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Sample records for posterior epidural mass

  1. Catheter-Based Transepidural Approach to Cervical and Thoracic Posterior and Perineural Epidural Spaces: A Cadaveric Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Khan, Asif A.; Sohail, Amna; Saed, Aveen; Jadhav, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Approaching the cervical and high thoracic level epidural space through transepidural route from lumbar region represents a method to lower the occurrence of complications associated with direct approach. The authors performed a cadaveric pilot project to determine the feasibility of various catheter-based manipulation and cephalad advancement using the transepidural route. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Two cadavers were used to determine the following: 1. Ability to place a guide sheath over a guidewire using a percutaneous approach within the posterior lumbar epidural space; 2. The highest vertebral level catheter can be advanced within the posterior epidural space; 3. Ability to cross midline within the posterior epidural space; and 4. Ability to catheterize the perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. RESULTS We were able to advance the catheters up to the level of cervical vertebral level of C2 within the posterior epidural space under fluoroscopic guidance from a sheath inserted via oblique parasagittal approach at the lumbar L4–L5 intervertebral space. We were able to cross midline within the posterior epidural space and catheterize multiple perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical vertebral level of C2, C3, and C4 on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. We also catheterized multiple epidural sheaths that surround the nerve roots exiting at the thoracic vertebral level on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. CONCLUSIONS We were able to advance a catheter or microcatheter up to the cervical vertebral level within the posterior epidural space and catheterize the perineural epidural sheath of the nerve root exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. Such observations support further exploration of percutaneous catheter based transepidural approach to cervical and thoracic dorsal epidural spaces for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26060530

  2. [Acute epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa in a case of von Willebrand's disease].

    PubMed

    Takenaka, N; Mine, T; Ikeda, E; Iwai, H; Kusano, S

    1988-01-01

    A rare case of acute epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa associated with von Willebrand's disease is reported. A 9-year-old boy fell down and hit his occipital region against a floor. Soon after he came home and slept, but three hours later he began to vomit and became drowsiness. He visited our hospital and his Glasgow Coma Scale showed 13 points. CT scan on admission showed acute epidural hematoma of left posterior fossa and contusional hematoma in the right temporal lobe. The bleeding time was over 18 minutes. He had been suspected to be suffering from von Willebrand's disease two years ago. Then fresh blood, fresh frozen plasma and anti-hemophilic globulin were prepared. Ten hours after injury, the operation was begun. Fresh epidural hematoma existed as a clot beyond transverse sinus. During the procedure of dural tenting suture, diffuse bleeding from bone, muscle, subcutaneous tissue and dura occurred and it was difficult to stop the bleeding. By using fresh blood and anti-hemophilic globulin, the bleeding was controlled, and then the operation was achieved. In the postoperative course a new epidural hematoma was found in the left temporal region and a new but asymptomatic retinal hemorrhage was found in his right eye. He was discharged without any neurological deficits 25 days after operation.

  3. Acute posterior fossa epidural hematoma in a newborn infant with Menkes disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Horikawa, Masahiro; Wakamatsu, Hajime; Hashimoto, Jyunya; Nawashiro, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) in newborn infants is rare compared with other types of intracranial hemorrhages. Furthermore, posterior fossa EDH is extremely rare. We present a case of posterior fossa EDH in an infant with Menkes disease with accessory bones in the occiput. A male infant with a condition diagnosed with Menkes disease by prenatal testing was born at 39 weeks via vacuum extraction. The patient presented with a mild tremor at 2 days after delivery. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan showed an acute EDH in the posterior fossa, extending into the occipitoparietal area. Three-dimensional CT and bone window CT scan revealed several accessory bones, diastasis of 1 accessory suture, a communicated fracture, and a linear fracture in the occipital bone. Furthermore, a bone fragment from a communicated fracture displaced toward the inside. The patient was treated conservatively for EDH because of his good general condition. The hematoma gradually resolved, and his tremor did not recur. We suggest the following mechanism of posterior fossa EDH development in our patient: (1) external force was applied to the occiput inside the birth canal during delivery, resulting in diastasis; (2) a communicated fracture occurred, and a bone fragment displaced toward the inside (linear fracture was caused indirectly by the force); (3) a transverse sinus was injured by the fragment; and (4) EDH developed in both the posterior fossa and supratentorial region. Copper deficiency can also cause fragility of connective tissues, vessels, and bones.

  4. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Tsuyoki; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Shoji, Shintaro; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Gen; Imura, Takayuki; Minehara, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Terumasa; Kawamura, Tadashi; Namba, Takanori; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case. PMID:26989542

  5. Parascapular mass revealing primary tuberculosis of the posterior arch

    PubMed Central

    Arbault, Anais; Ornetti, Paul; Chevallier, Olivier; Avril, Julien; Pottecher, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a parascapular abscess revealing primary tuberculosis of the posterior arch in a 31-year-old man. Sectional imaging is essential in order to detect the different lesions of this atypical spinal tuberculosis as osteolysis of the posterior arch extendible to vertebral body, osteocondensation, epidural extension which is common in this location, and high specificity of a zygapophysial, costo-vertebral or transverse arthritis.

  6. Large posterior abdominal masses: computed tomographic localization.

    PubMed

    Engel, I A; Auh, Y H; Rubenstein, W A; Whalen, J P; Kazam, E

    1983-10-01

    Large posterior abdominal masses, particularly those in the right upper abdomen, may be difficult to localize correctly into the peritoneal or retroperitoneal compartments. The following signs were found to be reliable CT indicators of retroperitoneal location: obliteration of the perinephric fat outlining the psoas muscle; lateral displacement of the fat outlining the posterior right lobe of the liver; rotation of the intrahepatic portal veins to the left; anterior displacement of the inferior vena cava and renal veins; and anterior displacement of the ascending colon, descending duodenum, or pancreatic head.

  7. Posterior mediastinal mass diagnosed as schwanomma with concomittant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Surya Kant; Mishra, Ashwini Kumar; Verma, Ajay Kumar; Prakash, Ved

    2014-01-01

    A 21-year-old non-smoker, non-hypertensive male without diabetes was referred to our pulmonary medicine department with suspected malignant intrathoracic mass. The clinicoradiological evaluation revealed that it could be a posterior mediastinal mass. The same diagnosis was confirmed on performing CT and MRI. Benign posterior mediastinal schwanomma was suspected as it is the most common posterior mediastinal mass. It was completely resected. Histopathological examination confirmed the same. The mass was also sent for culture for mycobacterium which came out to be positive. The patient recovered from the surgery and postoperative X-ray showed complete clearance. He was treated with antitubercular treatment and responded very well. PMID:25246469

  8. Effect of ethnicity and body mass index on the distance from skin to lumbar epidural space in parturients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V; Swinson, A K; Hughes, C; Mokashi, S; Russell, R

    2011-10-01

    With the current prevalence of obesity and trends in ethnic diversity amongst parturients in UK maternity units, we performed a prospective, observational study to establish the effect of ethnicity and body mass index on the distance from skin to epidural space in parturients. A total of 1210 parturients participated in this study. The mean (SD) distance from skin to lumbar epidural space was 5.4 (1.1) cm. When tested in a multiple regression model, both body mass index and ethnicity significantly influenced the distance from skin to lumbar epidural space in parturients. The distance from skin to lumbar epidural space amongst ethnic groups differed at any given body mass index. It was significantly greater in Black/British Black and White parturients compared with their Asian and Chinese counterparts. You can respond to this article at http://www.anaesthesiacorrespondence.com.

  9. Thoracic epidural catheter in the management of a child with an anterior mediastinal mass: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Loran M; Mossad, Emad B

    2006-02-01

    We describe a case of an anterior mediastinal mass compressing the right main bronchus that required a biopsy through a thoracotomy incision. The anesthetic management of these patients is associated with several risks and challenges, including potential airway compression and cardiovascular collapse. Inhalation induction and maintenance of spontaneous respiration is recommended to preserve normal transpulmonary pressure gradient and improve flow through conducting airways. We placed a thoracic epidural catheter under general anesthesia as the main analgesic technique in order to maintain spontaneous breathing. The use of regional anesthesia, especially continuous epidurals in pediatric cardiothoracic anesthesia have many theoretical advantages including attenuation of the neuroendocrine response, facilitation of rapid extubation and improved ventilatory mechanics secondary to decreased narcotic requirements. The absolute risk of nerve injury and epidural hematoma for this procedure is unknown and hard to define in this patient population. We reviewed multiple studies and case reports addressing its safety and reported side effects. Finally, we emphasize that a thoracic epidural anesthesia is a reasonable choice that can be applied carefully in special situations even for children under general anesthesia. PMID:16430421

  10. Echocardiographic Manifestation of Esophagitis Mimicking a Posterior Mediastinal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Swarup, Supreeya; Kantamneni, Sowmya; Kabir, Sarah; Zeltser, Roman; Makaryus, Amgad N

    2014-01-01

    Incidental extracardiac findings (ECFs) are commonly noted on cardiac imaging. The majority of the ECFs are noticed on computed tomography (CT), cardiac magnetic resonance scanning, and myocardial perfusion imaging. Although transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is a widely used cardiac modality, there is scarcity of data describing ECF on TTE. ECFs have the potential to alter patient management. We present a rare case of a cystic mass seen in the posterior mediastinum on TTE, which led to further evaluation and diagnosis of esophagitis with ulceration. PMID:25780343

  11. The pathogenesis of spinal epidural abscess: microangiographic studies in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Feldenzer, J A; McKeever, P E; Schaberg, D R; Campbell, J A; Hoff, J T

    1988-07-01

    An experimental model of spinal epidural abscess was developed in rabbits by injecting Staphylococcus aureus into the posterior thoracolumbar epidural space. This model has been shown to reproduce the neurological, bacteriological, and radiological aspects of the human disease. In this study, the effect of the infectious epidural mass on the vasculature of the spinal cord in paraplegic rabbits was studied using microangiographic techniques. The normal vascular anatomy of the rabbit spinal cord was defined in control experiments. Vascular proliferation was demonstrated in the epidural space surrounding the abscesses. Anterior and paired posterior spinal arteries remained patent in paraplegic rabbits with mild or moderate spinal cord compression and in some cases of severe compression. In animals with severe compression, the anterior epidural venous plexus remained patent, but the dorsal spinal vein was occluded. Occlusion of perforating arteries occurred only with extreme spinal cord compression. These data indicate that the initial neurological deficit associated with experimental spinal epidural abscess is not due to vascular thrombosis. PMID:2454302

  12. Management of infiltrating spinal epidural angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Nadi, Mustafa M; Nadi, Arwa M; Zabara, Mohammad Y; Ahmad, Tahani M

    2015-04-01

    Angiolipomas of the spine are rare benign tumors commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. The present report describes a case of spinal angiolipoma with thoracic mediastinal extension in a 50-year-old woman. She presented with a long-standing history of mid-back pain with progressive lower extremities weakness. An MRI showed a heterogeneously enhancing mass located in the posterior epidural space of the thoracic spine with mediastinal extension. Histopathological examination demonstrated features consistent with spinal angiolipoma. This report emphasizes the diagnosis and therapeutic management options of infiltrating spinal angiolipomas.

  13. Management of infiltrating spinal epidural angiolipoma

    PubMed Central

    Nadi, Mustafa M.; Nadi, Arwa M.; Zabara, Mohammad Y.; Ahmad, Tahani M.

    2015-01-01

    Angiolipomas of the spine are rare benign tumors commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. The present report describes a case of spinal angiolipoma with thoracic mediastinal extension in a 50-year-old woman. She presented with a long-standing history of mid-back pain with progressive lower extremities weakness. An MRI showed a heterogeneously enhancing mass located in the posterior epidural space of the thoracic spine with mediastinal extension. Histopathological examination demonstrated features consistent with spinal angiolipoma. This report emphasizes the diagnosis and therapeutic management options of infiltrating spinal angiolipomas. PMID:25864069

  14. Epidural spinal myelolipoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Miyake, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Yamada, Kazutaka; Uzuka, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    Epidural spinal myelolipoma was diagnosed in a 13-year-old, male Siberian husky that was referred for evaluation of progressive pelvic limb paresis and urinary incontinence. An epidural mass was detected by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. The mass was removed and identified histopathologically as an epidural myelolipoma. Pelvic limb paresis improved after surgery, but urinary retention associated with neurological bladder dysfunction persisted.

  15. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  16. Bilateral en-masse distalization of maxillary posterior teeth with skeletal anchorage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Noorollahian, Saeed; Alavi, Shiva; Shirban, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to introduce a new method for bilateral distal movement of the entire maxillary posterior segment. Case report: A 17-year-old girl with Class I skeletal malocclusion (end-to-end molar relationships, deviated midline and space deficiency for left maxillary canine) was referred for orthodontic treatment. She did not accept maxillary first premolars extraction. A modified Hyrax appliance (Dentaurum Ispringen, Germany) was used for bilateral distalization of maxillary posterior teeth simultaneously. Expansion vector was set anteroposteriorly. Posterior legs of Hyrax were welded to first maxillary molar bands. All posterior teeth on each side consolidated with a segment of 0.017 × 0.025-in stainless steel wire from the buccal side. Anterior legs of Hyrax were bent into eyelet form and attached to the anterior palate with two mini-screws (2 × 10 mm) (Jeil Medical Corporation Seoul, South Korea). Hyrax opening rate was 0.8 mm per month. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were used to evaluate the extent of distal movement. 3.5-mm distalization of posterior maxillary teeth was achieved in five months. Results: A nearly bodily distal movement without anchorage loss was obtained. Conclusion: The mini-screw-supported modified Hyrax appliance was found to be helpful for achieving en-masse distal movement of maxillary posterior teeth. PMID:27409657

  17. Biomechanical evaluation of DTRAX® posterior cervical cage stabilization with and without lateral mass fixation

    PubMed Central

    Voronov, Leonard I; Siemionow, Krzysztof B; Havey, Robert M; Carandang, Gerard; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lateral mass screw (LMS) fixation with plates or rods is the current standard procedure for posterior cervical fusion. Recently, implants placed between the facet joints have become available as an alternative to LMS or transfacet screws for patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability of the DTRAX® cervical cage for single- and two-level fusion and compare this to the stability achieved with LMS fixation with rods in a two-level construct. Methods Six cadaveric cervical spine (C3–C7) specimens were tested in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation to ±1.5 Nm moment without preload (0 N) in the following conditions: 1) intact (C3–C7), 2) LMS and rods at C4–C5 and C5–C6, 3) removal of all rods (LMS retained) and placement of bilateral posterior cages at C5–C6, 4) bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 (without LMS and rods), and 5) C4–C5 and C5–C6 bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 with rods reinserted. Results Bilateral posterior cervical cages significantly reduced range of motion in all tested directions in both single- and multilevel constructs (P<0.05). Similar stability was achieved with bilateral posterior cages and LMS in a two-level construct: 0.6°±0.3° vs 1.2°±0.4° in flexion–extension (P=0.001), (5.0°±2.6° vs 3.1°±1.3°) in lateral bending (P=0.053), (1.3°±1.0° vs 2.2°±0.9°) in axial rotation (P=0.091) for posterior cages and LMS, respectively. Posterior cages, when placed as an adjunct to LMS, further reduced range of motion in a multilevel construct (P<0.05). Conclusion Bilateral posterior cages provide similar cervical segmental stability compared with a LMS and rod construct and may be an alternative surgical option for select patients. Furthermore, supplementation of a lateral mass construct with posterior cages increases cervical spine stability in single- and multilevel conditions.

  18. Biomechanical evaluation of DTRAX® posterior cervical cage stabilization with and without lateral mass fixation

    PubMed Central

    Voronov, Leonard I; Siemionow, Krzysztof B; Havey, Robert M; Carandang, Gerard; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lateral mass screw (LMS) fixation with plates or rods is the current standard procedure for posterior cervical fusion. Recently, implants placed between the facet joints have become available as an alternative to LMS or transfacet screws for patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability of the DTRAX® cervical cage for single- and two-level fusion and compare this to the stability achieved with LMS fixation with rods in a two-level construct. Methods Six cadaveric cervical spine (C3–C7) specimens were tested in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation to ±1.5 Nm moment without preload (0 N) in the following conditions: 1) intact (C3–C7), 2) LMS and rods at C4–C5 and C5–C6, 3) removal of all rods (LMS retained) and placement of bilateral posterior cages at C5–C6, 4) bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 (without LMS and rods), and 5) C4–C5 and C5–C6 bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 with rods reinserted. Results Bilateral posterior cervical cages significantly reduced range of motion in all tested directions in both single- and multilevel constructs (P<0.05). Similar stability was achieved with bilateral posterior cages and LMS in a two-level construct: 0.6°±0.3° vs 1.2°±0.4° in flexion–extension (P=0.001), (5.0°±2.6° vs 3.1°±1.3°) in lateral bending (P=0.053), (1.3°±1.0° vs 2.2°±0.9°) in axial rotation (P=0.091) for posterior cages and LMS, respectively. Posterior cages, when placed as an adjunct to LMS, further reduced range of motion in a multilevel construct (P<0.05). Conclusion Bilateral posterior cages provide similar cervical segmental stability compared with a LMS and rod construct and may be an alternative surgical option for select patients. Furthermore, supplementation of a lateral mass construct with posterior cages increases cervical spine stability in single- and multilevel conditions. PMID

  19. Four cases of spinal epidural angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kenneth; Tsui, Alpha; Paldor, Iddo; Kaye, Andrew H; Gaillard, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumours composed of mature fatty tissue and abnormal vascular elements, most commonly found within the posterior spinal epidural space. Most tumours are located within the mid-thoracic spine; in contrast thoracolumbar junction and purely lumbar angiolipomas are rare. We report a case series of four spinal angiolipomas, including a thoracolumbar junction and a purely lumbar tumour.

  20. Lumbar spinal epidural angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Nanassis, Kimon; Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion; Marinopoulos, Dimitrios; Mintelis, Apostolos; Tsitsopoulos, Philippos

    2008-04-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are rare benign tumours most commonly found in the thoracic spine. A case of an extradural lumbar angiolipoma in a 47-year-old female is described. She had a recent history of lower back pain accompanied by sciatica. Lumbar MRI revealed a dorsal epidural mass at the L2-L3 level. The patient underwent a bilateral laminectomy, in which the tumour was totally excised. The pathological examination indicated haemangiolipoma. Post-operatively, the patient's neurological signs and symptoms improved remarkably quickly. MRI at 6 and 18 months after surgery revealed no evidence of tumour recurrence.

  1. Spinal and epidural anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    Intraspinal anesthesia; Subarachnoid anesthesia; Epidural; Peridural anesthesia ... Spinal and epidural anesthesia have fewer side effects and risks than general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free). Patients usually recover their senses ...

  2. Posterior colpotomy: a successful retrieval route for pelvic masses following robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Feuer, Gerald; Yap, Stephanie; Hernandez, Patricia

    2012-12-01

    We report a technique of transvaginal extraction of pelvic masses or larger specimens removed during robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery in order to avoid larger port incisions and postoperatively reduce pain. Fifty women underwent a transvaginal incision to remove large pelvic masses after robot-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomies. Posterior colpotomies were performed with bagged specimens delivered into the vagina, extracted, and then closed robotically with a running suture. Vaginal extraction of pelvic masses was successful in all attempted cases and in no case was there any spillage, with an average operative time of 94.22 ± 4.48 and no intraoperative complications. This technique can be considered efficacious and safe with minimal morbidity. We suggest a surgical set-up including vaginal-cervical Ahluwalia retractor elevator to be prepared should the specimen be too large to remove via the port site, thus giving the surgeon the opportunity to perform this procedure with ease if necessary. PMID:27628465

  3. Epidural analgesia in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Tan, T K

    1998-03-01

    An ideal analgesic for labour would preferably be non-invasive, as effective as spinals and epidurals without their attendant complications and is safe to mother and child and should not complicate the labour process. Analgesia for labouring women ranges from the use of opioid injections to invasive methods, chiefly epidural injections. Each has its advantages and drawbacks. This article provides a review of analgesic methods and techniques for labouring women. It focuses mainly on the role of epidurals, how it is utilised by anaesthetists and the differing methods of drug delivery through the epidural route. It discusses various concoctions of local anaesthetics and adjuvants used. The epidural route is probably the most effective and most commonly used invasive route for achieving analgesia during labour. Local anaesthetics of varying concentrations are administered as intermittent boluses or as a continuous infusion. Adjuvant drugs are able to enhance the quality and duration of the analgesia. Opioids including fentanyl and sufentanil, and clonidine are discussed. The use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia and combined spinal-epidural analgesia are reviewed. Ambulatory or mobile epidurals are increasingly popular. They are known to improve maternal satisfaction because of preservation of motor power. Ambulation may help with cervical dilatation and engagement, and abolition of backpain, among other advantages. This article describes the methods of establishing mobile epidurals and offers guidelines on safe ambulation and contraindications to its use. PMID:9663317

  4. Thoracic Extraosseous Epidural Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Asil, Kiyasettin; Ceylan, Davut; Erdem, Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas were first reported in 1929 by Globus and Doshay, and are defined as benign vascular structures developed between the neural tissues occurring in the central nervous system, consisting of a dilated vascular bed. Cavernous hemangiomas comprise nearly 5-12% of all spinal vascular malformations; however, existence in the epidural space without bone involvement is rare. Only 4% of all cavernous hemangiomas (0.22/1.000.000) are purely epidural cavernous hemangiomas. In this case report, we removed a hemorrhagic thoracic mass presenting with progressive neurological deficits in a 55-year-old male patient. We found this case to be appropriate for presentation due to the rare occurrence of this type of cavernous hemangioma. PMID:25674348

  5. Radical excision combined with instrumented fixation in the management of thoracic epidural angiolipoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Spinal angiolipoma is a benign uncommon neoplasm composed of mature lipocytes admixed with abnormal blood vessels. They account for only 0.04% to 1.2% of all spinal tumors. We present a case of thoracic epidural angiolipoma treated by combining radical resection with instrumented spinal fixation, without any surgical complication. Case presentation A 32-year-old Asian woman presented with dorsal epidural angiolipoma at the upper-thoracic level. She had a seven-month history of gradually worsening weakness and numbness in her lower extremities. Imaging studies of her thoracic spine demonstrated a heterogeneously well-enhancing mass, located in her posterior epidural space without surrounding bone erosion at the upper thoracic level. We also observed compression of her thoracic cord. During surgery, a reddish-gray, highly vascularized mass was excised. Her facet joints had to be resected to expose the part migrating into the intervertebral foramen. Because there was concern regarding the stability of her thoracic spine, we performed spinal fixation using pedicle screws. Histopathological study of the surgical specimen showed a typical angiolipoma. Conclusion Angiolipomas can be radically excised with good prognosis. Surgical removal is the preferred treatment for spinal angiolipoma, and the prognosis after surgical management is very good. Although outcomes remained favorable despite incomplete resections in a number of spinal angiolipoma, complete removal is preferred. We successfully achieved total resection without any surgical complication by combining radical resection with instrumented spinal fixation. PMID:25412677

  6. Thoracic epidural angiolipoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jun; Du, Yong; Yang, Han-Feng; Hu, Fu-Bi; Huang, Ya-Yong; Li, Bing; Zee, Chi-Shing

    2013-04-28

    Angiolipoma of the spine is a benign neoplasm consisting of both mature fatty tissue and abnormal vascular elements, and usually presents with a slow progressive clinical course. Our patient presented with bilateral lower extremity weakness and chest-back numbness. Physical examination revealed adipose elements superficial hypesthesia below the T5 level and analgesia below the T6 level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed an avidly and heterogeneously enhancing mass which was located in the posterior epidural space. Compression of the thoracic cord by the fusiform mass was seen between T3-T4. During the operation, a flesh pink vascular mass (4.7 cm × 1.0 cm × 1.0 cm) with obscure margin and strong but pliable texture was found in the posterior epidural space extending from T3 to T4. There was no infiltration of the dura or the adjacent bony spine. Histopathological study of the surgical specimen showed a typical angiolipoma. We review the previously documented cases of spinal extradural angiolipomas performed with MRI.

  7. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Taisei; Iida, Yasuaki; Yokoyama, Yuichirou; Tsuge, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Keiji; Wada, Akihito; Mikami, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Solitary epidural space metastasis of a malignant tumor is rare. We encountered a 79-year-old male patient with solitary metastatic epidural tumor who developed paraplegia and dysuria. The patient had undergone total gastrectomy for gastric cancer followed by chemotherapy 8 months priorly. The whole body was examined for suspected metastatic spinal tumor, but no metastases of the spine or important organs were observed, and a solitary mass was present in the thoracic spinal epidural space. The mass was excised for diagnosis and treatment and was histopathologically diagnosed as metastasis from gastric cancer. No solitary metastatic epidural tumor from gastric cancer has been reported in English. Among the Japanese, 3 cases have been reported, in which the outcome was poor in all cases and no definite diagnosis could be made before surgery in any case. Our patient developed concomitant pneumonia after surgery and died shortly after the surgery. When a patient has a past medical history of malignant tumor, the possibility of a solitary metastatic tumor in the epidural space should be considered. PMID:27703825

  8. [Postoperative epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Donato, S; Malisano, A M; Dogareschi, T; Chiarandini, P; Spasiano, A; Pasetto, A

    1995-01-01

    Epidural analgesia with local anesthetics and opioids is one of the most effective methods for postoperative pain control. In critical patients it seems to improve outcome as well as pain control. This technique works better when started in the intraoperative time. Epidural analgesia is safe on surgical wards if nursing staff is trained in managing epidural catheters and in early detection and treatment of major and minor side effects. Nursing staff cooperates with the Acute Pain Service doctors and nurses who are on call on a 24 hour basis. Many perspective and retrospective studies showed a very low incidence of major side effects with epidurals. So we can consider it safe and effective even if we consider its invasiveness.

  9. Scoliosis associated with idiopathic lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There are very few reports of spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) in association with scoliosis. A 49-year-old man presented with persistent back pain and right hip lump. The lumbar spine X-rays showed scoliosis (Lenke classification 5BN). Lumbar MRI demonstrated circumferential epidural fat deposit from L1 to lower S2 level. There was no obvious etiology of SEL except mild increased body mass index (BMI). The patient was managed with conservative treatment. After 6 months medication (limaprost and ginkgo), his symptoms were relieved.

