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Sample records for posterior epidural mass

  1. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram B; Aswani, Yashant

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication. PMID:27857455

  2. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Gala, Foram B; Aswani, Yashant

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication.

  3. Roseomonas spinal epidural abscess complicating instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Bantouna, Vasiliki; Lianoudakis, Efstratios; Stavrakakis, Ioannis; Scoulica, Efstathia

    2013-07-01

    The first case of a spinal epidural abscess caused by Roseomonas mucosa following instrumented posterior lumbar fusion is presented. Although rare, because of its highly resistant profile, Roseomonas species should be included in the differential diagnosis of epidural abscesses in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts.

  4. Epidural catheter anchored in the posterior lateral epidural space: How to manage it.

    PubMed

    Costa, C; Fonseca, S; Guedes, L; Leão, A; Sousa, A

    2017-07-27

    We describe a case of an epidural catheter entrapment without knotting, kinking, shearing or breakage confirmed by CT scan and how to manage it. A patient was admitted for tibial fracture repair under general anesthesia with an epidural. At discharge day, multiple attempts to retrieve the catheter were made. Contrast CT scan showed the catheter anchored in the left posterior-lateral epidural space. Despite the absence of guidelines regarding epidural catheter entrapment, all the methods described in the literature were used. This is a rare complication and it may be associated with neurological and infectious complications. Radiologic imaging should be obtained to better characterize the catheters' position and plan removal. In this case, tension in the paraspinal muscles or in the supraspinous and intraspinous ligaments could explain the entrapment. General anesthesia with the non-depolarising muscle relaxant allowed muscles and ligaments to relax and we were able to retrieve the catheter intact. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Posterior Epidural Migration of Sequestrated Cervical Disc Fragment: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gopalan Senthil; Mahesha, Kanthila Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study was undertaken to delineate the characteristics of non-traumatic sequestrated epidurally migrated cervical disc prolapse. Purpose To present first case series of eight such cases diagnosed preoperatively and to discuss their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and their management. Overview of Literature Non-traumatic spontaneous migration of the sequestrated disc fragment epidurally behind cervical vertebral body is rare. Only ten cases have been reported in literature. Methods Detailed clinico-radiological profiles of these 8 cases are presented. In six cases their clinical picture was suggestive of cervical myelopathy. MRI scan showed single level epidural migrated disc behind body of C4, C6, and C7 in six patients and two cases with multiple levels (C5-C6). In six cases, anterior corpectomy with excision of the disc was performed and the seventh patient underwent dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient chose not to undergo surgery. Results T1 images of the MRI scan showed an isointense signal in all the 8 cases. T2 images revealed a varying intensity. In six cases who underwent anterior corpectomy, there was a rent in the posterior longitudinal ligament. Among those in two cases multiple disc fragments were seen. In the rest four cases, a single large fragment was observed. These patients improved after anterior corpectomy and disc excision. There was no improvement in the patient who had undergone dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient who refused surgery progressively deteriorated. Conclusions We opine that MRI scan especially T1 images are useful in these cases. We prefer to treat these cases through anterior corpectomy with excision of the sequestrated disc which proved to result in excellent outcome. PMID:22164316

  6. Posterior epidural migration of sequestrated cervical disc fragment: case series.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Uddanapalli Sreeramulu; Kumar, Gopalan Senthil; Mahesha, Kanthila Bhat

    2011-12-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to delineate the characteristics of non-traumatic sequestrated epidurally migrated cervical disc prolapse. To present first case series of eight such cases diagnosed preoperatively and to discuss their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and their management. Non-traumatic spontaneous migration of the sequestrated disc fragment epidurally behind cervical vertebral body is rare. Only ten cases have been reported in literature. Detailed clinico-radiological profiles of these 8 cases are presented. In six cases their clinical picture was suggestive of cervical myelopathy. MRI scan showed single level epidural migrated disc behind body of C4, C6, and C7 in six patients and two cases with multiple levels (C5-C6). In six cases, anterior corpectomy with excision of the disc was performed and the seventh patient underwent dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient chose not to undergo surgery. T1 images of the MRI scan showed an isointense signal in all the 8 cases. T2 images revealed a varying intensity. In six cases who underwent anterior corpectomy, there was a rent in the posterior longitudinal ligament. Among those in two cases multiple disc fragments were seen. In the rest four cases, a single large fragment was observed. These patients improved after anterior corpectomy and disc excision. There was no improvement in the patient who had undergone dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient who refused surgery progressively deteriorated. We opine that MRI scan especially T1 images are useful in these cases. We prefer to treat these cases through anterior corpectomy with excision of the sequestrated disc which proved to result in excellent outcome.

  7. Posterior epidural migration of a sequestrated lumbar disk fragment: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Chuang, Y L; Yao, M S; Chiu, W T; Chen, C L; Chan, W P

    2006-08-01

    We present a 75-year-old man who, for 2 weeks, had progressive pain in both of his thighs when standing straight. MR imaging showed a sequestrated disk fragment, which had a signal intensity similar to that of a herniated disk with a rim enhancement in the posterior epidural space and a ruptured outermost annulus of the intervertebral disk at L2-3. Awareness of these MR imaging findings can help in the diagnosis of posterior epidural disk migration.

  8. Horner's Syndrome Secondary to Epidural Anaesthesia Following Posterior Instrumented Scoliosis Correction.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Simon; Gunn, Lucinda; Madhavan, Pradeep

    2015-02-01

    An 11-year-old girl underwent T4 to L1 posterior instrumented scoliosis correction for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Postoperative clinical examination revealed left-sided Horner's syndrome which was preceded by left-sided C8 paraesthesia. The Horner's syndrome resolved after 14 hours following weaning and removal of the epidural catheter. Horner's syndrome following posterior instrumented scoliosis correction associated to epidural use is extremely rare. Surgeons must be aware of the risks of epidural placement and the need for close monitoring of associated complications. Alternative aetiology producing a Horner's syndrome must always be considered because of its devastating long term sequela if missed.

  9. Horner's Syndrome Secondary to Epidural Anaesthesia Following Posterior Instrumented Scoliosis Correction

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Lucinda; Madhavan, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    An 11-year-old girl underwent T4 to L1 posterior instrumented scoliosis correction for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Postoperative clinical examination revealed left-sided Horner's syndrome which was preceded by left-sided C8 paraesthesia. The Horner's syndrome resolved after 14 hours following weaning and removal of the epidural catheter. Horner's syndrome following posterior instrumented scoliosis correction associated to epidural use is extremely rare. Surgeons must be aware of the risks of epidural placement and the need for close monitoring of associated complications. Alternative aetiology producing a Horner's syndrome must always be considered because of its devastating long term sequela if missed. PMID:25705345

  10. Is epidural analgesia a risk factor for occiput posterior or transverse positions during labour?

    PubMed

    Le Ray, Camille; Carayol, Marion; Jaquemin, Sébastien; Mignon, Alexandre; Cabrol, Dominique; Goffinet, François

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the station of the fetal head at epidural placement is associated with the risk of malposition during labour. Retrospective study (covering a 3-month period) of patients in labour with singleton cephalic term fetuses and epidural placement before 5 cm of dilatation. We studied the following risk factors for malposition: station and cervical dilatation at epidural placement, induction of labour, parity and macrosomia. Malposition, defined as all occiput posterior and occiput transverse positions, was assessed at 5 cm of dilatation because of our policy of systematic manual rotation for malpositions. The study included 398 patients, 200 of whom had malpositions diagnosed at 5 cm of dilatation. In both the univariate and multivariate analyses, station at epidural placement was the only risk factor significantly associated with this malposition (adjusted OR: 2.49, 95% CI 1.47-4.24). None of the other factors studied was significantly associated with malposition: nulliparity (OR 1.45, 95% CI 0.96-2.20), macrosomia (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.37-1.50), induction of labour (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.49-1.45), or dilatation less than 3 cm at epidural administration (OR 1.16, 95% CI 0.59-2.30). Only three infants of the 365 delivered vaginally (0.8%) were born in occiput posterior positions. Epidural placement when the fetal head is still "high" is associated with an increased rate of occiput posterior and transverse malpositions during labour.

  11. Trephination mini-craniectomy for traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematomas in selected pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Han-Song; You, Chao-Guo; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Nu; Lin, Jian; Lin, Fen-Chun; Wang, Mao-De

    2017-08-01

    Posterior fossa epidural hematomas (PFEDH) are uncommon in children but usually require timely surgical intervention due to the risk of life-threatening brainstem compression. We attempt to make the surgical procedure less invasive by treating selected pediatric patients with trephination mini-craniectomy. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical courses, radiological findings, surgical procedures, and prognoses of the pediatric patients who were treated in our departments for traumatic PFEDH from January 2010 to January 2015. During this period, a total of 17 patients were surgically treated for PFEDH and 7 were managed with trephination mini-craniectomy for hematoma evacuation. The outcomes were good in all 7 patients as evaluated with Glasgow Outcome Score. There was no mortality in this series. The on average 30-month clinical follow-up showed that patients experienced satisfactory recoveries without complications. Our results suggest that trephination mini-craniectomy is a safe surgical technique for selected PFEDH patients with moderate hematoma volume and stabilized neurological functions. However, standard craniectomy is recommend when there are rapid deteriorations in patients' neurological functions or the hematomas are large and exerted severe mass effects. Copyright © 2017 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute posterior fossa epidural hematoma in a newborn infant with Menkes disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Horikawa, Masahiro; Wakamatsu, Hajime; Hashimoto, Jyunya; Nawashiro, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) in newborn infants is rare compared with other types of intracranial hemorrhages. Furthermore, posterior fossa EDH is extremely rare. We present a case of posterior fossa EDH in an infant with Menkes disease with accessory bones in the occiput. A male infant with a condition diagnosed with Menkes disease by prenatal testing was born at 39 weeks via vacuum extraction. The patient presented with a mild tremor at 2 days after delivery. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan showed an acute EDH in the posterior fossa, extending into the occipitoparietal area. Three-dimensional CT and bone window CT scan revealed several accessory bones, diastasis of 1 accessory suture, a communicated fracture, and a linear fracture in the occipital bone. Furthermore, a bone fragment from a communicated fracture displaced toward the inside. The patient was treated conservatively for EDH because of his good general condition. The hematoma gradually resolved, and his tremor did not recur. We suggest the following mechanism of posterior fossa EDH development in our patient: (1) external force was applied to the occiput inside the birth canal during delivery, resulting in diastasis; (2) a communicated fracture occurred, and a bone fragment displaced toward the inside (linear fracture was caused indirectly by the force); (3) a transverse sinus was injured by the fragment; and (4) EDH developed in both the posterior fossa and supratentorial region. Copper deficiency can also cause fragility of connective tissues, vessels, and bones.

  13. Postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis and posterior spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Florian; Mutlak, Haitham; Tizi, Karima; Senft, Christian; Setzer, Matthias; Seifert, Volker; Weise, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The value of postoperative epidural analgesia after major spinal surgery is well established. Thus far, the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been denied to patients undergoing debridement and instrumentation in spondylodiscitis, with the risk of increased postoperative pain resulting in prolonged recovery. The value of PCEA with special regard to infectious complications remains to be clarified. The present study examined the value of postoperative PCEA in comparison with intravenous analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis undergoing posterior spinal surgery. METHODS Thirty-two patients treated surgically for spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine were prospectively included in a database and retrospectively reviewed for this study. Postoperative antibiotic treatment, functional capacity, pain levels, side effects, and complications were documented. Sixteen patients were given patient-demanded intravenous analgesia (PIA) followed by 16 patients assigned to PCEA. If PCEA was applied, the insertion of an epidural catheter was performed under the direct visual guidance of the surgeon at the end of the surgery. RESULTS Three patients intended for PCEA treatment were excluded due to predefined exclusion criteria. Postoperative pain was significantly lower in the PCEA group during the first 48 hours after surgery (p = 0.03). As determined by the trunk control test conducted at 8 (p < 0.001), 24 (p = 0.004), 48 (p = 0.015), 72 (p = 0.0031), and 96 hours (p < 0.001), patients in the PCEA treatment group displayed significantly increased mobilization capacity compared with those of the PIA group. Time until normal accomplishment of all mobilization maneuvers was reduced in the PCEA group compared with that in the PIA group (p = 0.04). No differences in complication rates were observed between the 2 groups (p = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS PCEA may reduce postoperative pain and lead to earlier achievement of functional capacity at a low

  14. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Tsuyoki; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Shoji, Shintaro; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Gen; Imura, Takayuki; Minehara, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Terumasa; Kawamura, Tadashi; Namba, Takanori; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case. PMID:26989542

  15. Acute spinal epidural hematoma and cranial interdural hematoma due to a rupture of a posterior communicating artery aneurysm: case report.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Andrea; Kotowski, Marc; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Schaller, Karl

    2011-10-01

    We describe an unusual presentation of a ruptured aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery with an acute intracranial hematoma between the dural layers associated with an acute spinal epidural hematoma descending to L1. A 35-year-old woman presented 3 hours after ictus with a postcoital headache, neck stiffness, and bilateral abducens cranial nerve palsy. No other neurological deficits were present. Clinically, she had a subarachnoid hemorrhage World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade 1. CT scan demonstrates an acute subdural hematoma, extending from the right parasellar region, around the clivus, tentorium, and falx. Angio-CT showed a posterior communicating artery aneurysm and an anterior communicating artery aneurysm and an extension of the hematoma to the cervical spine. This justified a spinal and cerebral MRI that confirmed an extension of the hematoma to the epidural space at the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar levels. Three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography confirmed aneurysms on the right posterior communicating artery and on the anterior communicating artery. Both aneurysms were completely occluded by coiling. With reference to the concept of the cranial subdural compartment described in studies conducted using an electron microscope, this group of hematomas was classified as interdural. Ruptured aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery may cause cranial acute interdural hematoma with a typical subarachnoid hemorrhage clinical presentation, and it rarely can extend to spinal epidural space.

  16. Posterior Intercostal Nerve Block With Liposomal Bupivacaine: An Alternative to Thoracic Epidural Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Rice, David C; Cata, Juan P; Mena, Gabriel E; Rodriguez-Restrepo, Andrea; Correa, Arlene M; Mehran, Reza J

    2015-06-01

    Pain relief using regional neuroaxial blockade is standard care for patients undergoing major thoracic surgery. Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) provides effective postoperative analgesia but has unwanted side effects, including hypotension, urinary retention, nausea, and vomiting, and is highly operator dependent. Single-shot intercostal nerve and paravertebral blockade have not been widely used because of the short duration of action of most local anesthetics; however, the recent availability of liposomal bupivacaine (LipoB) offers the potential to provide prolonged blockade of intercostal nerves (72 to 96 hours). We hypothesized that a five-level unilateral posterior intercostal nerve block using LipoB would provide effective analgesia for patients undergoing thoracic surgery. We identified patients who underwent lung resection using intraoperative LipoB posterior intercostal nerve blockade and retrospectively compared them with a group of patients who had TEA and who were matched for age, sex, type of surgery, and surgical approach. We analyzed perioperative morbidity, pain scores and narcotic requirements. There were 54 patients in each group. Mean hospital stay was 3.5 days and 4.5 days (p = 0.004) for LipoB group and TEA group, respectively. There were no significant differences in perioperative complications, postoperative pain scores, or in narcotic utilization between LipoB group and TEA group. No acute toxicity related to LipoB was observed. Posterior intercostal nerve blockade using LipoB is safe and provides effective analgesia for patients undergoing thoracic surgery. It may be considered as a suitable alternative to TEA. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Comparison of the Effect of Epidural Patient-Controlled Analgesia with Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia on Pain Control after Posterior Lumbar Instrumented Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Cheong, Seong-Mee; Kim, Sumi; Kooh, Mirang

    2011-01-01

    Objective Retrospective analysis to compare the effect and complication of epidural patient-controlled analgesia (epidural PCA) with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) for the treatment of the post-operative pain after posterior lumbar instrumented fusion. Methods Sixty patients who underwent posterior lumbar instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disease at our institution from September 2007 to January 2008 were enrolled in this study. Out of sixty patients, thirty patients received IV PCA group and thirty patients received epidural PCA group. The pain scale was measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS) score. Results There were no significant difference between IV PCA group and epidural PCA group on the PCA related complications (p=0.7168). Ten patients in IV PCA group and six patients in epidural PCA group showed PCA related complications. Also, there were no significant differences in reduction of VAS score between two groups on postoperative 2 hours (p=0.9618) and 6 hours (p=0.0744). However, postoperative 12 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours showed the significant differences as mean of reduction of VAS score (p=0.0069, 0.0165, 0.0058 respectively). Conclusion The epidural PCA is more effective method to control the post-operative pain than IV PCA after 12 hours of spinal fusion operation. However, during the first twelve hours after operation, there were no differences between IV PCA and epidural PCA. PMID:22102950

  18. Posterior paramedian subrhomboidal analgesia versus thoracic epidural analgesia for pain control in patients with multiple rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Casey L; Berry, Stepheny; Howard, James; De Ruyter, Martin; Thepthepha, Melissa; Nazir, Niaman; McDonald, Tracy; Dalton, Annemarie; Moncure, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Rib fractures are common in trauma admissions and are associated with an increased risk of pulmonary complications, intensive care unit admissions, and mortality. Providing adequate pain control in patients with multiple rib fractures decreases the risk of adverse events. Thoracic epidural analgesia is currently the preferred method for pain control. This study compared outcomes in patients with multiple acute rib fractures treated with posterior paramedian subrhomboidal (PoPS) analgesia versus thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). This prospective study included 30 patients with three or more acute rib fractures admitted to a Level I trauma center. Thoracic epidural analgesia or PoPS catheters were placed, and local anesthesia was infused. Data were collected including patients' pain level, adjunct morphine equivalent use, adverse events, length of stay, lung volumes, and discharge disposition. Nonparametric tests were used and two-sided p < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Nineteen (63%) of 30 patients received TEA and 11 (37%) of 30 patients received PoPS. Pain rating was lower in the PoPS group (2.5 vs. 5; p = 0.03) after initial placement. Overall, there was no other statistically significant difference in pain control or use of oral morphine adjuncts between the groups. Hypotension occurred in eight patients, 75% with TEA and only 25% with PoPS. No difference was found in adverse events, length of stay, lung volumes, or discharge disposition. In patients with rib fractures, PoPS analgesia may provide pain control equivalent to TEA while being less invasive and more readily placed by a variety of hospital staff. This pilot study is limited by its small sample size, and therefore additional studies are needed to prove equivalence of PoPS compared to TEA. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  19. Rare Posterior Pharyngeal Mass: Atypical Marginal Zone Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Eliçora, Sultan Şevik; Güven, Mehmet; Varli, Ali F; Yilmaz, Mahmut S; Alponat, Selin

    2016-03-01

    Cases of posterior pharyngeal masses are quite rare, and are typically derived from schwannoma or encephalocele, or are of vascular or infectious origin. They are clinically significant due to their tendency to cause airway obstruction. The aim of this study was to present a rare atypical marginal hyperplasia case of a posterior pharyngeal wall mass. A 10-year-old male was admitted to our clinic with dyspnea. A plane-surfaced 4 × 3 × 3 cm mass was observed on the posterior pharyngeal wall upon physical examination. The patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging and surgical treatment. Following excision of material from the patient's mass, a pathologic diagnosis of atypical marginal zone hyperplasia was made. Atypical marginal zone hyperplasia of the posterior pharyngeal wall has not yet been reported in the literature. Marginal zone hyperplasia associated with a lymphoproliferative disease should be considered when making differential diagnoses of posterior pharyngeal wall masses.

  20. Intrathecal Morphine Versus Extended-Release Epidural Morphine for Postoperative Pain Control in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Posterior Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mindy; Zuk, Jeannie; McKay, Nancy; Erickson, Mark; Pan, Zhaoxing; Galinkin, Jeffrey

    2017-06-01

    Posterior spinal fusion for scoliosis is one of the most painful elective pediatric surgeries. Good postoperative pain control allows early ambulation and return of ability to tolerate oral intake. Options for analgesia in this patient population are suboptimal. We hypothesized that extended-release epidural morphine (EREM) would provide better pain control and less adverse effects compared to intrathecal (IT) morphine. The primary outcome was total IV morphine consumption during 0-48 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes included time until first patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) demand, pain scores, and adverse opioid effects. After institutional review board approval, 71 subjects undergoing posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis completed the study. The subjects were randomly allocated to 7.5 μg/kg IT morphine or 150 μg/kg EREM. The final IT morphine and EREM groups contained 37 and 34 subjects, respectively. Postoperative pain was treated with morphine PCA, ketorolac, oral oxycodone, and acetaminophen. Morphine consumption, pain scores, nausea and vomiting, pruritus, and respiratory depression were measured every 4 hours. Parents completed a caregiver questionnaire about their child's pain control regimen after the first postoperative day. There was no difference in total morphine consumption over the first 48 hours between subjects in the EREM and IT morphine groups: median (range) 42.2 (5.5-123.0) and 34.0 (4.5-128.8) mg, respectively (P = .27). EREM and IT morphine groups had no difference in time until first PCA demand. Pain scores were no different between the groups from 8 to 24 hours after surgery. Compared to IT morphine, EREM subjects had lower pain scores from 28 to 36 hours after surgery. The reported incidence of pruritus was lower in the EREM subjects. There was no difference in total morphine consumption or time until first PCA demand between the EREM and IT morphine groups. EREM provides a longer duration of analgesia after

  1. Multiple epidural steroid injections and body mass index linked with occurrence of epidural lipomatosis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural lipomatosis (EL) is an increase of adipose tissue, normally occurring in the epidural space, sufficient to distort the thecal sac and compress neural elements. There is a lack of knowledge of risk factors, impact on patient’s symptoms, and its possible association with epidural steroid injections. Methods History, physical examination, patient chart, and MRI were analyzed from 856 outpatients referred for epidural steroid injections. Seventy patients with signs of EL on MRI comprised the study group. Thirty-four randomly selected patients comprised the control group. The severity of EL was determined by the MRI assessment. The impact of EL was determined by the patient’s history and physical examination. Logistic regression was used to correlate the probability of developing EL with BMI and epidural steroid injections. Results EL was centered at L5 and S1 segments. The average BMI for patients with EL was significantly greater than that of control group (36.0 ± 0.9 vs. 29.2 ± 0.9, p <0.01). The probability of developing EL with increasing BMI was linear up to the BMI of 35 after which it plateaued. Triglycerides were significantly higher for the EL group as compared to controls (250 ± 30 vs. 186 ± 21 mg/dL p < 0.01). The odds of having EL were 60% after two epidural steroid injections, 90% after three epidural steroid injections and approached 100% with further injections, independent of BMI. Other risk factors considered included alcohol abuse, use of protease inhibitors, levels of stress, hypothyroidism and genetic predisposition. However there were insufficient quantities to determine statistical significance with a degree of confidence. The impact of EL on patient’s symptoms correlated with EL severity with Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.73 at p < 0.01 significance level. Conclusions The BMI and triglycerides levels were found to be significantly elevated for the EL group, pointing to an increased

  2. Posterior left atrial wall hematoma mimicking cystic intracavitary atrial mass.

    PubMed

    Bahnacy, Yasser; Suresh, Cheriyil; Dawoud, Hamed; Zubaid, Mohammad

    2010-10-01

    Atrial myxoma is the most common benign primary tumor of the heart most commonly in the left atrium (LA). Cystic or cavitated intracardiac masses are rare. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient admitted with chest infection, hemoptysis, and severe respiratory distress, who had to be ventilated. Chest computed tomography showed bilateral lung consolidation with large mass occupying the region of the LA. Transthoracic echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography showed a large intracavitary left atrial cystic mobile mass. Open-heart surgical exploration did not show any mass inside the LA. A posterior left atrial wall hematoma was found and evacuated. Biopsies confirmed the presence of blood clots. Posterior left atrial wall hematoma may appear as left atrial intracavitary cystic mass and should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic left atrial mass.

  3. Efficacy of post-operative analgesia after posterior lumbar instrumented fusion for degenerative disc disease: a prospective randomized comparison of epidural catheter and intravenous administration of analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Kluba, Torsten; Hofmann, Fabian; Bredanger, Sabine; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Niemeyer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to compare the efficacy of epidural (EDA) versus intravenous (PCA) application of analgesics after lumbar fusion. Fifty-two patients scheduled for elective posterior instrumented lumbar fusion were randomized into two groups. EDA patients received an epidural catheter intraoperatively, and administration of ropivacain and sulfentanil was started after a normal postoperative wake-up test in the recovery room area. PCA patients received intravenous opioids in the post-operative period. Differences between EDA and PCA groups in terms of patient satisfaction with respect to pain relief were not significant. Nevertheless, EDA patients reported less pain on the third day after surgery. There were significantly more side effects in the EDA group, including complete reversible loss of sensory function and motor weakness. There were no major side effects, such as infection or persisting neurological deficits, in either group. The routine use of epidural anesthesia for lumbar spine surgery has too many risks and offers very little advantage over PCA. PMID:21808704

  4. An observational study of the relationship between lumbar epidural space depth and body mass index in Michigan parturients.

    PubMed

    Clinkscales, C P; Greenfield, M L V H; Vanarase, M; Polley, L S

    2007-10-01

    Studies of urban parturient populations demonstrate increasing prevalence of obesity, which contributes to difficult epidural catheter placement. The aim of this study was to characterize the relationship between lumbar epidural space depth and body mass index in United States parturients from Michigan. We studied the records of 2009 parturients at or beyond 36 weeks' gestation. In addition to lumbar epidural space depth and body mass index, we recorded maternal age, gestational age and vertebral interspace of epidural placement. A multi-linear regression model was created with centimeter depth from skin to lumbar epidural space as the dependent variable and body mass index as the independent variable, adjusted for maternal age, gestational age and vertebral interspace. Lumbar epidural space depth was (mean +/- SD) 5.3 cm+/-1.21, with more than 96% of catheters placed at L2-3 or L3-4. Mean body mass index was 31.5+/-6.2 kg/m(2). Mean maternal age was 29.3+/-5.7 years while mean gestational age was 39.3+/-1.3 weeks. In a multi-linear regression model, body mass index and maternal age were significant predictors of centimeter depth. When adjusted for maternal age, gestational age and vertebral interspace of catheter placement, body mass index was associated with an increase in depth (P<0.0001, R(2)=0.3646). Maternal age, when adjusted for body mass index and vertebral interspace, was associated with a decreased depth (P=0.0014). When maternal age, gestational age and vertebral interspace are controlled for, increasing body mass index is associated with increasing depth, while increasing maternal age is associated with decreasing depth.

  5. Audit of the influence of body mass index on the performance of epidural analgesia in labour and the subsequent mode of delivery.

    PubMed

    Dresner, M; Brocklesby, J; Bamber, J

    2006-10-01

    To assess the influence of body mass index (BMI) on the performance of epidural analgesia in labour and the subsequent mode of delivery. A retrospective audit of prospectively collected quality assurance data. The delivery suite of Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, UK. This is a 4500-delivery teaching hospital unit. All women receiving epidural analgesia during labour in our unit between April 1997 and December 2005. Epidural recipients were divided into BMI groups according to World Health Organization (WHO) categories and compared for indices of epidural performance and mode of delivery. Midwife and patient satisfaction scores with epidural analgesia, epidural resite rates, and mode of delivery. Data from 13 299 epidural recipients were analysed. Using WHO definitions, 22.8% were of normal body mass, 41.9% were overweight, 31.9% obese, and 3.4% morbidly obese. Epidurals were more likely to fail as BMI increased, as judged by midwife satisfaction scores (P < 0.001) and epidural resite rates (P < 0.01). This trend was not seen for maternal satisfaction scores using the WHO BMI categories. However, if women with BMI below 30 kg/m2 were grouped together, a significant trend was found (P < 0.01). BMI had no influence on vaginal instrumental deliveries, but caesarean section rates rose from 11.5% in women of normal BMI to 29.2% in the morbidly obese women (P < 0.001). Obesity increases the incidence of analgesic failure and the need for resite of epidurals. The caesarean section rate among epidural recipients increases dramatically as BMI rises.

  6. Thoracic epidural catheter in the management of a child with an anterior mediastinal mass: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Loran M; Mossad, Emad B

    2006-02-01

    We describe a case of an anterior mediastinal mass compressing the right main bronchus that required a biopsy through a thoracotomy incision. The anesthetic management of these patients is associated with several risks and challenges, including potential airway compression and cardiovascular collapse. Inhalation induction and maintenance of spontaneous respiration is recommended to preserve normal transpulmonary pressure gradient and improve flow through conducting airways. We placed a thoracic epidural catheter under general anesthesia as the main analgesic technique in order to maintain spontaneous breathing. The use of regional anesthesia, especially continuous epidurals in pediatric cardiothoracic anesthesia have many theoretical advantages including attenuation of the neuroendocrine response, facilitation of rapid extubation and improved ventilatory mechanics secondary to decreased narcotic requirements. The absolute risk of nerve injury and epidural hematoma for this procedure is unknown and hard to define in this patient population. We reviewed multiple studies and case reports addressing its safety and reported side effects. Finally, we emphasize that a thoracic epidural anesthesia is a reasonable choice that can be applied carefully in special situations even for children under general anesthesia.

  7. Epidural abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001416.htm Epidural abscess To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An epidural abscess is a collection of pus (infected material) between ...

  8. Use of intraoperative sodium tetradecyl sulfate for the treatment of a spinal epidural hemangioma. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza N; Saquib, Syed; Christoforidis, Greg; Caragine, Louis P

    2007-08-01

    Spinal hemangiomas can be categorized into three different groups based on location. Vertebral body (VB) hemangiomas are frequent incidental findings on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. There is a subdivision of these with spinal epidural extension that have been reported in the literature. Spinal hemangiomas can also be epidural without VB involvement; these are extremely rare with few reported cases in the thoracic epidural spinal column. The diagnosis and imaging characteristics as well as the surgical tools used in gross-total resection of spinal epidural hemangioma are not well understood. The authors present a detailed characterization of a spinal epidural hemangioma in a 30-year-old woman who presented with complaints of gradual onset of low-back pain that worsened over 1 year. The MR imaging findings indicated a large L2-S1 epidural spinal mass causing thecal sac compression. The patient underwent an L2-S1 laminectomy, and a vascular extradural mass was noted on the posterior aspect of the dura mater. Preoperative spinal angiography as well as intraoperative angiography was performed. Total resection of the tumor was achieved using intraoperative embolization with sodium tetradecyl sulfate and microscopic dissection. The postoperative MR imaging findings and clinical outcome were excellent. The findings and use of sodium tetradecyl sulfate in gross-total resection are discussed. The authors also review treatment modalities and demonstrate the utility and effectiveness of intraoperative sodium tetradecyl sulfate in grosstotal resection of large difficult spinal epidural hemangiomas.

  9. Increasing body mass index predicts increasing difficulty, failure rate, and time to discovery of failure of epidural anesthesia in laboring patients.

    PubMed

    Kula, Ayse O; Riess, Matthias L; Ellinas, Elizabeth H

    2017-02-01

    Obese parturients both greatly benefit from neuraxial techniques, and may represent a technical challenge to obstetric anesthesiologists. Several studies address the topic of obesity and neuraxial analgesia in general, but few offer well described definitions or rates of "difficulty" and "failure" of labor epidural analgesia. Providing those definitions, we hypothesized that increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with negative outcomes in both categories and increased time needed for epidural placement. Single center retrospective chart review. Labor and Delivery Unit of an inner city academic teaching hospital. 2485 parturients, ASA status 2 to 4, receiving labor epidural analgesia for anticipated vaginal delivery. None. We reviewed quality assurance and anesthesia records over a 12-month period. "Failure" was defined as either inadequate analgesia or a positive test dose, requiring replacement, and/or when the anesthesia record stated they failed. "Difficulty" was defined as six or more needle redirections or a note indicating difficulty in the anesthesia record. Overall epidural failure and difficulty rates were 4.3% and 3.0%, respectively. Patients with a BMI of 30kg/m(2) or higher had a higher chance of both failure and difficulty with two and almost three fold increases, respectively. Regression analysis indicated that failure was best predicted by BMI and less provider training while difficulty was best predicted by BMI. Additionally, increased BMI was associated with increased time of discovery of epidural catheter failure. Obesity is associated with increasing technical difficulty and failure of neuraxial analgesia for labor. Practitioners should consider allotting extra time for obese parturients in order to manage potential problems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bilateral en-masse distalization of maxillary posterior teeth with skeletal anchorage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Noorollahian, Saeed; Alavi, Shiva; Shirban, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to introduce a new method for bilateral distal movement of the entire maxillary posterior segment. Case report: A 17-year-old girl with Class I skeletal malocclusion (end-to-end molar relationships, deviated midline and space deficiency for left maxillary canine) was referred for orthodontic treatment. She did not accept maxillary first premolars extraction. A modified Hyrax appliance (Dentaurum Ispringen, Germany) was used for bilateral distalization of maxillary posterior teeth simultaneously. Expansion vector was set anteroposteriorly. Posterior legs of Hyrax were welded to first maxillary molar bands. All posterior teeth on each side consolidated with a segment of 0.017 × 0.025-in stainless steel wire from the buccal side. Anterior legs of Hyrax were bent into eyelet form and attached to the anterior palate with two mini-screws (2 × 10 mm) (Jeil Medical Corporation Seoul, South Korea). Hyrax opening rate was 0.8 mm per month. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were used to evaluate the extent of distal movement. 3.5-mm distalization of posterior maxillary teeth was achieved in five months. Results: A nearly bodily distal movement without anchorage loss was obtained. Conclusion: The mini-screw-supported modified Hyrax appliance was found to be helpful for achieving en-masse distal movement of maxillary posterior teeth. PMID:27409657

  11. Stridor due to an innominate artery compression and posterior mediastinal mass in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Edwin; Parray, Tariq; Poteet-Schwartz, Kim

    2012-06-01

    There are many causes for stridor in a pediatric patient. We present an interesting case of a pediatric patient who had stridor due to an innominate artery compression and posterior mediastinal mass. We discuss the anesthetic complication and management of patients with stridor.

  12. Biomechanical evaluation of DTRAX® posterior cervical cage stabilization with and without lateral mass fixation

    PubMed Central

    Voronov, Leonard I; Siemionow, Krzysztof B; Havey, Robert M; Carandang, Gerard; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lateral mass screw (LMS) fixation with plates or rods is the current standard procedure for posterior cervical fusion. Recently, implants placed between the facet joints have become available as an alternative to LMS or transfacet screws for patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability of the DTRAX® cervical cage for single- and two-level fusion and compare this to the stability achieved with LMS fixation with rods in a two-level construct. Methods Six cadaveric cervical spine (C3–C7) specimens were tested in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation to ±1.5 Nm moment without preload (0 N) in the following conditions: 1) intact (C3–C7), 2) LMS and rods at C4–C5 and C5–C6, 3) removal of all rods (LMS retained) and placement of bilateral posterior cages at C5–C6, 4) bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 (without LMS and rods), and 5) C4–C5 and C5–C6 bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 with rods reinserted. Results Bilateral posterior cervical cages significantly reduced range of motion in all tested directions in both single- and multilevel constructs (P<0.05). Similar stability was achieved with bilateral posterior cages and LMS in a two-level construct: 0.6°±0.3° vs 1.2°±0.4° in flexion–extension (P=0.001), (5.0°±2.6° vs 3.1°±1.3°) in lateral bending (P=0.053), (1.3°±1.0° vs 2.2°±0.9°) in axial rotation (P=0.091) for posterior cages and LMS, respectively. Posterior cages, when placed as an adjunct to LMS, further reduced range of motion in a multilevel construct (P<0.05). Conclusion Bilateral posterior cages provide similar cervical segmental stability compared with a LMS and rod construct and may be an alternative surgical option for select patients. Furthermore, supplementation of a lateral mass construct with posterior cages increases cervical spine stability in single- and multilevel conditions. PMID

  13. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Epidural Injections An epidural injection provides temporary or prolonged relief ... limitations of Epidural Injection? What is an Epidural Injection? An epidural injection is an injection of medication ...

  14. Association Between Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope, Body Mass Index, and ACL Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bojicic, Katherine M.; Beaulieu, Mélanie L.; Imaizumi Krieger, Daniel Y.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Wojtys, Edward M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: While body mass index (BMI), a modifiable parameter, and knee morphology, a nonmodifiable parameter, have been identified as risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, the interaction between them remains unknown. An understanding of this interaction is important because greater compressive axial force (perhaps due to greater BMI) applied to a knee that is already at an increased risk because of its geometry, such as a steep lateral posterior tibial slope, could further increase the probability of ACL injury. Purpose: To quantify the relationship between BMI and select knee morphological parameters as potential risk factors for ACL injury. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Sagittal knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) files from 76 ACL-injured and 42 uninjured subjects were gathered from the University of Michigan Health System’s archive. The posterior tibial slope (PTS), middle cartilage slope (MCS), posterior meniscus height (PMH), and posterior meniscus bone angle (MBA) in the lateral compartment were measured using MRI. BMI was calculated from demographic data. The association between the knee structural factors, BMI, and ACL injury risk was explored using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: PTS (P = .043) and MCS (P = .037) significantly predicted ACL injury risk. As PTS and MCS increased by 1°, odds of sustaining an ACL injury increased by 12% and 13%, respectively. The multivariate logistic regression analysis, which included PTS, BMI centered around the mean (cBMI), and their interaction, showed that this interaction predicted the odds of ACL rupture (P = .050; odds ratio, 1.03). For every 1-unit increase in BMI from the average that is combined with a 1° increase in PTS, the odds of an ACL tear increased by 15%. Conclusion: An increase in BMI was associated with increased risk of ACL tear in the presence of increased lateral posterior tibial slope. Larger values of PTS or

  15. Association Between Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope, Body Mass Index, and ACL Injury Risk.

    PubMed

    Bojicic, Katherine M; Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Imaizumi Krieger, Daniel Y; Ashton-Miller, James A; Wojtys, Edward M

    2017-02-01

    While body mass index (BMI), a modifiable parameter, and knee morphology, a nonmodifiable parameter, have been identified as risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, the interaction between them remains unknown. An understanding of this interaction is important because greater compressive axial force (perhaps due to greater BMI) applied to a knee that is already at an increased risk because of its geometry, such as a steep lateral posterior tibial slope, could further increase the probability of ACL injury. To quantify the relationship between BMI and select knee morphological parameters as potential risk factors for ACL injury. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Sagittal knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) files from 76 ACL-injured and 42 uninjured subjects were gathered from the University of Michigan Health System's archive. The posterior tibial slope (PTS), middle cartilage slope (MCS), posterior meniscus height (PMH), and posterior meniscus bone angle (MBA) in the lateral compartment were measured using MRI. BMI was calculated from demographic data. The association between the knee structural factors, BMI, and ACL injury risk was explored using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. PTS (P = .043) and MCS (P = .037) significantly predicted ACL injury risk. As PTS and MCS increased by 1°, odds of sustaining an ACL injury increased by 12% and 13%, respectively. The multivariate logistic regression analysis, which included PTS, BMI centered around the mean (cBMI), and their interaction, showed that this interaction predicted the odds of ACL rupture (P = .050; odds ratio, 1.03). For every 1-unit increase in BMI from the average that is combined with a 1° increase in PTS, the odds of an ACL tear increased by 15%. An increase in BMI was associated with increased risk of ACL tear in the presence of increased lateral posterior tibial slope. Larger values of PTS or MCS were associated with an increased risk of ACL tear.

  16. [Characteristics and distribution of normal human epidural fat].

    PubMed

    Reina, M A; Pulido, P; Castedo, J; Villanueva, M C; López, A; Sola, R G

    2006-01-01

    Epidural fat provides sufficient cushion for the pulsatile movements of the dural sac, protects nerve structures, facilitates the movement of the dural sac over the periosteum of the spinal column during flexion and extension, and forms a pharmacologic reservoir of lipophilic substances. We review epidural fat and related structures, including their development during the fetal period when the epidural space is filled by undifferentiated loose, areolar mesenchymal tissue that surrounds the dural sac. In the adult, epidural fat has a continuous distribution and follows a certain metameric pattern. It is located mainly on the dorsal side of the epidural space, where it is organized in triangular capsules joined to the midline of the ligamentum flavum by a vascular pedicle. We consider the distribution of epidural fat in the axial and sagittal planes; its presence in the anterior, lateral and posterior epidural space; its presence in the cervical, thoracic and lumbar portions of the spinal column; and its characteristics and variations according to differing body habits and sex. Finally, we speculate on the possible anesthetic implications of epidural fat in terms of the pharmacokinetics of drugs injected into the epidural space and the tasks of locating the epidural space and inserting an epidural catheter during anesthetic procedures.

  17. Postoperative analgesic efficacy of different volumes and masses of ropivacaine in posterior brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Bruno Salome; Cruvinel, Marcos Guilherme Cunha; Carneiro, Fabiano Soares; Lago, Flavio; Silva, Yerkes Pereira

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of posterior brachial plexus block for shoulder surgeries is demonstrated by different authors. However, there is no consensus on the ideal mass and volume of local anesthetic to be employed. The objetive of this study was to compare different volumes and masses of ropivacaine in posterior brachial plexus block in arthroscopic surgeries of the shoulder. Sixty patients > 18 years, physical status ASA I and II, scheduled for unilateral arthroscopic surgeries of the shoulder were randomly placed in three groups: A (10 mL to 0.5%), B (20 mL to 0.5%), C (5 mL to 1%). The block was performed with a 22G needle of 100 mm connected to neurostimulator, in a point 3 cm lateral to the midpoint of C6 and C7 interspace, being injected the solution corresponding to each group. The postoperative pain was evaluated at the recovery room and within the first 24 hours of the postoperative period. The groups were compared on length of time until the first complaint of pain, visual numeric scale (VNS) score and morphine consumption within the first 24 hours. There was no statistically significant difference between the three groups related to age, weight and height. There was no difference in length of time until the first complaint of pain, VNS scores over three and morphine consumption in the postoperative period between the groups. This study concluded that 5 mL of 1% ropivacaine promoted analgesic efficacy similar to 10 mL or 20 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine in the posterior brachial plexus block using neurostimulator. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. MRI of spinal epidural lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mascalchi, M; Torselli, P; Falaschi, F; Dal Pozzo, G

    1995-05-01

    We reviewed the MRI features in eight patients with spinal epidural lymphoma (clinically primary in 4 patients); one patient had multiple lesions. The cervical spine was involved in one patient, the thoracolumbar spine in 5 and the sacrum in two. Mean longitudinal extension of the epidural lesion was 2.6 vertebral segments. The tumours were homogeneously isointense with the spinal cord on T1-weighted images and isointense or hyperintense on proton-density and T2-weighted images. The spinal cord was compressed in four patients but showed signal changes in only one. In five patients the lesions communicated through the intervertebral foramina with paravertebral soft tissue masses. In all but one of the patients diffuse signal changes in the vertebral body marrow consistent with osteolytic or osteoblastic changes were identified adjacent to or at distance from the epidural lesion. Vertebral collapse was observed in two patients.

  19. Extramedullary plasmacytoma presenting as a solitary mass in the intracranial posterior fossa.

    PubMed

    Daghighi, Mohammad Hossein; Poureisa, Masoud; Shimia, Mohammad; Mazaheri-Khamene, Ramin; Daghighi, Shadi

    2012-11-01

    A patient with a 3-month history of headache refractory to pain medication was admitted. The CT scan and MRI showed evidence of a posterior fossa mass. This was pathologically confirmed as an extra medullary plasmacytoma (EMP). He had a pathologic fracture of the left humerus 7 years ago while the radiologist was unaware at the time of diagnosis. A solitary bone plasmacytoma (SBP) was the cause of the pathologic fracture. This report includes the first description of MRI findings in a patient with a rare-incidence intracranial solitary extra medullary plasmacytoma (SEP) in Iran. There is a striking similarity between the features of intracranial SEP and meningiomas. Intracranial SEP, although rare, should be included in the differential diagnosis of brain tumors in areas where meningiomas commonly arise. The MRI findings and differential diagnosis of plasmacytoma are reviewed. Before this case report, only few cases have been reported in the literature. Nonetheless, this is the first report of posterior fossa EMP from Iran.

  20. Extramedullary Plasmacytoma Presenting as a Solitary Mass in the Intracranial Posterior Fossa

    PubMed Central

    Daghighi, Mohammad Hossein; Poureisa, Masoud; Shimia, Mohammad; Mazaheri-Khamene, Ramin; Daghighi, Shadi

    2012-01-01

    A patient with a 3-month history of headache refractory to pain medication was admitted. The CT scan and MRI showed evidence of a posterior fossa mass. This was pathologically confirmed as an extra medullary plasmacytoma (EMP). He had a pathologic fracture of the left humerus 7 years ago while the radiologist was unaware at the time of diagnosis. A solitary bone plasmacytoma (SBP) was the cause of the pathologic fracture. This report includes the first description of MRI findings in a patient with a rare-incidence intracranial solitary extra medullary plasmacytoma (SEP) in Iran. There is a striking similarity between the features of intracranial SEP and meningiomas. Intracranial SEP, although rare, should be included in the differential diagnosis of brain tumors in areas where meningiomas commonly arise. The MRI findings and differential diagnosis of plasmacytoma are reviewed. Before this case report, only few cases have been reported in the literature. Nonetheless, this is the first report of posterior fossa EMP from Iran. PMID:23408237

  1. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... slipped vertebrae’, also known as spondylolisthesis). The epidural space is a fat filled ‘sleeve’ that surrounds the ... spinal cord. Steroids (‘cortisone’) placed into the epidural space have a very potent anti-inflammatory action that ...

  2. Lateral mass screw stimulation thresholds in posterior cervical instrumentation surgery: a predictor of medial deviation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bayard; Curtis, Erik; Hirshman, Brian; Oygar, Ahmet; Chen, Karen; Gabel, Brandon C; Vaida, Florin; Allison, David W; Ciacci, Joseph D

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Normative data exists for stimulus-evoked pedicle screw electromyography (EMG) current thresholds in the lumbar spine, and is routinely referenced during spine surgeries to detect a screw breach, prevent injury of neural elements, and ensure the most biomechanically sound instrumentation construct. To date, similar normative data for cervical lateral mass screws is limited, thus the utility of lateral mass screw testing remains unclear. To address this disparity, in this study the authors describe cumulative lateral mass screw stimulation threshold data in patients undergoing posterior cervical instrumentation with lateral mass screws. These data are correlated with screw placement on postoperative imaging, and a novel correlation is discovered with direct clinical implications. METHODS Using a ball-tip probe, 154 lateral mass screws in 21 patients were electrically tested intraoperatively. In each case, for each screw, the lowest (or threshold) current at which the first polyphasic stimulus-evoked EMG response was reproducibly observed by a neurophysiologist was recorded. All patients underwent postoperative CT. Screw position within the lateral mass was first measured in the axial and sagittal planes for each lateral mass screw using the CT images. Screw placement was also evaluated by 2 independent physicians, blinded to current threshold data, on a binary scale of acceptability. The predictive capacity of screw EMG threshold data was evaluated via multivariable regression analyses and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses. Predictive capacity was examined with respect to screw position within the lateral mass, as well as screw acceptability. RESULTS Lateral mass screw EMG thresholds did not appear to differ significantly for screws considered "acceptable" versus "unacceptable" according to the radiographic criteria. Accordingly, ROC analysis confirmed that EMG current threshold data were of minimal utility in predicting screw radiographic

  3. Accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus: tomographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Mariano Paiva; Magalhães, Edno; de Farias Cascudo, Elialba; Jogaib, Marco Antonio Dias; da Silva, Marcelo Carneiro

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent venous catheterizations occur in approximately 9% of lumbar epidural anesthetic procedures with catheter placement and, if not promptly recognized, can result in fatal consequences. The objective of this report is to describe a case of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus and its recording by computed tomography with contrast injection through the catheter. A female patient in her sixties, physical status II (ASA), underwent conventional cholecystectomy under balanced general anesthesia and an epidural with catheter for postoperative analgesia. During surgery, there was clinical suspicion of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus because of blood backflow through the catheter, confirmed by the administration of a test dose through the catheter. After the surgery, a CT scan was obtained after contrast injection through the catheter. Contrast was observed all the way from the skin to the azygos vein, passing through anterior and posterior epidural venous plexuses and intervertebral vein. It is possible to identify the actual placement of the epidural catheter, as well as to register an accidental catheterization of the epidural venous plexus, using computed tomography with contrast injection through the epidural catheter. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. [Accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus: tomographic analysis].

    PubMed

    Souza, Mariano Paiva; Magalhães, Edno; Cascudo, Elialba de Farias; Jogaib, Marco Antonio Dias; Silva, Marcelo Carneiro da

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent venous catheterizations occur in approximately 9% of lumbar epidural anesthetic procedures with catheter placement and, if not promptly recognized, can result in fatal consequences. The objective of this report is to describe a case of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus and its recording by computed tomography with contrast injection through the catheter. A female patient in her sixties, physical status II (ASA), underwent conventional cholecystectomy under balanced general anesthesia and an epidural with catheter for postoperative analgesia. During surgery, there was clinical suspicion of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus because of blood backflow through the catheter, confirmed by the administration of a test dose through the catheter. After the surgery, a CT scan was obtained after contrast injection through the catheter. Contrast was observed all the way from the skin to the azygos vein, passing through anterior and posterior epidural venous plexuses and intervertebral vein. It is possible to identify the actual placement of the epidural catheter, as well as to register an accidental catheterization of the epidural venous plexus, using computed tomography with contrast injection through the epidural catheter. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Intramuscular myxoma presenting as a rare posterior neck mass in a young child: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ishoo, Edwin

    2007-04-01

    Intramuscular myxoma (IMM) is an uncommon benign tumor that presents as a slow-growing, deep-seated mass confined to the skeletal muscle. Histologically, these lesions most resemble umbilical cord tissue. They are generally found in the proximal thigh, gluteal region, or shoulder girdle and are exceedingly rare neck masses in the pediatric population. These tumors most often present as painless, deep-seated intramuscular masses that may exhibit symptoms of compression of surrounding structures.(1) I report a case of a 22-month-old girl with an IMM in the posterior cervical triangle.

  6. CHRONIC SPONTANEOUS LUMBAR EPIDURAL HEMATOMA SIMULATING EXTRADURAL SPINAL TUMOR : A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    MATSUI, HIROKI; IMAGAMA, SHIRO; ITO, ZENYA; ANDO, KEI; HIRANO, KENICHI; TAUCHI, RYOJI; MURAMOTO, AKIO; MATSUMOTO, TOMOHIRO; ISHIGURO, NAOKI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is an uncommon disorder, and chronic SEHs are rarer than acute SEHs. However, there is few reported involving the bone change of the vertebral body in chronic SEHs. We present a case report of lumbar epidural hematoma that required differentiation from extramedullary spinal tumors by a long process because the CT scan revealed scalloping of the vertebral body and review the relevant literature. A 78-year-old man had experienced a gradual onset of low back pain and excruciating pain in both legs. Lumbar MRI on T1-weighted images revealed a space-occupying lesion with a hyperintense signal relative to the spinal cord with no enhancement on gadolinium adminisration. Meanwhile, T2-weighted images revealed a heterogeneous intensity change, accompanying a central area of hyperintense signals with a hypointense peripheral border at the L4 vertebra. Moreover, the CT scan demonstrated scalloping of the posterior wall of the L4 vertebral body which is generally suspected as the CT finding of spainal tumor. During the epidural space exploration, we found a dark red-colored mass surrounded by a capsular layer, which was fibrous and adhered to the flavum and dura mater. Microscopic histological examination of the resected mass revealed a mixture of the relatively new hematoma and the hematoma that was moving into the connective tissue. Accordingly, the hematoma was diagnosed as chronic SEH. The particular MRI findings of chronic SEHs are helpful for making accurate preoperative diagnoses of this pathology. PMID:25130006

  7. Spinal epidural lipomatosis in lumbar magnetic resonance imaging scans.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Hisashi; Tanaka, Toshikazu; Ogawa, Takeshi; Mishima, Hajime

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the frequency of advanced spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) detected on lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans performed at the authors' hospital and to compare the frequency, cause, and progression of SEL in these cases with that reported in the literature. The total number of MRI examinations of the lumbar spine performed at this hospital over 45 months was 1498 (705 men and 793 women; mean age, 60.3 years). After the MRI data were reduced (T1- and T2-weighted sagittal and axial images) on the basis of the exclusion criteria, the anterior and posterior diameters of the dural sac and spinal canal were measured, as well as the thickness of the epidural fat. On the basis of these parameters, the severity of SEL was classified as grade 0 to grade III. Five cases of grade III SEL were diagnosed. The frequency of grade III SEL noted in this study was 0.33% (5/1498). Obesity (body mass index greater than 27.5) was noted in 3 cases, and the use of exogenous corticosteroids was noted in 3 cases. Exogenous steroid usage associated with advanced SEL in this study was greater than that reported in the literature. Most symptoms of SEL progress slowly, and early diagnosis allows for a dose reduction of the prescribed steroids. Thus, lumbar MRI examinations should be conducted aggressively in patients with exogenous steroid use and presenting with low back pain or buttock pain. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Large Increase in Blood Pressure After Extubation and High Body Mass Index Elevate the Risk of Spinal Epidural Hematoma After Spinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kentaro; Abe, Yuichiro; Satoh, Shigenobu; Yanagibashi, Yasushi; Hyakumachi, Takahiko; Masuda, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    Matched case-control study. To identify factors other than a multilevel procedure that increase the risk of symptomatic postoperative spinal epidural hematoma (SEH). Postoperative SEH is a potentially devastating complication of spinal surgery. Previous studies that reported risk factors for postoperative SEH all identified a multilevel procedure as a risk factor, but the other risk factors remain unclear. Patients who developed postoperative SEH requiring surgical evacuation were identified from database. Each patient was matched with 3 controls who underwent spinal decompression at the same number of levels in the same part of the spine by the same surgeon during the preceding or following year. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the risk factors for postoperative SEH to obtain adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Clinical outcomes after evacuation were investigated separately divided with or without severe paralysis or time until the second surgery. Postoperative SEH evacuation was performed after 32 of 8250 (0.39%) spinal decompression procedures. The incidence was significantly higher after thoracic procedures (2.41%) than after cervical (0.21%) or lumbar (0.39%) procedures. Multivariate analysis identified a 50 mm Hg or greater increase in systolic blood pressure after extubation (adjusted odds ratio: 3.22, 95% confidence interval: 1.22-8.51) and higher body mass index (adjusted odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.31) as risk factors. Among 14 patients with severe paralysis due to postoperative SEH, those who underwent evacuation within 24 hours of the onset had a significantly better improvement in clinical outcome and Frankel grade than did those after 24 hours. A 50 mm Hg or greater increase in systolic blood pressure after extubation and high body mass index were identified as risk factors for SEH. Appropriate blood pressure control especially at the end of surgery is important for the prevention of

  9. Prediction by computerised tomography of distance from skin to epidural space during thoracic epidural insertion.

    PubMed

    Carnie, J; Boden, J; Gao Smith, F

    2002-07-01

    In this single group observational study on 29 patients, we describe a technique that predicts the depth of the epidural space, calculated from the routine pre-operative chest computerised tomography (CT) scan using Pythagorean triangle trigonometry. We also compared the CT-derived depth of the epidural space with the actual depth of needle insertion. The CT-derived and the actual depths of the epidural space were highly correlated (r = 0.88, R2 = 0.78, p < 0.0001). The mean (95% CI) difference between CT-derived and actual depths was 0.26 (0.03-0.49) cm. Thus, the CT-derived depth tends to be greater than the actual depth by between 0.03 and 0.49 cm. There were no associations between either the CT-derived or the actual depth of the epidural space and age, weight, height or body mass index.

  10. Posterior scleritis.

    PubMed

    Benson, W E

    1988-01-01

    Posterior scleritis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of many ocular conditions, including angle closure glaucoma, choroidal folds, optic disk edema, circumscribed fundus mass, choroidal detachment, and exudative retinal detachment. Because it is rare, a high index of suspicion is necessary. Anterior scleritis, pain, or a history of collagen-vascular disease, when present, help to alert the clinician to the correct diagnosis. Posterior scleritis affects women more often than men, but annular ciliochoroidal effusion and choroidal folds are more common in men. Exudative macular detachment and a circumscribed fundus mass are more common in women. This paper reviews the world literature on posterior scleritis and describes findings in a series of 43 patients seen at Wills Eye Hospital. It stresses the clinical features and ancillary diagnostic tests that help to establish the diagnosis.

  11. Symptomatic Epidural Gas-containing Cyst from Intervertebral Vacuum Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sung Min; Suh, Bumn Suk; Park, Jin Su

    2012-12-01

    Vacuum disc phenomenon is a collection of gas in the intervertebral disc space but rarely causes nerve compression. However, some rare type of vacuum phenomenon in the spinal canal may bring about posterior gas displacement within the epidural space. The authors describe two patients with symptomatic epidural gas-containing cyst that seem to be originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbosacral radiculopathy. Radiographic studies demonstrated intervertebral vacuum phenomenon and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and the nerve root. The nerve root in both patients was compressed by gas containing cyst that was surrounded by thin walled capsule separable from the gaseous degenerated disc space. The speculative mechanism of the nerve root compression is discussed. The possibility of gas containing cyst should be considered in case of the nerve root compression in which epidural gas is present.

  12. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis involving posterior elements of the dorsal spine: An unusual cause of extradural spinal mass in an adult.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Devendra K; Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Savant, Hemant V

    2011-07-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells occurring as an isolated lesion or as part of a systemic proliferation. It is commoner in children younger than 10 years of age with sparing of the posterior elements in more than 95% of cases. We describe a case of LCH in an adult female presenting with paraplegia. MRI revealed a well-defined extradural contrast enhancing mass at D2-D4 vertebral level involving the posterior elements of spine. D2-5 laminectomy with excision of lesion was performed which lead to marked improvement of patients neurological status. Histopathology was suggestive of eosinophilic granuloma. We describe the case, discuss its uniqueness and review the literature on this rare tumor presentation.

  13. Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis involving posterior elements of the dorsal spine: An unusual cause of extradural spinal mass in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Devendra K.; Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Savant, Hemant V.

    2011-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells occurring as an isolated lesion or as part of a systemic proliferation. It is commoner in children younger than 10 years of age with sparing of the posterior elements in more than 95% of cases. We describe a case of LCH in an adult female presenting with paraplegia. MRI revealed a well-defined extradural contrast enhancing mass at D2-D4 vertebral level involving the posterior elements of spine. D2-5 laminectomy with excision of lesion was performed which lead to marked improvement of patients neurological status. Histopathology was suggestive of eosinophilic granuloma. We describe the case, discuss its uniqueness and review the literature on this rare tumor presentation. PMID:23125497

  14. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Ellanti, P; Morris, S

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  15. Salmonella Typhi Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ying Ying; Chen, John L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of Salmonella infection. We report a case of a 57-year-old transgender male who presented with lower back pain for a period of one month following a fall. Physical examination only revealed tenderness over the lower back with no neurological deficits. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine revealed a spondylodiscitis at T10-T11 and T12-L1 and right posterior epidural collection at the T9-T10 level. He underwent decompression laminectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion of T8 to L3 vertebrae. Intraoperatively, he was found to have acute-on-chronic osteomyelitis in T10 and T11, epidural abscess, and discitis in T12-L1. Tissue and wound culture grew Salmonella Typhi and with antibiotics susceptibility guidance he was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for a period of six weeks. He recovered well with no neurological deficits. PMID:27034871

  16. Dorsal spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Kulkarni, Bijal; Kumar, Abhaya

    2010-07-01

    A 61-year-old female patient presented with diffuse pain in the dorsal region of the back of 3 months duration. The magnetic resonance imaging showed an extramedullary, extradural space occupative lesion on the right side of the spinal canal from D5 to D7 vertebral levels. The mass was well marginated and there was no bone involvement. Compression of the adjacent thecal sac was observed, with displacement to the left side. Radiological differential diagnosis included nerve sheath tumor and meningioma. The patient underwent D6 hemilaminectomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, the tumor was purely extradural in location with mild extension into the right foramina. No attachment to the nerves or dura was found. Total excision of the extradural compressing mass was possible as there were preserved planes all around. Histopathology revealed cavernous hemangioma. As illustrated in our case, purely epidural hemangiomas, although uncommon, ought to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural soft tissue masses. Findings that may help to differentiate this lesion from the ubiquitous disk prolapse, more common meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors are its ovoid shape, uniform T2 hyperintense signal and lack of anatomic connection with the neighboring intervertebral disk or the exiting nerve root. Entirely extradural lesions with no bone involvement are rare and represent about 12% of all intraspinal hemangiomas.

  17. Dorsal spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Kulkarni, Bijal; Kumar, Abhaya

    2010-01-01

    A 61-year-old female patient presented with diffuse pain in the dorsal region of the back of 3 months duration. The magnetic resonance imaging showed an extramedullary, extradural space occupative lesion on the right side of the spinal canal from D5 to D7 vertebral levels. The mass was well marginated and there was no bone involvement. Compression of the adjacent thecal sac was observed, with displacement to the left side. Radiological differential diagnosis included nerve sheath tumor and meningioma. The patient underwent D6 hemilaminectomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, the tumor was purely extradural in location with mild extension into the right foramina. No attachment to the nerves or dura was found. Total excision of the extradural compressing mass was possible as there were preserved planes all around. Histopathology revealed cavernous hemangioma. As illustrated in our case, purely epidural hemangiomas, although uncommon, ought to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural soft tissue masses. Findings that may help to differentiate this lesion from the ubiquitous disk prolapse, more common meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors are its ovoid shape, uniform T2 hyperintense signal and lack of anatomic connection with the neighboring intervertebral disk or the exiting nerve root. Entirely extradural lesions with no bone involvement are rare and represent about 12% of all intraspinal hemangiomas. PMID:21572634

  18. Finite Element Analysis of the Effect of Epidural Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam; Ji, Gyu Yeul; Yi, Seong; Yoon, Do Heum; Shin, Dong Ah; Kim, Keung Nyun; Ha, Yoon; Oh, Chang Hyun

    2016-07-01

    It is well documented that epidural adhesion is associated with spinal pain. However, the underlying mechanism of spinal pain generation by epidural adhesion has not yet been elucidated. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of spinal pain generation by epidural adhesion using a two-dimensional (2D) non-linear finite element (FE) analysis. A finite element analysis. A two-dimensional nonlinear FE model of the herniated lumbar disc on L4/5 with epidural adhesion. A two-dimensional nonlinear FE model of the lumbar spine was developed, consisting of intervertebral discs, dura, spinal nerve, and lamina. The annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulpous were modeled as hyperelastic using the Mooney-Rivlin equation. The FE mesh was generated and analyzed using Abaqus (ABAQUS 6.13.; Hibbitt, Karlsson & Sorenson, Inc., Providence, RI, USA). Epidural adhesion was simulated as rough contact, in which no slip occurred once two surfaces were in contact, between the dura mater and posterior annulus fibrosus. The FE model of adhesion showed significant stress concentration in the spinal nerves, especially on the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). The stress concentration was caused by the lack of adaptive displacement between the dura mater and posterior annulus fibrosus. The peak von Mises stress was higher in the epidural adhesion model (Adhesion, 0.67 vs. Control, 0.46). In the control model, adaptive displacement was observed with decreased stress in the spinal nerve and DRG (with adhesion, 2.59 vs. without adhesion, 3.58, P < 0.00). This study used a 2D non-linear FE model, which simplifies the 3D nature of the human intervertebral disc. In addition, this 2D non-linear FE model has not yet been validated. The current study clearly demonstrated that epidural adhesion causes significantly increased stress in the spinal nerves, especially at the DRG. We believe that the increased stress on the spinal nerve might elicit more pain under similar magnitudes of lumbar disc protrusion.

  19. Acute lymphocytic leukemia recurring in the spinal epidural space.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Kawasaki, Takashi; Sakata, Katsumi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Isao

    2007-08-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with a very rare spinal epidural mass associated with recurrence of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) manifesting as acute progressive neurological deficits. The patient presented with shoulder pain and ambulatory difficulties 3 years after remission of ALL treated by bone marrow transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural mass extending from C-7 to T-3, which compressed the cord and extended to the intervertebral foramen along the roots. After decompression surgery, the symptoms dramatically improved. Histological examination showed clusters of immature lymphocytes consistent with recurrence of leukemia, so chemotherapy and radiation therapy were carried out. At 1 year after the operation, no local mass expansion or systemic progression of leukemia had occurred. Leukemic mass must be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural mass, even in patients with ALL.

  20. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Miftode, E; Luca, V; Mihalache, D; Leca, D; Stefanidis, E; Anuţa, C; Sabadis, L

    2001-01-01

    In a retrospective study, 68 patients with Spinal Epidural Abscess (SEA) were reviewed. Of these, 66% had different predisposing factors such as staphylococcal skin infections, surgical procedures, rachicentesis, trauma, spondilodiscitis. Abscess had a lumbar region location in 53% of cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent etiological agent (81%). The overall rate of mortality in SEA patients was 13.2%.

  1. [Vertebral osteomyelitis associated with epidural block].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Esper, R; Cruz-Bautista, I

    2001-01-01

    Infectious complications after epidural anesthesia are infrequent and the most common are epidural and subdural abscess. We report one rare case of vertebral osteomyelitus associated with an epidural catheter and review the literature.

