quantification via CT Based on Standardized Anatomy Space in Adult Lung Transplant Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.; Odhner, Dewey; Wu, Caiyun; Pednekar, Gargi; Palmer, Scott; Rozenshtein, Anna; Shirk, Melissa A.; Newell, John D.; Porteous, Mary; Diamond, Joshua M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Overweight and underweight conditions are considered relative contraindications to lung transplantation due to their association with excess mortality. Yet, recent work suggests that body mass index (BMI) does not accurately reflect adipose tissue mass in adults with advanced lung diseases. Alternative and more accurate measures of adiposity are needed. Chest fat estimation by routine computed tomography (CT) imaging may therefore be important for identifying high-risk lung transplant candidates. In this paper, an approach to chest fat quantification and quality assessment based on a recently formulated concept of standardized anatomic space (SAS) is presented. The goal of the paper is to seek answers to several key questions related to chest fat quantity and quality assessment based on a single slice CT (whether in the chest, abdomen, or thigh) versus a volumetric CT, which have not been addressed in the literature. Methods Unenhanced chest CT image data sets from 40 adult lung transplant candidates (age 58 ± 12 yrs and BMI 26.4 ± 4.3 kg/m2), 16 with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 16 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and the remainder with other conditions were analyzed together with a single slice acquired for each patient at the L5 vertebral level and mid-thigh level. The thoracic body region and the interface between subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in the chest were consistently defined in all patients and delineated using Live Wire tools. The SAT and VAT components of chest were then segmented guided by this interface. The SAS approach was used to identify the corresponding anatomic slices in each chest CT study, and SAT and VAT areas in each slice as well as their whole volumes were quantified. Similarly, the SAT and VAT components were segmented in the abdomen and thigh slices. Key parameters of the attenuation (Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions) were determined from each chest slice and

  2. 24 CFR 110.30 - Effect of failure to display poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Effect of failure to display poster... FAIR HOUSING FAIR HOUSING POSTER Enforcement § 110.30 Effect of failure to display poster. Any person... Secretary pursuant to part 105 of this chapter. A failure to display the fair housing poster as required...

  3. 24 CFR 110.30 - Effect of failure to display poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Effect of failure to display poster... FAIR HOUSING FAIR HOUSING POSTER Enforcement § 110.30 Effect of failure to display poster. Any person... Secretary pursuant to part 105 of this chapter. A failure to display the fair housing poster as required...

  4. 24 CFR 110.30 - Effect of failure to display poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effect of failure to display poster... FAIR HOUSING FAIR HOUSING POSTER Enforcement § 110.30 Effect of failure to display poster. Any person... Secretary pursuant to part 105 of this chapter. A failure to display the fair housing poster as required...

  5. 24 CFR 110.30 - Effect of failure to display poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Effect of failure to display poster... FAIR HOUSING FAIR HOUSING POSTER Enforcement § 110.30 Effect of failure to display poster. Any person... Secretary pursuant to part 105 of this chapter. A failure to display the fair housing poster as required...

  6. 24 CFR 110.30 - Effect of failure to display poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Effect of failure to display poster... FAIR HOUSING FAIR HOUSING POSTER Enforcement § 110.30 Effect of failure to display poster. Any person... Secretary pursuant to part 105 of this chapter. A failure to display the fair housing poster as required...

  7. Correlations between quality indexes of chest compression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng-ling; Yan, Li; Huang, Su-fang; Bai, Xiang-jun

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a kind of emergency treatment for cardiopulmonary arrest, and chest compression is the most important and necessary part of CPR. The American Heart Association published the new Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care in 2010 and demanded for better performance of chest compression practice, especially in compression depth and rate. The current study was to explore the relationship of quality indexes of chest compression and to identify the key points in chest compression training and practice. METHODS: Totally 219 healthcare workers accepted chest compression training by using Laerdal ACLS advanced life support resuscitation model. The quality indexes of chest compression, including compression hands placement, compression rate, compression depth, and chest wall recoil as well as self-reported fatigue time were monitored by the Laerdal Computer Skills and Reporting System. RESULTS: The quality of chest compression was related to the gender of the compressor. The indexes in males, including self-reported fatigue time, the accuracy of compression depth and the compression rate, the accuracy of compression rate, were higher than those in females. However, the accuracy of chest recoil was higher in females than in males. The quality indexes of chest compression were correlated with each other. The self-reported fatigue time was related to all the indexes except the compression rate. CONCLUSION: It is necessary to offer CPR training courses regularly. In clinical practice, it might be better to change the practitioner before fatigue, especially for females or weak practitioners. In training projects, more attention should be paid to the control of compression rate, in order to delay the fatigue, guarantee enough compression depth and improve the quality of chest compression. PMID:25215093

  8. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Smith, H Garth; Sargent, Larry A; Lundgrin, Daryl B

    2006-01-27

    Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma is a rare disease that usually presents with indurated yellow red nodules or plaques in the dermis or subdermal tissues. The pathogenesis of this disease is unknown and the limited number of cases has made long-term studies difficult. We report the case of a 61-year-old woman seen in our office for a 5 x 5-cm lesion of her chest wall. Biopsies established a diagnosis of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. The patient received 4 months of intralesional steroid injections without change in the lesion. The patient was also treated with colchicine for several months without improvement. Therefore, the lesion was surgically excised and the area was reconstructed with local advancement skin flaps. The patient has been followed for 2 years with no evidence of recurrence.