  10. Scoliosis associated with idiopathic lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong Rok

    2016-03-01

    There are very few reports of spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) in association with scoliosis. A 49-year-old man presented with persistent back pain and right hip lump. The lumbar spine X-rays showed scoliosis (Lenke classification 5BN). Lumbar MRI demonstrated circumferential epidural fat deposit from L1 to lower S2 level. There was no obvious etiology of SEL except mild increased body mass index (BMI). The patient was managed with conservative treatment. After 6 months medication (limaprost and ginkgo), his symptoms were relieved. PMID:27683700

  11. Translaminar lumbar epidural endoscopy: anatomy, technique, and indications.

    PubMed

    De Antoni, D J; Claro, M L; Poehling, G G; Hughes, S S

    1996-06-01

    This article describes a new technique to achieve access to the epidural space via a direct posterior portal. This minimally invasive technique allows treatment of disc protrusions and extrusions with full visualization and minimal dissection of the paraspinal musculature. Hemostasis, visualization, and triangulation is performed with standard arthroscopic instrumentation. The anatomy of, indications for, and advantages of this techniques are described. PMID:8783828

  12. Translaminar lumbar epidural endoscopy: anatomy, technique, and indications.

    PubMed

    De Antoni, D J; Claro, M L; Poehling, G G; Hughes, S S

    1996-06-01

    This article describes a new technique to achieve access to the epidural space via a direct posterior portal. This minimally invasive technique allows treatment of disc protrusions and extrusions with full visualization and minimal dissection of the paraspinal musculature. Hemostasis, visualization, and triangulation is performed with standard arthroscopic instrumentation. The anatomy of, indications for, and advantages of this techniques are described.

  13. Salmonella Typhi Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ying Ying; Chen, John L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of Salmonella infection. We report a case of a 57-year-old transgender male who presented with lower back pain for a period of one month following a fall. Physical examination only revealed tenderness over the lower back with no neurological deficits. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine revealed a spondylodiscitis at T10-T11 and T12-L1 and right posterior epidural collection at the T9-T10 level. He underwent decompression laminectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion of T8 to L3 vertebrae. Intraoperatively, he was found to have acute-on-chronic osteomyelitis in T10 and T11, epidural abscess, and discitis in T12-L1. Tissue and wound culture grew Salmonella Typhi and with antibiotics susceptibility guidance he was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for a period of six weeks. He recovered well with no neurological deficits. PMID:27034871

  14. Thoracic epidural analgesia in obese patients with body mass index of more than 30 kg/m2 for off pump coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Munish; Mehta, Yatin; Sawhney, Ravinder; Vats, Mayank; Trehan, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Perioperative Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) is an important part of a multimodal approach to improve analgesia and patient outcome after cardiac and thoracic surgery. This is particularly important for obese patients undergoing off pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB). We conducted a randomized clinical trial at tertiary care cardiac institute to compare the effect of TEA and conventional opioid based analgesia on perioperative lung functions and pain scores in obese patients undergoing OPCAB. Sixty obese patients with body mass index >30 kg/m2 for elective OPCAB were randomized into two groups (n=30 each). Patients in both the groups received general anesthesia but in group 1, TEA was also administered. We performed spirometry as preoperative assessment and at six hours, 24 hours, second, third, fourth and fifth day after extubation, along with arterial blood gases analysis. Visual analogue scale at rest and on coughing was recorded to assess the degree of analgesia. The other parameters observed were: time to endotracheal extubation, oxygen withdrawal time and intensive care unit length of stay. On statistical analysis there was a significant difference in Vital Capacity at six hours, 24 hours, second and third day postextubation. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second followed the same pattern for first four postoperative days and peak expiratory flow rate remained statistically high till second postoperative day. ABG values and PaO2/FiO2 ratio were statistically higher in the study group up to five days. Visual analogue scale at rest and on coughing was significantly lower till fourth and third postoperative day respectively. Tracheal extubation time, oxygen withdrawal time and ICU stay were significantly less in group 1. The use of TEA resulted in better analgesia, early tracheal extubation and shorter ICU stay and should be considered for obese patients undergoing OPCAB. PMID:20075532

  15. Endovascular Treatment of Vertebral Artery Injury during Cervical Posterior Fusion (C1 Lateral Mass Screw)

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Ko, Jung-Ho; Cho, Chun-Sung; Lee, Sang-Koo; Kim, Young-Joon; Kim, Young Jin

    2013-01-01

    Summary We describe two cases of vertebral artery injury during posterior cervical fusion. We treated both cases by an endovascular technique. The vertebral artery injury may result in catastrophic situations, such as, infarction, massive blood loss and even death. Our clinical outcome was good and we prove that endovascular treatment is an effective and less invasive way to treat vertebral artery injury. PMID:24070088

  16. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis involving posterior elements of the dorsal spine: An unusual cause of extradural spinal mass in an adult.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Devendra K; Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Savant, Hemant V

    2011-07-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells occurring as an isolated lesion or as part of a systemic proliferation. It is commoner in children younger than 10 years of age with sparing of the posterior elements in more than 95% of cases. We describe a case of LCH in an adult female presenting with paraplegia. MRI revealed a well-defined extradural contrast enhancing mass at D2-D4 vertebral level involving the posterior elements of spine. D2-5 laminectomy with excision of lesion was performed which lead to marked improvement of patients neurological status. Histopathology was suggestive of eosinophilic granuloma. We describe the case, discuss its uniqueness and review the literature on this rare tumor presentation.

  17. [Epidural extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Rafael; Bernal-García, Luis Miguel; Pineda-Palomo, Manuel; Botana-Fernández, Marcos; Gilete-Tejero, Ignacio Javier; Cabezudo-Artero, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a malignant tumour of the bone that sometimes presents extraskeletal involvement, with the epidural location being rare. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with paresthesia, paresis and urinary retention. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an epidural mass from C6 to D3. Laminectomy from C7 to D2 and partial resection of the lesion was performed. Pathological analysis was consistent with Ewing sarcoma. The patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy, without evidence of disease at 8 months follow-up. A review of the literature on all published cases of extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma with epidural involvement is presented. PMID:25497289

  18. Spinal epidural angiolipoma complicated by an intratumoral abscess. Case report.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Gianpaolo; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Lauriola, Libero; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2005-08-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are rare, benign lesions representing 0.14 to 1.2% of all spinal axis tumors. They most commonly involve the midthoracic spine and are located in the posterior epidural space. Up to now, six pediatric cases have been reported in the literature; two of them involved an acute clinical onset that was related to a venous infarction of a tumor. The authors report the case of a 16-year-old boy with a midthoracic epidural angiolipoma who was admitted with a clinical history of an acute paraparesis. In contrast to previous descriptions, the acute onset in this case was related to a spontaneous intratumoral abscess within the tumor.

  19. Body Mass Index, Modulated by Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope, Predicts ACL Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bojicic, Katherine M.; Beaulieu, Melanie L.; Krieger, Daniel Imaizumi; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Wojtys, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Intervention strategies to prevent ACL injury rely on increasing knowledge of risk factors. While several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for ACL rupture have been identified, the interaction between them remains unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the relationship between BMI and several knee geometries as potential risk factors for ACL injury. We hypothesized that an increased BMI in the presence of an increased posterior tibial slope or middle cartilage slope would increase risk of ACL injury. We also hypothesized that an increased BMI in the presence of a decreased posterior meniscal height or meniscal bone angle would result in an increased risk of ACL injury. Methods: Sagittal knee MRI files from 76 ACL-injured and 42 non-injured subjects were gathered from the institution’s archive. The PTS, MCS, PMH, and MBA were measured using the circle method and compared with BMI from the subject demographic. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistical regression. Figure 1 details measurements made for each knee geometry. Results: Univariate analysis of PTS showed increases in PTS significantly increase the odds of ACL tear (p = 0.043, OR =1.12). Univariate analysis of MCS showed increases of MCS significantly increase the odds of ACL tear (p = 0.037, OR = 1.12). Multivariate analysis of PTS and BMI centered around the mean (PTS*cBMI) showed increases of PTS in combination with increases in cBMI significantly increases the odds of ACL rupture (p value = .050, OR = 1.03). Table 1 shows predicted increases in ACL injury risk for combinations of increases in PTS and BMI. Conclusion: An increase in BMI will increase the risk of ACL tear when an increase in lateral posterior tibial slope is present. An increase in lateral posterior tibial slope or lateral middle cartilage slope increases the risk of an ACL tear.

  20. Epidural Lysis of Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E.; Hurley, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  1. Surgical treatment of supra- and infratentorial epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Xiaoyu, Wang; Guoping, Li

    2013-01-01

    Supra- and infratentorial acute epidural hematoma (SIEDH) is a common type of posterior fossa epidural hematoma (PFEDH), representing 11- 64% of all PFEDHs. Although SIEDH is associated with typical characteristics, it might be difficult to diagnose when presenting as infratentorial acute epidural hematoma, which is clinically silent and has nonspecific symptoms. However, this type of hematoma can often be rapidly deteriorating, causing a sharp rise in intracranial pressure that leads to a life-threatening foramen magnum herniation. Early diagnosis and management of SIEDH are imperative. Traditional surgical management has always required relatively large craniotomies, larger than the hematoma itself, to expose its edge, and then tack up the dura matter). It usually opens the window and emphasizes retention of the bone bridge outside the transverse sinus. This method can effectively eliminate the hematoma, but it is associated with larger postoperative wound, longer operation time, larger skull defect, and more complications. Hence, exploration into a better surgical method is direly needed.

  2. Severe Scapular Pain Following Unintentional Cervical Epidural Air Injection.

    PubMed

    Henthorn, Randall W; Murray, Kerra

    2016-03-01

    This a unique case of severe scapular pain following unintentional epidural space air injection during epidural steroid injection.A 70-year-old woman presented for a fluoroscopically guided C7-T1 interlaminar epidural steroid injection. Three injection attempts were made using the loss of resistance with air technique. On the first attempt the epidural space was entered, but contrast injection showed that the needle was intravenous. On the second attempt an equivocal loss of resistance with air was perceived and 5 mL of air was lost from the syringe. The needle was withdrawn and redirected, and upon the third needle passage the contrast injection showed appropriate epidural space filling up to the C4-5 level. Injection of betamethasone mixed in lidocaine was initially uneventful.However, 20 minutes post-injection the patient experienced sudden sharp and continuous pain along the medial edge of the scapula. After failing to respond to multiple intravascular analgesics, the patient was transferred to the emergency room. Her pain subsided completely following an intravenous diazepam injection. Cervical spine computerized tomography showed obvious air in the posterior epidural space from C4-5 to C6-7 as well as outside the spinal canal from (C4-T2). Having recovered fully, she was discharged the following morning. In reviewing the procedure, the equivocal loss of resistance on the second passage was actually a true loss of resistance to epidural space and air was unintentionally injected. Surprisingly, severe scapular pain resulted in a delayed manner after the steroid solution was injected. The authors theorize that unintentional prefilling of the epidural space with air prior to the injection of the subsequent steroid mixture added sufficient pressure to the epidural space to cause right-sided C4 nerve root stretching/entrapment and ensuing radicular pain to the right scapular border. The subsequent intravenous diazepam provided cervical muscle relaxation and

  3. Traumatic epidural hematoma in children.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Giovanni; Caroli, Emanuela; Raco, Antonino; Salvati, Maurizio; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of childhood acute epidural hematoma and to report our experience in recent years. A series of 35 patients below the age of 15 years treated for acute epidural hematoma at our institution between June 1991 and December 2000 was analyzed in detail. Pediatric epidural hematoma presents both age-related and atypical features when compared with epidural hematoma in adults. In selected cases, prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma results in an excellent outcome. Outcomes seem to be directly related to the patient's preoperative neurologic status and the presence of associated intracranial lesions.

  4. Epidural myelolipoma in a Husky-cross: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marina Verena; Ludwig, Davina Claudia; Lempp, Charlotte; Haist, Verena; Stein, Veronika Maria

    2013-04-04

    Epidural spinal myelolipoma was diagnosed in an 11.5-year-old castrated male Husky-cross that was evaluated at the veterinary teaching hospital due to progressive thoracolumbar spinal hyperaesthesia and mild proprioceptive pelvic limb ataxia. A focal, ill-defined mildly inhomogenous extradural mass lesion was detected by MRI. The dog was euthanized. At necropsy an extradurally located reddish mass of about 2.5 cm in diameter was present in the vertebral canal. The mass was identified histopathologically as an epidural myelolipoma.

  5. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  6. Cervical epidural arteriovenous fistula with radiculopathy mimicking cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Kawabori, Masahito; Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Shunsuke; Asano, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2009-03-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with a rare case of cervical epidural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) manifesting as radiculopathy of the right upper extremity that mimicked cervical spondylosis. She had a 2-month history of gradually progressive right-hand motor weakness and sensory disturbance. The initial diagnosis was cervical disk herniation. However, computed tomography with contrast medium showed abnormal enhancement at the right C5-6 and C6-7 intervertebral foramina. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium disclosed an enhanced abnormal epidural mass at the dorsal surface of the dural tube between the C5 and C6 vertebrae. T(2)-weighted MR imaging showed a slight flow void on the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the spinal cord between C3 and T4. Digital subtraction angiography disclosed cervical epidural and dural AVFs fed by the C5 and C6 radicular arteries. The diagnosis was concomitant epidural and dural AVFs. The dilated internal vertebral venous plexus attributable to epidural AVF was considered to be responsible for the radiculopathy. Transarterial embolization using n-butylcyanoacrylate achieved complete occlusion of the lesions. Her symptoms improved immediately and MR imaging and angiography performed 10 days postembolization showed reduction of both the epidural and dural AVFs.

  7. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOR - CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Nada; Djaković, Ivka; Kličan-Jaić, Katarina; Rudman, Senka Sabolović; Ivanec, Željko

    2015-09-01

    Labor pain is one of the most severe pains. Labor is a complex and individual process with varying maternal requesting analgesia. Labor analgesia must be safe and accompanied by minimal amount of unwanted consequences for both the mother and the child, as well as for the delivery procedure. Epidural analgesia is the treatment that best meets these demands. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Society of Anesthesiologists, mother's demand is a reason enough for the introduction of epidural analgesia in labor, providing that no contraindications exist. The application of analgesics should not cease at the end of the second stage of labor, but it is recommended that lower concentration analgesics be then applied. Based on the latest studies, it can be claimed that epidural analgesia can be applied during the major part of the first and second stage of labor. According to previous investigations, there is no definitive conclusion about the incidence of instrumental delivery, duration of second stage of labor, time of epidural analgesia initiation, and long term outcomes for the newborn. Cooperation of obstetric and anesthesiology personnel, as well as appropriate technical equipment significantly decrease the need of instrumental completion of a delivery, as well as other complications encountered in the application of epidural analgesia. Our hospital offers 24/7 epidural analgesia service. The majority of pregnant women in our hospital were aware of the advantages of epidural analgesia for labor, however, only a small proportion of them used it, mainly because of inadequate level of information.

  8. Epidural angiomatous meningioma of the thoracic spine: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YANG, TAO; WU, LIANG; YANG, CHENLONG; XU, YULUN

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural angiomatous meningiomas (AMs) are extremely rare lesions. Here, we report on a case of an epidural AM of the thoracic spine with chronic but severe cord compression. The patient underwent a T6-T8 laminectomy through the posterior approach. En bloc resection was achieved, and histopathological examination demonstrated an AM. Delayed paraplegia occurred 4 h postoperatively. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone, hyperbaric oxygen and rehabilitation. Gradually, over the next six months, the bilateral leg strength was improved compared with the preoperative status, and no tumor recurrence was noted. Although epidural AM is extremely rare, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions. A definitive diagnosis is difficult based on magnetic resonance imaging alone due to the nonspecific characteristics of the tumor. Since AM is a histologically benign and highly vascularized tumor, timely gross total resection (GTR) is the most effective treatment. A good clinical outcome may be expected following GTR (Simpson grade I and II resection). PMID:26870233

  9. Spinal epidural angiolipomas: Clinical characteristics, management and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bouali, Sofiene; Maatar, Nidhal; Bouhoula, Asma; Abderrahmen, Khansa; Said, Imed Ben; Boubaker, Adnen; Kallel, Jalel; Jemel, Hafedh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare expansive processes made of mature lipomatous and angiomatous elements. They often have a benign character. Their etiology, pathogenesis remains uncertain, and it is a cause of spinal cord compression. The magnetic resonance imaging is the most important neuroradiological examination. Histological examination is the only examination to confirm the diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice. Methods: A retrospective study of all patients operated on for a spinal epidural angiolipoma at the Department of Neurosurgery at the National Institute of Neurology of Tunis between January 2000 and December 2014 (15 years) was performed. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical, radiological, histological characteristics and the treatment of this tumor. Results: A total of nine patients were operated from January 01, 2000 to November 30, 2014. The average age of our patients was 51 years with ages that ranged from 29 to 65 with a male predominance. The period between onset of symptoms and diagnosis ranged from 24 months with an average 12 months. Posterior localization of the tumor was seen in all patients. Surgical resection was performed for all cases. The postoperative course has been satisfactory, with a complete recovery of neurological functions in all patients. Conclusions: The spinal epidural angiolipomas is rare expansive process causing spinal cord compression. Treatment is exclusively surgical resection. The functional outcome of spinal epidural angiolipomas is particularly favorable with a complete neurological recovery is if the patient was quickly operated. PMID:27695535

  10. Spinal epidural angiolipomas: Clinical characteristics, management and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bouali, Sofiene; Maatar, Nidhal; Bouhoula, Asma; Abderrahmen, Khansa; Said, Imed Ben; Boubaker, Adnen; Kallel, Jalel; Jemel, Hafedh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare expansive processes made of mature lipomatous and angiomatous elements. They often have a benign character. Their etiology, pathogenesis remains uncertain, and it is a cause of spinal cord compression. The magnetic resonance imaging is the most important neuroradiological examination. Histological examination is the only examination to confirm the diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice. Methods: A retrospective study of all patients operated on for a spinal epidural angiolipoma at the Department of Neurosurgery at the National Institute of Neurology of Tunis between January 2000 and December 2014 (15 years) was performed. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical, radiological, histological characteristics and the treatment of this tumor. Results: A total of nine patients were operated from January 01, 2000 to November 30, 2014. The average age of our patients was 51 years with ages that ranged from 29 to 65 with a male predominance. The period between onset of symptoms and diagnosis ranged from 24 months with an average 12 months. Posterior localization of the tumor was seen in all patients. Surgical resection was performed for all cases. The postoperative course has been satisfactory, with a complete recovery of neurological functions in all patients. Conclusions: The spinal epidural angiolipomas is rare expansive process causing spinal cord compression. Treatment is exclusively surgical resection. The functional outcome of spinal epidural angiolipomas is particularly favorable with a complete neurological recovery is if the patient was quickly operated.

  11. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... pillow under your stomach. If this position causes pain, you either sit up or lie on your ...

  12. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... located outside the dural membrane. Steroids, anesthetics and anti-inflammatory medications are typically delivered in an epidural injection. ... create different effects for patients. Corticosteroids act as anti-inflammatory agents, reducing swelling and nerve irritation to allow ...

  13. Microscopic Posterior Transdural Resection of Cervical Retro-Odontoid Pseudotumors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasushi; Manabe, Hideki; Sumida, Tadayoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hamasaki, Takahiko

    2015-12-01

    Retro-odontoid pseudotumors are noninflammatory masses formed posterior to the odontoid process. Because of their anatomy, the optimal surgical approach for resecting pseudotumors is controversial. Conventionally, 3 approaches are used: the anterior transoral approach, the lateral approach, and the posterior extradural approach; however, each approach has its limitations. The posterior extradural approach is the most common; however, it remains challenging due to severe epidural veins. Although regression of pseudotumors after fusion surgery has been reported, direct decompression and a pathologic diagnosis are ideal when the pseudotumor is large. We therefore developed a new microscopic surgical technique; transdural resection. After C1 laminectomy, the dorsal and ventral dura was incised while preserving the arachnoid. Removal of the pseudotumor was performed and both of the dura were repaired. The patient's clinical symptoms subsequently improved and the pathologic findings showed degenerative fibrocartilaginous tissue. In addition, no neurological deterioration, central spinal fluid leakage, or arachnoiditis was observed. Currently, the usefulness of the transdural approach has been reported for cervical and thoracic disk herniation. According to our results, the transdural approach is recommended for resection of retro-odontoid pseudotumors because it enables direct decompression of the spinal cord and a pathologic diagnosis. PMID:26544168

  14. Microscopic Posterior Transdural Resection of Cervical Retro-Odontoid Pseudotumors

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Hideki; Sumida, Tadayoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hamasaki, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Retro-odontoid pseudotumors are noninflammatory masses formed posterior to the odontoid process. Because of their anatomy, the optimal surgical approach for resecting pseudotumors is controversial. Conventionally, 3 approaches are used: the anterior transoral approach, the lateral approach, and the posterior extradural approach; however, each approach has its limitations. The posterior extradural approach is the most common; however, it remains challenging due to severe epidural veins. Although regression of pseudotumors after fusion surgery has been reported, direct decompression and a pathologic diagnosis are ideal when the pseudotumor is large. We therefore developed a new microscopic surgical technique; transdural resection. After C1 laminectomy, the dorsal and ventral dura was incised while preserving the arachnoid. Removal of the pseudotumor was performed and both of the dura were repaired. The patient’s clinical symptoms subsequently improved and the pathologic findings showed degenerative fibrocartilaginous tissue. In addition, no neurological deterioration, central spinal fluid leakage, or arachnoiditis was observed. Currently, the usefulness of the transdural approach has been reported for cervical and thoracic disk herniation. According to our results, the transdural approach is recommended for resection of retro-odontoid pseudotumors because it enables direct decompression of the spinal cord and a pathologic diagnosis. PMID:26544168

  15. Cauda Equina Syndrome Caused by Idiopathic Epidural Lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Seong; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) is a rare condition that presents as a back pain with progressive neurologic symptoms. Most affected patients are obese and receiving steroid therapy, or have an endocrinopathies. We report a rare case of cauda equina syndrome caused by SEL in a non-obese healthy young man without any evident traumatic episode. A healthy 19-year-old man, who had experienced lower back pain for two months, visited our emergency room because of the sudden development of motor weakness and voiding difficulty. Lumbar magnetic resonance image revealed extradural fat compressing the cauda equina. Urgent decompression via posterior laminectomy and excision of excess epidural fat resulted in an immediate symptom improvement. PMID:26834816

  16. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  17. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bustoros, Mark; Thomas, Cheddhi; Frenster, Joshua; Modrek, Aram S; Bayin, N Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Rosen, Gerald; Schiff, Peter B; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  18. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes.

  19. The Epidural Ligaments (of Hofmann): A Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tardieu, Gabrielle G; Loukas, Marios; Moisi, Marc; Chapman, Jens; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    The epidural space contains the internal vertebral venous plexus, adipose, and other connective tissues. In the anatomical literature, there are nonspecific descriptions of varying fibrous connective tissue bands in the epidural space, mainly mentioned in the lumbar region, that tether the dural sac to the posterior longitudinal ligament, the vertebral canal, and the ligamentum flavum. These ligaments have been termed as Hofmann’s ligaments. This review expands on the anatomy and function of Hofmann’s ligaments, increasing the awareness of their presence and serves as an impetus for further study of their histology, innervation, and function.  PMID:27752405

  20. Emergency surgery for epidural abcess secondary to sacral fistula after laparoscopic proctectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zeitoun, Jeremie; Menahem, Benjamin; Fohlen, Audrey; Lebreton, Gil; Lubrano, Jean; Alves, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old man presented via the emergency department with a few days history of abdominal and colic occlusion symptoms. He presented signs of sepsis, midline lumbar spine tenderness and reduced hip flexion. Computer tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed a presacral collection contiguous with the posterior part of the colo-rectal anastomosis, and MRI lumbar spine revealed abscess invation into the epidural space. He underwent a laparotomy with washout of the presacral abscess and a colostomy with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotic therapy. At 3 weeks after initial presentation he had made a full clinical recovery with progressive radiological resolution of the epidural abscess. The objective of the case report is to highlight a unique and clinically significant complication of a rare post-operative complication after rectal surgery and to briefly discuss other intra-abdominal sources of epidural abscess. PMID:27421299

  1. Sciatica and epidural corticosteroid injections.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    According to trials conducted in hundreds of patients with sciatica, epidural corticosteroid injections have no demonstrated efficacy beyond the placebo effect, either in the short-term or the long-term. However, they expose patients to a risk of sometimes serious neurological adverse effects.

  2. Resolution of third nerve palsy despite persistent aneurysmal mass effect after flow diversion embolization of posterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Binyamin, Tamar R; Dahlin, Brian C; Waldau, Ben

    2016-09-01

    Posterior communicating artery (PCOM) aneurysms may cause third nerve palsies. The optimal treatment with clipping versus coiling remains controversial. Here we report on two cases of resolution of third nerve palsy after flow diversion embolization of large and giant PCOM aneurysms without adjuvant coil placement. The resolution of third nerve palsy was not preceded by significant shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac on MRI. However, one patient showed resolution of T2-weighted signal abnormalities in the midbrain and mesial temporal lobe despite a similar size of the aneurysm. Therefore, flow diversion embolization of a PCOM aneurysm may resolve oculomotor nerve palsies through decreasing arterial pulsations against the nerve or midbrain. PMID:27183957

  3. The Use of a Dehydrated Amnion/Chorion Membrane Allograft in Patients Who Subsequently Undergo Reexploration after Posterior Lumbar Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Subach, Brian R.; Copay, Anne G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Context. Products that can reduce development of epidural fibrosis may reduce risk for ongoing pain associated with development of scar tissue and make subsequent epidural reexploration easier. Purpose. To evaluate the use of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM) on the formation of soft tissue scarring in the epidural space. Study Design. Case series. Patient Sample. Five patients having transforaminal lumbar interbody lumbar fusion (TLIF) with posterior instrumentation and implantation of dHACM in the epidural space and subsequent epidural reexploration. Outcome Measures. Degree of scar tissue adjacent to the epidural space at reexploration. Intraoperative and postoperative complications related to dHACM and patient reported outcomes. Methods. The degree of scar tissue adjacent to the epidural space was assessed during the reexploration surgery. Patients' outcomes were collected using standard validated questionnaires. Results. Four of 5 cases had easily detachable tissue during epidural reexploration. Angiolipoma of 10% was noted in 1 case and 5% in 2 cases. Significant improvements in patient reported outcomes were observed. No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that dHACM implant during TLIF may have favorable effects on epidural fibrosis and is well tolerated. Further studies with larger cohorts are required to prove our results. PMID:25653880

  4. En-masse retraction with a preformed nickel-titanium and stainless steel archwire assembly and temporary skeletal anchorage devices without posterior bonding

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Jeong-Hyun; Ahn, Hyo-Won; Seo, Kyung-Won; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Nelson, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the therapeutic effects of a preformed assembly of nickel-titanium (NiTi) and stainless steel (SS) archwires (preformed C-wire) combined with temporary skeletal anchorage devices (TSADs) as the sole source of anchorage and to compare these effects with those of a SS version of C-wire (conventional C-wire) for en-masse retraction. Methods Thirty-one adult female patients with skeletal Class I or II dentoalveolar protrusion, mild-to-moderate anterior crowding (3.0-6.0 mm), and stable Class I posterior occlusion were divided into conventional (n = 15) and preformed (n = 16) C-wire groups. All subjects underwent first premolar extractions and en-masse retraction with pre-adjusted edgewise anterior brackets, the assigned C-wire, and maxillary C-tubes or C-implants; bonded mesh-tube appliances were used in the mandibular dentition. Differences in pretreatment and post-retraction measurements of skeletal, dental, and soft-tissue cephalometric variables were statistically analyzed. Results Both groups showed full retraction of the maxillary anterior teeth by controlled tipping and space closure without altered posterior occlusion. However, the preformed C-wire group had a shorter retraction period (by 3.2 months). Furthermore, the maxillary molars in this group showed no significant mesialization, mesial tipping, or extrusion; some mesialization and mesial tipping occurred in the conventional C-wire group. Conclusions Preformed C-wires combined with maxillary TSADs enable simultaneous leveling and space closure from the beginning of the treatment without maxillary posterior bonding. This allows for faster treatment of dentoalveolar protrusion without unwanted side effects, when compared with conventional C-wire, evidencing its clinical expediency. PMID:25309863

  5. Whole Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Song, Jae Gyok; Ryu, Jae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male who had no underlying disease, including coagulopathy, underwent thoracotomy and bleeding control due to hemothorax. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred. Urgent spine magnetic resonance imaging showed a massive anterior spinal epidural hematoma from C2 to L1 level with different signal intensities, which was suspected to be staged hemorrhage. Hematoma evacuation with decompressive laminectomy was performed. The patient's neurologic deterioration was recovered immediately, and he was discharged without neurological deficits. A drug history of naftazone, which could induce a drug-induced platelet dysfunction, was revealed retrospectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of whole spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a young patient, with a history of hemorrhoid medication. PMID:24967052

  6. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Report.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a 12-year-old female, who presented with significant upper and lower extremities weakness preceded by pain around the neck and shoulder girdle. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed epidural hematoma extending from C6-T2 with characteristic heterogeneously hyperintensity on T2 and homogenously isointensity on T1. Emergent spinal decompression was performed. However, the patient remained substantially weak in her lower extremities and was wheelchair bound at 3 months postoperatively. We have discussed clinical features, predisposing events, pathogenesis and treatment guidelines described in the literature. We also aim to reinforce the notion of keeping a high degree of clinical suspicion to identify and intervene at the earliest stage to prevent the physically and socially challenging consequences of SSEH. PMID:27598898

  7. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga¸secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Background Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. Results The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Conclusion Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. PMID:27030718

  8. Computed tomographic staging of traumatic epidural bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-09-01

    The computed tomographic findings in 45 patients with post-traumatic epidural hemotomas are subdivided into three categories (acute, subacute, and chronic) and correlated with the severity of bleeding, clot formation, and clot resorption. Active epidural bleeding may be identified in acute cases.