  2. Severe Scapular Pain Following Unintentional Cervical Epidural Air Injection.

    PubMed

    Henthorn, Randall W; Murray, Kerra

    2016-03-01

    This a unique case of severe scapular pain following unintentional epidural space air injection during epidural steroid injection.A 70-year-old woman presented for a fluoroscopically guided C7-T1 interlaminar epidural steroid injection. Three injection attempts were made using the loss of resistance with air technique. On the first attempt the epidural space was entered, but contrast injection showed that the needle was intravenous. On the second attempt an equivocal loss of resistance with air was perceived and 5 mL of air was lost from the syringe. The needle was withdrawn and redirected, and upon the third needle passage the contrast injection showed appropriate epidural space filling up to the C4-5 level. Injection of betamethasone mixed in lidocaine was initially uneventful.However, 20 minutes post-injection the patient experienced sudden sharp and continuous pain along the medial edge of the scapula. After failing to respond to multiple intravascular analgesics, the patient was transferred to the emergency room. Her pain subsided completely following an intravenous diazepam injection. Cervical spine computerized tomography showed obvious air in the posterior epidural space from C4-5 to C6-7 as well as outside the spinal canal from (C4-T2). Having recovered fully, she was discharged the following morning. In reviewing the procedure, the equivocal loss of resistance on the second passage was actually a true loss of resistance to epidural space and air was unintentionally injected. Surprisingly, severe scapular pain resulted in a delayed manner after the steroid solution was injected. The authors theorize that unintentional prefilling of the epidural space with air prior to the injection of the subsequent steroid mixture added sufficient pressure to the epidural space to cause right-sided C4 nerve root stretching/entrapment and ensuing radicular pain to the right scapular border. The subsequent intravenous diazepam provided cervical muscle relaxation and

  3. Normal values of posterior antebrachial cutaneous nerve conduction study related to age, gender, height, and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Simin; Mansoori, Korosh; Raissi, Gholam R; Emami Razavi, Seyede Z; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have proposed posterior antebrachial cutaneous (PABC) nerve could help in interpretation of some conditions in upper limb electrodiagnostic study. This study aimed to establish these normal values and to assess the effect of sex, age, height, and body mass index on these normal values. Eligible participants were 84 healthy adult people aged between 22 and 75 years who underwent PABC nerve conduction studies. The mean ± SD values of the base-to-peak amplitude, peak latency, and nerve conduction velocity of all participants were 10.95 ± 2.90 μV, 2.08 ± 0.20 milliseconds, and 57.85 ± 7.83 m/second, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation between the subjects' age and the PABC onset latency, peak latency, and nerve conduction velocity (r = 0.64, P < 0.001; r = 0.6, P < 0.001; and r = 0.44, P < 0.001, respectively). A significant negative correlation was observed between age and base-to-peak amplitude and peak-to-peak amplitude of participants, as well (r = -0.38, r = -0.41, P < 0.001, respectively). The correlation of body mass index with base-to-peak amplitude and peak-to-peak amplitude were r = -0.36, P < 0.001 and r = -0.40, P < 0.001, respectively. This study has established normal values for PABC nerve conduction studies. Furthermore, age and body mass index must be taken into account for making diagnostic conclusion in PABC nerve conduction studies.

  4. Epidural Hematoma in Lacrosse.

    PubMed

    Rimel, R W; Nelson, W E; Persing, J A; Jane, J A

    1983-03-01

    In brief: Several hours after being hit by a lacrosse stick in the left temporoparietal area slightly anterior to the ear, a lacrosse player was found unresponsive and wrapped in a blanket in his dormitory room. He had not lost consciousness during the game, sat out only five minutes, and completed the game. His Glasgow Coma Scale score was 12 of a possible 15. A CT scan showed an epidural hematoma and a skull fracture. He underwent an immediate left temporoparietal craniotomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. He recovered fully and requested permission to return to play six months after the injury. The authors think that an improved lacrosse helmet design would help prevent this type of injury.

  5. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  6. Medicolegal cases for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    French, Keisha L; Daniels, Eldra W; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess are rare surgical emergencies resulting in significant neurologic deficits. Making the diagnosis for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess can be challenging; however, a delay in recognition and treatment can be devastating. The objective of this retrospective analysis study was to identify risk factors for an adverse outcome for the provider. The LexisNexis Academic legal search database was used to identify a total of 19 cases of spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess filed against medical providers. Outcome data on trial verdicts, age, sex, initial site of injury, time to consultation, time to appropriate imaging studies, time to surgery, and whether a rectal examination was performed or not were recorded. The results demonstrated a significant association between time to surgery more than 48 hours and an unfavorable verdict for the provider. The degree of permanent neurologic impairment did not appear to affect the verdicts. Fifty-eight percent of the cases did not present with an initial deficit, including loss of bowel or bladder control. All medical professionals must maintain a high level of suspicion and act quickly. Physicians who are able to identify early clinical features, appropriately image, and treat within a 48 hour time frame have demonstrated a more favorable medicolegal outcome compared with their counterparts in filed lawsuits for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess cases.

  7. Treatment of multilevel cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy with posterior decompression and fusion with lateral mass plate fixation and local bone graft.

    PubMed

    Huang, Russel C; Girardi, Federico P; Poynton, Ashley R; Cammisa Jr, Frank P

    2003-04-01

    This is a retrospective review of 32 patients with multilevel cervical myelopathy treated by laminectomy and lateral mass plate fusion. The prognosis of surgically treated myelopathy is evaluated as well as prognostic factors for recovery of myelopathy. Diagnoses included cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Final follow-up was at 15.2 months (mean) postoperatively. Myelopathy was graded preoperatively and postoperatively by the system of Nurick. All patients had preoperative radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The presence of abnormal T2-weighted MRI signal (myelomalacia) was noted. Postoperative studies included flexion-extension radiographs to assess fusion and MRI to evaluate decompression of neural elements and resolution of myelomalacia. Severity of preoperative Nurick myelopathy, presence of myelomalacia, and age were evaluated as potential prognostic indicators for surgically treated myelopathy. Mean Nurick score improved from 2.6 (range 1-4) to 1.8 (range 0-3) postoperatively (p < 0.0001). Twenty-two patients (71%) had improvement in Nurick grade of at least one point, and nine showed no improvement. No patients had deterioration of Nurick grade. Preoperative myelomalacia was noted in 15 (47%) patients, and all 15 had residual myelomalacia postoperatively. Severe myelopathy, age, and myelomalacia had no prognostic value for improvement of myelopathy. Complications included pseudarthrosis (3%), wound infection (9%), and transient C5 palsy (6%). This study demonstrates excellent outcomes from laminectomy and fusion in multilevel cervical myelopathy. A high rate of improvement of myelopathy was observed, neurologic deterioration did not occur, and complication rates were low. Severe myelopathy and myelomalacia on preoperative MRI had no prognostic value.

  8. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katherine G

    2013-09-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare bacterial infection located within the spinal canal. Early diagnosis and rapid treatment are important because of its potential to cause rapidly progressive spinal cord compression and irreversible paralysis. A staphylococcus bacterial infection is the cause in most cases. Treatment includes antibiotics and possible surgical drainage of the abscess. A favorable neurologic outcome correlates with the severity and duration of neurologic deficits before surgery and the timeliness of the chosen intervention. It is important for the critical care nurse to monitor the patient's neurologic status and provide appropriate interventions.

  9. Ectopic extramedullary hematopoiesis: evaluation and treatment of a rare and benign paraspinal/epidural tumor.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Tobias A; Higgins, Michael; Joseph, Flynn; Mendel, Ehud

    2013-03-01

    Ectopic extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), defined as the formation of blood cells outside the bone marrow, usually occurs in a scenario of chronic anemia when, even after conversion of the bony yellow marrow to red marrow, the body is still unable to meet the demand for red blood cells. Ectopic extramedullary hematopoiesis most commonly occurs in the liver and spleen but may, in fact, occur almost anywhere in the body. Although previous reports have documented EMH presenting as paraspinal masses, such lesions have almost always been associated with a predisposing hematological disorder such as hemolytic anemia, myelofibrosis or myelodysplastic syndromes, thalassemia, polycythemia vera, leukemia, or lymphoma. The authors of this report describe the first reported instance of EMH in a patient presenting with a symptomatic epidural and paraspinal cervical lesion arising from the posterior spinal elements and no known predisposing hematological disease. Initial radiographs revealed a bony lesion arising posteriorly from the C2-3 laminae and spinous processes. Subsequent imaging suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed by CT-guided biopsy, peripheral blood smears, and bone marrow aspirate. Despite epidural compression and slight displacement of the cervical cord and thecal sac, the patient's symptoms were limited to pain and diminished cervical range of motion. Therefore, surgery was deferred in favor of nonsurgical therapy. Several alternative modalities for the treatment of EMH have been suggested in the literature, including cytotoxic agents and radiotherapy. The authors opted for an approach utilizing directed low-dose radiotherapy of a total of 25 Gy divided in 2.5-Gy fractions. At the 3-month follow-up, the patient continued to be asymptomatic, and MRI demonstrated a significant reduction in the dimensions of the lesion. Extramedullary hematopoiesis with spinal cord compression in the absence of a preexisting hematological disorder has not been described in

  10. How I do it: epidural anterior petrosectomy.

    PubMed

    Roche, Pierre-Hugues; Lubrano, Vincent F; Noudel, Rémy

    2011-06-01

    Among the potential approaches to access the petroclival area, epidural anterior petrosectomy (EAP) appears to be the most direct and conservative transpetrous route. In this article, we aim to detail the relevant surgical steps necessary to perform EAP in a reproducible and safe manner. The temporo-pterional bone flap is tailored to access the floor of the middle fossa and expose the foramen ovale and foramen spinosum. Elevation of the dura covering the upper surface of the petrous apex is conducted medially toward the level of the petrous ridge. Identification of the landmarks of the rhomboid fossa delineates the limits of the drilling zone (necessary for removal of the petrous apex)-beneath Meckel's cave and just anterior to the anterior margin of the internal auditory meatus. The tentorium is divided at its free edge and is followed by opening of the posterior fossa dura. Epidural anterior petrosectomy is a conservative trans-petrous approach that offers an excellent direct surgical corridor for exposure of disease processes involving Meckel's cave, the petroclival area and the ventrolateral pons.

  11. The pitfalls of differential diagnosis of lumbar spine epidural lesions--exemplification with two particular cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Iliescu, B F; Chiriţă, B C; Poeată, I

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar spinal epidural lesions could belong to a wide spectrum of pathologies. However, some cases present with rare conditions that can cause significant neurological deficit and raise serious diagnostic challenges. We present two such cases where the clinical picture and the imaging findings failed to elucidate the actual diagnosis, which came as an intraoperative and pathological surprise. The first case is that of a 78-years-old male that presented for low back pain, bilateral S1 radicular sciatica, paraparesis, and difficulty walking. The neurologic exam showed the absence of the rotulian reflexes bilaterally, and a partial sensory loss in the crural dermatomes. The MRI showed an epidural mass, contrast enhancing at the L1-L2 level, suggestive for an extraxial tumor. The second case is that of a 62-year-old woman that presented for a hyperalgic sciatica involving the right S1 root with parestesias in the corresponding dermatome. MRI showed a cystic, contrast enhancing lesion in the L5-S1 recess, mimicking a cystic neuroma. Both patients underwent surgery and histopathological exams were performed from the excised pieces. In the first case the surgery resulted in complete removal of the pathological process and histopathological result returned chronic organized hematoma, concordant with the intraoperatory aspect. The evolution was good. In the second case the histopathological result came back as pulpous disk. Again the evolution was good with complete neurological recovery. In the presence of an epidural mass with clear clinical symptomatology, rare entities like chronic epidural hematoma or posterior migrated disk material should be always considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with suspicion of extradural chronic compressions. In these cases, only the intraoperatory and histopathological exams can provide a clear diagnosis.

  12. Spinal epidural abscess in a patient with piriformis pyomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gerald S.; Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Arnone, Gregory D.; Barks, Ashley L.; Hage, Ziad A.; Neckrysh, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal epidural abscess resulting from piriformis pyomyositis is extremely rare. Such condition can result in serious morbidity and mortality if not addressed in a timely manner. Case Description: The authors describe the case of a 19-year-old male presenting with a 2-week history of fever, low back pain, and nuchal rigidity. When found to have radiographic evidence of a right piriformis pyomyositis, he was transferred to our institution for further evaluation. Because he demonstrated rapid deterioration, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar magnetic resonance imaging scans were emergently performed. They revealed an extensive posterior spinal epidural abscess causing symptomatic spinal cord compression extending from C2 to the sacrum. He underwent emergent decompression and abscess evacuation through a dorsal midline approach. Postoperatively, he markedly improved. Upon discharge, the patient regained 5/5 strength in both upper and lower extremities. Cultures from the epidural abscess grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus warranting a 6-week course of intravenous nafcillin. Conclusion: A 19-year-old male presented with a holospinal epidural abscess (C2 to sacrum) originating from piriformis pyomyositis. The multilevel cord abscess was emergently decompressed, leading to a marked restoration of neurological function. PMID:28028447

  13. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in a Patient With Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Frost, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, there are no reports in the literature of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) developing upper cervical spine infections. Our objective is to present a case of upper cervical epidural abscess in a patient with PD and to review upper cervical spine infection. We present the patient’s presentation, physical examination, imaging findings, and management as well a review of the literature. A 66-year-old male with PD presented to the emergency department (ED) following referral by a neurologist for a presumed C2 fracture. The preceding history was 1 week of severe neck pain requiring a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which was initially interpreted as a C2 fracture. On admission from the ED, further review of the MRI appeared to show anterior prevertebral abscess and an epidural abscess. The patient’s neurological examination was at baseline. In the span of 2 days, the patient developed significant motor weakness. A repeat MRI demonstrated expansion of the epidural collection and spinal cord compression. Surgical management consisting of C1 and C2 laminectomy, irrigation, and debridement from anterior and posterior approaches was performed. Postoperatively, the patient did not recover any motor strength and elected to withdraw care and died. Spinal epidural abscess requires a high index of suspicion and needs prompt recognition to prevent neurological impairment. Upper cervical spine infections are rare but can lead to lethal consequences. PMID:26623170

  14. Spinal epidural angiolipomas: Clinical characteristics, management and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bouali, Sofiene; Maatar, Nidhal; Bouhoula, Asma; Abderrahmen, Khansa; Said, Imed Ben; Boubaker, Adnen; Kallel, Jalel; Jemel, Hafedh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare expansive processes made of mature lipomatous and angiomatous elements. They often have a benign character. Their etiology, pathogenesis remains uncertain, and it is a cause of spinal cord compression. The magnetic resonance imaging is the most important neuroradiological examination. Histological examination is the only examination to confirm the diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice. Methods: A retrospective study of all patients operated on for a spinal epidural angiolipoma at the Department of Neurosurgery at the National Institute of Neurology of Tunis between January 2000 and December 2014 (15 years) was performed. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical, radiological, histological characteristics and the treatment of this tumor. Results: A total of nine patients were operated from January 01, 2000 to November 30, 2014. The average age of our patients was 51 years with ages that ranged from 29 to 65 with a male predominance. The period between onset of symptoms and diagnosis ranged from 24 months with an average 12 months. Posterior localization of the tumor was seen in all patients. Surgical resection was performed for all cases. The postoperative course has been satisfactory, with a complete recovery of neurological functions in all patients. Conclusions: The spinal epidural angiolipomas is rare expansive process causing spinal cord compression. Treatment is exclusively surgical resection. The functional outcome of spinal epidural angiolipomas is particularly favorable with a complete neurological recovery is if the patient was quickly operated. PMID:27695535

  15. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOR - CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Nada; Djaković, Ivka; Kličan-Jaić, Katarina; Rudman, Senka Sabolović; Ivanec, Željko

    2015-09-01

    Labor pain is one of the most severe pains. Labor is a complex and individual process with varying maternal requesting analgesia. Labor analgesia must be safe and accompanied by minimal amount of unwanted consequences for both the mother and the child, as well as for the delivery procedure. Epidural analgesia is the treatment that best meets these demands. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Society of Anesthesiologists, mother's demand is a reason enough for the introduction of epidural analgesia in labor, providing that no contraindications exist. The application of analgesics should not cease at the end of the second stage of labor, but it is recommended that lower concentration analgesics be then applied. Based on the latest studies, it can be claimed that epidural analgesia can be applied during the major part of the first and second stage of labor. According to previous investigations, there is no definitive conclusion about the incidence of instrumental delivery, duration of second stage of labor, time of epidural analgesia initiation, and long term outcomes for the newborn. Cooperation of obstetric and anesthesiology personnel, as well as appropriate technical equipment significantly decrease the need of instrumental completion of a delivery, as well as other complications encountered in the application of epidural analgesia. Our hospital offers 24/7 epidural analgesia service. The majority of pregnant women in our hospital were aware of the advantages of epidural analgesia for labor, however, only a small proportion of them used it, mainly because of inadequate level of information.

  16. [Inadvertent epidural infusion of paracetamol].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sánchez, V E; del Pino Moreno, A L

    2014-10-01

    A 45-year-old woman was accidentally administered an epidural infusion of paracetamol instead of levobupivacaine for postoperative pain therapy during the postoperative period of abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia combined with epidural analgesia. The patient had no neurological symptoms at any time, although a slight tendency to arterial hypotension that did not require treatment was observed. No rescue analgesia was necessary until 8h after the start of epidural infusion. The incidence of these types of errors is probably underestimated, although there are several cases reported with various drugs.

  17. [Epidural emphysema complicating bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Rouetbi, N; Ben Saad, A; Joobeur, S; Skhiri, N; Cheikh Mhamed, S; Mribah, H; El Kamel, A

    2012-12-01

    Epidural emphysema is an exceptional complication of bronchial asthma, revealed by an incidental finding in chest tomography. We report a case of a 21-year-old man admitted with asthma attack complicated by subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema. Chest tomography confirmed the mediastinal emphysema and also revealed the epidural emphysema within the vertebral canal. Neurological examination was negative. The patient showed complete recovery 10days after the onset of symptoms. The epidural emphysema is a rare complication during asthma attacks. The benignity of this complication should not require a systematic chest tomography.

  18. Immunoglobulin G4-related epidural inflammatory pseudotumor presenting with pulmonary complications and spinal cord compression: case report.

    PubMed

    Rumalla, Kavelin; Smith, Kyle A; Arnold, Paul M

    2017-03-17

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently defined condition characterized by inflammatory tumefactive lesions in various organ systems. IgG4-RD is a clinical and radiological diagnosis of exclusion and requires the presence of specific histopathological criteria for diagnosis. A 50-year-old man presented to an outside hospital with a 3-month history of progressively worsening back pain and symptoms of pleurisy, nasal crusting, and hematochezia. Radiological workup revealed an epidural-paraspinal mass with displacement of the spinal cord, destruction of the T5-6 vertebrae, and extension into the right lung. Biopsy sampling and subsequent histopathological analysis revealed dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with an increased number of IgG4-positive plasma cells and a storiform pattern of fibrosis. With strong histopathological evidence of IgG4-RD, the patient was started on a regimen of prednisone. Further testing ruled out malignant neoplasm, infectious etiologies, and other autoimmune diseases. Two weeks later, the patient presented with acute-onset paraplegia due to spinal cord compression. The patient underwent decompression laminectomy of T5-6, posterior instrumented fusion of T2-8, and debulking of the epidural-paraspinal mass. After the continued administration of glucocorticosteroids, the patient improved remarkably to near-normal strength in the lower extremities and sensory function 6 months after surgery. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of IgG4-related epidural inflammatory pseudotumor and spinal cord compression in the United States. This case highlights the importance of early administration of glucocorticosteroids, which were essential to preventing further progression and preventing relapse. IgG4-RD evaluation is important after other diseases in the differential diagnosis are ruled out.

  19. Posterior Fixation with C1 Lateral Mass Screws and C2 Pars Screws for Type II Odontoid Fracture in the Elderly: Long-Term Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Dobran, Mauro; Nasi, Davide; Esposito, Domenico Paolo; Iacoangeli, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    We sought to evaluate the long-term C1-C2 fusion rates, fracture healing, and functional outcomes in geriatric patients with type II odontoid fracture treated with posterior fixation with polyaxial C1 lateral mass screws and C2 pars screws. Twenty-one consecutive patients between 2005 and 2011 with Anderson and D'Alonzo type II odontoid fracture underwent a posterior atlantoaxial fixation with polyaxial C1 lateral mass screws and C2 pars screws. A long-term clinical and radiologic follow-up was achieved in all patients with a mean follow-up period of 53.28 ± 15.41 months (range 38-91 months). All 21 patients had bilateral C1 lateral mass screws and bilateral C2 pars screws. Correct positioning of the C1 lateral mass screws and C2 pars screws was observed in all 42 placements by postoperative computed tomography scans. No vascular or neurologic complication was noted. At the last follow-up, 20 patients (95.24%) had a solid fusion (defined as Lenke fusion grade A or B) while 1 patient (4.76%) had a partial fusion (Lenke fusion grade C). Overall, no hardware failures occurred in any patient. Odontoid fracture healing was achieved in 18 patients out of 21 (85.71%). The mean postoperative Neck Disability Index score was 12.73%, and neck motion was within normal physiologic limits at 12 months. This study adds to the evidence that posterior atlantoaxial fixation with polyaxial C1 lateral mass screws and C2 pars screws is a safe and effective surgical option in the treatment of odontoid fractures including long-term stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Chronic epidural haematoma mimicking meningioma].

    PubMed

    Beculić, Hakija; Skomorac, Rasim; Jusić, Aldin; Mekić-Abazović, Alma; Bajtarević, Alma

    2011-02-01

    The study presents a rare case of organised chronic epidural haematoma that imitated a meningioma. A patient was admitted to the Department of Neurology of the Cantonal Hospital Zenica due to loss of consciousness and right hemiparesis. Non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT) scan had shown an expansive intracranial process in the left parietal region which was radiologically diagnosed as a meningioma. During the operation a linear skull fracture and organised chronic epidural haematoma were found.

  1. Antibacterial activity of epidural infusions.

    PubMed

    Coghlan, M W; Davies, M J; Hoyt, C; Joyce, L; Kilner, R; Waters, M J

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural catheterisation appears to be increasing, being recently reported as one in 1000 among surgical patients. This study was designed to investigate the antibacterial activity of various local anaesthetics and additives, used in epidural infusions, against a range of micro-organisms associated with epidural abscess. The aim was to determine which, if any, epidural infusion solution has the greatest antibacterial activity. Bupivacaine, ropivacaine and levobupivacaine crystals were dissolved and added to Mueller-Hinton Agar in concentrations of 0.06%, 0.125%, 0.2%, 0.25%, 0.5% and 1%. Fentanyl, adrenaline and clonidine were also mixed with agar in isolation and in combination with the local anaesthetics. Using a reference agar dilution method, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for a range of bacteria. Bupivacaine showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli with minimum inhibitory concentrations between 0.125% and 0.25%. It did not inhibit the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at any of the concentrations tested. Levobupivacaine and ropivacaine showed no activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, even at the highest concentrations tested, and minimal activity against Escherichia coli (minimum inhibitory concentrations 0.5% and 1% respectively). The presence of fentanyl, adrenaline and clonidine had no additional effect on the antibacterial activity of any of the local anaesthetic agents. The low concentrations of local anaesthetic usually used in epidural infusions have minimal antibacterial activity. While the clinical implications of this in vitro study are not known, consideration should be given to increasing the concentration of bupivacaine in an epidural infusion or to administering a daily bolus of 0.25% bupivacaine to reduce the risk of epidural bacterial growth.

  2. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Krishnamohan, Prashanth; Berger, Joseph R

    2014-11-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) remains a relatively infrequent diagnosis. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common organism identified, and the infectious source in SEA emanates from skin and soft tissue infections in about 20 % of instances. The thoracic spine is most often involved followed by the lumbar spine. The classic triad of fever, spinal pain, and neurological deficit is present in but a minority of patients. The appearance of neurological deficits with SEA has a significant impact on the prognosis; therefore, early diagnosis is imperative. Magnetic resonance imaging has permitted earlier diagnosis, although significant delays in diagnosis are common due to the nonspecific symptoms that frequently attend the disorder. Due to the rarity of this condition, there have been few randomized controlled trials to evaluate new treatment strategies, and most recommendations regarding treatment are based on case series studies often derived from the experiences at a single center.

  3. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  4. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bustoros, Mark; Thomas, Cheddhi; Frenster, Joshua; Modrek, Aram S; Bayin, N Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Rosen, Gerald; Schiff, Peter B; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes.

  5. Primary spinal epidural B-lymphoblastic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prabhakaran, Pranab K.; Mathew, Sherin P.

    2017-01-01

    Extranodal lymphomas constitute 20% to 30% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The common sites involved are skin, stomach, brain, and small intestine. Epidural localization is a rare site for lymphomas, accounting for 10% of spinal epidural tumors. Lymphomas occurring primarily in the epidural space without other previously detected lymphomatous foci (i.e., primary spinal epidural lymphomas) represent an even rarer entity. We report a case of primary spinal epidural B-lymphoblastic lymphoma. The patient presented with paraparesis, and a spinal epidural lesion was diagnosed. Considering the rapidity of symptom onset, the possibility of epidural abscess was considered, and he underwent partial laminectomy with decompression of the lesion. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were diagnostic of B-lymphoblastic lymphoma. The present case is the first report in the literature of B-lymphoblastic lymphoma presenting as a spinal epidural lesion. PMID:28127138

  6. Holospinal epidural abscess of the spinal axis: two illustrative cases with review of treatment strategies and surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gabriel A; Kochar, Arshneel S; Manjila, Sunil; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Geertman, Robert T; Anderson, James S; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2014-08-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of spinal infections, the subcategory of holospinal epidural abscesses (HEAs) is extremely infrequent and requires unique management. Panspinal imaging (preferably MRI), modern aggressive antibiotic therapy, and prompt surgical intervention remain the standard of care for all spinal axis infections including HEAs; however, the surgical decision making on timing and extent of the procedure still remain ill defined for HEAs. Decompression including skip laminectomies or laminoplasties is described, with varied clinical outcomes. In this review the authors present the illustrative cases of 2 patients with HEAs who were treated using skip laminectomies and epidural catheter irrigation techniques. The discussion highlights different management strategies including the role of conservative (nonsurgical) management in these lesions, especially with an already identified pathogen and the absence of mass effect on MRI or significant neurological defects. Among fewer than 25 case reports of HEA published in the past 25 years, the most important aspect in deciding a role for surgery is the neurological examination. Nearly 20% were treated successfully with medical therapy alone if neurologically intact. None of the reported cases had an associated cranial infection with HEA, because the dural adhesion around the foramen magnum prevented rostral spread of infection. Traditionally a posterior approach to the epidural space with irrigation is performed, unless an extensive focal ventral collection is causing cord compression. Surgical intervention for HEA should be an adjuvant treatment strategy for all acutely deteriorating patients, whereas aspiration of other infected sites like a psoas abscess can determine an infective pathogen, and appropriate antibiotic treatment may avoid surgical intervention in the neurologically intact patient.

  7. Fluoroscopically guided extraforaminal cervical nerve root blocks: analysis of epidural flow of the injectate with respect to needle tip position.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Kyle; Riew, K Daniel; Gilula, Louis A

    2014-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective evaluation of consecutively performed fluoroscopically guided cervical nerve root blocks. Objective To describe the incidence of injectate central epidural flow with respect to needle tip position during fluoroscopically guided extraforaminal cervical nerve root blocks (ECNRBs). Methods Between February 19, 2003 and June 11, 2003, 132 consecutive fluoroscopically guided ECNRBs performed with contrast media in the final injected material (injectate) were reviewed on 95 patients with average of 1.3 injections per patient. Fluoroscopic spot images documenting the procedure were obtained as part of standard quality assurance. An independent observer not directly involved in the procedures retrospectively reviewed the images, and the data were placed into a database. Image review was performed to determine optimal needle tip positioning for injectate epidural flow. Results Central epidural injectate flow was obtained in only 28.9% of injections with the needle tip lateral to midline of the lateral mass (zone 2). 83.8% of injectate went into epidural space when the needle tip was medial to midline of the lateral mass (zone 3). 100% of injectate flowed epidurally when the needle tip was medial to or at the medial cortex of the lateral mass (zone 4). There was no statistically significant difference with regards to central epidural flow and the needle tip position on lateral view. Conclusion To ensure central epidural flow with ECNRBs one must be prepared to pass the needle tip medial to midplane of the lateral mass or to medial cortex of the lateral mass. Approximately 16% of ECNRBs with needle tip medial to midline of the lateral mass did not flow into epidural space. One cannot claim a nerve block is an epidural block unless epidural flow of injectate is observed.

  8. [Teaching practices of thoracic epidural catheterizations in different grade of anesthesia residents].

    PubMed

    Alagoz, Ali; Sazak, Hilal; Tunc, Mehtap; Ulus, Fatma; Kokulu, Serdar; Pehlivanoglu, Polat; Sahin, Saziye

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to clarify the importance of residency grade and other factors which influence the success of thoracic epidural catheterization in thoracotomy patients. After the ethical committee approval, data were recorded retrospectively from the charts of 415 patients. All patients had given written informed consent. The thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were divided into two groups as second-third year (Group I) and fourth year (Group II) according to residency grade. We retrospectively collected demographic data, characteristics of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts, and all difficulties and complications during thoracic epidural catheterization. Overall success rate of thoracic epidural catheterization was similar between the groups. Levels of catheter placement, number and duration of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were not different between the groups (p>0.05). Change of needle insertion level was statistically higher in Group II (p=0.008), whereas paresthesia was significantly higher in Group I (p=0.007). Dural puncture and postdural puncture headache rates were higher in Group I. Higher body mass index and level of the insertion site were significant factors for thoracic epidural catheterization failure and postoperative complication rate and those were independence from residents' experience (p<0.001, 0.005). Body mass index and level of insertion site were significant on thoracic epidural catheterization failure and postoperative complication rate. We think that residents' grade is not a significant factor in terms overall success rate of thoracic epidural catheterization, but it is important for outcome of these procedures. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. The Epidural Ligaments (of Hofmann): A Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tardieu, Gabrielle G; Loukas, Marios; Moisi, Marc; Chapman, Jens; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    The epidural space contains the internal vertebral venous plexus, adipose, and other connective tissues. In the anatomical literature, there are nonspecific descriptions of varying fibrous connective tissue bands in the epidural space, mainly mentioned in the lumbar region, that tether the dural sac to the posterior longitudinal ligament, the vertebral canal, and the ligamentum flavum. These ligaments have been termed as Hofmann’s ligaments. This review expands on the anatomy and function of Hofmann’s ligaments, increasing the awareness of their presence and serves as an impetus for further study of their histology, innervation, and function.  PMID:27752405

  10. Initial forces experienced by the anterior and posterior teeth during dental-anchored or skeletal-anchored en masse retraction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, David; Heo, Giseon; El-Bialy, Tarek; Carey, Jason P; Major, Paul W; Romanyk, Dan L

    2017-07-01

    To investigate initial forces acting on teeth around the arch during en masse retraction using an in vitro Orthodontic SIMulator (OSIM). The OSIM was used to represent the full maxillary arch in a case wherein both first premolars had been extracted. Dental and skeletal anchorage to a posted archwire and skeletal anchorage to a 10-mm power arm were all simulated. A 0.019 × 0.025-inch stainless steel archwire was used in all cases, and 15-mm light nickel-titanium springs were activated to approximately 150 g on both sides of the arch. A sample size of n = 40 springs were tested for each of the three groups. Multivariate analysis of variance (α = 0.05) was used to determine differences between treatment groups. In the anterior segment, it was found that skeletal anchorage with power arms generated the largest retraction force (P < .001). The largest vertical forces on the unit were generated using skeletal anchorage, followed by skeletal anchorage with power arms, and finally dental anchorage. Power arms were found to generate larger intrusive forces on the lateral incisors and extrusive forces on the canines than on other groups. For the posterior anchorage unit, dental anchorage generated the largest protraction and palatal forces. Negligible forces were measured for both skeletal anchorage groups. Vertical forces on the posterior unit were minimal in all cases (<0.1 N). All retraction methods produced sufficient forces to retract the anterior teeth during en masse retraction. Skeletal anchorage reduced forces on the posterior teeth but introduced greater vertical forces on the anterior teeth.

  11. Recent Advances in Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Maria; George, John E.; Seif, John; Farag, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia is a term that denotes all forms of central blocks, involving the spinal, epidural, and caudal spaces. Epidural anesthesia is a versatile technique widely used in anesthetic practice. Its potential to decrease postoperative morbidity and mortality has been demonstrated by numerous studies. To maximize its perioperative benefits while minimizing potential adverse outcomes, the knowledge of factors affecting successful block placement is essential. This paper will provide an overview of the pertinent anatomical, pharmacological, immunological, and technical aspects of epidural anesthesia in both adult and pediatric populations and will discuss the recent advances, the related rare but potentially devastating complications, and the current recommendations for the use of anticoagulants in the setting of neuraxial block placement. PMID:22174708

  12. Cervical Epidural Depth: Correlation Between Cervical MRI Measurements of the Skin-to-Cervical Epidural Space and the Actual Needle Depth During Interlaminar Cervical Epidural Injections.

    PubMed

    Algrain, Haitham; Liu, Alison; Singh, Sarabdeep; Vu, To-Nhu; Cohen, Steven P

    2017-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between skin-to-epidural space depth, as measured on cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and actual needle depth, as measured by Tuohy needle markings during cervical epidural steroid injections. We conducted a retrospective review of cervical MRI images to determine estimated depth from skin to epidural space. Of the 121 reviewed patients who underwent cervical epidural steroid injections, 81 met inclusion criteria and were retained for data analysis. At the C6-C7 level, the estimated needle depth according to MRI images was 6.03 ± 1.15 cm (mean ± SD) and the actual needle depth was 5.62 ± 0.77 cm. At the C7-T1 level, the estimated needle depth based on MRI images was 5.90 ± 1.05 cm and the actual needle depth was 5.73 ± 0.98 cm. At both C6-C7 and C7-T1, MRI depth ( P  <   0.009, P  <   0.001) and body mass index ( P  <   0.001, P  <   0.002) were significantly associated with actual depth. Estimates of needle depth made with MRI were consistently slightly deeper than the actual loss-of-resistance needle depth, indicating that the provider should employ caution when using MRI predictive depths. Information garnered from preprocedure MRIs can be used to improve the safety of cervical epidural steroid injection procedures.

  13. Combined spinal-epidural versus epidural analgesia in labour.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Scott W; Taghizadeh, Neda; Dennis, Alicia T; Hughes, Damien; Cyna, Allan M

    2012-10-17

    Traditional epidural techniques have been associated with prolonged labour, use of oxytocin augmentation and increased incidence of instrumental vaginal delivery. The combined spinal-epidural (CSE) technique has been introduced in an attempt to reduce these adverse effects. CSE is believed to improve maternal mobility during labour and provide more rapid onset of analgesia than epidural analgesia, which could contribute to increased maternal satisfaction. To assess the relative effects of CSE versus epidural analgesia during labour. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (28 September 2011) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We updated the search on 30 June 2012 and added the results to the awaiting classification section. All published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving a comparison of CSE with epidural analgesia initiated for women in the first stage of labour. Cluster-randomised trials were considered for inclusion. Quasi RCTs and cross-over trials were not considered for inclusion in this review. Three review authors independently assessed the trials identified from the searches for inclusion, assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Data were checked for accuracy. Twenty-seven trials involving 3274 women met our inclusion criteria. Twenty-six outcomes in two sets of comparisons involving CSE versus traditional epidurals and CSE versus low-dose epidural techniques were analysed.Of the CSE versus traditional epidural analyses five outcomes showed a significant difference. CSE was more favourable in relation to speed of onset of analgesia from time of injection (mean difference (MD) -2.87 minutes; 95% confidence interval (CI) -5.07 to -0.67; two trials, 129 women); the need for rescue analgesia (risk ratio (RR) 0.31; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.70; one trial, 42 women); urinary retention (RR 0.86; 95% CI 0.79 to 0.95; one trial, 704 women); and rate of instrumental delivery (RR 0.81; 95% CI 0.67 to 0.97; six trials

  14. [Case of spinal epidural abscess after continuous epidural block to manage the pain of herpes zoster].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tatsuhito; Nakatani, Toshihiko; Narai, Yasuhiro; Sakakibara, Manabu; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Saito, Youji

    2014-03-01

    A woman in her 90's received continuous epidural block for the pain of herpes zoster. Four days after epidural catheterization, she was found with cellutitis. Fourteen days after epidural catheterization, spinal epidural abscess was pointed out on MRI. Since there were no neurological symptoms, we performed conservative medical management with antibiotics. She recovered without sequela When the symptoms of cellutitis appeared after epidural block (even if there are neither neurological symptoms nor infectious signs), there is a possibility of progressing into spinal epidural abscess.

  15. Emergency surgery for epidural abcess secondary to sacral fistula after laparoscopic proctectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zeitoun, Jeremie; Menahem, Benjamin; Fohlen, Audrey; Lebreton, Gil; Lubrano, Jean; Alves, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old man presented via the emergency department with a few days history of abdominal and colic occlusion symptoms. He presented signs of sepsis, midline lumbar spine tenderness and reduced hip flexion. Computer tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed a presacral collection contiguous with the posterior part of the colo-rectal anastomosis, and MRI lumbar spine revealed abscess invation into the epidural space. He underwent a laparotomy with washout of the presacral abscess and a colostomy with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotic therapy. At 3 weeks after initial presentation he had made a full clinical recovery with progressive radiological resolution of the epidural abscess. The objective of the case report is to highlight a unique and clinically significant complication of a rare post-operative complication after rectal surgery and to briefly discuss other intra-abdominal sources of epidural abscess. PMID:27421299

  16. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma after abrupt sneezing with prompt recovery of severe paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Štětkářová, Ivana; Jelínková, Lenka; Janík, Vaclav; Peisker, Tomas

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare neurologic condition with threatening consequences when spinal cord compression is present. The diagnosis must be performed quickly using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which shows collection of blood in the epidural space. With spinal cord compression, there is an indication for urgent surgical decompression. Here, we present a 64-year-old woman who developed sudden thoracic and lower back pain accompanied by severe paraparesis and urinary retention after sneezing abruptly. An MRI revealed a posterior thoracic epidural hematoma extending from the T6 to T11 vertebral level with spinal cord compression. Decompression was recommended, but the patient refused surgery, while neurologically improving with time. Complete neurologic recovery was observed within 24 hours after SSEH onset. A conservative therapeutic approach with careful observation may therefore be considered as a treatment of choice in some cases where surgery is refused, (due to high risk or other reasons) and neurologic recovery is early and sustained.

  17. Reversal of tetraplegia in a patient with haematogenous cervical epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Katonis, Pavlos; Souvatzis, Xenia; Tsavalas, Nikolaos; Alpantaki, Kalliopi

    2011-08-01

    Pyogenic haematogenous cervical epidural abscess complicated by tetraplegia is an uncommon entity, but its clinical importance overshadows its rarity. Predisposing risk factors for spinal epidural abscess include diabetes, intravenous drug abuse, liver disease, renal failure, malignancy, HIV, infection elsewhere, rheumatoid conditions, trauma and a number of spinal interventions. Lack of recovery and death are much more frequent when complete paralysis exists since more than 24 to 48 hours. Most authors combine decompressive laminectomy and antibiotics. Anterior decompression and needle aspiration are rarely used, the former more specifically in case of anterior abscess formation. A high index of suspicion along with reliance on gadolinium-enhanced MRI is essential to diagnose the pathology and institute appropriate treatment on an individual basis. The authors report on a diabetic male patient who developed a cervical epidural abscess with tetraplegia after dental extraction. He was treated within six hours by one stage anterior/posterior decompression and fusion, with complete recovery.

  18. [Hyperthermia after obstetrical epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mercier, F J; Benhamou, D

    1994-01-01

    Unlike epidural anaesthesia for general surgery or caesarean section, épidural analgesia for labour leads to maternal hyperthermia. Its recent demonstration is probably related to the multiple influencing factors: site of measurement, ambient temperature, previous labour duration and dilatation at the time of epidural puncture, and occurrence of shivering. During the first 2 to 5 hours of epidural analgesia, there is a weak--if any--thermic increase. Then, when labour is prolonged (mostly primiparae) a linear increase occurs with time, at a mean rate of 1 degree C per 7 hours. The pathophysiology remains hypothetical: heat loss (sweating and hyperventilation) would be reduced during epidural analgesia and therefore surpassed by the important labour-induced heat production. This hyperthermia has been correlated with foetal tachycardia but never with any infectious process. A potential deleterious effect is still debated and may lead to propose an active cooling for the mother. This hyperthermia must also be recognized to avoid an inadequate obstetrical attitude (antibiotics, extractions).

  19. [Epidural analgesia in obstetrics: is there an effect on labor and delivery?].

    PubMed

    Segado Jiménez, M I; Arias Delgado, J; Domínguez Hervella, F; Casas García, M L; López Pérez, A; Izquierdo Gutiérrez, C

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is routinely used in obstetrics but has been blamed for possible effects on labor that lead to greater use of instruments or conversion to cesarean delivery. We aimed to assess this possibility in a cohort of obstetric patients receiving or not receiving epidural analgesia. Prospectively enrolled full-term obstetric patients were distributed in 2 groups according to whether they received epidural analgesia or not. We compared maternal and fetal characteristics, obstetric variables, and type of delivery between groups to record the likely causes of difficult labor and delivery and detect a possible influence of epidural analgesia. Of a total of 602 patients, 462 received epidural analgesia and 140 did not. Epidural analgesia was related to a higher rate of use of instruments but not cesareans (P < .01) and more frequent need for oxytocin (30.7% of the epidural analgesia group vs 0% of the group receiving no epidural analgesia, P < .001). The women receiving analgesia also had a longer mean (SD) duration of the dilatation phase of labor (6.4 [4.2] hours in the epidural group vs 4.7 [3.5] hours in the no-epidural group, P < .01) and of the expulsion phase (1.0 [0.6] hours vs 0.7 [0.6] hours, respectively; P<.01). We observed no effects on the incidence of tearing, rate of episiotomy, or other variables. Predictors of instrumentation or conversion to cesarean delivery were longer duration of the first phase (odds ratio [OR] 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.3), longer duration of the second phase (OR 2.3; 95% CI, 1.3-3.9), and maternal obesity (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.9-1.2). Previous deliveries and initiation of epidural analgesia after the fetus has reached Hodge's first plane decreased risk 2.7-fold and 3.03-fold, respectively. Although epidural analgesia has traditionally been associated with a higher incidence of difficult labor and delivery, this association was not unequivocally evident in this cohort of patients. The apparent increase seems

  20. The Use of a Dehydrated Amnion/Chorion Membrane Allograft in Patients Who Subsequently Undergo Reexploration after Posterior Lumbar Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Subach, Brian R.; Copay, Anne G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Context. Products that can reduce development of epidural fibrosis may reduce risk for ongoing pain associated with development of scar tissue and make subsequent epidural reexploration easier. Purpose. To evaluate the use of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM) on the formation of soft tissue scarring in the epidural space. Study Design. Case series. Patient Sample. Five patients having transforaminal lumbar interbody lumbar fusion (TLIF) with posterior instrumentation and implantation of dHACM in the epidural space and subsequent epidural reexploration. Outcome Measures. Degree of scar tissue adjacent to the epidural space at reexploration. Intraoperative and postoperative complications related to dHACM and patient reported outcomes. Methods. The degree of scar tissue adjacent to the epidural space was assessed during the reexploration surgery. Patients' outcomes were collected using standard validated questionnaires. Results. Four of 5 cases had easily detachable tissue during epidural reexploration. Angiolipoma of 10% was noted in 1 case and 5% in 2 cases. Significant improvements in patient reported outcomes were observed. No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that dHACM implant during TLIF may have favorable effects on epidural fibrosis and is well tolerated. Further studies with larger cohorts are required to prove our results. PMID:25653880

  1. Catheter failure rates and time course with epidural versus combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor.

    PubMed

    Groden, J; Gonzalez-Fiol, A; Aaronson, J; Sachs, A; Smiley, R

    2016-05-01

    The combined spinal-epidural technique for labor analgesia has several advantages over the traditional epidural technique, including faster onset, greater maternal satisfaction, and decreased need for physician boluses. Proponents of the epidural technique criticize the combined spinal-epidural technique, arguing that the epidural catheter remains untested and thus may not be reliable if needed for surgical intervention. We compared failure rates and time of failure between techniques in our tertiary-care academic practice. Data regarding failed catheters were collected from October 2012 to September 2014 as part of our Quality Assurance program. Failed catheters were defined as any catheter replaced after it was considered to be properly placed and then determined to be intravascular, one sided or resulting in poor maternal analgesia or anesthesia. A total of 5487 analgesics were performed (3980 combined spinal-epidural; 1507 epidural). Eighty-five combined spinal-epidural catheters (2.1%) and 59 epidural catheters (3.9%) were replaced during labor (P<0.001). Mean time to replacement was 512±422min and 354±300min for the combined spinal-epidural (n=80) and epidural (n=57) groups, respectively (P=0.02). Median time to replacement was 398 [IQR 131-578] min and 281 [IQR 186-767] min for combined spinal-epidural and epidural groups, respectively (P<0.0001). We were able to demonstrate that catheters placed using a combined spinal-epidural technique were less likely to fail during labor and that the time to detection of a failed catheter was significantly longer in the combined spinal-epidural group. Our findings validate the combined spinal-epidural technique as reliable for labor analgesia and tend to refute the theory of the untested catheter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Paraplegia After Thoracic Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Vivek; Kaveeshvar, Hirsh; Dwivedi, Samvid

    2016-09-01

    Epidural steroid injections are a common procedure performed by pain physicians. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia along with several other groups recently provided guidelines for performing epidural injections in the setting of anticoagulants. We present a case of a patient who developed an epidural hematoma and subsequent paraplegia despite strict adherence to these guidelines. Although new guidelines serve to direct practice, risks of devastating neurologic complications remain as evidenced by our case.

  3. [Maintaining epidural anesthesia by the midwife].

    PubMed

    Dörfling, C; Nolte, A G

    1990-12-01

    Epidural anaesthesia as a method of pain relief during labour has lately become very popular. Statistics show that in some labour units up to 70 per cent of all patients undergo epidural anaesthesia. The popularity of this method can be attributed to its effectiveness in relieving pain during labour. The anaesthetist commences an epidural block by introducing an epidural catheter into the epidural space. The anaesthetist administers the test dose and the first therapeutic dose. Within a short duration of time (10 to 20 minutes) the patient can already experience the numbing effect of the anaesthetic. This anaesthetic loses its numbing effect within two to three hours and effective pain relief can only be achieved by administering a further dose of local anaesthetic via the epidural catheter. This procedure can be repeated between three to six times during the average duration of labour. Alternatively, a continuous epidural infusion procedure can be used. The last method, however, sometimes requires the administration of additional epidural "top-ups". There are some risks in administering additional "top-up" dosages. The possibility exists of the anaesthetic causing a spinal block as a result of being administered into the spinal fluid. The "top-up" can also cause convulsions if administered intravenously. In some units it is expected of the midwife to maintain epidural anaesthesia on prescription by the doctor. These side-effects can, however, also occur when the patient is being treated by medical personnel with ample experience and knowledge. It is expected of some midwives to maintain an epidural block on prescription by the anaesthetist. If the midwife lacks the necessary knowledge of epidural anaesthetic and its maintenance, she might unintentionally administer the local anaesthetic into the spinal fluid or intravascularly. This might cause a threat to the mother's and baby's lives. This research covers the maintenance of epidural anaesthesia as carried out by

  4. Horner's syndrome with epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rowena; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Edmonds, Keith

    2010-08-23

    A 29-year-old woman, primigravida, had labour induced for post-maturity following an uncomplicated antenatal course. She requested an epidural prior to commencement of syntocinon. This was administered in the sitting position without complication. The midwife noted drooping of the right eyelid of the patient 6.5 h following insertion of the epidural. Blood pressure and CTG remained reassuring. The obstetric anaesthetist reviewed the labouring woman and noted a right-sided ptosis as well as the right cheek being flushed and dry. There was no motor block and sensation in T1/T2/S3/S4 was intact. Horner's syndrome was diagnosed and anaesthetic review was recommended prior to further top-ups. The patient progressed well in the second stage of labour and did not require further top-ups and gave birth to a healthy male infant. Horner's syndrome resolved within 4 h following delivery and the postpartum period was uncomplicated.

  5. Utility of the RENAL index -Radius; Exophytic/endophytic; Nearness to sinus; Anterior/posterior; Location relative to polar lines- in the management of renal masses.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, C; Trilla, E; Lorente, D; Morote, J

    2016-12-01

    The growing incidence of renal masses and the wide range of available treatments require predictive tools that support the decision making process. The RENAL index -Radius; Exophytic/endophytic; Nearness to sinus; Anterior/posterior; Location relative to polar lines- helps standardise the anatomy of a renal mass by differentiating 3 groups of complexity. Since the introduction of the index, there have been a growing number of studies, some of which have been conflicting, that have evaluated the clinical utility of its implementation. To analyse the scientific evidence on the relationship between the RENAL index and the main strategies for managing renal masses. A search was conducted in the Medline database, which found 576 references on the RENAL index. In keeping with the PRISM Declaration, we selected 100 abstracts and ultimately reviewed 96 articles. The RENAL index has a high degree of interobserver correlation and has been validated as a predictive nomogram of histological results. In active surveillance, the index has been related to the tumour growth rate and probability of nephrectomy. In ablative therapy, the index has been associated with therapeutic efficacy, complications and tumour recurrence. In partial nephrectomy, the index has been related to the rate of complications, conversion to radical surgery, ischaemia time, function preservation and tumour recurrence, a finding also observed in radical nephrectomy. The RENAL index is an objective, reproducible and useful system as a predictive tool of highly relevant clinical parameters such as the rate of complications, ischaemia time, renal function and oncological results in the various currently accepted treatments for the management of renal masses. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. The Effect of Epidural Analgesia on the Delivery Outcome of Induced Labour: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether the use of epidural analgesia during induced labour was a risk factor for instrumental vaginal delivery and caesarean section (CS) delivery. Study Design. This was a retrospective case series of primigravidae women being induced at term for all indications with a normal body mass index (BMI) at booking and under the age of 40 years. Results. We identified 1,046 women who fulfilled the inclusion criteria of which 31.2% had an epidural analgesia. Those with an epidural analgesia had significantly greater maternal age, higher BMI, greater percentage of oxytocin usage, and a longer first and second stage of labour. Women with an epidural analgesia had a higher instrumental delivery (37.9% versus 16.4%; p < 0.001) and CS delivery rate (26% versus 10.1%; p < 0.001). Multivariable analysis indicated that the use of an epidural was not a risk factor for a CS delivery but was a risk factor for an instrument-assisted delivery (adjusted OR = 3.63; 95% CI: 2.51–5.24; p < 0.001). Conclusion. Our study supports the literature evidence that the use of an epidural increases the instrumental delivery rates. It has also added that there is no effect on CS delivery and the observed increase is due to the presence of confounding factors. PMID:27990163

  7. Two-tuohy needle and catheter technique for fluoroscopically guided percutaneous drainage of spinal epidural abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Perez-Toro, Marco R; Burton, Allen W; Hamid, Basem; Koyyalagunta, Dhanalakshmi

    2009-04-01

    The incidence of spinal epidural abscess has increased in the past decades. Traditionally, management was based on surgical decompression. More recent studies have shown conservative management has successful outcomes in selected patients. We present a case, in which an elderly woman presented with new onset radicular pain and mild leukocytosis more than a week after a complicated revision of an intrathecal catheter in place for management of chronic axial low back pain. Magentic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a posterior epidural abscess from T12 to L2. Two Touhy needles were placed in the epidural space with fluoroscopic guidance for drainage of the abscess. A catheter was then advanced into the epidural space for irrigation with saline and an antibiotic solution. Intravenous antibiotics were continued for a total of 6 weeks. Radicular pain resolved immediately post-procedure. Serial MRIs also showed decreasing size of the abscess. Posterior spinal epidural abscesses may be successfully treated by way of the two Touhy needle and catheter technique for drainage and irrigation. This procedure should be reserved for patients that present with no neurological deficits or deemed nonsurgical candidates. Patients should continue on prolonged intravenous antibiotics and be monitored closely for clinical deterioration and undergo serial follow-up MRIs.

  8. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga¸secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Background Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. Results The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Conclusion Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. PMID:27030718

  9. Expectant fathers and labor epidurals.

    PubMed

    Chapman, L L

    2000-01-01

    A qualitative research study was conducted to describe and explain expectant father's experiences during labor when their partners receive labor epidurals. Grounded theory. Seventeen couples were interviewed using a semi-structured interview format. Two major concepts were identified: "Losing Her" and "She's Back." The men reported that these were the two critical points at which the epidural affected their experience. The theory, "Cruising through Labor," explained the fathers' experiences. Childbirth preparation classes that describe and explain women's responses to the increasing pain of labor contractions, the exhaustion of labor, and the effect of epidural analgesia could possibly assist men in preparing for the changes they will witness in their partners during the labor experience. Knowing that these changes are normal responses to the effects of labor might reduce men's levels of anxiety, frustration, and sense of helplessness. The labor nurse is a major support to the expectant fathers. Labor nurses who remain in the room during this phase, explain what is happening, and include the expectant father in their nursing care provide the best support.

  10. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga Secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C; De Koninck, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Combined Spinal Epidural Technique for Labor Analgesia Does Not Delay Recognition of Epidural Catheter Failures: A Single-center Retrospective Cohort Survival Analysis.

    PubMed

    Booth, Jessica M; Pan, Joshua C; Ross, Vernon H; Russell, Gregory B; Harris, Lynne C; Pan, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    It is unclear whether recognition of epidural catheter failures is delayed with combined spinal epidural technique (CSE) compared to traditional epidural technique (EPID) when used for labor analgesia. The authors hypothesized that recognition of failed catheters is not delayed by CSE. Anesthetic, obstetric, and quality assurance records from 2,395 labor neuraxial procedures (1,440 CSE and 955 EPID) performed at Forsyth Medical Center (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) between June 30 and December 31, 2012, were retrospectively analyzed. The primary outcome was catheter survival (failure-free) time during labor analgesia. A proportional hazards model with the counting method was used to assess relationships between the techniques and survival (failure-free) time of catheters, while controlling for subjects' body mass index and providers' level of training in the final best-fit multivariable regression model. Cumulative incidence of epidural catheter failures was 6.6% for CSE and 11.6% for EPID (P = 0.001). In the multivariable regression model, catheters placed with CSE versus epidural were less likely to fail (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.79; P = 0.0002) for labor analgesia. Among the catheters that failed, there was no overall difference in failure time course between the techniques (hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.54; P = 0.26) even though more failed catheters with CSE (48.4%) than with EPID (30.6%) were recognized within the first 30 min of placement (P = 0.009). In this cohort, CSE has a significantly lower risk of overall epidural catheter failures than EPID and does not delay recognition of epidural catheter failures. Choice of CSE versus EPID should be based on overall risk of failure, efficacy, and side effects.

  12. Thoracic spinal epidural abscess caused by Salmonella typhi.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Saad Hamdan; Ata, Osama Abu; El-Adwan, Nael

    2008-03-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with a rare spinal epidural abscess manifesting as attacks of back pain associated with fever, weight loss, generalized weakness and fatigability, and constipation. He had multiple skin pustules in the last 4 months treated with oral amoxicillin. He had suffered diabetes mellitus for the last 5 years and was insulin dependent. Physical examination found slight paraparesis with sensory loss around the nipple and sphincteric urgency, and diabetic retinopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed edematous T2, T3, and T4 vertebral bodies, and narrow enhanced T3-4 disk space with a soft tissue enhanced mass mostly anterior to the spinal cord and indenting the cord. T3-4 costotransversectomy was performed to remove the extradural mass and evacuate the intradiscal material. Histological examination of the bone found osteomyelitis, and culture of the soft tissue showed Salmonella typhi sensitive to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. Intravenous ceftriaxone administration was started, and the patient was discharged after 6 days in good condition. The outcome of spinal epidural abscess is devastating unless recognized and treated early. The present case of spinal epidural abscess in the thoracic spine caused by Salmonella typhi infection illustrates the importance of cultures to assess the drug sensitivity of the specific strain detected and adjusting the treatment accordingly.

  13. Risk factors for failed conversion of labor epidural analgesia to cesarean delivery anesthesia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational trials.

    PubMed

    Bauer, M E; Kountanis, J A; Tsen, L C; Greenfield, M L; Mhyre, J M

    2012-10-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates evidence for seven risk factors associated with failed conversion of labor epidural analgesia to cesarean delivery anesthesia. Online scientific literature databases were searched using a strategy which identified observational trials, published between January 1979 and May 2011, which evaluated risk factors for failed conversion of epidural analgesia to anesthesia or documented a failure rate resulting in general anesthesia. 1450 trials were screened, and 13 trials were included for review (n=8628). Three factors increase the risk for failed conversion: an increasing number of clinician-administered boluses during labor (OR=3.2, 95% CI 1.8-5.5), greater urgency for cesarean delivery (OR=40.4, 95% CI 8.8-186), and a non-obstetric anesthesiologist providing care (OR=4.6, 95% CI 1.8-11.5). Insufficient evidence is available to support combined spinal-epidural versus standard epidural techniques, duration of epidural analgesia, cervical dilation at the time of epidural placement, and body mass index or weight as risk factors for failed epidural conversion. The risk of failed conversion of labor epidural analgesia to anesthesia is increased with an increasing number of boluses administered during labor, an enhanced urgency for cesarean delivery, and care being provided by a non-obstetric anesthesiologist. Further high-quality studies are needed to evaluate the many potential risk factors associated with failed conversion of labor epidural analgesia to anesthesia for cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cervical epidural hematoma after chiropractic spinal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Heiner, Jason D

    2009-10-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma is a rare but potentially devastating complication of spinal manipulation therapy. This is a case report of a healthy pregnant female who presented to the emergency department with a cervical epidural hematoma resulting from chiropractic spinal manipulation therapy that responded to conservative treatment rather than the more common route of surgical management.

  15. Facial nerve paralysis and partial brachial plexopathy after epidural blood patch: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shahien, Radi; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2011-01-01

    We report a complication related to epidural analgesia for delivery in a 24- year-old woman who was admitted with mild pre-eclampsia and for induction of labor. At the first postpartum day she developed a postdural puncture headache, which was unresponsive to conservative measures. On the fifth day an epidural blood patch was done, and her headache subsided. Sixteen hours later she developed paralysis of the right facial nerve, which was treated with prednisone. Seven days later she complained of pain in the left arm and the posterior region of the shoulder. She was later admitted and diagnosed with partial brachial plexopathy. PMID:21386953

  16. Chronic epidural hematoma with rapid ossification.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jong Hee; Choi, Jae Young; Chang, Jin Woo; Park, Yong Gou; Kim, Tai Seung; Chung, Sang Sup

    2002-12-01

    The authors present a rare case of ossified chronic epidural hematoma. A 13-year-old female patient presented with an ossified chronic epidural hematoma. She had sustained a head injury about 10 weeks previously and had received conservative care for a delayed-onset epidural hematoma at a local hospital. Ossification was identified about 4 weeks after the head injury and then progressed rapidly. A chronic epidural hematoma with a thick collagenous capsule and newly formed bone was removed 73 days after the head injury. An epidural hematoma with mild symptoms can be treated conservatively. When, however, the hematoma is observed not to be naturally absorbed during serial follow-up examinations, surgical removal must be considered, even if the patient's condition is good, because this entity carries the risk of bone calcification and ossification.

  17. Postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis mimicking epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gürbüz, Mehmet Sabri; Erdoğan, Barıs; Yüksel, Mehmet Onur; Somay, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture is a very rare condition. Arachnoiditis may also present with fever and elevated infection markers and may mimic epidural abscess, which is one of the well known infectious complications of lumbar puncture. We report the case of a 56-year-old man with lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture who was operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess. In the intraoperative and postoperative microbiological and histopathological examination, no epidural abscess was detected. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient with postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess reported in the literature. The authors suggest that arachnoiditis may mimic epidural abscess due to its clinical and radiological features and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of complications of lumbar puncture. PMID:24197809

  18. Epidural Analgesia for Labor: Continuous Infusion Versus Programmed Intermittent Bolus.

    PubMed

    Onuoha, Onyi C

    2017-03-01

    Despite the traditional practice to maintain labor analgesia with a combination of continuous epidural infusion and patient-controlled epidural analgesia using an automated epidural pump; compelling data now shows that bolus injection through the epidural catheter may result in better distribution of anesthetic solution in the epidural space. The programmed intermittent epidural bolus technique is proposed as a better maintenance mode and may represent a more effective mode of maintaining epidural analgesia for labor, especially prolonged labor. Additional prospective and adequately powered studies are needed to confirm findings and determine the optimal combination of volume, rate, time, and drug concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Symptomatic posterior mediastinal angioleiomyoma.

    PubMed

    I, Hoseok; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Choi, Kyung Un; Kim, Yeong-Dae

    2008-08-30

    We report a case of a symptomatic angioleiomyoma in the left posterior mediastinum. A 66-year-old woman presented with left back and flank pain for 6 months. Chest computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a well-circumscribed 4.3 cm round mass. The mass was initially diagnosed as nerve sheath tumor, because of her symptoms and its close location to the sympathetic trunk and intercostal nerve. It was uneventfully removed through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. The pathology revealed an angioleiomyoma.

  20. Digging up the recent Spanish memory: genetic identification of human remains from mass graves of the Spanish Civil War and posterior dictatorship.

    PubMed

    Baeta, Miriam; Núñez, Carolina; Cardoso, Sergio; Palencia-Madrid, Leire; Herrasti, Lourdes; Etxeberria, Francisco; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2015-11-01

    The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and posterior dictatorship (until 1970s) stands as one of the major conflicts in the recent history of Spain. It led to nearly two hundred thousand men and women executed or murdered extra-judicially or after dubious legal procedures. Nowadays, most of them remain unidentified or even buried in irretraceable mass graves across Spain. Here, we present the genetic identification of human remains found in 26 mass graves located in Northern Spain. A total of 252 post-mortem remains were analyzed and compared to 186 relatives, allowing the identification of 87 victims. Overall, a significant success of DNA profiling was reached, since informative profiles (≥ 12 STRs and/or mitochondrial DNA profile) were obtained in 85.71% of the remains. This high performance in DNA profiling from challenging samples demonstrated the efficacy of DNA extraction and amplification methods used herein, given that only around 14.29% of the samples did not provide an informative genetic profile for the analysis performed, probably due to the presence of degraded and/or limited DNA in these remains. However, this study shows a partial identification success rate, which is clearly a consequence of the lack of both appropriate family members for genetic comparisons and accurate information about the victims' location. Hence, further perseverance in the exhumation of other intact graves as well as in the search of more alleged relatives is crucial in order to facilitate and increase the number of genetic identifications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Management of acute spontaneous thoracic spinal epidural hematoma causing paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Alić, Fahrudin; Bečulić, Hakija; Jusić, Aldin; Skomorac, Rasim; Moranjkić, Mirza; Hrvat, Lejla; Tandir, Lejla

    2017-02-01

    Aim To emphasize the importance of early recognition, diagnostic processing and emergent surgical treatment of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). Methods A 39-year-old female presented with sudden onset of severe pain between the shoulder blades followed by paraparesis and alerted sensibility in the lower extremities. An hour later she developed paraplegia with sensory deficits below ThIV level, absence of patellar reflex, ankle jerk reflex and sphincter dysfunction. Results Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated acute extensive epidural mass of thoracic spinal segments (ThI-ThIII). The patient underwent emergent decompressive laminectomy ThI-ThIII with epidural hematoma evacuation within 24 hours of symptoms onset. After the surgical treatment, because of suspicion on spinal arteriovenous malformation, complete diagnostic evaluation with spinal angiography was done and no form of vascular malformation was found. Idiopathic SSEH was diagnosed. Two months later the patient reached complete neurological improvement. Conclusion The SSEH is a rare condition that should be kept in mind in patients presenting with neurological deficit and a sudden onset of back pain like it was in our case. For early diagnosis, immediate MRI is essential. Prompt surgical decompression such as laminectomy is an absolute surgical indication widely accepted for patients with progressive neurological deficit. The SSEH should be considered as one of the important differential diagnoses in patients who have developed acute myelopathy.

  2. Epidural meningioma of the sacral canal. Case report.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Scott A; Linton, Kim M; Durnian, Jonathan M; Cowie, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Spinal meningiomas are reported infrequently as pure epidural tumors, and they are rarely located at the caudal end of the spine. The unique combination of a wholly epidural tumor confined entirely to the sacral canal has not been previously described. The authors describe the case of a 29-year-old man who presented with coccygeal and left-sided S2-4 dermatomal pain. Examination confirmed sensory loss in the same distribution. A magnetic resonance image revealed an enhancing mass lesion in the sacral canal scalloping the bone at S-2 and S-3. An apparent complete resection was performed. Intraoperatively the authors observed an entirely epidural tumor with a small dural attachment at the most caudal end of the thecal sac. Histological examination confirmed that the tumor was an atypical meningioma. A local recurrence developed within 1 year of surgery, and the patient underwent a hemisacrectomy for tumor removal. An additional recurrence in the lumbosacral spine and multiple pulmonary metastases developed thereafter. In addition to the unique nature of this case, the authors also observed a tumor behaving in a far more aggressive fashion than its histological findings would suggest. This adds to the differential diagnosis of tumors occurring in the sacral canal.