  9. Relevance of an incidental chest finding

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Télles, Arturo; Mendoza, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodule represents 0.2% of incidental findings in routine chest X-ray images. One of the main diagnoses includes lung cancer in which small-cell subtype has a poor survival rate. Recently, a new classification has been proposed including the very limited disease stage (VLD stage) or T1-T2N0M0 with better survival rate, specifically in those patients who are treated with surgery. However, current recommendations postulate that surgery remains controversial as a first-line treatment in this stage. We present the case of a 46-year-old female referred to our hospital with a preoperative diagnosis of a solitary pulmonary nodule. On initial approach, a biopsy revealed a small cell lung cancer. She received multimodal therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, and prophylactic cranial irradiation and is currently alive without recurrence on a 2-year follow-up. PMID:22345914

  10. 12 CFR 528.5 - Equal Housing Lender Poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... It is recommended that savings associations post a Spanish language version of the poster in offices serving areas with a substantial Spanish-speaking population. (b) The text of the Equal Housing Lender...

  11. 12 CFR 390.146 - Equal Housing Lender Poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... It is recommended that savings associations post a Spanish language version of the poster in offices serving areas with a substantial Spanish-speaking population. (b) The text of the Equal Housing Lender...

  12. 12 CFR 528.5 - Equal Housing Lender Poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... It is recommended that savings associations post a Spanish language version of the poster in offices serving areas with a substantial Spanish-speaking population. (b) The text of the Equal Housing Lender...

  13. The Future of Radiation Protection: Handbook and Companion Poster

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Future of Radiation Protection: 2025 is a report on challenges the radiation protection community will confront over the generation ahead. The companion poster is also available, Radiation Protection at EPA: Over the Decades.

  14. Understanding Enzyme Activity Using Single Molecule Tracking (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.-S.; Zeng, Y.; Luo, Y.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M.; Smith S.; Wei, H.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-06-01

    This poster describes single-molecule tracking and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. It discusses whether the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) moves on cellulose, how the CBM binds to cellulose, and the mechanism of cellulosome assembly.

  15. Wind Power Across Native America: Opportunities, Challenges, and Status (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, A.; Gough, R.; Flowers, L.; Taylor, R.

    2009-05-01

    Wind projects on tribal lands are differennt, and this poster outlines the ways in which these projects differ, a summary of existing and pending Native American Wind Projects (50 kW and larger), and tribal wind opportunities and issues.

  16. Chest neoplasms with infectious etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Chen, Melissa M; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago; Carrillo, Jorge; Restrepo, Catalina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of thoracic tumors have known or suspected viral etiologies. Oncogenic viruses can be classified by the type of genomic material they contain. Neoplastic conditions found to have viral etiologies include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoid granulomatosis, Kaposi’s sarcoma, Castleman’s disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, leukemia and lymphomas. Viruses involved in these conditions include Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8, human papillomavirus, Simian virus 40, human immunodeficiency virus, and Human T-lymphotropic virus. Imaging findings, epidemiology and mechanism of transmission for these diseases are reviewed in detail to gain a more thorough appreciation of disease pathophysiology for the chest radiologist. PMID:22224176

  17. List of Posters for Focus Meeting 20: Astronomy for Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuti, Piero

    2016-10-01

    The following table contains a list of all posters and first authors that were registered to a participant during the the IAU General Assembly under Focus Meeting 20: Astronomy for Development. Due to the limited amount of time allocated for talks at the Focus Meeting, several Oral proposals had to be converted to Posters. We hope this table will be useful to illustrate the diversity of contributions to the Focus Meeting

  18. Photocopy of photograph. Photographer unknown. Poster from the World War ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph. Photographer unknown. Poster from the World War II period. During drives to encourage purchase of war bonds, posters featuring female shipyard workers were widely distributed purchasers were allowed one vote for each bond bought. Votes were cast and the woman who got the most votes was named "War Bond Girl." The contest was won by Kay McGinty, 4th row, 2nd column. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. Coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Fahad; Tai, Javed Majid; Bokhari, Saira

    2014-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma may result in cardiac injuries ranging from simple arrhythmias to fatal cardiac rupture. Coronary artery dissection culminating in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is rare after blunt chest trauma. Here we report a case of a 37-year-old man who had an AMI secondary to coronary dissection resulting from blunt chest trauma after involvement in a physical fight. PMID:25246456

  20. Automatic image hanging protocol for chest radiographs in PACS.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hui; Hao, Wei; Foos, David H; Cornelius, Craig W

    2006-04-01

    Chest radiography is one of the most widely used techniques in diagnostic imaging. It comprises at least one-third of all diagnostic radiographic procedures in hospitals. However, in the picture archive and communication system, images are often stored with the projection and orientation unknown or mislabeled, which causes inefficiency for radiologists' interpretation. To address this problem, an automatic hanging protocol for chest radiographs is presented. The method targets the most effective region in a chest radiograph, and extracts a set of size-, rotation-, and translation-invariant features from it. Then, a well-trained classifier is used to recognize the projection. The orientation of the radiograph is later identified by locating the neck, heart, and abdomen positions in the radiographs. Initial experiments are performed on the radiographs collected from daily routine chest exams in hospitals and show promising results. Using the presented protocol, 98.2% of all cases could be hung correctly on projection view (without protocol, 62%), and 96.1% had correct orientation (without protocol, 75%). A workflow study on the protocol also demonstrates a significant improvement in efficiency for image display.