  9. Spinal epidural abscess in a young girl without risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis; Birbilis, Theodosios; Michailidis, Lambros; Souftas, Vasileios; Chatzimichael, Athanassios

    2011-07-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare infection associated with well-established risk factors mainly in adults. We describe an 11-year-old girl without any known risk factors who presented with fever and localized spinal tenderness in the lumbar area and was diagnosed with spinal MRI as suffering from a posterior SEA extending between T11 and L4. She was successfully managed with sequential intravenous and oral antibiotics along with minimally invasive surgery without laminectomy. Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was the responsible pathogen isolated at surgery. Immediate institution of antibiotics, spinal MRI, and well-timed neurosurgical consultation are mandatory for a favorable outcome in cases of SEA in children. PMID:21360025

  10. Digging up the recent Spanish memory: genetic identification of human remains from mass graves of the Spanish Civil War and posterior dictatorship.

    PubMed

    Baeta, Miriam; Núñez, Carolina; Cardoso, Sergio; Palencia-Madrid, Leire; Herrasti, Lourdes; Etxeberria, Francisco; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2015-11-01

    The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and posterior dictatorship (until 1970s) stands as one of the major conflicts in the recent history of Spain. It led to nearly two hundred thousand men and women executed or murdered extra-judicially or after dubious legal procedures. Nowadays, most of them remain unidentified or even buried in irretraceable mass graves across Spain. Here, we present the genetic identification of human remains found in 26 mass graves located in Northern Spain. A total of 252 post-mortem remains were analyzed and compared to 186 relatives, allowing the identification of 87 victims. Overall, a significant success of DNA profiling was reached, since informative profiles (≥ 12 STRs and/or mitochondrial DNA profile) were obtained in 85.71% of the remains. This high performance in DNA profiling from challenging samples demonstrated the efficacy of DNA extraction and amplification methods used herein, given that only around 14.29% of the samples did not provide an informative genetic profile for the analysis performed, probably due to the presence of degraded and/or limited DNA in these remains. However, this study shows a partial identification success rate, which is clearly a consequence of the lack of both appropriate family members for genetic comparisons and accurate information about the victims' location. Hence, further perseverance in the exhumation of other intact graves as well as in the search of more alleged relatives is crucial in order to facilitate and increase the number of genetic identifications. PMID:26378723

  11. Digging up the recent Spanish memory: genetic identification of human remains from mass graves of the Spanish Civil War and posterior dictatorship.

    PubMed

    Baeta, Miriam; Núñez, Carolina; Cardoso, Sergio; Palencia-Madrid, Leire; Herrasti, Lourdes; Etxeberria, Francisco; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2015-11-01

    The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and posterior dictatorship (until 1970s) stands as one of the major conflicts in the recent history of Spain. It led to nearly two hundred thousand men and women executed or murdered extra-judicially or after dubious legal procedures. Nowadays, most of them remain unidentified or even buried in irretraceable mass graves across Spain. Here, we present the genetic identification of human remains found in 26 mass graves located in Northern Spain. A total of 252 post-mortem remains were analyzed and compared to 186 relatives, allowing the identification of 87 victims. Overall, a significant success of DNA profiling was reached, since informative profiles (≥ 12 STRs and/or mitochondrial DNA profile) were obtained in 85.71% of the remains. This high performance in DNA profiling from challenging samples demonstrated the efficacy of DNA extraction and amplification methods used herein, given that only around 14.29% of the samples did not provide an informative genetic profile for the analysis performed, probably due to the presence of degraded and/or limited DNA in these remains. However, this study shows a partial identification success rate, which is clearly a consequence of the lack of both appropriate family members for genetic comparisons and accurate information about the victims' location. Hence, further perseverance in the exhumation of other intact graves as well as in the search of more alleged relatives is crucial in order to facilitate and increase the number of genetic identifications.

  12. Epidural anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection.

    PubMed

    Tzimas, P; Prout, J; Papadopoulos, G; Mallett, S V

    2013-06-01

    Although epidural analgesia is routinely used in many institutions for patients undergoing hepatic resection, there are unresolved issues regarding its safety and efficacy in this setting. We performed a review of papers published in the area of anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection surgery and selected four areas of current controversy for the focus of this review: the safety of epidural catheters with respect to postoperative coagulopathy, a common feature of this type of surgery; analgesic efficacy; associated peri-operative fluid administration; and the role of epidural analgesia in enhanced recovery protocols. In all four areas, issues are raised that question whether epidural anaesthesia is always the best choice for these patients. Unfortunately, the evidence available is insufficient to provide definitive answers, and it is clear that there are a number of areas of controversy that would benefit from high-quality clinical trials.

  13. [Epidural analgesia in combination with general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Antje; Poepping, Daniel M

    2015-07-01

    Epidural anaesthesia is a widely used and accepted technique for perioperative analgesia in different kinds of surgery. Apart from analgetic effect and due to wide positve effects on patients outcome epidural analgesia is often used with general anaesthesia. It represents a reliable and reversible neural deafferentation technique that effectively contributes to a reduction of the surgical stress response with subsequent positive effects on cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, and immune function. Animal studies suggest that the use of epidural anaesthesia may be beneficial for cancer surgery because of less tumour recurrence. Further, a benefit is expected in patient's mortality. This article summarizes and critically discusses the current knowledge on the effects of epidural anaesthesia on pain management, cardiopulmonary as well as gastrointestinal functions and patient's outcome.

  14. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  15. Epidural steroid warning controversy still dogging FDA.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Candido, Kenneth D; Singh, Vijay; Gharibo, Christopher G; Boswell, Mark V; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Falco, Frank J E; Grider, Jay S; Diwan, Sudhir; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    On April 23, 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a letter of warning that injection of corticosteroids into the epidural space of the spine may result in rare, but serious adverse events, including "loss of vision, stroke, paralysis, and death." The advisory also advocated that patients should discuss the benefits and risks of epidural corticosteroid injections with their health care professionals, along with the benefits and risks associated with other possible treatments. In addition, the FDA stated that the effectiveness and safety of the corticosteroids for epidural use have not been established, and the FDA has not approved corticosteroids for such use. To raise awareness of the risks of epidural corticosteroid injections in the medical community, the FDA's Safe Use Initiative convened a panel of experts including pain management experts to help define the techniques for such injections with the aim of reducing preventable harm. The panel was unable to reach an agreement on 20 proposed items related to technical aspects of performing epidural injections. Subsequently, the FDA issued the above referenced warning and a notice that a panel will be convened in November 2014. This review assesses the inaccuracies of the warning and critically analyzes the available literature. The literature has been assessed in reference to alternate techniques and an understanding of the risk factors when performing transforaminal epidural injections in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions, ultimately resulting in improved safety. The results of this review show the efficacy of epidural injections, with or without steroids, in a multitude of spinal ailments utilizing caudal, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar interlaminar approaches as well as lumbar transforaminal epidural injections . The evidence also shows the superiority of steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation utilizing caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches without any significant difference as

  16. [History and Technique of Epidural Anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Waurick, Katrin; Waurick, René

    2015-07-01

    In 1901, the first Epidural anesthesia via a caudal approach was independently described by two FrenchmanJean-Anthanase Sicard and Fernand Cathelin.. The Spanish military surgeon, Fidel Pagés Miravé, completed the lumbar approach successfully in 1921. The two possibilities for identification of the epidural space the "loss of resistance" technique and the technique of the "hanging drop" were developed by Achille Mario Dogliotti, an Italian, and Alberto Gutierrez, an Argentinean physician, at the same time. In 1956 John J. Bonica published the paramedian approach to the epidural space. As early as 1931 Eugene Aburel, a Romanian obstetrician, injected local anaesthetics via a silk catheter to perform lumbar obstetric Epidural analgesia. In 1949 the first successful continuous lumbar Epidural anaesthesia was reported by Manuel Martinez Curbelo, a Cuban. Epidural anaesthesia can be performed in sitting or lateral position in all segments of the spinal column via the median or paramedian approach. Different off-axis angles pose the challenge in learning the technique.

  17. [Techniques for identifying the epidural space].

    PubMed

    Figueredo, E

    2005-01-01

    A large part of the success of epidural anesthesia rests on correct identification of the epidural space. The last hundred years have seen the description of numerous techniques for locating the space in the most straightforward, effective, safe, and reliable manner. To evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches and the complications associated with each, we carried out a MEDLINE search using the following key words: "epidural analgesia," "epidural anesthesia," "epidural space," "identification," and "loss of resistance" (LOR). Traditional, complementary, and instrument-guided techniques used to identify the epidural space were analyzed. The results of clinical trials comparing different LOR techniques were evaluated. LOR with air, with isotonic saline, or a combination of both were the techniques shown to be simplest and safest. With respect to safety, LOR with air led to the greatest number of complications (pneumocephalus, air embolism, insufficient analgesia, higher incidence of dural puncture, nerve root compression, subcutaneous emphysema). When a small air bubble is created inside the syringe, LOR with saline solution is reliable and teachable, as well as safe and effective.

  18. Symptomatic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis After a Single Local Epidural Steroid Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, Chung Hong Kaur, Shaleen; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare disorder that can manifest with progressive neurological deficits. It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated epidural fat commonly associated with the administration of exogenous steroids associated with a variety of systemic diseases, endocrinopathies, and Cushing syndrome (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). Occasionally, spinal epidural lipomatosis may occur in patients not exposed to steroids or in patients with endocrinopathies, primarily in obese individuals (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). However, spinal lumbar epidural lipomatosis resulting from local steroid injection has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 45-year-old diabetic man with claudication that was probably due to symptomatic lumbar spinal lipomatosis resulting from a single local epidural steroid injection.

  19. An epidural analgesia program: balancing risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Rosen, H F; Calio, M M

    1990-09-01

    An alternative to parenteral narcotic management is the administration of analgesics into the epidural space. The recognition and prevention of complications or side effects of epidural analgesia are prime concerns in planning nursing care for these patients.

  20. Retroperitoneoscopic unroofing of a renal cyst under epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Yagisawa, T; Ito, F; Shimizu, T; Toma, H; Yamagata, K; Ikeda, M

    2001-08-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has routinely been performed under general anesthesia. Our first case of a large renal cyst treated successfully with retroperitoneoscopic unroofing under epidural anesthesia is presented here. Epidural anesthesia can be used for retroperitoneoscopic surgery if necessary.

  1. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  2. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  3. Unusual Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis and Lumbosacral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Picazo, David; Ramírez Villaescusa, José

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural lipomatosis is most frequently observed in patients on chronic steroid treatment. Only a few idiopathic epidural lipomatosis cases have been described. Material and Methods. 64-year-old male patient presented with low back pain and left leg pain. Later, the patient experienced neurogenic claudication and radicular pain in the left leg without urinary dysfunction. Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an abnormal fat tissue overgrowth in the epidural space with compression of the dural sac, degenerative disc disease at L4-L5 level, and instability at L5-S1. Endocrinopathic diseases and chronic steroid therapy were excluded. If conservative treatment failed, surgical treatment can be indicated. Results. After surgery, there was a gradual improvement in symptoms and signs, and six months later the patient returned to daily activities and was neurologically normal. Conclusion. In the absence of common causes of neurogenic claudication, epidural lipomatosis should be considered. The standard test for the diagnosis of epidural lipomatosis is magnetic resonance (MR). At first, conservative treatment must be considered; weight loss and the suspension of prior corticosteroid therapy are indicated. In the presence of neurological impairment, the operative treatment of wide surgical decompression must be performed soon after diagnosis. PMID:27069704

  4. Treatment of shivering after epidural lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Harris, M M; Lawson, D; Cooper, C M; Ellis, J

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness of intravenous meperidine and warm local anesthetic for prevention of postanesthetic shivering was evaluated in urology patients undergoing epidural blockade for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. When administered before the blockade, meperidine, 12.5 mg or 25 mg, was not significantly better than saline placebo for preventing postepidural shivering. Changes in the concentrations of catecholamines or lidocaine did not result in differences between patients who shivered and those who did not shiver. In a second experiment, patients receiving body-temperature or room-temperature epidural lidocaine did not differ with respect to the incidence of postanesthetic shivering, onset of sensory blockade, or core temperature during a 30-minute observation period. The authors concluded that neither meperidine, in doses employed, nor body-temperature lidocaine prevents shivering after epidural blockade. This shivering appears to be different from that observed during emergence from general anesthesia.

  5. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  6. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  7. Sciatica caused by lumbar epidural gas.

    PubMed

    Belfquih, Hatim; El Mostarchid, Brahim; Akhaddar, Ali; gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disc degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. The clinical features are similar to those of common sciatica. CT is very useful in the detection of epidural gas accumulation and nerve root compression. We report a case of symptomatic epidural gas accumulation originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbo-sacral radiculopathy. A 45-year-old woman suffered from sciatica for 9 months. The condition worsened in recent days. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and S1 nerve root. After evacuation of the gas, her pain resolved without recurrence.

  8. Spinal epidural angiolipoma: A rare cause of spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Rajesh K; Koti, Kalyan; Dandamudi, Srinivas

    2012-09-01

    Spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare, benign tumors composed of mature lipocytes admixed with abnormal blood vessels. Only 128 cases of spinal epidural angiolipomas have been reported in literature till now. Spinal angiolipomas are predominantly located in the mid-thoracic region. We report a case of dorsal epidural angiolipoma in a 56-year-old male who presented with paraparesis and was diagnosed to have D4-5 epidural angiolipoma. Total surgical excision of the epidural angiolipoma was done and his paraparesis gradually improved.

  9. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery.

  10. Pin-site epidural hematoma: A catastrophic complication of cranial fixation in a child

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Prasad; Kumar, Soumen Kanti; Kartikueyan, Rajaraman; Patel, Sachinkumar Maheshbhai

    2016-01-01

    Cranial fixation with pins is a routine adjunct in neurosurgery and is usually considered safe. A rarely reported complication is skull fracture at the pin site and consequent epidural hematoma. Usually, these are picked up only postoperatively and rarely, intraoperatively if there is unexplained “brain bulge” in which case the operation should be terminated and urgent imaging has to be done. We describe such a complication that occurred while operating on a 12-year-old child with a posterior fossa tumor and review the available literature dealing with such events. PMID:27114664

  11. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation. PMID:27688918

  12. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess.

    PubMed

    Aycan, Abdurrahman; Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail; Arslan, Harun

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation. PMID:27688918

  13. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation.

  14. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-08-20

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery.

  15. Epidural volume extension in combined spinal epidural anaesthesia for elective caesarean section: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Loubert, C; O'Brien, P J; Fernando, R; Walton, N; Philip, S; Addei, T; Columb, M O; Hallworth, S

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the effect of epidural volume extension on spinal blockade in pregnant women undergoing elective caesarean section with a combined spinal-epidural technique. We randomly allocated 90 healthy subjects to three groups to receive spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg (group B7.5), spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg immediately followed by epidural volume extension with saline 5 ml (group B7.5-EVE) or spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 10 mg without epidural volume extension (group B10). We evaluated the height of the block every 5 min for 15 min following the spinal injection. The overall sensory block level increased with time (p < 0.001), regardless of the group studied, and there were significantly fewer failures of block in the group B10 compared with both B7.5 and B7.5-EVE groups (p = 0.001). In conclusion, we could not demonstrate a benefit in using epidural volume extension with 5 ml saline as part of a combined spinal epidural technique in term parturients undergoing elective caesarean section.

  16. [Spinal epidural angiolipoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Dufrenot, Leïla; Pelé, Eric; Cursolle, Jean-Christophe; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2010-02-01

    Spinal epidural angiolipoma is a rare tumor revealed by a slowly progressive paraplegia. We reported a case of a 44-year-old female and point out the peculiar pattern of this lesion characterized by the prominence of the vascular component over the lipomatous component. Recognition of this entity is important because this is a benign and curable cause of paraplegia.

  17. Spontaneous extracranial decompression of epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Neely, John C; Jones, Blaise V; Crone, Kerry R

    2008-03-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) is a common sequela of head trauma in children. An increasing number are managed nonsurgically, with close clinical and imaging observation. We report the case of a traumatic EDH that spontaneously decompressed into the subgaleal space, demonstrated on serial CT scans that showed resolution of the EDH and concurrent enlargement of the subgaleal hematoma.

  18. [Clinical use of spinal or epidural steroids].

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, F; Ciccozzi, A; Donatelli, F; Paladini, A; Varrassi, G

    2002-01-01

    Steroids, drugs with potent antiinflammatory properties on the damaged nervous roots, have been especially used as adjuvants of local anesthetics, by spinal route, in the treatments of low-back pain. Spinal route was chosen to obtain a higher local concentration of drug, with few systemic side effects and to improve drug's action mechanism. Steroids seem to interact with GABA receptors and thus control neural excitability through a stabilising effect on membranes, modification of nervous conduction and membrane hyperpolarization, in supraspinal and spinal site. Epidural steroids are especially used in the treatment of low back pain due to irritation of nervous roots. They have been administered alone or in association with local anesthetics and/or saline solution. Slow release formulations have been generally used (methylprednisolone acetate, and triamcinolone diacetate). Other indications of epidural steroids are: postoperative hemilaminectomy pain, prevention of post herpetic neuralgia, degenerative ostheoartrithis. Intra-thecal steroids have been frequently used in the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy due to discopathy, as an alternative treatment when epidural administration is ineffective. Positive results have been obtained with methylprednisolone acetate, alone or in association with local anesthetics. Complications related to intraspinal steroids injections are due to execution of the block and side effects of drugs. Complications associated with intrathecal steroids are more frequent and severe than epidural injections and include: adhesive arachnoiditis, aseptic meningitis, cauda equina syndrome. Steroidal toxicity seems to be related to the polyethylenic glycole vehicle. Anyway, slow release formulations contain less concentrated polyethylenic glycole. The epidural administration, a correct dilution of steroid with local anesthetics solution and/or saline solution, and a limited number of injections (no more than three) allows a significant reduction of

  19. Which should be appropriate surgical treatment for subtentorial epidural empyema? Burr-hole evacuation versus decompressive craniectomy: Review of the literature with a case report

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Vaner; Özgür, Abdulkadir; Terzi, Suat

    2016-01-01

    Subtentorial empyema is a rare intracranial complication of chronic otitis media. Moreover, if not correctly treated, it is a life-threatening infection. Epidural and subdural empyemas on subtentorial space have different effects. This difference is not mentioned in literature. If the distinction can be made, surgical treatment method will be different, and the desired surgical treatment may be less minimal invasive. A 26-year-old male patient was found to have developed epidural empyema in the subtentorial space. We performed a burr-hole evacuation in this case because there was low cerebellar edema, Also, the general condition of the patient was good, the empyema was a convex image on the lower surface of tentorium on magnetic resonance images, and when the dura mater base is reached during mastoidectomy for chronic otitis media, we were observed to drain a purulent material through the epidural space. After 10 days from surgery increased posterior fossa edema caused hydrocephalus. Therefore, ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion was performed. The patient fully recovered and was discharged after 6 weeks. Complete correction in the posterior fossa was observed by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Burr-hole evacuation from inside of the mastoidectomy cavity for subtentorial epidural empyema is an effective and minimal invasive surgical treatment. PMID:27057210

  20. Lab in a needle for epidural space identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, B.; Micco, A.; Ricciardi, A.; Amorizzo, E.; Mercieri, M.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2016-05-01

    This work relies on the development of a sensorized medical needle with an all-optical guidance (Lab in a Needle) system for epidural space identification. The device is based on the judicious integration of a Fiber Bragg grating sensor inside the lumen of an epidural needle to discriminate between different types of tissue and thus providing continuous and real time measurements of the pressure experienced by the needle tip during its advancement. Experiments carried out on an epidural training phantom demonstrate the validity of our approach for the correct and effective identification of the epidural space.

  1. [Complications related to epidural catheter in caesarean delivery].

    PubMed

    Leykin, Y; Lucca, M

    2001-09-01

    A review of complications related to epidural catheters in caesarean delivery is presented. Catheters for prolongation of nerve blocks were first used in 1940s. Thereafter, there has been steady development in the design and plastic material technology of the different catheters. In the last decade the regional anaesthesia for caesarean section became very popular, as well as continuous increase in the use of epidural catheters. The anatomical changes of pregnancy like marked distension of the epidural veins resulted in increased risk of the complications due to the epidural catheter placement. It is likely that permanent neurologic sequelae due to regional anaesthesia in obstetrics almost never occur, while minor self-limiting complications do occur. The possible complications of epidural catheter techniques are: trauma, malposition and migration of the catheter, knotting and breaking, radiculopathy, dural puncture, subdural injection, abscess and infection, haematoma and wrong solution injection. Most of the malpositions of the epidural catheter can be avoided by a careful technique, advancing the catheter with no forceful movement and not more than 3 to 4 cm into epidural space. Broken parts of the catheters should be left as a rule within the spinal space. Test dose should be always done for continuous epidural anaesthesia. Early diagnosis and prompt appropriate treatment will usually lead to complete resolution of the neurological deficit even in cases of epidural haematoma or abscess.

  2. Spinal epidural empyema in a cat.

    PubMed

    Maeta, Noritaka; Kanda, Teppei; Sasaki, Takanori; Morita, Takehito; Furukawa, Toshinori

    2010-06-01

    The diagnosis and surgical treatment of spinal epidural empyema (SEE) in a 2-year-old neutered male domestic shorthaired cat is described. SEE was diagnosed by computed tomographic myelography (CT myelography) and surgical exploration. The lesion was missed on both non-enhanced CT and conventional myelography. SEE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of progressive myelopathy in cats, and CT myelography should be undertaken when magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cannot be performed. PMID:20226705

  3. Comparison of continuous epidural infusion and programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yunan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Jinlu; Yang, Ruimin; Liu, Jingchen

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate differences between continuous epidural infusion (CEI) and programmed intermittent epidural bolus (IEB) analgesia for the Chinese parturients undergoing spontaneous delivery and to approach their safety to parturients and neonates. Methods Two hundred healthy American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II, term (≥37 weeks’ gestation), nulliparous women who requested analgesia for labor were recruited. Epidural analgesia was initiated with a solution of 0.15% ropivacaine 10 mL and maintained with 0.1% ropivacaine mixed with sufentanil 0.3 μg/mL by CEI at a rate of 5 mL/h combined with a patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture or IEB of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture combined with a PCEA bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture. The lockout interval was 20 minutes in each arm between the CEI and the IEB group. After 20 minutes of first dosage, visual analog scale (VAS) score was obtained every 60 minutes. The maternal and fetal outcome and total consumption of analgesic solution were compared. Results There was no difference in demographic characteristics, duration of first and second stages, delivery methods, sensory block, fetal Apgar scores, and the maternal outcomes between the CEI and IEB groups. There was a significant difference in VAS scores and epidural ropivacaine total consumption between the two groups (IEB vs CEI: 51.27±9.61 vs 70.44±12.78 mg, P<0.01). Conclusion The use of programmed IEB mixed with PCEA improved labor analgesia compared to CEI mixed with PCEA, which could act as maintenance mode for epidural labor analgesia. PMID:27471390

  4. Spinal angiolipoma in a pregnant woman presenting with acute epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Nonaka, Yasuomi; Abe, Yusuke; Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Ito, Masanori

    2011-06-01

    A 26-year-old woman in week 31 of pregnancy presented to the emergency room with acute onset of paraplegia. Her medical history was unremarkable. Neurological examination revealed complete paraplegia, total sensory loss below the T7 dermatome, and significant vesicorectal dysfunction. MRI revealed an intraspinal mass from T3 to T4, which was hyperintense on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. Blood examination found no abnormality. She underwent emergent hemilaminectomy and removal of the hematoma. Intraoperatively, unusually ectatic venous vessels were found adhered to the lower surface of the epidural clot. No concurrent vascular malformations were identified and the dura mater was intact. The histological diagnosis was angiolipoma. Postoperatively her neurological deficits showed remarkable improvement, and she gave birth to a healthy baby. Spinal angiolipoma in a pregnant woman may be complicated with acute epidural hemorrhage. Emergent surgical evacuation can be performed safely with a good functional prognosis.