  3. Epidural Cystic Spinal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zheng-he; Wang, Zi-feng; Sun, Peng; Jin, Jie-tian; Zhang, Xiang-heng; Zhao, Yi-ying; Wang, Jian; Mou, Yong-gao; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cystic spinal meningioma (CSM) is an uncommon meningioma variant. Extradural CSMs are particularly rare and difficult to distinguish from other intraaxial tumors. This study presents a case of a 36-year-old woman with intraspinal extradual CSM at the thoracolumbar spine. She experienced persistent weakness, progressive numbness, and sensory disturbance in the right lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patient revealed an irregular cystic mass at the thoracic 11 to lumbar 3 levels dorsally. This case was misdiagnosed as other neoplasms prior to surgery because of the atypical radiographic features and location of the tumor. Extradural CSMs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraspinal extradural cystic neoplasms. Complete removal of cystic wall provides an optimal outcome, rendering the lesion curable. PMID:26986119

  4. [Spinal cord compression due to a epidural lipoma].

    PubMed

    Urculo, E; Samprón, N; Alfaro, R; Arrazola, M; Linazasoro, G

    2008-04-01

    The spinal extradural space is normally occupied by adipose tissue and a venous plexus, so it should be not surprising that lipomas arise and reach sufficient size to compress symptomatically the spinal cord. Nevertheless, the spinal epidural lipomas are rare and benign tumours may present as a progressive spinal cord compression syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in demonstrating the full extent and characteristics of these lesions, the severity of cord compression and the location in the canal. Usually, the lesion is amenable to total surgical extirpation and the functional prognosis is good. Histopathologically the tumour consists of a mature adipose cells matrix intermixed with vascular endothelial channels, that is the reason why it is also named angiolipomas. A 47 year-old woman complained of dorsal and bilateral submamarian pain lasting two years and progressive loss of sensibility and weakness in her legs. Following magnetic resonance studies a posterior spinal cord compression by an extradural tumour at T3-T7 levels was observed. She was operated on and we found an extradural yellow tumour easily to dissect and it was completely removed. One year later she is asymptomatic. Spinal epidural lipoma is a benign tumour which initially presents itself with local or radicular pain accompanied by progressive spinal cord compression syndrome. The choice treatment is laminectomy and total excision. Probably, this is one of the easiest tumours to remove of the spinal canal and a source of satisfaction because a complete recovery can usually be achieved.

  5. Cervical epidural steroid injection for cervicobrachialgia.

    PubMed

    Stav, A; Ovadia, L; Sternberg, A; Kaadan, M; Weksler, N

    1993-08-01

    Fifty patients with chronic resistant cervicobrachialgia were randomly divided into two groups. Twenty-five patients (group A) were treated with cervical epidural steroid/lidocaine injections and 17 patients (group B) were treated with steroid/lidocaine injections into the posterior neck muscles. Another eight patients from group B were excluded from the study because they had started the process of litigation of insurance claims and their subjective analysis of pain relief might therefore not be trustworthy. One to three injections were administered at 2-week intervals according to the clinical response. All patients continued their various pre-study treatments: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, non-opioid analgesics and physiotherapy. Pain relief was evaluated by the visual analogue scale 1 week after the last injection and then 1 year later. One week after the last injection we rated pain relief as very good and good in 76% of the patients in group A, as compared to 35.5% of the patients in group B. One year after the treatment 68% of the group A patients still had very good and good pain relief, whereas only 11.8% of group B patients reported this degree of pain relief. These differences were statistically significant. We failed to achieve significant improvement of tendon reflexes or of sensory loss in both groups, but the increase in the range of motion, the fraction of patients who were able to decrease their daily dose of analgesics, and recovery of the capacity for work were significantly better in group A. We encountered no complications in either group of patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Effectiveness of epidural anesthesia for external cephalic version (ECV).

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Matsuda, H; Kawakami, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Yoshinaga, Y; Hayata, E; Asai, K; Kawashima, A; Furuya, K

    2010-09-01

    The Cochrane review conducted in 2001 re-established the usefulness of external cephalic version (ECV). The success rate for ECV using epidural anesthesia or spinal anesthesia is reported to be 35 to 86%. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of epidural anesthesia for ECV. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of pregnant women who were at 35 to 36 weeks of gestation between 2001 and June 2009, with a single fetus, non-cephalic presentation and without non-reassuring fetal status. The subjects were ultrasonographically examined for placental location, presence/absence of nuchal cord and amniotic fluid volume. Those with placenta previa, early rupture of membranes, uterine anomaly or severe fetal anomaly and those in whom delivery was initiated were excluded from the study. The study protocol was approved by the institutional ethics committee, and written informed consent was obtained for all procedures described in the protocol. The success rate for ECV was compared between the anesthesia and non-anesthesia groups. Analysis was also performed to identify factors contributing to successful ECV. There were 86 women with non-cephalic presentation who underwent ECV during the study period. The non-anesthesia group consisted of 34 women in whom ritodrine hydrochloride, a tocolytic agent, was administered alone, and 52 women in whom a tocolytic agent and epidural anesthesia were used constituted the anesthesia group. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of age, parity, body mass index and placental location. The success rate for ECV was 55.9% (19/34 patients) in the non-anesthesia group and 78.8% (41/52 patients) in the anesthesia group, showing a significant difference between the two groups (odds ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.26 to 2.44). Analysis was also performed to identify factors determining successful ECV other than epidural anesthesia from among age, parity, body mass index, placental location, presence

  7. Observational study of changes in epidural pressure and elastance during epidural blood patch in obstetric patients.

    PubMed

    Pratt, S D; Kaczka, D W; Hess, P E

    2014-05-01

    During an epidural blood patch, we inject blood until the patient describes mild back pressure, often leading to injection of more than 20 mL of blood. We undertook this study to measure the epidural pressures generated during an epidural blood patch and to identify the impact of volume on epidural elastance in obstetric patients. This study was performed in postpartum patients who presented for an epidural blood patch with symptoms consistent with a postdural puncture headache. After identification of the epidural space using loss of resistance to air or saline, we measured static epidural pressure after each 5-mL injection of blood. Models were then fitted to the data and the epidural elastance and compliance calculated. Eighteen blood patches were performed on 17 patients. The mean final volume injected was 18.9±7.8 mL [range 6-38 mL]. The mean final pressure generated was 13.1±13.4 mmHg [range 2-56 mmHg]. A curvilinear relationship existed between volume injected and pressure, which was described by two models: (1) pressure=0.0254×(mL injected)(2)+0.0297 mL, or (2) pressure=0.0679×mL(1.742). The value for r2 was approximately 0.57 for both models. We found no correlation between the final pressure generated and the success of the epidural blood patch. We found a curvilinear relationship between the volume of blood injected during an epidural blood patch and the pressure generated in the epidural space. However, there was a large variation in both the volume of blood and the epidural pressure generated. The clinical importance of this finding is not known. A larger study would be required to demonstrate whether pressure is a predictor of success. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Epidural stimulation in arteritic patients].

    PubMed

    Herreros, J

    1989-10-01

    We are presenting the results of a multicenter retrospective study including 203 patients with arterial disease of the lower extremities, treated with epidural stimulation. The indications were: stage III or IV ischemia of the Leriche-Fontaine classification, arteriosclerosis or diabetic arteriopathy and untractable pain, or presence of necrosis as in Buerger's disease, Raynaud's phenomenon, frost-bite, Sudeck's disease and ergotamin poisoning. 47 p. cent of the patients had undergone a sympathectomy. The evolution was excellent in 47 p. cent of arteriosclerosis and/or diabetes cases, 100 p. cent of cases of Buerger's disease, 78 p. cent of cases of Raynaud's disease, and good in 33 p. cent of patients with arteriosclerosis and 12 p. cent of cases of Raynaud's disease. The plethysmography curves were improved and there was a statistically significant increase of the transcutaneous PO2 as well as of the isotopic results of muscular and cutaneous perfusion with 201TL and 125I antipyrin. These results demonstrate the capabilities of epidural stimulation in the treatment of arterial diseases of the extremities.

  9. Spinal epidural abscess in a young girl without risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis; Birbilis, Theodosios; Michailidis, Lambros; Souftas, Vasileios; Chatzimichael, Athanassios

    2011-07-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare infection associated with well-established risk factors mainly in adults. We describe an 11-year-old girl without any known risk factors who presented with fever and localized spinal tenderness in the lumbar area and was diagnosed with spinal MRI as suffering from a posterior SEA extending between T11 and L4. She was successfully managed with sequential intravenous and oral antibiotics along with minimally invasive surgery without laminectomy. Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was the responsible pathogen isolated at surgery. Immediate institution of antibiotics, spinal MRI, and well-timed neurosurgical consultation are mandatory for a favorable outcome in cases of SEA in children.

  10. Epidural blood patch and acute varicella.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Bergman, Bradley D; Berger, Ines H

    2004-12-01

    We present the case of a 38-yr-old woman who required an epidural blood patch in the context of acute varicella (chickenpox). The unique risks in this case include the possible triggering of central nervous system complications after the introduction of viremic blood into the epidural or intrathecal space. However, the risk was believed to be acceptable because the patient was receiving antiviral coverage. She enjoyed complete relief of her headache but experienced transient back and leg pain. Leptomeningeal irritation caused by acute varicella infection may put patients at increased risk for pain after epidural blood patch.

  11. Epidural analgesia improves postoperative nitrogen balance.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, M R; Fernades, A; Mordhorst, R; Kehlet, H

    1978-01-01

    Postoperative nitrogen balance was monitored in twelve patients undergoing hysterectomy under either epidural analgesia or general anaesthesia. The mean cumulative five-day nitrogen losses were significantly lower after epidural analgesia than after general anaesthesia. Nitrogen sparing presumably results from inhibiting the stress-induced release of catabolic hormones, since epidural analgesia abolished postoperative hyperglycaemia and increase in plasma cortisol concentrations. No adverse effects of inhibiting the stress response were observed. Neurogenic stimuli thus play a crucial part in the catabolic response to surgery. Inhibiting the endocrine metabolic response to trauma by neurogenic blockade may reduce the morbidity precipitated in high-risk patients by the catabolic response to surgery. PMID:638618

  12. Targeting Lumbar Spinal Neural Circuitry by Epidural Stimulation to Restore Motor Function After Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Minassian, Karen; McKay, W Barry; Binder, Heinrich; Hofstoetter, Ursula S

    2016-04-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation has a long history of application for improving motor control in spinal cord injury. This review focuses on its resurgence following the progress made in understanding the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms and on recent reports of its augmentative effects upon otherwise subfunctional volitional motor control. Early work revealed that the spinal circuitry involved in lower-limb motor control can be accessed by stimulating through electrodes placed epidurally over the posterior aspect of the lumbar spinal cord below a paralyzing injury. Current understanding is that such stimulation activates large-to-medium-diameter sensory fibers within the posterior roots. Those fibers then trans-synaptically activate various spinal reflex circuits and plurisegmentally organized interneuronal networks that control more complex contraction and relaxation patterns involving multiple muscles. The induced change in responsiveness of this spinal motor circuitry to any residual supraspinal input via clinically silent translesional neural connections that have survived the injury may be a likely explanation for rudimentary volitional control enabled by epidural stimulation in otherwise paralyzed muscles. Technological developments that allow dynamic control of stimulation parameters and the potential for activity-dependent beneficial plasticity may further unveil the remarkable capacity of spinal motor processing that remains even after severe spinal cord injuries.

  13. Breast adenocarcinoma metastatic to epidural cervical spine meningioma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Aghi, Manish; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Brisman, Jonathan L

    2005-11-01

    While several cases of cancer metastatic to cranial meningiomas have been reported, metastasis to spinal meningioma has been reported only once, and a mechanism for such metastases has not been investigated. We report a case of breast carcinoma metastatic to an epidural cervical meningioma, summarize the literature on metastases to central nervous system meningiomas, and suggest a possible mechanism. Our patient, a 55-year-old woman, presented with difficulty walking, back pain, and quadriparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing C3-4 epidural lesion and an L4 compression fracture. Because of concern that the fracture and epidural lesion might represent metastases, we performed a metastatic work-up, which revealed a right breast mass. The patient underwent C3-C4 laminectomies and an epidural lesion was encountered. Intraoperative frozen section revealed mixed meningioma and breast adenocarcinoma. A gross total resection was achieved and the patient subsequently received spinal irradiation and hormonal therapy. Whereas a literature review revealed numerous reports of metastases to cranial meningiomas, this represents only the second reported case of such pathology in the spine. Mechanisms of this unusual process likely include meningiomas' vascularity, meningiomas' slow growth providing nutrient availability, and perhaps, as suggested by our analysis, E-cadherin expression by both meningiomas and breast cancer. Metastasis to meningioma must be considered in an epidural spinal lesion in all patients with a known malignancy, with surgical aggressiveness tailored to the intraoperative pathologic diagnosis.

  14. Effect of epidural analgesia on labor and delivery: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gerli, Sandro; Favilli, Alessandro; Acanfora, Marta M; Bini, Vittorio; Giorgini, Carla; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo

    2011-03-01

    Two groups of women have been retrospectively compared: 155 women who received analgesia and 1355 women who delivered without analgesia. The duration of the first stage, second stage, and total duration of labor was longer in epidural group, however epidural analgesia was not demonstrated as an independent risk factor for a prolonged labor. The variable most influencing the total duration of labor and the duration of the first stage was nulliparity; the variables most influencing the duration of the second stage were the older age, a reduced body mass index, a high newborn weight and nulliparity.

  15. Successful medical treatment of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo-Ren; Wang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2008-04-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal disease. A 67-year-old female suffered fever and painful swelling of the right knee and lower leg for one week. Both synovial fluid and blood cultures yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Low back pain developed and fever was sustained despite the administration of intravenous oxacillin. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracolumbar spine revealed spinal epidural abscess from T12 to S1. Because of severe hypoalbuminemia and general anasarca and followed by exploratory laparotomy for massive duodenal bleeding, she did not receive surgical intervention for the spinal epidural abscess. After intravenous administration of oxacillin 2 g 4-hourly for 12 weeks, she recovered and follow-up MRI confirmed the efficacy of the medical treatment. She remained well at 1-year follow-up. In a patient with minimal neurological deficit or surgical contraindication, spinal epidural abscess can be successfully treated with a medical regimen.

  16. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  17. Incidence of epidural catheter-associated infections after continuous epidural analgesia in children.

    PubMed

    Sethna, Navil F; Clendenin, David; Athiraman, Umeshkumar; Solodiuk, Jean; Rodriguez, Diana P; Zurakowski, David

    2010-07-01

    Clinical observation suggests that the number of serious epidural catheter-associated infections have increased recently in children. This increase is likely attributed to an increase in reporting and in frequency of epidural analgesia usage. Estimates of infection rates are difficult to determine primarily because of insufficient study of large pediatric populations. In this retrospective study, the authors investigated the incidence of epidural catheter-associated soft tissue and epidural infections after use of continuous epidural analgesia spanning 17 yr. A total of 10,653 epidural catheters were used in 7,792 children. The majority of catheters, 10,437 (98%), were placed for the management of postoperative pain, and 216 (2%) were placed for the management of chronic pain. The authors identified 13 cases of infections (nine cellulitis, two paravertebral musculature infections, one epidural inflammation, and one epidural abscess) between 3 and 11 days after catheter insertion. The incidence of infection was significantly higher in patients treated for chronic pain (7 of 216 = 3.2%) compared with postoperative pain (6 of 10,437 = 0.06%; P < 0.0001). Surgical drainage of subcutaneous pus was performed in three patients, and medical therapy was administered in the remainder of patients; all patients recovered without sequelae. Although rare, epidural catheter-associated infections remain a serious concern in high-risk children who may benefit the most from epidural analgesia. The findings of the authors support the low rate of epidural infection previously reported despite growing concerns of serious infections in children. These findings highlight the importance of vigilance to early diagnostic indicators of infection and provide practitioners and families with incidence data to guide informed medical decision-making.

  18. Observational study of changes in epidural pressure and elastance during epidural blood patch in obstetric patients

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, S.D.; Kaczka, D.W.; Hess, PE

    2014-01-01

    Background During an epidural blood patch, we inject blood until the patient describes mild back pressure, often leading to injection of more than 20 mL of blood. We undertook this study to measure the epidural pressures generated during an epidural blood patch and to identify the impact of volume on epidural elastance in obstetric patients. Methods This study was performed in postpartum patients who presented for an epidural blood patch with symptoms consistent with a postdural puncture headache. After identification of the epidural space using loss of resistance to air or saline, we measured static epidural pressure after each 5-mL injection of blood. Models were then fitted to the data and the epidural elastance and compliance calculated. Results Eighteen blood patches were performed on 17 patients. The mean final volume injected was 18.9 ± 7.8 mL [range 6 to 38 mL]. The mean final pressure generated was 13.1 ± 13.4 mmHg [range 2 to 56 mmHg]. A curvilinear relationship existed between volume injected and pressure, which was described by two models: (1) pressure = 0.0254 × (mL injected)2 + 0.0297 × mL, or (2) pressure = 0.0679 × mL1.742. The value for r2 was approximately 0.57 for both models. We found no correlation between the final pressure generated and the success of the EBP. Conclusions We found a curvilinear relationship between the volume of blood injected during an epidural blood patch and the pressure generated in the epidural space. However, there was a large variation in both the volume of blood and the epidural pressure generated. The clinical importance of this finding is not known. A larger study would be required to demonstrate whether pressure is a predictor of success. PMID:24631062

  19. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications. This descriptive study was conducted to determine which...surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when receiving epidural analgesia in the postoperative period. A...hospital. A description of the patients age, gender, type of surgery, type of epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and

  20. Epidural steroid warning controversy still dogging FDA.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Candido, Kenneth D; Singh, Vijay; Gharibo, Christopher G; Boswell, Mark V; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Falco, Frank J E; Grider, Jay S; Diwan, Sudhir; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    On April 23, 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a letter of warning that injection of corticosteroids into the epidural space of the spine may result in rare, but serious adverse events, including "loss of vision, stroke, paralysis, and death." The advisory also advocated that patients should discuss the benefits and risks of epidural corticosteroid injections with their health care professionals, along with the benefits and risks associated with other possible treatments. In addition, the FDA stated that the effectiveness and safety of the corticosteroids for epidural use have not been established, and the FDA has not approved corticosteroids for such use. To raise awareness of the risks of epidural corticosteroid injections in the medical community, the FDA's Safe Use Initiative convened a panel of experts including pain management experts to help define the techniques for such injections with the aim of reducing preventable harm. The panel was unable to reach an agreement on 20 proposed items related to technical aspects of performing epidural injections. Subsequently, the FDA issued the above referenced warning and a notice that a panel will be convened in November 2014. This review assesses the inaccuracies of the warning and critically analyzes the available literature. The literature has been assessed in reference to alternate techniques and an understanding of the risk factors when performing transforaminal epidural injections in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions, ultimately resulting in improved safety. The results of this review show the efficacy of epidural injections, with or without steroids, in a multitude of spinal ailments utilizing caudal, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar interlaminar approaches as well as lumbar transforaminal epidural injections . The evidence also shows the superiority of steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation utilizing caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches without any significant difference as

  1. Spinal epidural abscess in brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Boyaci, Ahmet; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Dokumaci, Dilek Sen

    2013-09-26

    Involvement of the skeletal system is a common complication of brucellosis. However, muscle involvement or paraspinal abscess formation are rare complications. Paraspinal abscess usually develops secondary to spondylitis. A case is reported here of a 33-year-old woman with symptoms of night sweats, fever and low back pain. Rose-Bengal test for brucellosis was positive and Brucella standard tube agglutination test was positive at a titre of 1/160. The diagnosis was made on MRI. The patient was treated with doxycycline and rifampin daily for 16 weeks. On day 14 of treatment, decline was observed in the patient's symptoms. In the presence of inflammatory lower back pain and fever, brucellosis should be considered particularly in the endemic areas. Furthermore, tuberculosis should be remembered in the differential diagnosis when a spinal epidural abscess is determined.

  2. Epidural hematoma associated with spinal fracture in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Ryoji; Imagama, Shiro; Satake, Kotaro; Iwase, Toshiki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical findings, radiographic appearance and surgical treatment of a spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) associated with spinal fracture in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). An 81-year-old male patient injured after falling from a 2.5 m tree presented with severe back pain. On plain radiographs and CT images, DISH with anterolateral osteophytes and fused thoracolumbar vertebrae was found along with a T12 fracture. Patient was initially treated with bed rest followed by placement into a body cast. Three weeks later, he presented with incomplete paraplegia of his lower limbs. CT images did not reveal any fracture displacement, but MRI images showed an epidural hematoma compressing the dura mater. The patient was successfully treated by posterior fixation surgery using pedicle screws and rod with vertebroplasty. We aimed to report a unique case of a SEH complicating a spinal fracture in DISH.

  3. [Low back pain secondary to lumbar epidural venous plexus dilatation due to compression of the inferior vena cava].

    PubMed

    Juan, L Jiménez; Argüelles, C Ferreiro; Gallardo, J M Fernández

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a patient presenting at the emergency department with subacute low back pain radiating to both lower limbs in whom ultrasonography and abdominal computed tomography diagnosed a retroperitoneal adenopathic mass compressing the inferior vena cava. Magnetid resonance imagin of the lumbar spine showed the retroperitoneal mass and also showed dilatation and tortuosity of the vessels of the lumbar epidural venous plexus, which was considered responsible for the radiating low back pain. Histological study defined the retroperitoneal mass as follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The dilatation of the lumbar epidural venous plexus can cause lumbar and radicular pain.

  4. Intermittent epidural TOP-UPS vs. patient control epidural analgesia during labor.

    PubMed

    Marijic, Vlatka; Bukovic, Damir; Mihaljevic, Slobodan; Oreskovic, Slavko; Persec, Jasminka; Zupic, Tomislav; Juras, Josip; Milinovic, Darko

    2013-12-01

    Pain during labor and delivery is often very unpleasant and stressful for the parturients. Patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been found to be both safe and effective, providing optimal pain relief and allowing women to participate in their own analgesia). Compared to other epidural techniques, intermittent epidural top-ups and continuous epidural analgesia (CEA), PCEA uses diluted local anesthetic solutions with less motor block and less unscheduled clinician interventions. The purpose of our study was to compare intermittent bolus epidural top-ups and PCEA in labor. Sixty ASA I patients who requested epidural analgesia for labor and had written consent were included in the study. 30 patients in the first group received intermittent bolus epidural top-ups, while patients in the second group received PCEA. We evaluated duration of labor, maternal sense of pain using VAS scale and maternal satisfaction during fetal descent in both groups. We found that the duration of labor was significantly shorter and maternal sense of pain was lower in the PCEA group than in the group receiving epidural bolus top-ups. There were no differences between groups in maternal satisfaction during fetal descent.

  5. Symptomatic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis After a Single Local Epidural Steroid Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, Chung Hong Kaur, Shaleen; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare disorder that can manifest with progressive neurological deficits. It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated epidural fat commonly associated with the administration of exogenous steroids associated with a variety of systemic diseases, endocrinopathies, and Cushing syndrome (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). Occasionally, spinal epidural lipomatosis may occur in patients not exposed to steroids or in patients with endocrinopathies, primarily in obese individuals (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). However, spinal lumbar epidural lipomatosis resulting from local steroid injection has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 45-year-old diabetic man with claudication that was probably due to symptomatic lumbar spinal lipomatosis resulting from a single local epidural steroid injection.

  6. Spinal epidural abscess successfully treated with percutaneous, computed tomography-guided, needle aspiration and parenteral antibiotic therapy: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Rong-Kuo; Chen, Chi-Jen; Tang, Lok-Ming; Chen, Sien-Tsong

    2002-08-01

    We describe a case of a posterior spinal epidural abscess that was successfully treated with percutaneous, computed tomography-guided, needle aspiration and parenteral antibiotic therapy. A 48-year-old man experienced acute pain in the paralumbar region for 1 week, followed by gait disturbance and micturition difficulty. Laboratory studies demonstrated leukocytosis and hyperglycemia. Blood cultures yielded Staphylococcus aureus. Magnetic resonance imaging scans of the thoracolumbar spine revealed a posterior spinal epidural abscess located between L2 and the lower cervical spine. The patient's low back pain persisted despite 10 days of antibiotic therapy. Therefore, percutaneous, computed tomography-guided, needle aspiration was performed. The low back pain was relieved dramatically and immediately after the procedure. The spinal epidural abscess completely resolved after 6 weeks of antibiotic treatment. Surgical decompression and antibiotic therapy are the treatments of choice for patients with spinal epidural abscesses. Selected patients may be treated nonsurgically. Rarely, percutaneous drainage of the abscess has been reported to be helpful. Our case suggests that percutaneous, computed tomography-guided, needle aspiration might be a rational alternative to surgical decompression for treatment of spinal epidural abscesses.

  7. Differential effects of epidural analgesia on modes of delivery and perinatal outcomes between nulliparous and multiparous women: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tai-Ho; Hsieh, T'sang-T'ang; Liu, Hung-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is considered one of the most effective methods for pain relief during labor. However, it is not clear whether similar effects of epidural analgesia on the progression of labor, modes of delivery, and perinatal outcomes exist between nulliparous and multiparous women. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to analyze all deliveries after 37 weeks of gestation, with the exclusion of pregnancies complicated by multiple gestations and fetal anomalies and deliveries without trials of labor; these criteria produced a study population of n=16,852. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to control for confounders. In total, 7260 of 10,175 (71.4%) nulliparous and 2987 of 6677 (44.7%) multiparous parturients were administered epidural analgesia. The independent factors for intrapartum epidural analgesia included a low prepregnancy body mass index, genetic amniocentesis, group B streptococcal colonization of the genito-rectal tract, and augmentation and induction of labor. In the nulliparous women, epidural analgesia was a significant risk factor for operative vaginal delivery (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.80-2.54); however, it was a protective factor against Caesarean delivery (adjusted OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.55-0.69). Epidural analgesia remained a significant risk factor for operative vaginal delivery (adjusted OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.58-2.97) but not for Caesarean delivery (adjusted OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.77-1.55) in the multiparous women. Furthermore, the women who were administered epidural analgesia during the trials of labor had similar rates of adverse perinatal outcomes compared with the women who were not administered epidural analgesia, except that a higher rate of 1-minute Apgar scores less than 7 was noted in the nulliparous women who were administered epidural analgesia. Intrapartum epidural analgesia has differential effects on the modes of delivery between nulliparous and multiparous women, and it is

  8. Posterior peritoneal recesses: assessment using CT

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenstein, W.A.; Auh, Y.H.; Zirinsky, K.; Kneeland, J.B.; Whalen, J.P.; Kazam, E.

    1985-08-01

    Intraperitoneal compartments may extend posteriorly to the level of known retroperitoneal structures at several locations within the abdomen. These locations include the posterior subhepatic or hepatorenal space, the splenorenal space, the retropancreatic recess, the paracolic gutters, and the pararectal fossae. Because of their posterior location, fluid collections within these compartments may be mistaken radiologically for retroperitoneal masses. The sectional anatomy of these spaces and particularly their appearance on computed tomographic scans, are illustrated in this paper.

  9. Posterior ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Sandro; Buda, Roberto; Mosca, Massimiliano; Parma, Alessandro; Di Caprio, Francesco

    2013-03-01

    Posterior ankle impingement is a common cause of chronic ankle pain and results from compression of bony or soft tissue structures during ankle plantar flexion. Bony impingement is most commonly related to an os trigonum or prominent trigonal process. Posteromedial soft tissue impingement generally arises from an inversion injury, with compression of the posterior tibiotalar ligament between the medial malleolus and talus. Posterolateral soft tissue impingement is caused by an accessory ligament, the posterior intermalleolar ligament, which spans the posterior ankle between the posterior tibiofibular and posterior talofibular ligaments. Finally, anomalous muscles have also been described as a cause of posterior impingement.

  10. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  11. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Hajnour, Mohamed S; Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Ejaz, Abdul Aziz Ahmed; Al Zahrani, Tariq; Kanchi, Naveed Uddin

    2017-01-01

    For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications.

  12. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hajnour, Mohamed S.; Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Ejaz, Abdul Aziz Ahmed; Al Zahrani, Tariq; Kanchi, Naveed Uddin

    2017-01-01

    For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications. PMID:28217071

  13. Epidural cortical stimulation and aphasia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cherney, Leora R.; Harvey, Richard L.; Babbitt, Edna M.; Hurwitz, Rosalind; Kaye, Rosalind C.; Lee, Jaime B.; Small, Steven. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several methods of delivering cortical brain stimulation to modulate cortical excitability and interest in their application as an adjuvant strategy in aphasia rehabilitation after stroke is growing. Epidural cortical stimulation, although more invasive than other methods, permits high frequency stimulation of high spatial specificity to targeted neuronal populations. Aims First, we review evidence supporting the use of epidural cortical stimulation for upper limb recovery after focal cortical injury in both animal models and human stroke survivors. These data provide the empirical and theoretical platform underlying the use of epidural cortical stimulation in aphasia. Second, we summarize evidence for the application of epidural cortical stimulation in aphasia. We describe the procedures and primary outcomes of a safety and feasibility study (Cherney, Erickson & Small, 2010), and provide previously unpublished data regarding secondary behavioral outcomes from that study. Main Contribution In a controlled study comparing epidural cortical stimulation plus language treatment (CS/LT) to language treatment alone (LT), eight stroke survivors with nonfluent aphasia received intensive language therapy for 6 weeks. Four of these participants also underwent surgical implantation of an epidural stimulation device which was activated only during therapy sessions. Behavioral data were collected before treatment, immediately after treatment, and at 6 and 12 weeks following the end of treatment. The effect size for the primary outcome measure, the Western Aphasia Battery Aphasia Quotient, was benchmarked as moderate from baseline to immediately post-treatment, and large from baseline to the 12-week follow-up. Similarly, effect sizes obtained at the 12-week follow-up for the Boston Naming Test, the Communicative Effectiveness Index, and for correct information units on a picture description task were greater than those obtained immediately post treatment

  14. Unusual Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis and Lumbosacral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Picazo, David; Ramírez Villaescusa, José

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural lipomatosis is most frequently observed in patients on chronic steroid treatment. Only a few idiopathic epidural lipomatosis cases have been described. Material and Methods. 64-year-old male patient presented with low back pain and left leg pain. Later, the patient experienced neurogenic claudication and radicular pain in the left leg without urinary dysfunction. Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an abnormal fat tissue overgrowth in the epidural space with compression of the dural sac, degenerative disc disease at L4-L5 level, and instability at L5-S1. Endocrinopathic diseases and chronic steroid therapy were excluded. If conservative treatment failed, surgical treatment can be indicated. Results. After surgery, there was a gradual improvement in symptoms and signs, and six months later the patient returned to daily activities and was neurologically normal. Conclusion. In the absence of common causes of neurogenic claudication, epidural lipomatosis should be considered. The standard test for the diagnosis of epidural lipomatosis is magnetic resonance (MR). At first, conservative treatment must be considered; weight loss and the suspension of prior corticosteroid therapy are indicated. In the presence of neurological impairment, the operative treatment of wide surgical decompression must be performed soon after diagnosis. PMID:27069704

  15. Influence of epidural dexamethasone on maternal temperature and serum cytokine concentration after labor epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Zhong; Hu, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Xia; Qian, Ping; Ge, Jia-Mei; Tang, Bei-Lei

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of epidural dexamethasone on maternal temperature and serum cytokine levels after labor epidural analgesia. Sixty healthy term nulliparas in spontaneous labor were randomized to receive epidural analgesia alone using bupivacaine 0.125% and fentanyl 1 μg/mL (group I) or epidural analgesia combined with dexamethasone 0.2mg/mL (group II) (n=30 per group). Maternal tympanic temperature was measured before epidural analgesia and hourly thereafter until delivery. Maternal and cord venous blood were sampled for analysis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-10 levels. There was no difference in the incidence of intrapartum fever (38 °C or more) between the 2 groups (3/30 versus 1/30, P=0.612). The mean maternal temperature increased with time in group I, with the elevation reaching statistical significance at 4 hours post analgesia and at delivery compared with baseline (P=0.012 and P=0.043, respectively). A similar trend was observed with maternal serum IL-6 levels in group I. In group II, maternal temperature and IL-6 levels did not differ from baseline at any time point during labor. Epidural dexamethasone alleviates maternal temperature elevation after epidural analgesia. This effect can be attributed to the decrease in IL-6 levels. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Idiopathic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis in the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Al-Omari, Ali A; Phukan, Rishabh D; Leonard, Dana A; Herzog, Tyler L; Wood, Kirkham B; Bono, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Overgrowth of epidural fat, known as spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL), can cause symptomatic compression of the spinal cord, conus medullaris, or cauda equina. Suggested predisposing factors such as obesity, steroid use, and diabetes mellitus have been based on a few reported cases, many of which were not surgically confirmed. There is a paucity of epidemiological data in surgically confirmed cases for this disorder. The purpose of this independently reviewed, retrospective, matched cohort analysis was to compare the demographics and incidence of comorbidities of patients who underwent lumbar decompression for SEL vs degenerative stenosis without SEL. Two surgeons' databases were reviewed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent decompression surgery for magnetic resonance imaging-verified, symptomatic lumbar SEL. A matched control group comprised an equal number of patients with degenerative stenosis (n=14). Demographic data, body mass index, symptom type/duration, comorbidities, complications, treatment history, and associated pathology were collected from medical records. Previously suggested risk factors, such as obesity, endocrinopathy, and epidural steroid injections, were not significantly different between the SEL and control groups. Furthermore, there were no differences in operative times, complications, or blood loss. The only noted difference between the 2 groups was the preoperative duration of symptoms, on average double in patients with SEL. This series represents the largest of its kind reported to date. Because symptom duration was the only difference noted, it is postulated to be the result of lack of awareness of SEL. Future prospective study in a larger group of patients is warranted. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):163-168.].

  17. Pin-site epidural hematoma: A catastrophic complication of cranial fixation in a child.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Prasad; Kumar, Soumen Kanti; Kartikueyan, Rajaraman; Patel, Sachinkumar Maheshbhai

    2016-01-01

    Cranial fixation with pins is a routine adjunct in neurosurgery and is usually considered safe. A rarely reported complication is skull fracture at the pin site and consequent epidural hematoma. Usually, these are picked up only postoperatively and rarely, intraoperatively if there is unexplained "brain bulge" in which case the operation should be terminated and urgent imaging has to be done. We describe such a complication that occurred while operating on a 12-year-old child with a posterior fossa tumor and review the available literature dealing with such events.

  18. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  19. Sciatica caused by lumbar epidural gas.

    PubMed

    Belfquih, Hatim; El Mostarchid, Brahim; Akhaddar, Ali; gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disc degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. The clinical features are similar to those of common sciatica. CT is very useful in the detection of epidural gas accumulation and nerve root compression. We report a case of symptomatic epidural gas accumulation originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbo-sacral radiculopathy. A 45-year-old woman suffered from sciatica for 9 months. The condition worsened in recent days. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and S1 nerve root. After evacuation of the gas, her pain resolved without recurrence.

  20. Experience with symptomatic spinal epidural cysts.

    PubMed

    Freidberg, S R; Fellows, T; Thomas, C B; Mancall, A C

    1994-06-01

    Epidural cysts, either synovial or ganglion, are an unusual cause of epidural compressive syndromes. We report a series of 26 patients with cysts, including 1 cervical, 2 thoracic, and 23 lumbar. Complaints at the time of admission and findings were similar to those associated with other epidural lesions at the same locations. The surgical technique is similar to that for other spinal lesions, with a wide exposure to enable a clear view of the cyst and surrounding structures, and is governed by imaging studies. Patients with cervical and thoracic lumbar cysts were free of symptoms and signs postoperatively. Of the 23 patients with lumbar cysts, 15 were free of symptoms after an operation, 7 had symptomatic improvement but had some pain and neurological findings, and 1 patient had no improvement. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging permit accurate preoperative evaluation.

  1. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery.

  2. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess.

    PubMed

    Aycan, Abdurrahman; Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail; Arslan, Harun

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation.

  3. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation. PMID:27688918

  4. Epidural analgesia for labor: Current techniques

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marcos; Halpern, Stephen H

    2010-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is an extremely effective and popular treatment for labor pain. In this review, we trace the history of the use of epidural analgesia and its refinements. We then outline the goals of treatment and methods used to attain those goals. The use of low concentrations of local anesthetics, combined with lipid-soluble opioids, does not impede the progress of labor or depress the newborn. The incidence of side effects is low. Maintenance of analgesia that allows patient control enhances patient satisfaction. PMID:23144567

  5. Obstetric epidurals and chronic adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Rice, I; Wee, M Y K; Thomson, K

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that obstetric epidurals lead to chronic adhesive arachnoiditis (CAA). CAA is a nebulous disease entity with much confusion over its symptomatology. This review outlines the pathological, clinical, and radiological features of the disease. The proposed diagnostic criteria for CAA are: back pain that increases on exertion, with or without leg pain; neurological abnormality on examination; and characteristic MRI findings. Using these criteria, there is evidence to show that epidural or subarachnoid placement of some contrast media, preservatives and possibly vasoconstrictors, may lead to CAA. No evidence was found that the preservative-free, low concentration bupivacaine with opioid mixtures or plain bupivacaine currently used in labour lead to CAA.

  6. Risk factors for failed reactivation of a labor epidural for postpartum tubal ligation: a prospective, observational study.

    PubMed

    Powell, Mark F; Wellons, Douglas D; Tran, Steve F; Zimmerman, John M; Frölich, Michael A

    2016-12-01

    To determine specific risk factors that increase the failure rate of labor epidurals reactivated for use as a surgical block for postpartum tubal ligation. Prospective, observational study. Labor and delivery suite and operating rooms at the Women and Infants Center. One hundred patients undergoing postpartum tubal ligation with an existing labor epidural that is documented to be within 2 cm of initial placement. Body mass index, patient satisfaction with her epidural during labor and delivery, time from delivery to reactivation for tubal ligation, depth to loss of resistance, and the need for top-ups during labor were recorded preoperatively. Failure to reactivate was recorded and defined as any patient that (1) did not achieve a T6 level to pinprick, (2) had perceived pain (pain score >3) that required administration of an intravenous opioid or local anesthetic infiltration, or (3) required conversion to general anesthesia. The overall success rate of reactivation was 78%. Significant risk factors for failure to reactivate were (1) poor patient satisfaction (P = .016), (2) increased time from delivery to reactivation (P = .044), and (3) the need for top-ups during labor and delivery (P = .032). Poor satisfaction score of the epidural during labor and delivery, increasing time from delivery to epidural reactivation for tubal ligation, and the need for top-ups during labor and delivery increase the incidence of reactivation failure. No correlation was found with body mass index or loss of resistance and failure to reactivate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-08-20

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery.

  8. Percutaneous Posterior Calcaneal Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Different types of posterior calcaneal osteotomy are used for calcaneal realignment in the management of hindfoot deformity. We describe a percutaneous technique of posterior calcaneal osteotomy that can be either a Dwyer-type closing wedge osteotomy or displacement osteotomy.

  9. Epidural volume extension in combined spinal epidural anaesthesia for elective caesarean section: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Loubert, C; O'Brien, P J; Fernando, R; Walton, N; Philip, S; Addei, T; Columb, M O; Hallworth, S

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the effect of epidural volume extension on spinal blockade in pregnant women undergoing elective caesarean section with a combined spinal-epidural technique. We randomly allocated 90 healthy subjects to three groups to receive spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg (group B7.5), spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg immediately followed by epidural volume extension with saline 5 ml (group B7.5-EVE) or spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 10 mg without epidural volume extension (group B10). We evaluated the height of the block every 5 min for 15 min following the spinal injection. The overall sensory block level increased with time (p < 0.001), regardless of the group studied, and there were significantly fewer failures of block in the group B10 compared with both B7.5 and B7.5-EVE groups (p = 0.001). In conclusion, we could not demonstrate a benefit in using epidural volume extension with 5 ml saline as part of a combined spinal epidural technique in term parturients undergoing elective caesarean section. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. [Maternal postures and epidural analgesia during labour].

    PubMed

    Ducloy-Bouthors, A-S; De Gasquet, B; Davette, M; Cuisse, M

    2006-06-01

    The evolution of birth is of interest for obstetricians and midwives. Postures with asymmetric stretching and balance, kneeling, or sitting have been claimed to be able to help foetal head rotation. Although walking during labour have no influence on the outcome of labour, hip-flexed postures enlarging the pelvic diameter are yet evaluated to improve the obstetric course of labour. In a prospective randomised study including 93 parturients, we compared the supine 30 degrees lateral tilt (control group) to three hip-flexed postures: sitting (S), right hip-flexed left lateral position (L) and left hip-flexed right lateral position (R). Epidural analgesia with 12 ml ropivacaine 0.1% and sufentanil 0.5 microg/ml was administered over a period of six minutes. The total epidural spread was 15+/-0.3 dermatomes and the upper level of thermo-analgesic blockade reached T7-T8 (T5 to T10) in each group. There were no differences between groups for the left and right total spread and upper level of epidural blockade, for the time to maximal block and pain relief. There was no motor block and no maternal or foetal side effects. We conclude that, for the three hip-flexed postures tested, position does not influence local anesthetic spread or symmetry of analgesia after induction of obstetric epidural anaesthesia.

  11. Pneumocephalus and seizures following epidural steroid injection.

    PubMed

    Sorber, Joseph; Levy, David; Schwartz, Adam

    2017-09-18

    We describe a patient with pneumocephalus following an epidural steroid injection (ESI) who presented with altered mental status, headache, focal neurologic findings and seizures. Pneumocephalus has rarely been described following ESI. A 34-year-old female presented with an altered level of consciousness worsening over approximately 18h following an ESI for lumbar back pain. She had associated headache, right-sided facial twitching and right upper extremity weakness. A brain CT scan revealed pneumocephalus in the right lateral ventricle and quadrigeminal plate cistern. While in the emergency department she experienced a self-limited generalized seizure. She was admitted and her symptoms persisted. Seven days following admission she was discharged to a rehabilitation facility, but her arm weakness persisted for greater than a month before resolving. Epidural anesthesia relies on the localization of the epidural space. The manual loss of resistance technique is widely used to identify the epidural space. The incidence of adverse effects is unknown. Case reports noting complications associated with this technique have been reported; rarely including pneumocephalus. Complications from the pneumocephalus are even less commonly reported. Though rare following an ESI and generally self-limited without complication, pneumocephalus should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with neurologic deficits after instrumentation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    violations. VI ABSTRACT Postoperative pain is an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications...This descriptive study was conducted to determine which surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when...epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and treatments were recorded and cross-tabulated. The following surgical categories

  13. Use of Pedicled Trapezius Myocutaneous Flap for Posterior Skull Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mansher; Rios Diaz, Arturo J; Cauley, Ryan; Smith, Timothy R; Caterson, E J

    2015-09-01

    Soft-tissue defects in posterior skull can be challenging for reconstruction. If related to tumor resection, these wound beds are generally irradiated and can be difficult from a recipient-vessel perspective for a free tissue transfer. Locoregional flaps might prove to be important reconstructive option in such patients. There is a very limited data on the usage of pedicled trapezius myocutaneous flaps for such defects. The authors reviewed existing study for usage of trapezius flap for posterior skull repair and used pedicled trapezius myocutaneous flaps based on the descending branch of superficial cervical artery (SCA) for reconstruction of posterior skull soft-tissue defect in an irradiated and infected wound. Two patients were operated for trapezius myocutaneous flap for posterior skull defects complicated by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and epidural abscess. There was no recipient or donor-site complication at a mean follow-up of 12.5 months. Neither of the 2 patients had any functional deficits for the entire duration of the follow-up. Although this flap was able to help in controlling the CSF leakage in the first patient, it successfully healed the cavity generated from epidural abscess drainage in the second patient. The large angle of rotation coupled with the ability to complete the procedure without repositioning the patients makes trapezius myocutaneous flap an attractive option for posterior skull reconstruction. In our limited experience, the pedicled trapezius flaps are a reliable alternative as they are well vascularized and able to obliterate the soft-tissue defect completely. The recipient site healed completely in infected as well as irradiated wound beds. In addition, the donor site can be primarily closed with minimal donor-associated complication.

  14. [Clinical use of spinal or epidural steroids].

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, F; Ciccozzi, A; Donatelli, F; Paladini, A; Varrassi, G

    2002-01-01

    Steroids, drugs with potent antiinflammatory properties on the damaged nervous roots, have been especially used as adjuvants of local anesthetics, by spinal route, in the treatments of low-back pain. Spinal route was chosen to obtain a higher local concentration of drug, with few systemic side effects and to improve drug's action mechanism. Steroids seem to interact with GABA receptors and thus control neural excitability through a stabilising effect on membranes, modification of nervous conduction and membrane hyperpolarization, in supraspinal and spinal site. Epidural steroids are especially used in the treatment of low back pain due to irritation of nervous roots. They have been administered alone or in association with local anesthetics and/or saline solution. Slow release formulations have been generally used (methylprednisolone acetate, and triamcinolone diacetate). Other indications of epidural steroids are: postoperative hemilaminectomy pain, prevention of post herpetic neuralgia, degenerative ostheoartrithis. Intra-thecal steroids have been frequently used in the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy due to discopathy, as an alternative treatment when epidural administration is ineffective. Positive results have been obtained with methylprednisolone acetate, alone or in association with local anesthetics. Complications related to intraspinal steroids injections are due to execution of the block and side effects of drugs. Complications associated with intrathecal steroids are more frequent and severe than epidural injections and include: adhesive arachnoiditis, aseptic meningitis, cauda equina syndrome. Steroidal toxicity seems to be related to the polyethylenic glycole vehicle. Anyway, slow release formulations contain less concentrated polyethylenic glycole. The epidural administration, a correct dilution of steroid with local anesthetics solution and/or saline solution, and a limited number of injections (no more than three) allows a significant reduction of

  15. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia for labor pain: best timing of epidural infusion following spinal dose.

    PubMed

    Okutomi, Toshiyuki; Saito, Miwako; Mochizuki, Junko; Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M

    2009-03-01

    The combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) technique for labor pain has attained wide spread popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The onset of analgesia is rapid and reliable, and maternal satisfaction is very high. However, the best timing of an epidural infusion following the spinal dose and its effect on the total local anesthetics consumption has not been well determined. A total of 144 consenting healthy nulliparous parturients whose labor was induced and who labored under regional analgesia were enrolled in this study. Following induction of the CSEA with intrathecal injection of bupivacaine, 2.5 mg and fentanyl, 25 microg, the patients were randomized into one of four groups to receive a subsequent continuous epidural infusion [E (3), E (30), E (60) and E (90)], depending on the timing of the initiation of epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine, 0.0002% fentanyl and 1:500,000 epinephrine at the rate of 10 ml/h. In study Groups E (3), E (30), E (60) and E (90), epidural infusion was initiated 3, 30, 60 and 90 min, respectively following spinal induction dose. Patients requesting additional labor analgesia were given an epidural bolus (8 ml) of ropivacaine, 0.2%. The number of parturients requesting additional boluses of ropivacaine and the total dose of ropivacaine required for labor analgesia were registered. The numbers of patients who required additional boluses of ropivacaine in Group E (3) and Group E (30) were significantly less than those in Group E (60) and Group E (90). The total dose of ropivacaine required for labor pain in Group E (3) and Group E (30) was insignificantly smaller than the total dose required in Group E (60) and Group E (90). Our results suggest that the best timing of epidural infusion following spinal dose was within 30 min of spinal induction dose.

  16. [The efficacy and safety of continuous epidural analgesia versus intradural-epidural analgesia during labor].

    PubMed

    Gómez, P; Echevarría, M; Calderón, J; Caba, F; Martínez, A; Rodríguez, R

    2001-05-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of intradural-epidural analgesia in comparison with continuous epidural analgesia during labor and childbirth. Forty-two women whose labor began spontaneously were enrolled and distributed randomly in two groups. The intradural-epidural analgesia group (IEA, n = 21) received 25 microgram of intradural fentanyl with 2.5 mg of isobaric bupivacaine with adrenalin, after which analgesia was maintained with epidural administration of one 8 mL bolus of 0.125% bupivacaine, followed by perfusion of a balanced concentration at a rate of 8 ml/h. Patients in the continuous epidural analgesia group (CEA, n = 21) were given 8 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine with adrenalin; the epidural perfusion of 0.125% bupivacaine and 1 microgram/ml of fentanyl was started at the same rate as in the IEA group. We recorded pain as assessed on a visual analog scale, extension of sensory and motor block, maternal hemodynamic constants, number of boluses of bupivacaine used, total doses of bupivacaine and oxytocin, instruments needed for childbirth, and side effects (pruritus, nausea and vomiting). Analgesic efficacy during the first 30 minutes was greater in the IEA group. The total dose of bupivacaine, required top-up boluses, and the extension of sensory block at 30 minutes, one hour and two hours were also significantly less in the IEA group. The incidence of pruritus was higher in the IEA group. No significant differences were observed for other variables. Intradural-epidural analgesia provides effective analgesia for labor, with rapid onset, reduced extension of sensory block, lower total doses of local anesthetics and few side effects.

  17. Which should be appropriate surgical treatment for subtentorial epidural empyema? Burr-hole evacuation versus decompressive craniectomy: Review of the literature with a case report

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Vaner; Özgür, Abdulkadir; Terzi, Suat

    2016-01-01

    Subtentorial empyema is a rare intracranial complication of chronic otitis media. Moreover, if not correctly treated, it is a life-threatening infection. Epidural and subdural empyemas on subtentorial space have different effects. This difference is not mentioned in literature. If the distinction can be made, surgical treatment method will be different, and the desired surgical treatment may be less minimal invasive. A 26-year-old male patient was found to have developed epidural empyema in the subtentorial space. We performed a burr-hole evacuation in this case because there was low cerebellar edema, Also, the general condition of the patient was good, the empyema was a convex image on the lower surface of tentorium on magnetic resonance images, and when the dura mater base is reached during mastoidectomy for chronic otitis media, we were observed to drain a purulent material through the epidural space. After 10 days from surgery increased posterior fossa edema caused hydrocephalus. Therefore, ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion was performed. The patient fully recovered and was discharged after 6 weeks. Complete correction in the posterior fossa was observed by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Burr-hole evacuation from inside of the mastoidectomy cavity for subtentorial epidural empyema is an effective and minimal invasive surgical treatment. PMID:27057210

  18. [Long lasting epidural anesthesia for a morbidly obese patient].

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Y; Nishiyama, T; Hanaoka, K

    1998-07-01

    A forty-six year old woman (136 cm, 115 kg), with body mass index (BMI) of 62.2, was scheduled for osteotomy because of postoperative infection and pseudoarthrosis of the right lower leg. During the post two years, the patient had received several orthopedic surgeries under spina anesthesia, which repeatedly accompanied intraoperative respiratory difficulties. At the age of thirty one, she weighted more than 100 kg and needed cardiopulmonary resuscitation during cesarean section under general anesthesia. Considering the past history of anesthesic complications, we decided to perform epidural anesthesia with a written informed consent from the patient. Due to technical difficulties, the operative procedures took six hours and forty-five minutes without complications related to anesthesia. This case demonstrates the necessity of safe and comfortable anesthesia for morbidly obese patients.

  19. Effects of epidural anaesthesia on intestinal oxygenation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Vagts, D A; Iber, T; Szabo, B; Haberstroh, J; Reising, K; Puccini, M; Geiger, K; Nöldge-Schomburg, G F E

    2003-02-01

    Perioperative intestinal hypoperfusion is a major contributing factor leading to organ dysfunction. It can be caused by stress as a result of surgical manipulation or hypoxia. Additionally, anaesthesia can affect intestinal oxygenation. This animal study was designed to assess the effects of reduced regional sympathetic nervous activity induced by thoracic epidural anaesthesia on intestinal oxygenation. After ethical approval, 16 anaesthetized and acutely instrumented pigs were randomly assigned to two groups (epidural anaesthesia alone vs epidural anaesthesia plus volume loading). The epidural anaesthesia aimed for a T5-T12 block. Measurements were at baseline and after 1 and 2 h. Epidural anaesthesia was associated with a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure and pronounced mesenteric vasodilatation. Mesenteric blood flow did not change. Intestinal oxygen uptake, mucosal tissue oxygen partial pressure and tissue carbon dioxide partial pressure remained unchanged. Despite marked systemic hypotension, epidural anaesthesia did not affect intestinal oxygenation. There was no benefit obtained from volume loading.

  20. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis after repeat epidural blood patch.

    PubMed

    Carlswärd, C; Darvish, B; Tunelli, J; Irestedt, L

    2015-08-01

    Epidural blood patching is an effective treatment for postdural puncture headache but has potential risks. Arachnoiditis is a very rare disabling condition and few cases have been described following an epidural blood patch. We present a case of chronic adhesive arachnoiditis in a parturient treated with a repeat epidural blood patch. A healthy 29-year-old woman had an accidental dural puncture following epidural insertion during labour. Initial treatment of postdural puncture headache with an epidural blood patch was ineffective and was therefore repeated. She gradually developed severe neurological symptoms consistent with arachnoiditis confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Despite intensive multimodal treatment with analgesics and physiotherapy, her neurological condition remains unresolved two years later. This serious but rare complication should encourage caution when treating parturients with postdural puncture headache with a repeat epidural blood patch.

  1. Management and visualization of a kinked epidural catheter

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidis, T; Fileli, A; Pyrgos, P

    2010-01-01

    A lumbar epidural catheter inserted in a 29-year-old woman for labor analgesia. The catheter failed to provide adequate analgesia. Moreover, after labor, it proved difficult to be removed. After computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance impedance (MRI) examination the course of the catheter was visible, the entrapped catheter was dislodged intact, revealing a kinking near its distal tip. Kinking of an epidural catheter leading to entrapment is an unusual complication of epidural catheterization. PMID:21311644

  2. [Spinal cord compression by tumor with onset following epidural catheterization].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Garés, T; Mateo, J M; Longás Valién, J; Aisa Hernández, G; Cía Blasco, P; Cuartero Lobera, J

    2008-02-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old boy with a pelvic tumor who developed signs of spinal cord compression following placement of a lumbar epidural catheter to obtain a percutaneous biopsy. The fact that a catheter had been inserted led us to suspect epidural hematoma as a complication, but surgery revealed that the pelvic tumor had spread to the lumbar epidural space and was causing motor blockade of both legs.

  3. Effect of combined spinal-epidural analgesia versus epidural analgesia on labor and delivery duration.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Ramirez, Javier; Haya, Javier; Pérez-López, Faustino R; Gil-Trujillo, Silvia; Garrido-Esteban, Rosa A; Bernal, Ginés

    2011-09-01

    To determine whether combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) can decrease the known epidural effect of lengthening delivery. Between April and May 2010, 144 women undergoing childbirth in hospital with epidural pain relief were randomized to receive either low-dose epidural analgesia (LEA) or CSEA. The spinal component included 2.5mg of bupivacaine, 25 μg of fentanyl, and 200 μg of morphine. The epidural component of the CSEA procedure was started once pain returned. The primary outcome was total labor duration measured from the time of initiation of labor analgesia to delivery. The difference in duration between LEA (n=72) and CSEA (n=72) was 5 minutes for labor (P=0.82), 2 minutes for delivery (P=0.60), and 7 minutes for total labor duration (P=0.75). The combined group used less levobupivacaine (P<0.001) and had lower sensory blockade at the dermatomal level (P=0.037). Women in the CSEA group had a higher incidence of pruritus (P=0.002) and lightheadedness (P=0.02) during labor; and a higher incidence of pruritus (P=0.002), nausea-vomiting (P=0.026), and drowsiness (P=0.003) in the postpartum period. As compared with LEA, CSEA did not shorten the duration of labor length; however, it did reduce levobupivacaine consumption and motor weakness. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Lab in a needle for epidural space identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, B.; Micco, A.; Ricciardi, A.; Amorizzo, E.; Mercieri, M.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2016-05-01

    This work relies on the development of a sensorized medical needle with an all-optical guidance (Lab in a Needle) system for epidural space identification. The device is based on the judicious integration of a Fiber Bragg grating sensor inside the lumen of an epidural needle to discriminate between different types of tissue and thus providing continuous and real time measurements of the pressure experienced by the needle tip during its advancement. Experiments carried out on an epidural training phantom demonstrate the validity of our approach for the correct and effective identification of the epidural space.

  5. Serratia marcescens spinal epidural abscess formation following acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Wei; Hsu, Shun-Neng; Liu, Jhih-Syuan; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of spinal epidural abscess following acupuncture is very rare. We herein report the case of a 54-year-old woman who presented with progressive low back pain and fever with a root sign. She underwent surgical decompression, with an immediate improvement of the low back pain. A culture of the epidural abscess grew Serratia marcescens. One year postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging revealed the almost complete eradication of the abscess. This case is the first case of Serratia marcescens-associated spinal epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture. The characteristics of spinal epidural abscess that develop after acupuncture and how to prevent such complications are also discussed.

  6. Myelopathy with syringomyelia following thoracic epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A; Ferrari, H

    2004-02-01

    Under general anaesthesia and muscle relaxation, a thoracic epidural catheter was inserted at the T8-T9 level in a 7-year-old boy scheduled to have a Nissen fundoplication to provide postoperative analgesia. After 4 ml of lignocaine 1.5% was injected through the catheter, hypotension resulted. Fifty-five minutes later 5 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% produced the same effect. In the recovery room a similar injection resulted in lower blood pressure and temporary apnoea. Sensory and motor deficits were noted the next day and four days later magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated spinal cord syringomyelia extending from T5 to T10. Four years later, dysaesthesia from T6 to T10 weakness of the left lower extremity and bladder and bowel dysfunction persist. The risks of inserting thoracic epidural catheters in patients under general anaesthesia and muscle relaxation are discussed, emphasising the possibility of spinal cord injury with disastrous consequences.

  7. Hepatocellular carcinoma metastases to the epidural space.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Hilary; Witt, J Peter; Kleinschmidt-Demasters, Bette K

    2009-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is relatively uncommon in the United States, although hepatitis C, one of the known risk factors for disease, is currently showing burgeoning growth in the country. Hence, it is possible that the incidence of HCC also will increase. Clinicians and pathologists in the United States are relatively unfamiliar with the patterns of metastatic spread for HCC. We report 2 US-native patients with cirrhosis and HCC who developed epidural space metastasis, a pattern of disease spread seen infrequently, even in endemic areas. Diagnostic testing was delayed in both patients because of the lowered suspicion for metastasis and the fact that neither patient had recognized metastatic spread to more common sites, such as lung or lymph nodes. New-onset neck or back pain-especially with symptoms of paresthesia, radiculopathy, or cord compression-in the setting of HCC warrants prompt investigation for metastases to the spine and epidural space.

  8. Epidural Abscess Masquerading as Lateral Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Brodner, David C.; Cutler, Jeff; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants, the evacuation of the sinus, or the use of medical treatment alone surrounds the treatment of lateral sinus thrombosis. Treatment of an epidural abscess associated with coalescent mastoiditis is much less controversial-drainage is usually recommended. The differing treatments of these complications mandate accurate diagnosis. The advent of more sophisticated radiological studies has facilitated diagnosis of these complications; however, tests are not infallible. We present three cases in which preoperative imaging demonstrates an epidural abscess mimicking lateral sinus thrombosis by compression of the vessel. A false-positive computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study may lead to the wrong diagnosis and, consequently, improper treatment. In light of this possibility, we recommend surgical exploration in all such cases. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171148

  9. Epidural analgesia and anticoagulant therapy. Experience with one thousand cases of continuous epidurals.

    PubMed

    Odoom, J A; Sih, I L

    1983-03-01

    One thousand lumbar epidural blocks in 950 patients undergoing vascular surgery are reported. All patients were receiving oral anticoagulants pre-operatively. Mean thrombotest (TT) was 19.3% (normal range 70-130%). During surgery intravascular heparin was administered. At the end of surgery, the kaolin cephalin clotting time (KCCT) was 68 (+/- 0.8) seconds (normal range 35-60 seconds), and partial thromboplastin time (PTT) was 536 (77.9%, normal control of 100%). Despite the anticoagulant therapy, no side effects were observed in any patient which could be related to haemorrhage or haematoma formation in the epidural space. It is concluded that, provided adequate precautions are taken, epidural analgesia can be safely used in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy.

  10. [Spinal epidural angiolipoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Dufrenot, Leïla; Pelé, Eric; Cursolle, Jean-Christophe; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2010-02-01

    Spinal epidural angiolipoma is a rare tumor revealed by a slowly progressive paraplegia. We reported a case of a 44-year-old female and point out the peculiar pattern of this lesion characterized by the prominence of the vascular component over the lipomatous component. Recognition of this entity is important because this is a benign and curable cause of paraplegia. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of continuous epidural infusion and programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yunan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Jinlu; Yang, Ruimin; Liu, Jingchen

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate differences between continuous epidural infusion (CEI) and programmed intermittent epidural bolus (IEB) analgesia for the Chinese parturients undergoing spontaneous delivery and to approach their safety to parturients and neonates. Methods Two hundred healthy American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II, term (≥37 weeks’ gestation), nulliparous women who requested analgesia for labor were recruited. Epidural analgesia was initiated with a solution of 0.15% ropivacaine 10 mL and maintained with 0.1% ropivacaine mixed with sufentanil 0.3 μg/mL by CEI at a rate of 5 mL/h combined with a patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture or IEB of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture combined with a PCEA bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture. The lockout interval was 20 minutes in each arm between the CEI and the IEB group. After 20 minutes of first dosage, visual analog scale (VAS) score was obtained every 60 minutes. The maternal and fetal outcome and total consumption of analgesic solution were compared. Results There was no difference in demographic characteristics, duration of first and second stages, delivery methods, sensory block, fetal Apgar scores, and the maternal outcomes between the CEI and IEB groups. There was a significant difference in VAS scores and epidural ropivacaine total consumption between the two groups (IEB vs CEI: 51.27±9.61 vs 70.44±12.78 mg, P<0.01). Conclusion The use of programmed IEB mixed with PCEA improved labor analgesia compared to CEI mixed with PCEA, which could act as maintenance mode for epidural labor analgesia. PMID:27471390

  12. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-12-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed.

  13. [Epidemiology of complications of obstetrical epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Palot, M; Visseaux, H; Botmans, C; Pire, J C

    1994-01-01

    Epidural analgesia (EA) is the best technique to obtain pain relief during labour. But the needle, the catheter and the local anaesthetics (LA) are 3 reasons to cause maternal complications. In France we do not know the exact number of EA performed every year and it is very difficult to appreciate the incidence of maternal complications. Therefore, it is necessary to know it and try to reduce the incidence of some of them. Maternal complications after EA are classically: 1. caused by catheter or needle: massive subarachnoid injection, toxic intravenous injection with convulsions and/or cardiac arrest; 2. secondary to infectious problems: meningitis or epidural abscess; 3. due to LA with the very rare anaphylactoid reactions; 4. due to prolonged neurologic complications with epidural and subdural haematomas, subarachnoid cysts or arachnoiditis. These complications are rare: 1/4,700 in the largest series of literature, involving more than 500,000 EA. In France, we tried to quantify maternal complications among nearly 300,000 EA performed over a period of 5 years. The overall incidence of serious complications was 1/4,005 EA. The most frequent are accidental dural puncture (1/156), massive subarachnoid injections (1/8,010) and convulsions (1/9,011). The incidence of these 3 complications must be reduced by better training, material or attention during bolus injection of LA.