  5. Posterior malleolus fracture.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Todd A; Lien, John; Kadakia, Anish R

    2013-01-01

    Posterior malleolus fractures are a common component of ankle fractures. The morphology is variable; these fractures range from small posterolateral avulsion injuries to large displaced fracture fragments. The integrity of the posterior malleolus and its ligamentous attachment is important for tibiotalar load transfer, posterior talar stability, and rotatory ankle stability. Fixation of posterior malleolus fractures in the setting of rotational ankle injuries has certain benefits, such as restoring articular congruity and rotatory ankle stability, as well as preventing posterior talar translation, but current indications are unclear. Fragment size as a percentage of the anteroposterior dimension of the articular surface is often cited as an indication for fixation, although several factors may contribute to the decision, such as articular impaction, comminution, and syndesmotic stability. Outcome studies show that, in patients with ankle fractures, the presence of a posterior malleolus fracture negatively affects prognosis. Notable variability is evident in surgeon practice. PMID:23281469

  6. Myoclonus-like involuntary movements following cesarean delivery epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee Yong; Lee, Sang Wook; Hong, Eun Pyo; Sim, Yeo Hae; Lee, Su-Mi; Park, Sung Wook; Kang, Jong-Man

    2016-11-01

    Spinal myoclonus following neuraxial anesthesia is rare. This report describes a case of myoclonus-like involuntary movement that occurred during the recovery from epidural anesthesia for a cesarean delivery. The patient's symptom improved with the administration of benzodiazepine, and the patient recovered with no neurological sequelae. In conclusion, epidural anesthesia can cause spinal myoclonus, which can be treated with a benzodiazepine. PMID:27687419

  7. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  8. Skin pulse wave monitoring during lumbar epidural and spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Meijer, J; de Lange, J J; Ros, H H

    1988-04-01

    The effectiveness of pulse wave monitoring of the big toes was compared with loss of cold discrimination to determine the onset of nerve blockade during lumbar epidural and spinal anesthesia. Forty-seven patients scheduled for elective urologic or lower extremity operations were assigned to one of three groups. Group 1 (15 patients) received epidural mepivacaine 1.5% with epinephrine; group 2 (12 patients), epidural bupivacaine 0.5%, and group 3 (20 patients), spinal bupivacaine 0.5%. In the epidural groups, the mean time to onset of increases in pulse wave amplitude was less than half the mean time to onset of decrease in cold discrimination (P less than 0.05). In patients given spinal anesthesia, there was no significant difference. The pulse wave monitor seems to be a sensitive and objective detector of early anesthetic effect during spinal and epidural anesthesia.

  9. The Epidural Treatment of Sciatica: Its Origin and Evolution.

    PubMed

    Ter Meulen, Bastiaan C; Weinstein, Henry; Ostelo, Raymond; Koehler, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Epidural injection with corticosteroids is a common treatment option for patients with lower back pain or sciatica. In this paper we review its origin and evolution. The first injections were given around 1900 in Paris by Jean Sicard (1872-1929) and Fernand Cathelin (1873-1945), who worked independently. They both injected small volumes of cocaine into the sacral hiatus. After a slow start, the epidural treatment of back pain and sciatica gradually spread to other parts of Europe and Northern America. In the early 1950s, corticosteroids were introduced for epidural use. Since the 1970s, there have been numerous clinical trials that show a significant, although small, effect of epidural corticosteroid injections compared with placebo for leg pain in the short term. Despite an ongoing debate about effectiveness and safety, epidural injections remain popular. PMID:26820578

  10. Postoperative pain relief with epidural buprenorphine versus epidural butorphanol in laparoscopic hysterectomies: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Dona Elsa; Ganapathi, P.; Anish Sharma, N. G.; Shankaranarayana, P.; Aiyappa, D. S.; Nazim, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of postoperative analgesia with epidural buprenorphine and butorphanol tartrate. Methods: Sixty patients who were scheduled for elective laparoscopic hysterectomies were randomly enrolled in the study. At the end of the surgery, in study Group A 1 ml (0.3 mg) of buprenorphine and in Group B 1 ml (1 mg) of butorphanol tartrate both diluted to 10 ml with normal saline was injected through the epidural catheter. Visual analog pain scales (VAPSs) were assessed every hour till the 6th h, then 2nd hourly till the 12th h. To assess sedation, Ramsay sedation score was used. The total duration of postoperative analgesia was taken as the period from the time of giving epidural drug until the patients first complain of pain and the VAPS is more than 6. Patients were observed for any side effects such as respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting, hypotension, bradycardia, pruritus, and headache. Results: Buprenorphine had a longer duration of analgesia when compared to butorphanol tartrate (586.17 ± 73.64 vs. 342.53 ± 47.42 [P < 0.001]). Nausea, vomiting (13% vs. 10%), and headache (20% vs. 13%) were more in buprenorphine group; however, sedation score and pruritus (3% vs. 6%) were found to be more with butorphanol. Conclusion: Epidural buprenorphine significantly reduced pain and increased the quality of analgesia with a longer duration of action and was a better alternative to butorphanol for postoperative pain relief. PMID:26957696

  11. Low-dose epidural dexmedetomidine improves thoracic epidural anaesthesia for nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X Z; Xu, Y M; Cui, X G; Guo, Y P; Li, W Z

    2014-03-01

    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia alone is an applied technique of anaesthesia for nephrectomy which has both advantages and limitations. Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonist which has both central and peripheral analgesic properties. Forty patients undergoing nephrectomy were enrolled in this clinical trial and allocated randomly to two groups, a control group (C group) and a dexmedetomidine group (D group). The C group received epidural 0.75% levobupivacaine 12 ml with 1 ml of isotonic sodium chloride solution, while the D group received epidural 0.75% levobupivacaine 12 ml with 1 ml (0.5 µg/kg) of dexmedetomidine. Haemodynamic changes, onset time and duration of sensory and motor block, muscle relaxation score, verbal rating score for pain, sedation score and the total postoperative analgesic consumption were evaluated. Sensory blockade duration was longer in the D group than in the C group (P=0.01). The incidence of motor block and the muscle relaxation score were significantly higher in the D group compared with the C group (P=0.01). Compared with the C group, pain scores were significantly lower in the first four postoperative hours in the D group (two hours rest P=0.038; two hours activity P=0.009; four hours rest P=0.044; four hours activity P=0.003). The total amount of flurbiprofen analgesic was significantly lower in the D group compared with the C group (P=0.03). Epidural dexmedetomidine 0.5 µg/kg appears to intensify thoracic epidural anaesthesia with levobupivacaine.

  12. Can the human lumbar posterior columns be stimulated by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation? A modeling study.

    PubMed

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Ladenbauer, Josef; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of different spinal cord segments in humans is a widely developed clinical practice for modification of pain, altered sensation, and movement. The human lumbar cord has become a target for modification of motor control by epidural and, more recently, by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation. Posterior columns of the lumbar spinal cord represent a vertical system of axons and when activated can add other inputs to the motor control of the spinal cord than stimulated posterior roots. We used a detailed three-dimensional volume conductor model of the torso and the McIntyre-Richard-Grill axon model to calculate the thresholds of axons within the posterior columns in response to transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation. Superficially located large-diameter posterior column fibers with multiple collaterals have a threshold of 45.4 V, three times higher than posterior root fibers (14.1 V). With the stimulation strength needed to activate posterior column axons, posterior root fibers of large and small diameters as well as anterior root fibers are coactivated. The reported results inform on these threshold differences, when stimulation is applied to the posterior structures of the lumbar cord at intensities above the threshold of large-diameter posterior root fibers. PMID:21401670

  13. Epidural anaesthesia and familial dysautonomia (the Riley Day syndrome). Three case reports.

    PubMed

    Challands, J F; Facer, E K

    1998-01-01

    Epidural anaesthesia in Familial Dysautonomia (FD) or the Riley Day syndrome has not previously been reported. Three children with FD presenting for redo Nissen fundoplication were managed with epidural anaesthesia. Cases 1 and 2 had had their original Nissen fundoplication without epidural anaesthesia. In Case 3, FD had not yet been diagnosed when she had her first operation, and it was performed with epidural anaesthesia. The anaesthetic management of these cases with and without epidural anaesthesia is described and discussed.

  14. Novel use of epidural catheter: Air injection for neuroprotection during radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Doctor, JR; Solanki, SL; Patil, VP; Divatia, JV

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign bone tumor, with a male-female ratio of approximately 2:1 and mainly affecting long bones. Ten percent of the lesions occur in the spine, mostly within the posterior elements. Treatment options for OO include surgical excision and percutaneous imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Lesions within the spine have an inherent risk of thermal damage to the vital structure because of proximity to the neural elements. We report a novel use of the epidural catheter for air injection for the neuroprotection of nerves close to the OO of the spine. A 12-year-old and 30 kg male child with an OO of the L3 vertebra was taken up for RFA. His preoperative examinations were within normal limits. The OO was very close to the L3 nerve root. Under general anesthesia, lumbar epidural catheter was placed in the L3-L4 space under imaging guidance. Ten ml of aliquots of air was injected under imaging guidance to avoid injury to the neural structures due to RFA. The air created a gap between neural elements and the tumor and served as an insulating material thereby protecting the neural elements from damage due to the RFA. Postoperatively, the patient did not develop any neurological deficit. PMID:27375396

  15. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Abe, Madoka; Kunitake, Naonobu; Matsumoto, Keiji; Ohga, Saiji; Sasaki, Tomonari; Uehara, Satoru; Okushima, Kazuhiro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

  16. Depth of the thoracic epidural space in children.

    PubMed

    Masir, F; Driessen, J J; Thies, K C; Wijnen, M H; van Egmond, J

    2006-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia in anaesthetized children requires a meticulous technique and may have an increased success rate when the distance between skin and epidural space is known. The objective of this observational study was to measure the skin to epidural distance (SED) during thoracic epidural puncture in 61 children. The epidural puncture was performed using the loss of resistance technique with saline 0.9%. The distance from the needle tip to the point where the needle emerged from the skin was measured. The post-operative analgesia parameters were also measured. Skin to epidural distance correlated significantly with the age and weight of the children. The equation for the relation between SED (cm) and age was 2.15 + (0.01 x months) and for SED vs weight was 1.95 + (0.045 x kg). Despite considerable variability among individuals, the observed correlation of SED with both age and weight shows that this parameter may be helpful to guide thoracic epidural puncture in anaesthetized children. PMID:17067139

  17. General versus epidural anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Ulutas, Murat; Secer, Mehmet; Taskapilioglu, Ozgur; Karadas, Soner; Akyilmaz, Ahmet Aykut; Baydilek, Yunus; Kocamer, Betul; Ozboz, Ayse; Boyaci, Suat

    2015-08-01

    This study was a retrospective analysis of 850 lumbar microdiscectomy (LMD) under epidural anesthesia (EA; n=573) or general anesthesia (GA; n=277) performed by the same surgeon and paid by invoice to the Social Security Institution of the Turkish Republic between April 2003 and May 2013. Although GA is the most frequently used method of anesthesia during LMD, the choice of regional anesthetia (epidural, spinal or a combination of these) differs between surgeons and anesthetists. Studies have reported that EA in surgery for lumbar disc herniation may be more reliable than GA, as it enables the surgeon to communicate with the patient during surgery, but few studies have compared the costs of these two anesthetic methods in LMD. We found that EA patient costs were significantly lower than GA patient costs (p<0.01) and there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the time spent in the operating room (p<0.01). There was no difference in the duration of surgery (p>0.05). The anesthetic method used during LMD affected the complication rate, cost and efficiency of operating room use. We suggest that EA is an anesthetic method that can contribute to health care cost savings and enable LMD to be completed with less nerve root manipulation and more comfort, efficacy, reliability and cost efficiency without affecting the success rate of the surgical procedure.

  18. General versus epidural anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Ulutas, Murat; Secer, Mehmet; Taskapilioglu, Ozgur; Karadas, Soner; Akyilmaz, Ahmet Aykut; Baydilek, Yunus; Kocamer, Betul; Ozboz, Ayse; Boyaci, Suat

    2015-08-01

    This study was a retrospective analysis of 850 lumbar microdiscectomy (LMD) under epidural anesthesia (EA; n=573) or general anesthesia (GA; n=277) performed by the same surgeon and paid by invoice to the Social Security Institution of the Turkish Republic between April 2003 and May 2013. Although GA is the most frequently used method of anesthesia during LMD, the choice of regional anesthetia (epidural, spinal or a combination of these) differs between surgeons and anesthetists. Studies have reported that EA in surgery for lumbar disc herniation may be more reliable than GA, as it enables the surgeon to communicate with the patient during surgery, but few studies have compared the costs of these two anesthetic methods in LMD. We found that EA patient costs were significantly lower than GA patient costs (p<0.01) and there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the time spent in the operating room (p<0.01). There was no difference in the duration of surgery (p>0.05). The anesthetic method used during LMD affected the complication rate, cost and efficiency of operating room use. We suggest that EA is an anesthetic method that can contribute to health care cost savings and enable LMD to be completed with less nerve root manipulation and more comfort, efficacy, reliability and cost efficiency without affecting the success rate of the surgical procedure. PMID:26067543

  19. Fever following an Epidural Blood Patch in a Child.

    PubMed

    Hunyady, Agnes I; Anderson, Corrie T M; Kuratani, John D; Kundu, Anjana

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that children suffer from the consequences of spontaneous or iatrogenic intracranial hypotension. Pediatric epidural blood patch is gaining popularity because of its ability to alter cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and to alleviate headaches attributed to low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. There is, however, still not enough data to document the safety profile of an epidural blood patch. Here we describe a case of a fever in a child temporally related to the administration of an epidural blood patch. This case depicts the dilemmas in making the diagnosis and instituting treatment for complications of this procedure in the pediatric population.

  20. Fever following an Epidural Blood Patch in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Hunyady, Agnes I.; Anderson, Corrie T. M.; Kuratani, John D.; Kundu, Anjana

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that children suffer from the consequences of spontaneous or iatrogenic intracranial hypotension. Pediatric epidural blood patch is gaining popularity because of its ability to alter cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and to alleviate headaches attributed to low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. There is, however, still not enough data to document the safety profile of an epidural blood patch. Here we describe a case of a fever in a child temporally related to the administration of an epidural blood patch. This case depicts the dilemmas in making the diagnosis and instituting treatment for complications of this procedure in the pediatric population. PMID:23029626

  1. Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in β-thalassaemia intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Hoi; Li, Allen; Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old man known to have β-thalassaemia intermedia since childhood presented with bilateral lower limb weakness after spinal anaesthesia for an elective minor operation of his left leg. MRI and CT scans were performed to rule out acute epidural haematoma; coincidental imaging features of marrow hyperplasia and spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis were found. This article will present and discuss the imaging features, differential diagnosis, management and literature review of the rare occurrence of extramedullary haematopoiesis in the spinal epidural space. PMID:24390965

  2. Congenital neuroblastoma with symptoms of epidural compression at birth.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, A R; De Ioris, M A; De Grandis, E; Podda, M; Cellini, M; Sorrentino, S; De Bernardi, B; Paladini, D; Gandolfo, C

    2016-03-01

    The occurrence of congenital neuroblastoma presenting at birth with symptoms of epidural compression secondary to spinal canal invasion is rare. Almost all cases reported in the literature have survived from the tumor but suffer severe sequelae, with the exception of the 2 most recently described whose birth was anticipated. The 3 cases of this article have been followed for a minimum of 5 years with the aim to describe their definitive late complications. In none of these cases had the routine ultrasound scan performed in third trimester of pregnancy discovered a tumor mass, nor had it shown abnormal fetal movements. All had leg hypotonia detected on the first day of life. In all, both primary and intraspinal tumors responded well to chemotherapy. All survive with motor deficit and severe bladder dysfunction despite early physiotherapy. Scoliosis has developed in the case with the longest follow-up. The description of these patients enforces the importance of early diagnosis of tumor masses in late pregnancy. Neonatologists should be aware of this rare clinical entity and take it into account in the differential diagnosis with other conditions of early-onset hypotonia. On the other hand, obstetric sonologists should be aware of the possibility to detect such rare tumors in late pregnancy, as anticipation of delivery may reduce the risk of late sequelae. PMID:26901768

  3. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  4. Indirect posterior composite resins.

    PubMed

    Leinfelder, Karl F

    2005-07-01

    The use of indirect posterior composite restorations has facilitated the generation of ideal anatomic form, marginal adaptation, and appropriate proximal contact and contour. Unfortunately, however, the use of post-cure heat treatments has done little to enhance the overall clinical performance of the restoration. The development of new curing techniques in conjunction with modifications of the formulae have contributed to a substantial improvement in both the mechanical characteristics and long-term clinical performance of indirect posterior composite resins.

  5. Central temperature changes are poorly perceived during epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Glosten, B; Sessler, D I; Faure, E A; Karl, L; Thisted, R A

    1992-07-01

    Hypothermia and shivering are common during epidural anesthesia for cesarean delivery but are not always accompanied by a sensation of coldness. To test the hypothesis that central temperature changes are not perceived during epidural anesthesia, we measured central and skin temperatures and thermal perception in 30 patients undergoing cesarean delivery with epidural anesthesia. Central temperature decreased 1.0 +/- 0.6 degrees C from control values during anesthesia and surgery, but thermal perception scores did not reflect central temperatures (P = 0.56) or changes in central temperature (P = 0.63). A feeling of warmth was significantly correlated with increased mean skin temperature (P = 0.02) and increased upper body skin temperature (P = 0.03). We conclude that central temperature is poorly perceived and is less important than skin temperature in determining thermal perception during high levels of epidural anesthesia.

  6. Epidural analgesia for labour: maternal knowledge, preferences and informed consent.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, S; Tan, T; Walsh, A; Carey, M

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia has become increasingly popular as a form of labour analgesia in Ireland. However obtaining true inform consent has always been difficult. Our study recruited 100 parturients who had undergone epidural analgesia for labour, aimed to determine the information they received prior to regional analgesia, and to ascertain their preferences regarding informed consent. Only 65 (65%) of patients planned to have an epidural. Knowledge of potential complications was variable and inaccurate, with less than 30 (30%) of women aware of the most common complications. Most women 79 (79%) believed that discomfort during labour affected their ability to provide informed consent, and believe consent should be taken prior to onset of labour (96, 96%). The results of this study helps define the standards of consent Irish patients expect for epidural analgesia during labour.

  7. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Vien, Christine; Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  8. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  9. Is epidural steroid injection effective for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-11-16

    There are several nonsurgical alternatives to treat radicular pain in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Epidural steroid injections have been used for several decades, but the different studies have shown variable effects. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified nine systematic reviews including seven pertinent randomized controlled trials. We concluded epidural steroid injection probably leads to little or no effect on reducing radicular pain of spinal stenosis.

  10. Unilateral anhidrosis: A rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Alkan, Güzide; Baysalman, Hatice Baran; Kaplan, Tevfik

    2016-02-01

    Management of pain following thoracotomy is an important issue for the control of early morbidity. We herein present the case of a patient who was referred to our hospital after a fall from a height. Right-sided multiple rib fractures, hemopneumothorax, and diaphragmatic rupture were detected. Thoracic epidural catheterization was performed for pain management just before thoracotomy. The patient developed unilateral anhidrosis postoperatively. We discuss this rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia with a review of relevant literature.

  11. Is epidural steroid injection effective for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    There are several nonsurgical alternatives to treat radicular pain in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Epidural steroid injections have been used for several decades, but the different studies have shown variable effects. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified nine systematic reviews including seven pertinent randomized controlled trials. We concluded epidural steroid injection probably leads to little or no effect on reducing radicular pain of spinal stenosis. PMID:26610278

  12. Unusual presentation of a spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Panciani, Pier Paolo; Forgnone, Sara; Fontanella, Marco; Ducati, Alessandro; Lanotte, Michele

    2009-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma (SSEH) is a rare clinical entity that generally requires an urgent surgical evacuation. The combination of Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) and Horner's syndrome (HS) as the presenting symptoms of a traumatic spinal epidural haematoma is very unusual, but it has never been observed in cases of spontaneous haematoma. We herein describe a case of SSEH presenting with simultaneous BSS and HS. The possibility of a conservative management in similar cases is discussed.

  13. Epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure

    PubMed Central

    Walaszczyk, Malgorzata; Knapik, Piotr; Misiolek, Hanna; Korlacki, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Parents have the right to decide on behalf of their children and deny consent to regional anaesthesia. The investigators decided to investigate quality of postoperative analgesia in adolescents undergoing epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure. Material/Methods The study subjects were 61 adolescents aged 11–18 years who underwent pectus excavatum repair with the Nuss procedure. Patients were divided into epidural (n=41) and opioid (n=20) groups, depending on their parents’ consent to epidural catheter insertion. Intraoperatively, 0.5% epidural ropivacaine with fentanyl or intermittent intravenous injections of fentanyl were used. Postoperative analgesia was achieved with either epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine with fentanyl, or subcutaneous morphine via an intraoperatively inserted “butterfly” cannula. Additionally, both groups received metamizol and paracetamol. Primary outcome variables were postoperative pain scores (Numeric Rating Scale and Prince Henry Hospital Pain Score). Secondary outcome variables included hemodynamic parameters, additional analgesia and side effects. Results Heart rate and blood pressure values in the postoperative period were significantly higher in the opioid group. Pain scores requiring intervention were noted almost exclusively in the opioid group. Conclusions Denial of parental consent to epidural analgesia following the Nuss procedure results in significantly worse control of postoperative pain. Our data may be useful when discussing with parents the available anaesthetic techniques for exceptionally painful procedures. PMID:22037752

  14. [Ultrasonography-guided identification of the lumbar epidural space].

    PubMed

    Bonazzi, M; Bianchi De Grazia, L; Di Gennaro, S; Lensi, C; Migliavacca, S; Marsicano, M; Riva, A; Laveneziana, D

    1995-05-01

    The study was designed to assess the reliability of sonographic evaluation in the prediction of the depth of the lumbar epidural space. Forty males, scheduled for epidural anesthesia for surgical repair of inguinal hernia, were prospectively studied. Patients were placed in a sitting position and sagittal scanning of the lumbar spine was performed with a 5-MHz transducer over the fourth or fifth interspace in order to identify the deeper hyperechogen interface, which represents the landmark between the ligamentum flavum and the epidural space. Ultrasound depth was measured and transducer removed. A Tuohy needle 18 G was then introduced percutaneously according to the standard technique and a rubber slide placed over it, so that it depth of insertion could be accurately measured. The potential for using ultrasounds for prediction of the distance from skin to epidural space was analyzed using a simple linear regression analysis; p values < 0.05 were considered significant. Mean values of ultrasound depth and needle depth were respectively 51 mm (SD 6.3) and 50.9 mm (SD 6.2); the correlation coefficient was 0.99. Ultrasound scanning of the lumbar spine provides an accurate measurement of the depth of the epidural space, which can facilitate the performance of the epidural anaesthesia and may decrease the complication rate, particularly in those patients in which anatomic landmarks are obscured.

  15. [Combined subarachnoid-epidural technique for obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2000-05-01

    Combined spinal-epidural blockade for labor pain has enjoyed increasing popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The usual procedure is to use a single space and a single needle for dural puncture, inserting a spinal needle through an epidural needle followed by insertion of a catheter. A small dose of one or several substances (usually a lipophilic opioid and a local anesthetic) is first injected in the intrathecal space to provide rapid, effective analgesia with minimal muscle blockade. The epidural catheter is used if labor lasts longer than the spinal block, if the spinal block is insufficient, or in case of cesarean section. Combined spinal-epidural blockade is a safe, valid alternative to conventional epidural analgesia and has become the main technique for providing obstetric analgesia in many hospitals. The most widely-recognized advantage of the technique is high maternal satisfaction with rapid and effective analgesia. Mobility of the lower extremities is preserved and the mother is often able to walk. Because opioids are injected into the intrathecal space and because the technique is more invasive than standard epidural analgesia, the potential risk to mother and fetus increases.

  16. Cervical epidural abscess caused by brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulos, Christos; Kamposos, Panagiotis; Papaioannou, Ioanna; Niarou, Vasiliki

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old Greek lady presented with fever, arthralgias of knees, cervical and lumbar pain during the last month. On clinical examination the patient was found to have tenderness of the cervical and the lumbar spine with great motion restriction. The blood tests revealed high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, abnormal liver function tests and a positive rheumatoid factor. Serological test for Brucella was positive while cervical MRI revealed epidural abscess and spondylodiscitis. Conservative treatment with streptomycin (it was substituted by rifampicin after the third week) and doxycyclin for 4 months significantly improved her symptoms. The frequency as well as the diagnosis and management of this manifestation are discussed. PMID:23188848

  17. Epidural hematoma after minor oral trauma.

    PubMed

    Rice, J O; Walters, C; Olson, R E; Pearson, D

    1976-07-01

    A case report was presented in which a 15-year-old boy was beaten about the head with a baseball bat. Intraoral trauma and facial lacerations were repaired. Since results of the neurological examination were within normal limits, the patient was discharged. The next day, the patient became lethargic; however, the patient's mother did not bring the patient back to the hospital until the routine postoperative visit. At that time, the patient had right hemiparesis, was unable to speak, and was clearly obtunded. A carotid angiogram disclosed a left venous epidural hematoma in the parietal area. A craniotomy was performed with good results. The importance of follow-up neurologic examinations in cases of trauma to the face and head is stressed.

  18. Comparison of epidural oxycodone and epidural morphine for post-caesarean section analgesia: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Ban Leong; Kwok, Sarah Carol; Mathur, Deepak; Ithnin, Farida; Newton-Dunn, Clare; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sultana, Rehena; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Epidural morphine after caesarean section may cause moderate to severe pruritus in women. Epidural oxycodone has been shown in non-obstetric trials to reduce pruritus when compared to morphine. We hypothesised that epidural oxycodone may reduce pruritus after caesarean section. Methods: A randomised controlled trial was conducted in pregnant women at term who underwent caesarean section with combined spinal-epidural technique initiated with intrathecal fentanyl 15 μg. Women received either epidural morphine 3 mg or epidural oxycodone 3 mg via the epidural catheter after delivery. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 24 h after caesarean section. The secondary outcomes were the pruritus scores, treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), pain scores and maternal satisfaction. Results: One hundred women were randomised (group oxycodone O = 50, morphine M = 50). There was no difference between Group O and M in the incidence of pruritus (n [%] 28 [56%] vs. 31 [62%], P = 0.68) and the worst pruritus scores (mean [standard deviation] 2.6 (2.8) vs. 3.3 [3.1], P = 0.23), respectively. Both groups had similar pain scores at rest (2.7 [2.3] vs. 2.0 [2.7], P = 0.16) and sitting up (5.0 [2.3] vs. 4.6 [2.4], P = 0.38) at 24 h. Pruritus scores were lower at 4–8, 8–12 and 12–24 h with oxycodone, but pain scores were higher. Both groups had a similar need for treatment of PONV and maternal satisfaction with analgesia. Conclusion: There was no difference in the incidence of pruritus at 24 h between epidural oxycodone and morphine. However, pruritus scores were lower with oxycodone between 4 and 24 h after surgery with higher pain scores in the same period. PMID:27053782

  19. The tibialis posterior tendon.

    PubMed

    Lhoste-Trouilloud, A

    2012-02-01

    The tibialis posterior tendon is the largest and anteriormost tendon in the medial ankle. It produces plantar flexion and supination of the ankle and stabilizes the plantar vault. Sonographic assessment of this tendon is done with high-frequency, linear-array transducers; an optimal examination requires transverse retromalleolar, longitudinal retromalleolar, and distal longitudinal scans, as well as dynamic studies. Disorders of the posterior tibial tendon include chronic tendinopathy with progressive rupture, tenosynovitis, acute rupture, dislocation and instability, enthesopathies. The most common lesion is a progressive "chewing gum" lesion that develops in a setting of chronic tendinopathy; it is usually seen in overweight women over 50 years of age with valgus flat feet. Medial ankle pain must also be carefully investigated, and the presence of instability assessed with dynamic maneuvers (forced inversion, or dorsiflexion) of the foot. Sonography plays an important role in the investigation of disorders involving the posterior tibial tendon.

  20. Microscopic epidural lesions in goats given repeated epidural injections of morphine: use of a modified autopsy procedure.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J J; Svendsen, O; Andersen, H B

    1986-01-01

    Epidural catheterization was performed in six goats. Five days later either saline or 20 mg (5 mg/ml) preservative free morphine was injected epidurally once daily for 8 days. The goats were sacrificed 4, 24 or 48 hours after the last injection. The lumbar part of columna was removed in toto for microscopic examination of the spinal cord and the entire epidural space after decalcification and transverse sectioning. After saline, minimal changes including a fibrous membrane surrounding the catheter, scattered fat cell necrosis, scattered small focal cell infiltrations and occasionally focal haemorrhages were seen. After morphine the changes were considerably more severe including diffuse cellular inflammatory reaction in the epidural space, fat cell necrosis, occasionally focal exudative inflammation and chronic inflammatory reaction in the vicinity of the fibrous membrane demarcating position of the catheter. It is concluded that the present modified autopsy procedure permits microscopic examination of the epidural space. It has been shown that repeated administration of morphine caused tissue damage in the epidural space of goats. The human predictability of the results obtained is unknown. However, the results are encouraging for investigations with similar procedure in humans. PMID:3953294

  1. Microscopic epidural lesions in goats given repeated epidural injections of morphine: use of a modified autopsy procedure.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J J; Svendsen, O; Andersen, H B

    1986-01-01

    Epidural catheterization was performed in six goats. Five days later either saline or 20 mg (5 mg/ml) preservative free morphine was injected epidurally once daily for 8 days. The goats were sacrificed 4, 24 or 48 hours after the last injection. The lumbar part of columna was removed in toto for microscopic examination of the spinal cord and the entire epidural space after decalcification and transverse sectioning. After saline, minimal changes including a fibrous membrane surrounding the catheter, scattered fat cell necrosis, scattered small focal cell infiltrations and occasionally focal haemorrhages were seen. After morphine the changes were considerably more severe including diffuse cellular inflammatory reaction in the epidural space, fat cell necrosis, occasionally focal exudative inflammation and chronic inflammatory reaction in the vicinity of the fibrous membrane demarcating position of the catheter. It is concluded that the present modified autopsy procedure permits microscopic examination of the epidural space. It has been shown that repeated administration of morphine caused tissue damage in the epidural space of goats. The human predictability of the results obtained is unknown. However, the results are encouraging for investigations with similar procedure in humans.

  2. Tibialis Posterior Tendon Entrapment Within Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fragment.

    PubMed

    Fantry, Amanda; Lareau, Craig; Vopat, Bryan; Blankenhorn, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Management of posterior malleolus fractures continues to be controversial, with respect to both need for fixation and fixation methods. Fixation methods include an open posterior approach to the ankle as well as percutaneous reduction and fixation with or without arthroscopy for visualization of the articular surface. Plain radiographs are unreliable in identifying fracture pattern and intraoperative reduction, making arthroscopy a valuable adjunct to posterior malleolus fracture management. In this article, we report a case of tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus fracture, as identified by arthroscopy and managed with open reduction. Tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus has not been previously reported. Ankle arthroscopy for posterior malleolus fractures provides an opportunity to identify soft-tissue or tendinous entrapment, articular surface reduction, and articular cartilage injuries unlikely to be identified with fluoroscopy alone and should be considered in reduction and fixation of posterior malleolus fractures.

  3. Tibialis Posterior Tendon Entrapment Within Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fragment.

    PubMed

    Fantry, Amanda; Lareau, Craig; Vopat, Bryan; Blankenhorn, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Management of posterior malleolus fractures continues to be controversial, with respect to both need for fixation and fixation methods. Fixation methods include an open posterior approach to the ankle as well as percutaneous reduction and fixation with or without arthroscopy for visualization of the articular surface. Plain radiographs are unreliable in identifying fracture pattern and intraoperative reduction, making arthroscopy a valuable adjunct to posterior malleolus fracture management. In this article, we report a case of tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus fracture, as identified by arthroscopy and managed with open reduction. Tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus has not been previously reported. Ankle arthroscopy for posterior malleolus fractures provides an opportunity to identify soft-tissue or tendinous entrapment, articular surface reduction, and articular cartilage injuries unlikely to be identified with fluoroscopy alone and should be considered in reduction and fixation of posterior malleolus fractures. PMID:26991573

  4. Obstetrical epidural and spinal anesthesia in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ellen; Zhao, Yinshan; Dahlgren, Leanne; Preston, Roanne; van der Kop, Mia; Synnes, Anne; Sadovnick, A Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony; Tremlett, Helen

    2013-10-01

    To examine obstetrical epidural and spinal anesthesia use in women with multiple sclerosis (MS) and the relationship with MS clinical factors. This was a retrospective cohort study, linking clinical data from women with MS in the British Columbia (BC) MS database to obstetrical data (1998-2009) from the BC Perinatal Database Registry. We compared epidural use in 431 deliveries to women with MS and 2,959 deliveries from the general population, as well as spinal use in cesarean deliveries (128 to women with MS and 846 in the general population), considering parity and using multivariate models. We also examined the association between epidural or spinal anesthesia and MS clinical factors-disease duration and disability [Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score]. Of 431 deliveries to women with MS, 116 were exposed to epidural anesthesia and of 128 cesarean deliveries, 82 were exposed to spinal anesthesia. The use of epidural anesthesia was similar in nullipara (adjusted OR = 0.86, 95 % CI = 0.63-1.18, p = 0.36), but more likely in multipara with MS (adjusted OR = 1.75, 95 % CI = 1.20-2.54, p = 0.004). Spinal anesthesia use in cesarean deliveries was comparable between the MS and general population cohorts (adjusted OR = 0.84, 95 % CI = 0.55-1.31, p = 0.45). Women who delivered 5 to <10 years after MS onset were less likely to have an epidural (adjusted OR = 0.57, 95 % CI = 0.34-0.95, p = 0.03) vs. those delivering within 5 years. EDSS was not associated with use of either type of anesthesia (adjusted p > 0.1). Contrary to previous studies, epidural anesthesia use differed between women with MS and the general population and was influenced by parity and MS disease duration; these findings warrant further investigation.

  5. Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    French, Cynthia A; Cong, Xiaomei; Chung, Keun Sam

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of epidural analgesia during labor, no consensus has been reached among obstetric and anesthesia providers regarding its effects on breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between labor epidural analgesia and breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published in 1990 or thereafter, using the search term breastfeeding combined with epidural, labor epidural analgesia, labor analgesia, or epidural analgesia Of 117 articles, 23 described empirical studies specific to labor epidural analgesia and measured a breastfeeding outcome. Results were conflicting: 12 studies showed negative associations between epidural analgesia and breastfeeding success, 10 studies showed no effect, and 1 study showed a positive association. Most studies were observational. Of 3 randomized controlled studies, randomization methods were inadequate in 2 and not evaluable in 1. Other limitations were related to small sample size or inadequate study power; variation and lack of information regarding type and dosage of analgesia or use of other intrapartum interventions; differences in timing, definition, and method of assessing breastfeeding success; or failure to consider factors such as mothers' intention to breastfeed, social support, siblings, or the mother's need to return to work or school. It is also unclear to what extent results are mediated through effects on infant neurobehavior, maternal fever, oxytocin release, duration of labor, and need for instrumental delivery. Clinician awareness of factors affecting breastfeeding can help identify women at risk for breastfeeding difficulties in order to target support and resources effectively.

  6. Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    French, Cynthia A; Cong, Xiaomei; Chung, Keun Sam

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of epidural analgesia during labor, no consensus has been reached among obstetric and anesthesia providers regarding its effects on breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between labor epidural analgesia and breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published in 1990 or thereafter, using the search term breastfeeding combined with epidural, labor epidural analgesia, labor analgesia, or epidural analgesia Of 117 articles, 23 described empirical studies specific to labor epidural analgesia and measured a breastfeeding outcome. Results were conflicting: 12 studies showed negative associations between epidural analgesia and breastfeeding success, 10 studies showed no effect, and 1 study showed a positive association. Most studies were observational. Of 3 randomized controlled studies, randomization methods were inadequate in 2 and not evaluable in 1. Other limitations were related to small sample size or inadequate study power; variation and lack of information regarding type and dosage of analgesia or use of other intrapartum interventions; differences in timing, definition, and method of assessing breastfeeding success; or failure to consider factors such as mothers' intention to breastfeed, social support, siblings, or the mother's need to return to work or school. It is also unclear to what extent results are mediated through effects on infant neurobehavior, maternal fever, oxytocin release, duration of labor, and need for instrumental delivery. Clinician awareness of factors affecting breastfeeding can help identify women at risk for breastfeeding difficulties in order to target support and resources effectively. PMID:27121239

  7. Labor epidural anesthesia, obstetric factors and breastfeeding cessation.

    PubMed

    Dozier, Ann M; Howard, Cynthia R; Brownell, Elizabeth A; Wissler, Richard N; Glantz, J Christopher; Ternullo, Sharon R; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly N; Childs, Cynthia K; Lawrence, Ruth A

    2013-05-01

    Breastfeeding benefits both infant and maternal health. Use of epidural anesthesia during labor is increasingly common and may interfere with breastfeeding. Studies analyzing epidural anesthesia's association with breastfeeding outcomes show mixed results; many have methodological flaws. We analyzed potential associations between epidural anesthesia and overall breast-feeding cessation within 30 days postpartum while adjusting for standard and novel covariates and uniquely accounting for labor induction. A pooled analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves and modified Cox Proportional Hazard models included 772 breastfeeding mothers from upstate New York who had vaginal term births of healthy singleton infants. Subjects were drawn from two cohort studies (recruited postpartum between 2005 and 2008) and included maternal self-report and maternal and infant medical record data. Analyses of potential associations between epidural anesthesia and overall breastfeeding cessation within 1 month included additional covariates and uniquely accounted for labor induction. After adjusting for standard demographics and intrapartum factors, epidural anesthesia significantly predicted breastfeeding cessation (hazard ratio 1.26 [95% confidence interval 1.10, 1.44], p < 0.01) as did hospital type, maternal age, income, education, planned breastfeeding goal, and breastfeeding confidence. In post hoc analyses stratified by Baby Friendly Hospital (BFH) status, epidural anesthesia significantly predicted breastfeeding cessation (BFH: 1.19 [1.01, 1.41], p < 0.04; non-BFH: 1.65 [1.31, 2.08], p < 0.01). A relationship between epidural anesthesia and breastfeeding was found but is complex and involves institutional, clinical, maternal and infant factors. These findings have implications for clinical care and hospital policies and point to the need for prospective studies.

  8. Posterior microphthalmos pigmentary retinopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pehere, Niranjan; Jalali, Subhadra; Deshmukh, Himanshu; Kannabiran, Chitra

    2011-04-01

    Posterior Microphthalmos Pigmentary Retinopathy Syndrome (PMPRS). Posterior microphthalmos (PM) is a relatively infrequent type of microphthalmos where posterior segment is predominantly affected with normal anterior segment measurements. Herein, we report two siblings with posterior microphthalmos retinopathy syndrome with postulated autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A 13-year-old child had PM and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and his 7-year-old sister had PM, RP, and foveoschisis. The genetics of this syndrome and variable phenotype is discussed. Importance of being aware of posterior microphthalmos and its posterior segment associations is highlighted.

  9. Pentoxifylline Inhibits Epidural Fibrosis in Post-Laminectomy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelten, Bilal; Erdogan, Hakan; Antar, Veysel; Sanel, Selim; Tuncdemir, Matem; Kutnu, Muge; Karaoglan, Alper; Orki, Tulay

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effectiveness of intramuscular pentoxifylline in the prevention of postoperative fibrosis. Material/Methods We divided 16 adult Wistar albino rats into 2 equal groups: treatment and control. Both groups underwent L1 vertebral total laminectomy to expose the dura. The intramuscular treatment group received pentoxifylline. Four weeks later, epidural fibrosis was studied in both groups using electron microscopy, light microscopy, histology, biochemistry, and macroscopy. Results The evaluation of epidural fibrosis in the 2 groups according to macroscopic (p<0.01) assessment and light microscopy revealed that epidural scar tissue formation was lower in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.001) and the number of fibroblasts was also decreased significantly in the pentoxifylline-treated group (p<0.05). More immature fibers were demonstrated in the treatment group by electron microscopy in comparison with the control group. In biochemical analysis, a statistically significant decrease was detected in hydroxyproline, which indicates fibrosis and myeloperoxidase activity, and shows an inflammatory response (P<0.001). Conclusions Systemic pentoxifylline application prevents postoperative epidural fibrosis and adhesions with various mechanisms. Our study is the first to present evidence of experimental epidural fibrosis prevention with pentoxifylline. PMID:26974057

  10. Computational modeling of epidural cortical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-12-01

    Epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) is a developing therapy to treat neurological disorders. However, it is not clear how the cortical anatomy or the polarity and position of the electrode affects current flow and neural activation in the cortex. We developed a 3D computational model simulating ECS over the precentral gyrus. With the electrode placed directly above the gyrus, about half of the stimulus current flowed through the crown of the gyrus while current density was low along the banks deep in the sulci. Beneath the electrode, neurons oriented perpendicular to the cortical surface were depolarized by anodic stimulation, and neurons oriented parallel to the boundary were depolarized by cathodic stimulation. Activation was localized to the crown of the gyrus, and neurons on the banks deep in the sulci were not polarized. During regulated voltage stimulation, the magnitude of the activating function was inversely proportional to the thickness of the CSF and dura. During regulated current stimulation, the activating function was not sensitive to the thickness of the dura but was slightly more sensitive than during regulated voltage stimulation to the thickness of the CSF. Varying the width of the gyrus and the position of the electrode altered the distribution of the activating function due to changes in the orientation of the neurons beneath the electrode. Bipolar stimulation, although often used in clinical practice, reduced spatial selectivity as well as selectivity for neuron orientation.

  11. Epidural infection: Is it really an abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We reviewed the literature regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Methods: Utilizing PubMed, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature on SEAs. Results: SEA remains a difficult infectious process to diagnose. This is particularly true in the early stages, when patients remain neurologically intact, and before the classic triad of fever, back pain, and neurologic deficit develop. However, knowledge of risk factors, obtaining serologic markers, and employing magnetic resonance scans facilitate obtaining a prompt and accurate diagnosis. In patients without neurologic deficits, lone medical therapy may prove effective. Conclusions: More prevalent over the previous three decades, SEA remains a rare but deleterious infectious process requiring prompt identification and treatment. Historically, identification of SEA is often elusive, diagnosis is delayed, and clinicians contend that surgical debridement is the cornerstone of treatment. Early surgery leads to more favorable outcomes and preserves neurologic function, particularly in the early stages of disease when minimal or no neurologic deficits are present. The advent of improved imaging modalities, diagnostic techniques, and multidrug antimicrobial agents has enabled medical/spinal surgical consultants to more rapidly diagnose SEA and institute more effective early medical treatment (e.g., data suggest that lone medical therapy may prove effective in the early management of SEA). PMID:23248757

  12. Combined general–epidural anesthesia with continuous postoperative epidural analgesia preserves sigmoid colon perfusion in elective infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Panaretou, Venetiana; Siafaka, Ioanna; Theodorou, Dimitrios; Manouras, Andreas; Seretis, Charalampos; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Katsaragakis, Stylianos; Sigala, Fragiska; Zografos, George; Filis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Background: In elective open infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair the use of epidural anesthesia and analgesia may preserve splanchnic perfusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of epidural anesthesia on gut perfusion with gastrointestinal tonometry in patients undergoing aortic reconstructive surgery. Methods: Thirty patients, scheduled to undergo an elective infrarenal abdominal aortic reconstructive procedure were randomized in two groups: the epidural anesthesia group (Group A, n=16) and the control group (Group B, n=14). After induction of anesthesia, a transanally inserted sigmoid tonometer was placed for the measurement of sigmoid and gastric intramucosal CO2 levels and the calculation of regional–arterial CO2 difference (ΔPCO2). Additional measurements included mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and arterial lactate levels. Results: There were no significant intra- and inter-group differences for MAP, CO, SVR, and arterial lactate levels. Sigmoid pH and PCO2 increased in both the groups, but this increase was significantly higher in Group B, 20 min after aortic clamping and 10 min after aortic declamping. Conclusions: Patients receiving epidural anesthesia during abdominal aortic reconstruction appear to have less severe disturbances of sigmoid perfusion compared with patients not receiving epidural anesthesia. Further studies are needed to verify these results. PMID:23493852

  13. Spinal epidural abscess: the importance of early diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, A; Laing, R; Smith, C; Kaar, G; Smith, F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To remind clinicians of the dangers of delayed diagnosis and the importance of early treatment of spinal epidural abscess.
METHODS—A review of the literature on spinal epidural abscess and a comparison of the published literature with local experience.
RESULTS—Imaging with MRI or CT enables early diagnosis of spinal epidural abcess and optimal therapy is surgical evacuation combined with 6-12 weeks (median 8 weeks) of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Clinical features are fever, pain, and focal neurological signs and may be associated with preceding and pre-existing bone or joint disease. The commonest aetiological organism is S aureus.
CONCLUSION—Early diagnosis and appropriate early antimicrobial chemotherapy with surgery is associated with an excellent prognosis.

 PMID:9703173

  14. Continuous Cervical Epidural Analgesia in Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Mahesh; Taha, Nafisa; Purohit, Navita; Kothari, Vatsal; Singh, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is a devastating complication of cancer. Patients may often require high doses of opioids that may cause side effects, myoclonus being one such. A 63-year-old male suffering from malignant spinal cord compression was admitted to our institution. The primary team managed him conservatively with pharmacotherapy with no relief of pain, and he experienced myoclonus and sedation as adverse effects. A continuous cervical epidural catheter with local anesthetic infusion was inserted for 5 days to control his pain. This relieved his pain, which was sustained even after we removed the epidural catheter on day 5, for up to 64 days until the time of his death. Continuous cervical epidural local anesthetic infusions may help with refractory pain by deafferentation of noxious stimuli. Central neuraxial blocks may be a valuable rescue in selected patients. PMID:27803576

  15. Postoperative epidural opioid analgesia: what are the choices?

    PubMed

    de Leon-Casasola, O A; Lema, M J

    1996-10-01

    The administration of hydrophilic opioids via a continuous infusion results in selective spinal analgesia with a low incidence of side effects. Lipophilic opioids may also be associated with spinal effects. However, the doses required to produce postoperative analgesia also produce plasma concentrations within the MEAC. Thus, in clinical practice it may not be possible to limit epidural doses of lipophilic opioids to those associated with spinal analgesia. Regardless of the mechanism of action, epidural administration of lipophilic opioids may offer no clinical advantages over the IV route. Notwithstanding, epidural administration of small doses of lipophilic opioids in combination with local anesthetics may offer significant clinical advantages over systemic administration of opioids alone. Dose-ranging studies will be necessary to determine the ideal concentrations of opioids and local anesthetics, as well as the ratios of the two drugs to obtain optimal analgesia with minimal incidence of side effects.

  16. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  17. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension following epidural anesthesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    An, X; Wu, S; He, F; Li, C; Fang, X

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of refractory spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) following epidural anesthesia. In this case, typical clinical symptoms and concomitant use of regional anesthesia led to the misdiagnosis of SIH as post-dural puncture headache (PDPH). A 56-year-old man received a successful appendectomy under epidural anesthesia performed at a T11-T12 intravertebral space. About 20 h later, the patient started complaining about orthostatic headache when getting up from his lying position, then a PDPH was diagnosed. However, the patient did not respond well to conservative treatment. Three months later, the first epidural blood patch was performed at the L3-L4 level, however, the patient still had an orthostatic headache. Five days later, spine magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple meningeal diverticulum in the cervicothoracic junction, and computerized tomography myelography demonstrated a C5-C6 spinal dural tear suggesting cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Finally, the patient was diagnosed as SIH and received a second epidural blood patch at the T2-T3 level and responded with improvements in symptomatology. The patient was then discharged, and at a 2-year follow-up, he had fully recovered except for some remaining neck stiffness. This case illustrates that SIH was misdiagnosed as PDPH because of the common clinical symptoms and potentially confounding events (epidural/spinal anesthesia and assumption that it was a case of PDPH). It is important to carefully observe patients in such conditions and promptly conduct suitable diagnostic tests. For a successful treatment of SIH, a timely epidural blood patch should be considered as soon as the diagnosis is established. PMID:26939569

  18. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance.

  19. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:27695168

  20. Epidural anesthesia for permanent spinal cord stimulation with a cylindrical type lead: a case series.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eun; Choi, Rak Min; Kee, Rim; Lee, Kang Hun; Jeon, Sangyoon; Jung, Jae-Wook; Kim, Woo-Jin; Yoon, Jin Sun

    2015-04-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in trials involving external stimulation are easily conducted under local anesthesia. However, implantation of a permanent SCS system is painful, and can be intolerable in some patients. Epidural anesthesia can be used to perform the SCS implantation without discomfort if the patient can localize the area of paresthesia. However, little is known about epidural anesthesia for SCS. This paper reports 23 cases of permanent SCS with a cylindrical type lead implanted under the epidural anesthesia. Epidural anesthesia was sufficient in 22 patients without discomfort and significant complications. The remaining patient experienced incomplete epidural anesthesia and required additional analgesics to blunt the pain. All the leads were placed consistent with the patient's report of paresthesia area under epidural anesthesia. Thus, epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe method for the optimal placement of SCS to minimize the discomfort for patients without impairing patients' response to the intraoperative stimulation test.

  1. Unusual case of persistent Horner's syndrome following epidural anaesthesia and caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shubhra; Burkat, Cat Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    This is a rare case of persistent Horner's syndrome following epidural anesthesia and Caesarean section. A 33-year-old female presented with persistent ptosis and miosis following epidural anesthesia and Caesarian section several months prior. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of head, neck, and chest were unremarkable. Medline search using terms Horner's, epidural, spinal anesthesia, delivery, childbirth, Caesarian, and pregnancy identified 31 articles describing Horner's syndrome in obstetric epidural anesthesia, of which 11 were following Caesarean section. The increased incidence of Horner's syndrome in the setting of epidural anesthesia in pregnancy may be related to epidural venous engorgement and cephalic spread of the local anaesthetic, with disruption in the oculosympathetic pathway. It is important to include recent epidural anesthesia within the differential diagnosis of acute Horner's syndrome in a postpartum female. Rarely, the ptosis may be permanent and require surgical intervention.

  2. Effect of preloading epidural space with normal saline on the incidence of complications of epidural catheter placement and spinal anesthesia for cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Geng, Guiqi; Sun, Xingfeng; Huang, Shaoqiang

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of preloading the epidural space with normal saline (NS) on the incidence of complications of epidural catheter placement and spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. Two hundred and ninety parturients at full term, who were scheduled for cesarean section under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups: group control (I) and group NS (II). The epidural puncture was performed at the estimated L3-4 interspace with a Tuohy needle attached to a 5 ml syringe. Loss of resistance to air was used to identify the epidural space. In group I no fluid was injected into the epidural space before insertion of the catheter; while in group II NS 5 ml was injected into the epidural space before catheter insertion. The incidence of blood vessel trauma and paraesthesia were evaluated. The effect of spinal anesthesia was evaluated. Blood vessel trauma in group II was significantly lower than in group I, P < 0.05. However, the incidence of paraesthesia was similar between the two groups, P > 0.05. Preloading the epidural space with NS can decrease the incidence of clinically apparent injury to blood vessels during epidural catheter placement, and can improve the effects of spinal analgesia, but does not reduce the incidence of paraesthesia.

  3. Epidural hematoma after thoracic epidural analgesia in a patient treated with ketorolac, mefenamic acid, and naftazone: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Dae Geun; Kim, Seok-Kon; Kim, Juri

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male undergoing thoracotomy and bleeding control received a preoperative thoracic epidural for postoperative analgesia. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred and urgent magnetic resonance imaging showed massive anterior epidural hematoma. During laminectomy and decompression, platelet dysfunction was diagnosed and preoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs medications were supposed to the cause of platelet dysfunction. After infusion of ten units of platelet concentrate, coagulopathy was improved. We should be more careful to drugs with antiplatelet effect when using regional analgesia. PMID:24729848

  4. Posterior Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  5. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  6. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  7. [Postoperative epidural hematoma remote from the site of craniotomy for STA-MCA anastomosis].

    PubMed

    Ohata, Hiroto; Yamada, Tadanori; Dohi, Shuji

    2008-06-01

    We experienced a case in which the cause of acute brain swelling following resection of dura matter could not be recognized until the postoperative CT scan. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 4-year history of Moyamoya disease. Right hemiplegia developed a month before operation, so that the anti-platelet therapy was continued. At the end of dural resection the brain started to bulge and the brain swelling increased progressively. The patient was immediately placed on a head up position and received a rapid administration of mannitol for the treatment. The operator performed the echo examination for clarifying the cause of the brain swelling, but they could not find it. As the brain swelling slightly improved by the treatment, the surgery was performed continuously At the end of the operation the patient was moved for a CT scan and it showed mass effect caused by epidural hematoma over the left temporal region distant from the site of craniotomy. Evacuation of the hematoma was carried out urgently. At discharge, she was conscious and had no focal neurological deficits. The occurrence of the epidural hematoma is one of the reasons for unknown brain swelling during surgery. We strongly recommend that any sudden deterioration during the operation should be treated with emergency CT scan. PMID:18546910

  8. Thoracic epidural spinal angiolipoma with coexisting lumbar spinal stenosis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Benvenutti-Regato, Mario; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinal angiolipomas (SALs) are uncommon benign lesions that may present insidiously with back pain or acutely with weakness due to tumor bleeding/thrombosis. Given their rarity, these lesions are often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of epidural masses. The purpose of this article is to report the case of an epidural SAL and to conduct a literature review on the topic. Methods A case report and review of the literature using the PubMed/Medline databases. All case reports and case series were reviewed up to June 2015. Results A 65-year old female presented with neurogenic claudication and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed lumbar spinal stenosis. Following decompressive surgery, she experienced symptom resolution, but three months postoperatively she presented to the emergency department with acute paraparesis. A thoracic MRI revealed a lesion located between T8 and T10 causing severe spinal cord compression. Following emergent laminectomy and en bloc resection, the patient regained function and the lesion was diagnosed as SAL. Our literature review revealed 178 reported cases, with a female and thoracic predominance. The majority of patients underwent surgical treatment, achieving a gross total resection in most cases. Similarly, complete symptom resolution was the most common outcome. Conclusion Spinal angiolipomas are uncommon spinal tumors. However, they may be treated as any other space-occupying lesion, and surgical resection allows for complete symptom recovery in most patients. PMID:26767159

  9. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  10. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and cerebrovascular constriction syndrome in the differential diagnosis of post-partum headaches].