  14. Epidural labour analgesia using Bupivacaine and Clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Syal, K; Dogra, RK; Ohri, A; Chauhan, G; Goel, A

    2011-01-01

    Background: To compare the effects of addition of Clonidine (60 μg) to Epidural Bupivacaine (0.125%) for labour analgesia, with regard to duration of analgesia, duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section, foetal outcome, patient satisfaction and side effects. Patients & Methods: On demand, epidural labour analgesia was given to 50 nulliparous healthy term parturients (cephalic presentation), divided in two groups randomly. Group I received bupivacaine (0.125%) alone, whereas Group II received bupivacaine (0.125%) along with Clonidine (60 μg). 10 ml of 0.125% bupivacaine was injected as first dose and further doses titrated with patient relief (Numerical Rating Scale <3). Top ups were given whenever Numerical Rating Scale went above 5. Results: There was statistically significant prolongation of duration of analgesia in Group II, with no difference in duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section or foetal outcome. Also clonidine gave dose sparing effect to bupivacaine and there was better patient satisfaction without any significant side effects in Group II. Conclusion: Clonidine is a useful adjunct to bupivacaine for epidural labour analgesia and can be considered as alternative to opioids. PMID:21804714

  15. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed. PMID:28096620

  16. EFFECT OF EPIDURAL ANALGESIA ON LABOR AND ITS OUTCOMES.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Sadia; Anwar, Muhannad Waseem; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is an effective and popular way to relieve labour pain but it may interfere with normal mechanism of labour. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of labour in women with effective epidural analgesia in terms of duration of labour, mode of delivery and neonatal outcome. This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Shaikh Zayed Federal Postgraduate Medical Institute and Hospital, Lahore. One hundred pregnant women were selected by non-probability convenient sampling method. Subjects were divided into two groups of. 50 each as per convenience. Patients of any gravidity at term from 37-41 weeks were included in the sample. Epidural analgesia was applied to group B and distilled water to group A at the lumber region and the progress of labour, mode of delivery and effects on Apgar scores of neonates were evaluated. Out of hundred patients, 77 had normal duration of second stage while 23 had prolonged second stage. Among them, 18 patients (36%) were in epidural group and 5 patients (10%) in non-epidural group, while 4 patients (8%) in epidural group developed intra-partum complications; whereas among non-epidural group had such complications. 65 patients had spontaneous vaginal delivery while 35 patients had instrumental delivery. Among them 29 patients (58%) were in epidural group while only 6 patients (12%) were in non-epidural group. Babies born had Apgar score 5/10 (21.8%), 6/10 (59.4%) and 7/10 (17.8%) at 1 minute and 8/10 (74.3%) and 9/10 (24.8%) at 5 minutes in both groups and none of them needed bag and mask resuscitation. Epidural analgesia does prolong the duration of second stage of labour and increases the instrumental delivery rate. Neonatal outcome is satisfactory while only a few intra-partum complications are found with epidural analgesia.

  17. An evaluation of epidural analgesia following circumferential belt lipectomy.

    PubMed

    Michaud, André-Paul; Rosenquist, Richard W; Cram, Albert E; Aly, Al S

    2007-08-01

    Belt lipectomy combines traditional abdominoplasty with a circumferential excision of skin and fat, with resultant buttock and lateral thigh lifts. Because of the extensive nature of the procedure, postoperative pain management can be difficult. Epidural analgesia has been shown to be efficacious in treating postoperative pain. This study compares the postoperative use of epidural analgesia with more traditional pain management regimens in a large series of belt lipectomy patients. Charts of 62 belt lipectomy patients were examined retrospectively. Postoperative pain control regimen, pain scores, total amount of opioids administered, and side effects encountered were recorded. Twenty-seven patients had traditional pain control regimens, opioids on demand, and pain control pumps. Thirty-five patients received epidural analgesia as their primary mode of postoperative pain control. Pain scores and total nonepidural opioids used were lower in the epidural analgesia group on postoperative days 0 and 1 compared with the nonepidural group. The two groups converged on postoperative days 2 through 5, sharing similar pain scores and opioid use after discontinuation of epidural analgesia. The incidence of side effects was similar in the two groups, with the exception of pruritus, which was much more prominent in the epidural group. Eight of the 35 epidural patients (23 percent) experienced transient and minor complications associated with epidural therapy; several resolved spontaneously, whereas the balance resolved with cessation or modification of the epidural infusion. Epidural analgesia is more effective than traditional pain control methods in reducing immediate postoperative pain in belt lipectomy patients. On the basis of these findings, epidural analgesia should also be considered for postoperative pain management in other truncal procedures.

  18. Can the human lumbar posterior columns be stimulated by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation? A modeling study.

    PubMed

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Ladenbauer, Josef; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of different spinal cord segments in humans is a widely developed clinical practice for modification of pain, altered sensation, and movement. The human lumbar cord has become a target for modification of motor control by epidural and, more recently, by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation. Posterior columns of the lumbar spinal cord represent a vertical system of axons and when activated can add other inputs to the motor control of the spinal cord than stimulated posterior roots. We used a detailed three-dimensional volume conductor model of the torso and the McIntyre-Richard-Grill axon model to calculate the thresholds of axons within the posterior columns in response to transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation. Superficially located large-diameter posterior column fibers with multiple collaterals have a threshold of 45.4 V, three times higher than posterior root fibers (14.1 V). With the stimulation strength needed to activate posterior column axons, posterior root fibers of large and small diameters as well as anterior root fibers are coactivated. The reported results inform on these threshold differences, when stimulation is applied to the posterior structures of the lumbar cord at intensities above the threshold of large-diameter posterior root fibers.

  19. Minimally invasive treatment of multilevel spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Maurer, Adrian J; Rabb, Craig H

    2013-01-01

    The use of minimally invasive tubular retractor microsurgery for treatment of multilevel spinal epidural abscess is described. This technique was used in 3 cases, and excellent results were achieved. The authors conclude that multilevel spinal epidural abscesses can be safely and effectively managed using microsurgery via a minimally invasive tubular retractor system.

  20. Extensive spinal epidural abscess as a complication of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chez; Kavar, Bhadrakant

    2010-01-01

    A spinal epidural abscess is a neurosurgical emergency. Successful treatment frequently requires decompression of the spinal canal in combination with intravenous antibiotics. We report a patient with Crohn's disease who developed an extensive spinal epidural abscess communicating with an intra-abdominal collection.

  1. Use of epidural analgesia in post-operative pain management.

    PubMed

    Weetman, Carole; Allison, Wendy

    This article provides an overview of the use of epidural infusion analgesia in the management of patients with post-operative pain. Epidural analgesia is an effective method for relieving pain and has minimal side effects. However, life-threatening complications can occur and nurses need to be able to identify these and provide safe care for patients.

  2. Epidural technique for postoperative pain: gold standard no more?

    PubMed

    Rawal, Narinder

    2012-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is a well-established technique that has commonly been regarded as the gold standard in postoperative pain management. However, newer, evidence-based outcome data show that the benefits of epidural analgesia are not as significant as previously believed. There are some benefits in a decrease in the incidence of cardiovascular and pulmonary complications, but these benefits are probably limited to high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal or thoracic surgery who receive thoracic epidural analgesia with local anaesthetic drugs only. There is increasing evidence that less invasive regional analgesic techniques are as effective as epidural analgesia. These include paravertebral block for thoracotomy, femoral block for total hip and knee arthroplasty, wound catheter infusions for cesarean delivery, and local infiltration analgesia techniques for lower limb joint arthroplasty. Wound infiltration techniques and their modifications are simple and safe alternatives for a variety of other surgical procedures. Although pain relief associated with epidural analgesia can be outstanding, clinicians expect more from this invasive, high-cost, labour-intensive technique. The number of indications for the use of epidural analgesia seems to be decreasing for a variety of reasons. The decision about whether to continue using epidural techniques should be guided by regular institutional audits and careful risk-benefit assessment rather than by tradition. For routine postoperative analgesia, epidural analgesia may no longer be considered the gold standard.

  3. Subdural Hematoma Associated With Labor Epidural Analgesia: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Lim, Grace; Zorn, Jamie M; Dong, Yuanxu J; DeRenzo, Joseph S; Waters, Jonathan H

    2016-01-01

    This report aimed to describe the characteristics and impact of subdural hematoma (SDH) after labor epidural analgesia. Eleven obstetric patients had SDHs associated with the use of labor epidural analgesia over 7 years at a tertiary care hospital. Ten of 11 patients had signs consistent with postdural puncture headache before the diagnosis of SDH. Five patients (45%) had a recognized unintentional dural puncture, 1 (9%) had a combined spinal-epidural with a 24-gauge needle, and 5 (45%) had no recognized dural puncture. For 10 of the 11 cases, SDH was diagnosed at a mean of 4.1 days (range, 1-7 days) after performance of labor epidural analgesia; one case was diagnosed at 25 days. Ten (91%) of 11 cases had a second hospital stay for a mean of 2.8 days (range, 2-4 days) for observation, without further requirement for neurosurgical intervention. One case (9%) had decompressive hemicraniectomy after becoming unresponsive. The observed rate of labor epidural analgesia-associated SDH was 0.026% (11 in 42,969, approximately 1:3900), and the rate of SDH was 1.1% (5 in 437, approximately 1:87) if a recognized dural puncture occurred during epidural catheter placement. Subdural hematoma after labor epidural anesthesia is rare but potentially more common than historically estimated. Cases of postdural puncture headache after labor epidural anesthesia should be monitored closely for severe neurologic signs and symptoms that could herald SDH.

  4. Practical tips for modified dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Norio; Oboshi, Kenji; Sasaki, Naoki; Yamada, Haruo

    2006-01-01

    Segmental dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia has been considered difficult to perform. The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not it is difficult for beginners to learn how to do modified dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia of cattle. Thirty cattle were divided into two groups, young (n = 8) and adult (n = 22), according to their age and body weight, and 0.12% new methylene blue (NMB) was injected into the first interlumbar (L1-L2) epidural space by four fifth-year veterinary school students who had never performed this method. After a 1 hour lecture on the modified dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia procedure which included basic anatomy and skills, each student successfully performed the procedure. In the young group, the NMB solution was distributed between the periosteum and the epidural fat (BPF) in one half and between the epidural fat and the dura mater (BFD) in the other half of the cattle. In about 60% (13/22) of the adult group, the NMB solution distributed as BFD type. This study showed that the modified dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia procedure is easy for beginners to perform if they overcome their fear about the deeper insertion of the epidural needle with basic anatomical knowledge and a little experience. PMID:16434853

  5. Caudal Epidural Block: An Updated Review of Anatomy and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Caudal epidural block is a commonly used technique for surgical anesthesia in children and chronic pain management in adults. It is performed by inserting a needle through the sacral hiatus to gain entrance into the sacral epidural space. Using conventional blind technique, the failure rate of caudal epidural block in adults is high even in experienced hands. This high failure rate could be attributed to anatomic variations that make locating sacral hiatus difficult. With the advent of fluoroscopy and ultrasound in guiding needle placement, the success rate of caudal epidural block has been markedly improved. Although fluoroscopy is still considered the gold standard when performing caudal epidural injection, ultrasonography has been demonstrated to be highly effective in accurately guiding the needle entering the caudal epidural space and produce comparative treatment outcome as fluoroscopy. Except intravascular and intrathecal injection, ultrasonography could be as effective as fluoroscopy in preventing complications during caudal epidural injection. The relevant anatomy and techniques in performing the caudal epidural block will be briefly reviewed in this article. PMID:28337460

  6. Does Preprocedural Ultrasound Increase the First-Pass Success Rate of Epidural Catheterization Before Cesarean Delivery? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Mohamed Mohamed; Atallah, Magdy Mamdouh; Elkharboutly, Walaa Safaa; Allakkany, Nasser Sameh; Abdelkhalek, Mostafa

    2017-03-01

    Preprocedural ultrasound may improve the efficacy and safety of epidural catheterization, especially in difficult cases. Most studies of ultrasound-assisted epidural catheterization in the obstetric population are dated and nonblinded with inconsistent designs. This double-blind, randomized controlled study aimed to compare the ultrasound-assisted with the conventional palpation techniques for epidural catheterization in parturients undergoing cesarean delivery. We hypothesized that the use of preprocedural ultrasound would increase the success rate of epidural catheterization at the first needle pass. Eligible subjects were American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status II parturients with full-term singleton pregnancy undergoing elective cesarean delivery using double-interspace combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. Exclusion criteria were age <19 or >40 years, body mass index ≥35 kg/m, women presenting in labor or having any contraindication to neuraxial anesthesia, marked spinal deformity, previous spinal surgery, or impalpable anatomical landmarks. One hundred ten patients were randomly allocated into 2 equal groups (palpation and ultrasound groups). All procedures were performed by a single experienced anesthesiologist. Patients and investigators assessing the outcome data were blinded to group allocation. A systematic spinal ultrasound assessment and a sham procedure were performed in the ultrasound and palpation groups, respectively, before attempting epidural catheterization. The primary outcome was the rate of successful epidural catheterization at the first needle pass. Secondary outcomes were the rate of successful epidural catheterization at the first skin puncture, number of performed needle passes and skin punctures, duration of the epidural procedure, patient satisfaction from the procedure, and complications of the procedure (incidence of unintentional dural and vascular punctures, failed block, unilateral or patchy block, and backache

  7. Epidural application of spinal instrumentation particulate wear debris: a comprehensive evaluation of neurotoxicity using an in vivo animal model.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Bryan W; Hallab, Nadim J; Hu, Nianbin; McAfee, Paul C

    2013-09-01

    The introduction and utilization of motion-preserving implant systems for spinal reconstruction served as the impetus for this basic scientific investigation. The effect of unintended wear particulate debris resulting from micromotion at spinal implant interconnections and bearing surfaces remains a clinical concern. Using an in vivo rabbit model, the current study quantified the neural and systemic histopathological responses following epidural application of 11 different types of medical-grade particulate wear debris produced from spinal instrumentation. A total of 120 New Zealand White rabbits were equally randomized into 12 groups based on implant treatment: 1) sham (control), 2) stainless steel, 3) titanium alloy, 4) cobalt chromium alloy, 5) ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPe), 6) ceramic, 7) polytetrafluoroethylene, 8) polycarbonate urethane, 9) silicone, 10) polyethylene terephthalate, 11) polyester, and 12) polyetheretherketone. The surgical procedure consisted of a midline posterior approach followed by resection of the L-6 spinous process and L5-6 ligamentum flavum, permitting interlaminar exposure of the dural sac. Four milligrams of the appropriate treatment material (Groups 2-12) was then implanted onto the dura in a dry, sterile format. All particles (average size range 0.1-50 μm in diameter) were verified to be endotoxin free prior to implantation. Five animals from each treatment group were sacrificed at 3 months and 5 were sacrificed at 6 months postoperatively. Postmortem analysis included epidural cultures and histopathological assessment of local and systemic tissue samples. Immunocytochemical analysis of the spinal cord and overlying epidural fibrosis quantified the extent of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, tumor necrosis factor-β, interleukin [IL]-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and activated macrophages. Epidural cultures were negative for nearly all cases, and there was no evidence of particulate debris or

  8. Citrobocter kasori spinal epidural abscess: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Jain, Pramod; Singh, Pritish; Divthane, Rupam; Badole, C M

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic spinal epidural abscess Is an uncommon Infectious occurrence. Clinical prospects of pyogenic spinal epidural abscess are graver if not promptly diagnosed and treated appropriately. A case of spinal epidural abscess has been presented with sinus tract formation at L4-L5 level, of pyogenic aetiology that progressed to paraplegia over the course of the disease. MRI pointed towards an epidural abscess extending from T12 vertebral level to S1 vertebral level. Surgical decompression in the form of laminectomy and evacuation of pus was done and antibiotics were given according to culture and sensitivity. Histopathological analysis revealed the acute suppurative nature of the abscess. Citrobacter kasori was isolated on pus culture. Pyogenic epidural abscess with causative organism being Citrobacter kasori has least been documented.

  9. [Spontaneous epidural hematoma after open heart surgery: case report].

    PubMed

    Anegawa, S; Hayashi, T; Furukawa, Y; Nagashima, T; Kumate, M

    1999-11-01

    Acute epidural hematoma not associated with head injury is rarely encountered and is known as spontaneous epidural hematoma. To our knowledge, only five cases with epidural hematoma after open-heart surgery have been published. Pathogenesis and preventive measures have not yet been determined. We report a case of such spontaneous epidural hematoma and consider the possible pathogenesis. A 12-year-old female received a radical operation for severe subaortic stenosis. The intraoperative course was uneventful except for massive hemorrhage which was adequately controlled. Postoperatively, she was moved to the CCU still not having aroused from anesthesia. Eleven hours later, it was found that her pupils were fixed and dilated. CT scan demonstrated a huge bifrontal epidural hematoma with disappearance of the basal cistern. Even though immediate emergency evacuation was performed, the patient died of acute brain swelling four days after the operation.

  10. Effects of 4% Icodextrin on Experimental Spinal Epidural Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Karanci, Turker; Kelten, Bilal; Karaoglan, Alper; Cinar, Nilgun; Midi, Ahmet; Antar, Veysel; Akdemir, Hidayet; Kara, Zeynep

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate whether spinal epidural 4% glucose polymer solution is effective in the prevention of postoperative fibrosis. Twenty eight adult Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into two equal groups, including treatment and control. Both groups underwent L1 vertebral total laminectomy to expose the dura. Topical treatment group received 4% icodextrin. Four weeks later, epidural fibrosis was examined in both groups histologically, biochemically and macroscopically. Topical use of 4% icodextrin prevented significantly epidural fibrosis following the laminectomy operation. Topical 4% icodextrin application inhibits postoperative epidural fibrosis with various mechanisms and prevents adhesions by playing barrier role between tissue surfaces through flotation. Our study is first to present evidence of experimental epidural fibrosis prevention with 4% icodextrin.

  11. Acute onset headache complicating labor epidural caused by intrapartum pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Smarkusky, Loren; DeCarvalho, Helena; Bermudez, Ady; González-Quintero, Víctor Hugo

    2006-09-01

    Epidural placement for obstetric anesthesia is a common procedure. Pneumocephalus, the introduction of air into the cranial cavity after epidural placement, is a rare complication encountered when air is used for identification of the epidural space. A 42-year-old primipara undergoing epidural placement reported sudden onset of severe headache with associated neurologic symptoms and nuchal rigidity. Emergent CT scan revealed pneumocephalus. With conservative management, her symptoms resolved with interval resumption of the air collection evidenced on interval CT. Acute onset headache after epidural placement can present with impressive neurologic signs and symptoms. Prompt identification of the cause of this pathology is of vital importance to delineate pneumocephalus from potentially treatable or life-threatening disorders.

  12. Spinal epidural abscess presenting as intra-abdominal pathology: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Andrew A; Darouiche, Rabih O

    2004-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare infectious disease. However, if left unrecognized and untreated, the clinical outcome of spinal epidural abscess can be devastating. Correctly diagnosing a spinal epidural abscess in a timely fashion is often difficult, particularly if the clinician does not actively consider the diagnosis. The most common presenting symptoms of spinal epidural abscess include backache, radicular pain, weakness, and sensory deficits. However, early in its course, spinal epidural abscess can also present with vague and nondescript manifestations. In this report, we describe a case of spinal epidural abscess presenting as abdominal pain, and review the literature describing other cases of spinal epidural abscess presenting as intra-abdominal pathology.

  13. The experience of giving birth with epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Keller, Kurt Dauer

    2014-06-01

    There is a lack of literature about what constitutes good midwifery care for women who have epidural analgesia during labour. It is known that an increasing number of women receive epidural analgesia for labour pain. We also know that while women rate the painkilling effect of the epidural analgesia as high, in general, their satisfaction with labour is unchanged or even lower when epidural analgesia is used. How do women experience being in labour with epidural analgesia, and what kind of midwifery care do they, consequently, need? A field study and semi-structured interviews were conducted on a phenomenological basis. Nine nulliparous women were observed from initiation of epidural analgesia until birth of their baby. They were interviewed the day after the birth and again 2 months later. The involved midwives were interviewed 2-3h after the birth. Initiation of epidural analgesia can have considerable implications for women's experience of labour. Two different types of emotional reactions towards epidural analgesia are distinguished, one of which is particularly marked by a subtle sense of worry and ambivalence. Another important finding refers to the labouring woman's relationship with the midwife, which represents an essential influencing factor on the woman' experience of labour. Within this relationship, some rather unnoticed matters of communication and recognition appear to be of decisive significance. After initiation of epidural analgesia the requirements of midwifery care seem to go beyond how women verbalise and define their own needs. The midwife should be attentive to the labouring woman's type of emotional reaction to epidural analgesia and her possible intricate worries. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Epidural analgesia during labor vs no analgesia: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Wesam Farid; Al-Metwalli, Roshdi; Mostafa, Manal

    2012-01-01

    Background: Epidural analgesia is claimed to result in prolonged labor. Previous studies have assessed epidural analgesia vs systemic opioids rather than to parturients receiving no analgesia. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of epidural analgesia on labor duration compared with parturients devoid of analgesia. Methods: One hundred sixty nulliparous women in spontaneous labor at full term with a singleton vertex presentation were assigned to the study. Parturients who request epidural analgesia were allocated in the epidural group, whereas those not enthusiastic to labor analgesia were allocated in the control group. Epidural analgesia was provided with 20 mL bolus 0.5% epidural lidocaine plus fentanyl and maintained at 10 mL for 1 h. Duration of the first and second stages of labor, number of parturients receiving oxytocin, maximal oxytocin dose required for each parturient, numbers of instrumental vaginal, vacuum-assisted, and cesarean deliveries and neonatal Apgar score were recorded. Results: There was no statistical difference in the duration of the active-first and the second stages of labor, instrumental delivery, vacuum-assisted or cesarean delivery rates, the number of newborns with 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores less than 7 between both groups and number of parturients receiving oxytocin, however, the maximal oxytocin dose was significantly higher in the epidural group. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia by lidocaine (0.5%) and fentanyl does not prolong labor compared with parturients without analgesia; however, significant oxytocin augmentation is required during the epidural analgesia to keep up the aforementioned average labor duration. PMID:22412775

  15. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases.

  16. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... tear. Contact sports. Athletes in sports such as football and soccer can tear their posterior cruciate ligament ... vehicle accident and participating in sports such as football and soccer are the most common risk factors ...

  17. Differential Effects of Epidural Analgesia on Modes of Delivery and Perinatal Outcomes between Nulliparous and Multiparous Women: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tai-Ho; Hsieh, T’sang-T’ang; Liu, Hung-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidural analgesia is considered one of the most effective methods for pain relief during labor. However, it is not clear whether similar effects of epidural analgesia on the progression of labor, modes of delivery, and perinatal outcomes exist between nulliparous and multiparous women. Methodology/Principal Findings A retrospective cohort study was conducted to analyze all deliveries after 37 weeks of gestation, with the exclusion of pregnancies complicated by multiple gestations and fetal anomalies and deliveries without trials of labor; these criteria produced a study population of n=16,852. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to control for confounders. In total, 7260 of 10,175 (71.4%) nulliparous and 2987 of 6677 (44.7%) multiparous parturients were administered epidural analgesia. The independent factors for intrapartum epidural analgesia included a low prepregnancy body mass index, genetic amniocentesis, group B streptococcal colonization of the genito-rectal tract, and augmentation and induction of labor. In the nulliparous women, epidural analgesia was a significant risk factor for operative vaginal delivery (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.80-2.54); however, it was a protective factor against Caesarean delivery (adjusted OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.55-0.69). Epidural analgesia remained a significant risk factor for operative vaginal delivery (adjusted OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.58-2.97) but not for Caesarean delivery (adjusted OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.77-1.55) in the multiparous women. Furthermore, the women who were administered epidural analgesia during the trials of labor had similar rates of adverse perinatal outcomes compared with the women who were not administered epidural analgesia, except that a higher rate of 1-minute Apgar scores less than 7 was noted in the nulliparous women who were administered epidural analgesia. Conclusions/Significance Intrapartum epidural analgesia has differential effects on the

  18. Novel use of epidural catheter: Air injection for neuroprotection during radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Doctor, JR; Solanki, SL; Patil, VP; Divatia, JV

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign bone tumor, with a male-female ratio of approximately 2:1 and mainly affecting long bones. Ten percent of the lesions occur in the spine, mostly within the posterior elements. Treatment options for OO include surgical excision and percutaneous imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Lesions within the spine have an inherent risk of thermal damage to the vital structure because of proximity to the neural elements. We report a novel use of the epidural catheter for air injection for the neuroprotection of nerves close to the OO of the spine. A 12-year-old and 30 kg male child with an OO of the L3 vertebra was taken up for RFA. His preoperative examinations were within normal limits. The OO was very close to the L3 nerve root. Under general anesthesia, lumbar epidural catheter was placed in the L3-L4 space under imaging guidance. Ten ml of aliquots of air was injected under imaging guidance to avoid injury to the neural structures due to RFA. The air created a gap between neural elements and the tumor and served as an insulating material thereby protecting the neural elements from damage due to the RFA. Postoperatively, the patient did not develop any neurological deficit. PMID:27375396

  19. Talar Osteochondroma Fracture Presenting as Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Ercin, Ersin; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Avsar, Serdar

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondromas are the most common benign bone tumors. They are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. When symptomatic, the symptoms are usually due to its location and size. Fracture of an osteochondroma presenting as posterior ankle impingement is a rare condition. We describe a 22-year-old man with solitary exostosis who presented with a posterior ankle mass and posterior ankle impingement with 2 years of follow-up. Surgical intervention was the treatment of choice in this patient, and histologic examination revealed a benign osteochondroma. Osteochondromas found in the posterior aspect of the talus can be complicated by fracture due to persistent motion of the ankle. Talar osteochondroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement causes. Posterior talar osteochondromas, especially when a stalk is present, should be treated surgically before it is more complicated by a fracture and posterior ankle impingement.

  20. Does epidural increase the incidence of cesarean delivery or instrumental labor in Saudi populations?

    PubMed

    Bakhamees, Hassan; Hegazy, Esmat

    2007-10-01

    This is a retrospective review of the medical records of 861 patients admitted for vaginal delivery. Patients were randomized to either epidural analgesia or other analgesic methods of pain relief for labor pains. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of epidural analgesia on the rate of cesarean section delivery. 861 patients were admitted to Saad Specialist Hospital for vaginal delivery between May 1, to September 30, 2006. Patients were divided into Nulliparous (334 patients) and Multiparous (527 patients) populations. Each population was then divided into two groups, epidural and non-epidural group. Epidural analgesia was initiated by a bolus of bupivacaine 0.25% (6 to 10 ml) plus fentanyl (50 to 100 microg), followed by bupivacaine 0.125% plus fentanyl (1 to 2 microg/ml) at the rate of (6 to 12 ml/h). Non-epidural analgesia was initiated by one or mixture of I.M meperidine 50 to 100 mg I.M, promethazine hydrochloride 25 mg, or Ontonox inhalers. In the Nulliparous population a total of 57 patients requested epidural (the epidural gp), while 277 patients received other analgesic methods (the non-epidural gp). There was no difference in the rate of cesarean section deliveries between the two analgesia groups (12 patients of 57 in the epidural group (21.1%), versus 61 patients of 277 (22%) in the non-epidural gp). In the Multiparous population, a total of 49 patients requested epidural analgesia (epidural gp), while 478 patients received other analgesic methods (the non-epidural gp). There was no difference in the rate of cesarean section deliveries between the two analgesia groups (5 of 49 patients (10.2%) in the epidural group compared to 39 of 478 patients (8.2%) in the non-epidural gp). Significantly, more patients in the epidural group had forceps or vacuum assisted deliveries compared to the other analgesia group (the non-epidural gp). This was evident in both the Nulliparous population (7 of 57 patients in the epidural gp (12

  1. Sonographic evaluation of epidural and intrathecal injections in cats.

    PubMed

    Otero, Pablo E; Verdier, Natali; Zaccagnini, Andrea S; Fuensalida, Santiago E; Sclocco, Matias; Portela, Diego A; Waxman, Samanta

    2016-11-01

    To describe the ultrasonographic anatomy of the caudal lumbar spine in cats and to detect ultrasound (US) signs associated with epidural or intrathecal injection. Prospective, clinical study. Twenty-six client-owned cats. Transverse (position 1) and parasagittal (position 2) two-dimensional US scanning was performed over the caudal lumbar spine in all cats. Midline distances between the identified structures were measured. Cats assigned to epidural injection (group E, n = 16) were administered a bupivacaine-morphine combination confirmed by electrical stimulation. Cats assigned to intrathecal injection (group I, n = 10) were administered a morphine-iohexol combination injected at the lumbosacral level and confirmed by lateral radiography. The total volume injected (0.3 mL kg(-1) ) was divided into two equal aliquots that were injected without needle repositioning, with the US probe in positions 1 and 2, respectively. The presence or absence of a burst of color [color flow Doppler test (CFDT)], dural sac collapse and epidural space enlargement were registered during and after both injections. US scanning allowed measurement of the distances between the highly visible structures inside the spinal canal. CFDT was positive for all animals in group E. In group I, intrathecal injection was confirmed in only two animals, for which the CFDT was negative; seven cats inadvertently and simultaneously were administered an epidural injection and showed a positive CFDT during the second aliquot injection, and the remaining animal was administered epidural anesthesia and was excluded from the CFDT data analysis. Dural sac collapse and epidural space enlargement were present in all animals in which an epidural injection was confirmed. US examination allowed an anatomical description of the caudal lumbar spine and real-time confirmation of epidural injection by observation of a positive CFDT, dural sac collapse and epidural space enlargement. © 2016 Association of

  2. Cervical epidural steroid injections and spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Adam L; McDonald, Brian P; Kia, Farid; Fried, Guy W

    2016-10-01

    Cervical interlaminar and transforaminal epidural steroid injections have been increasingly performed as a medical interventional treatment for pain. This study aimed to examine if there was increasing proportion of cervical spinal cord injured acute rehabilitation hospital admissions related to cervical epidural injections because of increased use of the procedure. Additionally, this study aimed to determine risk factors that may have made these patients known higher risk premorbidly. A retrospective chart review was carried out. The sample was from a 2001 to 2008 spinal cord-related injuries admitted to Magee Rehabilitation (2,770). A total of 1,343 patients were classified as having acute spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Of these patients, seven cases of SCI occurred after cervical epidural injections. Chart data regarding characteristics of patients and proportion of SCI admissions to cervical epidural injections injuries were the outcome measures. Parameters analyzed included age, sex, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale on admission, mechanism of injury, presenting symptoms, time of onset, and risk factors. Proportion of SCI admissions to cervical epidural injections injuries was also analyzed. From the years 2001 to 2008, there were seven admissions for such injury with no change in the proportion of SCIs from cervical epidural injections relative to all SCIs. All were incomplete and mechanisms included anterior cord infarction (1), intraparenchymal injection (1), epidural abscess (2), contusion (1), epidural hematoma (1), and unknown (1). Presenting symptoms included hypotension, respiratory distress, chest pain, upper limb numbness, paresthesias, weakness, and fever. Symptom onset ranged from minutes to 72 hours after injection. Although there is an increased use of interventional spine procedures to treat pain, this did not increase the proportion of cervical epidural-related SCI admissions. Additional research is needed to advocate reporting

  3. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  4. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  5. Intrapartum sonography head transverse and asynclitic diagnosis with and without epidural analgesia initiated early during the first stage of labor.

    PubMed

    Malvasi, A; Tinelli, A; Brizzi, A; Guido, M; Laterza, F; De Nunzio, G; Bochicchio, M; Ghi, T; Stark, M; Benhamou, D; Di Renzo, G C; Di Renzo, G

    2011-05-01

    To investigate if early epidural analgesia can influence fetal head engagement into the pelvis and if it can increase the rate of transverse and asynclitic position during labour. 195 women with combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSE) or without neuraxial analgesia were studied. CSE was performed using a mixture of ropivacaine 0.02% with 0.3 microg/ml of sufentanil administered in the spinal space. Maintenance of analgesia was managed with intermittent epidural administration of 10-15 ml of ropivacaine (0.07%-0.10%) mixed with 0.5 microg/ml of sufentanil, based on the stage of labour and the degree of pain. 2D transabdominal ultrasound (US) was used. Serial transabdominal US examinations were performed at 45-90 min intervals to detect transverse and asynclitic positions, using the following signs: squint sign, sunset thalamus and cerebellum signs that best details the fetal head station. After delivery, the complete set of clinical and US data obtained by each examination were recorded and compared in women with and without labour analgesia. Data were examined by independent reviewers. There was no difference in obstetric outcome between women in whom CSE had been used and those who did not request analgesia during labour (p > 0.05). Epidural analgesia initiated early during labour and using low doses does not increase the rate of dystocic labors. Transverse fetal head positioning with anterior or posterior asynclitism does not seem to be promoted by drug or technique-related mechanisms, but rather should be the consequence of cephalopelvic disproportion.

  6. A randomized trial of dural puncture epidural technique compared with the standard epidural technique for labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Cappiello, Eric; O'Rourke, Nollag; Segal, Scott; Tsen, Lawrence C

    2008-11-01

    We designed this prospective, double-blind, randomized study to examine whether a dural puncture without intrathecal drug administration immediately before epidural drug administration would improve labor analgesia when compared to a traditional epidural technique without prior dural puncture. Eighty nulliparous parturients with cervical dilation less than 5 cm were randomly assigned to receive a standardized epidural technique, with or without a single dural puncture with a 25-gauge (G) Whitacre spinal needle. After successful placement of the needle(s) and the epidural catheter, 12 mL of bupivacaine 2.5 mg/mL was administered through the epidural catheter and a patient-controlled epidural infusion of bupivacaine 1.25 mg/mL + fentanyl 2 mug/mL was initiated. The presence of sacral analgesia (S1) and pain scores were compared between groups. In demographically similar groups, parturients with prior dural puncture had more frequent blockade of the S1 dermatome (absolute risk difference [95% confidence interval] 22% [6-39]), more frequent visual analog scale scores <10/100 at 20 min (absolute risk difference 20% [1-38]), and reduced one-sided analgesia (absolute risk difference [95% CI] 17% [2-330]). The highest median sensory level (T10) was no different between groups. Dural puncture with a 25-G spinal needle immediately before the initiation of epidural analgesia improves the sacral spread, onset, and bilateral pain relief produced by analgesic concentrations of bupivacaine with fentanyl in laboring nulliparous patients.

  7. Measurements of Epidural Space Depth Using Preexisting CT Scans Correlate with Loss of Resistance Depth during Thoracic Epidural Catheter Placement

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Nathaniel H.; Cobb, Benjamin G.; Linnau, Ken F.; Kent, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Thoracic epidural catheters provide the best quality postoperative pain relief for major abdominal and thoracic surgical procedures, but placement is one of the most challenging procedures in the repertoire of an anesthesiologist. Most patients presenting for a procedure that would benefit from a thoracic epidural catheter have already had high resolution imaging that may be useful to assist placement of a catheter. Methods. This retrospective study used data from 168 patients to examine the association and predictive power of epidural-skin distance (ESD) on computed tomography (CT) to determine loss of resistance depth acquired during epidural placement. Additionally, the ability of anesthesiologists to measure this distance was compared to a radiologist, who specializes in spine imaging. Results. There was a strong association between CT measurement and loss of resistance depth (P < 0.0001); the presence of morbid obesity (BMI > 35) changed this relationship (P = 0.007). The ability of anesthesiologists to make CT measurements was similar to a gold standard radiologist (all individual ICCs > 0.9). Conclusions. Overall, this study supports the examination of a recent CT scan to aid in the placement of a thoracic epidural catheter. Making use of these scans may lead to faster epidural placements, fewer accidental dural punctures, and better epidural blockade. PMID:25628654

  8. The tibialis posterior tendon.

    PubMed

    Lhoste-Trouilloud, A

    2012-02-01

    The tibialis posterior tendon is the largest and anteriormost tendon in the medial ankle. It produces plantar flexion and supination of the ankle and stabilizes the plantar vault. Sonographic assessment of this tendon is done with high-frequency, linear-array transducers; an optimal examination requires transverse retromalleolar, longitudinal retromalleolar, and distal longitudinal scans, as well as dynamic studies. Disorders of the posterior tibial tendon include chronic tendinopathy with progressive rupture, tenosynovitis, acute rupture, dislocation and instability, enthesopathies. The most common lesion is a progressive "chewing gum" lesion that develops in a setting of chronic tendinopathy; it is usually seen in overweight women over 50 years of age with valgus flat feet. Medial ankle pain must also be carefully investigated, and the presence of instability assessed with dynamic maneuvers (forced inversion, or dorsiflexion) of the foot. Sonography plays an important role in the investigation of disorders involving the posterior tibial tendon.

  9. [Anterior and posterior medullary analgesic stimulation, using a percutaneous implantation technic].

    PubMed

    Lazorthes, Y; Verdie, J C; Arbus, L

    1978-01-01

    The technique of percutaneous implantation of a pain-relieving stimulator reduces the surgical procedure considerably. This advantage is, however, lessened by the absence of precision in placing epidural electrodes, and by the risk of their later displacement leading to inadequate stimulation. To reduce this disadvantage the authors suggest a technique that is a modification of the classical open procedure: it is particularly suitable for implantation at the cervico-dorsal junction. In 12 patients treated by percutaneous implantation, 5 received, from epidural electrodes, an anterior medullary electrical stimulation which caused analgesia without paraesthesiae in the painful ares. The results, however, do not justify a conclusion that anterior medullary stimulation is better than posterior column stimulation.

  10. Posterior vitreous detachment.

    PubMed

    Thimons, J J

    1992-01-01

    Posterior vitreous detachment is an expected consequence of aging, but it can also be the initiating cause of a retinal detachment. To understand the mechanism of posterior vitreous detachment and its sequelae, it is necessary to appreciate the anatomy of the vitreous, its development, and the pathogenesis of vitreous degeneration. This paper is a discussion of these considerations, the types of complications that may result from vitreous detachment, the proper examination of patients who present with the symptoms of vitreous detachment, and appropriate patient management.

  11. Posterior crossbites in children.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J F; Crevoisier, R; King, D L; Henry, R; Mills, C M

    1996-11-01

    Posterior crossbite, the most common malocclusion in young children, can be caused by a variety of skeletal, muscular, or dental factors. This condition produces insufficient maxillary arch width and is frequently associated with various oral sucking and postural habits. If left untreated, this problem can result in adverse skeletal growth changes. Various mechanical treatment modalities designed to expand the posterior maxillary arch width are available to correct this problem. The appropriate treatment method depends on the patient's age and level of cooperation as well as the determined etiology of the constriction.

  12. Posterior Fossa Tumors.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Lara A; Young Poussaint, Tina

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of death from solid tumors in childhood. The most common posterior fossa tumors in children are medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymoma, and brainstem glioma. Location, and imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) and conventional MR (cMR) imaging may provide important clues to the most likely diagnosis. Moreover, information obtained from advanced MR imaging techniques increase diagnostic confidence and help distinguish between different histologic tumor types. Here we discuss the most common posterior fossa tumors in children, including typical imaging findings on CT, cMR imaging, and advanced MR imaging studies.

  13. Tibialis Posterior Tendon Entrapment Within Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fragment.

    PubMed

    Fantry, Amanda; Lareau, Craig; Vopat, Bryan; Blankenhorn, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Management of posterior malleolus fractures continues to be controversial, with respect to both need for fixation and fixation methods. Fixation methods include an open posterior approach to the ankle as well as percutaneous reduction and fixation with or without arthroscopy for visualization of the articular surface. Plain radiographs are unreliable in identifying fracture pattern and intraoperative reduction, making arthroscopy a valuable adjunct to posterior malleolus fracture management. In this article, we report a case of tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus fracture, as identified by arthroscopy and managed with open reduction. Tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus has not been previously reported. Ankle arthroscopy for posterior malleolus fractures provides an opportunity to identify soft-tissue or tendinous entrapment, articular surface reduction, and articular cartilage injuries unlikely to be identified with fluoroscopy alone and should be considered in reduction and fixation of posterior malleolus fractures.

  14. Posterior Knee Loose Bodies: Treated by Posterior Knee Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ho Lam; Lui, Tun Hing

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The posterior portion of the knee joint, which includes the tibial attachment of the posterior cruciate ligament and the posterior horn of the menisci, has been called a “blind spot” because it is difficult to observe this area under arthroscopy through standard anterior portals. Posteromedial, posterolateral, and posterior transseptal portals have been developed for visualization and instrumentation of the posteromedial and posterolateral compartments of the knee joint. Case Report: A 57-year-old man presented of persistent left posterior knee pain for 1 year. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed posterior knee encapsulated loose bodies. The symptoms did not respond to physiotherapy and analgesics. The loose bodies were removed via posterior knee arthroscopy. The symptoms subsided afterward. Conclusion: Lateral portal of the knee allows establishment of the posterolateral portal under endoscopic visualization, and the loose bodies of the posterior compartment of the knee can be effectively removed via the posterior knee arthroscopy. PMID:28819604

  15. The impact of preoperative epidural injections on postoperative infection in lumbar fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Singla, Anuj; Yang, Scott; Werner, Brian C; Cancienne, Jourdan M; Nourbakhsh, Ali; Shimer, Adam L; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Shen, Francis H

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESIs) are performed for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes for a variety of indications, including low-back pain, the leading cause of disability and expense due to work-related conditions in the US. The steroid agent used in epidural injections is reported to relieve nerve root inflammation, local ischemia, and resultant pain, but the injection may also have an adverse impact on spinal surgery performed thereafter. In particular, the possibility that preoperative epidural injections may increase the risk of surgical site infection after lumbar spinal fusion has been reported but has not been studied in detail. The goal of the present study was to use a large national insurance database to analyze the association of preoperative LESIs with surgical site infection after lumbar spinal fusion. METHODS A nationwide insurance database of patient records was used for this retrospective analysis. Current Procedural Terminology codes were used to query the database for patients who had undergone LESI and 1- or 2-level lumbar posterior spinal fusion procedures. The rate of postoperative infection after 1- or 2-level posterior spinal fusion was analyzed. These study patients were then divided into 3 separate cohorts: 1) lumbar spinal fusion performed within 1 month after LESI, 2) fusion performed between 1 and 3 months after LESI, and 3) fusion performed between 3 and 6 months after LESI. The study patients were compared with a control cohort of patients who underwent lumbar fusion without previous LESI. RESULTS The overall 3-month infection rate after lumbar spinal fusion procedure was 1.6% (1411 of 88,540 patients). The infection risk increased in patients who received LESI within 1 month (OR 2.6, p < 0.0001) or 1-3 months (OR 1.4, p = 0.0002) prior to surgery compared with controls. The infection risk was not significantly different from controls in patients who underwent lumbar fusion more than 3 months after LESI

  16. Considering symptomatic spinal epidural lipomatosis in the differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Adriana; Induru, Raghava; Lagman, Ruth

    2013-09-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) is the abnormal accumulation of normal fat within the spinal canal. It is more frequent in those patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy or in cases of endogenous hypercortisolism states. We report a case of SEL in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with history of steroid treatment as part of his chemotherapy regimen, presenting with clinical manifestations of partial cord compression. Magnetic resonance imaging images of the lumbar spine revealed the presence of epidural tumor suspicious for metastatic disease. Operative findings were consistent with epidural lipomatosis. Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare condition that needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with risk factors, presenting with symptomatic cord compression.

  17. Anaphylactic Shock Following Nonionic Contrast Medium during Caudal Epidural Injection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Park, Jae Woo; Hwang, Byeong Mun

    2015-10-01

    Caudal epidural injection is a common intervention in patients with low back pain and sciatica. Even though the complications of fluoroscopically directed epidural injections are less frequent than in blind epidural injections, complications due to contrast media can occur. We report a case of anaphylactic shock immediately after injection of an intravenous nonionic contrast medium (iohexol) during the caudal epidural injection for low back pain and sciatica in a patient without a previous allergic history to ionic contrast media (ioxitalamate). Five minutes after the dye was injected, the patient began to experience dizziness, and the systolic blood pressure dropped to 60 mmHg. Subsequently, the patient exhibited a mild drowsy mental state. About 30 minutes after the subcutaneous injection of 0.2 mg epinephrine, the systolic blood pressure increased to 90 mmHg. The patient recovered without any sequela. Life-threatening complications after injection of intravenous contrast medium require immediate treatment.

  18. Lower Back Tattoo: OK to Have an Epidural?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and delivery, postpartum care Could a lower back tattoo keep me from having an epidural during labor? ... Yvonne Butler Tobah, M.D. A lower back tattoo won't necessarily prevent you from having an ...

  19. The association between epidural labor analgesia and maternal fever.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Katherine W; Segal, B Scott

    2013-09-01

    The association between epidural labor analgesia and maternal fever is complex and controversial. Observational, retrospective, before-and-after, and randomized controlled trials all support the association, with the most current evidence supporting the mechanistic involvement of noninfectious inflammation. Considering the clinically significant neonatal consequences that have been previously demonstrated, and the possibility of more common subclinical fetal brain injury that animal models imply, the avoidance of maternal fever during labor is imperative. With the current popularity of epidural analgesia in labor, it is important that clinicians delineate how epidurals cause maternal fever and how to block the noninfectious inflammatory response that seems to warm a subset of women laboring with epidurals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Epidural analgesia for labour: maternal knowledge, preferences and informed consent.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, S; Tan, T; Walsh, A; Carey, M

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia has become increasingly popular as a form of labour analgesia in Ireland. However obtaining true inform consent has always been difficult. Our study recruited 100 parturients who had undergone epidural analgesia for labour, aimed to determine the information they received prior to regional analgesia, and to ascertain their preferences regarding informed consent. Only 65 (65%) of patients planned to have an epidural. Knowledge of potential complications was variable and inaccurate, with less than 30 (30%) of women aware of the most common complications. Most women 79 (79%) believed that discomfort during labour affected their ability to provide informed consent, and believe consent should be taken prior to onset of labour (96, 96%). The results of this study helps define the standards of consent Irish patients expect for epidural analgesia during labour.

  1. Epidural analgesia during labour - maternal understanding and experience - informed consent.

    PubMed

    Mahomed, K; Chin, D; Drew, A

    2015-01-01

    Women obtain information on epidural analgesia from various sources. For epidural for pain relief in labour this is provided by the anaesthetist as part of the consenting process. There is much discussion about the inadequacy of this consenting process; we report on women's knowledge, experience and recall of this process at a regional hospital with a 24-h epidural service. Fifty-four women were interviewed within 72 h of a vaginal birth. 91% of the women had acquired information from friends, relatives and antenatal classes. Lack of recall of benefits of epidural analgesia accounted for 26 (38%) and 25 (26%) of the responses, respectively. Similarly in terms of amount of pain relief they could expect, 13 (21%) could not remember and 13 (21%) thought that it may not work. We suggest use of varying methods of disseminating information and wider utilisation of anaesthetists in the antenatal educational programmes.

  2. Epidural Anesthesia for Caesarean Section in a Pregnant Patient with Pituitary Macroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Babu, D. Dinesh; Sureshkumar, K; Patil, Shubhada A.

    2014-01-01

    Anaesthesia for patient with pituitary adenoma posted for non-neurosurgical surgeries is a challenge to the anaesthesiologist with the risk of sudden change in intracranial dynamics during administration of spinal anaesthesia or during stress response of general anaesthesia. There is a chance of increase in tumour size during antenatal period. A careful assessment of pituitary function and a screening of visual field and fundus examination are essential to rule out any mass effect. We are presenting the anaesthetic management of patient with pituitary macroadenoma posted for elective caesarean section done under epidural anaesthesia due to its rarity. PMID:25177577

  3. Epidural resiniferatoxin induced prolonged regional analgesia to pain.

    PubMed

    Szabo, T; Olah, Z; Iadarola, M J; Blumberg, P M

    1999-09-04

    Adequate treatment of cancer pain remains a significant clinical problem. To reduce side effects of treatment, intrathecal and epidural routes of administration have been used where appropriate to reduce the total dose of agent administered while achieving regional control. Resiniferatoxin (RTX), an ultrapotent capsaicin analog, gives long-term desensitization of nociception via C-fiber sensory neurons. We evaluate here the analgesic effect on rats of epidurally administered RTX, using latency of response to a thermal stimulus in unrestrained animals. Results were compared with those for systemically administered RTX. Vehicle or graded doses of RTX were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) or through an indwelling lumbar (L4) epidural catheter as a single dose. Both routes of application of RTX produced profound thermal analgesia, reaching a plateau within 4-6 h and showing no restoration of pain sensitivity over 7 days. Vehicle was without effect. For the epidural route, the effect was selective as expected for the targeted spinal cord region, whereas the subcutaneous administration of RTX had a generalized analgesic effect. At doses yielding a tripling of back paw withdrawal latency, epidural treatment was 25-fold more effective than the subcutaneous route of application. Consistent with the regional selectivity of the lumbar epidural route, the front paws showed no more effect than by systemic RTX treatment. Binding experiments with [3H]RTX provided further evidence of the segmental desensitization induced by epidural RTX. We conclude that epidural administration of RTX at the lumbar spinal level produces profound, long-lasting, segmental analgesia to C-fiber mediated pain in the rat.

  4. Unilateral anhidrosis: A rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Alkan, Güzide; Baysalman, Hatice Baran; Kaplan, Tevfik

    2016-02-01

    Management of pain following thoracotomy is an important issue for the control of early morbidity. We herein present the case of a patient who was referred to our hospital after a fall from a height. Right-sided multiple rib fractures, hemopneumothorax, and diaphragmatic rupture were detected. Thoracic epidural catheterization was performed for pain management just before thoracotomy. The patient developed unilateral anhidrosis postoperatively. We discuss this rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia with a review of relevant literature.

  5. Is epidural steroid injection effective for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-11-16

    There are several nonsurgical alternatives to treat radicular pain in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Epidural steroid injections have been used for several decades, but the different studies have shown variable effects. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified nine systematic reviews including seven pertinent randomized controlled trials. We concluded epidural steroid injection probably leads to little or no effect on reducing radicular pain of spinal stenosis.

  6. Symptomatic epidural gas cyst associated with discal vacuum phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kakitsubata, Yousuke; Theodorou, Stavroula J; Theodorou, Daphne J; Yuko, Miyata; Ito, Yasunori; Yuki, Yasuhiro; Wada, Shoichi; Maehara, Toyo

    2009-10-01

    Four cases of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging documented lumbar nerve root compression associated with a vacuum disc communicating with the epidural space are presented. To give an insight into the mechanism of nerve root compression associated with vacuum disc phenomenon. Few cases of lumbar radiculopathy resulting from epidural gas have been reported and illustrated using cross-sectional imaging studies. The medical records, imaging examinations, and surgical findings (when available) of 4 symptomatic patients with epidural and intradiscal gas collections were reviewed. Three patients underwent surgery with needle aspiration of the epidural gas, and 1 patient was treated conservatively. Clinical symptoms of epidural gas cyst were similar to those of other more common causes of nerve root compression. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings showed intraspinal gas collection associated with a vacuum disc. One patient had an additional vertebral pneumatocyst. Although evacuation of intraspinal gas resulted in complete cure or major neurologic improvement in 3 patients, an initial period of observation is warranted because gas may disappear spontaneously as in 1 of our patients. All 4 patients recovered full motor and sensory functions of the lower extremities. One year later, patients were completely free of symptoms. Although the vacuum disc is considered a common imaging finding of no or not much pathologic significance, occasionally intradiscal gas may leak into the spinal canal. Detection of an epidural gaseous collection at the same level with a vacuum disc strongly suggests a communication between the intervertebral disc and the epidural space. Epidural gas collections can be implicated as a possible cause of radicular symptoms and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy.

  7. [Epidural analgesia during labour: maternal, fetal and neonatal aspects].

    PubMed

    Soncini, E; Grignaffini, A; Anfuso, S; Cavicchioni, O

    2003-06-01

    The most effective technique for eliminating labour and childbirth pain is continuous lumbar epidural analgesia. The preoccupation regarding the possible negative effects on the time taken for labour and on dystocias in general represents one of the greatest hindrances in the way of its wider use. The purpose of the present study is to monitor the effects of continuous lumbar epidural analgesia on delivery times, on the state of the fetus, on the incidence of dystocic deliveries and on neonatal outcome. Comparative prospective study. The data relating to the deliveries of 148 nulliparas and 51 pluriparas at term, submitted to epidural analgesia at the Obstetric Clinic of the University of Parma in 1999-2000 were compared with data from 144 nulliparas in labour and 60 pluriparas without epidural analgesia, selected in random fashion out of 4251 women who delivered children in the same period. The anesthetic procedure employed consisted in an injection of 20 mg/10 ml ropivacaine and 50 mg fentanyl in the epidural space at intervals of 1-2 h. The duration of the dilatation period was not influenced by administration of epidural analgesia while the expulsion period was longer in the course of epidural analgesia. There were no significant differences between delivery modalities in the 2 groups either as regards vaginal operative delivery or the number of cesarean sections for dystocia. The cardiotocographic profile was similar in the 2 groups. The neonatal outcome (Apgar index at 1' and 5' and transfer to the intensive care department) did not show significant differences, confirming the absence of noteworthy side-effects even from the neonatal standpoint. The use of low concentrations of ropivacaine (0.2%) associated with fentanyl in the epidural space proved to be a safe and effective technique for controlling labour and delivery pain.

  8. [MRI appearance of lumbar epidural abscesses: report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Semlali, S; Fikri, M; Nassar, I; El Quessar, A; El Hassani, Mr; Chakir, N; Jiddane, M

    2004-03-01

    The authors report three cases of non-tuberculous epidural abscess. Presenting symptoms included lumbar back pain, muscle spasms, soft tIssue swelling, and neurological deficits in all three cases. MR imaging was helpful for diagnosis and showed involvement of perivertebral soft tissues and an epidural abscess of variable size. There was no significant involvement of intervertebral disks or vertebrae. Diagnosis was confirmed by bacteriologic exam. Clinical outcome was favourable with antibiotic treatment.

  9. [Combined epidural and spinal anesthesia for cesarean section].

    PubMed

    Hody, J L

    1994-01-01

    Combined spinal epidural block has proven its efficacy in skilled hands. This technique allies advantages of spinal anaesthesia, regarding its speed of action and intensity of motor blockade and advantages of postoperative epidural analgesia. This block must be performed with great care and method to reach a success rate of almost 100%. Local anaesthetics and additives are reviewed and commented. The two main complications, hypotension and post dural puncture headache can be contained in very low limits.

  10. Spinal epidural arteriovenous hemangioma mimicking lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hyun; Song, Sang Woo; Lee, Soo Eon; Lee, Sang Hyung

    2012-10-01

    A spinal epidural hemangioma is rare. In this case, a 51 year-old female patient had low back pain and right thigh numbness. She was initially misdiagnosed as having a ruptured disc with possible sequestration of granulation tissue formation due to the limited number of spinal epidural hemangiomas and little-known radiological findings. Because there are no effective diagnostic tools to verify the hemangioma, more effort should be put into preoperative imaging tests to avoid misdiagnosis and poor decisions).

  11. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  12. [Combined subarachnoid-epidural technique for obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2000-05-01

    Combined spinal-epidural blockade for labor pain has enjoyed increasing popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The usual procedure is to use a single space and a single needle for dural puncture, inserting a spinal needle through an epidural needle followed by insertion of a catheter. A small dose of one or several substances (usually a lipophilic opioid and a local anesthetic) is first injected in the intrathecal space to provide rapid, effective analgesia with minimal muscle blockade. The epidural catheter is used if labor lasts longer than the spinal block, if the spinal block is insufficient, or in case of cesarean section. Combined spinal-epidural blockade is a safe, valid alternative to conventional epidural analgesia and has become the main technique for providing obstetric analgesia in many hospitals. The most widely-recognized advantage of the technique is high maternal satisfaction with rapid and effective analgesia. Mobility of the lower extremities is preserved and the mother is often able to walk. Because opioids are injected into the intrathecal space and because the technique is more invasive than standard epidural analgesia, the potential risk to mother and fetus increases.

  13. Thoracic epidural anesthesia decreases endotoxin-induced endothelial injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The sympathetic nervous system is considered to modulate the endotoxin-induced activation of immune cells. Here we investigate whether thoracic epidural anesthesia with its regional symapathetic blocking effect alters endotoxin-induced leukocyte-endothelium activation and interaction with subsequent endothelial injury. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized, cannulated and hemodynamically monitored. E. coli lipopolysaccharide (Serotype 0127:B8, 1.5 mg x kg-1 x h-1) or isotonic saline (controls) was infused for 300 minutes. An epidural catheter was inserted for continuous application of lidocaine or normal saline in endotoxemic animals and saline in controls. After 300 minutes we measured catecholamine and cytokine plasma concentrations, adhesion molecule expression, leukocyte adhesion, and intestinal tissue edema. Results In endotoxemic animals with epidural saline, LPS significantly increased the interleukin-1β plasma concentration (48%), the expression of endothelial adhesion molecules E-selectin (34%) and ICAM-1 (42%), and the number of adherent leukocytes (40%) with an increase in intestinal myeloperoxidase activity (26%) and tissue edema (75%) when compared to healthy controls. In endotoxemic animals with epidural infusion of lidocaine the values were similar to those in control animals, while epinephrine plasma concentration was 32% lower compared to endotoxemic animals with epidural saline. Conclusions Thoracic epidural anesthesia attenuated the endotoxin-induced increase of IL-1β concentration, adhesion molecule expression and leukocyte-adhesion with subsequent endothelial injury. A potential mechanism is the reduction in the plasma concentration of epinephrine. PMID:24708631

  14. Epidural fibrosis after permanent catheter insertion and infusion.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A

    1995-11-01

    Forty-six permanent epidural catheters and life-port units were implanted in 43 patients with severe, recurrent low back pain who had been considered not to be candidates for surgical intervention and in whom other therapeutic modalities had failed. Eight cases developed epidural fibrosis (EF). For analgesia, patients received either infusions with preservative-free solutions of fentanyl and bupivacaine or daily boluses of morphine and bupivacaine. Catheters remained from 75 days to 433 days. Signs of EF appeared from 21 days to 320 days after implantation. Pain at injection or resistance to injection were initial manifestations of EF, followed by poor, and eventually, nil analgesic effect. The epidural catheters were made of either polyamide, silicone, or polyurethane. Epidurograms revealed encapsulation, narrowing, and loculation of epidural space with gradually reduced spread of the contrast material. The occurrence of EF limits the permanency of implanted epidural catheters. The infusate does not cause this complication, which appears to be a foreign body reaction due to the presence of the catheter in the epidural space.

  15. Epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure

    PubMed Central

    Walaszczyk, Malgorzata; Knapik, Piotr; Misiolek, Hanna; Korlacki, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Parents have the right to decide on behalf of their children and deny consent to regional anaesthesia. The investigators decided to investigate quality of postoperative analgesia in adolescents undergoing epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure. Material/Methods The study subjects were 61 adolescents aged 11–18 years who underwent pectus excavatum repair with the Nuss procedure. Patients were divided into epidural (n=41) and opioid (n=20) groups, depending on their parents’ consent to epidural catheter insertion. Intraoperatively, 0.5% epidural ropivacaine with fentanyl or intermittent intravenous injections of fentanyl were used. Postoperative analgesia was achieved with either epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine with fentanyl, or subcutaneous morphine via an intraoperatively inserted “butterfly” cannula. Additionally, both groups received metamizol and paracetamol. Primary outcome variables were postoperative pain scores (Numeric Rating Scale and Prince Henry Hospital Pain Score). Secondary outcome variables included hemodynamic parameters, additional analgesia and side effects. Results Heart rate and blood pressure values in the postoperative period were significantly higher in the opioid group. Pain scores requiring intervention were noted almost exclusively in the opioid group. Conclusions Denial of parental consent to epidural analgesia following the Nuss procedure results in significantly worse control of postoperative pain. Our data may be useful when discussing with parents the available anaesthetic techniques for exceptionally painful procedures. PMID:22037752

  16. Pneumocephalus during cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Joong; Park, Hae-Gyun; Park, Yong-Hee; Shin, Mee-Ran; Koo, Gill-Hoi; Shin, Hwa-Yong

    2015-01-01

    A cervical transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids (CTFESI) is a frequently used procedure for cervical radiculopathy. Most cases of pneumocephalus after an epidural block occur when using an interlaminar approach with the loss-of-resistance technique. The authors present the first case of pneumocephalus after cervical transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids. A 64-yr-old woman with left C7 radiculopathy was undergoing C6-7 transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids. The epidural spread of contrast was checked by fluoroscope, and 5 mg of dexamethasone in 4 ml of 0.1875% ropivacaine was injected. She lost consciousness 5 mins after the procedure and regained awareness after manual ventilation. She subsequently complained of nausea and headache, and a computed tomography brain scan revealed pneumocephalus. After carefully assessing the fluoroscopic images, the authors believe that the needle may have punctured the dura mater of the nerve root sleeve, allowing air to enter the subdural space. Thus, fluoroscopic images should be carefully examined to reduce dural puncture when performing cervical transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids, and air should be completely removed from the needle, extension tube, and syringe.

  17. [Inadvertent injection of succinylcholine as an epidural test dose].

    PubMed

    Pourzitaki, Chryssa; Tsaousi, Georgia; Logotheti, Helena; Amaniti, Ekaterini

    Epidural action of neuromuscular blocking agents could be explained under the light of their physicochemical characteristics and epidural space properties. In the literature there are few cases of accidental neuromuscular agent's epidural administration, manifesting mainly with neuromuscular blockade institution or fasciculations. We report a case of accidental succinylcholine administration as an epidural test dose, in a female patient undergoing scheduled laparotomy, under combined general and epidural anesthesia. Approximately 2min after the succinylcholine injection the patient complained for shortness of breath, while mild fasciculations appeared in her trunk and face, managed by immediate general anesthesia institution. With the exception of a relatively longer duration of neuromuscular blockade compared with intravenous administration, no neurological or cardiovascular sequelae or other symptoms of local or systemic toxicity were observed. Oral administration of diazepam seems to lessen the adverse effects from accidental epidural administration of succinylcholine. The meticulous and discriminative labeling of syringes, as well as keeping persistent cautions during all anesthesia procedures remains of crucial importance. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Spinal epidural abscess treated with antibiotics alone.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Singh, Poonam; Gehlot, Prateek; Dhaneria, Mamta

    2013-04-30

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare clinical condition among children. Most patients do not present with classical signs. A 13-year-old boy without any predisposing factors presented with paraparesis, bladder and bowel involvement. MRI spine demonstrated an SEA at the C7 and D1 levels on both sides of the midline with cord oedema at the C2-3 to C6 level with minimal marrow oedema in the C6 vertebral body. We treated the patient with antibiotics (ceftriaxone and vancomycin) alone. The patient showed excellent response with only minimal residual gait disturbance at the end of 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy. This is the first paediatric report of complete recovery of a patient at clinical stage 4 following antibiotic treatment alone from India. However, caution should be exercised to closely monitor the patient's recovery as any progression in the neurological state warrants surgery.

  19. Comparison of epidural oxycodone and epidural morphine for post-caesarean section analgesia: A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sng, Ban Leong; Kwok, Sarah Carol; Mathur, Deepak; Ithnin, Farida; Newton-Dunn, Clare; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sultana, Rehena; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng

    2016-03-01

    Epidural morphine after caesarean section may cause moderate to severe pruritus in women. Epidural oxycodone has been shown in non-obstetric trials to reduce pruritus when compared to morphine. We hypothesised that epidural oxycodone may reduce pruritus after caesarean section. A randomised controlled trial was conducted in pregnant women at term who underwent caesarean section with combined spinal-epidural technique initiated with intrathecal fentanyl 15 μg. Women received either epidural morphine 3 mg or epidural oxycodone 3 mg via the epidural catheter after delivery. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 24 h after caesarean section. The secondary outcomes were the pruritus scores, treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), pain scores and maternal satisfaction. One hundred women were randomised (group oxycodone O = 50, morphine M = 50). There was no difference between Group O and M in the incidence of pruritus (n [%] 28 [56%] vs. 31 [62%], P = 0.68) and the worst pruritus scores (mean [standard deviation] 2.6 (2.8) vs. 3.3 [3.1], P = 0.23), respectively. Both groups had similar pain scores at rest (2.7 [2.3] vs. 2.0 [2.7], P = 0.16) and sitting up (5.0 [2.3] vs. 4.6 [2.4], P = 0.38) at 24 h. Pruritus scores were lower at 4-8, 8-12 and 12-24 h with oxycodone, but pain scores were higher. Both groups had a similar need for treatment of PONV and maternal satisfaction with analgesia. There was no difference in the incidence of pruritus at 24 h between epidural oxycodone and morphine. However, pruritus scores were lower with oxycodone between 4 and 24 h after surgery with higher pain scores in the same period.

  20. A prospective, randomized, blinded-endpoint, controlled study - continuous epidural infusion versus programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Joana; Nunes, Sara; Veiga, Mariano; Cortez, Mara; Seifert, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that administration of a programmed intermittent epidural bolus (PIEB) compared to continuous epidural infusion (CEI) leads to greater analgesia efficacy and maternal satisfaction with decreased anesthetic interventions. In this study, 166 women with viable pregnancies were included. After an epidural loading dose of 10mL with Ropivacaine 0.16% plus Sufentanil 10μg, parturient were randomly assigned to one of three regimens: A - Ropivacaine 0.15% plus Sufentanil 0.2μg/mL solution as continuous epidural infusion (5mL/h, beginning immediately after the initial bolus); B - Ropivacaine 0.1% plus Sufentanil 0.2μg/mL as programmed intermittent epidural bolus and C - Same solution as group A as programmed intermittent epidural bolus. PIEB regimens were programmed as 10mL/h starting 60min after the initial bolus. Rescue boluses of 5mL of the same solution were administered, with the infusion pump. We evaluated maternal satisfaction using a verbal numeric scale from 0 to 10. We also evaluated adverse, maternal and neonatal outcomes. We analyzed 130 pregnants (A=60; B=33; C=37). The median verbal numeric scale for maternal satisfaction was 8.8 in group A; 8.6 in group B and 8.6 in group C (p=0.83). We found a higher caesarean delivery rate in group A (56.7%; p=0.02). No differences in motor block, instrumental delivery rate and neonatal outcomes were observed. Maintenance of epidural analgesia with programmed intermittent epidural bolus is associated with a reduced incidence of caesarean delivery with equally high maternal satisfaction and no adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. [A prospective, randomized, blinded-endpoint, controlled study - continuous epidural infusion versus programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia].