    PubMed

    Ruiz López, N; Cano Hernández, B; Balbás Álvarez, S

    2016-02-01

    Postpartum headache can be due to many causes. In a patient with previous epidural analgesia, the headache can be attributed to post-dural puncture headache, even if the symptoms are not typical of this clinical entity. We report a case of a post-partum with accidental dural tap during the insertion of an epidural catheter for labour analgesia, and who referred to headaches in the third post-partum day. Initially, a post-dural puncture headache was suspected, but the subsequent onset of seizures and visual impairment meant that the diagnosis had to be reconsidered. In this case report, the clinical and pathophysiological features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, as well as the differential diagnosis of post-partum headaches are described.

  11. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  12. [Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma during pregnancy: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Hack, I; Cademartori, M S; Mamani, R S; Beltrame, C M; Cademartori, C G

    1984-03-01

    A case of spontaneous dorso- lumbar spinal epidural hematoma during pregnancy is reported. The hematoma was removed 8 hours after the onset of paraplegia, and there was no evidence of vascular malformation. The motor deficit remained unchanged post-operatively. The etiology, clinical findings and the value of early laminectomy are discussed.

  13. Spinal cord injury following an attempted thoracic epidural.

    PubMed

    Mayall, M F; Calder, I

    1999-10-01

    Unsuccessful attempts were made to insert a thoracic epidural in an anaesthetised patient. Signs of spinal cord damage were observed the following day. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a haematoma anterior to the spinal cord. Surgical exploration revealed an intradural haematoma and a needle puncture of the cord. The patient suffered a permanent paraparesis.

  14. Is epidural analgesia necessary after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy?

    PubMed

    Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Ibe, Takashi; Atsumi, Jun; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Takeyoshi, Isumi

    2010-10-01

    Most studies have shown that thoracic epidural analgesia reduces postoperative pain, but it carries potential risks. Recently, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery has become an established technique that causes minimal postoperative pain. This report shows that thoracic epidural analgesia is not always necessary after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy. From January to December 2007, 30 consecutive patients who underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy were examined retrospectively. We analyzed the necessity for routine thoracic epidural analgesia. The continuous subcutaneous analgesia catheter for morphine (2 mg in 48 h) was removed from 15 patients on postoperative day 1, and from the other 15 on day 2. We administered loxoprofen sodium hydrate, diclofenac sodium suppository, pentazocine hydrochloride, and mexiletine hydrochloride for postoperative analgesia, as needed. The mean pain score was no more than 1.0. The maximum score was 3.0 on day 0, and 2.0 on day 14; subsequently, no pain score exceeded 2.0. The postoperative hospital stay was 8.7 ± 0.8 days. All patients made uneventful postoperative recoveries. There is no need for thoracic epidural analgesia after every video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy because our patients recovered with no serious complication. Less invasive surgical approaches should require simpler postoperative pain management. PMID:20947601

  15. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords “Upper cervical epidural abscess,” “C1 osteomyelitis,” “C2 osteomyelitis,” “C1 epidural abscess,” “C2 epidural abscess.” We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  16. Horner syndrome during lumbar epidural analgesia for obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Schachner, S M; Reynolds, A C

    1982-06-01

    Horner syndrome (ptosis, miosis, anhidrosis, and facial and conjunctival vasodilation) is a recognized complication of lumbar epidural analgesia for labor and delivery. Alone, it presents no significant risk to mother or fetus, as resolution is spontaneous and complete. Horner syndrome may, however, be associated with significant maternal hypotension and therefore should be an indication for close maternal and fetal monitoring to provide reassurance.

  17. [Epidural sacral anesthesia with 3% mepivacaine in rectal surgery].

    PubMed

    Marzocchi, M; Monti, E; Cesari, D; Vespignani, M G; Gelli, G; Pirazzoli, G

    1990-09-01

    The authors think that the sacral epidural anaesthesia effected with Mepivacaine 3%, 6 ml (180 mg) and Fentanyl 2 ml (100 mcg) is perfectly indicated for the proctologic surgery as it is of simple execution and presents a short latency (12 min.), good deepness and perfect haemodynamic stability. Besides, it does not endanger the lower limbs innervation. No urinary retention.

  18. Symptomatic lumbar epidural varices. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, G A; Weingarten, K; Lavyne, M H

    1994-05-01

    Lumbar epidural varices have been infrequently described in the literature and rarely accepted as a primary pathophysiological entity. The authors' total experience with symptomatic lumbar epidural varices over the last 15 years includes four cases (incidence 0.067% of all lumbar spine operations), two of which are described in detail in this paper. The mechanism for their formation is proposed: central disc herniations obstruct the anterior epidural venous flow leading to anterolateral caudal venous distention. Subsequent venous endothelial injury predisposes to varying degrees of phlebothrombosis. Decompression of partially thrombosed varices may occur during operative discectomy or spontaneously during regression of the nonoperated disc prolapse. Regression of the central disc herniation may also explain the "disappearing disc" phenomenon, in which patients with clinical and radiographic evidence of apparently large caudal disc herniations exhibit clinical and radiographic resolution. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the epidural varix depend upon the degree of thrombosis within this anomaly. A thrombosed varix is hyperintense on T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted images, whereas flowing blood is hypointense. The variable hypo- and hyperintensity on the T2-weighted MR imaging sequences correlate with a partially patent lumen within the varix. PMID:8169634

  19. Incidence of intravascular penetration in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Furman, Michael B; Giovanniello, Michael T; O'Brien, Erin M

    2003-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN A prospective, observational, human, study was conducted. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the incidence of vascular penetration during fluoroscopically guided, contrast-enhanced transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, and to determine whether the observation of blood in the needle hub can be used to predict a vascular injection. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA Incorrectly placed intravascular cervical spinal injections result in medication flow systemically and not to the desired target. A recently published study demonstrates a high incidence of intravascular injections in transforaminal lumbosacral epidural injections. No studies so far have evaluated the incidence of vascular injections in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, nor have they calculated the ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict a vascular injection in the cervical spine.METHODS The incidence of fluoroscopically confirmed intravascular uptake of contrast was prospectively observed in 337 patients treated with cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections. The ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict intravascular injection was also investigated. For each subject, the injection level was chosen on the basis of the clinical scenario including history, physical examination, and review of imaging studies. Some patients had multilevel injections. Using fluoroscopic guidance, the authors placed a 25-gauge needle into the epidural space using a transforaminal approach according to accepted standard technique. Needle tip location was confirmed with biplanar imaging. The presence or absence of blood in the needle hub spontaneously ("flash") and after attempted aspiration by pulling back on the syringe's plunger was documented. Contrast then was injected under real-time fluoroscopy to determine whether the location of the needle tip was intravascular. The results were recorded in a prospective manner indicating the presence or absence of blood

  20. Acoustic puncture assist device: A novel technique to identify the epidural space

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mokaddam, MA; Al-Harbi, MK; El-Jandali, ST; Al-Zahrani, TA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD) is designed to detect and signal the loss of resistance during the epidural procedure. We aimed to evaluate this device in terms of successful identification of the epidural space and the incidence of accidental dural puncture. Patients and Methods: Following Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent obtained from all patients, 200 adult patients (107 males) American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III who underwent lower limb orthopedic surgery under lumbar epidural anesthesia using APAD were enrolled in the study. APAD system was connected to the epidural needle using normal saline prefilled extension tube. Numbers of successful epidural attempts and accidental dural tap were documented. Results: The mean values of the depth of epidural space and the time to perform epidural puncture were 5.8 ± 1.0 cm and 3.3 ± 1.4 min, respectively. In 63% of patients, epidural puncture was successful from the first attempt and in 1% it was successful from the fourth attempt. Epidural anesthesia by APAD was successful in 198 cases (99 %). Dural tap occurred in 2 cases (1%). Conclusions: Using APAD, the success of identifying the epidural space was high and reliable. PMID:27051369

  1. [The influence of epidural anestesia of the incidence of vaginal operative deliveries. Study of 6,110 deliveries with 4.590 epidrual anesthesias (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Elert, A

    1979-12-01

    6,110 labors and deliveries are reviewed. 4,590 were done under epidural anaesthesia. The incidence of vaginal operative deliveries was not increased by epidural anaesthesia. The technique, complications and advantage of epidural anaesthesia are discussed.

  2. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  3. The posterior sagittal trans-sphincteric approach.

    PubMed

    Peña, A; Hong, A

    2004-01-01

    The posterior sagittal, transphincteric approach to treat different pelvic problems has been known since last century. Although some surgeons have embraced it and have enthusiastically advocated it s use, it has never become an overly popular technique. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the approach, both from an historical perspective and from the authors experience. The international literature on the subject was reviewed since 1877 up to the present date. A retrospective evaluation of the authors experience was conducted, and the results reviewed. Specific attention was paid to the final result obtained in the treatment of the original condition, surgical complications and the effect of the surgical approach on bowel and urinary control. The experiential review included 114 cases. They were divided into two groups. A included 85 patients who underwent a posterior sagittal transphincteric approach that included 49 cases of Hirschsprung s disease (primary 21, secondary 28), 15 presacral masses; 10 rectaltumors; 7 acquired recto-genito-urinary fistulae; and 4 cases of idiopathic rectal prolapse. Group B included 29 patients who underwent a posterior sagittal trans-anorectal approach, in which the anterior wall of the rectum and the sphincter was divided as well.. This group included 12 cases of urogenital sinuses; 8 acquired urethral stricture or atresia after trauma; and 9 posterior urethral masses. Post-operative bowel control was normal all cases except in those patients whose basic condition had resulted in fecal incontinence, or who had sustained an irreversible injury prior tothe operation. Urinary control was normal except in cases with pre-operative incontinence. Complications included recurrence of recto-genitourinary fistulae in 3 cases, recto-cutaneous fistula in 3 Hirschsprung s patients and 2 partial wound dehisences. The posterior sagittal trans-sphincteric approach represents a useful technical alternative

  4. A double-blind assessment of segmental sensory changes with epidural fentanyl versus epidural saline in patients undergoing extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hore, P J; Silbert, B S; Cook, R J; Beilby, D S

    1990-04-01

    Segmental changes to pin prick and cold stimuli were tested in a double-blind manner in pain-free patients scheduled for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL). Fifty patients were randomly allocated to receive either epidural fentanyl (100 micrograms in 10 ml normal saline) or 10 ml epidural normal saline. In a further 25 patients an epidural catheter was inserted but no solution injected. In contrast to this latter group, epidural fentanyl and normal saline both produced segmental sensory changes. There were no significant differences between fentanyl and normal saline groups in the number of patients reporting sensory changes to pin prick, rate of onset of these changes, or segmental level. For cold stimuli, more patients in the fentanyl group than in the normal saline group reported a change (16 vs. 8; P = 0.02) but the segmental level was similar. The effect of normal saline as a diluent in epidurally administered opioids may be of clinical importance.

  5. Risk of acute hypotension following epidural analgesia during deep regional hyperthermia: a case report.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, J; Hoff, A M; Oudkerk, M; de Kock, W; van de Merwe, S A; de Jong, P C

    1992-01-01

    A potentially dangerous complication occurring during deep regional hyperthermia is described. A patient receiving epidural analgesics for pain caused by a large pelvic recurrent rectal tumour was treated by hyperthermia induced by electromagnetic radiation. The epidural infusion pump failed during heating and further analgesics were administered by bolus injections into the epidural space. Following the second bolus injection, a severe drop in arterial blood pressure was observed. The most likely multifactorial pathogenesis is discussed and measures to avoid such an event are recommended.

  6. Gossypiboma mimicking posterior urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bindey; Kumar, Prem; Sinha, Sanjay Kumar; Sinha, Neelam; Hasan, Zaheer; Thakur, Vinit Kumar; Anand, Utpal; Priyadarshi, Rajiv Nayan; Mandal, Manish

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Foreign bodies in the urogenital tract are not uncommon. Hairpins, glass rods, umbilical tapes, ball point pen are described in lower urogenital tract. Retained gauze piece (gossypiboma) in posterior urethra may cause diagnostic dilemma. Symptoms and investigations may mimic stricture of posterior urethra. PRESENTATION OF CASE Two cases of retained gauze pieces in the urethra are described here. The micturating cystourethrogram was suggestive of posterior urethral stricture. DISCUSSION Two cases described here had retained gauze piece as a cause of filling defect and abnormal appearance in the micturating cystourethrogram. Gossypiboma may be a possibility where posterior urethral stricture are seen after previous surgery in paediatric age group. CONCLUSION In the setting of previous urogenital surgery gossypiboma should be kept in the differential diagnosis where posterior urethral stricture are seen in the paediatric age group. PMID:23500749

  7. [Involuntary Movement of Bilateral Lower Limbs Caused by Epidural Anesthesia: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Toki, Keiko; Yokose, Masashi; Miyashita, Tetsuya; Sato, Hitoshi; Fujimoto, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Sayoko; Goto, Takahisa

    2016-06-01

    Regional anesthesia, especially epidural anesthesia, rarely causes involuntary movement Here we present a case of a patient who demonstrated myoclonus-like involuntary movement of the lower limbs during continuous infusion of ropivacaine, fentanyl, and droperidol through the thoracic epidural catheter. This movement disappeared when the epidural infusion was stopped, but reappeared when the epidural infusion was restarted. Naloxone did not eliminate the movement The patient was thereafter discharged uneventfully. This case and other reports in the literature suggest that involuntary movement associated with regional anesthesia is rare and self-limiting. However, careful consideration should be given to exclude other, potentially dangerous complications. PMID:27483662

  8. Histopathological Alterations after Single Epidural Injection of Ropivacaine, Methylprednizolone Acetate, or Contrast Material in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsou, Maria-Chrysanthi; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Demetrios; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Kelekis, Alexis

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The consequences from the injection of different types of drugs in the epidural space remains unknown. Increasing evidence suggests that localized inflammation, fibrosis, and arachnoiditis can complicate sequential epidural blockades, or even epidural contrast injection. We investigate the in vivo effect of epidural injections in the epidural space in an animal model. Materials and Methods: A group of ten male adult pigs, five punctures to each at distinct vertebral interspaces under general anesthesia, were examined, testing different drugs, used regularly in the epidural space (iopamidol, methylprednisolone acetate, ropivacaine). Each site was marked with a percutaneous hook wire marker. Histological analysis of the epidural space, the meninges, and the underlying spinal cord of the punctured sites along with staining for caspase-3 followed 20 days later. Results: The epidural space did not manifest adhesions or any other pathology, and the outer surface of the dura was not impaired in any specimen. The group that had the contrast media injection showed a higher inflammation response compared to the other groups (P = 0.001). Positive staining for caspase-3 was limited to <5% of neurons with all substances used. Conclusion: No proof of arachnoiditis and/or fibrosis was noted in the epidural space with the use of the above-described drugs. A higher inflammation rate was noted with the use of contrast media.

  9. Spontaneous spinal epidural hemorrhage from intense piano playing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Ju; Su, Fang Jy; Huang, Ying C; Chen, Shih-Han

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare but real neurosurgical emergency. It is caused by atraumatic rupture of the vertebral epidural vein that results in nerve root or spinal cord compression. Most cases of SSEH have a multifactorial etiology, including congenital and acquired coagulopathies; platelet dysfunction; vascular malformation; tumors; uncontrolled hypertension; pregnancy; and, very rarely, activities requiring Valsalva. Herein we reported the case of a young pianist who was attacked by SSEH during piano practice. Playing the piano is a joyful, relaxing entertainment; however, this musical activity can be a highly demanding physical and mental exercise for pianists. Emotional and expressive performance, especially in professional performing, has been reported to result in significant increase of sympathetic and decrease of parasympathetic activities and thus influence the cardiorespiratory variables. The increased biomechanical stress from fluctuating hemodynamics was thought to trigger the rupture of her spinal arteriovenous malformation. PMID:24418452

  10. Transient bladder and fecal incontinence following epidural blood patch

    PubMed Central

    Palomero-Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; Palacio-Abinzada, Francisco J.; Campollo, Sara Chacón; Laporta-Báez, Yolanda; Mendez Cendón, Jose Carlos; López-García, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Epidural blood patch (EBP) is the currently accepted treatment of choice for postdural puncture headache because of its high initial success rates and infrequent complications. Many authors recommended a small volume (10-20 mL) of blood to be delivered for an effective EBP. Here, we report an obstetric patient who developed a transient bladder and fecal incontinence after 19 mL of blood EBP at L1 -L2 level. Since the magnetic resonance image did not demonstrate any definitive spinal cord lesion, the exact mechanism remains unclear. We suggest that accumulation of blood performed at L1 to L2 level in a closed relationship with the sacral cord, may have trigger a significant pressure elevation of the epidural space at this level, resulting in a temporal spinal cord-related injury in the sacral cord. PMID:26543470

  11. Communications during epidural catheter placement for labour analgesia.

    PubMed

    Slater, P; Sellors, J; Cyna, A M

    2011-11-01

    Evidence suggests that anaesthetists' communication can affect patient experience. There is a lack of guidance for anaesthetists as to the optimal verbal communication to use during insertion of epidurals on the labour ward. We recorded the verbal communication used by 14 anaesthetists during the siting of epidural catheters in women on the labour ward; a classification of the language used was subsequently devised. We found that commands and information statements were the most common types of communication used. Individual anaesthetists differed markedly in their use of positive and negative verbal language. This classification of verbal communication that we produced may be of value in future training and research of verbal communication used by anaesthetists on the labour ward.

  12. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Isolated to the Thoracic Epidural Spine.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Benjamin; Talbott, Jason; Uzelac, Alina; Rehani, Bhavya

    2015-11-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare benign histiocytic disease that infrequently presents in the spine. We report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease isolated to the epidural thoracic spine in a 26-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the 15th reported case of isolated spinal disease and only the fourth case of isolated thoracic epidural disease. Given its rarity as well as non-specific symptoms and imaging findings, Rosai-Dorfman disease is often not considered and misdiagnosed on imaging studies. To help improve awareness of Rosai-Dorfman spinal disease, we review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. PMID:27252790

  13. Spontaneous spinal epidural hemorrhage from intense piano playing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Ju; Su, Fang Jy; Huang, Ying C; Chen, Shih-Han

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare but real neurosurgical emergency. It is caused by atraumatic rupture of the vertebral epidural vein that results in nerve root or spinal cord compression. Most cases of SSEH have a multifactorial etiology, including congenital and acquired coagulopathies; platelet dysfunction; vascular malformation; tumors; uncontrolled hypertension; pregnancy; and, very rarely, activities requiring Valsalva. Herein we reported the case of a young pianist who was attacked by SSEH during piano practice. Playing the piano is a joyful, relaxing entertainment; however, this musical activity can be a highly demanding physical and mental exercise for pianists. Emotional and expressive performance, especially in professional performing, has been reported to result in significant increase of sympathetic and decrease of parasympathetic activities and thus influence the cardiorespiratory variables. The increased biomechanical stress from fluctuating hemodynamics was thought to trigger the rupture of her spinal arteriovenous malformation.

  14. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum and epidural pneumatosis after oral ecstasy consumption.

    PubMed

    Clause, A L; Coche, E; Hantson, P; Jacquet, L M

    2014-04-01

    A 19-year-old man was admitted with acute dyspnoea. Physical examination revealed subcutaneous emphysema in the cervical and thoracic area. This was further confirmed by the total body computed tomography that also demonstrated mediastinal emphysema. Epidural pneumatosis of the thoracis spine was also evident. There was no history of trauma, but well of a recent oral ecstasy consumption during a techno rave party, associated with intense dancing and jumping. Clinical course was favourable with conservative therapy.

  15. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Prostatic Small Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Solitary, spinal epidural metastasis (SEM) that is not related to vertebral metastasis is very rare. And solitary SEM from prostatic cancer is rarely found in previously published reports. However, it is clinically significant due to the possibility of neurologic dysfunction, and it can be assessed by MRI. In this report, we show a case of solitary SEM arising from prostatic small cell carcinoma detected by MRI. PMID:27413569

  16. Subdural Hematoma as a Consequence of Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tracy M.; Elsayed, Kareem S.; Kane, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Regional spinal and epidural anesthesia are used commonly in operative procedures. While the most frequent complication, postdural puncture headache (PDPH), is a clinically diagnosed positional headache that is usually self-limited, subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a potentially fatal complication that cannot be missed. We report a case of an otherwise healthy female who presented with persistent positional headache and was ultimately found to have a large subdural hematoma with midline shift requiring surgical evacuation. PMID:26697237

  17. Experimental Model of Intervertebral Disk Mediated Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Larionov, Sergey N.; Sorokovikov, V.A.; Erdyneyev, K.C.; Lepekhova, S.A.; Goldberg, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis (EF) after lumbar discectomy is the most common and at the same time controversial issue. Purpose The etiology and pathogenesis creates a lot of discussion and selection of methods of treatment and prevention continues. Methods LIV laminectomy with dura mater (DM) exposition was done in 24 rats, and then, 0.3 ml of elements of suspension of autologous intervertebral disk was implicated on DM. As autologous intervertebral disk, we used the intervertebral disk from amputated tail. In all the animals, incisions were closed with 3/0 Vicryl. EF was examined. Fibroblast cell density was calculated in each field at ×40 magnification: Grade 1 - fewer than 100 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 2 - 100-150 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 3 - more than 150 fibroblasts in each field. Results Based on histological results, we confirmed our model of experiment. On the 30th day of evaluation, there were significant histological evidences of postoperative epidural adhesions in experimental animals, which included the obliteration of epidural space, the presence of adhesions in the dura and nerve roots, the restructuring of the yellow ligament, bone sclerosis, excessive appearance of fibrous tissue around the autologous intervertebral disk tissue that applied on the DM. Conclusion In our work, we describe a new experimental model, where the elements of autologous intervertebral disk play the role of inflammation trigger, which cause postoperative scar and EF. PMID:27647957

  18. Experimental Model of Intervertebral Disk Mediated Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Larionov, Sergey N.; Sorokovikov, V.A.; Erdyneyev, K.C.; Lepekhova, S.A.; Goldberg, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis (EF) after lumbar discectomy is the most common and at the same time controversial issue. Purpose The etiology and pathogenesis creates a lot of discussion and selection of methods of treatment and prevention continues. Methods LIV laminectomy with dura mater (DM) exposition was done in 24 rats, and then, 0.3 ml of elements of suspension of autologous intervertebral disk was implicated on DM. As autologous intervertebral disk, we used the intervertebral disk from amputated tail. In all the animals, incisions were closed with 3/0 Vicryl. EF was examined. Fibroblast cell density was calculated in each field at ×40 magnification: Grade 1 - fewer than 100 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 2 - 100-150 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 3 - more than 150 fibroblasts in each field. Results Based on histological results, we confirmed our model of experiment. On the 30th day of evaluation, there were significant histological evidences of postoperative epidural adhesions in experimental animals, which included the obliteration of epidural space, the presence of adhesions in the dura and nerve roots, the restructuring of the yellow ligament, bone sclerosis, excessive appearance of fibrous tissue around the autologous intervertebral disk tissue that applied on the DM. Conclusion In our work, we describe a new experimental model, where the elements of autologous intervertebral disk play the role of inflammation trigger, which cause postoperative scar and EF.

  19. Efficacy of continuous epidural block in acute herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo Na; Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Eung Don

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate efficacy of continuous epidural block for prevent postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) progression in cases of acute herpes zoster with severe pain and also to identify predictive factors for PHN in such conditions. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of patients with herpes zoster who underwent continuous epidural block between March 2013 and October 2015. Time points were set as 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after zoster onset. PHN was defined as the presence of pain with NRS ≥3 at certain time points. The incidence of developing PHN was 38.1%, 27.0%, and 19.0% 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after zoster onset, respectively. Age and duration of catheterization were predictive factors for PHN at 1 month. Age, duration of catheterization, and NRS at first visit were identified as predictive factors for PHN at 3 months. Presence of diabetes, duration of catheterization, and NRS during catheterization were significant predictive factors for PHN at 6 months. The incidence of PHN is higher in zoster patients with severe pain that requires continuous epidural block compared to incidence in the general population. Advanced age and severe initial pain intensity were predictive factors of PHN development. Prolonged catheterization resulting from weak response to treatment strongly suggested progression to PHN. PMID:27512887

  20. Transient neurologic syndrome after spinal anesthesia with epidural steroid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cöcelli, L. Pirbudak; Erkutlu, Ibrahim; Karakurum, Gunhan; Avci, Neslihan; Gül, Rauf; Öner, Ünsal

    2009-01-01

    Background: Transient neurologic syndrome (TNS) is a rare complication of spinal and epidural anesthesia. It is defined as paradoxic postoperative back pain radiating to the lower extremities with no neurologic deficits. Because it is a self-limited disease, the treatment is usually symptomatic and consists of NSAIDs and injections of a neuromuscular-blocking drug at the trigger points. The syndrome may be resistant to this treatment regimen and may last for several months, resulting in a long convalescence. Case summary: A 63-year-old Turkish woman (height, 165 cm; weight, 71 kg) underwent hemorrhoidectomy in the jackknife position using spinal anesthesia. No adverse events occurred during puncture or surgery or in the immediate postoperative recovery period. Recovery from the sensory and motor block was normal. Twenty-four hours after surgery, lower limb and plantar pain developed with no sensory or motor deficit. Neurologic examination revealed normal motor and sensory function. Electroneuromyography showed partial denervation potential of muscles innervated by the left sciatic nerve. The symptoms were suggestive of TNS. Combination oral NSAID treatment with amitriptyline (25 mg/d) and gabapentin (1200 mg/d) was initiated. Because the pain still persisted 6 weeks after surgery, epidural steroid injection with triamcinolone acetate (80 mg) with isotonic saline was administered, resulting in definite pain relief (visual analog scale score = 0). Conclusions: Epidural steroid treatment was effective in this patient with TNS resistant to treatment with NSAIDs, amitriptyline, and gabapentin. Future studies are needed to evaluate this treatment. PMID:24683240

  1. [Technical difficulties in epidural blocks and spinal bleeding complications].

    PubMed

    Nava, S; Rossignoli, L; Tagariello, V; Bertini, L

    2001-12-01

    The clinical cases of two patients with neurological complications following neuroaxial blocks are reported. The events took place in different institutions where thousands of central blocks were yearly performed. In both instances the blocking procedures presented technical difficulties needing repeated lumbar punctures. The first case concerns a patient receiving anticoagulant and fibrinolytic therapy for vascular pathology. This 89 year-old female experienced severe cord compression requiring surgical decompression and laminectomy. The second case regards a patient with previous minor surgical procedure requiring postoperative antiinflammatory treatment. This 74 year-old male experienced subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal/epidural hematoma as shown by NMR. The symptoms regressed with steroid therapy. The authors emphasise the risks of mechanical trauma of epidural or spinal anesthesia both during positioning or removal of an epidural catheter. The problem related to the compatibility between central blocks and antithrombotic/anticoagulant prophylaxis/therapy is now of primary concern and has led to publications about guide lines on this topic. If central block is carried out in patients with bleeding diathesis it is mandatory to co-ordinate multidisciplinary assistance for early detection of significant symptoms of the above described complications and subsequent treatment.

  2. Safety of different acupuncture manipulations for posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Shi-Zhe; He, Si; Huang, Ling-Hui; Tian, Guang; Meng, Zhi-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture at Fengchi (GB20) in the posterior neck improves vertigo. However, subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal epidural hematoma have been reported to occur after acupuncture in the posterior neck. Therefore, in the present study, we assessed the safety of acupuncture at Fengchi. Laboratory tests and adverse event reports were used to evaluate the safety of different acupuncture manipulations for the treatment of posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. A total of 136 patients were randomly assigned to four groups. Verum acupuncture was conducted with different needle insertion directions (contralateral paropia or prominentia laryngea) and different needle twisting frequencies (60 or 120 times/minute) at Fengchi and matching acupoints (for example, Zhongwan [CV12], Qihai [CV6], Zusanli [ST36], and Fenglong [ST40]). The patients received 14 treatments over 3-4 weeks. Routine blood analysis, hepatic and renal function tests, urine and feces tests and electrocardiography were performed before the first treatment session and after the final session. Adverse events were recorded after every session. Of the 136 patients, 120 completed the study. There were no significant differences between pretreatment and posttreatment test results in any of the groups. Only five patients suffered from minor adverse events (needling pain, slight hematoma and transient chest tightness). No serious adverse events were found. Our results indicate that a 14-session course of needling at Fengchi is relatively safe for treating posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. PMID:27651774

  3. Safety of different acupuncture manipulations for posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xiao-feng; Deng, Shi-zhe; He, Si; Huang, Ling-hui; Tian, Guang; Meng, Zhi-hong

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture at Fengchi (GB20) in the posterior neck improves vertigo. However, subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal epidural hematoma have been reported to occur after acupuncture in the posterior neck. Therefore, in the present study, we assessed the safety of acupuncture at Fengchi. Laboratory tests and adverse event reports were used to evaluate the safety of different acupuncture manipulations for the treatment of posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. A total of 136 patients were randomly assigned to four groups. Verum acupuncture was conducted with different needle insertion directions (contralateral paropia or prominentia laryngea) and different needle twisting frequencies (60 or 120 times/minute) at Fengchi and matching acupoints (for example, Zhongwan [CV12], Qihai [CV6], Zusanli [ST36], and Fenglong [ST40]). The patients received 14 treatments over 3–4 weeks. Routine blood analysis, hepatic and renal function tests, urine and feces tests and electrocardiography were performed before the first treatment session and after the final session. Adverse events were recorded after every session. Of the 136 patients, 120 completed the study. There were no significant differences between pretreatment and posttreatment test results in any of the groups. Only five patients suffered from minor adverse events (needling pain, slight hematoma and transient chest tightness). No serious adverse events were found. Our results indicate that a 14-session course of needling at Fengchi is relatively safe for treating posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. PMID:27651774

  4. Injuries of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Moyer, R A; Marchetto, P A

    1993-04-01

    A review of the anatomy and biomechanics of the posterior cruciate ligament, and the systematic approach for the diagnosis and treatment of isolated posterior cruciate ligament injuries and posterior cruciate ligament insufficiency in combination with other ligamentous instabilities is discussed.

  5. Comparison of aesthetic posterior restorations.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, R D

    1991-09-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased desire by the profession and the public for an aesthetic restoration that will restore a posterior tooth to its original form and function. The currently available aesthetic posterior restoration materials and techniques are porcelain, cast ceramic, direct composite, direct-indirect composite, indirect composite, and CAD-CAM fabrications. The indications and contraindications of these restorative materials and proper diagnosis and case selection are described.

  6. Vaccum drainage system application in the management of operation-related non-regional epidural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidural intracranial hematoma is one of the most common complications of surgeries for intracranial tumors. The non-regional epidural hematoma is related to severe fluctuation of the intracranial pressure during the operation. The traditional management of hematoma evacuation through craniotomy is time-consuming and may aggravate intracranial pressure imbalance, which causes further complications. We designed a method using vaccum epidural drainage system, and tried to evaluate advantage and the disadvantage of this new technique. Methods Seven patients of intracranial tumors were selected. All of the patients received tumor resection and intra-operative non-regional epidural hematoma was confirmed through intra-operative ultrasound or CT scan. The vaccum drainage system was applied. Another ten patients who received craniotomy for intra-operative non-regional epidural hematoma evacuation were selected as comparison. Regular tests, like serial CT scan, were performed afterward to evaluate the effectiveness and to help deciding when to remove the drainage system. Results The vaccum drainage method was effective in epidual hemotoma clearance and prevented recurrent epidural hemorrhage. The drainage systems were removed within 4 days. All of the patients recovered well. No complications related to the drainage system were observed. Conclusions Compared to the traditional craniotomy, the new method of epidural hemoatoma management using vaccum epidural drainage system proved to be as effective in hematoma clearance, and was less-invasive and easier to perform, with less complication, shorter hospitalization, less economic burden, and better prognosis. PMID:23842198

  7. Epidural hematoma secondary to sinusitis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Aviner, Shraga; Olshinka, Noam; Cherniavsky, Evgenia; Forer, Boaz; Bibi, Haim

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma is a potentially life threatening event that demands prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment, usually following head trauma. We present a case of a 9-year-old boy with no history of head trauma, and who was diagnosed with epidural hematoma secondary to frontal sinusitis; and the medical literature was reviewed. PMID:24370469

  8. Postoperative urinary retention in a dog following morphine with bupivacaine epidural analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Herperger, L J

    1998-01-01

    Urinary retention, overflow incontinence, and subsequent detrusor atony were observed following surgery in which a morphine with bupivacaine epidural injection was used for perioperative analgesia. The premise that the urinary retention may have been due to the effects of the morphine component of the epidural is discussed, along with other possible causes. PMID:9789679

  9. Epidural analgesia for childbirth: effects of newer techniques on neonatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Capogna, Giorgio; Camorcia, Michela

    2004-01-01

    New low-dose, local anesthetic-opioid combinations, combined spinal epidural analgesia, and new anesthetic drugs, such as ropivacaine and levobupivacaine, have modified the anesthetic practice in obstetric labor analgesia. These new analgesic techniques have less or no neonatal effects when compared with traditional epidural labor analgesia. They also have less effect on mode of delivery, which may in turn affect neonatal outcome. The use of very diluted or low concentrations of local anesthetic solutions may reduce their placental passage and thus the possible subtle neonatal effects. Small doses of epidural or spinal opioids alone or combined with low doses of local anesthetics does not affect the well-being of the neonate at birth. When considering the neonatal outcome, combined spinal epidural analgesia is as well tolerated as low-dose epidural analgesia. Transient fetal heart rate changes have been described immediately after the administration of intrathecal or epidural opioids. Maternal hypotension may also occur at the onset of epidural analgesia. Whether the occurrence of transient fetal heart rate changes or maternal hypotension immediately after the epidural block may influence the neonatal outcome at birth needs verification.

  10. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyung Ream; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air.

  11. Extraosseous, Epidural Cavernous Hemangioma with Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ozkal, Birol; Yaldiz, Can; Yaman, Onur; Ozdemır, Nail; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cavernous malformations are characterized by enlarged vascular structures located in benign neural tissues within the cerebellum and spinal cord of the central nervous system. Cavernous hemangiomas (CHs) account for 5% to 12% of all spinal vascular malformations. Case Report We removed a hemorrhagic thoracic mass in a 40-year-old male patient who presented with progressive neurological deficits. Conclusions We found it appropriate to present this case due to its rarity. PMID:25960818

  12. Clinical effects of computed tomography-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa P; Girod, Maud; Peeters, Dominique; Sandersen, Charlotte; Couvreur, Thierry; Bolen, Géraldine

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine clinical effects of CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate in healthy dogs. ANIMALS 15 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to 3 groups (5 dogs/group) and received a single CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, or translaminar epidural injection of methylprednisolone acetate (0.1 mg/kg). Contrast medium was injected prior to injection of methylprednisolone to verify needle placement. Neurologic examinations were performed 1, 3, 7, and 10 days after the injection. In dogs with neurologic abnormalities, a final neurologic examination was performed 24 days after the procedure. RESULTS Methylprednisolone injections were successfully performed in 14 of the 15 dogs. In 1 dog, vascular puncture occurred, and the methylprednisolone injection was not performed. No major or minor complications were identified during or immediately after the procedure, other than mild transient hyperthermia. During follow-up neurologic examinations, no motor, sensory, or postural deficits were identified, other than mild alterations in the patellar, withdrawal, cranial tibial, and perineal reflexes in some dogs. Overall, altered reflexes were observed in 11 of the 14 dogs, during 27 of 65 neurologic examinations. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate were associated with few complications in healthy dogs. However, the number of dogs evaluated was small, and additional studies are needed to assess clinical efficacy and safety of these procedures. PMID:27668585

  13. Comparison of epidural analgesia and cryoanalgesia in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Brichon, P Y; Pison, C; Chaffanjon, P; Fayot, P; Buchberger, M; Néron, L; Bocca, A; Verdier, J; Sarrazin, R

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 120 patients undergoing elective thoracotomy for parenchymal disease. Patients were randomized into three groups: A (control group), B (epidural analgesia), C (freezing of intercostal nerves). Subjective pain relief was assessed on a linear visual analog scale. Analgesic requirements were evaluated during the 12 days following surgery, or until discharge if earlier. The vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) were measured on the day before operation and on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 7th postoperative days (POD). Subjective pain relief was significantly better in Group B in comparison with Group A (P < 0.05) or C (P < 0.05). Group C had the lowest score on the 11th and 12th POD but differences were not statistically significant. Requirements for intravenous analgesics were lower in Group B than in the control group (P < 0.05) during the first 3 POD, and in group C than in the control group the day of operation (P < 0.05). Oral analgesic requirements, when compared with controls, were lower in group B during the first 5 POD, and lower in group C on the 3rd and the 4th POD (P < 0.05). Cryoanalgesia led to a slight but not significant increase in VC and FEV1. Epidural analgesia led to a significant increase when compared with controls in FEV1 during the first 3 POD, and in FVC on the 7th POD (P < 0.05). It is concluded that epidural analgesia led to the best pain relief and restoration of pulmonary function after thoracotomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7811482

  14. Bionic epidural stimulation restores arterial pressure regulation during orthostasis.

    PubMed

    Yanagiya, Yusuke; Sato, Takayuki; Kawada, Toru; Inagaki, Masashi; Tatewaki, Teiji; Zheng, Can; Kamiya, Atsunori; Takaki, Hiroshi; Sugimachi, Masaru; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2004-09-01

    A bionic baroreflex system (BBS) is a computer-assisted intelligent feedback system to control arterial pressure (AP) for the treatment of baroreflex failure. To apply this system clinically, an appropriate efferent neural (sympathetic vasomotor) interface has to be explored. We examined whether the spinal cord is a candidate site for such interface. In six anesthetized and baroreflex-deafferentiated cats, a multielectrode catheter was inserted into the epidural space to deliver epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS). Stepwise changes in ESCS rate revealed a linear correlation between ESCS rate and AP for ESCS rates of 2 pulses/s and above (r2, 0.876-0.979; slope, 14.3 +/- 5.8 mmHg.pulses(-1).s; pressure axis intercept, 35.7 +/- 25.9 mmHg). Random changes in ESCS rate with a white noise sequence revealed dynamic transfer function of peripheral effectors. The transfer function resembled a second-order, low-pass filter with a lag time (gain, 16.7 +/- 8.3 mmHg.pulses(-1).s; natural frequency, 0.022 +/- 0.007 Hz; damping coefficient, 2.40 +/- 1.07; lag time, 1.06 +/- 0.41 s). On the basis of the transfer function, we designed an artificial vasomotor center to attenuate hypotension. We evaluated the performance of the BBS against hypotension induced by 60 degrees head-up tilt. In the cats with baroreflex failure, head-up tilt dropped AP by 37 +/- 5 mmHg in 5 s and 59 +/- 11 mmHg in 30 s. BBS with optimized feedback parameters attenuated hypotension to 21 +/- 2 mmHg in 5 s (P < 0.05) and 8 +/- 4 mmHg in 30 s (P < 0.05). These results indicate that ESCS-mediated BBS prevents orthostatic hypotension. Because epidural stimulation is a clinically feasible procedure, this BBS can be applied clinically to combat hypotension associated with various pathophysiologies.

  15. Complete transthoracic resection of giant posterior mediastinal goiter: case report and review of surgical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Honglin; Ren, Dian; Liu, Yi; Li, Xin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Gang; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic goiters generally occupy anterior mediastinum, rarely involving the posterior mediastinal space. Reported herein is a 54-year-old female with a giant posterior mediastinal mass that was successfully resected via right posterolateral thoracotomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant posterior mediastinal goiter. This patient has done well postoperatively, with no evidence of local recurrence at 12-month follow-up. Related surgical strategies in past publications are summarized. PMID:27217766

  16. Inflammation and Epidural-Related Maternal Fever: Proposed Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Pervez; David, Anna L; Fernando, Roshan; Ackland, Gareth L

    2016-05-01

    Intrapartum fever is associated with excessive maternal interventions as well as higher neonatal morbidity. Epidural-related maternal fever (ERMF) contributes to the development of intrapartum fever. The mechanism(s) for ERMF has remained elusive. Here, we consider how inflammatory mechanisms may be modulated by local anesthetic agents and their relevance to ERMF. We also critically reappraise the clinical data with regard to emerging concepts that explain how anesthetic drug-induced metabolic dysfunction, with or without activation of the inflammasome, might trigger the release of nonpathogenic, inflammatory molecules (danger-associated molecular patterns) likely to underlie ERMF.

  17. Epidural Tube: A Useful Device in Sialendoscopy Operations.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Fang, Wei; Chen, Ju-feng; Long, Xing

    2016-03-01

    Salivary endoscopy, which was first described in 1991, is a safe technique with few complications. The sialendoscopy operation has been developed and successfully offered as a minimally invasive and gland-preserving approach for the treatment of chronic obstructive sialadenitis. For many surgeons, entering the duct lumen of the salivary gland is the most difficult and time-consuming step of the sialendoscopy operation. This report introduces a timesaving and straightforward method for entering the duct lumen using an epidural tube, which is a plastic tube with a blunt tip. PMID:26433042

  18. Spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma mimicking acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Noor; Shahid, Muhammad; Haque, Munirul; Qureshi, Masood

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is an acute neurological emergency which carries significant morbidity unless diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. Some cases of SSEH are idiopathic but there is a well-recognised association with deranged coagulation and abnormalities of clotting. In recent years there has been increasing availability of novel anti-platelet agents, often prescribed in the setting of suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and following percutaneous coronary interventions and these agents also present an increased risk of SSEH. We present a case of SSEH following an acute presentation with chest pain and treatment with dual anti-platelet therapy. PMID:26807374

  19. [Caudal epidural anesthesia in pyloromyotomy in infants: our experience].

    PubMed

    Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Cía Armendáriz, M L; Carrascosa Moreno, S; Martínez Bermejo, M A; Conde Cortés, J; Gracia Velilla, A; Bento Bravo, L

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this work is to introduce an alternative to ordinary anaesthetic with tracheal intubation for the surgery of pyloric stenosis. We argue in favour of this alternative that it can be achieved with relative ease if the technique of caudal epidural is well known, a better control of peri and post-operative analgesia without the need of opiates, and that this technique obviates orotracheal intubation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Based on our experience with 18 patients, we introduce the anaesthetic technique, the monitoring systems and the obtained results. Our conclusion is that this technique is a good alternative to general anaesthetic for the surgical treatment of pyloric stenosis.

  20. Children's understanding of posterior probability.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Vittorio; Gonzalez, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Do young children have a basic intuition of posterior probability? Do they update their decisions and judgments in the light of new evidence? We hypothesized that they can do so extensionally, by considering and counting the various ways in which an event may or may not occur. The results reported in this paper showed that from the age of five, children's decisions under uncertainty (Study 1) and judgments about random outcomes (Study 2) are correctly affected by posterior information. From the same age, children correctly revise their decisions in situations in which they face a single, uncertain event, produced by an intentional agent (Study 3). The finding that young children have some understanding of posterior probability supports the theory of naive extensional reasoning, and contravenes some pessimistic views of probabilistic reasoning, in particular the evolutionary claim that the human mind cannot deal with single-case probability. PMID:17391661

  1. Rethinking "posterior" tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Currently, many clinicians who help with breastfeeding problems are diagnosing "posterior" tongue-tie in infants and performing or referring for frenotomy. In this "Speaking Out" article, I argue that the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie has successfully raised awareness of the importance of impaired tongue function in breastfeeding difficulty. However, the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie also applies a reductionist, medicalized theoretical frame to the complex problem of impaired tongue function, risking unintended outcomes. Impaired tongue function arises out of multiple interacting and co-evolving factors, including the interplay between social behaviors concerning breastfeeding and mother-infant biology. Consideration of theoretical frames is vital if we are to build an evidence base through efficient use of the scarce resources available for clinical breastfeeding research and minimize unintended outcomes.

  2. Unsuccessful outcomes after posterior urethroplasty.

    PubMed

    Engel, Oliver; Fisch, Margit

    2015-03-01

    Posterior urethroplasty is the most common strategy for the treatment of post-traumatic urethral injuries. Especially in younger patients, post-traumatic injuries are a common reason for urethral strictures caused by road traffic accidents, with pelvic fracture or direct trauma to the perineum. In many cases early endoscopic realignment is the first attempt to restore the junction between proximal and distal urethra, but in some cases primary realignment is not possible or not enough to treat the urethral injury. In these cases suprapubic cystostomy alone and delayed repair by stricture excision and posterior urethroplasty is an alternative procedure to minimise the risk of stricture recurrence.

  3. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of Irish practice.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, A; Omer, W; Harmon, D

    2014-06-01

    Currently, we do not have a national standard regarding epidural consent in Ireland. The aim of this survey was to assess practice in obstetric units in Ireland with regard to obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and whether the risks discussed with women are being documented. A postal survey of anaesthetists in Irish obstetric units was performed in January 2012 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 16/18 (88%). There was major variation both in which risks are discussed with women in labour and what risks are quoted. The most frequently quoted risks were headache--15/16 (93.8% of the respondents), partially/not working epidural--15/16 (93.8%), drop in blood pressure--14/16 (87.5%) and temporary backache/local tenderness--12/16 (75%). The more serious risks were not discussed as frequently: permanent nerve damage--8/16 (50%), paralysis--8/16 (50%), epidural abscess/haematoma--6/16 (37.5%), meningitis--3/16 (18.7%). The vast majority of respondents supported introduction of a national standardised information leaflet, detailing all the benefits and risks of epidural analgesia, to be shown to all women before consenting to epidural insertion.

  4. Connection of the Posterior Occipital Muscle and Dura Mater of the Siamese Crocodile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Hui; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Zhao-Xi; Luan, Bing-Yi; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Sui, Hong-Jin

    2016-10-01

    The myodural bridge was proposed initially in 1995. The myodural bridge is a connective tissue bridge that connects a pair of deep muscles at the suboccipital region to the dura mater. There have been numerous studies concerning the morphology and function of the myodural bridge. To determine whether a myodural bridge exists in reptiles, six Siamese crocodiles were investigated using gross anatomy dissection and P45 sheet plastination technologies. As a result, we demonstrated that the posterior occipital muscles of the Siamese crocodile are directly or indirectly connected to the proatlas, atlas, and intermembrane between them. Multiple trabeculae existing in the posterior epidural space extended from the ventral surface of the proatlas, atlas, and intermembrane between them to the dorsal surface of the spinal dura mater. This study showed that the posterior occipital muscle in the suboccipital region of the Siamese crocodile is connected to the spinal dura mater through the proatlas, atlas, and the trabeculae. In conclusion, a myodural bridge-like structure exists in reptiles. This connection may act as a pump to provide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation at the occipitocervical junction. We hypothesize that a physiologic role of the Siamese crocodile's myodural bridge may be analogous to the human myodural bridge. Anat Rec, 299:1402-1408, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27507762

  5. [Failure of extension of epidural analgesia to anesthesia for emergency cesarean section].

    PubMed

    Gago, A; Guasch, E; Gutiérrez, C; Guiote, P; Gilsanz, F

    2009-01-01

    Epidural analgesia provides effective control of labor pain and allows emergency cesarean section to be performed without recourse to general anesthesia. This technique is subject to failure, however. We sought to determine the incidence of failure of extension of epidural analgesia for labor to epidural anesthesia for emergency cesarean section. We also analyzed possible risk factors for failure. A 2-month observational study was carried out in a tertiary-care university hospital in patients who had an epidural catheter inserted for labor analgesia and who later underwent emergency cesarean section. Epidural catheter failure was defined if additional analgesia was required during surgery or if general anesthesia was required. Data were gathered on possible risk factors, such as obesity, difficult epidural puncture, leakage of blood on insertion, history of cesarean delivery, need for rescue analgesia, and level of satisfaction with analgesia during dilation. In total, 134 emergency cesareans were performed in women carrying an epidural catheter. The catheter failed to administer the anesthetic in 18 patients (13.4%). General anesthesia was required in 9 cases (6.7%). Difficult insertion (more than 2 attempts) was associated with a higher failure rate (P=.064). The relative risk of epidural catheter failure was 2.86-fold higher when rescue analgesia was needed during delivery than in cases when no supplement was required (P=.021). Receiving adequate analgesia during labor seems to be a protective factor (80%) against anesthetic catheter failure during cesarean section (P=.01). We conclude that high demand for rescue analgesia and signs of inadequate analgesia during labor should warn of epidural catheter failure if extension to anesthesia becomes necessary for a cesarean delivery.

  6. Posterior-Only Circumferential Decompression and Reconstruction in the Surgical Management of Lumbar Vertebral Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Caridi, John; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The purpose of this report is to discuss the surgical management of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and present a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with instrumentation using an expandable titanium cage and without segmental nerve root sacrifice as an option in the treatment of this disease process. Methods We report a 42-year-old man who presented with 3 days of low back pain and chills who rapidly decompensated with severe sepsis following admission. Magnetic resonance imaging of his lumbosacral spine revealed intramuscular abscesses of the left paraspinal musculature and iliopsoas with SEA and L4 vertebral body involvement. The patient failed maximal medical treatment, which necessitated surgical treatment as a last resort for infectious source control. He underwent a previously undescribed procedure in the setting of SEA: a single-stage, posterior-only approach for circumferential decompression and reconstruction of the L4 vertebral body with posterior segmental instrumented fixation. Results After the surgery, the patient's condition gradually improved; however, he suffered a wound dehiscence necessitating a surgical exploration and deep wound debridement. Six months after the surgery, the patient underwent a revision surgery for adjacent-level pseudarthrosis. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and off narcotic pain medication and had returned to full activity. Conclusion This patient is the first reported case of lumbar osteomyelitis with SEA treated surgically with a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation. Although this approach is more technically challenging, it presents another viable option for the treatment of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis that may reduce the morbidity associated with an anterior approach. PMID:26835214

  7. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease.

  8. An Active Learning Algorithm for Control of Epidural Electrostimulation.

    PubMed

    Desautels, Thomas A; Choe, Jaehoon; Gad, Parag; Nandra, Mandheerej S; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Tai, Yu-Chong; Edgerton, V Reggie; Burdick, Joel W

    2015-10-01

    Epidural electrostimulation has shown promise for spinal cord injury therapy. However, finding effective stimuli on the multi-electrode stimulating arrays employed requires a laborious manual search of a vast space for each patient. Widespread clinical application of these techniques would be greatly facilitated by an autonomous, algorithmic system which choses stimuli to simultaneously deliver effective therapy and explore this space. We propose a method based on GP-BUCB, a Gaussian process bandit algorithm. In n = 4 spinally transected rats, we implant epidural electrode arrays and examine the algorithm's performance in selecting bipolar stimuli to elicit specified muscle responses. These responses are compared with temporally interleaved intra-animal stimulus selections by a human expert. GP-BUCB successfully controlled the spinal electrostimulation preparation in 37 testing sessions, selecting 670 stimuli. These sessions included sustained autonomous operations (ten-session duration). Delivered performance with respect to the specified metric was as good as or better than that of the human expert. Despite receiving no information as to anatomically likely locations of effective stimuli, GP-BUCB also consistently discovered such a pattern. Further, GP-BUCB was able to extrapolate from previous sessions' results to make predictions about performance in new testing sessions, while remaining sufficiently flexible to capture temporal variability. These results provide validation for applying automated stimulus selection methods to the problem of spinal cord injury therapy.

  9. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease. PMID:26275629

  10. Stereolithography for Posterior Fossa Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Celso; Dujovny, Manuel; Evenhouse, Raymond; Charbel, Fady T.; Sadler, Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Posterior fossa cranioplasty has been suggested for improvement of neurological symptoms following craniectomy. However, there is no particular recommendation in the literature about techniques for prosthesis manufacture and implantation. We report our experience using rapid prototyping technology and stereolithography for pre-surgical implant design and production of cranioplasties. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171056

  11. Neonatal posterior fossa subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Coker, S; Beltran, R; Fine, M

    1987-07-01

    Hemorrhage into the posterior fossa is a rare neurosurgical emergency in neonates. CT scanning is diagnostic. Blood layering under the apex of the tentorium cerebelli, however, may resemble a dilated vascular structure, and the rigidity of the pressured tentorium may prevent upward transmission of increased intracranial pressure, resulting in a soft fontanelle.

  12. The distance from the skin to the epidural space in a Chinese patient population.

    PubMed

    Lau, H P

    1989-09-01

    The inter-relationship between age, height, weight and distance from the skin to the epidural space correlated with the patient's weight (r = 0.52, F = 23.96, P less than 0.001), and showed no correlation with patient's height (r = 0.18, F = 0.04, P greater than 0.05) or age (r = 0.13, F = 1.88, P greater than 0.05). The epidural space was found at a depth range of 3-7 cm, and 60% of patients had a depth of 4-5 cm. The results may be useful as a guideline for successful epidural blocks.