    PubMed

    Nunes, Joana; Nunes, Sara; Veiga, Mariano; Cortez, Mara; Seifert, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that administration of a programmed intermittent epidural bolus (PIEB) compared to continuous epidural infusion (CEI) leads to greater analgesia efficacy and maternal satisfaction with decreased anesthetic interventions. In this study, 166 women with viable pregnancies were included. After an epidural loading dose of 10mL with Ropivacaine 0.16% plus Sufentanil 10μg, parturient were randomly assigned to one of three regimens: A - Ropivacaine 0.15% plus Sufentanil 0.2μg/mL solution as continuous epidural infusion (5mL/h, beginning immediately after the initial bolus); B - Ropivacaine 0.1% plus Sufentanil 0.2μg/mL as programmed intermittent epidural bolus and C - Same solution as group A as programmed intermittent epidural bolus. PIEB regimens were programmed as 10mL/h starting 60min after the initial bolus. Rescue boluses of 5mL of the same solution were administered, with the infusion pump. We evaluated maternal satisfaction using a verbal numeric scale from 0 to 10. We also evaluated adverse, maternal and neonatal outcomes. We analyzed 130 pregnants (A=60; B=33; C=37). The median verbal numeric scale for maternal satisfaction was 8.8 in group A; 8.6 in group B and 8.6 in group C (p=0.83). We found a higher caesarean delivery rate in group A (56.7%; p=0.02). No differences in motor block, instrumental delivery rate and neonatal outcomes were observed. Maintenance of epidural analgesia with programmed intermittent epidural bolus is associated with a reduced incidence of caesarean delivery with equally high maternal satisfaction and no adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of epidural oxycodone and epidural morphine for post-caesarean section analgesia: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Ban Leong; Kwok, Sarah Carol; Mathur, Deepak; Ithnin, Farida; Newton-Dunn, Clare; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sultana, Rehena; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Epidural morphine after caesarean section may cause moderate to severe pruritus in women. Epidural oxycodone has been shown in non-obstetric trials to reduce pruritus when compared to morphine. We hypothesised that epidural oxycodone may reduce pruritus after caesarean section. Methods: A randomised controlled trial was conducted in pregnant women at term who underwent caesarean section with combined spinal-epidural technique initiated with intrathecal fentanyl 15 μg. Women received either epidural morphine 3 mg or epidural oxycodone 3 mg via the epidural catheter after delivery. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 24 h after caesarean section. The secondary outcomes were the pruritus scores, treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), pain scores and maternal satisfaction. Results: One hundred women were randomised (group oxycodone O = 50, morphine M = 50). There was no difference between Group O and M in the incidence of pruritus (n [%] 28 [56%] vs. 31 [62%], P = 0.68) and the worst pruritus scores (mean [standard deviation] 2.6 (2.8) vs. 3.3 [3.1], P = 0.23), respectively. Both groups had similar pain scores at rest (2.7 [2.3] vs. 2.0 [2.7], P = 0.16) and sitting up (5.0 [2.3] vs. 4.6 [2.4], P = 0.38) at 24 h. Pruritus scores were lower at 4–8, 8–12 and 12–24 h with oxycodone, but pain scores were higher. Both groups had a similar need for treatment of PONV and maternal satisfaction with analgesia. Conclusion: There was no difference in the incidence of pruritus at 24 h between epidural oxycodone and morphine. However, pruritus scores were lower with oxycodone between 4 and 24 h after surgery with higher pain scores in the same period. PMID:27053782

  3. Synovial Cyst Mimicking an Intraspinal Sacral Mass

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 68-year-old female had a three-week history of severe low back pain radiating down the posterior left buttocks and left leg exacerbated by standing and walking. Lumbar spine MRI revealed cystic mass with similar intensity to cerebrospinal fluid located on dorsolateral left side of the sacral spinal canal inferior to the S1 pedicle. There was compression of left exiting S1 and traversing S2 nerve roots. Neurosurgery consult was requested to evaluate the cystic mass in the sacral spinal canal. After clinical evaluation, an unusually located synovial cyst was thought possible. Cyst contents were heterogeneous, suggestive of small hemorrhage and acute clinical history seemed reasonable. Left S1 and partial left S2 hemilaminectomy was performed and an epidural, partially hemorrhagic cyst was removed. There was no obvious connection to the ipsilateral L5-S1 facet joint. Pathology revealed synovial cyst, and the patient's leg pain was improved postoperatively. This synovial cyst was unusual as it had no connection with the facet joint intraoperatively and its location in the sacral canal was uncommon. PMID:24716025

  4. Controlled release ibuprofen-poloxamer gel for epidural use - A pharmacokinetic study using microdialysis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Paavola, Anne; Bernards, Christopher M; Rosenberg, Per H

    2016-11-01

    In order to avoid the risks of sideeffects of epidural local anesthetics and opioids, the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) epidurally would be an interesting option of analgesic therapy. The fairly short duration of action of spinally administered NSAIDs, e.g., ibuprofen, may be prolonged by using controlled release poloxamer gel formulation. Using a microdialysis technique we studied the epidural and intrathecal pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen after its epidural administration as a poloxamer 407 formulation or a solution formulation. In addition, plasma ibuprofen concentrations were analyzed from central venous blood samples. Ibuprofen concentrations in the epidural space were significantly higher and longer lasting after the epidural gel injection compared with the epidural solution injection. The epidural AUC of ibuprofen was over threefold greater after epidural ibuprofen gel injection compared with the ibuprofen solution injection (p<0.001). The systemic absorption of ibuprofen from 25% poloxamer 407 gel was very low. The in situ forming poloxamer gel acted as a reservoir allowing targeted ibuprofen release at the epidural injection site and restricted ibuprofen molecules to a smaller spinal area. Ibuprofen diffusion from the epidural space to the intrathecal space was steady and prolonged. These results demonstrate that the use of epidurally injectable poloxamer gel can increase and prolong ibuprofen delivery from epidural space to the CSF enhancing thus ibuprofen entry into the central neuroaxis for spinal analgesia. Further toxicological and dose-finding studies are justified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Posterior scleritis: clinical profile and imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Biswas, J; Mittal, S; Ganesh, S K; Shetty, N S; Gopal, L

    1998-12-01

    Posterior scleritis is relatively uncommon and is often misdiagnosed due to its protean manifestations. We report eight cases of posterior scleritis to analyse the clinical profile, ultrasonographic and computed tomography (CT) scan features of this rare disorder. Fundus findings included serous retinal detachment, choroidal folds, retinal folds, subretinal mass, choroidal detachment, disc edema, and macular edema. There was associated anterior scleritis and anterior uveitis in the majority of the cases. In all cases ultrasound with or without CT scan confirmed the clinical diagnosis. All patients responded to systemic steroids except one who required immunosuppressive therapy. This paper describes the clinical profile of a series of posterior scleritis cases highlighting varied clinical presentation, and the role of ultrasound and CT scan findings in the diagnosis.

  6. Microscopic epidural lesions in goats given repeated epidural injections of morphine: use of a modified autopsy procedure.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J J; Svendsen, O; Andersen, H B

    1986-01-01

    Epidural catheterization was performed in six goats. Five days later either saline or 20 mg (5 mg/ml) preservative free morphine was injected epidurally once daily for 8 days. The goats were sacrificed 4, 24 or 48 hours after the last injection. The lumbar part of columna was removed in toto for microscopic examination of the spinal cord and the entire epidural space after decalcification and transverse sectioning. After saline, minimal changes including a fibrous membrane surrounding the catheter, scattered fat cell necrosis, scattered small focal cell infiltrations and occasionally focal haemorrhages were seen. After morphine the changes were considerably more severe including diffuse cellular inflammatory reaction in the epidural space, fat cell necrosis, occasionally focal exudative inflammation and chronic inflammatory reaction in the vicinity of the fibrous membrane demarcating position of the catheter. It is concluded that the present modified autopsy procedure permits microscopic examination of the epidural space. It has been shown that repeated administration of morphine caused tissue damage in the epidural space of goats. The human predictability of the results obtained is unknown. However, the results are encouraging for investigations with similar procedure in humans.

  7. Estimating the Incidence of Suspected Epidural Hematoma and the Hidden Imaging Cost of Epidural Catheterization: A Retrospective Review of 43,200 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, Justin P.; Sandberg, Warren S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hematoma associated with epidural catheterization is rare, but the diagnosis might be suspected relatively frequently. We sought to estimate the incidence of suspected epidural hematoma after epidural catheterization, and to determine the associated cost of excluding or diagnosing an epidural hematoma through radiologic imaging. Methods We conducted an electronic retrospective chart review of 43,200 patient charts using 4 distinct search strategies and cost analysis, all from a single academic institution from 2001 through 2009. Charts were reviewed for use of radiological imaging studies to identify patients with suspected and confirmed epidural hematomas. Costs for imaging to exclude or confirm the diagnosis were related to the entire cohort. Results In our analysis, over a 9-year period that included 43,200 epidural catheterizations, 102 patients (1:430) underwent further imaging studies to exclude or confirm the presence of an epidural hematoma—revealing 6 confirmed cases and an overall incidence (per 10,000 epidural blocks) of epidural hematoma of 1.38 (95% CI 0, 0.002). Among our patients, 207 imaging studies, primarily lumbar spine MRI, were performed. Integrating Medicare cost expenditure data, the estimated additional cost over a 9-year period for imaging and hospital charges related to identifying epidural hematomas nets to approximately $232,000 or an additional $5.37 per epidural. Discussion About 1 in 430 epidural catheterization patients will be suspected to have an epidural hematoma. The cost of excluding the diagnosis, when suspected, is relatively low when allocated across all epidural catheterization patients. PMID:23924685

  8. Posterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Go, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 20-25% of all acute strokes occur in the posterior circulation. These strokes can be rather difficult to diagnose because they present in such diverse ways, and can easily be mistaken for more benign entities. A fastidious history, physical exam, high clinical suspicion, and appropriate use of imaging are essential for the emergency physician to properly diagnose and treat these patients. Expert stroke neurologist consultation should be utilized liberally.

  9. [Posterior cortical atrophy].

    PubMed

    Solyga, Volker Moræus; Western, Elin; Solheim, Hanne; Hassel, Bjørnar; Kerty, Emilia

    2015-06-02

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a neurodegenerative condition with atrophy of posterior parts of the cerebral cortex, including the visual cortex and parts of the parietal and temporal cortices. It presents early, in the 50s or 60s, with nonspecific visual disturbances that are often misinterpreted as ophthalmological, which can delay the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to present current knowledge about symptoms, diagnostics and treatment of this condition. The review is based on a selection of relevant articles in PubMed and on the authors' own experience with the patient group. Posterior cortical atrophy causes gradually increasing impairment in reading, distance judgement, and the ability to perceive complex images. Examination of higher visual functions, neuropsychological testing, and neuroimaging contribute to diagnosis. In the early stages, patients do not have problems with memory or insight, but cognitive impairment and dementia can develop. It is unclear whether the condition is a variant of Alzheimer's disease, or whether it is a separate disease entity. There is no established treatment, but practical measures such as the aid of social care workers, telephones with large keypads, computers with voice recognition software and audiobooks can be useful. Currently available treatment has very limited effect on the disease itself. Nevertheless it is important to identify and diagnose the condition in its early stages in order to be able to offer patients practical assistance in their daily lives.

  10. Posterior Shoulder Instability.

    PubMed

    Brelin, Alaina; Dickens, Jonathan F

    2017-09-01

    Posterior shoulder instability is a relatively uncommon condition, occurring in ∼10% of those with shoulder instability. Because of the rarity of the condition and the lack of knowledge in treatment, it is often misdiagnosed or patients experience a delay in diagnosis. Posterior instability typically affects athletes participating in contact or overhead sports and is usually the result of repetitive microtrauma or blunt force with the shoulder in the provocative position of flexion, adduction, and internal rotation, leading to recurrent subluxation events. Acute traumatic posterior dislocations are rare injuries with an incidence rate of 1.1 per 100,000 person years. This rate is ∼20 times lower than that of anterior shoulder dislocations. Risk factors for recurrent instability are: (1) age below 40 at time of first instability; (2) dislocation during a seizure; (3) a large reverse Hill-Sachs lesion; and (4) glenoid retroversion. A firm understanding of the pathoanatomy, along with pertinent clinical and diagnostic modalities is required to accurately diagnosis and manage this condition.

  11. Persistent occiput posterior.

    PubMed

    Barth, William H

    2015-03-01

    Persistent occiput posterior (OP) is associated with increased rates of maternal and newborn morbidity. Its diagnosis by physical examination is challenging but is improved with bedside ultrasonography. Occiput posterior discovered in the active phase or early second stage of labor usually resolves spontaneously. When it does not, prophylactic manual rotation may decrease persistent OP and its associated complications. When delivery is indicated for arrest of descent in the setting of persistent OP, a pragmatic approach is suggested. Suspected fetal macrosomia, a biparietal diameter above the pelvic inlet or a maternal pelvis with android features should prompt cesarean delivery. Nonrotational operative vaginal delivery is appropriate when the maternal pelvis has a narrow anterior segment but ample room posteriorly, like with anthropoid features. When all other conditions are met and the fetal head arrests in an OP position in a patient with gynecoid pelvic features and ample room anteriorly, options include cesarean delivery, nonrotational operative vaginal delivery, and rotational procedures, either manual or with the use of rotational forceps. Recent literature suggests that maternal and fetal outcomes with rotational forceps are better than those reported in older series. Although not without significant challenges, a role remains for teaching and practicing selected rotational forceps operations in contemporary obstetrics.

  12. Epidural Anesthesia for Cesarean Delivery in a Morbidly Obese Parturient With Spinal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Allison; DiGiovanni, Neil; Hart, Stuart; Russo, Melissa; Bui, Cuong

    2012-01-01

    We report our experience with epidural anesthesia for cesarean section in a morbidly obese parturient with progressive paraplegia from a spinal meningioma. Epidural anesthesia may represent a safe anesthetic choice in such clinical situations. PMID:22778679

  13. Epidural anesthesia for cesarean delivery in a morbidly obese parturient with spinal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Clark, Allison; Digiovanni, Neil; Hart, Stuart; Russo, Melissa; Bui, Cuong

    2012-01-01

    We report our experience with epidural anesthesia for cesarean section in a morbidly obese parturient with progressive paraplegia from a spinal meningioma. Epidural anesthesia may represent a safe anesthetic choice in such clinical situations.

  14. Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    French, Cynthia A; Cong, Xiaomei; Chung, Keun Sam

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of epidural analgesia during labor, no consensus has been reached among obstetric and anesthesia providers regarding its effects on breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between labor epidural analgesia and breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published in 1990 or thereafter, using the search term breastfeeding combined with epidural, labor epidural analgesia, labor analgesia, or epidural analgesia Of 117 articles, 23 described empirical studies specific to labor epidural analgesia and measured a breastfeeding outcome. Results were conflicting: 12 studies showed negative associations between epidural analgesia and breastfeeding success, 10 studies showed no effect, and 1 study showed a positive association. Most studies were observational. Of 3 randomized controlled studies, randomization methods were inadequate in 2 and not evaluable in 1. Other limitations were related to small sample size or inadequate study power; variation and lack of information regarding type and dosage of analgesia or use of other intrapartum interventions; differences in timing, definition, and method of assessing breastfeeding success; or failure to consider factors such as mothers' intention to breastfeed, social support, siblings, or the mother's need to return to work or school. It is also unclear to what extent results are mediated through effects on infant neurobehavior, maternal fever, oxytocin release, duration of labor, and need for instrumental delivery. Clinician awareness of factors affecting breastfeeding can help identify women at risk for breastfeeding difficulties in order to target support and resources effectively.

  15. Racial differences in the use of epidural analgesia for labor.

    PubMed

    Glance, Laurent G; Wissler, Richard; Glantz, Christopher; Osler, Turner M; Mukamel, Dana B; Dick, Andrew W

    2007-01-01

    There is strong evidence that pain is undertreated in black and Hispanic patients. The association between race and ethnicity and the use of epidural analgesia for labor is not well described. Using the New York State Perinatal Database, the authors examined whether race and ethnicity were associated with the likelihood of receiving epidural analgesia for labor after adjusting for clinical characteristics, demographics, insurance coverage, and provider effect. This retrospective cohort study was based on 81,883 women admitted for childbirth between 1998 and 2003. Overall, 38.3% of the patients received epidural analgesia for labor. After adjusting for clinical risk factors, socioeconomic status, and provider fixed effects, Hispanic and black patients were less likely than non-Hispanic white patients to receive epidural analgesia: The adjusted odds ratio was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.78-0.93) for white/Hispanic and 0.78 (0.74-0.83) for blacks compared with non-Hispanic whites. Compared with patients with private insurance, patients without insurance were least likely to receive epidural analgesia (adjusted odds ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.64-0.89). Black patients with private insurance had similar rates of epidural use to white/non-Hispanic patients without insurance coverage: The adjusted odds ratio was 0.66 (95% CI, 0.53-0.82) for white/non-Hispanic patients without insurance versus 0.69 (0.57-0.85) for black patients with private insurance. Black and Hispanic women in labor are less likely than non-Hispanic white women to receive epidural analgesia. These differences remain after accounting for differences in insurance coverage, provider practice, and clinical characteristics.

  16. [Epidural obstetric analgesia, maternal fever and neonatal wellness parameters].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; Delgado Arnáiz, C; Rodríguez Caravaca, G; Serrano Rodríguez, M L; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2005-04-01

    To study the relation between epidural analgesia and the development of maternal fever during labor and childbirth, and to determine the possible relation between that association and neonatal welfare and in the performance of tests to rule out sepsis in newborns. Prospective study of all women who gave birth at Fundación Hospital Alcorcón over a period of 3 years. All the women were offered epidural analgesia based on infusion of 0.0625% bupivacaine and 2 microg x mL(-1). Data collected were age, nulliparity, epidural analgesia infusion, induction of labor, uterine stimulation with oxytocin, type of birth, fetal weight, duration of dilation and expulsion, Apgar score (at 1 and 5 minutes), umbilical artery pH, and maternal temperature. Data for 4364 women were analyzed. Fever developed during labor in 5.7%; 93.7% of the fevers occurred in women receiving epidural analgesia (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that independent risk factors for the development of fever were epidural analgesia (odds ratio [OR], 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-3.04), nulliparity (OR, 2,929; 95% CI, 2.005-4.279), fetal weight (OR, 1.484; 95% CI, 1.102-2.001), and duration of labor (OR, 1.003; 95% CI, 1.003-1.004). No significant differences in Apgar score at 5 minutes or umbilical artery pH were found between the women with and without fever. Tests to rule out sepsis were ordered for 85.1% of the infants of mothers with fever after epidural analgesia. Epidural analgesia was associated with greater risk of developing fever in mothers giving birth, but that association had no repercussion on the neonatal wellness parameters studied.

  17. Labor Epidural Anesthesia, Obstetric Factors and Breastfeeding Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Dozier, Ann M.; Howard, Cynthia R.; Brownell, Elizabeth A.; Wissler, Richard N.; Glantz, J. Christopher; Ternullo, Sharon R.; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly N.; Childs, Cynthia K.; Lawrence, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Breastfeeding benefits both infant and maternal health. Use of epidural anesthesia during labor is increasingly common and may interfere with breastfeeding. Studies analyzing epidural anesthesia’s association with breastfeeding outcomes show mixed results; many have methodological flaws. We analyzed potential associations between epidural anesthesia and overall breast-feeding cessation within 30 days postpartum while adjusting for standard and novel covariates and uniquely accounting for labor induction. Methods A pooled analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves and modified Cox Proportional Hazard models included 772 breastfeeding mothers from upstate New York who had vaginal term births of healthy singleton infants. Subjects were drawn from two cohort studies (recruited postpartum between 2005 and 2008) and included maternal self-report and maternal and infant medical record data. Results Analyses of potential associations between epidural anesthesia and overall breastfeeding cessation within one month included additional covariates and uniquely accounted for labor induction. After adjusting for standard demographics and intrapartum factors, epidural anesthesia significantly predicted breastfeeding cessation (hazard ratio 1.26 [95%confidence interval 1.10, 1.44], p<.01) as did hospital type, maternal age, income, education, planned breastfeeding goal, and breastfeeding confidence. In post hoc analyses stratified by Baby Friendly Hospital (BFH) status, epidural anesthesia significantly predicted breastfeeding cessation (BFH: 1.19 [1.01,1.41], p<.04; non-BFH: 1.65 [1.31, 2.08], p<.01). Conclusions A relationship between epidural anesthesia and breastfeeding was found but is complex and involves institutional, clinical, maternal and infant factors. These findings have implications for clinical care and hospital policies and point to the need for prospective studies. PMID:22696104

  18. Labor epidural anesthesia, obstetric factors and breastfeeding cessation.

    PubMed

    Dozier, Ann M; Howard, Cynthia R; Brownell, Elizabeth A; Wissler, Richard N; Glantz, J Christopher; Ternullo, Sharon R; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly N; Childs, Cynthia K; Lawrence, Ruth A

    2013-05-01

    Breastfeeding benefits both infant and maternal health. Use of epidural anesthesia during labor is increasingly common and may interfere with breastfeeding. Studies analyzing epidural anesthesia's association with breastfeeding outcomes show mixed results; many have methodological flaws. We analyzed potential associations between epidural anesthesia and overall breast-feeding cessation within 30 days postpartum while adjusting for standard and novel covariates and uniquely accounting for labor induction. A pooled analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves and modified Cox Proportional Hazard models included 772 breastfeeding mothers from upstate New York who had vaginal term births of healthy singleton infants. Subjects were drawn from two cohort studies (recruited postpartum between 2005 and 2008) and included maternal self-report and maternal and infant medical record data. Analyses of potential associations between epidural anesthesia and overall breastfeeding cessation within 1 month included additional covariates and uniquely accounted for labor induction. After adjusting for standard demographics and intrapartum factors, epidural anesthesia significantly predicted breastfeeding cessation (hazard ratio 1.26 [95% confidence interval 1.10, 1.44], p < 0.01) as did hospital type, maternal age, income, education, planned breastfeeding goal, and breastfeeding confidence. In post hoc analyses stratified by Baby Friendly Hospital (BFH) status, epidural anesthesia significantly predicted breastfeeding cessation (BFH: 1.19 [1.01, 1.41], p < 0.04; non-BFH: 1.65 [1.31, 2.08], p < 0.01). A relationship between epidural anesthesia and breastfeeding was found but is complex and involves institutional, clinical, maternal and infant factors. These findings have implications for clinical care and hospital policies and point to the need for prospective studies.

  19. Epidural analgesia in labour and risk of caesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Bannister-Tyrrell, Melanie; Ford, Jane B; Morris, Jonathan M; Roberts, Christine L

    2014-09-01

    A Cochrane Systematic Review of randomised controlled trials of epidural analgesia compared with other or no analgesia in labour reported no overall increased risk of caesarean delivery. However, many trials were affected by substantial non-compliance, and there are concerns about the external validity of some trials for contemporary maternity populations. We aimed to explore the association between epidural analgesia in labour and caesarean delivery in clinical practice and compare with findings from randomised controlled trials. Population-based cohort of pregnant women (n = 210 708) without major obstetrical complications who delivered a singleton live infant in hospitals in New South Wales, Australia, 2007-10. Data were obtained from linked, validated population-based data collections. Propensity score matching was used to examine the association between epidural analgesia in labour and caesarean delivery. Epidural analgesia in labour was used by a third (31.5%, n = 66 317) of the women, and 9.8% (n = 20 531) had a caesarean delivery. Epidural analgesia in labour was associated with increased risk of caesarean delivery {risk ratio [RR] 2.5, [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.5, 2.6]}. The association with epidural analgesia in labour was higher for caesarean delivery for failure to progress {RR 3.0, [95% CI 2.9, 3.0]} than for caesarean delivery for fetal distress {RR 1.9, [95% CI 1.8, 2.0]}. Epidural analgesia in labour is associated with caesarean delivery in a large maternity population. Population-based studies contribute important data about obstetrical care, when research settings and participants may not represent the clinical settings or broader population in which obstetrical interventions in labour are applied. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Primary Lumbo-sacral Spinal Epidural Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mally, Rahul; Khan, Shadma; Velho, Vernon

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of 24-year-old male presented with low back pain radiating to the left lower limb, tingling numbness and weakness of 6 months duration. Magnetic resonance imaging scan with contrast reveals an extradural mass at lumbosacral region. Patient was operated with laminectomy and complete excision of the lesion was done. Patient's radicular pain relieved following the surgery and weakness also improved. Histopathology was suggestive of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Patient received chemotherapy which was followed by radiotherapy. Primary Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the lumbosacral spinal epidural tissue is an uncommon lesion. Lymphoma involves the central nervous system in 5-11% of cases either at presentation of the disease or during its course. The spinal epidural tissue is involved primarily in 0.1-3.3% of cases with spinal cord compression being the commonest presentation. Excision of the lesion followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy is required to achieve cure. PMID:21892393

  1. Epidural Volume Extension During Combined Spinal-Epidural Labor Analgesia Does Not Increase Sensory Block.

    PubMed

    Zaphiratos, Valerie; George, Ronald B; Macaulay, Bruce; Bolleddula, Prasad; McKeen, Dolores M

    2016-09-01

    Combined spinal-epidural (CSE) analgesia is widely used for delivering labor analgesia. Epidural volume extension (EVE) involves the injection of fluid into the epidural space compressing the dural sac, causing cephalad shift of the cerebral spinal fluid. Our hypothesis was that EVE with 10 mL normal saline during CSE would increase the sensory block height at 15 minutes after intrathecal injection. We expected EVE to decrease pain scores, decrease analgesia onset time, and decrease motor block compared with performing CSE without EVE (NEVE). We randomly assigned 60 healthy term laboring nulliparous parturients with cervical dilation <5 cm to receive CSE either with EVE of 10 mL normal saline through the Tuohy needle before catheter insertion or CSE NEVE. Intrathecal analgesia consisted of 2 mg plain bupivacaine and 10 μg fentanyl (1 mL total). A blinded researcher assessed sensory dermatome level, analgesia, and motor blockade at regular intervals for 30 minutes. The primary outcome measure was the median peak sensory dermatome level at 15 minutes. Fifty-four parturients were analyzed. There was no significant difference in peak sensory dermatome levels at 15 minutes (median difference, 1 dermatome level; 95% confidence interval of median difference, 0 to 2; P = 0.22) and 30 minutes (median difference, 0 dermatome level; 95% confidence interval, -2 to 2; P = 0.76). There was no difference in the time to peak dermatome, minimum pain score, or the time to minimum pain score between groups. We found no significant difference between groups with regard to sensory dermatome level or pain scores when using EVE compared with NEVE. Our study demonstrates that addition of EVE does not offer superior analgesia when using a CSE technique for parturients requesting labor analgesia.

  2. Does occiput posterior position in the second stage of labour increase the operative delivery rate?

    PubMed

    Carseldine, Wendy J; Phipps, Hala; Zawada, Shannon F; Campbell, Neil T; Ludlow, Joanne P; Krishnan, Surya Y; De Vries, Bradley S

    2013-06-01

    To assess the impact of occipito-posterior position in the second stage of labour on operative delivery. Double-blinded prospective cohort study of ultrasound determined occiput-posterior position during the second stage of labour compared with occiput-anterior position. The primary outcome was operative (caesarean section, forceps or vacuum) delivery. A total of 68% (13/19) women in the occiput-posterior group, and 27% (39/141) in the occiput-anterior group had an operative delivery (unadjusted: P < 0.001). Caesarean section was performed in 37% and 5%, respectively (P < 0.001). The occiput-posterior group had a longer second stage (mean 2 h 59 minutes vs 1 h 54 minutes; P = 0.001) and larger infants (mean 3723 g vs 3480 g, P = 0.024). In the logistic regression, occiput-posterior position, nulliparity, abnormal second stage cardiotocograph and epidural analgesia were independent predictors for operative delivery. Occiput-posterior position early in the second stage of labour is strongly associated with operative delivery. There is potential to explore interventions such as manual rotation. © 2013 The Authors ANZJOG © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  3. Acute epidural-like appearance of an encapsulated solid non-organized chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Ruth; Pascual, José M; Subhi-Issa, Issa; Yus, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    We report the exceptional case of an encapsulated solid non-organized chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) in a 67-year-old woman that was admitted with acute hemiplegia followed by rapid deterioration in consciousness 5 months after a minor head trauma. Computed tomography (CT) showed an extracerebral biconvex shaped hyperdense mass that led to the misdiagnosis of an acute epidural hematoma. Urgent craniotomy revealed an encapsulated mass filled with solid fresh clot in the subdural space. Complete evacuation of this SDH, including both its inner and outer membranes, was achieved, and the patient recovered successfully. Histological analysis confirmed that the content of the hematoma corresponded to a newly formed clot that was enclosed between an inner membrane, composed of two collagen layers, and an outer membrane with a three layered structure. Chronic SDH may seldom present as an encapsulated solid non-organized lesion that consists of a fibrous capsule enclosing a fresh clot and lacking the thick fibrous septations that typically connect the inner and outer membranes of organized chronic SDH. This entity mimics the clinical course and radiological appearance of acute epidural hematomas and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of extracerebral hyperdense biconvex shaped lesions.

  4. Failure to Extend Epidural Labor Analgesia for Cesarean Delivery Anesthesia: A Focused Review.

    PubMed

    Mankowitz, Suzanne K W; Gonzalez Fiol, Antonio; Smiley, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Extension of epidural labor analgesia for cesarean delivery anesthesia may fail. There are a number of factors associated with labor epidural catheter failure. This focused review discusses these associations and anesthetic options when faced with inadequate surgical epidural anesthesia for cesarean delivery.

  5. Visible Evidence of Lumbar Epidural Catheter Misplacement–A Critical Incident Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Butala, Beena; Parikh, Geeta; Pargi, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    One of the causes of failed epidurals is catheter misplacement. Though various techniques of epidural space identification have been developed, none of them is 100% successful. Here, we present a case of lumbar epidural catheter misplacement in a patient scheduled to undergo right sided open nephrectomy. Catheter was found in the surgical field coming out of psoas major muscle. PMID:28274024

  6. Visible Evidence of Lumbar Epidural Catheter Misplacement-A Critical Incident Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rajkiran; Butala, Beena; Parikh, Geeta; Pargi, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    One of the causes of failed epidurals is catheter misplacement. Though various techniques of epidural space identification have been developed, none of them is 100% successful. Here, we present a case of lumbar epidural catheter misplacement in a patient scheduled to undergo right sided open nephrectomy. Catheter was found in the surgical field coming out of psoas major muscle.

  7. Epidural Bovine Pericardium Facilitates Dissection During Cranioplasty: A Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Griessenauer, Christoph J; He, Lucy; Salem, Mohamed; Chua, Michelle; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Thomas, Ajith J

    2015-12-01

    Adhesions and scarring of the subcutaneous tissue to the dura mater or dural substitute often complicate cranioplasty. We present our experience with epidural bovine pericardium as a barrier membrane to minimize adhesions and facilitate separation of tissue layers. A cohort of patients who underwent decompressive craniectomy and subsequent cranioplasty at a major academic institution in the United States from August 2007 to October 2013 and had epidural bovine pericardium placed as a barrier membrane was retrospectively reviewed. Medical records and imaging studies were reviewed for a number of variables including presence of adhesions, infection, contusions, and operative complications. Twenty-nine patients (male-to-female = 1:1.1; mean age 45 ± 14.7 years) who underwent decompressive craniectomy with placement of epidural bovine pericardium with subsequent cranioplasty were identified. The median interval between craniectomy and cranioplasty was 64 days, and autologous bone was used for cranioplasty in 86.2% of cases. The average size of cranial defect was 71.2 ± 28.5 cm(2). At the time of cranioplasty, no or minimal adhesions were found between the subcutaneous tissue and the epidural bovine pericardium. There were 2 (6.9%) infections, 2 (6.9%) patients had contusion after the cranioplasty, and no patient had a complication after cranioplasty that required reoperation. Epidural bovine pericardium at the time of decompressive craniectomy facilitates dissection at the time of cranioplasty and is not associated with any additional risks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pentoxifylline Inhibits Epidural Fibrosis in Post-Laminectomy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelten, Bilal; Erdogan, Hakan; Antar, Veysel; Sanel, Selim; Tuncdemir, Matem; Kutnu, Muge; Karaoglan, Alper; Orki, Tulay

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effectiveness of intramuscular pentoxifylline in the prevention of postoperative fibrosis. Material/Methods We divided 16 adult Wistar albino rats into 2 equal groups: treatment and control. Both groups underwent L1 vertebral total laminectomy to expose the dura. The intramuscular treatment group received pentoxifylline. Four weeks later, epidural fibrosis was studied in both groups using electron microscopy, light microscopy, histology, biochemistry, and macroscopy. Results The evaluation of epidural fibrosis in the 2 groups according to macroscopic (p<0.01) assessment and light microscopy revealed that epidural scar tissue formation was lower in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.001) and the number of fibroblasts was also decreased significantly in the pentoxifylline-treated group (p<0.05). More immature fibers were demonstrated in the treatment group by electron microscopy in comparison with the control group. In biochemical analysis, a statistically significant decrease was detected in hydroxyproline, which indicates fibrosis and myeloperoxidase activity, and shows an inflammatory response (P<0.001). Conclusions Systemic pentoxifylline application prevents postoperative epidural fibrosis and adhesions with various mechanisms. Our study is the first to present evidence of experimental epidural fibrosis prevention with pentoxifylline. PMID:26974057

  9. Morphine and hydromorphone epidural analgesia. A prospective, randomized comparison.

    PubMed

    Chaplan, S R; Duncan, S R; Brodsky, J B; Brose, W G

    1992-12-01

    Because evidence from uncontrolled, unblinded studies suggested fewer side effects from epidural hydromorphone than from epidural morphine, we employed a randomized, blinded study design to compare the side effects of lumbar epidural morphine and hydromorphone in 55 adult, non-obstetric patients undergoing major surgical procedures. A bolus dose of epidural study drug was given at least 1 h prior to the conclusion of surgery, followed by a continuous infusion of the same drug for two postoperative days. Infusions were titrated to patient comfort. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, VAS sedation scores, and subjective ratings of nausea and pruritus were assessed twice daily. The two treatments provided equivalent analgesia. Sedation scores and prevalence of nausea did not differ significantly between groups. Prevalence of pruritus, however, differed significantly on postoperative day 1, with moderate to severe pruritus reported by 44.4% of patients in the morphine group versus 11.5% in the hydromorphone group (P < .01). On post-operative day 2, reports of pruritus by patients receiving morphine remained higher than those among the hydromorphone-treated subjects, although this difference was no longer statistically significant (32% vs. 16.7%, P = .18). We conclude that lumbar epidural morphine and hydromorphone afford comparable analgesia, but the occurrence of moderate to severe pruritus on the first postoperative day is reduced by the use of hydromorphone.

  10. Posterior interosseous neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kele, Henrich; Xia, Annie; Weiler, Markus; Schwarz, Daniel; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the spatial pattern of lesion dispersion in posterior interosseous neuropathy syndrome (PINS) by high-resolution magnetic resonance neurography. Methods: This prospective study was approved by the local ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. In 19 patients with PINS and 20 healthy controls, a standardized magnetic resonance neurography protocol at 3-tesla was performed with coverage of the upper arm and elbow (T2-weighted fat-saturated: echo time/repetition time 52/7,020 milliseconds, in-plane resolution 0.27 × 0.27 mm2). Lesion classification of the radial nerve trunk and its deep branch (which becomes the posterior interosseous nerve) was performed by visual rating and additional quantitative analysis of normalized T2 signal of radial nerve voxels. Results: Of 19 patients with PINS, only 3 (16%) had a focal neuropathy at the entry of the radial nerve deep branch into the supinator muscle at elbow/forearm level. The other 16 (84%) had proximal radial nerve lesions at the upper arm level with a predominant lesion focus 8.3 ± 4.6 cm proximal to the humeroradial joint. Most of these lesions (75%) followed a specific somatotopic pattern, involving only those fascicles that would form the posterior interosseous nerve more distally. Conclusions: PINS is not necessarily caused by focal compression at the supinator muscle but is instead frequently a consequence of partial fascicular lesions of the radial nerve trunk at the upper arm level. Neuroimaging should be considered as a complementary diagnostic method in PINS. PMID:27683851

  11. Mature posterior fossa teratoma mimicking dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Bohara, Manoj; Yonezawa, Hajime; Karki, Prasanna; Bakhtiar, Yuriz; Hirano, Hirofumi; Kitazono, Ikumi; Matsuyama, Nozomu; Arita, Kazunori

    2013-10-01

    We describe a very rare case of mature posterior fossa teratoma in an adult who presented with clinico-radiological findings consistent with a dermoid cyst. A computed tomography scan showed a hypodense mass in the cistern magna with calcification and a sinus tract in the occipital bone. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a hypo- to hyperintense mass without contrast enhancement. The intraoperative picture showed a dermal sinus and a cyst containing lipid, keratin and hair. Histopathological examination showed a tumor with components of all the three germ layers; thereby, a diagnosis of mature teratoma was made. The histopathological differentiation between teratoma and dermoid cyst is very valuable for ruling out the presence of immature/malignant or germinomatous components that would require further adjuvant therapies. Thus, we here present a rare case of posterior fossa teratoma mimicking dermoid cyst and emphasize the importance of histopathological differentiation between these entities.

  12. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  13. Pathophysiology of intracranial epidural haematoma following birth.

    PubMed

    Hamlat, Abderrahmane; Heckly, Anne; Adn, Mahmoudreza; Poulain, Patrice

    2006-01-01

    Epidural haematoma in newborn infants is rare, and few specific obstetrical data related to its formation are available in the literature. The aim of this study is to discuss the pathophysiology of this condition. EDH is always a post traumatic lesion and it is only possible if the insult has produced a cleavage of the dura mater from bone. Therefore, EDH results from the mechanical forces exerted on the foetal head during birth, with or with no instrumental interference. Although it is still unclear whether the injury (and dura mater cleavage) was directly caused by the forceps or had already been inflicted by natural forces, or a combination of both however, in some patients (with neither dystocia nor skull fracture), there is no basis for explaining EDH formation, apart from propulsion of the fore coming head through the birth canal. Excessive moulding, whether or not associated with iatrogenic trauma, has been incriminated in most cases of EDH. As dystocia cannot always be anticipated, EDH will remain an ever-present cause of morbidity in the neonatal population, albeit a rare occurrence.

  14. Evaluation and management of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    DeFroda, Steven F; DePasse, J Mason; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H; Palumbo, Mark A

    2016-02-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is an uncommon and potentially catastrophic condition. SEA often presents a diagnostic challenge, as the "classic triad" of fever, spinal pain, and neurological deficit is evident in only a minority of patients. When diagnosis is delayed, irreversible neurological damage may ensue. To minimize morbidity, an appropriate level of suspicion and an understanding of the diagnostic evaluation are essential. Infection should be suspected in patients presenting with axial pain, fever, or elevated inflammatory markers. Although patients with no known risk factors can develop SEA, clinical concern should be heightened in the presence of diabetes, intravenous drug use, chronic renal failure, immunosuppressant therapy, or a recent invasive spine procedure. When the clinical profile is consistent with the diagnosis of SEA, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal column should be obtained on an emergent basis to delineate the location and neural compressive effect of the abscess. Rapid diagnosis allows for efficient treatment, which optimizes the potential for a positive outcome.

  15. Epidural infection: Is it really an abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We reviewed the literature regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Methods: Utilizing PubMed, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature on SEAs. Results: SEA remains a difficult infectious process to diagnose. This is particularly true in the early stages, when patients remain neurologically intact, and before the classic triad of fever, back pain, and neurologic deficit develop. However, knowledge of risk factors, obtaining serologic markers, and employing magnetic resonance scans facilitate obtaining a prompt and accurate diagnosis. In patients without neurologic deficits, lone medical therapy may prove effective. Conclusions: More prevalent over the previous three decades, SEA remains a rare but deleterious infectious process requiring prompt identification and treatment. Historically, identification of SEA is often elusive, diagnosis is delayed, and clinicians contend that surgical debridement is the cornerstone of treatment. Early surgery leads to more favorable outcomes and preserves neurologic function, particularly in the early stages of disease when minimal or no neurologic deficits are present. The advent of improved imaging modalities, diagnostic techniques, and multidrug antimicrobial agents has enabled medical/spinal surgical consultants to more rapidly diagnose SEA and institute more effective early medical treatment (e.g., data suggest that lone medical therapy may prove effective in the early management of SEA). PMID:23248757

  16. Computational modeling of epidural cortical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-12-01

    Epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) is a developing therapy to treat neurological disorders. However, it is not clear how the cortical anatomy or the polarity and position of the electrode affects current flow and neural activation in the cortex. We developed a 3D computational model simulating ECS over the precentral gyrus. With the electrode placed directly above the gyrus, about half of the stimulus current flowed through the crown of the gyrus while current density was low along the banks deep in the sulci. Beneath the electrode, neurons oriented perpendicular to the cortical surface were depolarized by anodic stimulation, and neurons oriented parallel to the boundary were depolarized by cathodic stimulation. Activation was localized to the crown of the gyrus, and neurons on the banks deep in the sulci were not polarized. During regulated voltage stimulation, the magnitude of the activating function was inversely proportional to the thickness of the CSF and dura. During regulated current stimulation, the activating function was not sensitive to the thickness of the dura but was slightly more sensitive than during regulated voltage stimulation to the thickness of the CSF. Varying the width of the gyrus and the position of the electrode altered the distribution of the activating function due to changes in the orientation of the neurons beneath the electrode. Bipolar stimulation, although often used in clinical practice, reduced spatial selectivity as well as selectivity for neuron orientation.

  17. Flexion-rotation manoeuvre increases dimension of the acoustic target window for paramedian thoracic epidural access.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, N; Walker, J; Tang, R; Vaghadia, H; Sawka, A

    2014-03-01

    The posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) has been found to be a reliable measure of the acoustic target window for lumbar spinal anaesthesia and a predictive tool for difficult spinals. Currently, there is limited information on the PLL in the thoracic spine and its potential use for optimizing the acoustic target window during thoracic epidural placement. This study examined the effects of changes in body position on the length of the PLL as a measure of the acoustic target window for paramedian thoracic epidural access. We performed thoracic ultrasonography on 30 adult volunteers to measure the length of the PLL at the T9/10 interspace, in five different positions: P1, neutral; P2, thoracic and lumbar flexion; P3, as in position 2 with dorsal table tilt to 10°; P4, as in position 2 with 45° rightward shoulder rotation; and P5, as in position 2 with 45° leftward shoulder rotation. The mean (sd) PLL length increased significantly from 9.9 (3.9) mm in P1 to 11.7 (3.4) mm in P2, 12.9 (3.1) mm in P3, and 13.8 (4.0) mm in P4 (P<0.01, <0.01, and <0.01, respectively). The mean PLL length in P3 and P4 was also significantly longer compared with P2 (P<0.01 and 0.01, respectively). In volunteers, flexion with 10° dorsal table tilt and flexion with right rotation significantly increased the length of the ipsilateral PLL, compared with the standard flexed sitting position, as visualized by paramedian ultrasonography at the level of T9/10.

  18. Can We Prevent a Postoperative Spinal Epidural Hematoma by Using Larger Diameter Suction Drains?

    PubMed

    Ahn, Dong Ki; Kim, Jin Hak; Chang, Byung Kwon; Lee, Jae Il

    2016-03-01

    Epidural hematoma is a rare but serious complication. According to previous studies, it is not prevented by suction drains. This study evaluated the following alternative hypothesis: the larger the diameter of a suction drain, the less the remaining epidural hematoma after spinal surgery. This was a randomized prospective study. Patients who underwent posterior lumbar decompression and instrumented fusion were divided into two groups: the large drain (LD, 2.8-mm-diameter tube) and small drain (SD, 1.6-mm-diameter tube) groups according to the diameter of the suction drains. All patients were consecutive and allocated alternately according to the date of operations. Suction drains were removed on day 3 and magnetic resonance imaging was performed on day 7 postoperatively. The size of remaining hematomas was measured by the degree of thecal sac compression in cross section using the following 4-point numeric scale: G1, less than one quarter; G2, between one quarter and half; G3, more than half; and G4, more than subtotal obstruction. There were 39 patients with LDs and 38 with SDs. They did not differ significantly in terms of sex, number of fusion segments, revision or not, antiplatelet medication, intraoperative injection of tranexamic acid. However, patient age differed significantly between the two groups (LD, 63.3 years and < SD, 68.6 years; p = 0.007). The two groups did not differ significantly in terms of prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet number, blood loss, or operation duration. However, platelet function analysis exhibited a significant difference (LD, 164.7 seconds and < SD, 222.3 seconds; p = 0.002). The two blinded readers showed high consistency (Kappa value = 0.740; p = 0.000). The results of reader 1 were as follows: LD and SD had 21 and 21 cases of G1, 9 and 11 cases of G2, 6 and 6 cases of G3, and 3 and 0 cases of G4, respectively. The results of reader 2 were as follows: LD and SD had 22 and 23 cases of G1, 7 and 9

  19. Effect of programmed intermittent epidural boluses and continuous epidural infusion on labor analgesia and obstetric outcomes: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Leopoldo E; Romero, David J; Vásquez, Oscar I; Matute, Ednna C; Van de Velde, Marc

    2017-09-07

    Continuous epidural infusion and programmed intermittent epidural boluses are analgesic techniques routinely used for pain relief in laboring women. We aimed to assess both techniques and compare them with respect to labor analgesia and obstetric outcomes. After Institutional Review Board approval, 132 laboring women aged between 18 and 45 years were randomized to epidural analgesia of 10 mL of a mixture of 0.1% bupivacaine plus 2 µg/mL of fentanyl either by programmed intermittent boluses or continuous infusion (66 per group). Primary outcome was quality of analgesia. Secondary outcomes were duration of labor, total drug dose used, maternal satisfaction, sensory level, motor block level, presence of unilateral motor block, hemodynamics, side effects, mode of delivery, and newborn outcome. Patients in the programmed intermittent epidural boluses group received statistically less drug dose than those with continuous epidural infusion (24.9 vs 34.4 mL bupivacaine; P = 0.01). There was no difference between groups regarding pain control, characteristics of block, hemodynamics, side effects, and Apgar scores. Our study evidenced a lower anesthetic consumption in the programmed intermittent boluses group with similar labor analgesic control, and obstetric and newborn outcomes in both groups.

  20. Comparison of lidocaine and saline for epidural top-up during combined spinal-epidural anesthesia in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Trautman, W J; Liu, S S; Kopacz, D J

    1997-03-01

    This study was designed to determine the efficacy of saline as an epidural top-up to prolong spinal anesthesia during combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA). Eight volunteers received three separate CSEAs with intrathecal lidocaine (50 mg). After two-segment regression, each subject received either a saline (10 mL), lidocaine 1.5% (10 mL), or control sham (0.5 mL saline) epidural injection in a randomized, double-blind, triple cross-over fashion. Sensory block was assessed by pinprick and tolerance to transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) equivalent to surgical stimulation at the knee and ankle. Motor strength was assessed with iso-metric force dynamometry. Data were analyzed with a repeated measures analysis of variance and a paired t-test. Sensory block to pinprick was prolonged in the thoracolumbar dermatomes only by lidocaine (P < 0.05). Neither lidocaine nor saline prolonged the duration of tolerance to TES at the tested sites. Instead, saline decreased the duration of tolerance to TES by 20 and 24 min at the knee and ankle (P < 0.05). Recovery from motor block at the quadriceps was prolonged by an epidural injection of lidocaine (P < 0.05). We conclude that when 10 mL of epidural saline is administered after two-segment regression, it is an ineffective top-up and may decrease the duration of spinal anesthesia during CSEA.

  1. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  2. Posterior Fossa Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Essam A.; Taibah, Abdel Kader; Achilli, Vittorio; Aristegui, Miguel; Mazzoni, Antonio; Sanna, Mario

    1994-01-01

    Posterior fossa meningioma is the second most common tumor in the cerebellopontine angle. It has a higher rate of postoperative morbidity and mortality compared to acoustic neuroma. Forty posterior fossa meningioma patients managed in our centers were reviewed. Thirty-nine patients were managed surgically with 42 surgical procedures. The approaches used were the translabyrinthine approach in 18 patients (43%), the modified transcochlear in 11 cases (26%), the petro-occipital transsigmoid in 5 cases (12%), the suboccipital in 4 cases (10%), the petro-occipital trassigmoid transcervical in 2 cases (5%), the petro-occipital transsigmoid transtentorial in 1 case (2%), and a subtemporal transtentorial for another case (2%). Facial nerve anatomical integrity was preserved in 87% of procedures but was interrupted in 5 cases, with 4 of the latter subsequently repaired. Total tumor removal was accomplished in 38 cases. A second-stage total tumor removal is planned for the remaining case. There was only one case of perioperative death and no cases of radiological recurrence so far. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4p206-bFigure 5p207-bFigure 5 PMID:17171173

  3. Knotting of a Cervical Epidural Catheter in the Patient with Post-Herpetic Neuralgia: A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Taek; Cho, Dong Woo; Lee, Young Bok

    2017-01-01

    Epidural block is achieved either by single injection of local anesthetic through an epidural needle or as a continuous block by infusion pump through an epidural catheter. Complications associated with epidural catheters include breakage, entrapment, and knotting. Knotting of epidural catheters is very rare, but knotting in lumbar epidural catheters has been reported in a number of studies, and most of these cases involved removal difficulty. We report a case in which we inserted a cervical epidural catheter in a patient who was experiencing severe post-herpetic neuralgia and then removed the knotted catheter without complications. PMID:28261560

  4. Techniques for the maintenance of epidural labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Capogna, Giorgio; Stirparo, Silvia

    2013-06-01

    After initiating neuraxial labor analgesia, there are many techniques that can be used to maintain analgesia for the duration of labor. In this review, we have examined the new techniques of maintenance of epidural labor analgesia recently proposed to overcome the undesirable effects of continuous infusion and patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA). As labor progresses, there is a greater need for analgesia. PCEA with basal infusion, automated intermittent mandatory boluses, programmed intermittent epidural boluses and computer-integrated PCEA have been introduced to combine the advantages of a manual bolus and continuous infusion, thus matching infusion rate and bolus modality to the patient's analgesic needs. Increased maternal satisfaction, reduced anesthetic consumption and decreased incidence of motor block are features of these new maintenance techniques. Technology has now provided us with more advanced drug delivery systems that may have the potential to fulfill the maternal requirements of a safe, natural, and painless childbirth, tailoring the analgesic regimen for each parturient's need.

  5. Epidural Gas Accumulation in Connection with Canine Degenerative Lumbosacral Disease.

    PubMed

    Skytte, Ditte; Schmökel, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Three dogs were presented with lumbosacral hyperesthesia. Computerized tomography scans were performed in all the cases, and magnetic resonance imaging was also performed in cases 1 and 3. There was intervertebral disc (IVD) protrusion causing nerve root compression and epidural gas accumulation in all the three cases. The gas-filled cystic structures in cases 1 and 3 were within the spinal canal; in case 2, the gas was within the disc protrusion. The IVD vacuum phenomenon is relatively common in dogs, but the formation of an epidural gas accumulation in cases of a lumbar disc protrusion is rare. The clinical significance of these epidural gas accumulations is unknown. Two of the dogs were treated surgically, improved after surgery, and showed no signs of pain in the follow-up examinations.

  6. Continuous Cervical Epidural Analgesia in Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Mahesh; Taha, Nafisa; Purohit, Navita; Kothari, Vatsal; Singh, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is a devastating complication of cancer. Patients may often require high doses of opioids that may cause side effects, myoclonus being one such. A 63-year-old male suffering from malignant spinal cord compression was admitted to our institution. The primary team managed him conservatively with pharmacotherapy with no relief of pain, and he experienced myoclonus and sedation as adverse effects. A continuous cervical epidural catheter with local anesthetic infusion was inserted for 5 days to control his pain. This relieved his pain, which was sustained even after we removed the epidural catheter on day 5, for up to 64 days until the time of his death. Continuous cervical epidural local anesthetic infusions may help with refractory pain by deafferentation of noxious stimuli. Central neuraxial blocks may be a valuable rescue in selected patients. PMID:27803576

  7. Clinical evaluation of a new epidural pressure monitor.

    PubMed

    Czech, T; Korn, A; Reinprecht, A; Schramm, W; Kimla, T; Spiss, C K

    1993-01-01

    Comparative measuring of epidural pressure using the Spiegelberg probe 1 and ventricular fluid pressure was carried out in 15 neurosurgical intensive-care patients. Deviations in both directions were established, with a trend toward overestimating ventricular pressure in epidural pressure measuring (r = 0.77). Individual pulsations, spontaneous wave courses and therapy-induced pressure changes were reflected without delays. There were no complications observed with probe implantation periods for up to 6 days. The system has been shown to be mechanically stable and easy to implant. We believe the device to be fit for trend monitoring of intracranial pressure. As with other epidural pressure monitoring systems, false assessments of ventricular pressure may lead to wrong decisions as to required therapy.

  8. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease mimicking an epidural spinal cord tumor: case report.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michelle M; Mashaly, Hazem; Puduvalli, Vinay K; Jin, Ming; Mendel, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    The authors report a case of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) presenting as a paraspinal, epidural mass. This disease encompasses a host of autoimmune conditions that were previously thought to be separate entities. It is characterized by fibrosis, mediated by the aberrant proliferation and tissue invasion of IgG4-positive plasma cells, which can occur in any organ. As with other autoimmune conditions, it tends to be responsive to steroids and other immunosuppressants. It can rarely present as a tumefactive lesion of the central nervous system, creating the potential for misdiagnosis (given its similar radiological appearance to malignancy) and mistreatment. In 2015, a panel of experts convened to set forth guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of IgG4-RD. In the case presented here, the patient initially presented with pain and weakness in the left upper extremity. Initial neuroimages revealed a contrast-enhancing mass extending from C-4 to T-1, invading the epidural spinal canal, encasing the exiting nerve roots, infiltrating the paraspinal musculature, and surrounding the left vertebral artery. A PET scan confirmed the mass was hypermetabolic, but results of fine-needle aspiration and CT-guided biopsy were inconclusive. Open biopsy yielded fibrotic tissue that met the pathological criteria for IgG4-RD: lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, fibrosis in a storiform pattern, and obliterative phlebitis. The patient was treated with 2 doses of 4 mg of dexamethasone (Decadron) and then 50 mg of prednisone per day. Within 2 weeks, the mass was radiologically shown to have drastically decreased in size. The prednisone dose was decreased to 40 mg per day, and 100 mg of azathioprine per day was added. The patient continued to improve and the mass continued to decrease over the next 6 months. Currently, she has been weaned from all steroids and will be maintained on a daily dose of 100 mg of azathioprine.

  9. Ethnicity and the distance to the epidural space in parturients.

    PubMed

    D'Alonzo, Richard C; White, William D; Schultz, John R; Jaklitsch, Paul M; Habib, Ashraf S

    2008-01-01

    In a pilot study, we previously demonstrated a higher average skin to lumbar epidural space distance (STLESD) in our obstetric population compared with the published literature. Furthermore, we demonstrated differences in STLESD based on ethnicity. The aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive analysis of the STLESD in our patient population by expanding the number of patients and ethnic groups included. Data from 3,305 patients were obtained from our electronic database from September 2003 through November 2005. Self-declared ethnicity included 1,177 Caucasians (36%), 1,162 African Americans (35%), 760 Hispanics (23%), 135 Asians (4%), and 71 Indian/Pakistani/Bangladeshi/Sri Lankans (2%). The influences of body mass index (BMI), ethnicity, and their interaction on the STLESD were tested with a multiple linear regression model. The mean +/- SD STLESD differed among the ethnic groups ranging from 4.8 +/- 0.9 cm in Asian patients to 6.3 +/- 1.6 cm in African American parturients. When all ethnic groups were compared, BMI had a significant influence on STLESD (P < .0001), but so did ethnicity (P = .0004). The Hispanic group demonstrated STLESDs that were significantly lower than the African American and Caucasian groups at high BMI (P < .0001). In a subanalysis performed without the Hispanic group, the influence of BMI on STLESD was found to be similar for each group. In this subanalysis, the African American group had STLESDs that were deeper compared with the other 3 ethnic groups (P < .0001), regardless of BMI. In this study we found that the STLESD was deeper than what was previously reported in the literature. Furthermore, ethnicity, in addition to BMI, influenced the STLESD.

  10. Reversal of Progressive Conscious Disturbance with Epidural Blood Patch for Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage at C2 Level.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Chen; Chia, Yuan-Yi; Lien, Wei-Hung

    2017-03-01

    Intracranial hypotension syndrome (IHS) is generally caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. Complications include bilateral subdural hygroma or haematoma and herniation of the cerebellar tonsils. Epidural blood patch (EBP) therapy is indicated if conservative treatment is ineffective. We reported the case of a 46-year-old man with a history of postural headache and dizziness. The patient was treated with bed rest and daily hydration with 2000 mL of fluid for 2 weeks. However, dizziness and headache did not resolve, and he became drowsy and disoriented with incomprehensible speech. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse dural enhancement on the postcontrast study, sagging of the midbrain, and CSF leakage over right lateral posterior thecal sac at C2 level. We performed EBP at the level of T10-T11. We injected 14 mL of autologous blood slowly in the Trendelenburg position. Within 30 minutes, he became alert and oriented to people, place, and time. We chose thoracic EBP as first line treatment in consideration of the risk of cervical EBP such as spinal cord and nerve root compression or puncture, chemical meningitis. Also we put our patient in Trendelenburg position to make blood travel towards the site of the leak. Untreated IHS may delay the course of resolution and affect the patient's consciousness. Delivery of EBP via an epidural catheter inserted from the thoracic spine is familiar with most of anesthesiologists. It can be a safe and effective treatment for patients with IHS caused by CSF leak even at C2.Key words: Anaesthetic techniques, regional, thoracic; cerebrospinal fluid leakage; epidural blood patch; heavily T2-weighted magnetic resonance myelography; intracranial hypotension syndrome; Trendelenburg position.

  11. The dynamics of epidural and opioid analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Zondag, Dirkje C; Gross, Mechthild M; Grylka-Baeschlin, Susanne; Poat, Angela; Petersen, Antje

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the association of analgesia, opioids or epidural, or the combination of both with labour duration and spontaneous birth in nulliparous women. A secondary data analysis of an existing cohort study was performed and included nulliparous women (n = 2074). Durations of total labour and first and second labour stage were calculated with Kaplan-Meier estimation for the four different study groups: no analgesia (n = 620), opioid analgesia (n = 743), epidural analgesia (n = 482), and combined application (n = 229). Labour duration was compared by Cox regression while adjusting for confounders and censoring for operative births. Logistic regression was used to investigate the association between the administration of different types of analgesia and mode of birth. Most women in the combined application group were first to receive opioid analgesia. Women with no analgesia had the shortest duration of labour (log rank p < 0.001) and highest chance of a spontaneous birth (p < 0.001). If analgesia was administered, women with opioids had a shorter first stage (p = 0.018), compared to women with epidural (p < 0.001) or women with combined application (p < 0.001). Women with opioids had an increased chance to reach full cervical dilatation (p = 0.006). Women with epidural analgesia (p < 0.001) and women with combined application (p < 0.001) had a prolonged second stage and decreased chance of spontaneous birth compared to women without analgesia. Women with opioids had a prolonged first stage, but increased chance to reach full cervical dilatation. Women with epidural analgesia and women with both opioid and epidural analgesia had a prolonged first and second stage and a decreased chance of a spontaneous birth.

  12. Is epidural analgesia during labor related to retained placenta?

    PubMed

    Sarit, Avraham; Sokolov, Amit; Many, Ariel

    2016-05-01

    To explore the influence of epidural analgesia on the course of the third stage of labor and on the incidence of the complete retained placenta as well as retained parts of the placenta. This is a population-based cohort study in a tertiary medical center. We collected data from all 4227 spontaneous singleton vaginal deliveries during 6 months and compared the incidence of retained placenta in deliveries with epidural analgesia with those without analgesia. Multivariable logistic regression was used to control for possible confounders. More than two-thirds of the women (69.25%) used epidural analgesia during their delivery. A need for intervention due to placental disorder during the third stage of labor was noted in 4.2% of all deliveries. Epidural analgesia appeared to be significantly (P=0.028) related to placental disorders compared with no analgesia: 4.8% vs. 3%, respectively. Deliveries with manual interventions during the third stage, for either complete retained placenta or suspected retained parts of the placenta, were associated with the use of epidural analgesia (P=0.008), oxytocin (P=0.002) and older age at delivery (P=0.000), but when including all factors in a multivariable analysis, using a stepwise logistic regression, the factors that were independently associated with interventions for placental disruption during the third stage of delivery were previous cesarean section, oxytocin use and, marginally, older age. Complete retained placenta and retained parts of the placenta share the same risk factors. Epidural analgesia does not directly influence the incidence of complete retained placenta or retained parts, though clinically linked through increased oxytocin use. The factors that were independently associated with interventions for placental disruption during the third stage of delivery were previous cesarean section, oxytocin use and older age.

  13. Epidural analgesia associated with better survival in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, F J; Abegg, R; van der Linden, J C; Cornelisse, H G J M; van Dorsten, F R C; Lemmens, V E; Bosscha, K

    2015-08-01

    Surgery remains the mainstay of treatment for potentially curable colon cancer. Otherwise, the surgical stress response might increase the likelihood of cancer dissemination during and after cancer surgery. There is growing evidence that the type of anaesthesia during cancer surgery plays a role in the metastatic process. Therefore, we assessed if the method of anaesthesia is associated with long-term survival after colon cancer surgery. A retrospective single-centre study was conducted including 588 patients who underwent colorectal cancer surgery, TNM stage I-IV, in the Jeroen Bosch Hospital between 1995 and 2003. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for statistical analysis. Adjustments were made for age, sex, comorbidity, TNM stage, chemotherapy, emergency surgery status and year of incidence. Of the 588 primary colon cancer patients with a median age of 70 years, 399 (68 %) patients underwent colon surgery with epidural anaesthesia, whilst 189 (32 %) patients were operated without epidural anaesthesia. Five-year survival for patients not receiving epidural analgesia was 42 % versus 51 % for patients receiving epidural analgesia (p = 0.03). This effect remained after adjustment for relevant patient, tumour, and treatment characteristics (hazard ratio (HR) 1.30 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.59), p = 0.01). Subgroup analysis in patients of 80 years and older (n = 100) showed also a better overall survival after receiving epidural analgesia (HR 1.74 (95 % CI 1.11-2.72), p = 0.01). Epidural analgesia during colon cancer surgery was associated with a better overall survival. Prospective trials evaluating the effects of locoregional analgesia on colon cancer recurrence are warranted.

  14. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:27695168

  15. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jin Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26512268

  16. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jin Hyuk; Cho, Keun-Tae

    2015-09-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus.

  17. Epidural Dexamethasone Influences Postoperative Analgesia after Major Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeong-Min; Kim, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Kwon, Jae-Young; Kim, Hae-Kyu; Kim, Hyae-Jin; Cho, Ah-Reum; Do, Wang-Seok; Kim, Hyo Sung

    2017-05-01

    Epidurally administered dexamethasone might reduce postoperative pain. However, the effect of epidural administration of dexamethasone on postoperative epidural analgesia in major abdominal surgery has been doubtful. To investigate the effects and optimal dose of epidural dexamethasone on pain after major abdominal surgery. A prospective randomized, double-blind study. University hospital. One hundred twenty ASA physical status I and II men, scheduled for gastrectomy, were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of 3 treatment regimens (n = 40 in each group): dexamethasone 5 mg (1 mL) with normal saline (1 mL) (group D) or dexamethasone 10 mg (2 mL) (group E) or 2 mL of normal saline (group C) mixed with 8 mL of 0.375% ropivacaine as a loading dose. After the surgery, 0.2% ropivacaine - fentanyl 4 ?g/mL was epidurally administered for analgesia. The infusion was set to deliver 4 mL/hr of the PCEA solution, with a bolus of 2 mL per demand and 15 minutes lockout time. The infused volume of PCEA, intensity of postoperative pain using visual analogue scale (VAS) during rest and coughing, incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), usage of rescue analgesia and rescue antiemetic, and side effects such as respiratory depression, urinary retention, and pruritus were recorded at 2, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after the end of surgery. The resting and effort VAS was significantly lower in group E compared to group C at every time point through the study period. On the contrary, only the resting VAS in group D was lower at 2 hours and 6 hours after surgery. Total fentanyl consumption of group E was significantly lower compared to other groups. There was no difference in adverse effect such as hypotension, bradycardia, PONV, pruritis, and urinary retention among groups. Use of epidural PCA with basal rate might interrupt an accurate comparison of dexamethasone effect. Hyperglycemia and adrenal suppression were not evaluated. Epidural dexamethasone was

  18. Epidural catheter design: history, innovations, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Roulhac D; Tsen, Lawrence C

    2014-07-01

    Epidural catheters have evolved during the past several decades, as clinicians and manufacturers have sought to influence the quality of analgesia and anesthesia and reduce the incidence of catheter-related complications. This evolution has allowed a transformation from single-shot to continuous-infusion techniques and resulted in easier passage into the epidural space, more extensive medication distribution, and ultimately, improved patient satisfaction. Particular catheter features, including the materials used, tip design, and orifice number and arrangement, have been associated with specific outcomes and provide direction for future development.

  19. Using clinical governance to standardise an epidural service.

    PubMed

    Trim, Jacquie; Fordyce, Fiona; Dua, Sharron

    Continual epidural infusions are an accepted intervention for the management of postoperative pain (McQuay and Moore 1998). Benchmarking nationally through an unpublished audit of Pain Society members identified variation in the concentrations prescribed and delivery systems used. These differences were reflected in local practice. As a result of the local disparity in the management and provision of epidural infusions, the acute pain service at Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust worked in conjunction with the pharmacy department to standardise the service provided to patients and staff. This process was complicated by the difficulty in obtaining anaesthetist consensus for a standard solution that was commercially available and funding for the dedicated delivery system.

  20. Hyperventilation-induced tetany associated with epidural analgesia for labor.

    PubMed

    Ray, N; Camann, W

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of painful carpo-pedal spasm associated with the initiation of epidural analgesia for labor. The patient, an otherwise healthy primigravida in early labor at term, was experiencing severe hyperventilation as a result of inappropriate use of the Lamaze breathing technique. Bilateral carpo-pedal spasm occurred, and produced severe pain. Resolution of symptoms coincided with onset of effective epidural labor pain relief. A diagnostic challenge was presented to the anesthesiologist, as the symptoms could have been consistent with subdural block, local anesthetic toxicity, high sensory level of analgesia or eclamptic neuro-excitation activity.

  1. Advantages and guidelines for using epidural drugs for analgesia.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, P J

    1992-03-01

    The administration of drugs by the epidural route is a safe and effective method for providing analgesia before, during, and after a surgical procedure. Local anesthetics administered by this route block nociceptive input as well as providing excellent muscle relaxation for surgery. The use of local anesthetics may be associated with short-term motor dysfunction and hypotension as a result of sympathetic blockade. Morphine given by the epidural route also provides effective analgesia and has the advantages of giving more prolonged analgesia with no effect on either motor or sympathetic pathways.

  2. Transient Horner's syndrome following thoracic epidural anesthesia for mastectomy: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Young; Chun, Hea Rim; Kim, Mun Gyu; Lee, Se Jin; Kim, Sang Ho; Ok, Si Young; Cho, Ana

    2015-03-01

    Transient Horner's syndrome is an uncommon complication of epidural anesthesia, though its exact incidence in thoracic epidural anesthesia is not clear. Therefore, this study prospectively evaluated the incidence of Horner's syndrome after thoracic epidural anesthesia for mastectomy. Patients scheduled for mastectomy, with or without breast reconstruction, were enrolled in this prospective observational study from September 2010 to December 2013. Intraoperative thoracic epidural anesthesia was established using 0.375% or 0.5% ropivacaine 15 mL with thoracic epidural analgesia continued postoperatively with a continuous infusion of 0.15% ropivacaine 2 mL·hr(-1) with fentanyl 8 μg·hr(-1). Signs of Horner's syndrome (miosis, ptosis, and hyperemia) were assessed at one and two hours as well as one, two, and three days postoperatively. Thoracic epidural anesthesia was successful in 439 patients, with six (1.4%) of these patients acquiring Horner's syndrome. All signs of Horner's syndrome resolved gradually within 180 min of discontinuing the epidural infusion. In one patient with Horner's syndrome, a radiographic contrast injection confirmed that the drug had spread to the cervical epidural level. The incidence of Horner's syndrome following thoracic epidural anesthesia and continuous thoracic epidural analgesia for mastectomy was 1.4%. The mechanism was consistent with cephalic spread of the epidural local anesthetic. This trial was registered at: Clinicaltrials.gov, number: NCT02130739.

  3. What's trending now? An analysis of trends in internet searches for labor epidurals.

    PubMed

    Sutton, C D; Carvalho, B

    2017-05-01

    The study aim was to investigate internet use for obtaining information about epidurals for labor and delivery. Google Trends for US data was queried from 2004 to 2015 to find the most common searches and determine temporal trends. The Google Trends query used the term [epidural] and evaluated changes in search trends over time. Search comparisons were made for each year from 2004 to 2015, and three equal time epochs during the study period (2004-07, 2008-11, 2012-15) were compared. We also compared searches for epidurals with commonly searched birth-related terms. Internet searches are increasing; there were 726000 searches for [epidural] in 2015. Search terms with the most significant growth in the past 4years (2012-15) were "birth with epidural," "pain after epidural," "labor without epidural," "epidural birth video," and "epidural vs natural". Searches for epidural side effects, risks, and pain on insertion were among the most common and were increasing most rapidly. Searches related to epidurals were more common than searches related to "natural births", "home births", and "labor pain", but were less common than searches for "midwives" or "doulas". The findings provide an insight into internet use by those seeking information about labor analgesic options. Identifying the most common and rapidly increasing online search queries may guide physician-parturient interactions and online content creation, to address labor analgesic topics that most interest users. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Bevel direction of epidural needles reliably predicts direction of catheter placement and contrast spread in human cadavers: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shaparin, Naum; Bernstein, Jeffrey; White, Robert S; Kaufman, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    To confirm the relationship between bevel orientation, catheter direction, and radiopaque contrast spread in the lumbar region. Pilot cadaver study. Anatomy laboratory of a university hospital. Cadavers were randomized to two groups of 4 cadavers each. In Group 1, needle bevel direction at epidural entry was cephalad; in Group 2, it was caudad. After placement of each epidural catheter in L4-L5 interspace, 2 mL of radiopaque contrast was injected and a lumbar posterior-anterior radiograph was obtained. Catheter direction and direction of radiopaque contrast spread were collected. Due to the inability to access the epidural space secondary to surgical changes in the lumbar spine, one cadaver in the cephalad group was excluded. In 7 of 7 (100%) cadavers, the catheter tip direction according to the radiograph corresponded directly with bevel direction. A strong relationship exists between bevel orientation and catheter direction; however, catheter position does not reliably predict the direction in which the injected fluid spreads in all cadavers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Unusual case of persistent Horner's syndrome following epidural anaesthesia and caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shubhra; Burkat, Cat Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    This is a rare case of persistent Horner's syndrome following epidural anesthesia and Caesarean section. A 33-year-old female presented with persistent ptosis and miosis following epidural anesthesia and Caesarian section several months prior. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of head, neck, and chest were unremarkable. Medline search using terms Horner’s, epidural, spinal anesthesia, delivery, childbirth, Caesarian, and pregnancy identified 31 articles describing Horner's syndrome in obstetric epidural anesthesia, of which 11 were following Caesarean section. The increased incidence of Horner's syndrome in the setting of epidural anesthesia in pregnancy may be related to epidural venous engorgement and cephalic spread of the local anaesthetic, with disruption in the oculosympathetic pathway. It is important to include recent epidural anesthesia within the differential diagnosis of acute Horner's syndrome in a postpartum female. Rarely, the ptosis may be permanent and require surgical intervention. PMID:21836349

  6. Unusual case of persistent Horner's syndrome following epidural anaesthesia and caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shubhra; Burkat, Cat Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    This is a rare case of persistent Horner's syndrome following epidural anesthesia and Caesarean section. A 33-year-old female presented with persistent ptosis and miosis following epidural anesthesia and Caesarian section several months prior. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of head, neck, and chest were unremarkable. Medline search using terms Horner's, epidural, spinal anesthesia, delivery, childbirth, Caesarian, and pregnancy identified 31 articles describing Horner's syndrome in obstetric epidural anesthesia, of which 11 were following Caesarean section. The increased incidence of Horner's syndrome in the setting of epidural anesthesia in pregnancy may be related to epidural venous engorgement and cephalic spread of the local anaesthetic, with disruption in the oculosympathetic pathway. It is important to include recent epidural anesthesia within the differential diagnosis of acute Horner's syndrome in a postpartum female. Rarely, the ptosis may be permanent and require surgical intervention.

  7. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  8. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Petrović, Branko; Kostić, Vladimir; Sternić, Nadezda; Kolar, Jovo; Tasić, Nebojsa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome was introduced into clinical practice in 1996 in order to describe unique syndrome, clinically expressed during hypertensive and uremic encephalopathy, eclampsia and during immunosuppressive therapy [1]. First clinical investigations showed that leucoencephalopathy is major characteristic of the syndrome, but further investigations showed no significant destruction in white cerebral tissue [2, 3, 4]. In majority of cases changes are localise in posterior irrigation area of the brain and in the most severe cases anterior region is also involved. Taking into consideration all above mentioned facts, the suggested term was Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) for the syndrome clinically expressed by neurological manifestations derived from cortical and subcortical changes localised in posterior regions of cerebral hemispheres, cerebral trunk and cerebellum [5]. Patient, aged 53 years, was re-hospitalized in Cardiovascular Institute "Dediwe" two months after successful aorto-coronary bypass performed in June 2001 due to the chest bone infection. During the treatment of the infection (according to the antibiogram) in September 2001, patient in evening hours developed headache and blurred vision. The recorded blood pressure was 210/120 mmHg so antihypertensive treatment was applied (Nifedipin and Furosemid). After this therapy there was no improvement and intensive headache with fatigue and loss of vision developed. Neurological examination revealed cortical blindness and left hemiparesis. Manitol (20%, 60 ccm every 3 hours) and i.v. Nytroglicerin (high blood pressure). Brain CT revealed oedema of parieto-occipital regions of both hemispheres, more emphasized on the right. (Figure 1a, b, c). There was no sign of focal ischemia even in deeper sections (Figure 1d, e, f). Following three days enormous high blood pressure values were registered. On the fourth day the significant clinical improvement occurred

  9. Posterior pole tumor update.

    PubMed

    Ou, Judy I; Wheeler, Sharon M; O'Brien, Joan M

    2002-12-01

    This chapter focuses on the diagnosis and management of choroidal melanoma in light of recent findings from the COMS. Retinoblastoma is emphasized to describe recent trends in primary treatment away from EBRT and toward chemoreduction with local therapy. In addition, vascular and glial tumors of the retina and tumors of the retinal pigment epithelium are described because of the association between these lesions and systemic disease. Recent advances in treatment and genetic testing for these diseases are discussed. Finally, ocular metastasis, intraocular lymphoid tumors, and intraocular leukemia are included because of their importance in determining systemic treatment and prognosis. The chapter gives an overview of important posterior pole tumors and highlights recent developments in the management of each intraocular disease process.

  10. Primary spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma: report of five cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, P; Gairola, M; Sharma, M; Thulkar, S; Julka, P; Rath, G

    2001-08-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is the most common malignant bone tumour occurring in children and adolescents and exists in two different clinicopathological entities: osseous Ewing's sarcoma (OES) and extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma (EES). Five cases of primary epidural EES are described, which presented with non-specific symptoms leading to a long diagnostic delay. The median age at diagnosis was 22 years (range 13-36 years). The median diagnostic delay was 3 months. All patients had one or more neurological deficits. All underwent surgical exploration with a laminectomy and partial resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy to a dose of 46-50 Gy and chemotherapy with VAC (vincristine, adriamycin and cyclophosphamide) alternating with ICE (ifosphamide, cisplatin and etoposide) for at least six cycles. The mean follow-up period is 21.2 months (range 11-32 months). Four of the five patients achieved a complete remission and are disease free at the time of writing this report. Two patients have a residual neurological deficit--both having presented with long history of neurological deficit. Primary spinal epidural EES should be suspected whenever young patients present with back pain and/or radicular pain, have abnormal neurology and an extradural mass is demonstrated on MRI. Surgical excision followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (50 Gy) and combination chemotherapy (VAC alternating with ICE) achieved local and systemic control in these patients. A greater number of patients and longer follow up are required to evolve a generally accepted treatment policy for this aggressive but potentially curable malignancy.

  11. Thoracic epidural spinal angiolipoma with coexisting lumbar spinal stenosis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Benvenutti-Regato, Mario; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinal angiolipomas (SALs) are uncommon benign lesions that may present insidiously with back pain or acutely with weakness due to tumor bleeding/thrombosis. Given their rarity, these lesions are often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of epidural masses. The purpose of this article is to report the case of an epidural SAL and to conduct a literature review on the topic. Methods A case report and review of the literature using the PubMed/Medline databases. All case reports and case series were reviewed up to June 2015. Results A 65-year old female presented with neurogenic claudication and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed lumbar spinal stenosis. Following decompressive surgery, she experienced symptom resolution, but three months postoperatively she presented to the emergency department with acute paraparesis. A thoracic MRI revealed a lesion located between T8 and T10 causing severe spinal cord compression. Following emergent laminectomy and en bloc resection, the patient regained function and the lesion was diagnosed as SAL. Our literature review revealed 178 reported cases, with a female and thoracic predominance. The majority of patients underwent surgical treatment, achieving a gross total resection in most cases. Similarly, complete symptom resolution was the most common outcome. Conclusion Spinal angiolipomas are uncommon spinal tumors. However, they may be treated as any other space-occupying lesion, and surgical resection allows for complete symptom recovery in most patients. PMID:26767159

  12. Vertical Small-Needle Caudal Epidural Injection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Maniquis Smigel, Liza; Dean Reeves, Kenneth; Jeffrey Rosen, Howard; Patrick Rabago, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Anecdotal evidence suggests that a vertical small-needle injection method enters the caudal epidural space with comparable efficacy to cephalad-directed methods, with less intravascular injection. Objectives Assess the success rate of vertical caudal epidural injection using epidurography and the frequency of intravascular injection using a vertical small-needle approach. Patients and Methods Participants had chronic generalized non-surgical low back pain and either gluteal and/or leg pain and were enrolled in a simultaneous clinical trial assessing the analgesic effect of 5% dextrose epidural injection. A 25 gauge 3.7 cm hypodermic needle was placed at the sacral hiatus using a fingertip-guided vertical technique without imaging assistance, followed by fluoroscopic epidurography. Minimal needle redirection was allowed up to 10 degrees from the vertical plane if the initial epidurogram showed an extradural pattern, followed by repeat epidurography. Results First needle placement without imaging resulted in blood return in 1/199 participants and positive epidurography in 179/199 (90%). Minimal needle repositioning resulted in a positive epidurogram in the remaining 19 attempts. No intravascular injection patterns were observed. Conclusions This compares favorably to published success rates of fluoroscopically-guided technique and was well tolerated. Vertical caudal epidural injection may be suitable for combination with ultrasound-guided methods with Doppler flow monitoring. PMID:27826539

  13. Epidural morphine analgesia in Guillain Barré syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Genis, D; Busquets, C; Manubens, E; Dávalos, A; Baró, J; Oterino, A

    1989-01-01

    Severe pain is a frequent symptom in the Guillain Barré syndrome and can be intense, long lasting and with no response to the usual analgesics, including parenteral opiates. Epidural analgesia using morphine chloride in low doses has satisfactorily relieved pain in this disease in nine patients. PMID:2795070

  14. [Iliopsoas abscess accompanied by epidural abscess--a case report].

    PubMed

    Fukushige, Tetsushi; Sano, Tomomi; Yamada, Sinichi; Ueda, Sawako; Kano, Tatsuhiko

    2003-09-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted to a hospital with pain of the low back as well as the left leg, and fever. He was suspected of suffering from the lumbar disc herniation because of the presence of Lasegue's sign on the first physical examination. Abdominal computed tomography, however, revealed the swelling of the left iliopsoas muscle. Iliopsoas abscess accompanied epidural abscess was confirmed by subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Antibiotic therapy was started for the successive 8 days. The fever resolved, but the pain persisted. The abscess extending from the iliopsoas muscle to the epidural space was still seen on the MRI 20 days after the completion of the antibiotic therapy, and he still complained of the pain of his low back and left leg. Therefore, we conducted epidural puncture under fluoroscopic guidance. Approximately 3 ml of pus was aspirated from the epidural space. Then, his complains decreased remarkably. Iliopsoas abscess should be taken into account in case of a patient with pain on the low back and leg and also inflammatory signs such as fever and leucocytosis.

  15. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords “Upper cervical epidural abscess,” “C1 osteomyelitis,” “C2 osteomyelitis,” “C1 epidural abscess,” “C2 epidural abscess.” We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  16. Disseminated blastomycosis presenting as mastoiditis and epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Makary, Chadia A; Roberts, Thomas D; Wetmore, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Blastomycosis is a systemic fungal infection that affects primarily the lungs. Head and neck involvement has been reported most commonly in the larynx as well as oral and nasal mucosa. Temporal bone involvement is extremely rare. We report a case of disseminated blastomycosis presenting as mastoiditis and epidural abscess. We discuss the importance of early diagnosis and prompt initiation of treatment for optimal outcome.

  17. Ethamsylate in vaginal surgery under lumbar epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G. B.; Eltringham, R. J.; Nightingale, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Sixty patients scheduled for vaginal surgery under lumbar epidural block were randomly allocated into two groups, one of which received ethamsylate intravenously prior to induction of anaesthesia. Ethamsylate did not reduce the blood loss at operation in these patients. The possible factors underlying this observation are discussed. PMID:6338800

  18. Update on epidural analgesia during labor and delivery.

    PubMed

    Lurie, S; Priscu, V

    1993-05-01

    Properly administered epidural analgesia provides adequate pain relief during labor and delivery, shortens the first stage of labor, avoids adverse effects of narcotics, hypnotics, or inhalation drugs and it could be used as anesthesia in case a cesarean section is required. Epidural analgesia should be provided to all patients who need and ask for it with an exception of contraindications such as coagulation disorders, suspected infection or gross anatomic abnormality. The technique must be carried out with care if serious life-threatening complications, such as intravenous or intrathecal injection of local anesthetic, are to be avoided. The aim of many recent investigations has been to reduce the total dose of local anesthetic used. Supplementation of an opioid (mainly fentanyl) and introduction of the patient controlled epidural pump may not only serve this goal, but also reduce the demands on the time of obstetric anesthetists. We conclude that properly and skillfully administered epidural is the best form of pain relief during labor and delivery and we hope that more mothers could enjoy its benefits.

  19. Hyaluronidase shortens levobupivacaine lumbosacral epidural anaesthesia in dogs.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, R; de Barros, A L C; Silva-Neto, A B; Pompermeyer, C T; Frazílio, F O

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hyaluronidase added to levobupivacaine in lumbosacral epidural blockade in dogs. Six adult mixed breed dogs (two males and four females) weighing 7 to 14 kg (10.5 ±1.5 kg) and aged two to five years were used. Each dog received both treatments in random order: levobupivacaine alone (LBA; n=6) or levobupivacaine plus hyaluronidase (LBH; n=6) administered in the lumbosacral epidural space. Systemic effects, spread and duration of anaesthesia and motor block were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals. The duration of local anaesthesia was 90 ±10 minutes (P=0.001) for LBH treatment and 150 ±15 minutes for LBA treatment. In the LBH treatment, anaesthesia reached the T12 to T13 dermatome and in the LBA treatment it reached the T11 to T12 dermatome in all animals in 5 and 15 minutes, respectively. Complete motor blockade was 75 ±12 minutes (P=0.01) and 120 ±15 minutes for LBH and LBA treatments, respectively. Hyaluronidase added to levobupivacaine significantly shortens the duration of epidural anaesthesia with the same dermatome spread into the epidural space in dogs. © 2011 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  20. Incidence of intravascular penetration in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Furman, Michael B; Giovanniello, Michael T; O'Brien, Erin M

    2003-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN A prospective, observational, human, study was conducted. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the incidence of vascular penetration during fluoroscopically guided, contrast-enhanced transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, and to determine whether the observation of blood in the needle hub can be used to predict a vascular injection. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA Incorrectly placed intravascular cervical spinal injections result in medication flow systemically and not to the desired target. A recently published study demonstrates a high incidence of intravascular injections in transforaminal lumbosacral epidural injections. No studies so far have evaluated the incidence of vascular injections in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, nor have they calculated the ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict a vascular injection in the cervical spine.METHODS The incidence of fluoroscopically confirmed intravascular uptake of contrast was prospectively observed in 337 patients treated with cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections. The ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict intravascular injection was also investigated. For each subject, the injection level was chosen on the basis of the clinical scenario including history, physical examination, and review of imaging studies. Some patients had multilevel injections. Using fluoroscopic guidance, the authors placed a 25-gauge needle into the epidural space using a transforaminal approach according to accepted standard technique. Needle tip location was confirmed with biplanar imaging. The presence or absence of blood in the needle hub spontaneously ("flash") and after attempted aspiration by pulling back on the syringe's plunger was documented. Contrast then was injected under real-time fluoroscopy to determine whether the location of the needle tip was intravascular. The results were recorded in a prospective manner indicating the presence or absence of blood

  1. Posterior breast cancer - mammographic and ultrasonographic features.

    PubMed

    Janković, Ana; Nadrljanski, Mirjan; Karapandzić, Vesna Plesinac; Ivanović, Nebojsa; Radojicić, Zoran; Milosević, Zorica

    2013-11-01

    Posterior breast cancers are located in the prepectoral region of the breast. Owing to this distinctive anatomical localization, physical examination and mammographic or ultrasonographic evaluation can be difficult. The purpose of the study was to assess possibilities of diagnostic mammography and breast ultrasonography in detection and differentiation of posterior breast cancers. The study included 40 women with palpable, histopathological confirmed posterior breast cancer. Mammographic and ultrasonographic features were defined according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. Based on standard two-view mammography 87.5%, of the cases were classified as BI-RADS 4 and 5 categories, while after additional mammographic views all the cases were defined as BI-RADS 4 and 5 categories. Among 96 mammographic descriptors, the most frequent were: spiculated mass (24.0%), architectural distortion (16.7%), clustered micro-calcifications (12.6%) and focal asymmetric density (12.6%). The differentiation of the spiculated mass was significantly associated with the possibility to visualize the lesion at two-view mammography (p = 0.009), without the association with lesion diameter (p = 0.083) or histopathological type (p = 0.055). Mammographic signs of invasive lobular carcinoma were significantly different from other histopathological types (architectural distortion, p = 0.003; focal asymmetric density, p = 0.019; association of four or five subtle signs of malignancy, p = 0.006). All cancers were detectable by ultrasonography. Mass lesions were found in 82.0% of the cases. Among 153 ultrasonographic descriptors, the most frequent were: irregular mass (15.7%), lobulated mass (7.2%), abnormal color Doppler signals (20.3%), posterior acoustic attenuation (18.3%). Ultrasonographic BI-RADS 4 and 5 categories were defined in 72.5% of the cases, without a significant difference among various histopathological types (p = 0.109). Standard two-view mammography

  2. Does intrapartum epidural analgesia affect nulliparous labor and postpartum urinary incontinence?

    PubMed

    Liang, Ching-Chung; Wong, Shu-Yam; Chang, Yao-Lung; Tsay, Pei-Kwei; Chang, Shuenn-Dhy; Lo, Liang-Ming

    2007-01-01

    The effect of epidural analgesia on nulliparous labor and delivery remains controversial. In addition, pregnancy and delivery have long been considered risk factors in the genesis of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). We sought to determine the effect of epidural analgesia and timing of administration on labor course and postpartum SUI. Five hundred and eighty three nulliparous women were admitted for vaginal delivery at > or = 36 gestational weeks. We compared various obstetric parameters and SUI, at puerperium and 3 months postpartum, among patients who had epidural and non-epidural analgesia, and among those who had early (cervical dilatation < 3 cm) and late (cervical dilatation > or = 3 cm) epidural analgesia. When compared with the non-epidural analgesia group (n = 319), the group that received epidural analgesia (n = 264) had significant prolongation of the first and second stages of labor, and higher likelihood for instrumental and cesarean delivery but similar incidence of severe vaginal laceration and postpartum SUI. Except for the first stage of labor, early administration of epidural analgesia did not result in a significant influence on obstetric parameters or an increased incidence of postpartum SUI. Our findings showed that epidural analgesia is associated with an increased risk of prolonged labor, and instrumental and cesarean delivery but is not related to increased postpartum SUI. Regarding the impact of the timing of epidural analgesia given in the labor course, the first stage of labor appeared to last longer when analgesia was administered early rather than late.

  3. Spinal cord ischemia following thoracotomy without epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Raz, Aeyal; Avramovich, Aharon; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Saute, Milton; Eidelman, Leonid A

    2006-06-01

    Paraplegia is an uncommon yet devastating complication following thoracotomy, usually caused by compression or ischemia of the spinal cord. Ischemia without compression may be a result of global ischemia, vascular injury and other causes. Epidural anesthesia has been implicated as a major cause. This report highlights the fact that perioperative cord ischemia and paraplegia may be unrelated to epidural intervention. A 71-yr-old woman was admitted for a left upper lobectomy for resection of a non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. The patient refused epidural catheter placement and underwent a left T5-6 thoracotomy under general anesthesia. During surgery, she was hemodynamically stable and good oxygen saturation was maintained. Several hours following surgery the patient complained of loss of sensation in her legs. Neurological examination disclosed a complete motor and sensory block at the T5-6 level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed spinal cord ischemia. The patient received iv steroid treatment, but remained paraplegic. Five months following the surgery there was only partial improvement in her motor symptoms. A follow-up MRI study was consistent with a diagnosis of spinal cord ischemia. In this case of paraplegia following thoracic surgery for lung resection, epidural anesthesia/analgesia was not used. The MRI demonstrated evidence of spinal cord ischemia, and no evidence of cord compression. This case highlights that etiologies other than epidural intervention, such as injury to the spinal segmental arteries during thoracotomy, should be considered as potential causes of cord ischemia and resultant paraplegia in this surgical population.

  4. [Comparison of ropivacaine and bupivacaine for epidural analgesia during labor].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Conde, P; Nicolás, J; Rodríguez, J; García-Castaño, M; del Barrio, E; Muriel, C

    2001-05-01

    To compare the analgesic efficacy and level of motor block using two local anesthetics, ropivacaine and bupivacaine, during labor. Sixty nulliparous women were enrolled during labor after full-term pregnancies. They were randomly assigned to receive epidural analgesia with ropivacaine (group R) or bupivacaine (group B). Group R patients received 10 ml of 0.18% ropivacaine with 5 microgram/ml of fentanyl followed by continuous epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine with 2 microgram/ml of fentanyl at a rate of 10 ml/h. Group B patients received 10 ml of 0.15% bupivacaine with 5 microgram/ml of fentanyl followed by continuous epidural perfusion of 0.0625% bupivacaine with 2 microgram/ml of fentanyl at the same rate. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale, motor blockade on a Bromage scale, and level of sensory block at different moments. We also recorded total doses of local anesthetic employed during continuous epidural infusion, manner of final delivery, Apgar score, degree of maternal satisfaction and side effects. The demographic and delivery characteristics were similar in both groups. We found no statistically significant differences between the two groups for level of motor blockade, which was nil for 29 patients (96.66%) in group R and 28 patients (93.33%) in group B. No differences in degree of pain or level of sensory block (T8-T10 in both groups) were observed. The total doses of local anesthetic used were similar at 23.7 +/- 11.6 mg in group R and 16.5 +/- 7.3 mg in group B (non-significant difference). Nor did we find differences in manner of delivery, neonatal Apgar scores, degree of maternal satisfaction or side effects. Ropivacaine and bupivacaine are equally effective for epidural analgesia during labor at the doses used and they do not cause a relevant level of motor blockade.

  5. Human skin flora as a potential source of epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Sakuragi, T; Dan, K

    1996-12-01

    The mechanism of epidural infection associated with epidural block is not clearly understood. Resident organisms in skin specimens were studied after skin was prepared with disinfectants. Sixty-nine paired skin specimens were excised at incisional sites after skin disinfection with 10% povidone-iodine (10% PVP-I) or 0.5% chlorhexidine in 80% ethanol (0.5% CHE) from 60 patients having back surgery. One of the specimen pairs was placed in 10 ml brain-heart infusion broth and incubated in air at 37 degrees C for 96 h. The other specimen was sectioned at 3 microns and prepared with Gram's stain for examination with the microscope. Thirteen gram-positive staphylococcal species (Staphylococcus epidermidis, 69.2%; S. hyicus, 15.4%; and S. capitis, 15.4%) were isolated from cultures. The isolates were found in a significantly greater proportion of the skin specimens disinfected with 10% PVP-I than in those disinfected with 0.5% CHE (11 of 34 cultures [32.4%] vs. 2 of 35 cultures [5.7%]; P < 0.01). Many gram-positive cocci were observed with the microscope in 4 (11.8%) and 5 (14.3%) of 34 and 35 skin specimens disinfected with 10% PVP-I and 0.5% CHE, respectively. The cocci formed a dense colony in each follicle and in the stratum corneum. No organism was present in any of 17,584 sweat glands examined. In a large proportion of patients, isolation of viable organisms from excised skin specimens after disinfection with 10% PVP-I suggests that contamination of the epidural space by the skin flora may be a potential mechanism of epidural infection associated with epidural block.

  6. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia: interactions between nalbuphine and hydromorphone.

    PubMed

    Parker, R K; Holtmann, B; White, P F

    1997-04-01

    Epidural opioid analgesia can offer advantages over intravenous administration, however, opioid-related side effects are common after epidural administration. We studied the effect of adding nalbuphine (NB), an opioid agonist-antagonist, to hydromorphone (HM) for patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) in 78 healthy women after elective cesarean delivery. Patients were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups. The control group received preservative-free HM (Dilaudid) alone, 0.075 mg/mL, while the three study groups received HM, 0.075 mg/mL, containing preservative-free NB (Nubain) 0.02, 0.04, or 0.08 mg/mL. Intraoperatively, all patients received epidural bupivacaine 0.5%. Postoperatively, a patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA) device was connected to the epidural catheter and programmed to deliver a 3-mL loading dose of the analgesic solution. Subsequently, patients could self-administer 2 mL bolus doses on demand with a 30-min lockout interval. Patients were encouraged to ambulate approximately 8 h after surgery, and PCEA therapy was discontinued when a clear liquid diet was tolerated. Visual analog scale scores were used to assess pain at 8-h intervals while using PCEA therapy. Although the overall incidences of nausea (19%-35%) and pruritus (32%-62%) were similar in all four groups, the addition of NB decreased the need for bladder catheterization. The highest NB concentration resulted in increased PCA demands during the 32-h study period. In conclusion, the combination of HM 0.075 mg/mL and NB 0.04 mg/mL resulted in lower nausea scores and a decreased incidence of urinary retention compared with HM alone, without increasing the opioid analgesic requirement.

  7. First report on treating spontaneous infectious spondylodiscitis of lumbar spine with posterior debridement, posterior instrumentation and an injectable calcium sulfate/hydroxyapatite composite eluting gentamicin: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bostelmann, Richard; Steiger, Hans Jakob; Scholz, Armin O

    2016-12-12

    Spontaneous infectious spondylodiscitis is a rare, but serious disease with the risk of progressive neurological impairment. The surgical approach to spontaneous infectious spondylodiscitis is in most cases an anterior debridement and fusion, often in staged surgeries. Here we report a case of single-stage posterior debridement and posterior instrumented fusion in combination with an injectable calcium sulfate/hydroxyapatite composite eluting gentamicin. A 59-year-old Caucasian man presented with a 6-week history of lumbar pain without sensory or motor disorders of his lower extremities. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of his lumbar spine in T2-weighted sequences showed a high signal of the intervertebral disc L4/L5 and in T1-weighted sequences an epidural abscess at the posterior wall of L4. Additional computed tomography imaging revealed osteolytic destruction of the base plate of L4 and the upper plate of L5. Antibiotic therapy was started with intravenous ciprofloxacin and clindamycin. We performed a posterior debridement via a minimally invasive approach, a posterior percutaneous stabilization using transpedicular screw-rod instrumentation and filled the intervertebral space with an injectable calcium sulfate/hydroxyapatite composite which elutes a high concentration of gentamicin. The patient's lower back pain improved quickly after surgery and no recurrence of infection has been noticed during the 1-year follow-up. Computed tomography at 11 months shows complete bony fusion of L4 and L5. An injectable calcium sulfate/hydroxyapatite composite releasing a high level of gentamicin can support the surgical treatment of spondylodiscitis in combination with posterior debridement and transpedicular screw-rod instrumentation.

  8. Efficacy of single dose epidural morphine versus intermittent low-dose epidural morphine along with bupivacaine for postcaesarean section analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Kiran; Agarwal, Navneet; Agrawal, V. K.; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Mahender

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obstetric anesthesia presents a challenge to the anesthesiologist. The effective pain management allows the partu-rient adequate degree of comfort and promotes physical reco-very and a sense of well being. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy and side effects of 1.20 mg single-dose epidural morphine (Group 1) versus intermittent 12 hourly epidural morphine (0.5 mg) with bupivacaine (Group2) for postoperative analgesia in lower segment caesarean section cases. Results: Each group consisted of 36 patients. Demographic characteristics of two groups were comparable and differences among them were not statistically significant. Mean duration of analgesia was significantly longer in group one patients (16.5±2.5h) in comparison to group two patients (11.5±1.5h). Mean highest visual analog scales (VAS scale) was significantly lower (3.2±0.9) in group one patients in comparison of group two (6.7±0.8) patients. Only 43% patient in group one required supplementary perenteral analgesic (Paracetamole/Diclofenac) and 71% required epidural morphine/bupivacaine in group two. Mean number of supplementary perenteral analgesic required in group one was 0.7 and it was 1.8 in group two. There was no significant difference in nausea, vomiting, itching, and pruritis in two groups of patients. Conclusion: Our study showed that the use of single dose epidural morphine is associated with lower pain scores at rest and movement when compared to intermittent epidural morphine with bupivacaine in postcaesarean section analgesia. PMID:25885497

  9. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma on the Ventral Portion of Whole Spinal Canal: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Young; Ha, Young-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is an uncommon but disabling disease. This paper reports a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma and treatment by surgical management. A 32-year-old male presented with a 30-minute history of sudden headache, back pain, chest pain, and progressive quadriplegia. Whole-spinal sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed spinal epidural hematoma on the ventral portion of the spinal canal. Total laminectomy from T5 to T7 was performed, and hematoma located at the ventral portion of the spinal cord was evacuated. Epidural drainages were inserted in the upper and lower epidural spaces. The patient improved sufficiently to ambulate, and paresthesia was fully recovered. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma should be considered when patients present symptoms of spinal cord compression after sudden back pain or chest pain. To prevent permanent neurologic deficits, early and correct diagnosis with timely surgical management is necessary. PMID:26512277

  10. Modern approach to an old technique: Narrative revision of techniques used to locate the epidural space.

    PubMed

    Brogly, N; Guasch Arévalo, E; Kollmann Camaiora, A; Alsina Marcos, E; García García, C; Gilsanz Rodríguez, F

    2017-03-16

    Since the first description of the epidural technique during the 1920s, the continuous progress of knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the epidural space has allowed the development of different techniques to locate this space while increasing both the safety and efficacy of the procedure. The most common techniques used today are based on the two main characteristics of the epidural space: the difference in distensibility between the ligamentum flavum and the epidural space, and the existence of negative pressure within the epidural space. However, over recent years, technological advances have allowed the development of new techniques to locate the epidural space based on other physical properties of tissues. Some are still in the experimental phase, but others, like ultrasound-location have reached a clinical phase and are being used increasingly in daily practice.

  11. Posterior sampling with improved efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.

    1998-12-01

    The Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique provides a means to generate a random sequence of model realizations that sample the posterior probability distribution of a Bayesian analysis. That sequence may be used to make inferences about the model uncertainties that derive from measurement uncertainties. This paper presents an approach to improving the efficiency of the Metropolis approach to MCMC by incorporating an approximation to the covariance matrix of the posterior distribution. The covariance matrix is approximated using the update formula from the BFGS quasi-Newton optimization algorithm. Examples are given for uncorrelated and correlated multidimensional Gaussian posterior distributions.

  12. Predicting early epidurals: association of maternal, labor, and neonatal characteristics with epidural analgesia initiation at a cervical dilation of 3 cm or less.

    PubMed

    Moore, Albert R; Shan, William Li Pi; Hatzakorzian, Roupen

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective studies have associated early epidural analgesia with cesarean delivery, but prospective studies do not demonstrate a causal relationship. This suggests that there are other variables associated with early epidural analgesia that increase the risk of cesarean delivery. This study was undertaken to determine the characteristics associated with early epidural analgesia initiation. Information about women delivering at 37 weeks or greater gestation with epidural analgesia, who were not scheduled for cesarean delivery, was extracted from the McGill Obstetric and Neonatal Database. Patients were grouped into those who received epidural analgesia at a cervical dilation of ≤3 cm and >3 cm. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the maternal, neonatal, and labor characteristics that increased the risk of inclusion in the early epidural group. Of the 13,119 patients analyzed, multivariable regression demonstrated odds ratios (OR) of 2.568, 5.915 and 10.410 for oxytocin augmentation, induction, and dinoprostone induction of labor (P < 0.001). Increasing parity decreased the odds of early epidural analgesia (OR 0.780, P < 0.001), while spontaneous rupture of membranes (OR 1.490) and rupture of membranes before labor commenced (OR 1.288) were also associated with early epidural analgesia (P < 0.001). Increasing maternal weight (OR 1.049, P = 0.002) and decreasing neonatal weight (OR 0.943, P < 0.001) were associated with increasing risk of early epidural analgesia. Labor augmentation and induction, nulliparity, rupture of membranes spontaneously and before labor starts, increasing maternal weight, and decreasing neonatal weight are associated with early epidural analgesia. Many of these variables are also associated with cesarean delivery.

  13. Epidural Neostigmine versus Fentanyl to Decrease Bupivacaine Use in Patient-controlled Epidural Analgesia during Labor: A Randomized, Double-blind, Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Booth, Jessica L; Ross, Vernon H; Nelson, Kenneth E; Harris, Lynnette; Eisenach, James C; Pan, Peter H

    2017-07-01

    The addition of opioids to epidural local anesthetic reduces local anesthetic consumption by 20% but at the expense of side effects and time spent for regulatory compliance paperwork. Epidural neostigmine also reduces local anesthetic use. The authors hypothesized that epidural bupivacaine with neostigmine would decrease total hourly bupivacaine use compared with epidural bupivacaine with fentanyl for patient-controlled epidural analgesia. A total of 215 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status II, laboring parturients requesting labor epidural analgesia consented to the study and were randomized to receive 0.125% bupivacaine with the addition of either fentanyl (2 μg/ml) or neostigmine (2, 4, or 8 μg/ml). The primary outcome was total hourly local anesthetic consumption, defined as total patient-controlled epidural analgesia use and top-ups (expressed as milliliters of 0.125% bupivacaine) divided by the infusion duration. A priori analysis determined a group size of 35 was needed to have 80% power at α = 0.05 to detect a 20% difference in the primary outcome. Of 215 subjects consented, 151 patients were evaluable. Demographics, maternal and fetal outcomes, and labor characteristics were similar among groups. Total hourly local anesthetic consumption did not differ among groups (P = 0.55). The total median hourly bupivacaine consumption in the fentanyl group was 16.0 ml/h compared with 15.3, 14.6, and 16.2 ml/h in the 2, 4, and 8 μg/ml neostigmine groups, respectively (P = 0.55). The data do not support any difference in bupivacaine requirements for labor patient-controlled epidural analgesia whether patients receive epidural bupivacaine with 2 to 8 μg/ml neostigmine or epidural bupivacaine with 2 μg/ml fentanyl.

  14. Transoral approach for epidural craniocervical pathological processes.

    PubMed

    Pásztor, E

    1985-01-01

    Transoral surgery for ventral craniocervical pathology is an integral part of modern neurosurgery. This approach should be considered in many more cases than in current practice. On the basis of our experiences with 15 operations in 13 patients we feel able to improve the surgical technique in some small details, as 1. the double, two flap incision of the posterior wall of the pharynx, 2. the method of "deep" resection of the odontoid in its high upward and backward position, and 3. insertion of bone grafts and chips in the cavity of tumorous vertebrae for fixation. Admittedly, these cases are not encountered every day in neurosurgical units. An exact knowledge of the anatomical, neurological, pathological, radiological and surgical details is of vital importance and constitutes the basis of this account. This method should not be confined to specialised regional neurosurgical centres, but is within the technical capacity of all trained neurosurgeons.

  15. Treatment of Spinal Epidural Abscess and Predisposing Factors of Motor Weakness: Experience with 48 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Min-Wook; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Youm, Jin-Young; Song, Shi-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) can be fatal if untreated, so early diagnosis and treatment are essential. We conducted a retrospective study to define its clinical features and evaluate the risk factors of motor weakness. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records and images of patients with SEA who had been hospitalized in our institute from January 2005 to June 2012. Pyogenic SEA patients were categorized as patients without motor weakness (Group A) and with motor weakness (Group B). Abscess volume was measured using the Gamma-Plan program. Intervertebral foramen height and posterior disc height were measured to evaluate degree of spinal stenosis. Results Of 48 patients with pyogenic SEA, 33 (68%) were treated surgically, and 15 (32%) were treated with antibiotics. Eleven patients had weakness and abscess volume was unrelated to motor weakness. Old age, 'spare room' (abscess volume subtracted from spinal volume) and intervertebral foramen height and posterior disc height were statistically significant. Among the 48 patients, 43 (85%) had good outcome and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was the only meaningful prognostic factor (p=0.014). The cut-off value of ESR was 112mm/h with 80% sensitivity and 79% specificity and had borderline significance (p=0.062). Conclusion SEA needs emergent diagnosis and treatment. Motor weakness is the most important factor in treatment decision. By careful image reading, early surgical treatment can be an option for selected patients with severe spinal stenosis for prevent motor weakness. Inflammatory markers, especially ESR, are valuable to identify worsening of SEA. PMID:26512265

  16. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Vertebral Osteomyelitis Following Epidural Catheterization: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, R.; Renjitkumar, J.

    2012-01-01

    Indwelling epidural catheters are frequently used to manage postoperative pain. This report describes a patient who developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) vertebral osteomyelitis of the lumbar spine following epidural catheterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MRSA vertebral osteomyelitis secondary to epidural catheter use in the English orthopedic literature. The patient and his family consented to publishing the data. PMID:24353973

  17. Safety of different acupuncture manipulations for posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xiao-feng; Deng, Shi-zhe; He, Si; Huang, Ling-hui; Tian, Guang; Meng, Zhi-hong

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture at Fengchi (GB20) in the posterior neck improves vertigo. However, subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal epidural hematoma have been reported to occur after acupuncture in the posterior neck. Therefore, in the present study, we assessed the safety of acupuncture at Fengchi. Laboratory tests and adverse event reports were used to evaluate the safety of different acupuncture manipulations for the treatment of posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. A total of 136 patients were randomly assigned to four groups. Verum acupuncture was conducted with different needle insertion directions (contralateral paropia or prominentia laryngea) and different needle twisting frequencies (60 or 120 times/minute) at Fengchi and matching acupoints (for example, Zhongwan [CV12], Qihai [CV6], Zusanli [ST36], and Fenglong [ST40]). The patients received 14 treatments over 3–4 weeks. Routine blood analysis, hepatic and renal function tests, urine and feces tests and electrocardiography were performed before the first treatment session and after the final session. Adverse events were recorded after every session. Of the 136 patients, 120 completed the study. There were no significant differences between pretreatment and posttreatment test results in any of the groups. Only five patients suffered from minor adverse events (needling pain, slight hematoma and transient chest tightness). No serious adverse events were found. Our results indicate that a 14-session course of needling at Fengchi is relatively safe for treating posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. PMID:27651774

  18. Safety of different acupuncture manipulations for posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Shi-Zhe; He, Si; Huang, Ling-Hui; Tian, Guang; Meng, Zhi-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture at Fengchi (GB20) in the posterior neck improves vertigo. However, subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal epidural hematoma have been reported to occur after acupuncture in the posterior neck. Therefore, in the present study, we assessed the safety of acupuncture at Fengchi. Laboratory tests and adverse event reports were used to evaluate the safety of different acupuncture manipulations for the treatment of posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. A total of 136 patients were randomly assigned to four groups. Verum acupuncture was conducted with different needle insertion directions (contralateral paropia or prominentia laryngea) and different needle twisting frequencies (60 or 120 times/minute) at Fengchi and matching acupoints (for example, Zhongwan [CV12], Qihai [CV6], Zusanli [ST36], and Fenglong [ST40]). The patients received 14 treatments over 3-4 weeks. Routine blood analysis, hepatic and renal function tests, urine and feces tests and electrocardiography were performed before the first treatment session and after the final session. Adverse events were recorded after every session. Of the 136 patients, 120 completed the study. There were no significant differences between pretreatment and posttreatment test results in any of the groups. Only five patients suffered from minor adverse events (needling pain, slight hematoma and transient chest tightness). No serious adverse events were found. Our results indicate that a 14-session course of needling at Fengchi is relatively safe for treating posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo.

  19. Early versus late initiation of epidural analgesia for labour.

    PubMed

    Sng, Ban Leong; Leong, Wan Ling; Zeng, Yanzhi; Siddiqui, Fahad Javaid; Assam, Pryseley N; Lim, Yvonne; Chan, Edwin S Y; Sia, Alex T

    2014-10-09

    Pain during childbirth is arguably the most severe pain some women may experience in their lifetime. Epidural analgesia is an effective form of pain relief during labour. Many women have concerns regarding its safety. Furthermore, epidural services and anaesthetic support may not be available consistently across all centres. Observational data suggest that early initiation of epidural may be associated with an increased risk of caesarean section, but the same findings were not seen in recent randomised controlled trials. More recent guidelines suggest that in the absence of a medical contraindication, maternal request is a sufficient medical indication for pain relief during labour. The choice of analgesic technique, agent, and dosage is based on many factors, including patient preference, medical status, and contraindications. There is no systematically reviewed evidence on the maternal and foetal outcomes and safety of this practice. This systematic review aimed to summarise the effectiveness and safety of early initiation versus late initiation of epidural analgesia in women. We considered the obstetric and fetal outcomes relevant to women and side effects of the treatments, including risk of caesarean section, instrumental birth and time to birth. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (12 February 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (January 1966 to February 2014), Embase (January 1980 to February 2014) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We included all randomised controlled trials involving women undergoing epidural labour analgesia that compared early initiation versus late initiation of epidural labour analgesia. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, extracted the data and assessed the trial quality. Data were checked for accuracy. We included nine studies with a total of 15,752 women.The overall risk of bias of

  20. Epidural analgesia during labor: continuous infusion or patient-controlled administration?

    PubMed

    Benhamou, D

    1995-05-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has several advantages over continuous epidural infusion of bupivacaine during labor: it produces a good analgesia with a limited sensory spread; generally, less bupivacaine is administered and maternal satisfaction with pain control is increased. However, the quality of analgesia is similar to that obtained with other forms of epidural administration. Moreover, PCEA is only a particular form of epidural and, as such, has the same safety requirements. PCEA does not appear to reduce the workload of the anesthetic team. The cost of the PCA pump will need to be included in future evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio.

  1. Effectiveness of premature epidural catheter termination as a quality indicator in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Mohammad; Qamar ul hoda, Muhammad; Samad, Khalid

    2010-07-01

    Premature epidural catheter termination in the postoperative period is a common cause of epidural analgesia failure. The incidence varies from 5.7 to 13%. A higher incidence of unplanned epidural catheter termination was observed in our hospital. We took this as a quality improvement project, monitored the causes and applied remedial measures at the same time to reduce the incidence. An audit was conducted by the Acute Pain Service between January 2004 and December 2007 to find the incidence and different causes of accidental epidural catheter pullout. Different strategies were applied simultaneously to counter the identified causes. A predesigned pro forma was used for audit while remedial measures included change in practice, counselling of the person responsible, group teaching and reinforcement of epidural care policy. The overall incidence of premature epidural termination was 3.9% during a 4-year period with a higher incidence in 2004 (5.59%), which was reduced in later years. The main reason for premature epidural catheter removal was mishandling of the catheter and filter (64%). The most common site for catheter disconnection was found to be at the filter end of the catheter (54.7%), although 39 (61%) epidural catheters were removed by the Acute Pain Service following disconnection or breakage to avoid danger of infection. Identification of premature epidural catheter termination as a quality indicator and continuous quality improvement efforts later on proved to be a useful approach in reducing the incidence. The present audit also helped to quantify the improvement in the quality of care.

  2. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia in labor does not always improve maternal satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Nikkola, Eeva; Läärä, Arja; Hinkka, Susanna; Ekblad, Ulla; Kero, Pentti; Salonen, Markku

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether patient-controlled epidural analgesia in labor with bupivacaine and fentanyl provides more satisfaction to mothers than intermittent bolus epidural analgesia or patient-controlled epidural analgesia with plain bupivacaine. Ninety mothers with term, uncomplicated pregnancies were randomized to receive intermittent bolus epidural analgesia (bupivacaine + fentanyl), patient-controlled epidural analgesia (bupivacaine + fentanyl), or patient-controlled epidural analgesia (bupivacaine). Pain during labor was evaluated with a visual analog scale. Obstetric and neonatal outcomes were recorded. After delivery, the mothers were given a questionnaire covering the following themes: experience of labor pain, feeling of control, fears and expectations associated with pregnancy/with delivery/with becoming a mother, as well as pain, physical condition and emotions after delivery. To elaborate on these answers, 30 mothers were further randomized to a semistructured interview, in which the same topics were discussed. The main outcome measure was maternal satisfaction. The intermittent bolus epidural analgesia group felt they could influence labor most (p = 0.03), and in the interview they expressed most satisfaction. In this group, the total drug utilization was smallest (bupivacaine: p <0.0001 comparing all groups, fentanyl: p = 0.03 comparing the two fentanyl-receiving groups). No differences in pain occurred. Vomiting (p = 0.04) and pruritus (p <0.0001) were more common or more severe in the groups receiving fentanyl. We found no advantages for patient-controlled epidural analgesia over intermittent bolus epidural analgesia in terms of maternal satisfaction.

  3. Incidence of intradiscal injection during lumbar fluoroscopically guided transforaminal and interlaminar epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Candido, Kenneth D; Katz, Jeffrey A; Chinthagada, Mariadas; McCarthy, Robert A; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2010-05-01

    Intradiscal injections during transforaminal epidural steroid injections and interlaminar lumbar epidural steroid injections have been reported rarely. In that regard, this retrospective observational report is the first attempt to quantify the overall rate of this complication. A retrospective analysis of 3 years of accrued data (2004-2007) showed that 2412 transforaminal epidural steroid injections were performed at the 2 training institutions (Loyola University Medical Center and Northwestern University/Feinberg School of Medicine). There were 6 intradiscal (annular) injections of contrast, for a rate of 1:402. Over the same interval, 4723 lumbar epidural steroid injections were performed, with 1 intradiscal injection, for a rate of 1:4723.

  4. Histopathological Alterations after Single Epidural Injection of Ropivacaine, Methylprednizolone Acetate, or Contrast Material in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsou, Maria-Chrysanthi; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Demetrios; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Kelekis, Alexis

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The consequences from the injection of different types of drugs in the epidural space remains unknown. Increasing evidence suggests that localized inflammation, fibrosis, and arachnoiditis can complicate sequential epidural blockades, or even epidural contrast injection. We investigate the in vivo effect of epidural injections in the epidural space in an animal model. Materials and Methods: A group of ten male adult pigs, five punctures to each at distinct vertebral interspaces under general anesthesia, were examined, testing different drugs, used regularly in the epidural space (iopamidol, methylprednisolone acetate, ropivacaine). Each site was marked with a percutaneous hook wire marker. Histological analysis of the epidural space, the meninges, and the underlying spinal cord of the punctured sites along with staining for caspase-3 followed 20 days later. Results: The epidural space did not manifest adhesions or any other pathology, and the outer surface of the dura was not impaired in any specimen. The group that had the contrast media injection showed a higher inflammation response compared to the other groups (P = 0.001). Positive staining for caspase-3 was limited to <5% of neurons with all substances used. Conclusion: No proof of arachnoiditis and/or fibrosis was noted in the epidural space with the use of the above-described drugs. A higher inflammation rate was noted with the use of contrast media.

  5. Epidural catheter misplaced into the thoracic cavity: Utilized to provide interpleural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Sundary, M. Thiriloga

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic epidural analgesia is one of the most effective and time-tested modalities of providing postthoracotomy pain relief. It improves postoperative pulmonary outcome. Nevertheless, being a blind procedure several complications have been associated with the technique. Pleural puncture is one rare complication that might occur following thoracic epidural catheterization. We have discussed a patient who underwent a right thoracotomy for excision of emphysematous bulla of lung under general anesthesia with thoracic epidural. The epidural catheter was misplaced in the pleural cavity and was detected intraoperatively after thoracotomy. The catheter was left in situ and was successfully utilized to provide postoperative analgesia via the interpleural route. PMID:25886437

  6. [Treatment of recurrent posterior epistaxis].

    PubMed

    Bro, Søren Pauli; Bille, Jesper; Petersen, Kristian Bruun

    2017-08-21

    30% of the patients presenting with epistaxis at emergency wards and otorhinolaryngeal specialist departments have posterior bleeding. Traditional treatment with packing often leads to initial treatment failure, and many patients experience recurrent bleeding within the following month. Recurrent posterior epistaxis should be treated with local electrocautery or endoscopic ligation of the sphenopalatine artery to reduce patient discomfort, hospital stay, risk of treatment failure and recurrence.

  7. [Clinical presentation of a dorsal epidural arachnoid cyst after an epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Obil-Chavarría, Claudia Alejandra; García-Ramos, Carla Lisette; Castro-Quiñonez, Sergio Alberto; Huato-Reyes, Raúl; Santillán-Chapa, Concepción Guadalupe; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro Antonio

    Arachnoid cysts are dural diverticula with liquid content similar to cerebrospinal fluid, with 1% occurring in the spinal cord. They locate mainly in the dorsal region of the thoracic spine, and are unusual causes of spinal cord compression. The case is presented of a previously healthy 15-year-old boy, with a 20-month history of spastic paraparesis that started apparently after epidural block for ankle osteosynthesis. There was decreased sensitivity and strength of the pelvic limbs and gradually presented with anaesthesia from T12 to L4 dermatomes, L5 and S1 bilateral hypoaesthesia and 4+/5 bilateral strength, in the L2 root and 2+/5 in L3, L4, L5, S1, hyperreflexia, Babinski and clonus, but with no alteration in the sacral reflexes. In the magnetic resonance it was diagnosed as an extradural arachnoid cyst from T6 to T9. The patient underwent a T6 to T10 laminotomy, cyst resection, dural defect suture, and laminoplasty. One year after surgery, the patient had recovered sensitivity, improvement of muscle strength up to 4+/5 in L2 to S1, and normal reflexes. After the anaesthetic procedure, increased pressure and volume changes within the cyst could cause compression of the spinal cord, leading to symptoms. Despite being a long-term compression, the patient showed noticeable improvement. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. A retrospective comparison of programmed intermittent epidural bolus with continuous epidural infusion for maintenance of labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Tien, Michael; Allen, Terrence K; Mauritz, Amy; Habib, Ashraf S

    2016-08-01

    To assess whether maintenance of labor epidural analgesia using programmed intermittent epidural bolus (PIEB) is associated with reduced local anesthetic (LA) consumption, patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) use, and rescue analgesia requirements compared to continuous epidural infusion (CEI). This is a retrospective study at an academic university medical center. Women receiving epidural labor analgesia from March to July of 2015 were identified and categorized into three groups: 1) CEI 5 mL/hr, 2) PIEB 5 mL/60 minutes, 3) PIEB 3 mL/30 minutes. The LA consisted of bupivacaine 0.125 mg/mL and fentanyl 2 μg/mL. All patients had similar PCEA settings. Data were collected on pattern of LA usage, obstetric outcomes and Bromage scores. The primary endpoint was total volume of LA consumed per hour. Secondary outcomes included need for clinician boluses, pattern of PCEA use, degree of motor blockade and delivery mode. We included 528 patients (262 had CEI, 162 had PIEB 5 mL/60 minutes, and 104 had PIEB 3 mL/30 minutes). Median LA consumed was 10.3, 9.5, and 9.7 mL/hr, respectively (p = 0.10). There were no differences in PCEA attempts or rescue clinician boluses, but PCEA volume (p = 0.03) and ratio of PCEA attempts/given (p < 0.01) were significantly different among the groups. Patients receiving PIEB 3 mL/30 minutes used lower PCEA volume than patients receiving CEI (p = 0.04). Patients with PIEB 5 mL/60 minutes and PIEB 3 mL/30 minutes had a higher ratio of PCEA attempts/given than CEI patients (p = 0.01 and p < 0.01, respectively). There were no differences in Bromage scores (p = 0.14) or delivery mode (p = 0.55) among the groups. The epidural maintenance regimen used (CEI vs. PIEB) was not associated with differences in LA consumption, motor blockade or delivery mode. Main limitations of the study include its single center retrospective design and the fact that patients were not randomized

  9. Spinal epidural abscess: a rare complication of olecranon bursitis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rhys D.R.; Thaya, Moe; Chew, Ne Siang; Gibbons, Charles E.R.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal condition if left untreated. We report the case of a 67-year old man who presented to the Accident and Emergency department complaining of acute onset of inter-scapular back pain, left leg weakness and loss of sensation in the left foot. On examination he was found to be pyrexial with long tract signs in the left lower leg. In addition he had a left sided olecranon bursitis of three weeks duration. Blood tests revealed raised inflammatory markers and a staphylococcal bacteremia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and he subsequently underwent a three level laminectomy with good resolution of his back pain and neurological symptoms. He has made a complete recovery with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics. PMID:21808663

  10. A spinal epidural hematoma with symptoms mimicking cerebral stroke.

    PubMed

    Shima, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Muneyoshi; Nomura, Motohiro; Mori, Kentaro; Miyashita, Katsuyoshi; Tamase, Akira; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Osuka, Koji; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2012-02-01

    A spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma (SCEH) is a rare condition, which usually requires urgent treatment. However, unusual manifestations, such as hemiparesis, may lead to a misdiagnosis. We herein report a case of SCEH that presented with pure motor hemiparesis to discuss the appropriate and prompt diagnosis and treatment of such cases. An 84-year-old female was brought to our emergency department complaining of nuchal pain, followed by right hemiparesis. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the neck demonstrated a spinal epidural hematoma right posterolateral to the spinal cord, extending from C2 to C3. She was managed conservatively and her symptoms improved significantly. The authors emphasize that cervical spinal lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients with acute onset of hemiparesis, when they are associated with neck pain. Even though magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard, a CT scan is also useful for quick screening for SCEH.

  11. Lumbar spine osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Godhania, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with no previous medical history presented with abdominal and low back pain. Based on clinical and radiological findings he was diagnosed with L1/L2 osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Further history taking revealed recent use of acupuncture for treatment of mechanical back pain. The patient was treated conservatively with an extended course of antibiotics, monitored with repeat MRI scans and had a full recovery with no neurological deficit. This is the first reported case of epidural abscess formation and osteomyelitis after acupuncture in the UK. As acupuncture becomes more commonly used in western countries, it is important to be aware of this rare but serious complication. PMID:26976275

  12. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Isolated to the Thoracic Epidural Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Benjamin; Talbott, Jason; Uzelac, Alina; Rehani, Bhavya

    2015-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare benign histiocytic disease that infrequently presents in the spine. We report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease isolated to the epidural thoracic spine in a 26-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the 15th reported case of isolated spinal disease and only the fourth case of isolated thoracic epidural disease. Given its rarity as well as non-specific symptoms and imaging findings, Rosai-Dorfman disease is often not considered and misdiagnosed on imaging studies. To help improve awareness of Rosai-Dorfman spinal disease, we review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. PMID:27252790

  13. Spinal epidural abscess: a rare complication of olecranon bursitis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Rhys D R; Thaya, Moe; Chew, Ne Siang; Gibbons, Charles E R

    2009-06-30

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal condition if left untreated. We report the case of a 67-year old man who presented to the Accident and Emergency department complaining of acute onset of inter-scapular back pain, left leg weakness and loss of sensation in the left foot. On examination he was found to be pyrexial with long tract signs in the left lower leg. In addition he had a left sided olecranon bursitis of three weeks duration. Blood tests revealed raised inflammatory markers and a staphylococcal bacteremia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and he subsequently underwent a three level laminectomy with good resolution of his back pain and neurological symptoms. He has made a complete recovery with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics.

  14. A case of Horner's syndrome with epidural anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rowena; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Edmonds, Keith

    2010-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman, primigravida, had labour induced for post-maturity following an uncomplicated antenatal course. She requested an epidural prior to commencement of syntocinon. This was administered in the sitting position without complication. The midwife noted drooping of the right eyelid of the patient 6.5 h following insertion of the epidural. Blood pressure and CTG remained reassuring. The obstetric anaesthetist reviewed the labouring woman and noted a right-sided ptosis as well as the right cheek being flushed and dry. There was no motor block and sensation in T1/T2/S3/S4 was intact. Horner's syndrome was diagnosed and anaesthetic review was recommended prior to further top-ups. The patient progressed well in the second stage of labour and did not require further top-ups and gave birth to a healthy male infant. Horner's syndrome resolved within 4 h following delivery and the postpartum period was uncomplicated. PMID:22767365

  15. Transient unilateral Horner's syndrome after epidural ropivacaine in a dog.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Tim; Schauvliege, Stijn; Gasthuys, Frank; Marcilla, Miguel Gozalo; Polis, Ingeborgh

    2009-07-01

    A left sided Horner's syndrome (ptosis, prolapse of the nictitating membrane and miosis) was observed in a 4-year-old female, neutered Beagle dog after epidural injection of 0.22 mL kg(-1) ropivacaine (0.75%) in 0.01 mL kg(-1) of saline during isoflurane anaesthesia. Clinical signs disappeared gradually and resolved completely 4 hours and 10 minutes after injection. The epidural injection of 0.22 mL kg(-1) ropivacaine (0.75%) in 0.01 mL kg(-1) of saline during isoflurane anaesthesia caused unilateral (left) Horner's syndrome in a 4-year-old female, neutered Beagle dog.

  16. Spontaneous spinal epidural hemorrhage from intense piano playing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Ju; Su, Fang Jy; Huang, Ying C; Chen, Shih-Han

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare but real neurosurgical emergency. It is caused by atraumatic rupture of the vertebral epidural vein that results in nerve root or spinal cord compression. Most cases of SSEH have a multifactorial etiology, including congenital and acquired coagulopathies; platelet dysfunction; vascular malformation; tumors; uncontrolled hypertension; pregnancy; and, very rarely, activities requiring Valsalva. Herein we reported the case of a young pianist who was attacked by SSEH during piano practice. Playing the piano is a joyful, relaxing entertainment; however, this musical activity can be a highly demanding physical and mental exercise for pianists. Emotional and expressive performance, especially in professional performing, has been reported to result in significant increase of sympathetic and decrease of parasympathetic activities and thus influence the cardiorespiratory variables. The increased biomechanical stress from fluctuating hemodynamics was thought to trigger the rupture of her spinal arteriovenous malformation.

  17. Epidural steroid injection for lumbar disc herniation in NFL athletes.

    PubMed

    Krych, Aaron J; Richman, Daniel; Drakos, Mark; Weiss, Leigh; Barnes, Ronnie; Cammisa, Frank; Warren, Russell F

    2012-02-01

    To our knowledge, there is no published information on the efficacy of epidural steroid injections for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation in an athletic population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of epidural corticosteroid injection for treatment of lumbar disc herniation in a group of National Football League (NFL) players. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all NFL players who underwent an epidural steroid injection at our institution for incapacitating pain secondary to an acute lumbar disc herniation (confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging) from 2003 to 2010. Our primary outcome was success of the injection, defined as return to play. The secondary outcome of the study was to evaluate risk factors for failure of this treatment approach. Seventeen players had a total of 37 injections for 27 distinct lumbar disc herniation episodes from 2003 to 2010. The success rate of returning an athlete to play for a given episode of disc herniation was 89% (24 of 27 episodes) with an average loss of 2.8 practices (range = 0-12) and 0.6 games (range = 0-2) after the injection. Four players required a repeat injection for the same episode. Three of these four players ultimately failed conservative management and required surgical intervention. Risk factors for failing injection therapy included sequestration of the disc herniation on magnetic resonance imaging (P = 0.01) and weakness on physical examination (P = 0.002). There were no complications reported. In this highly selective group of professional athletes, our results suggest that epidural steroid injections are a safe and effective therapeutic option in the treatment of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation.

  18. [Epidural venography in the diagnosis of lumbar disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gasparini, D; Giammusso, V; Di Lelio, A; Vaccari, U; Bacarini, L

    1980-04-01

    80 patients with back pain and sciatalgia were studied by plain-film of lumbosacral spine, radiculography and epidural phlebography; 30 of them were surgically controlled. Radiculographic and phlebographic specimens were compared and phlebography showed more sensibility and specificity in the study of extradural pathology. The analysis of the phlebographic alterations suggested a semeiologic criterion we think that could be usefully used in the study of osteoligamentous lesions in lumbosacral spine.

  19. Diabetes mellitus and spinal epidural abscess: clinical or surgical treatment?

    PubMed

    Felício, João S; Martins, Carlliane Lins P; Liberman, Bernardo

    2011-12-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is an uncommon condition and its most important predisposing factor is diabetes mellitus. Although the treatment of choice is prompt surgical abscess evacuation, followed by antibiotic therapy, successful conservative treatment of SEA has been reported in some cases. We describe a SEA case in a 23-year old white woman with diabetes for 14 years, who was successfully treated only with antibiotics, and achieved full recovery at the fourth month of follow-up.

  20. Care and management of intrathecal and epidural catheters.

    PubMed

    Du Pen, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Epidural and intrathecal catheters have increasingly become a part of acute and chronic pain management over the past 25 years. Externalized systems include temporary, permanent exteriorized, and permanent port systems for use over weeks to months of expected therapy. Implanted, completely internalized systems are available for conditions expected to require many months or years of therapy. Expert care includes routine management as well as advanced troubleshooting. Prevention of infection is a key priority for nurses managing these devices.

  1. Epidural Catheter Migration in a Patient with Severe Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of appropriate neuraxial catheter positioning is typically a straightforward procedural undertaking. It can, however, lead to deception of even the most experienced clinician and occur despite the most meticulous attention to detail. Written and verbal consent were obtained from the patient to prepare, discuss, and publish this case report; we describe the occurrence of what we believe was the intraoperative migration of an epidural catheter in the setting of significant tissue changes resulting from a previous spinal fusion. PMID:28097025

  2. Epidural injections of indomethacin for postlaminectomy syndrome: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J Antonio

    2003-02-01

    Since there have been side effects reported with the administration of corticosteroids epidurally, their application has been limited. Because some nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs have central and spinal antinociceptive actions, we have compared the effects of indomethacin (INM) given by the epidural route to methylprednisolone (MTP). This was a prospective, comparative study in an ambulatory pain care center. Two hundred six patients with recurrent low back pain (Visual Analog Scale >7) and radiculopathy after they had had 2 or more lumbar laminectomies with the diagnosis of "postlaminectomy syndrome" were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. Group I (64 patients) was given 2 epidural injections of lyophilized INM 1 mg. Group II (60 patients) received 2 injections of 2 mg of INM at the same intervals. Group III (82 patients) was treated by 2 epidural injections of MTP 80 mg. In every case, the medication was diluted in 3 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine. Reductions of pain were assessed by changes in the Visual Analog Scale; physical activities, attitude, and medication intake were graded by the Pain Progress Score recorded before each treatment and 2 wk after the last. After each injection, all patients had pain relief to Visual Analog Scale <3. Increased analgesia (P < 0.05) was noted when a double dose of INM was used (Group II) or when 80 mg of MTP was given. The total average scores of the Pain Progress Score showed significant differences at the second injection in Groups II and III only. Physical activity, emotional attitudes, and medication intake were also improved but the changes were not statistically significant. In conclusion, in this group of patients, INM produced adequate analgesia in Groups I and II, with evidence suggesting that 2 mg of INM may produce a similar degree of pain relief as 80 mg of MTP after the second injection. Other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs may be explored in the future for the same purpose.

  3. Hands-and-knees positioning during labor with epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Stremler, Robyn; Halpern, Stephen; Weston, Julie; Yee, Jennifer; Hodnett, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Hands-and-knees position has shown promise as an intervention to improve labor and birth outcomes, but no reports exist that examine its use with women laboring with epidural analgesia. Concerns of safety, effects on analgesia, and acceptability of use may limit use of active positioning during labor with regional analgesia. This article presents a case study series of 13 women who used hands-and-knees position in the first stage of labor.

  4. Epidural anaesthesia for caesarean section in pituitary dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Li, Ruihua; Lang, Bao

    2017-04-01

    We describe the anaesthetic management for caesarean section in a 32-year-old patient with pituitary dwarfism. In addition to supportive treatment, we offered a postoperative epidural analgesia pump. The patient recovered well without any complications. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Does pregnancy increase the efficacy of lumbar epidural anesthesia?

    PubMed

    Arakawa, M

    2004-04-01

    Pregnancy has been reported to enhance the sensitivity of nerves to local anesthetics and to decrease anesthetic requirements during regional anesthesia. In this study, whether pregnancy increased the efficacy of lumbar epidural anesthesia was evaluated. Two populations (14 pregnant and 14 non-pregnant women) undergoing lumbar epidural anesthesia were studied and received 17 mL of 2% lidocaine-epinephrine (1: 200,000). The pain threshold response after repeated electrical stimulation was used to assess sensory blockade at the L2, S1 and S3 dermatomes. Motor blockade was evaluated using the Bromage score. Demographic data except for weight were comparable between the two groups. There was a significant difference in cephalad spread of anesthesia between the groups. No significant differences in pain threshold or onset of sensory blockade at the L2, S1 or S3 segments were found between the groups. The pain thresholds at the S1 and S3 dermatomes were significantly lower than that at L2 within each group. The mean onset times at the S1 and S3 dermatomes were significantly longer than that at L2 within each group. No differences in Bromage score were found between the groups. In pregnant women, cephalad spread of epidural anesthesia was facilitated but latency of blockade, density and motor blockade were not. It takes over 25 min to achieve satisfactory blockade at sacral segments. Those who perform lumbar epidural anesthesia alone for cesarean section should consider the use of additives (e.g. fentanyl, bicarbonate) to enhance the block, or a greater volume of local anesthetic.

  6. The Neurological Safety of Epidural Pamidronate in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pyung Bok; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Chul Joong; Shin, Hye Young; Lee, Seung Yun; Park, Jong Cook; Choi, Yun Suk; Kim, Chong Soo

    2010-01-01

    Background Pamidronate is a potent inhibitor of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Recently, the drug has been known to relieve bone pain. We hypothesized that direct epidural administration of pamidronate could have various advantages over oral administration with respect to dosage, side effects, and efficacy. Therefore, we evaluated the neuronal safety of epidurally-administered pamidronate. Methods Twenty-seven rats weighing 250-350 g were equally divided into 3 groups. Each group received an epidural administration with either 0.3 ml (3.75 mg) of pamidronate (group P), 0.3 ml of 40% alcohol (group A), or 0.3 ml of normal saline (group N). A Pinch-toe test, motor function evaluation, and histopathologic examination of the spinal cord to detect conditions such as chromatolysis, meningeal inflammation, and neuritis, were performed on the 2nd, 7th, and 21st day following administration of each drug. Results All rats in group A showed an abnormal response to the pinch-toe test and decreased motor function during the entire evaluation period. Abnormal histopathologic findings, including neuritis and meningeal inflammation were observed only in group A rats. Rats in group P, with the exception of 1, and group N showed no significant sensory/motor dysfunction over a 3-week observation period. No histopathologic changes were observed in groups P and N. Conclusions Direct epidural injection of pamidronate (about 12.5 mg/kg) showed no neurotoxic evidence in terms of sensory/motor function evaluation and histopathologic examination. PMID:20556213

  7. Defining competence in obstetric epidural anaesthesia for inexperienced trainees.

    PubMed

    Drake, E J; Coghill, J; Sneyd, J R

    2015-06-01

    Cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis has been used for assessing competence of trainees learning new technical skills. One of its disadvantages is the required definition of acceptable and unacceptable success rates. We therefore monitored the development of competence amongst trainees new to obstetric epidural anaesthesia in a large public hospital. Obstetric epidural data were collected prospectively between January 1996 and December 2011. Success rates for inexperienced trainees were calculated retrospectively for (1) the whole database, (2) for each consecutive attempt and (3) each trainee's individual overall success rate. Acceptable and unacceptable success rates were defined and CUSUM graphs generated for each trainee. Competence was assessed for each trainee and the number of attempts to reach competence recorded. Mean (sd) success rate for all inexperienced trainees was 76.8 (0.1%), range 63-90%. Consecutive attempt success rate produced a learning curve with a mean success rate commencing at 58% on attempt 1. After attempt 10 the attempt number had no effect on subsequent success rates. From these results, the acceptable and unacceptable success rates were set at 65 and 55% respectively. CUSUM graphs demonstrated 76 out of 81 trainees competent after a mean of 46 (22) attempts. CUSUM is useful for assessing trainee epidural competence. Trainees require approximately 50 attempts, as defined by CUSUM, to reach competence. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Effects of epidural and spinal anesthesia on blood rheology.

    PubMed

    Odoom, J A; Bovill, J G; Hardeman, M R; Oosting, J; Zuurmond, W W

    1992-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the influence of epidural and spinal anesthesia on blood viscosity. We studied 22 patients, ASA classification I, who underwent elective knee or ankle arthroscopy and received epidural (n = 11) or spinal (n = 11) anesthesia with plain bupivacaine, and 10 control volunteers, who did not undergo surgery or receive anesthesia. There were significant decreases in hematocrit, plasma viscosity, and whole-blood viscosity at high (70 s-1), medium (0.5 s-1), and low (0.05 s-1) shear rates. The magnitude of changes was similar in all groups but occurred earlier in the control group (between 10 and 30 min) and after spinal administration (between 10 and 30 min) rather than after epidural administration (between 30 and 60 min) of bupivacaine. Only spinal anesthesia was associated with a decrease in erythrocyte deformability. The observed rheologic changes are attributed to hemodilution from the intravenous administration of fluids and the redistribution of fluid in the intravascular and extravascular compartments after sympathetic blockade and to postural changes rather than the effect of bupivacaine on blood elements.

  9. Epidural needle for recipient site preparation in hair restoration surgery.

    PubMed

    Zor, Fatih; Kulahci, Yalcin; Sever, Celalettin; Bayram, Yalcin; Benlier, Erol; Bozkurt, Mehmet

    2011-06-01

    The mini- and micro-grafting method is still one of the most current treatment methods for male pattern baldness and female androgenic alopecia. The preparation of the recipient area with 16G needle has been reported in the literature. However, during the insertion of grafts, the neighboring grafts tend to `pop out'. The study presents our experience in the hair implantation for recipient site preparation with 16G epidural needle. The 16G epidural needle was used during preparation of the recipient field in eight patients. Approximately 500 micrografts were grafted in each patient to reconstruct the anterior hairline. During insertion of the micrografts, almost none of the previously inserted grafts tended to `pop out'. The anterior hairline of the patients was natural without obvious scarring. The mean follow-up period of these patients was 1.5 years. The amount of graft survival was found to be satisfactory. According to the surgeon's clinical observations, application of this technique was found to be easier than standard needle techniques. It can be used by inexperienced surgeons. Use of epidural needle for recipient hole preparation works well in reducing the popping out, and the curved fashion of the holes reduced the angle of the hair follicle. © 2011 The International Society of Dermatology.

  10. Continuous epidural analgesia, a new prospect in analgesia of newborns.

    PubMed

    Mixa, V; Nedomova, B; Berka, I

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of continuous caudal epidural block in post-operative analgesia in very young children has been growing. This method of analgesia is used in major abdominal and urological surgeries. A local anaesthetic, usually levobupivacaine, is administered through an epidural catheter introduced via hiatus canalis sacralis. The usual type of the catheter is Arrow G20 armed with a metal spiral, which can be used for children of up to approximately 2000 g of body weight. We want to introduce a modification of the method which uses the thin silicone catheter Premicath G28. This catheter allows for the administration of caudal epidural analgesia even in premature children of approximately 500 g of body weight. This solution eliminates adverse effects of systemic opioid analgesia, accelerates surgical wound healing and disconnection from ventilation system, and improves the potential of enteral nutrition. Depth and quality of analgesia in very young children are monitored using a complex scheme called Comfort Neo Scale (Tab. 1, Fig. 2, Ref. 7).

  11. Bupivacaine crystal deposits after long-term epidural infusion.

    PubMed

    Balga, I; Gerber, H; Schorno, X H; Aebersold Keller, F; Oehen, H-P

    2013-07-01

    The case of a 45-year-old male patient (body weight 52 kg, height 1.61 m) with a locally invasive gastric carcinoma infiltrating into the retroperitoneal space is reported. Because of severe cancer pain a tunnelled thoracic epidural catheter (EC) was placed at thoracic spinal level 7/8 and a local anesthetic (LA) mixture of bupivacaine 0.25 % and morphine 0.005 % was infused continuously at 6 ml h(-1). To optimize pain therapy the concentration was doubled (bupivacaine 0.5 %, morphine 0.01 %) 3 months later but the infusion rate was reduced to 3 ml h(-1) thus the total daily dose did not change. The patient died 6 months after initiation of the epidural analgesia from the underlying disease. The total amount of bupivacaine infused was 69 g and of morphine 1.37 g. The patient never reported any neurological complications. The autopsy revealed large white crystalline deposits in the thoracic epidural space which were identified as bupivacaine base by infrared spectrometry. Morphine could not be detected. A histological examination showed unreactive fatty tissue necrosis within the crystalline deposits but nerve tissue could not be identified. It is concluded that the bupivacaine crystalline deposits arose due to precipitation but the clinical significance with regard to sensory level and neuraxial tissue toxicity is unknown.

  12. Localization of epidural space: A review of available technologies.

    PubMed

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Sonny, Abraham; Chin, Ki Jinn

    2017-01-01

    Although epidural analgesia is widely used for pain relief, it is associated with a significant failure rate. Loss of resistance technique, tactile feedback from the needle, and surface landmarks are traditionally used to guide the epidural needle tip into the epidural space (EDS). The aim of this narrative review is to critically appraise new and emerging technologies for identification of EDS and their potential role in the future. The PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Studies, and Web of Science databases were searched using predecided search strategies, yielding 1048 results. After careful review of abstracts and full texts, 42 articles were selected to be included. Newer techniques for localization of EDS can be broadly classified into techniques that (1) guide the needle to the EDS, (2) identify needle entry into the EDS, and (3) confirm catheter location in EDS. An ideal method should be easy to learn and perform, easily reproducible with high sensitivity and specificity, identifies inadvertent intrathecal and intravascular catheter placements with ease, feasible in perioperative setting and have a cost-benefit advantage. Though none of them in their current stages of development qualify as an ideal method, many show tremendous potential. Some techniques are useful in patients with difficult spinal anatomy and infants, and thus are complementary to traditional methods. In addition to improving the existing technology, future research should aim at proving the superiority of these techniques over traditional methods, specifically regarding successful EDS localization, better safety profile, and a favorable cost-benefit ratio.

  13. The use of combined spinal-epidural technique to compare intrathecal ziconotide and epidural opioids for trialing intrathecal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Amitabh; Loh, Jeffrey; Puttanniah, Vinay; Malhotra, Vivek

    2013-03-01

    SUMMARY Choosing the initial medications for intrathecal delivery is often confusing and not standardized. We describe a novel way for using a combined spinal-epidural technique to compare two first-line medications for intrathecal delivery; ziconotide and morphine (or hydromorphone). Five patients with intractable chronic or cancer pain were elected to have an intrathecal drug delivery system implanted for pain management. Each patient was given a 3-day inpatient trial with the combined spinal-epidural technique. The Visual Analog Scale, Numerical Rating Scale, short-term McGill questionnaire and opioid consumption were monitored daily. The results were used to develop a paradigm to describe how ziconotide can be used in practice.

  14. A prospective evaluation of complications of 10,000 fluoroscopically directed epidural injections.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Malla, Yogesh; Wargo, Bradley W; Cash, Kimberly A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Fellows, Bert

    2012-01-01

    Among the multiple modalities of treatments available in managing chronic spinal pain, including surgery and multiple interventional techniques, epidural injections by various routes, such as interlaminar epidural injections, caudal epidural injections, transforaminal epidural injections, and percutaneous adhesiolysis are common. Even though the complications of fluoroscopically directed epidural injections are fewer than blind epidural injections, and have better effectiveness, multiple complications have been reported in scattered case reports, with only minor complications in randomized or non-randomized studies and systematic reviews. Thus, prospective studies with large patient series are essential to determine the types and incidences of complications. A prospective, non-randomized study of patients undergoing interventional techniques from May 2008 to December 2009. A private interventional pain management practice, a specialty referral center in the United States. To assess the complication rate of fluoroscopically directed epidural injections. This study was carried out over a period of 20 months and included over 10,000 procedures: 39% caudal epidurals, 23% cervical interlaminar epidurals, 14% lumbar interlaminar epidurals, 13% lumbar transforaminal epidurals, 8% percutaneous adhesiolysis, and 3% thoracic interlaminar epidural procedures. All of the interventions were performed under fluoroscopic guidance in an ambulatory surgery center by one of 3 physicians. The complications encountered during the procedure and postoperatively were prospectively evaluated. Measurable outcomes employed were intravascular entry of the needle, profuse bleeding, local hematoma, bruising, dural puncture and headache, nerve root or spinal cord irritation with resultant injury, infectious complications, vasovagal reactions, and facial flushing. Intravascular entry was higher for adhesiolysis (11.6%) and lumbar transforaminal (7.9%) procedures compared to other epidurals which

  15. [Obstetric epidural analgesia: relationship between obstetric variables and the course of labor].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; Rodríguez Caravaca, G; Serrano Rodríguez, Maria L; Delgado González, T; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2004-03-01

    To analyze the relationship between epidural analgesia and diverse obstetric and fetal variables as well as the impact of epidural analgesia on the rates of instrumental and cesarean delivery. Observational study of women who gave birth at Fundación Hospital Alcorcón over a period of 3 years. All the women were offered obstetric epidural analgesia based on 0.0625% bupivacaine plus 2 microg/mL of fentanyl. The following data were recorded: age, nulliparity (yes/no) administration of epidural analgesia (yes/no), induction of labor (yes/no), stimulation of uterine activity with oxytocin (yes/no), type of delivery, fetal weight, duration of dilation, duration of expulsion, cause of cesarean. The records of 4364 women were gathered. The percentages of inductions, nulliparas, oxytocin stimulation, and fetal weight greater than 4 kg and less than 2.5 kg were higher among women taking epidural analgesia. The age of women who received epidurals was significantly lower. The durations of dilation and expulsion were longer among women receiving epidural analgesia, and epidural analgesia was associated with greater risk of instrumental and cesarean deliveries. The significant increase in administration of epidural blocks over the 3-year period of the study was not accompanied by an increased rate of instrumentally assisted deliveries or cesareans. It is difficult to evaluate the real influence of epidural analgesia on certain aspects of labor and its evolution. The strength of the association between epidural analgesia and greater risk of increased rates of instrumental and cesarean deliveries may be influenced by factors not considered in the present study.

  16. Neostigmine Decreases Bupivacaine Use by Patient-Controlled Epidural Analgesia During Labor: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Vernon H.; Pan, Peter H.; Owen, Medge D; Seid, Melvin H.; Harris, Lynne; Clyne, Brittany; Voltaire, Misa; Eisenach, James C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Intrathecal neostigmine produces analgesia, but also severe nausea. In contrast, epidural neostigmine enhances opioid and local anesthetic analgesia without causing nausea. Previous studies examined only single epidural neostigmine bolus administration and did not assess the efficacy of continuous epidural infusion or several aspects of maternal and fetal safety. We therefore tested the hypothesis that epidural neostigmine in combination with bupivacaine by continuous infusion during labor would reduce the amount of bupivacaine required. Methods Twelve healthy women scheduled for elective cesarean delivery were assigned to receive epidural neostigmine, 40 μg (first 6 subjects) or 80 μg (second 6 subjects) as a single bolus, with fetal heart rate and uterine contractions monitored for 20 minutes. In a subsequent experiment, 40 healthy laboring women were randomized to receive bupivacaine 1.25 mg/mL alone or with neostigmine 4 μg/mL by patient-controlled epidural analgesia. The primary outcome measure was hourly bupivacaine use. Results Epidural neostigmine bolus did not alter baseline fetal heart rate, induce contractions or produce nausea. Epidural neostigmine infusion reduced bupivacaine requirement by 19% in all patients and 25% in those with > 4 hours of treatment (P<0.05 for both), but might have contributed to the incidence of mild sedation. Mode of delivery, incidence of maternal nausea and fetal heart rate abnormality were similar between groups. Conclusions These data show that adding epidural neostigmine 4 μg/mL reduces the hourly bupivacaine requirement by 19% to 25% with patient-controlled epidural analgesia during labor. Administered as a bolus and by continuous infusion at the studied doses, epidural neostigmine does not cause nausea and does not induce uterine contractions or fetal heart rate abnormalities, but mild sedation can occur. PMID:19377050

  17. Cauda equina syndrome caused by epidural pneumorrhachis: treatment with percutaneous computed tomography-guided translaminar trephination.

    PubMed

    Paik, Nam Chull; Lim, Chun Soo; Jang, Ho Suk

    2013-04-01

    A case report and review of the literature. To present a rare case, and its treatment, of cauda equina syndrome (CES) caused by epidural pneumorrhachis after repeated caudal epidural injections. Pneumorrhachis is defined as the presence of air in the epidural or subarachnoid space. Epidural pneumorrhachis is usually asymptomatic and managed conservatively, but rare cases of lumbar radiculopathy resulting from epidural air have been reported. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no previous report of CES caused by epidural air. A 63-year-old male presented with recent aggravation of a low backache, with pain radiating to both lower limbs. He also complained of newly developed numbness in the buttocks, groins, and perineum, and difficulty with urination and defecation, after repeated caudal epidural injections during a 3-week period. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed epidural pneumorrhachis compressing the lumbar dural sac at the L2-L3 and L3-L4 levels. The patient's symptoms persisted despite 3 days of oxygen inhalation therapy. Attempted needle aspiration of the epidural air was unsuccessful and percutaneous computed tomography-guided translaminar trephination was performed. The day after trephination, the patient's lower extremity motor strength began to improve; sphincter dysfunction began to resolve on the second day. During 8 weeks, his pain resolved and he gradually regained sensation. Two years later, the patient was free of symptoms or signs of CES. Epidural pneumorrhachis may cause dural sac compression, thus worsening a patient's previous symptoms and possibly eliciting new problems such as CES. Conservative treatment should be the first-line approach, but surgery is often necessary when the problem remains unsolved. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided translaminar trephination may be an alternative to surgical decompression of the epidural space in selected patients.

  18. Delayed Presentation of a Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess of Dental Origin after a Fall in an Elderly Patient.

    PubMed

    Bodman, Alexa; Riordan, Margaret; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-05-23

    Spinal epidural abscesses are an uncommon cause of spinal cord injury but, depending on the size and presence of neurological deficits, urgent neurosurgical intervention may be required. We present a unique case of a patient presenting with a spinal epidural collection several days after a fall. While a spinal epidural hematoma was suspected based on the patient's history and MRI findings, a spinal epidural abscess was found during surgery. The patient underwent laminectomy and instrumented fusion with successful treatment of her infection.

  19. Comparison of Epidrum, Epi-Jet, and Loss of Resistance syringe techniques for identifying the epidural space in obstetric patients.

    PubMed

    Kartal, S; Kösem, B; Kılınç, H; Köşker, H; Karabayırlı, S; Çimen, N K; Demircioğlu, R I

    2017-08-01

    Identifying the epidural space is essential during epidural anesthesia (EA). Pressure of the epidural space in pregnancy is higher than that in nonpregnant woman. Loss of resistance (LOR) method is the most commonly preferred method for identifying the epidural space. Epidrum and Epi-Jet are recently innovated supporting devices that facilitate identifying process for epidural space. In this study we aimed to compare Epidrum, Epi-Jet, and LOR methods in identifying the epidural space, feasibility of technique. Two hundred and forty pregnant women who were scheduled for caesarian section surgery under lumbar EA or combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) were randomized into three groups (Group I Epidrum, n = 80), Group II (Epi-Jet, n = 80), and Group III (LOR, n = 80). We recorded the time required to identify the epidural space and deflation of Epidrum balloon and Epi-Jet syringe, number of attempts, additional methods used to identify epidural space, usefulness of methods, accuracy of identification of epidural space, and outcomes of epidural catheterization. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to demographic data, duration of deflation of Epidrum balloon and Epi-Jet syringe and distance between skin and epidural space. The mean time required to enter epidural space in Group I was shorter than that in Group II (P = 0.031). Feasibility of Epi-Jet was easier than that of Epidrum (P = 0.015). Number of uncertainties of epidural space identification was higher in Group I than that in Group II (P = 0.009). Also, the requirement for LOR to confirm epidural space and failure rates was higher in Group I than Group II (P < 0.001). We suggest that Epi-Jet is superior to Epidrum in pregnant patients in terms of clarity of epidural space identification, usefulness, and success rates of EA or CSEA.

  20. Combined posterior Bankart lesion and posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments associated with recurrent posterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Hill, J David; Lovejoy, John F; Kelly, Robert A

    2007-03-01

    Recurrent posterior glenohumeral instability is uncommon and is often misdiagnosed. Damage to the posterior capsule, posteroinferior glenohumeral ligament, and posterior labrum have all been implicated as sources of traumatic posterior instability. We describe a case of traumatic recurrent posterior instability resulting from a posterior Bankart lesion accompanied by posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments. The Bankart lesion was repaired using a single arthroscopic suture anchor at the glenoid articular margin. The posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments was addressed with 3 suture anchors placed at the capsular origin at the posterior humeral head. Using these anchors, the posterior capsule was advanced laterally and superiorly for a secure repair. Arthroscopic anatomic reconstruction of both lesions resulted in an excellent clinical outcome.

  1. Large, spontaneous spinal subdural–epidural hematoma after epidural anesthesia for caesarean section: Conservative management with excellent outcome

    PubMed Central

    Siasios, Ioannis D.; Vakharia, Kunal; Gibbons, Kevin J.; Dimopoulos, Vassilios G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Iatrogenic or spontaneous spinal hematomas are rarely seen and present with multiple symptoms that can be difficult to localize. Most spontaneous spinal hematomas are multifactorial, and the pathophysiology is varied. Here, we present a case of a scattered, multicomponent, combined subdural and epidural spinal hematoma that was managed conservatively. Case Description: A 38-year-old woman came to the emergency department (ED) complaining of severe neck and back pain. She had undergone a caesarean section under epidural anesthesia 4 days prior to her arrival in the ED. She was placed on heparin and then warfarin to treat a pulmonary embolism that was diagnosed immediately postpartum. Her neurological examination at presentation demonstrated solely the existence of clonus in the lower extremities and localized cervical and low thoracic pain. In the ED, the patient's international normalized ratio was only mildly elevated. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large thoracolumbar subdural hematoma with some epidural components in the upper thoracic spine levels. Spinal cord edema was also noted at the T6-T7 vertebral level. The patient was admitted to the neurosurgical intensive care unit for close surveillance and reversal of her coagulopathy. She was treated conservatively with pain medication, fresh frozen plasma, and vitamin K. She was discharged off of warfarin without any neurological deficit. Conclusions: Conservative management of spinal hematomas secondary to induced coagulopathies can be effective. This case suggests that, in the face of neuroimaging findings of significant edema and epidural blood, the clinical examination should dictate the management, especially in such complicated patients. PMID:27843682

  2. Labour epidural analgesia in Poland in 2009 - a survey.

    PubMed

    Furmanik, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Labour analgesia in most developed countries is funded by the state, available to every woman in labour, and plays an important role in the everyday activities of most anaesthetists. This paper presents the second part of an Obstetric Anaesthesia Survey which was conducted in 2009. The first part of the Survey, relating to anaesthesia for caesarean sections, was published in 2010. The author sent out 432 questionnaires containing questions about hospital size and location, staffing levels and numbers of deliveries per year. There were also questions regarding regional and other pain relief methods used in labour, ways of administration, drugs used and monitoring of patients. The response rate was 24%. Around 45% of responding hospitals had only 1-3 deliveries per year, which makes it difficult to provide separate obstetric anaesthetic cover. Only ten hospitals (11%) employed an anaesthetist for the labour ward. Epidural analgesia was used in 55% of hospitals but only 20% provided the service for 24 hours per day and free of charge. Entonox was used very occasionally, but the most common means of pain relief was pethidine injection. There were marked differences in the medication used for labour epidurals, with 18% of units using high concentrations of local anaesthetics which could result in motor block. Despite a lack of regulations in Polish law and a lack of proper training in 50% of units, midwives were looking after the patients with established labour epidural which could create medico-legal consequences. There was also a marked variation in the parameters monitored during labour analgesia. Epidural labour analgesia was offered for 24 hours per day and free of charge in only 20% of hospitals. Without public pressure it will be difficult to get more funding from the National Health Fund (NFZ) to enable other hospitals, especially those with small obstetric units, to introduce regional labour analgesia. Although the 2009 guidelines addressed most of the issues

  3. Complete transthoracic resection of giant posterior mediastinal goiter: case report and review of surgical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Honglin; Ren, Dian; Liu, Yi; Li, Xin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Gang; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic goiters generally occupy anterior mediastinum, rarely involving the posterior mediastinal space. Reported herein is a 54-year-old female with a giant posterior mediastinal mass that was successfully resected via right posterolateral thoracotomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant posterior mediastinal goiter. This patient has done well postoperatively, with no evidence of local recurrence at 12-month follow-up. Related surgical strategies in past publications are summarized. PMID:27217766

  4. Manipulation with prolonged epidural analgesia for treatment of TKA complicated by arthrofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pariente, Gerardo Mangino; Lombardi, Adolph V; Berend, Keith R; Mallory, Thomas H; Adams, Joanne B

    2006-01-01

    Inability to achieve adequate range of motion (ROM) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) represents a frustrating complication for both patient and surgeon. Manipulation under anesthesia is indicated in TKA having less than 90 degrees ROM after six weeks, with no progression or regression in ROM. A modified technique has evolved for patients with chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS) symptoms or persistent stiffness after standard manipulation. A retrospective review was conducted to determine the efficacy of the modified technique, which uses epidural anesthesia continued for postoperative analgesia, hospital stay of one to three days, continuous passive motion (CPM) for two to three days, and daily physical therapy (PT). Between 1997 and 2003, 5714 TKAs were performed in 4106 patients. Manipulation using a standard technique was performed on 334 (5.8%) knees in 273 patients. Manipulation using a modified technique was performed on 65 (1%) knees in 60 patients. Age averaged 58 years and body mass index (BMI) averaged 34.39. Follow up averaged 18.4 months. ROM improved significantly from 71 degrees to 102 degrees (p < 0.0001). Knee Society pain, function, and total clinical scores all improved significantly (all p < 0.0001). Successful results were observed in 48 (74%) knees. Four (6%) additional knees achieved a successful result after a subsequent manipulation. Nine (14%) knees required component revision for treatment of persistent arthrofibrosis, which included one full revision, five polyethylene exchanges, and three revisions of femoral component and polyethylene. Two significant complications occurred: one subdural hematoma and one death due to pulmonary embolism. Although not without complications, manipulation under epidural anesthesia represents a viable option for treatment of persistent stiffness after TKA; 80% of these difficult cases achieved successful results.

  5. Posterior Glottic Insufficiency in Children.

    PubMed

    Padia, Reema; Smith, Marshall E

    2017-04-01

    Dysphonia secondary to posterior glottic insufficiency (PGI) can be difficult to identify and correct. Inadequate arytenoid approximation from medial arytenoid erosion results in a breathy, soft voice. The anatomical location of the gap is difficult to correct by vocal fold injection laryngoplasty. This study reviews the presentation, evaluation, and treatment for pediatric patients who were identified with PGI. An Institutional Review Board-approved chart review was performed on all patients who were diagnosed with PGI at our institution from 2013 to 2015. We studied the presentation, workup, and treatment for these patients, including laryngoscopy, parent or patient-based voice impairment ratings, and response to treatment. Seven patients were identified. Erosion of the medial arytenoid was identified on microlaryngoscopy for all of these patients. The patients had suboptimal improvement from injection laryngoplasty. Three patients underwent surgical correction with an endoscopic posterior cricoid reduction laryngoplasty (EPCRL) with significant improvement in voice, assessed by perceptual, laryngoscopic, and patient-based measures. The key diagnostic procedures to identify posterior glottic insufficiency include laryngoscopic findings of a posterior glottal gap, microlaryngoscopy with close inspection of the posterior glottis and medial arytenoids, and suboptimal response to injection laryngoplasty. The EPCRL is an effective procedure to treat dysphonia from PGI.

  6. Rethinking "posterior" tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Currently, many clinicians who help with breastfeeding problems are diagnosing "posterior" tongue-tie in infants and performing or referring for frenotomy. In this "Speaking Out" article, I argue that the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie has successfully raised awareness of the importance of impaired tongue function in breastfeeding difficulty. However, the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie also applies a reductionist, medicalized theoretical frame to the complex problem of impaired tongue function, risking unintended outcomes. Impaired tongue function arises out of multiple interacting and co-evolving factors, including the interplay between social behaviors concerning breastfeeding and mother-infant biology. Consideration of theoretical frames is vital if we are to build an evidence base through efficient use of the scarce resources available for clinical breastfeeding research and minimize unintended outcomes.

  7. A Case of Extensive Sacral Decubitus Ulcer Complicated by an Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Mai; Hiratsuka, Munehisa; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We herein report a 62-year-old man with an extensive sacral decubitus ulcer complicated by an epidural abscess. An epidural abscess is a rare disease, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a deep infection with decubitus. Moreover, the diagnosis may be late in such instances and should be carefully considered when a patient has paralysis. PMID:27536469

  8. [Epidural anesthesia and analgesia in the perioperative treatment of a patient with Kartagener syndrome].

    PubMed

    Errando, C L; Sifre, C; López-Alarcón, D

    1998-12-01

    Kartagener's syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by a triad of symptoms--bronchiectasis, situs inversus and sinusitis--and is classified as an immotile cilia syndrome. Patients may experience specific airway problems when undergoing anesthesia for surgical procedures. We report the case of a woman with Kartagener's syndrome who underwent surgery under epidural anesthesia with postoperative epidural analgesia, both techniques proving successful.

  9. [Comparative study of detection methods in epidural anesthesia: Episensor and loss of resistance].

    PubMed

    de Andrés, J A; Gomar, C; Calatrava, P; Nalda, M A

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate an electronic detector of negative pressure (Episensor, Palex, Spain) designed for the identification of epidural space. Ninety patients were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (n = 47) received epidural anesthesia as perioperative analgesic technique with Episensor method and group 2 (n = 43) received epidural anesthesia with the classic method of loss of resistance with gas mandrin. The following parameters were studied: a) demographic features, b) characteristics of epidural anesthesia, and c) complications occurring during space detection. There were no statistical differences in the analysis of demographic variables neither in the quality of the epidural anesthesia achieved in both groups. With respect to complications, group I presented the highest number of complications although only the lack of detection of epidural space achieved statistical significance (8.5%, p less than 0.05); the incidence was lower than that reported in the literature as physiologically possible in the lumbar epidural segment. We conclude that progressive knowledge of Episensor may decrease the initial incidence of complications with a success rate similar to that of classic techniques of identification of epidural space.

  10. Epidural hematoma secondary to sinusitis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Aviner, Shraga; Olshinka, Noam; Cherniavsky, Evgenia; Forer, Boaz; Bibi, Haim

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma is a potentially life threatening event that demands prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment, usually following head trauma. We present a case of a 9-year-old boy with no history of head trauma, and who was diagnosed with epidural hematoma secondary to frontal sinusitis; and the medical literature was reviewed.

  11. A new technique for long time catheterization of sacral epidural canal in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Erkin, Yüksel; Aydın, Zeynep; Taşdöğen, Aydın; Karcı, Ayşe

    2013-01-01

    In this study we aimed to develop a simple and practical technique for chronic sacral epidural catheterization of rabbits. We included ten rabbits weighing 2-2.5 kg in the study. After anesthesia and analgesia, we placed an epidural catheter by a 2 cm longitudinal skin incision in the tail above the sacral hiatus region. We confirmed localization by giving 1% lidocaine (leveling sensory loss and motor function loss of the lower extremity). The catheter was carried forward through a subcutaneous tunnel and fixed at the neck. Chronic caudal epidural catheter placement was succesful in all rabbits. The catheters stayed in place effectively for ten days. We encountered no catheter complications during this period. The localization of the catheter was reconfirmed by 1% lidocaine on the last day. After animals killing, we performed a laminectomy and verified localization of the catheter in the epidural space. Various methods for catheterization of the epidural space in animal models exist in the literature. Epidural catheterization of rabbits can be accomplished by atlanto-occipital, lumbar or caudal routes by amputation of the tail. Intrathecal and epidural catheterization techniques defined in the literature necessitate surgical skill and knowledge of surgical procedures like laminectomy and tail amputation. Our technique does not require substantial surgical skill, anatomical integrity is preserved and malposition of the catheter is not encountered. In conclusion, we suggest that our simple and easily applicable new epidural catheterization technique can be used as a model in experimental animal studies.

  12. Intermittent epidural bolus compared with continuous epidural infusions for labor analgesia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    George, Ronald B; Allen, Terrence K; Habib, Ashraf S

    2013-01-01

    The current standard labor epidural analgesic regimens consist of a local anesthetic in combination with an opioid delivered via continuous epidural infusion (CEI). With CEI local anesthetic, doses may be large with resulting profound motor blockade potentially affecting the incidence of instrumental deliveries. In this systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), we compared the effect of intermittent epidural bolus (IEB) to standard CEI dosing with or without patient-controlled epidural analgesia on patient satisfaction, the need for manual anesthesia interventions, labor progression, and mode of delivery in healthy women receiving labor epidural analgesia. A systematic review of RCTs that compared CEI with IEB for labor analgesia was performed. The articles were evaluated for validity, and data were extracted by the authors and summarized using odds ratios (ORs), mean differences (MDs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Nine RCTs were included in this systematic review. Three hundred forty-four subjects received CEI, whereas 350 subjects received IEB labor analgesia. All 9 studies were deemed to be low risk of bias. There was no statistical difference detected between IEB and CEI in the rate of cesarean delivery (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56-1.35), duration of labor (MD, -17 minutes; 95% CI, -42 to 7), or the need for anesthetic intervention (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.29-1.06). IEB did result in a small but statistically significant reduction in local anesthetic usage (MD, -1.2 mg bupivacaine equivalent per hour; 95% CI, -2.2 to -0.3). Maternal satisfaction score (100-mm visual analog scale) was higher with IEB (MD, 7.0 mm; 95% CI, 6.2-7.8). IEB is an appealing concept; current evidence suggests IEB slightly reduces local anesthetic usage and improves maternal satisfaction. Given the wide CIs of the pooled results for many outcomes, definite conclusions cannot be drawn for those outcomes, but there is also a potential that IEB improves instrumental delivery

  13. A prospective, randomized evaluation of the effects of epidural needle rotation on the distribution of epidural block.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Battista; Agnoletti, Vanni; Ricci, Alessandro; van Oven, Hanna; Montone, Nicoletta; Casati, Andrea

    2004-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of turning the tip of the Tuohy needle 45 degrees toward the operative side before threading the epidural catheter (45 degrees -rotation group, n = 24) as compared to a conventional insertion technique with the tip of the Tuohy needle oriented at 90 degrees cephalad (control group, n = 24) on the distribution of 10 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine with 10 microg sufentanil in 48 patients undergoing total hip replacement. The catheter was introduced 3 to 4 cm beyond the tip of the Tuohy needle. A blinded observer recorded sensory and motor blocks on both sides, quality of analgesia, and volumes of local anesthetic used during the first 48 h of patient-controlled epidural analgesia. Readiness to surgery required 21 +/- 6 min in the control group and 17 +/- 7 min in the 45 degree-rotation group (P > 0.50). The maximum sensory level reached on the operative side was T10 (T10-7) in the control group and T9 (T10-6) in the 45 degree-rotation group (P > 0.50); whereas the maximum sensory level reached on the nonoperative side was T10 (T12-9) in the control group and L3 (L5-T12) in the 45 degree-rotation group (P = 0.0005). Complete motor blockade of the operative limb was achieved earlier in the 45 degree-rotation than in the control group, and motor block of the nonoperative side was more intense in patients in the control group. Two-segment regression of sensory level on the surgical side was similar in the two groups, but occurred earlier on the nonoperative side in the 45 degree-rotation group (94 +/- 70 min) than in the control group (178 +/- 40 min) (P = 0.0005). Postoperative analgesia was similar in the 2 groups, but the 45 degree-rotation group consumed less local anesthetic (242 +/- 35 mL) than the control group (297 +/- 60 mL) (P = 0.0005). We conclude that the rotation of the Tuohy introducer needle 45 degrees toward the operative side before threading the epidural catheter provides a preferential distribution of sensory and motor block toward

  14. [Clinical Manifestations of Spinal Epidural Hematoma-Stroke Mimic and Pitfalls in Diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Masaru

    2017-02-01

    Clinical manifestations of spinal epidural hematoma are presented, and the cases mimicking acute ischemic stroke have been reviewed from the literature. Many reports described the cases of spinal epidural hematoma with acute hemiparesis mimicking ischemic stroke in which intravenous thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator was considered. A correct diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke must be made within 4.5 hours from the onset of symptoms, a relatively short window period. A spinal epidural hematoma is a potentially important stroke mimic in a wide variety of conditions that mimic a stroke. The literature review and discussion will emphasize allowing the distinction between these hemiparetic presentation of spinal epidural hematoma and acute ischemic stroke. A spinal epidural hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute onset of hemiparesis when associated with neck pain and signs of Horner's syndrome and Brown-Sēquard syndrome.

  15. Asymptomatic pneumomediastinum resulting from air in the epidural space -a case report-.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun Kyoung; Cha, Young Deog; Song, Jang Ho; Park, Ji Woong; Lee, Mi Hyeon

    2013-09-01

    There are no reports regarding pneumomediastinum caused by thoracic epidural block complications. We believe that it is possible to experience an occurrence of pneumomediastinum caused by air in the epidural space after performing a thoracic epidural block using the loss of resistance (LOR) technique with air. We report a witnessed case where pneumomediastinum appeared after a thoracic epidural block. Pneumorrrhachis, paravertebral muscle emphysema, and pneumomediastinum were diagnosed by Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography. Although extremely rare, pneumomediastinum can be caused by an epidural block using LOR technique with air. In order to avoid the above danger, the use of saline or very minimal amount of air is required during a careful LOR technique.

  16. Bilateral epidural extension of thoracic capillary vertebral (intraosseous) hemangioma mimicking spinal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kan, C H; Saw, C B; Rozaini, R; Fauziah, K; Ng, C M; Saffari, M H

    2008-06-01

    We describe a rare case of vertebra (intraosseous) hemangioma with bilateral and symmetrical epidural extension causing cord compression in a 24-year-old woman. The epidural component was isointense to cord on both T1 and T2 sequences, and enhanced markedly and homogenously following gadolinium administration. The gradual in onset and progressive nature with the typical enhancing pattern lead the neurosurgeon to the more common diagnosis of spinal meningioma. Epidural extension of vertebral hemangiomas causing cord compression is rarely reported. Review of literatures reveal that cases that have been reported are of unilateral extension into epidural space and of cavernous type. This is the first case report of capillary vertebral (intraossous) hemangioma with bilateral extension through both intervetebral foramen into the epidural space causing myelopathy.

  17. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyung Ream; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air.

  18. [Application of posterior spinal canal reconstruction in surgery of intraspinal tumor].

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; Huang, Wu; He, Yunsong; Nong, Mingshan; Liang, Tiansen; Tan, Suzhen; Yang, Xing

    2014-08-01

    To apply H-shaped allogeneic bone graft combined with spinous process replantation for posterior spinal canal reconstruction after removal of intraspinal tumors, and observe its effectiveness. A total of 48 cases of thoracic and lumbar intraspinal tumors were recruited between February 2006 and May 2012, including 35 males and 13 females with a mean age of 29.5 years (range, 17-48 years). The disease duration was 3-16 months (mean, 10.5 months). Intraspinal tumors located at T5,6 in 3 cases, at T10 in 7 cases, at T12, L1 in 13 cases, at L3 in 10 cases, and at L4-S1 in 15 cases. There were 18 cases of epidural meningioma, 2 cases of epidural lipoma, 3 cases of extramedullary neurological tumors, 10 cases of extramedullary meningioma, 6 cases of extramedullary schwannoma, 6 cases of intramedullary ependymoma, and 3 cases of intramedullary astrocytoma. All patients underwent H-shaped allogeneic bone graft combined with spinous process replantation for posterior spinal canal reconstruction after removal of intraspinal tumor by posterior laminectomy. The Oswestry disability index (ODI) was used to assess postoperative symptom improvement, and the Frankel grade of spinal cord injury to evaluate the extent of nerve damage and recovery. After operation, 8 cases had cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and 4 cases had yellowish exudate, and they were all cured after appropriate treatment; primary healing of wound was obtained in the other cases, without postoperative complication. Forty-eight patients were followed up 18-72 months (mean, 38 months). CT showed all the graft bones healed and posterior spinal canal was well reconstructed without iatrogenic spinal stenosis formation. X-ray film showed no vertebral instability or spondylolisthesis, and no shifting of reconstructed vertebrae. MRI showed no recurrence except 1 case. The symptoms were improved significantly after operation; the ODI score at last follow-up (16.69 ± 2.53) was significantly lower (t = 0.89, P = 0.00) than

  19. [Comparison of transforaminal and interlaminar epidural steroid injections for the treatment of chronic lumbar pain].

    PubMed

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan

    A cross-sectional study. We compared the 12 month outcomes of fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural steroid injections with interlaminar epidural steroid injections for the treatment of chronic lumbar spinal pain. Chronic lower back pain is a multifactorial disorder with many possible etiologies. The lifetime prevalence of spinal pain is reportedly 65-80% in the neck and lower back. Epidural injection of corticosteroids is a commonly used intervention for managing chronic spinal pain. Patients who did not benefit from previous treatments were included in this study. Injections were performed according to magnetic resonance imaging findings at the nearest level of lumbar pathology; 173 patients received interlaminar epidural steroid injections and 126 patients received transforaminal epidural steroid injections. All of the patients were regularly followed up for 12 months using a verbal numeric rating scale. Magnetic resonance imaging findings, complications, verbal numeric rating scale, and satisfaction scores were recorded. Lumbar disk pathology was the most frequently encountered problem. The interlaminar epidural steroid injections were preferred at the L4-L5 intervertebral level. Verbal numeric rating scale scores significantly decreased during the 12-month period compared to basal scores (p<0.001). Significant differences between the two groups according to verbal numeric rating scale and satisfaction scores were not observed (p>0.05). There were no major complications; however, the interlaminar epidural steroid injections group had 22 (12.7%) minor complications, and the transforaminal epidural steroid injections group had 12 (9.5%) minor complications. This study showed that interlaminar epidural steroid injections can be as effective as transforaminal epidural steroid injections when performed at the nearest level of lumbar pathology using fluoroscopy in 12-month intervals. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por

  20. An in vitro comparison of the electrical conducting properties of multiport versus single-port epidural catheters for the epidural stimulation test.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ban C H; Sze, Corey K C

    2005-11-01

    Effective conduction of electricity through a catheter is essential for the success of the epidural stimulation test. In this in vitro study we examined the electrical conductivity of single and multiport epidural catheters (with and without embedded metal elements) after being primed with normal saline. Seven different types of 19-gauge catheters (n = 5), either single-port or multiport catheters, with or without embedded metal elements, were studied. The proximal end of each epidural catheter was connected to the cathode of a nerve stimulator via an electrode adapter. The catheter, primed with normal saline, was placed at the bottom of a syringe filled with 5 different volumes of saline (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 mL) and attached to an electrode adapter. The voltage of the peripheral nerve stimulator was measured using an oscilloscope. The electrical resistance between the proximal and distal end of the catheter was calculated using Ohm's Law. In catheters without metal elements the electrical resistances were too high to be measured. In catheters that had metal elements, the mean electrical resistances of the same catheter design (single-port or multiport) were similar. However, the electrical resistances of the multiport metal reinforced epidural catheters were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than the single-port metal coil reinforced epidural catheters. The volume of saline in the syringe had no impact on the measured electrical resistances. This study suggests that multiport metal reinforced epidural catheters have low electrical resistances and, thus, are a reasonable alternative to single-port catheters for transmitting sufficient current for performing the epidural stimulation test. On the other hand, epidural catheters without metal elements (single-port or multiport) are not suitable for performing the stimulation test.

  1. Surgical management of posterior fossa metastases.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Geraint J; Jenkinson, Michael D; Zakaria, Rasheed

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis of brain metastases is associated with a poor prognosis reflecting uncontrolled primary disease that has spread to the relative sanctuary of the central nervous system. 20 % of brain metastases occur in the posterior fossa and are associated with significant morbidity. The risk of acute hydrocephalus and potential for sudden death means these metastases are often dealt with as emergency cases. This approach means a full pre-operative assessment and staging of underlying disease may be neglected and a proportion of patients undergo comparatively high risk surgery with little or no survival benefit. This study aimed to assess outcomes in patients to identify factors that may assist in case selection. We report a retrospective case series of 92 consecutive patients operated for posterior fossa metastases between 2007 and 2012. Routine demographic data was collected plus data on performance status, primary cancer site, details of surgery, adjuvant treatment and survival. The only independent positive prognostic factors identified on multivariate analysis were good performance status (if Karnofsky performance score >70, hazard ratio (HR) for death 0.36, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.18-0.69), adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (HR 0.37, 95 % CI 0.21-0.65) and adjuvant chemotherapy where there was extracranial disease and non-synchronous presentation (HR 0.51, 95 % CI 0.31-0.82). Patients presenting with posterior fossa metastases may not be investigated as thoroughly as those with supratentorial tumours. Staging and assessment is essential however, and in the meantime emergencies related to tumour mass effect should be managed with steroids and cerebrospinal fluid diversion as required.

  2. The Simplified Posterior Interosseous Flap.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Pedro C; Thione, Alessandro; Rubí, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Several technical modifications have been described to avoid complications and simplify dissection. The authors describe some technical tips that make posterior interosseous flap dissection safer and more straightforward. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Children's Understanding of Posterior Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girotto, Vittorio; Gonzalez, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Do young children have a basic intuition of posterior probability? Do they update their decisions and judgments in the light of new evidence? We hypothesized that they can do so extensionally, by considering and counting the various ways in which an event may or may not occur. The results reported in this paper showed that from the age of five,…

  4. Children's Understanding of Posterior Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girotto, Vittorio; Gonzalez, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Do young children have a basic intuition of posterior probability? Do they update their decisions and judgments in the light of new evidence? We hypothesized that they can do so extensionally, by considering and counting the various ways in which an event may or may not occur. The results reported in this paper showed that from the age of five,…

  5. Stereolithography for Posterior Fossa Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Celso; Dujovny, Manuel; Evenhouse, Raymond; Charbel, Fady T.; Sadler, Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Posterior fossa cranioplasty has been suggested for improvement of neurological symptoms following craniectomy. However, there is no particular recommendation in the literature about techniques for prosthesis manufacture and implantation. We report our experience using rapid prototyping technology and stereolithography for pre-surgical implant design and production of cranioplasties. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171056

  6. Clinical effects of computed tomography-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa P; Girod, Maud; Peeters, Dominique; Sandersen, Charlotte; Couvreur, Thierry; Bolen, Géraldine

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine clinical effects of CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate in healthy dogs. ANIMALS 15 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to 3 groups (5 dogs/group) and received a single CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, or translaminar epidural injection of methylprednisolone acetate (0.1 mg/kg). Contrast medium was injected prior to injection of methylprednisolone to verify needle placement. Neurologic examinations were performed 1, 3, 7, and 10 days after the injection. In dogs with neurologic abnormalities, a final neurologic examination was performed 24 days after the procedure. RESULTS Methylprednisolone injections were successfully performed in 14 of the 15 dogs. In 1 dog, vascular puncture occurred, and the methylprednisolone injection was not performed. No major or minor complications were identified during or immediately after the procedure, other than mild transient hyperthermia. During follow-up neurologic examinations, no motor, sensory, or postural deficits were identified, other than mild alterations in the patellar, withdrawal, cranial tibial, and perineal reflexes in some dogs. Overall, altered reflexes were observed in 11 of the 14 dogs, during 27 of 65 neurologic examinations. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate were associated with few complications in healthy dogs. However, the number of dogs evaluated was small, and additional studies are needed to assess clinical efficacy and safety of these procedures.

  7. Connection of the Posterior Occipital Muscle and Dura Mater of the Siamese Crocodile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Hui; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Zhao-Xi; Luan, Bing-Yi; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Sui, Hong-Jin

    2016-10-01

    The myodural bridge was proposed initially in 1995. The myodural bridge is a connective tissue bridge that connects a pair of deep muscles at the suboccipital region to the dura mater. There have been numerous studies concerning the morphology and function of the myodural bridge. To determine whether a myodural bridge exists in reptiles, six Siamese crocodiles were investigated using gross anatomy dissection and P45 sheet plastination technologies. As a result, we demonstrated that the posterior occipital muscles of the Siamese crocodile are directly or indirectly connected to the proatlas, atlas, and intermembrane between them. Multiple trabeculae existing in the posterior epidural space extended from the ventral surface of the proatlas, atlas, and intermembrane between them to the dorsal surface of the spinal dura mater. This study showed that the posterior occipital muscle in the suboccipital region of the Siamese crocodile is connected to the spinal dura mater through the proatlas, atlas, and the trabeculae. In conclusion, a myodural bridge-like structure exists in reptiles. This connection may act as a pump to provide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation at the occipitocervical junction. We hypothesize that a physiologic role of the Siamese crocodile's myodural bridge may be analogous to the human myodural bridge. Anat Rec, 299:1402-1408, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effect of magnesium infusion on thoracic epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Mitra, Koel; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Roy, Suddhadeb; Sarkar, Aniruddha; Kundu, Sudeshna; Goswami, Anupam; Sarkar, Uday Narayan; Sanki, Prakash; Mitra, Ritabrata

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Patients of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) having an ASA status III or more are likely to be further downgraded by surgery to critical levels of pulmonary function. Aim: To compare the efficacy of thoracic epidural block with (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination and (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination with adjunctive intravenous magnesium infusion for the relief of postoperative pain in patients undergoing LVRS. Methods: Patients were operated under general anesthesia. Thirty minutes before the anticipated completion of skin closure in both groups, (Group A and Group B) 7 ml of (0.125%) bupivacaine calculated as 1.5 ml/thoracic segment space for achieving analgesia in dermatomes of T4, T5, T6, T7, and T8 segments, along with fentanyl 50 μg (0.5 ml), was administered through the catheter, activating the epidural block, and the time was noted. Thereafter, in patients of Group A, magnesium sulfate injection 30 mg/kg i.v. bolus was followed by infusion of magnesium sulfate at 10 mg/kg/hr and continued up to 24 hours. Group B was treated as control. Results and Analysis: A significant increase in the mean and maximum duration of analgesia in Group A in comparison with Group B (P<0.05) was observed. Total epidural dose of fentanyl and bupivacaine required in Group A was significantly lower in comparison with Group B in 24 hours. Discussion: Requirement of total doses of local anesthetics along with opioids could be minimized by magnesium infusion; therefore, the further downgradation of patients of LVRS may be prevented. Conclusion: Intravenous magnesium can prolong opioid-induced analgesia while minimizing nausea, pruritus, and somnolence. PMID:21655018

  9. Prediction of life expectancy in patients with spinal epidural metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Ronald H.M.A.; de Ruiter, Godard; Feuth, Ton; Arts, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment of spinal epidural metastasis is multidisciplinary and usually involves a team of medical oncologists, radiologists, radiotherapists, and spinal surgeons. Life expectancy is one of the factors considered when deciding whether surgery is warranted. Because expert estimates of life expectancy are generally not reliable, a prediction model is needed. Here, we temporally validated a model that was previously validated geographically. Methods The records of 110 consecutive patients who were referred with a spinal epidural metastasis were collected prospectively from 2009 to 2013 in order to validate the model, which was published in 2011. The actual and estimated life expectancies were represented graphically, and calibration and discrimination were determined. The calibration slope, Harrell's c-index, D, and RD2 were calculated. Hazard ratios in the derivation set of 2011 were compared with the validation set. Misspecification was determined using the joint test for β*. Results The calibration slope was 0.64 ± 0.15 (95% CI: 0.34–0.94), Harrell's c-index was 0.72, D was 1.08, and RD2 was 0.22, indicating slightly worse discrimination in the derivation set. The joint test for β* = 0 was statistically significant and indicated misspecification; however, this misspecification was attributed entirely to the surgical group. Conclusions We validated a prediction model for surgical decision making, showing that the model's overall performance is good. Based on these results, this model will help clinicians to decide whether to offer surgery to patients with spinal epidural metastasis. PMID:26254478

  10. Epidural application of ionomeric cement implants. Experimental and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Geyer, G; Baier, G; Helms, J

    1998-04-01

    During setting and hardening, the hybrid bone substitute ionomeric cement (Ionocem) achieves a stable and durable bond with the apatite of the adjacent bone without interpository soft tissue. Fluid contact during setting results in the release of aluminium ions which may reach critical levels as high as 3000 micrograms/l. On epidural application it is, therefore, essential to prevent cement constituents from gaining access to the intradural space. After the cement has hardened, the presence of aluminium is demonstrable in the adjacent bone to a maximum depth of 20 microns (EDX microanalysis). In rabbits, epidural placement of freshly mixed cement causes slight thickening of the dura. There is reason to believe that human dura, with a thickness 10 times greater, is impermeable to components of the cement. After epidural application of the freshly mixed cement in the frontobasal and laterobasal regions and at the skull cap and petrous apex, 76 patients in all have been followed for up to 6.5 years. During this period no complications have arisen and functional (and cosmetic) results are promising. The availability of preformed implants (Ionoroc, Ionocast) permitted the peridural placement of minimal quantities of freshly mixed cement. These implants were fixed to localized sites on the adjacent calvarial bone by use of Ionocem. Notwithstanding the stringent manufacturer guidelines, there have been reports in the literature that during the vulnerable stage of setting neurotoxic aluminium ions were released into the dural space with a fatal outcome in two cases. In view of potential intradural complications, such as may occur in case of dural leaks, it was considered that further application of the material adjacent to the dura was no longer warranted. The production of Ionocem was discontinued in May 1995.

  11. Posterior-Only Circumferential Decompression and Reconstruction in the Surgical Management of Lumbar Vertebral Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Caridi, John; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The purpose of this report is to discuss the surgical management of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and present a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with instrumentation using an expandable titanium cage and without segmental nerve root sacrifice as an option in the treatment of this disease process. Methods We report a 42-year-old man who presented with 3 days of low back pain and chills who rapidly decompensated with severe sepsis following admission. Magnetic resonance imaging of his lumbosacral spine revealed intramuscular abscesses of the left paraspinal musculature and iliopsoas with SEA and L4 vertebral body involvement. The patient failed maximal medical treatment, which necessitated surgical treatment as a last resort for infectious source control. He underwent a previously undescribed procedure in the setting of SEA: a single-stage, posterior-only approach for circumferential decompression and reconstruction of the L4 vertebral body with posterior segmental instrumented fixation. Results After the surgery, the patient's condition gradually improved; however, he suffered a wound dehiscence necessitating a surgical exploration and deep wound debridement. Six months after the surgery, the patient underwent a revision surgery for adjacent-level pseudarthrosis. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and off narcotic pain medication and had returned to full activity. Conclusion This patient is the first reported case of lumbar osteomyelitis with SEA treated surgically with a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation. Although this approach is more technically challenging, it presents another viable option for the treatment of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis that may reduce the morbidity associated with an anterior approach.

  12. Posterior-Only Circumferential Decompression and Reconstruction in the Surgical Management of Lumbar Vertebral Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z.; Caridi, John; Cho, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The purpose of this report is to discuss the surgical management of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and present a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with instrumentation using an expandable titanium cage and without segmental nerve root sacrifice as an option in the treatment of this disease process. Methods We report a 42-year-old man who presented with 3 days of low back pain and chills who rapidly decompensated with severe sepsis following admission. Magnetic resonance imaging of his lumbosacral spine revealed intramuscular abscesses of the left paraspinal musculature and iliopsoas with SEA and L4 vertebral body involvement. The patient failed maximal medical treatment, which necessitated surgical treatment as a last resort for infectious source control. He underwent a previously undescribed procedure in the setting of SEA: a single-stage, posterior-only approach for circumferential decompression and reconstruction of the L4 vertebral body with posterior segmental instrumented fixation. Results After the surgery, the patient's condition gradually improved; however, he suffered a wound dehiscence necessitating a surgical exploration and deep wound debridement. Six months after the surgery, the patient underwent a revision surgery for adjacent-level pseudarthrosis. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and off narcotic pain medication and had returned to full activity. Conclusion This patient is the first reported case of lumbar osteomyelitis with SEA treated surgically with a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation. Although this approach is more technically challenging, it presents another viable option for the treatment of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis that may reduce the morbidity associated with an anterior approach. PMID:26835214

  13. Epidural and spinal anesthesia use during labor: 27-state reporting area, 2008.

    PubMed

    Osterman, Michelle J K; Martin, Joyce A

    2011-04-06

    This report presents 2008 data on receipt of epidural and spinal anesthesia as collected on the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth. The purpose of this report is to describe the characteristics of women giving birth and the circumstances of births in which epidural or spinal anesthesia is used to relieve the pain of labor for vaginal deliveries. Descriptive statistics are presented on births occurring in 2008 to residents of 27 states that had implemented the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth as of January 1, 2008. Analyses are limited to singleton births in vaginal deliveries that occurred in the 27-state reporting area only and are not generalizable to the United States as a whole. Overall, 61 percent of women who had a singleton birth in a vaginal delivery in the 27 states in 2008 received epidural or spinal anesthesia; non-Hispanic white women received epidural or spinal anesthesia more often (69 percent) than other racial groups. Among Hispanic origin groups, Puerto Rican women were most likely to receive epidural or spinal anesthesia (68 percent). Levels of treatment with epidural or spinal anesthesia decreased by advancing age of mother. Levels increased with increasing maternal educational attainment. Early initiation of prenatal care increased the likelihood of epidural or spinal anesthesia receipt, as did attendance at birth by a physician. Use of epidural or spinal anesthesia was more common in vaginal deliveries assisted by forceps (84 percent) or vacuum extraction (77 percent) than in spontaneous vaginal deliveries (60 percent). Use of epidural or spinal anesthesia was less likely when infants were born prior to 34 weeks of gestation or weighed less than 1,500 grams. Women with chronic and gestational diabetes were more likely to receive an epidural or spinal anesthesia than women with no pregnancy risk factors. Precipitous labor (less than 3 hours) was associated with decreased epidural or spinal anesthesia receipt. longer second

  14. Compartment syndrome obscured by post-operative epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Md. Quamar; Ali, Mir Sadat; Al Ruwaili, Majed; Al Sayed, Hassan Noori

    2012-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is an orthopedic emergency that require early recognition and urgent intervention to avoid catastrophic complications. High index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis based on a constellation of signs and symptoms that include pain out of proportion and worsened by passive stretching, altered sensorium and palpable tenseness. Any event thus, that masks pain, may lead to delay the diagnosis of compartment syndrome. We report here a case of polytrauma where post-operative analgesia was administered using epidural catheter, which obscured pain and lead to delay in recognition of compartment syndrome. Authors wish to share a lesson, learned at the expense of tragedy. PMID:24765418

  15. Inflammation and Epidural-Related Maternal Fever: Proposed Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Pervez; David, Anna L; Fernando, Roshan; Ackland, Gareth L

    2016-05-01

    Intrapartum fever is associated with excessive maternal interventions as well as higher neonatal morbidity. Epidural-related maternal fever (ERMF) contributes to the development of intrapartum fever. The mechanism(s) for ERMF has remained elusive. Here, we consider how inflammatory mechanisms may be modulated by local anesthetic agents and their relevance to ERMF. We also critically reappraise the clinical data with regard to emerging concepts that explain how anesthetic drug-induced metabolic dysfunction, with or without activation of the inflammasome, might trigger the release of nonpathogenic, inflammatory molecules (danger-associated molecular patterns) likely to underlie ERMF.

  16. [medullar adhesive arachnoiditis: a late complication after obstetrical epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Ploteau, S; de Kersaint-Gilly, A; Boog, G

    2004-11-01

    A 30-year-old woman, G3P3, was progressively affected by spastic paraparesis with loss of sensitivity and urinary incontinence due to medullar adhesive arachnoiditis occurring five months after an epidural analgesia for repeat cesarean section. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a voluminous subarachnoid cyst and a septated syringomyelic cavitation attributed to metabisulfite, the preservative of epinephrine and to multiple lidocaine injections through the catheter in the postoperative period. Despite two decompressive neurosurgical operations, the neurological state of the patient continues to worsen.

  17. Lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis following attempted epidural anesthesia--case report.

    PubMed

    Haisa, T; Todo, T; Mitsui, I; Kondo, T

    1995-02-01

    A 30-year-old female experienced a sudden sharp pain radiating down to the left leg from the lower back at epidural intubation for anesthesia at childbirth. She continued to complain of pain in the left leg afterwards. Magnetic resonance images demonstrated a conglomeration of adherent nerve roots due to lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis. Microsurgical dissection of adherent nerve roots was performed. Her symptoms disappeared after surgery, but soon recurred, being less severe and responsive to anti-inflammatory agents. Lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis should be considered for differential diagnosis in patients presenting with back and leg pain syndrome.

  18. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  19. Epidural Tube: A Useful Device in Sialendoscopy Operations.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Fang, Wei; Chen, Ju-feng; Long, Xing

    2016-03-01

    Salivary endoscopy, which was first described in 1991, is a safe technique with few complications. The sialendoscopy operation has been developed and successfully offered as a minimally invasive and gland-preserving approach for the treatment of chronic obstructive sialadenitis. For many surgeons, entering the duct lumen of the salivary gland is the most difficult and time-consuming step of the sialendoscopy operation. This report introduces a timesaving and straightforward method for entering the duct lumen using an epidural tube, which is a plastic tube with a blunt tip.

  20. Dural Puncture Epidural Technique Improves Labor Analgesia Quality With Fewer Side Effects Compared With Epidural and Combined Spinal Epidural Techniques: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Chau, Anthony; Bibbo, Carolina; Huang, Chuan-Chin; Elterman, Kelly G; Cappiello, Eric C; Robinson, Julian N; Tsen, Lawrence C

    2017-02-01

    The dural puncture epidural (DPE) technique is a modification of the combined spinal epidural (CSE) technique, where a dural perforation is created from a spinal needle but intrathecal medication administration is withheld. The DPE technique has been shown to improve caudal spread of analgesia compared with epidural (EPL) technique without the side effects observed with the CSE technique. We hypothesized that the onset of labor analgesia would follow this order: CSE > DPE > EPL techniques. A total of 120 parturients in early labor were randomly assigned to EPL, DPE, or CSE groups. Initial dosing for EPL and DPE consisted of epidural 20 mL of 0.125% bupivacaine plus fentanyl 2 μg/mL over 5 minutes, and for CSE, intrathecal 0.25% bupivacaine 1.7 mg and fentanyl 17 μg. Upon block completion, a blinded coinvestigator assessed the outcomes. Two blinded obstetricians retrospectively interpreted uterine contractions and fetal heart rate tracings 1 hour before and after the neuraxial technique. The primary outcome was time to numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) ≤ 1 analyzed by using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard model. Secondary outcomes included block quality, maternal adverse effects, uterine contraction patterns, and fetal outcomes analyzed by using the χ test with Yates continuity correction. There was no significant difference in the time to NPRS ≤ 1 between DPE and EPL (hazard ratio 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83-2.4, P = .21). DPE achieved NPRS ≤ 1 significantly slower than CSE (hazard ratio 0.36; 95% CI 0.22-0.59, P = .0001). The median times (interquartile range) to NPRS ≤ 1 were 2 (0.5-6) minutes for CSE, 11 (4-120) minutes for DPE, and 18 (10-120) minutes for EPL. Compared with EPL, DPE had significantly greater incidence of bilateral S2 blockade at 10 minutes (risk ratio [RR] 2.13; 95% CI 1.39-3.28; P < .001), 20 minutes (RR 1.60; 95% CI 1.26-2.03; P < .001), and 30 minutes (RR 1.18; 95% CI 1.01-1.30; P < .034), a lower

  1. Effects of postoperative epidural analgesia on recurrence-free and overall survival in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cata, Juan P; Gottumukkala, Vijaya; Thakar, Dilip; Keerty, Dinesh; Gebhardt, Rodolfo; Liu, Diane D

    2014-02-01

    To determine whether postoperative epidural analgesia is associated with better recurrence-free survival and overall survival after lung cancer surgery. Retrospective study. Academic hospital. Data of patients with stage 1, stage 2, and stage 3 nonsmall cell lung cancer, who underwent tumor resection surgery, were studied. Patient data were grouped into three different postoperative pain management interventions: intravenous patient-controlled analgesia, patient-controlled epidural analgesia, and their combination. Univariate and multicovariate Cox proportional hazards models were applied to assess the effects of covariates of interest on overall survival and recurrence-free survival. The type of postoperative analgesia used for patients who underwent surgery for nonsmall cell lung cancer did not affect recurrence-free survival or overall survival. However, certain variables, including age ≥ 65 years, male gender, body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2), ASA physical status 4, and the need for preoperative blood transfusions, pneumonectomy, and postoperative radiation, were associated with decreased recurrence-free survival and overall survival. The type of postoperative analgesia used after surgery for nonsmall cell lung cancer is not associated with better 2-year or 5-year recurrence-free survival or overall survival rates. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Epidural Cystic Spinal Meningioma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zheng-he; Wang, Zi-feng; Sun, Peng; Jin, Jie-tian; Zhang, Xiang-heng; Zhao, Yi-ying; Wang, Jian; Mou, Yong-gao; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2016-03-01

    Cystic spinal meningioma (CSM) is an uncommon meningioma variant. Extradural CSMs are particularly rare and difficult to distinguish from other intraaxial tumors. This study presents a case of a 36-year-old woman with intraspinal extradual CSM at the thoracolumbar spine. She experienced persistent weakness, progressive numbness, and sensory disturbance in the right lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patient revealed an irregular cystic mass at the thoracic 11 to lumbar 3 levels dorsally. This case was misdiagnosed as other neoplasms prior to surgery because of the atypical radiographic features and location of the tumor. Extradural CSMs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraspinal extradural cystic neoplasms. Complete removal of cystic wall provides an optimal outcome, rendering the lesion curable.

  3. Posterior Fixation Techniques in the Subaxial Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ghori, Ahmer; Makanji, Heeren; Cha, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the historical context, indications, techniques, and complications of four posterior fixation techniques to stabilize the subaxial cervical spine. Specifically, posterior wiring, laminar screw fixation, lateral mass fixation, and pedicle screw fixation are among the common methods of operative fixation of the subaxial cervical spine. While wiring and laminar screw fixation are now rarely used, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation are technically challenging and present the risk of significant complications if performed incorrectly. With a sound understanding of anatomy and rigorous preoperative evaluation of bony structures, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation provide a safe and reliable method for subaxial cervical spine fixation. PMID:26594602

  4. Prevention of postoperative pain and of epidural fibrosis after lumbar microdiscectomy: pilot study in a series of forty cases treated with epidural vaseline-sterile-oil-morphine compound.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, Luciano; Pappagallo, Marco; Tatta, Carlo; Roperto, Raffaelino; Elsawaf, Ahmed; Ferrante, Luigi

    2008-06-15

    At the end of lumbar microdiscectomy, we administered an emulsion of low-dose epidural morphine and vaseline sterile-oil as carrier for morphine delivery. To evaluate safety and analgesic efficacy of this compound and the impact on long-term epidural scar production. Epidural analgesia has been used with lumbar microdiscectomy for facilitating management of postoperative pain, shortening patients' hospital stay and recovery time, and increasing the satisfaction rate. Several products have been used as barrier against the development of epidural fibrosis after lumbar procedures, to improve long-term outcome. Two milligrams of morphine mixed with 2 mL of vaseline sterile-oil have been epidurally administered to 40 consecutive patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy, evaluating safety and analgesic effectiveness of the compound and the incidence of epidural fibrosis at clinical and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scan follow-up. Outcome measures included (1) visual analog scale (VAS) to assess the intensity of spontaneous low back and radicular pain, (2) straight-leg-raising maneuver to assess the degrees of leg elevation in relation to evoked-sciatic pain, (3) postoperative time to comfortable ambulation, (4) duration of postoperative hospitalization, (5) required amount of postoperative analgesics, (6) postoperative work time loss, and (7) follow-up lumbar magnetic resonance imaging or segmental computed tomography with contrast medium for quantitative evaluation of postoperative epidural fibrosis. Neither intraoperative nor postoperative clinically relevant adverse events, such as urinary retention, respiratory disturbances, or wound infections, were observed. At hospital discharge, patients showed a low pain intensity score (mean VAS 11.3 mm +/- 0.88; mean straight-leg-raising 64.9 degrees +/- 14.6), with low consumption of analgesics (31.2% in hospital, 35% at home). Mean hospital stay was 1.21 +/- 0.17 days; mean postoperative work time loss

  5. Extensive spinal epidural abscess treated with "apical laminectomies" and irrigation of the epidural space: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Bi, Wenya Linda; Bahluyen, Biji; Rodriguez, Samuel T; Groff, Michael W; Chi, John H

    2015-03-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare but often devastating infection of the epidural space around the spinal cord. When an SEA is widespread, extensive decompression with laminectomy is often impossible, as it may subject the patient to very long operative times, extensive blood loss, and mechanical instability. A technique called "skip laminectomy" has been described in the literature, in which laminectomies are performed at the rostral and caudal ends of an abscess that spans 3-5 levels and a Fogarty catheter is used to mechanically drain the abscess, much like in an embolectomy. In this report of 2 patients, the authors present a modification of this technique, which they call "apical laminectomies" to allow for irrigation and drainage of an extensive SEA spanning the entire length of the vertebral column (C1-2 to L5-S1). Two patients presented with cervico-thoraco-lumbar SEA. Laminectomies were performed at the natural apices of the spine, namely, at the midcervical, midthoracic, and midlumbar spine levels. Next, a pediatric feeding tube was inserted in the epidural space from the thoracic laminectomies up toward the cervical laminectomy site and down toward the lumbar laminectomy site, and saline antibiotics were used to irrigate the SEA. Both patients underwent this procedure with no adverse effects. Their SEAs resolved both clinically and radiologically. Neither patient suffered from mechanical instability at 1 year after treatment. For patients who present with extensive SEAs, apical laminectomies seem to allow for surgical cure of the infectious burden and do not subject the patient to extended operating room time, an increased risk of blood loss, and the risk of mechanical instability.

  6. [YouTube as an information source of spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Tulgar, Serkan; Selvi, Onur; Serifsoy, Talat Ercan; Senturk, Ozgur; Ozer, Zeliha

    Social media as YouTube have become a part of daily life and many studies evaluated health-related YouTube videos. Our aim was to evaluate videos available on YouTube for the conformity to textbook information and their sufficiency as a source for patient information. A search of the YouTube website was performed using the keywords "spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia". Firstly, 180 videos were evaluated and the characteristics of the video were noted, and the features of the video too were noted if the video was regarding neuraxial anesthesia. Questionnaire 1 (Q1) evaluating the video quality relating to neuraxial anesthesia was designed using a textbook as reference and questionnaire 2 (Q2) was designed for evaluating patient information. After exclusions, 40 videos were included in the study. There was no difference in Q1 or Q2 scores when videos were grouped into 4 quarters according to their appearance order, time since upload or views to length rate (p>0.05). There was no statistical difference between Q1 or Q2 scores for spinal, epidural or combined videos (p>0.05). Videos prepared by a healthcare institute have a higher score in both Questionnaires 1 and 2 (10.87±4.28 vs. 5.84±2.90, p=0.044 and 3.89±5.43 vs. 1.19±3.35, p=0.01 respectively). Videos prepared by institutes, societies, etc. were of higher educational value, but were still very lacking. Videos should be prepared in adherence to available and up-to-date guidelines taking into consideration appropriate step by step explanation of each procedure, patient safety and frequently asked questions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Intrathecal Catheterization by Epidural Catheter: Management of Accidental Dural Puncture and Prophylaxis of PDPH.

    PubMed

    Jadon, Ashok; Chakraborty, Swastika; Sinha, Neelam; Agrawal, Rajiv

    2009-02-01

    Accidental or inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anaesthesia results in high incidence of post dural puncture headache (PDPH). Spinal or intrathecal catheter in such a situation, provides a conduit for administration of appropriate local anaesthetic for rapid onset of intraoperative surgical anaesthesia and postoperative pain relief. This procedure prevents PDPH if catheter left in situ for > 24 hrs and also avoids the associated risks with a repeat attempts at epidural analgesia. Primary aim of this study was to observe the effect of spinal catheter on incidence of PDPH, and to assess early and delayed complications of spinal catheterization by epidural catheter. In prospective clinical study 34 patients who had accidental dural puncture during epidural anaesthesia were included. The catheter meant for epidural use was inserted in spinal space and used for spinal anaesthesia and postoperative analgesia. Catheter was removed between 24-36hrs after surgery. The incidence of accidental dural puncture was 4%(34/846). Two patients 5.88% (2/34) had transient paresthesia during spinal catheter insertion. Post dural puncture headache occurred in 11.76% (4/34) patients. Two patients required epidural blood patch and two patients were managed with conservative treatment. No patient had any serious intraoperative or postoperative side effects. Epidural catheter can be used as spinal catheter to manage accidental dural puncture without serious complications, and it also prevents PDPH.

  8. Spinal epidural abscess following glossectomy and neck dissection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Esther; Thorpe, Eric; Borrowdale, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon but potentially life threatening entity that rarely occurs after otolaryngology procedures. Presentation of case We report a case of a diabetic patient who presented with a lumbar spinal epidural abscess eight days after head and neck oncologic surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an L4 spinal epidural abscess. Cultures from the spinal epidural abscess, blood, urine, and the previous neck incision grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient recovered neurologic function after surgical decompression and drainage, long-term intravenous antibiotics, and physical therapy. Discussion The development of postoperative spinal epidural abscess is rare after otolaryngology procedures but has been reported in the cervical epidural space. To our knowledge, lumbar spinal epidural abscess has not yet been reported after head and neck oncologic surgery. Even more unique is the presence of the pathogen K. pneumoniae. Conclusion A high index of suspicion of this potential outcome is paramount as early recognition and intervention are keys to recovery of neurologic function. PMID:26799413

  9. [Labor management using epidural anesthesia in a gravida patient with high spinal injury].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Keiko; Tsuda, Katsuya; Ueda, Sawako; Ueda, Naoyuki; Kano, Tatsuhiko

    2006-09-01

    Since autonomic hyperreflexia (AH) is a serious complication during labor in a gravida with spinal cord injury, anesthetic measures should be taken for the suppression of AH even in a sensory-loss condition. Several reports have described various methods for the suppression of AH, in which epidural anesthesia has been advocated as a useful means for the prevention or amelioration of AH. However, it is difficult to evaluate the efficacy of epidural anesthesia due to the lack of sensory and motor functions. We report a primipara who had spinal cord injury below the T 3 level at the age of 17 due to a traffic accident and underwent successful vaginal delivery twice under epidural anesthesia at the ages of 30 and 32. For the first delivery, we placed two epidural catheters. We controlled the rate and the content of epidural infusion through the two different injection sites so as to meet delivery process. For the second delivery we did epidural anesthesia in the same way. Tubal-ligation was also performed under epidural anesthesia after the second delivery. No major obstetric complication including AH occurred in either of delivery. The woman with high spinal injury could have two healthy children without major complications during labor by the cooperation of gynecologists and anesthesiologists.

  10. Reduction of epidural scar adhesion by topical application of simvastatin after laminectomy in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Yan, L-Q; Liang, Y; Li, X-L; Cao, X-J; Lu, C

    2015-01-01

    Epidural scar adhesion is one of the major causes of the failed back surgery syndrome after laminectomy. Recent studies have shown that simvastatin has potent anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory properties. This study evaluates the effect of the topical application of simvastatin on reducing epidural scar adhesion after laminectomy in rats. Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, chitosan and simvastatin group. After laminectomy was performed at L1 level, simvastatin and chitosan were applied to the laminectomy sites. The control group received no additional treatment. Four weeks later, the rats were killed and the epidural adhesion was evaluated by macroscopic assessment, hydroxyproline content analysis and histological analysis. The number of fibroblasts and the optical density of the collagen were also determined. The results showed that simvastatin could reduce epidural scar adhesion in rats. Little epidural adhesions were seen in the laminectomy sites treated with simvastatin. The hydroxyproline content, the number of fibroblasts and the optical density of the collagen in the simvastatin group were significantly less than those of the chitosan and control group. However, dense epidural adhesion was found in control group. Topical application of simvastatin could reduce epidural scar adhesion after laminectomy in rats. Further research is necessary to determine the optimal dosage and the safety of simvastatin.

  11. Thoracic epidural catheter placement using a paramedian approach with cephalad angulation in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Franci, Paolo; Leece, Elizabeth A; Corletto, Federico

    2012-10-01

    To describe a technique for insertion of a thoracic epidural catheter. Clinical report. Dogs (n = 3) undergoing thoracic wall resection and thoracotomy. A paramedian approach with cephalic angulation was used to place a 24-g epidural catheter in 3 dogs. Dogs 1 and 2 had left caudal thoracic wall resection and dog 3 had left thoracotomy. In dog 1, the epidural catheter was inserted at L2-L3 intervertebral space and the tip of the catheter advanced to the level of T13 vertebral body. In dog 2, the epidural catheter was inserted at T12-T13 intervertebral space and the tip of the catheter was advanced to the level of T8 vertebral body. In dog 3, the epidural catheter was inserted at T13-L1 intervertebral space and its tip advanced until reaching the vertebral body of T10. All dogs were administered a combination of bupivacaine and morphine through the epidural catheter to provide intra- and postoperative analgesia. The peridural space was identified and the tip of the catheter was positioned where intended in all dogs. Dog 1 developed transient Horner's syndrome and dog 3 required intraoperative fentanyl during the first part of the procedure. Paramedian approach with cephalad angulation is a suitable technique to place thoracic epidural catheters in dogs. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  12. Persistent post-dural-puncture headache treated with epidural infusion of dextran.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A

    1994-05-01

    A retrospective review was done on medical records of 13 patients with persistent post-dural-puncture headaches after one or more epidural blood patches. Headache occurred in nine patients with post-laminectomy syndrome after "wet taps" while performing epidural blocks. In two patients post-dural-puncture headache appeared after long term implanted intrathecal catheters were removed. In two other cases headache developed after spinal anesthesia. Treatment included bed rest, intravenous hydration and at least one epidural blood patch; three patients were given 60 milliliters of epidural saline, without success. Eight epidural catheters were inserted through the lumbar access and five through the caudal approach. Initially, a bolus of 20 milliliters of dextran-40 was given followed by an infusion of 3 mL/hr, until 12 hours after the head pain and any other related symptoms subsided. In all patients the headache disappeared within 20 hours after initiating therapy (9.55 mean hours, SD +/- 0.79). In five patients headache ceased in less than five hours. Nausea and photo-phobia subsided earlier. Patients with post-dural-puncture headache resistant to other treatments, including at least one epidural blood patch, were successfully treated by a bolus followed by continuous epidural infusion of dextran-40.

  13. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of Irish practice.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, A; Omer, W; Harmon, D

    2014-06-01

    Currently, we do not have a national standard regarding epidural consent in Ireland. The aim of this survey was to assess practice in obstetric units in Ireland with regard to obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and whether the risks discussed with women are being documented. A postal survey of anaesthetists in Irish obstetric units was performed in January 2012 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 16/18 (88%). There was major variation both in which risks are discussed with women in labour and what risks are quoted. The most frequently quoted risks were headache--15/16 (93.8% of the respondents), partially/not working epidural--15/16 (93.8%), drop in blood pressure--14/16 (87.5%) and temporary backache/local tenderness--12/16 (75%). The more serious risks were not discussed as frequently: permanent nerve damage--8/16 (50%), paralysis--8/16 (50%), epidural abscess/haematoma--6/16 (37.5%), meningitis--3/16 (18.7%). The vast majority of respondents supported introduction of a national standardised information leaflet, detailing all the benefits and risks of epidural analgesia, to be shown to all women before consenting to epidural insertion.

  14. The fetal occiput posterior position: state of the science and a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Penny

    2010-03-01

    The fetal occiput posterior position poses challenges in every aspect of intrapartum care-prevention, diagnosis, correction, supportive care, labor management, and delivery. Maternal and newborn outcomes are often worse and both physical and psychological traumas are more common than with fetal occiput anterior positions. The purpose of this paper is to describe nine prevailing concepts that guide labor and birth management with an occiput posterior fetus, and summarize evidence to clarify the state of the science. A search was conducted of the databases of PubMed and the Cochrane Library. Additional valuable information was obtained from obstetric and midwifery textbooks, books and websites for the public, conversations with maternity care professionals, and years of experience as a doula. Nine prevailing concepts are as follows: (1) prenatal maneuvers rotate the occiput posterior fetus to occiput anterior; (2) it is possible to detect the occiput posterior fetus prenatally; (3) a fetus who is occiput anterior at the onset of labor will remain in that position throughout labor; (4) back pain in labor is a reliable sign of an occiput posterior fetus; (5) the occiput posterior fetus can be identified during labor by digital vaginal examination; (6) an ultrasound scan is a reliable way to detect fetal position; (7) maternal positions facilitate rotation of the occiput posterior fetus; (8) epidural analgesia facilitates rotation; (9) manual rotation of the fetal head to occiput anterior improves the rate of occiput anterior deliveries. Concepts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 have little scientific support whereas concepts 6, 7, and 9 are supported by promising evidence. Many current obstetric practices with respect to the occiput posterior position are unsatisfactory, resulting in failure to identify and correct the problem and thus contributing to high surgical delivery rates and traumatic births. The use of ultrasound examination to identify fetal position is a method that is

  15. Distortions of posterior visual space.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Flip; Voshell, Martin G

    2009-01-01

    The study of spatial vision is a long and well traveled road (which, of course, converges to a vanishing point at the horizon). Its various distortions have been widely investigated empirically, and most concentrate, pragmatically, on the space anterior to the observer. The visual world behind the observer has received relatively less attention and it is this perspective the current experiments address. Our results show systematic perceptual distortions in the posterior visual world when viewed statically. Under static viewing conditions, observer's perceptual representation was consistently 'spread' in a hyperbolic fashion. Directions to distant, peripheral locations were consistently overestimated by about 11 degrees from the ground truth and this variability increased as the target was moved toward the center of the observer's back. The perceptual representation of posterior visual space is, no doubt, secondary to the more immediate needs of the anterior visual world. Still, it is important in some domains including certain sports, such as rowing, and in vehicular navigation.

  16. Epidural hematomas after the implantation of thoracic paddle spinal cord stimulators.

    PubMed

    Moufarrij, Nazih A

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE There is little information on the frequency of symptomatic epidural hematomas after the implantation of paddle spinal cord stimulators (SCSs) in the thoracic spine. The purpose of this paper is to provide this metric and compare it to the frequency of symptomatic epidural hematomas for all other thoracic laminectomies combined. METHODS This study involved retrospectively analyzing the experience of a single surgeon in a consecutive series of patients who underwent the implantation of a thoracic paddle SCS with respect to the occurrence of a symptomatic epidural hematoma. For comparison, the occurrence of a symptomatic epidural hematoma in non-SCS thoracic laminectomies done during the same period of time was determined. RESULTS One hundred fifty-four thoracic paddle SCSs were implanted between May 2002 and February 2015. Despite perfect hemostasis and no preoperative risk factors, 4 of 154 patients (2.60%) developed postoperative lower-extremity weakness caused by an epidural hematoma. There were no other causes of a neurological deficit. In 3 of the 4 patients, the symptoms were delayed. Over the same time period, only 1 of 119 patients (0.84%) developed a postoperative motor deficit from a symptomatic epidural hematoma after a non-SCS laminectomy. CONCLUSIONS The occurrence of epidural hematomas after thoracic paddle SCS implantation may be underreported. Suggestions are given to decrease its incidence. It seems paradoxical that an epidural hematoma occurred 3 times more often after small SCS thoracic laminectomies than after larger non-SCS thoracic laminectomies. If confirmed by future studies, this finding may suggest that the intrusion of instruments into a confined epidural sublaminar space or the presence of a paddle and a hematoma in this restricted space may account for this differential.

  17. Efficacy of Epidural Injections in the Treatment of Lumbar Central Spinal Stenosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan David; Manchikanti, Kavita; Boswell, Mark; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Hirsch, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lumbar central spinal stenosis is common and often results in chronic persistent pain and disability, which can lead to multiple interventions. After the failure of conservative treatment, either surgical or nonsurgical modalities such as epidural injections are contemplated in the management of lumbar spinal stenosis. Evidence Acquisition: Recent randomized trials, systematic reviews and guidelines have reached varying conclusions about the efficacy of epidural injections in the management of central lumbar spinal stenosis. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of all three anatomical epidural injection approaches (caudal, interlaminar, and transforaminal) in the treatment of lumbar central spinal stenosis. A systematic review was performed on randomized trials published from 1966 to July 2014 of all types of epidural injections used in the management of lumbar central spinal stenosis. Methodological quality assessment and grading of the evidence was performed. Results: The evidence in managing lumbar spinal stenosis is Level II for long-term improvement for caudal and lumbar interlaminar epidural injections. For transforaminal epidural injections, the evidence is Level III for short-term improvement only. The interlaminar approach appears to be superior to the caudal approach and the caudal approach appears to be superior to the transforaminal one. Conclusions: The available evidence suggests that epidural injections with local anesthetic alone or with local anesthetic with steroids offer short- and long-term relief of low back and lower extremity pain for patients with lumbar central spinal stenosis. However, the evidence is Level II for the long-term efficacy of caudal and interlaminar epidural injections, whereas it is Level III for short-term improvement only with transforaminal epidural injections. PMID:25789241

  18. No association of labor epidural analgesia with cerebral palsy in children.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Graham, Jove H; Feng, Wen; Lewis, Meredith W; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Kirchner, H Lester

    2016-12-01

    Some pregnant women avoid labor epidural analgesia because of their concerns about risk of cerebral palsy in children. Although it is believed that labor epidural does not contribute to cerebral palsy, to our knowledge no study has been published to specifically address this concern. We carried out a retrospective case-control study to investigate whether labor epidural analgesia is associated with cerebral palsy in children. This study used data that were collected and entered into the Geisinger electronic health records between January 2004 and January 2013. During this period, 20,929 children were born at Geisinger hospitals. Among them, 50 children were diagnosed with cerebral palsy, and 20 of those were born vaginally. Each of these 20 cerebral palsy children was matched with up to 5 non-cerebral palsy children born at the same hospitals in the same timeframe using propensity scoring methods. Analgesia was classified as epidural (including epidural or combined spinal and epidural) or non-epidural. Conditional logistic regression was used to compare the percentages of deliveries with each analgesia type between the cerebral palsy and non-cerebral palsy groups. In the non-cerebral palsy group, the percentage of patients receiving labor epidural analgesia was 72 %, and in the cerebral palsy group the percentage was 45 %. There was no significant difference between non-cerebral palsy and cerebral palsy groups (odds ratio, 0.57; 95 % confidence interval, 0.14-2.24; p = 0.42). We found no association between the use of labor epidural analgesia and the occurrence of cerebral palsy in children.

  19. Outcome and complications of epidural analgesia in patients with chronic cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Smitt, P S; Tsafka, A; Teng-van de Zande, F; van der Holt, R; Elswijk-de Vries, I; Elfrink, E; van den Bent, M J; Vecht, C J

    1998-11-01

    Some cancer patients require invasive techniques for control of chronic cancer pain. Many patients have benefited from local administration of opioids and anesthetics through an epidural catheter. However, epidural abscess and meningitis are side effects of epidural catheters that have serious morbidity and mortality. In a retrospective study, the charts of all patients who received an epidural catheter for the management of chronic cancer pain in a 3-year period (1993-1996) were reviewed. Patients with nervous system infections were identified and pertinent clinical, radiologic (magnetic resonance imaging), and bacteriologic data were analyzed. Ninety-one patients received 137 epidural catheters for a total of 4326 catheter days. All but four patients had died at the time of the final analysis. The median survival after placement of the first epidural catheter was 38 days (range, 1 day--> 1000 days). Seventy-two patients received a percutaneous port whereas 19 patients were treated with an implanted subcutaneous port. Adequate pain relief was obtained in 76% of the 58 patients with nociceptive pain and in 73% of 33 patients with neuropathic pain. All neuropathic pain was associated with active tumor and could be classified as nociceptive nerve pain. Technical complications and superficial infections occurred in as many as 43% of patients. Deep infections occurred in 12 patients, 11 of whom had a spinal epidural abscess. Deep infection is a frequent complication of epidural analgesia and is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Only cancer patients with a short life expectancy (< or =3 months) should be treated with epidural analgesia.

  20. Nocardia spinal epidural abscess: 14-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    West, Kristoffer R; Mason, Robert C; Sun, Mike

    2012-01-16

    This article describes an immunocompetent patient with a spinal abscess that developed from Nocardia asteroides. Nocardia is a rare etiology for spinal abscesses, especially in immunocompetent patients. Nocardia usually affects the lungs and brain of immunocompromised individuals. Few reports of Nocardia involving bones or the spine have been published.The patient had a history of chronic back pain and had several procedures to alleviate the pain. In August 1997, the patient had an epidural block and a subsequent infection that was treated with antibiotics. In October 1997, she developed increasing back pain greater than her baseline chronic low back pain. Additional presenting symptoms were fever, chills, and nausea. On admission, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an epidural abscess. The patient underwent irrigation and debridement. Postoperatively, the patient was initially placed on broad-spectrum antibiotics. After 38 days, the culture was identified as N asteroides, and the patient was placed on appropriate antibiotics. The patient has been followed with MRI prior to the discovery of the abscess and annually since the abscess due to her baseline chronic low back pain. No residual abscess was discovered. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. An Active Learning Algorithm for Control of Epidural Electrostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Desautels, Thomas A.; Nandra, Mandheerej S.; Roy, Roland R.; Zhong, Hui; Tai, Yu-Chong; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Burdick, Joel W.

    2015-01-01

    Epidural electrostimulation has shown promise for spinal cord injury therapy. However, finding effective stimuli on the multi-electrode stimulating arrays employed requires a laborious manual search of a vast space for each patient. Widespread clinical application of these techniques would be greatly facilitated by an autonomous, algorithmic system which choses stimuli to simultaneously deliver effective therapy and explore this space. We propose a method based on GP-BUCB, a Gaussian process bandit algorithm. In n = 4 spinally transected rats, we implant epidural electrode arrays and examine the algorithm's performance in selecting bipolar stimuli to elicit specified muscle responses. These responses are compared with temporally interleaved, intra-animal stimulus selections by a human expert. GP-BUCB successfully controlled the spinal electrostimulation preparation in 37 testing sessions, selecting 670 stimuli. These sessions included sustained, autonomous operations (10 session duration). Delivered performance with respect to the specified metric was as good as or better than that of the human expert. Despite receiving no information as to anatomically likely locations of effective stimuli, GP-BUCB also consistently discovered such a pattern. Further, GP-BUCB was able to extrapolate from previous sessions’ results to make predictions about performance in new testing sessions, while remaining sufficiently flexible to capture temporal variability. These results provide validation for applying automated stimulus selection methods to the problem of spinal cord injury therapy. PMID:25974925

  2. Thoracic epidural steroid injection for rib fracture pain.

    PubMed

    Rauchwerger, Jacob J; Candido, Kenneth D; Deer, Timothy R; Frogel, Jonathan K; Iadevaio, Robert; Kirschen, Neil B

    2013-06-01

    Treatment for rib fracture pain can be broadly divided into pharmacologic approaches with oral and/or parenteral medication and interventional approaches utilizing neuraxial analgesia or peripheral nerve blocks to provide pain relief. Both approaches attempt to control nociceptive and neuropathic pain secondary to osseous injury and nerve insult, respectively. Success of treatment is ultimately measured by the ability of the selected modality to decrease pain, chest splinting, and to prevent sequelae of injury, such as pneumonia. Typically, opioids and NSAIDs are the drugs of first choice for acute pain because of ease of administration, immediate onset of action, and rapid titration to effect. In contrast, neuropathic pain medications have a slower onset of action and are more difficult to titrate to therapeutic effect. Interventional approaches include interpleural catheters, intercostal nerve blocks, paravertebral nerve blocks, and thoracic and lumbar epidural catheters. Each intervention has its own inherent advantages, disadvantages, and success rates. Rib fracture pain management practice is founded on the thoracic surgical and anesthesiology literature. Articles addressing rib fracture pain are relatively scarce in the pain medicine literature. As life expectancy increases, and as healthcare system modifications are implemented, pain medicine physicians may be consulted to treat increasing number of patients suffering rib fracture pain and may need to resort to novel therapeutic measures because of financial constraints imposed by those changes. Here we present the first published case series of thoracic epidural steroid injections used for management of rib fracture pain. © 2012 The Authors Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  3. [Clinical anesthetic effects of epidural ropivacaine with tramadol].

    PubMed

    Cai, Jin; Guo, Qu-Lian; Zou, Wang-Yuan

    2004-04-01

    To observe the anesthesic effects of epidural ropivacaine with tramadol during lower limbs surgery. Thirty patients (ASA I - II) scheduled for the lower limbs surgery were randomly divided into 2 groups with 15 patients in each group: group ropivacaine (R) and group ropivacaine with tramadol (T). The puncture was performed at the interspace of L2-3. Each patient was given 2% lidocaine 3 ml with 0.75% ropivacaine 10 ml which included NS 1 ml in Group R or tramadol 50 mg in Group T. The potency of analgesia, the time of sensation block to T12 and T10, the time to the highest plane of analgesia, the lasting time of analgesia, the degree of sedation, the degree of motor block, and the side effects were recorded and analyzed during anesthesia after the first dose. The time of sensation block which reached T12 and T10 and the time to the highest plane of analgesia decreased significantly in Group T than that in Group R (P < 0.05). The lasting time of analgesia in Group T was longer than that in Group R (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the potency of analgesia, the degree of sedation and motor block, and the side effects (P > 0.05). The epidural ropivacaine with tramadol enhanced the anesthetic effects of ropivacaine.

  4. Management of spinal epidural arteriovenous fistulas: interventional techniques and results.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Dinesh; Levitt, Michael R; Sekhar, Laligam N; Kim, Louis J; Hallam, Danial K; Ghodke, Basavaraj V

    2014-03-01

    Spinal epidural arteriovenous fistulas (SEDAVF) are rare and poorly understood clinical entities. We report a series of five (three men, two women) consecutive cases treated at our center to analyze their characteristic and treatment strategies in their management. We report a successful technique of percutaneous embolization of fistulas in a patient with failed previous attempts. All five patients were symptomatic; three patients presented with a history of back pain, which progressed to myelopathic symptoms, one patient had symptoms of persistent back pain, and one patient had intermittent numbness of the left arm and thigh. Of the three patients who had myelopathic symptoms, two were successfully treated with transarterial embolizations with Onyx copolymer. The third patient who had a prominent epidural venous pouch with numerous arterial feeders was embolized percutaneously with a flat detector CT guided navigation (XperCT) and real time fluoroscopic monitoring of the injected n-butyl cyanoacrylate glue, after previous unsuccessful attempts with surgery and arterial embolizations. All three myelopathic treated patients had complete angiographic remission of the fistulas and symptoms on follow-up (mean 7.2 months). The diagnosis and treatment of SEDAVF can be challenging due to their rarity and intricate pathomechanics. Patients with severe pain or progression of symptoms or myelopathic symptoms need to be treated at the earliest opportunity, while asymptomatic patients can be closely monitored. Percutaneous embolization is an effective strategy to embolize SEDAVF associated venous pouch.

  5. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease.

  6. An Active Learning Algorithm for Control of Epidural Electrostimulation.

    PubMed

    Desautels, Thomas A; Choe, Jaehoon; Gad, Parag; Nandra, Mandheerej S; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Tai, Yu-Chong; Edgerton, V Reggie; Burdick, Joel W

    2015-10-01

    Epidural electrostimulation has shown promise for spinal cord injury therapy. However, finding effective stimuli on the multi-electrode stimulating arrays employed requires a laborious manual search of a vast space for each patient. Widespread clinical application of these techniques would be greatly facilitated by an autonomous, algorithmic system which choses stimuli to simultaneously deliver effective therapy and explore this space. We propose a method based on GP-BUCB, a Gaussian process bandit algorithm. In n = 4 spinally transected rats, we implant epidural electrode arrays and examine the algorithm's performance in selecting bipolar stimuli to elicit specified muscle responses. These responses are compared with temporally interleaved intra-animal stimulus selections by a human expert. GP-BUCB successfully controlled the spinal electrostimulation preparation in 37 testing sessions, selecting 670 stimuli. These sessions included sustained autonomous operations (ten-session duration). Delivered performance with respect to the specified metric was as good as or better than that of the human expert. Despite receiving no information as to anatomically likely locations of effective stimuli, GP-BUCB also consistently discovered such a pattern. Further, GP-BUCB was able to extrapolate from previous sessions' results to make predictions about performance in new testing sessions, while remaining sufficiently flexible to capture temporal variability. These results provide validation for applying automated stimulus selection methods to the problem of spinal cord injury therapy.

  7. The morphology and clinical significance of the dorsal meningovertebra ligaments in the cervical epidural space.

    PubMed

    Shi, Benchao; Zheng, Xuefeng; Min, Shaoxiong; Zhou, Zhilai; Ding, Zihai; Jin, Anmin

    2014-11-01

    The dural sac is anchored within the vertebral canal by connective tissue called meningovertebral ligaments in the epidural space. During flavectomy and laminectomy, inadvertent disruption of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments may lead to dura laceration and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks. All the described dorsal meningovertebral ligaments were located in the lumbar region. A rare study is available about dorsal meningovertebral ligaments of the cervical spinal dura to the adjacent vertebrae. To identify and describe the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments at each cervical level and discuss their clinical significance. A dissection-based study of 22 embalmed cadavers. The anatomy was studied in 22 whole cervical cadavers (11 females, 11 males), prepared with formaldehyde, whose ages at the time of death ranged from 55 to 78 years. The vertebral canal was divided to expose the dural sac and the spinal nerve roots. At all levels of the cervical vertebra, the morphology, quantity, origin, insertion, and spatial orientation of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments were determined and the length, width or diameter, and thickness of the ligaments were measured with vernier calipers. The dorsal meningovertebral ligaments in the cervical region anchored the posterior dural sac to the ligamentum flavum or laminae. The number of attachment points on the ligamentum flavum was relatively larger than that on the lamina, and the occurrence rate of dorsal meningovertebral ligaments was 100% at C1-C2 and C4--C5. The thickest ligaments were observed at the C1 and C2 vertebrae. The length of the ligaments varied from 1.50 to 35.22 mm, and the orientation of the ligaments mostly was craniocaudal. The morphology of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments was divided into four types: strip type, cord type, grid type, and thin slice type. In the cervical spine, the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments exist between the posterior dural sac and the ligamentum flavum or lamina. The dorsal

  8. Tachyphylaxis associated with repeated epidural injections of lidocaine is not related to changes in distribution or the rate of elimination from the epidural space

    SciTech Connect

    Mogensen, T.; Simonsen, L.; Scott, N.B.; Henriksen, J.H.; Kehlet, H. )

    1989-08-01

    The relationship between tachyphylaxis (measured as a decrease in the rate of regression of sensory levels of analgesia) during repeated epidural injections of lidocaine and both the distribution of lidocaine within the epidural space (as measured by spread of simultaneous injection of the tracer technetium-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA)) and elimination of lidocaine from the epidural space (as measured by serum concentrations of lidocaine) was investigated in 18 patients undergoing minor surgery during lumbar epidural analgesia. Twelve patients received four injections of 20 mL of 2% lidocaine at 2-hr intervals. Epidural distribution was assessed by injection of 99mTc-DTPA diluted in saline on the preoperative day and diluted in an equal volume of 2% lidocaine on the morning before surgery and again after the fourth injection of lidocaine 6 hr later. The distribution of 99mTc-DTPA in the epidural space was unchanged during the three measurements despite significant tachyphylaxis in both sensory analgesia and motor blockade (11 of 12 patients had sensory analgesia 2 hr after the first injection in contrast to only 3 of 12 patients during the third injection). In another six patients 20 mL of 2% lidocaine were injected three times at 2-hr intervals before surgery, with measurements of serum concentrations of lidocaine after the first and last injections. Despite tachyphylaxis (no patient had sensory analgesia 2 hr after the third injection), there was no difference in the rate of disappearance of lidocaine from the epidural space as assessed by plasma lidocaine concentration curves during the first and third injection (0.5 +/- 0.1 and 0.3 +/- 0.04 microgram.mL-1.min-1, respectively).

  9. Cervical spontaneous epidural hematoma as a complication of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, L; Carletti, S; Frondizi, D; Spera, C; Maira, G

    1996-01-01

    Epidural hematoma is a rare cause of spinal cord compression, which usually provokes severe neurological deficits. It is presumed to originate from venous or, more probably, arterial bleeding. Thrombocytopenia and other disorders of coagulation may precipitate the onset of epidural hematoma and facilitate the evolution of the disease. We report the case of a patient suffering from a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with severe thrombocytopenia during a MACOP-B schedule, who presented with a spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma. We discuss the etiopathological aspects, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare cause of acute cervical spinal cord compression.

  10. Fracture of epidural catheter: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Reena; Vikram, A

    2017-01-01

    Epidural blocks are a very important part of the anesthetic armamentarium. Among some of the known complications, fracture of epidural catheter, though is extremely rare, is a well-established entity. When it happens, it leaves the anesthesiologist puzzled and worried. We describe the occurrence of such an event where epidural catheter broke during insertion since it will also add to such an under-reported complication of a very commonly performed procedure. A brief review is also done which will delineate the recommendations for the prevention and management of such an event. PMID:28217068

  11. Neurogenic claudication without spinal stenosis arising as a result of lumbar epidural varices.

    PubMed

    Dabasia, H; Rahim, N; Marshall, R

    2012-09-01

    Neurogenic claudication is most frequently observed in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. We describe a patient with lumbar epidural varices secondary to obstruction of the inferior vena cava by pathological lymph nodes presenting with this syndrome. Following a diagnosis of follicular lymphoma, successful chemotherapy led to the resolution of the varices and the symptoms of neurogenic claudication. The lumbar epidural venous plexus may have an important role in the pathogenesis of spinal stenosis. Although rare, epidural venous engorgement can induce neurogenic claudication without spinal stenosis. Further investigations should be directed at identifying an underlying cause.

  12. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess in a 21-month-old child.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tyler J; Seamon, Jason P

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous epidural abscess formation is a rare finding in all populations and even more so in the pediatric population. Its rarity and varied presentations often lead to misdiagnosis. We present a pediatric case in which the diagnosis of spontaneous spinal epidural abscess was missed upon initial presentation and subsequently identified at a later visit to the emergency department. Literature suggests utilizing three simple physical exam findings that may improve the first visit diagnosis of spontaneous epidural abscesses in children. Findings of any two of the following signs should guide the clinician to consider SEA as a possibility prior to discharge: fever, back or neck pain, extremity weakness or inability to walk.

  13. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Suppression and Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome as a Complication of Epidural Steroid Injections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections are well accepted as a treatment for radicular back pain in appropriate candidates. While overall incidence of systemic side effects has not been well established, at least five biochemically proven cases of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome have been reported as complications of epidural steroid treatment. We present an additional case of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome and adrenal suppression in a middle-aged woman who received three epidural steroid injections over a four-month period. We review this case in the context of previous cases and discuss diagnostic and management issues. PMID:23991341

  14. Mechanisms and management of an incomplete epidural block for cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, Dmitry; Vadhera, Rakesh B

    2003-03-01

    Epidural blockade is an important option for anesthesia in parturients undergoing abdominal delivery. Despite the multiple benefits of this method, there is at least one significant downside--a relatively high occurrence of unsatisfactory anesthesia that requires intervention. Depending on the presumed mechanism of epidural block failure and other clinically relevant factors (e.g., timing of diagnosis, urgency of the procedure, and so forth), certain effective measures are recommended to successfully manage this demanding situation. In general, it is important to make every effort to make the pre-existing epidural effective or replace it with another regional technique, because overall, regional anesthesia is associated with significantly lower maternal mortality. It is important to identify a dysfunctional epidural block preoperatively before a maximum volume of local anesthetic has been administered. If catheter manipulation does not produce substantial improvement, and there is no time constraint, it is safe and reasonable to replace the epidural catheter. However, risks associated with excessive volume of local anesthetic should be kept in mind. Additional epidural injections or a second catheter placement might be considered under special circumstances. Single-shot spinal anesthesia after a failed epidural may provide fast onset and reliable surgical anesthesia. Available data, although limited and contradictory, suggest the possibility of unpredictably high or total spinal anesthesia. Many authors, however, believe that appropriate precautions and modifications in technique make this a safe alternative. These modifications include limiting the amount of epidural local anesthetic administered when diagnosing a nonfunctioning epidural and decreasing the dose of intrathecal local anesthetic by 20% to 30%. If there is no documented block when the spinal is inserted, and more than 30 minutes have passed from the last epidural dose, it is probably safe to use a

  15. Essential Thrombocytosis and Labor Epidural Placement While on Aspirin: Assessing Hemorrhagic Risks: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Paul Martin

    2017-09-15

    Essential thrombocytosis (ET) is a rare disease with known thrombotic and bleeding complications. We encountered a patient with a diagnosis of longstanding Janus kinase-2 gene-negative ET on aspirin therapy presenting for labor epidural. Evaluation of platelet function with point-of-care analysis using Plateletworks in a community hospital setting allowed confirmation of adequate numbers of functional platelets to support safe epidural placement. The relevant issues of ET for anesthesia management with labor epidurals are discussed. Unique, relevant, and unexpected findings from the platelet function testing are presented.

  16. Spinal Myoclonus Developed during Cervical Epidural Drug Infusion in Postherpetic Neuralgia Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Younghoon; Baek, Sung Uk

    2011-01-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most frequent complication of herpes zoster. Treatment of this neuropathic pain syndrome is difficult and often disappointing. Although postherpetic neuralgia is generally a self-limited condition, it can last indefinitely. Continuous epidural blockade for patients with acute zoster can shorten the duration of treatment. However, continuous epidural block has some complications such as infection, dural puncture, and total spinal and nerve damages. We report a case of myoclonus during continuous epidural block with ropivacaine, morphine, and ketamine in an acute zoster patient. PMID:21935497

  17. Spinal Myoclonus Developed during Cervical Epidural Drug Infusion in Postherpetic Neuralgia Patient.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Younghoon; Baek, Sung Uk; Yeo, Jin Seok

    2011-09-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most frequent complication of herpes zoster. Treatment of this neuropathic pain syndrome is difficult and often disappointing. Although postherpetic neuralgia is generally a self-limited condition, it can last indefinitely. Continuous epidural blockade for patients with acute zoster can shorten the duration of treatment. However, continuous epidural block has some complications such as infection, dural puncture, and total spinal and nerve damages. We report a case of myoclonus during continuous epidural block with ropivacaine, morphine, and ketamine in an acute zoster patient.

  18. Posterior arch C-1 screw technique: a cadaveric comparison study.

    PubMed

    Moisi, Marc; Fisahn, Christian; Tkachenko, Lara; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Reintjes, Stephen; Grunert, Peter; Norvell, Daniel C; Tubbs, R Shane; Page, Jeni; Newell, David W; Nora, Peter; Oskouian, Rod J; Chapman, Jens

    2017-03-17

    OBJECTIVE Posterior atlantoaxial stabilization and fusion using C-1 lateral mass screw fixation has become commonly used in the treatment of instability and for reconstructive indications since its introduction by Goel and Laheri in 1994 and modification by Harms in 2001. Placement of such lateral mass screws can be challenging because of the proximity to the spinal cord, vertebral artery, an extensive venous plexus, and the C-2 nerve root, which overlies the designated starting point on the posterior center of the lateral mass. An alternative posterior access point starting on the posterior arch of C-1 could provide a C-2 nerve root-sparing starting point for screw placement, with the potential benefit of greater directional control and simpler trajectory. The authors present a cadaveric study comparing an alternative strategy (i.e., a C-1 screw with a posterior arch starting point) to the conventional strategy (i.e., using the lower lateral mass entry site), specifically assessing the safety of screw placement to preserve the C-2 nerve root. METHODS Five US-trained spine fellows instrumented 17 fresh human cadaveric heads using the Goel/Harms C-1 lateral mass (GHLM) technique on the left and the posterior arch lateral mass (PALM) technique on the right, under fluoroscopic guidance. After screw placement, a CT scan was obtained on each specimen to assess for radiographic screw placement accuracy. Four faculty spine surgeons, blinded to the surgeon who instrumented the cadaver, independently graded the quality of screw placement using a modified Upendra classification. RESULTS Of the 17 specimens, the C-2 nerve root was anatomically impinged in 13 (76.5%) of the specimens. The GHLM technique was graded Type 1 or 2, which is considered "acceptable," in 12 specimens (70.6%), and graded Type 3 or 4 ("unacceptable") in 5 specimens (29.4%). In contrast, the PALM technique had 17 (100%) of 17 graded Type 1 or 2 (p = 0.015). There were no vertebral artery injuries found

  19. Comparison of loss of resistance technique between Epidrum® and conventional method for identifying the epidural space

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon Wook; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Soo Hwan; Chung, Mi Hwa; Choi, Young Ryong

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidrum® is a recently developed, air operated, loss of resistance (LOR) device for identifying the epidural space. We investigated the usefulness of Epidrum® by comparing it with the conventional LOR technique for identifying the epidural space. Methods One hundred eight American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II patients between the ages of 17 and 68 years old and who were scheduled for elective surgery under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomized into two groups: one group received epidural anesthesia by the conventional LOR technique (C group) and the second group received epidural anesthesia using Epidrum® (ED group). While performing epidural anesthesia, the values of variables were recorded, including the number of failures, more than 2 attempts, the incidence of dural puncture, the time needed to locate the epidural space, the distance from the skin to the epidural space and ease of performance, and the satisfaction scores. Results The ED group showed a lower failure rate, fewer cases of more than 2 attempts, a lesser time to identify the epidural space, and better ease and satisfaction scores of procedure than the C group, with statistical significance. Conclusions Using Epidrum® compared to the conventional LOR technique is an easy, rapid, and reliable method for identifying the epidural space. PMID:22558497

  20. Single-stage Anterior and Posterior Fusion Surgery for Correction of Cervical Kyphotic Deformity Using Intervertebral Cages and Cervical Lateral Mass Screws: Postoperative Changes in Total Spine Sagittal Alignment in Three Cases with a Minimum Follow-up of Five Years

    PubMed Central

    OGIHARA, Satoshi; KUNOGI, Junichi

    The surgical treatment of cervical kyphotic deformity remains challenging. As a surgical method that is safer and avoids major complications, the authors present a procedure of single-stage anterior and posterior fusion to correct cervical kyphosis using anterior interbody fusion cages without plating, as illustrated by three consecutive cases. Case 1 was a 78-year-old woman who presented with a dropped head caused by degeneration of her cervical spine. Case 2 was a 54-year-old woman with athetoid cerebral palsy. She presented with cervical myelopathy and cervical kyphosis. Case 3 was a 71-year-old woman with cervical kyphotic deformity following a laminectomy. All three patients underwent anterior release and interbody fusion with cages and posterior fusion with cervical lateral mass screw (LMS) fixation. Postoperative radiographs showed that correction of kyphosis was 39° in case 1, 43° in case 2, and 39° in case 3. In all three cases, improvement of symptoms was established without major perioperative complications, solid fusion was achieved, and no loss of correction was observed at a minimum follow-up of 61 months. We also report that preoperative total spine sagittal malalignment was improved after corrective surgery for cervical kyphosis and was maintained at the latest follow-up in all three cases. The combination of anterior fusion cages and LMS is considered a safe and effective procedure in cases of severe cervical kyphotic deformity. Preoperative total spine sagittal malalignment improved, accompanied by correction of cervical kyphosis, and was maintained at last follow-up in all three cases. PMID:26119893

  1. Posterior commissure of the human larynx revisited.

    PubMed

    Tucker, John A; Tucker, Sean T

    2010-05-01

    The existence of the posterior commissure (PC) of the human larynx has been disputed (Hirano M, Sato K, et al. The posterior glottis. Trans Am Laryngol Assoc. 1986;107:70-75). "The term posterior commissure has no relevance to anatomical structure. The term commissure means a joining together. The bilateral vocal folds never join at their posterior ends. The posterior aspect of the glottis is a wall. The posterior lateral aspect of the posterior glottis is also the lateral wall of the posterior glottis" (Hirano M, Sato K, et al. The posterior glottis. Trans Am Laryngol Assoc. 1986;107:70-75). This study is intended to clarify the development of anatomical and morphological aspects of the PC in conjunction with a clinical classification of the larynx in sagittal view. This study uses human embryo and fetal laryngeal sections from the Carnegie Collection of Human Embryos (the world standard) and whole organ laryngeal sections from the Tucker Laryngeal Fetal Collection. Correlation of histologic and gross anatomical structure is made with the Hirano et al atlas, the Vidić Photographic Atlas of the Human Body, and the O'Rahilly Embryonic Atlas. Embryologic data clearly describe and illustrate the posterior union of the cricoid cartilage with formation of the PC. The anatomical functional aspects of the posterior lateral cricoid lamina as the supporting buttress of the articulating arytenoid cartilages are illustrated.

  2. An Update on Drugs Used for Lumbosacral Epidural Anesthesia and Analgesia in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Steagall, Paulo V. M.; Simon, Bradley T.; Teixeira Neto, Francisco J.; Luna, Stelio P. L.

    2017-01-01

    This review aims to report an update on drugs administered into the epidural space for anesthesia and analgesia in dogs, describing their potential advantages and disadvantages in the clinical setting. Databases searched include Pubmed, Google scholar, and CAB abstracts. Benefits of administering local anesthetics, opioids, and alpha2 agonists into the epidural space include the use of lower doses of general anesthetics (anesthetic “sparing” effect), perioperative analgesia, and reduced side effects associated with systemic administration of drugs. However, the potential for cardiorespiratory compromise, neurotoxicity, and other adverse effects should be considered when using the epidural route of administration. When these variables are considered, the epidural technique is useful as a complementary method of anesthesia for preventive and postoperative analgesia and/or as part of a balanced anesthesia technique. PMID:28553642

  3. Epidural analgesia during labor and delivery: effects on the initiation and continuation of effective breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zorina Marzan; Heaman, Maureen I

    2005-08-01

    This prospective cohort study examined the association between epidural analgesia during labor and delivery, infant neurobehavioral status, and the initiation and continuation of effective breastfeeding. Healthy, term infants delivered vaginally by mothers who received epidural analgesia (n = 52) or no analgesia (n = 63) during labor and delivery were assessed at 8 to 12 hours postpartum, followed by a telephone interview with the mothers at 4 weeks postpartum. There was no significant difference between the epidural analgesia and no-analgesia groups in breastfeeding effectiveness or infant neurobehavioral status at 8 to 12 hours or in the proportion of mothers continuing to breastfeed at 4 weeks. Therefore, epidural analgesia did not appear to inhibit effective breastfeeding. There was a positive correlation between infant neurobehavioral status and breastfeeding effectiveness (Spearman rho = 0.48, P = .01), suggesting that neurobehavioral assessment may prove beneficial in identifying infants at greater risk for breastfeeding difficulties.

  4. Does epidural analgesia affect the rate of spontaneous obstetric lacerations in normal births?

    PubMed

    Albers, Leah L; Migliaccio, Laura; Bedrick, Edward J; Teaf, Dusty; Peralta, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    The precise relationship between epidural use and genital tract lacerations in normal childbirth is unclear. Data from a clinical trial on measures to lower genital tract trauma in vaginal birth were used for a secondary analysis. The goal was to assess whether epidurals affect the rate of spontaneous obstetric lacerations in normal vaginal births. Maternal characteristics and intrapartum variables were compared in women who did and did not use an epidural in labor, and also in those with and without any sutured lacerations following vaginal birth. Variables that were statistically different in both cases were entered into regression equations for simultaneous adjustment. Epidural use was not an independent predictor of sutured lacerations. Predictors of sutured lacerations included nulliparity, a prolonged second stage, being non-Hispanic white, and an infant birthweight greater than 4000 grams. Elements of midwifery management need further research.

  5. Combined Spinal Epidural Anaesthesia for Caesarean Section and Hysterectomy in a Parturient with Placenta Accreta

    PubMed Central

    Seyhan, Tülay Özkan; Sungur, Mukadder Orhan; Edipoğlu, İpek; Baştu, Ercan

    2014-01-01

    Placenta accreta complicates the anaesthetic and surgical approach in caesarean section. In this report, a parturient with placenta accreta and multiple drug allergies who was managed using combined spinal epidural anaesthesia for caesarean hysterectomy is discussed. PMID:27366410

  6. [Continuous epidural administration of droperidol to prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kenji; Higuchi, Jun; Sakio, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Onoda, Noboru

    2002-02-01

    This randomized double-blind trial was designed to evaluate the antiemetic effect of continuous epidural analgesia with droperidol mixed with bupivacaine and buprenorphine. We studied 78 patients for abdominal gynecological surgery under general-epidural anesthesia. After recovery from anesthesia, they received epidural administration of 0.25% bupivacaine 40 ml and buprenorphine 0.4 mg with or without droperidol 2.5-5.0 mg at a rate of 2 ml.h-1 for 24 hours. The addition of droperidol 5.0 mg led to serious undesirable effects. Droperidol 2.5 mg, however, showed not only significant antiemetic effect without any adverse action, but also the reduction of rescue analgesics. We conclude that the addition of a small dose of droperidol to epidural analgesics reduces the incidence of postoperative emesis and the requirement of rescue analgesics.

  7. Giving Birth With Epidural Analgesia: The Experience of First-Time Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Ryoko; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our qualitative descriptive study was to describe the birth experiences of women using epidural analgesia for pain management. We interviewed nine primiparas who experienced vaginal births. Five themes emerged: (a) coping with pain, (b) finding epidural administration uneventful, (c) feeling relief having an epidural, (d) experiencing joy, and (e) having unsettled feelings of ambivalence. Although epidural analgesia was found to be effective for pain relief and may contribute to some women’s satisfaction with the birth experience, it does not guarantee a quality birth experience. In order to support and promote childbearing women’s decision making, we recommend improved education on the variety of available pain management options, including their risks and benefits. Fostering a sense of caring, connection, and control in women is a key factor to ensure positive birth experiences, regardless of pain management method. PMID:23277728

  8. Delayed neurological deficits induced by an epidural hematoma associated with a thoracic osteoporotic compression fracture.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Soo; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Choon-Dae; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2012-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman developed neurological deficits 6 weeks after the onset of a thoracic osteoporotic compression fracture. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the thoracic spine revealed an epidural hematoma at the T10-L2 levels. Acute decompressive laminectomy and percutaneous vertebroplasty were performed. Following the surgery, the patient's neurologic deficits improved and follow-up MR imaging showed complete resolution of the hematoma. Spinal epidural hematomas are rare and associated delayed neurological deficits are extremely rare. Conservative treatment may be effective for epidural hematomas in neurologically intact patients, but epidural hematomas can be a cause of neural compression and symptomatic deterioration resulting in delayed neurological deficits during the follow-up period.

  9. An Update on Drugs Used for Lumbosacral Epidural Anesthesia and Analgesia in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Steagall, Paulo V M; Simon, Bradley T; Teixeira Neto, Francisco J; Luna, Stelio P L

    2017-01-01

    This review aims to report an update on drugs administered into the epidural space for anesthesia and analgesia in dogs, describing their potential advantages and disadvantages in the clinical setting. Databases searched include Pubmed, Google scholar, and CAB abstracts. Benefits of administering local anesthetics, opioids, and alpha2 agonists into the epidural space include the use of lower doses of general anesthetics (anesthetic "sparing" effect), perioperative analgesia, and reduced side effects associated with systemic administration of drugs. However, the potential for cardiorespiratory compromise, neurotoxicity, and other adverse effects should be considered when using the epidural route of administration. When these variables are considered, the epidural technique is useful as a complementary method of anesthesia for preventive and postoperative analgesia and/or as part of a balanced anesthesia technique.

  10. Combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia with chloroprocaine for hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Run-Qiao; Tian, Yu-Ke; Fang, Wei-Ran

    2008-01-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to determine the clinical efficacy and safety of chloroprocaine (CP) for gynaecological surgery. 2. One hundred and twenty gynaecological patients scheduled for hysterectomy were divided randomly into four groups: Group A (n = 30), 2.5% CP 1.0 mL; Group B (n = 30), 2.5% CP 1.2 mL; Group C (n = 30), 2.5% CP 1.4 mL; and Group D (n = 30), 2.5% CP 1.6 mL. The dose of CP used in each group was mixed with 1 mL vehicle containing 5% glucose and 1.5% ephedrine. Spinal anaesthesia was achieved by lumbar puncture in the L2-3 interspace and injection of the mixture. Wherever necessary, CP (2.5%) was used for epidural anaesthesia. 3. Although the times to onset and peak effect, as well as the grade of motor block of the lower limbs (Bromage scale), were similar among the four groups, the level of the highest sensory nerve block increased gradually, from T7 (+/- 1), T6 (+/- 1), T4 (+/- 1) to T3 (+/- 1) in Groups A, B, C and D, respectively. The rate of unsatisfactory spinal anaesthesia was 80 and 16.7% in Groups A and B, respectively, and consequently epidural anaesthesia was superimposed in those patients for surgery to start. Spinal anaesthesia was very satisfactory for surgery in Groups C and D. In contrast, the incidence of hypotension in Groups B, C and D was 6.7, 16.7 and 67.7%, respectively; however, respiratory depression only occurred in Group D in nine cases (30%). No other adverse events or neurologic deficits were found. 4. The present results suggest that 30-35 mg CP in a total volume of 2.2-2.4 mL used for spinal anaesthesia in hysterectomy is safe and efficient. The combination of spinal and epidural anaesthesia with 2.5% CP can achieve 100% satisfactory anaesthesia for this type of surgery.

  11. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  12. Posterior tibial slope and femoral sizing affect posterior cruciate ligament tension in posterior cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Shinichi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Furu, Moritoshi; Ito, Hiromu; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-08-01

    During cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty, surgeons sometimes encounter increased tension of the posterior cruciate ligament. This study investigated the effects of femoral size, posterior tibial slope, and rotational alignment of the femoral and tibial components on forces at the posterior cruciate ligament in cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty using a musculoskeletal computer simulation. Forces at the posterior cruciate ligament were assessed with the standard femoral component, as well as with 2-mm upsizing and 2-mm downsizing in the anterior-posterior dimension. These forces were also determined with posterior tibial slope angles of 5°, 7°, and 9°, and lastly, were measured in 5° increments when the femoral (tibial) components were positioned from 5° (15°) of internal rotation to 5° (15°) of external rotation. Forces at the posterior cruciate ligament increased by up to 718N with the standard procedure during squatting. The 2-mm downsizing of the femoral component decreased the force at the posterior cruciate ligament by up to 47%. The 2° increment in posterior tibial slope decreased the force at the posterior cruciate ligament by up to 41%. In addition, posterior cruciate ligament tension increased by 11% during internal rotation of the femoral component, and increased by 18% during external rotation of the tibial component. These findings suggest that accurate sizing and bone preparation are very important to maintain posterior cruciate ligament forces in cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty. Care should also be taken regarding malrotation of the femoral and tibial components because this increases posterior cruciate ligament tension. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of cerebral perfusion pressure changes in laboring women: effects of epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Williams, K P; Wilson, S

    1999-12-01

    To compare the effect of epidural anesthesia on cerebral perfusion pressure in laboring women. Maternal cerebral blood flow velocity was assessed in seven laboring patients with continuous epidural anesthesia and 15 without, using transcranial Doppler. Maternal cerebral blood flow velocity was assessed during the first stage at the trough of a contraction, at the peak of a contraction and at the second stage during pushing over the course of four contractions. Calculated estimated cerebral perfusion pressure: eCPP = Vmean/(Vmean - Vdiastolic) x (mean BP - diastolic BP), where V is velocity and BP is blood pressure; modified from Aaslid and colleagues. An index of cerebrovascular resistance, the resistance area product, was calculated: RAP = mean BP/mean velocity. We calculated an index of cerebral blood flow (cerebral blood flow index): CBF index = eCPP/RAP. In non-epidural patients, the eCPP fell significantly at the peak of a contraction and during pushing. Cerebrovascular resistance, RAP, rose significantly during the peak of a contraction, although cerebral blood flow did not change. In patients undergoing epidural anesthesia, the stages of labor had no significant effect on eCPP or RAP; however, these values were lower than those in patients without epidural anesthesia. The epidural group had a lower eCPP and RAP and cerebral blood flow index compared to the non-epidural group. In the non-epidural group, the mean arterial pressure was higher in all stages of labor with a trend towards an increase in eCPP and cerebral blood flow index.

  14. Pain due to epidural tumor in cancer patients. Report of two cases and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Caraceni, A; Martini, C; Zecca, E; De Conno, F; Portenoy, R K

    1997-10-01

    The cases of two patients with inguinal pain as the only symptom of a T12 metastatic lesion is reported. The patterns of pain referrals from tumor lesions to the spine, epidural space, and spinal cord are reviewed. Focal back pain and pain reported in a distal distribution can both be associated with epidural or cord disease. The differential diagnosis of back pain in patients with cancer can be difficult but may be crucial in differentiating important neurological complications of systemic neoplasms.

  15. “Dry tap” during spinal anaesthesia turns out to be epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Dinesh Kumar; Kaul, Vinca; Parampill, Reena

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of “dry tap” during spinal anaesthesia in a patient posted for incision and drainage of lower limb with cellulitis. When the patient was being given sub-arachnoid block (SAB) for regional anaesthesia, it turned out to be a case of pyogenic ilio-psoas abscess extended up to the paravertebral and epidural spaces. The causative organism was Staphylococcus aureus. This is probably the first case reported when epidural abscess is diagnosed during SAB. PMID:22923830

  16. Early removal of urinary catheters in patients with thoracic epidural catheters.

    PubMed

    Tripepi-Bova, Kathleen A; Sun, Zhiyuan; Mason, David; Albert, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether early removal of urinary catheters in patients with thoracic epidurals resulted in urinary retention (>500 mL by bladder scanner). Patients were given up to 8 hours to void before further intervention. Of 61 patients, only 4 (6.6%) required urinary catheter reinsertion due to urinary retention. Early removal of urinary catheters after thoracic surgery in patients with thoracic epidurals was safe, with minimal urinary retention.

  17. Effect of epidural analgesia on labor times and mode of delivery: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Indraccolo, U; Ripanelli, A; Di Iorio, R; Indraccolo, S R

    2012-01-01

    To assess changes in labor times and delivery outcome in low-risk women requesting pain relief and undergoing epidural analgesia, according to the epidural analgesia schemes. Prospective observati