  13. Epidural pneumatosis associated with spontaneous pneumomediastinum: a rare complication of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Healy, Mary-Louise; O'Shea, Donal; Crowley, Rachel K

    2016-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum and epidural pneumatosis are rare complications of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). These result from the emesis and hyperventilation associated with DKA which lead to alveolar rupture and air escape into the mediastinal and epidural spaces. These complications are often asymptomatic and resolve with the correction of the underlying metabolic abnormality. Oesophageal contrast studies are only required if oesophageal perforation is suspected in patients presenting with persistent vomiting and chest pain. We report the rare association of pneumomediastinum and epidural pneumatosis complicating DKA in a 19-year-old female patient. PMID:27451054

  14. Cervical epidural abscess: rare complication of bacterial endocarditis with streptococcus viridans: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Doh, Jae-Won

    2015-03-01

    Although many patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complain of joint, muscle, and back pain, infections at these sights are rare. The incidence of spinal abscess in cervical spine complicating endocarditis is very rare. Although the surgical management is the mainstay of treatment, conservative treatment can get success in selected patients. We report a patient with cervical epidural abscess due to Streptococcus viridans endocarditis. Both epidural abscess and IE were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics for 8 weeks, with recovery. It is important to remind spinal epidural abscess can occur in those patients with bacterial endocarditis. PMID:25883665

  15. Clinical Practice of Epidural Puncture in Dogs and Cats Assisted by a Commercial Acoustic Puncture Assist Device-Epidural Locator: Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, Katrin; Turković, Veljko; Moens, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare an Acoustic Puncture Assist Device-Epidural Locator (APAD-EL) with the "pop sensation" (POP) and "lack of resistance" (LOR) commonly used to confirm penetration of the ligamentum flavum and to ensure correct epidural placement in dogs and cats. We recruited 38 dogs and cats undergoing surgery and receiving epidural analgesia. Two anesthetists performed epidural puncture using the POP and LOR signs. Simultaneously, APAD-EL was used to collect visual and acoustic confirmation during advancement and placement of the needle tip for post hoc evaluation. A positive APAD-EL sign consists of a sudden pressure drop at the needle tip visible on a display and a concomitant pitch change of an acoustic signal. Failure to record a sudden pressure drop is considered a negative APAD sign. Descriptive statistics were used. In 32 patients with positive POP and LOR, the APAD was also positive. In one patient, POP was positive with a negative LOR and APAD result. Five patients had negative POP but positive LOR. Four patients had APAD positive and one (a dog) APAD negative. The study results showed that the APAD-EL information supports the subjective signs of correct needle placement suggested by positive POP and LOR experienced by trained anesthetists. The technique can be useful to assist difficult epidural puncture and as a training and teaching tool.

  16. Needle Tip Position and Bevel Direction Have No Effect in the Fluoroscopic Epidural Spreading Pattern in Caudal Epidural Injections: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Won Kyoung; Kim, Ah Na; Lee, Pil Moo; Park, Cheol Hwan; Kim, Jae Hun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Caudal epidural steroid injections (CESIs) are an effective treatment for pain. If the injection spreads in a specific pattern depending on the needle position or bevel direction, it would be possible to inject the agent into a specific and desired area. Objectives. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to determine if the needle position and bevel direction have any effect on the epidural spreading pattern in CESI. Methods. Demographic data of the patient were collected. During CESI, the needle position (middle or lateral) and direction (ventral or dorsal) were randomly allocated. Following fluoroscope-guided injection of 4 mL contrast media and 10 mL of injectates, the epidural spreading patterns (ventral or dorsal, bilateral or lateral) were imaged. Results. In the 210 CESIs performed, the needle tip position and bevel direction did not influence the epidural spreading patterns at L4-5 and L5-S1 disc levels. A history of Lumbar spine surgery was associated with a significantly limited spread to each disc level. A midline needle tip position was more effective than the lateral position in spreading to the distant disc levels. Conclusions. Neither the needle tip position nor the bevel direction affected the epidural drug spreading pattern during CESI. PMID:27445609

  17. How I teach evidence-based epidural information in a hospital and keep my job.

    PubMed

    Tumblin, Ann

    2007-01-01

    A childbirth educator reveals her dilemma in teaching evidence-based practice in today's high-tech birth climate. She focuses on strategies to use when sharing epidural information with expectant parents. PMID:18769516

  18. [Acute epidural hematoma with extravasation on cerebral angiogram in an infant (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Oseki, J; Oana, K; Kobayashi, T; Kawada, Y; Kanaya, H

    1977-03-01

    The authors recently operated on a boy four years of age with acute epidural hematoma showing an extravasation on the cerebral angiogram. The hematoma (hematoma volume 125 ml) was evacuated 7 hours after the head injury. The postoperative course was quite uneventful, and he was discharged a month after surgery without any neurologic deficits. The authors reviewed the literature and found 4 cases of acute epidural hematoma with extravasations in infants and children. In all cases the operative results were good. The age incidence and frequency of occurence overall for acute epidural hematomas, extravasations on cerebral angiograms and their mechanism, and the length of time from injury to operation were also discussed. It should be emphasized that, for acute epidural hematoma in infants and children, the early diagnosis and early surgery are essential to save the patients.

  19. Giving Birth With Epidural Analgesia: The Experience of First-Time Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Ryoko; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our qualitative descriptive study was to describe the birth experiences of women using epidural analgesia for pain management. We interviewed nine primiparas who experienced vaginal births. Five themes emerged: (a) coping with pain, (b) finding epidural administration uneventful, (c) feeling relief having an epidural, (d) experiencing joy, and (e) having unsettled feelings of ambivalence. Although epidural analgesia was found to be effective for pain relief and may contribute to some women’s satisfaction with the birth experience, it does not guarantee a quality birth experience. In order to support and promote childbearing women’s decision making, we recommend improved education on the variety of available pain management options, including their risks and benefits. Fostering a sense of caring, connection, and control in women is a key factor to ensure positive birth experiences, regardless of pain management method. PMID:23277728

  20. A missed Behçet’s case presenting with spontaneous epidural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Levent; Mengi, Gönen; Özyemişçi-Taşkıran, Özden

    2015-01-01

    Spinal vascular events related to Behçet’s disease are relatively uncommon. Deep vein thrombosis is the most frequent vascular involvement. Anticoagulant therapy is a debated issue in Behçet’s disease. In this case report, we present a patient with a delayed diagnosis of Behçet’s disease after development of cervical epidural hematoma following anticoagulant therapy due to deep venous thrombosis. Anticoagulant therapy without immunosuppressive therapy leading to uncontrolled systemic inflammation may be the cause of spinal epidural hematoma. On the other hand, epidural vascular involvement as a vasculitic manifestation of Behçet’s disease in conjunction with anticoagulant therapy may have predisposed to spontaneous bleeding via increased fragility or microaneurysms in epidural arteries. In this case report, the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to Behçet’s disease is emphasized.

  1. Maternal pyrexia associated with the use of epidural analgesia in labour.

    PubMed

    Fusi, L; Steer, P J; Maresh, M J; Beard, R W

    1989-06-01

    To establish the effect of pain relief on maternal temperature during labour forty patients who went into spontaneous labour with a single fetus, had a normal temperature (less than 37.5 degrees C), and had no clinical evidence of infection were investigated prospectively. They were divided into two comparable groups--one receiving pethidine and the other epidural analgesia. Both groups had much the same temperatures at the beginning of labour and before any analgesic administration. The mean temperature in the pethidine group remained constant during labour, whereas in the epidural analgesia group it showed a significant rise after only 6 hours of labour. This rise was not related to any clinical evidence of infection. Patients receiving epidural analgesia during labour are at increased risk of developing pyrexia. This pyrexia may be the result of vascular and thermoregulatory modifications induced by epidural analgesia.

  2. Towards a realistic in vitro experience of epidural Tuohy needle insertion.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Neil; Dubey, Venketesh N; Wee, Michael Y K; Isaacs, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The amount of pressure exerted on the syringe and the depth of needle insertion are the two key factors for successfully carrying out epidural procedure. The force feedback from the syringe plunger is helpful in judging the loss of pressure, and the depth of the needle insertion is crucial in identifying when the needle is precisely placed in the epidural space. This article presents the development of two novel wireless devices to measure these parameters to precisely guide the needle placement in the epidural space. These techniques can be directly used on patients or implemented in a simulator for improving the safety of procedure. A pilot trial has been conducted to collect depth and pressure data with the devices on a porcine cadaver. These measurements are then combined to accurately configure a haptic device for creating a realistic in vitro experience of epidural needle insertion. PMID:23636758

  3. Epidural analgesia for post-caesarean pain relief: a comparison between morphine and fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Blanco, J; Blanco, E; Carceller, J M; Sarabia, A; Solares, G

    1987-11-01

    In 20 post-operative patients who had undergone caesarean section, morphine 2 mg or fentanyl 75 micrograms in 0.9% saline were given epidurally in a randomized study, to compare their effectiveness in providing post-operative pain relief and the incidence of untoward reaction. There was a faster onset of action (P less than 0.01) and the quality of pain relief was substantially better after epidural fentanyl (P less than 0.01). However, the duration of action was markedly longer after epidural morphine (P less than 0.01). There was a significantly greater incidence of urinary retention after morphine administration (P less than 0.05). It is suggested that fentanyl gives better relief of pain than morphine when given epidurally.

  4. Posterior Fixation Techniques in the Subaxial Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ghori, Ahmer; Makanji, Heeren; Cha, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the historical context, indications, techniques, and complications of four posterior fixation techniques to stabilize the subaxial cervical spine. Specifically, posterior wiring, laminar screw fixation, lateral mass fixation, and pedicle screw fixation are among the common methods of operative fixation of the subaxial cervical spine. While wiring and laminar screw fixation are now rarely used, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation are technically challenging and present the risk of significant complications if performed incorrectly. With a sound understanding of anatomy and rigorous preoperative evaluation of bony structures, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation provide a safe and reliable method for subaxial cervical spine fixation. PMID:26594602

  5. Creep of posterior dental composites.

    PubMed

    Papadogianis, Y; Boyer, D B; Lakes, R S

    1985-01-01

    The creep of microspecimens of posterior dental composites was studied using a torsional creep apparatus. Shear stresses were maintained for 3 h and recovery was followed for 50 h. Creep curves were obtained at 21, 37, and 50 degrees C and four torque levels. The effect of conditioning the specimens in water up to 8 weeks was studied. The posterior composites exhibited linear viscoelastic behavior at low deformations. They had higher shear moduli and greater resistance to creep than conventional and microfilled composites. In aging experiments, maximum shear moduli occurred when specimens were 48 h to 1 week old. Subsequent softening was attributed to water absorption. Residual strain was highest when the composites were stressed within 24 h of initiating polymerization. Residual strain was very low in specimens 48 h to 8 weeks of age.

  6. Posterior cruciate ligament of the knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a powerful ligament extending from the top-rear surface of the tibia to the bottom-front surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from posterior instability.

  7. Low dose combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia for caesarean section in a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pirlet, M; Baird, M; Pryn, S; Jones-Ritson, M; Kinsella, S M

    2000-07-01

    A patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy was scheduled for elective caesarean section after stabilization on medical therapy. Wer performed a combined spinal epidural using one ml 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (5 mg) with 0.3 mg diamorphine for the spinal. The epidural was topped up with 10 mL bupivacaine 0.5%. Significant haemodynamic changes consisted of reduction in heart rate and hypotension after the spinal, and tachycardia after delivery. The benefits and risks of this approach are discussed.

  8. [Labor epidural analgesia for a woman with a pityriasis versicolor in the lumbar region].

    PubMed

    Dubar, G; Omarjee, M; Viguié, C; Barbarot, S; Mignon, A

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is usually contraindicated in case of infection at the site of needle insertion. Tinea versicolor is a benign superficial cutaneous fungal infection caused by the proliferation of a skin commensal yeast of low pathogenicity. We report the case of a pregnant woman with a tinea versicolor in the lumbar region, who benefited from a labor epidural analgesia, realised with reinforced antiseptic measures. No neurological or infectious complication occurred.

  9. A sheared Racz catheter in cervical epidural space for thirty months: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jae Hyuk; Choi, Hoon; Kim, Jin Sung; Lee, Min Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous epidural neuroplasty may lead to complications such as hematoma, infection, epidural abscess, meningitis, hypotension, respiratory depression, urinary and fecal dysfunction, sexual dysfunction and paresthesia. Other technical complications may include shearing or tearing, misplacement, blockage and migration of the catheter. We report a case of a 41-year-old female patient, who underwent surgical removal of a sheared catheter, which was retained for 30 months after cervical Racz neuroplasty. PMID:25844142

  10. Computed tomographic epidurography: an aid to understanding deformation of the lumbar dural sac by epidural injections.

    PubMed

    Fukushige, T; Kano, T; Sano, T; Irie, M

    1999-09-01

    Local anaesthetics injected into the epidural space may deform the dural sac to a variable degree, thereby contributing to variability in the extent of the block. We investigated deformation of the lumbar dural sac after injection into the lumbar epidural space. The subjects were 26 patients with low-back pain who underwent lumbar epidurography and computed tomographic (CT) epidurography, of whom seven also underwent myelography and computed tomographic myelography. The epidural space was entered via the sacral hiatus in 24 patients and through the L5/S1 interspace in two patients. Ten millilitres of local anaesthetic was then injected into the epidural space followed by 20 mL of contrast medium. Computed tomographic epidurography was undertaken approximately 30-min after the epidural injection at the mid-vertebral and mid-discal levels from the first lumbar through to the first sacral vertebrae. The dural sac usually showed an oval or hexagonal shape on the transverse views at the first and second lumbar vertebral levels, and the shape of an inverted triangle below the level of the third lumbar vertebra. A median line of translucency was also observed on the posteroanterior epidurographic view in 25 of the 26 patients. This line was though to be a manifestation of the dural deformation to the inverted triangle. Dural sac deformation usually shows a specific pattern, although there are individual variations. Dural deformability is an important consideration in any analysis of the spread of epidural block or of the changes of epidural pressure after epidural injection of local anaesthetics. PMID:10549463

  11. Osteosarcoma of the posterior maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Prabhusankar, K.; Karande, Amol; Jerry, Jeethu J.; Rishal, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a very uncommon tumor of the maxillofacial region. Due to the occurrence of the tumor at a young age and its aggressive nature, radical surgery forms the only modality of treatment. A combination of radiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy has been used for the management of this tumor. A case report of osteosarcoma of the posterior maxilla in an adolescent with a 1-year disease-free follow-up is presented in this report. PMID:27652252

  12. Osteosarcoma of the posterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Prabhusankar, K; Karande, Amol; Jerry, Jeethu J; Rishal, Yousef

    2016-08-01

    Osteosarcoma is a very uncommon tumor of the maxillofacial region. Due to the occurrence of the tumor at a young age and its aggressive nature, radical surgery forms the only modality of treatment. A combination of radiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy has been used for the management of this tumor. A case report of osteosarcoma of the posterior maxilla in an adolescent with a 1-year disease-free follow-up is presented in this report. PMID:27652252

  13. Osteosarcoma of the posterior maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Prabhusankar, K.; Karande, Amol; Jerry, Jeethu J.; Rishal, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a very uncommon tumor of the maxillofacial region. Due to the occurrence of the tumor at a young age and its aggressive nature, radical surgery forms the only modality of treatment. A combination of radiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy has been used for the management of this tumor. A case report of osteosarcoma of the posterior maxilla in an adolescent with a 1-year disease-free follow-up is presented in this report.

  14. Lumbar epidural catheter placement in the presence of low back tattoos: a review of the safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Welliver, Dawn; Welliver, Mark; Carroll, Tammy; James, Peggy

    2010-06-01

    Current fashion in body art includes low back tattoos of varying designs and colors, a trend that presents unique concerns for anesthesia providers. Does the placement of epidural catheters risk the introduction of tattoo pigment dyes into the epidural space through the process of coring? Are there specific risks associated with tattoo dyes and epidural needle placement? We performed a comprehensive review of the literature using multiple search databases with the intent to form guidelines for practice using a level of evidence taxonomy. The available evidence does not identify any specific risks associated with epidural catheter placement through low back tattoos, although tissue coring with tissue transport to deeper sites has been confirmed. Continued investigation is necessary before comprehensive practice guidelines regarding the practice of placing epidural needles and catheters through lumbar tattoos can be developed. We suggest avoidance of piercing tattoos when performing epidural punctures until there is sound evidence of short-term and long-term safety. PMID:20572405

  15. Lumbar epidural catheter placement in the presence of low back tattoos: a review of the safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Welliver, Dawn; Welliver, Mark; Carroll, Tammy; James, Peggy

    2010-06-01

    Current fashion in body art includes low back tattoos of varying designs and colors, a trend that presents unique concerns for anesthesia providers. Does the placement of epidural catheters risk the introduction of tattoo pigment dyes into the epidural space through the process of coring? Are there specific risks associated with tattoo dyes and epidural needle placement? We performed a comprehensive review of the literature using multiple search databases with the intent to form guidelines for practice using a level of evidence taxonomy. The available evidence does not identify any specific risks associated with epidural catheter placement through low back tattoos, although tissue coring with tissue transport to deeper sites has been confirmed. Continued investigation is necessary before comprehensive practice guidelines regarding the practice of placing epidural needles and catheters through lumbar tattoos can be developed. We suggest avoidance of piercing tattoos when performing epidural punctures until there is sound evidence of short-term and long-term safety.

  16. Bacterial Infection in Deep Paraspinal Muscles in a Parturient Following Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xuhong; Song, Jiefu; Liang, Qingyuan; Qin, Jibin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial infection related to epidural catheterizations could occur. In general, the incidence of postoperative infection at the insertion site is very low. Paucity literatures are reported for paraspinal muscle infection after epidural analgesia in parturient. We report a case of paraspinal muscle infection shortly after epidural analgesia in a parturient, who was subjected to because of threatened preterm labor. Epidural morphine was administered for 2 days for childbirth pain control. She began to have constant low-back pain and fever on postpartum Day 2. Magnetic resonance image revealed a broad area of subcutaneous edema with a continuum along the catheter trajectory deep to the paraspinal muscles. A catheter-related bacterial infection was suspected. The surgical debridement and drainage was required combined with intravenous antibiotics on postpartum Day 3. She was soon cured uncomplicatedly. Epidural analgesia is effective to control labor pain and, in general, it is safe. However, the sequelae of complicated infection may be underestimated. A literature search yielded 7 other cases of catheter-related epidural abscess or soft tissue infection. Vigilance for these infections, especially in postpartum patients with backache, is needed. Moreover, early detection and proper treatment of infectious signs at postanesthetic visit are very important. PMID:26683923

  17. The effects of cryoanalgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia in patients undergoing thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Yang, M K; Cho, C H; Kim, Y C

    2004-11-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of cryoanalgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia on pain and respiratory complications in patients undergoing thoracotomy. Ninety patients were prospectively randomised to epidural analgesia alone (n = 45) or epidural analgesia and cryoanalgesia combined (n = 45). We monitored the use of rescue pain medication and changes in forced vital capacity and forced expired volume in 1 s, and recorded pain and opioid-related side-effects during the immediate postoperative period. The incidence of post-thoracotomy pain and numbness were also assessed up to the sixth month after surgery. Cryoanalgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia was associated with earlier recovery in pulmonary function, less pain during movement and a lower daily requirement for rescue analgesia one week after surgery. However, the combination of cryoanalgesia and epidural analgesia failed to decrease the incidence of long-term pain and numbness. In view of its associated long-term morbidity, cryoanalgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia is not recommended for patients undergoing thoracotomy. PMID:15479314

  18. Epidural catheter fixation. A comparison of subcutaneous tunneling versus device fixation technique

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashima; Parasa, Sujay Kumar; Tejvath, Kiran; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The technique of securing the epidural catheter has a major bearing on the efficacy of epidural analgesia. Specific fixator devices, for e.g., Lockit epidural catheter clamp, which successfully prevents catheter migration, are available. The possibility of catheter snapping and surgical retrieval has been reported with tunneling of catheters. These techniques have not been compared for safety, efficacy and appropriateness of achieving secure epidural catheter fixation in the postoperative period. Material and Methods: A total of 200 patients who required postoperative epidural analgesia were included. They were randomized into two groups: Group I (n = 100) in whom epidural catheters were tunneled vertically in the paravertebral subcutaneous tissue and group II (n = 100) wherein a Lockit device was used to fix the catheter. Likert score was used to quantify patient's comfort during procedure. The techniques were compared for migration, catheter dislodgement, local trauma, catheter snapping and catheter obstruction. Results: 12% of tunneled catheters had migrated significantly outward. 22% of patients had erythema and 77% had significant procedural discomfort in group I. In group II, 3% catheters had kinked and 14% had erythema from device adhesive. Conclusion: Our results support the use of Lockit device as a safe and comfortable fixation device compared to subcutaneous tunneling of catheters. PMID:27006544

  19. Anaesthetists' experiences with the early labour epidural recommendation for obese parturients: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Va, Eley; Lk, Callaway; Aaj, van Zundert; J, Lipman; C, Gallois

    2016-09-01

    Caring for obese pregnant women presents challenges for all medical professionals. Despite a lack of supporting evidence, expert opinion and international guidelines suggest early labour epidural insertion for obese women. Anecdotally this is not supported by all anaesthetists. This qualitative study explored the experiences of anaesthetists regarding early epidural analgesia in obese parturients, to answer the research question: Are anaesthetists consistent in how they apply early epidural analgesia in obese parturients? Personal in-depth interviews with 42 specialist anaesthetists working in south-east Queensland, Australia, were completed between February and April, 2015. Leximancer™ text analysis software applied a validated algorithm to the data to identify themes and concepts. The major themes were explored by the first author to answer the research question. Three major themes were identified: the demands associated with caring for obese women; concern regarding the anaesthetic technique used in obese women; and the importance of communication with obstetric staff. Disagreement regarding interpretation and application of early epidural analgesia was identified within this group of anaesthetists. These anaesthetists were inconsistent in how they interpreted and applied early epidural analgesia for obese parturients, with some questioning the validity of the practice. The combination of uncertainty, urgency and technical difficulty presented by obese parturients provoked anxiety in these clinicians, particularly the anticipation of unplanned general anaesthesia. Consistent anaesthetic practice could improve the implementation of early epidural analgesia in obese parturients. PMID:27608347

  20. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results.

  1. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results. PMID:27062173

  2. Fluoroscopy guided transforaminal epidural anesthesia in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Channabasappa, SM; Dharmappa, S; Pandurangi, R

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old male patient with a long-standing history of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) presented for ureteroscopic stone removal. On preoperative assessment, tracheal intubation was likely to be difficult due to decreased cervical spine mobility. Traditional neuraxial block was impossible due to the fusion of vertebral bodies. AS patients present the most serious array of intubation, which is secondary to decrease in cervical spine mobility and possible temporomandibular joint disease. Management of a case of AS can be very challenging when the airway and the central neuraxial blockade, both are difficult. Fluoroscopic assisted central neuraxial blockade may lead to predictable success in AS. We present a case report with severe AS where conventional techniques failed and C-arm assisted helped in successful epidural anesthesia for ureteroscopic stone removal. PMID:26955319

  3. [A Case of Spinal Epidural Hematoma Presenting with Transient Hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Komai, Takanori; Nakashima, Kazuya; Tominaga, Takashi; Nogaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with spinal epidural hematoma who presented with transient hemiplegia. A 90-year-old man awakened from sleep due to sudden neck pain. Fifteen minutes later, the man experienced progressively worsening weakness in his left hand, and was transported in an ambulance to our hospital. At the hospital, he presented with hemiplegia, and we suspected intracranial disease. Therefore, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which revealed no intracranial lesions. Shortly after the MRI, the patient showed no signs of hemiplegia. However, since the severe neck pain persisted, we performed cervical MRI, which showed a high-intensity area at the C2-C5 level, predominantly on the left side. Despite recovery from hemiplegia, we performed a laminectomy of C3-C5 with evacuation of a hematoma at the C2-C6 level. After the surgery, the patient had no neck pain. PMID:27056873

  4. Hemorrhagic lumbar synovial facet cyst secondary to transforaminal epidural injection: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Elgafy, Hossein; Peters, Nicholas; Lea, Justin E; Wetzel, Robert M

    2016-07-18

    A 64-year-old-female presented with progressive left foot weakness, low back and radicular pain after a left sided S1 transforaminal epidural steroid injection (ESI). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed left side L5-S1 large extradural heterogeneous mass with layering areas suggesting different stages of hematoma formation. Past medical history was significant for peripheral vascular disease and transient ischemic attacks, for which she took aspirin and clopidogrel (antiplatelet agent). These medications were discontinued one week prior to ESI. Although synovial cysts associated with facet arthropathy are common, hemorrhagic cyst is not. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of symptomatic hemorrhagic lumbar facet synovial cyst following ESI on a patient taking anti-platelet medications. PMID:27458557

  5. Hemorrhagic lumbar synovial facet cyst secondary to transforaminal epidural injection: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Elgafy, Hossein; Peters, Nicholas; Lea, Justin E; Wetzel, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old-female presented with progressive left foot weakness, low back and radicular pain after a left sided S1 transforaminal epidural steroid injection (ESI). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed left side L5-S1 large extradural heterogeneous mass with layering areas suggesting different stages of hematoma formation. Past medical history was significant for peripheral vascular disease and transient ischemic attacks, for which she took aspirin and clopidogrel (antiplatelet agent). These medications were discontinued one week prior to ESI. Although synovial cysts associated with facet arthropathy are common, hemorrhagic cyst is not. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported case of symptomatic hemorrhagic lumbar facet synovial cyst following ESI on a patient taking anti-platelet medications. PMID:27458557

  6. Evaluation of a single-dose, extended-release epidural morphine formulation for pain control after lumbar spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Vineyard, Joseph C; Toohey, John S; Neidre, Arvo; Fogel, Guy; Joyner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    DepoDur, an extended-release epidural morphine, has been used effectively for postoperative pain control following many orthopaedic and general surgery procedures and has provided prolonged analgesia when compared with Duramorph. The goal of this article was to compare the safety and analgesic efficacy of DepoDur versus Duramorph after lumbar spine surgery. A prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical study was completed at a single extended-stay ambulatory surgery center. All patients over 18 undergoing posterior lumbar spine fusions were considered for the study. Sixty patients were randomly assigned to a control or treatment group. The control group received DepoDur before surgery, while the treatment group received Duramorph. Although results show no significant differences between the two groups in postoperative visual analog pain scale scores, use of pain medication, and adverse events, subjects receiving DepoDur were less likely to receive Naloxone and oxygen supplementation, experience nausea or fever, and were more likely to experience hypotension. DepoDur proved to be safe and effective, offering similar prolonged analgesic activity when compared with Duramorph.

  7. A fully implanted programmable stimulator based on wireless communication for epidural spinal cord stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Xu, Qi; He, Jiping; Ren, Hangkong; Zhou, Houlun; Zheng, Kejia

    2012-03-15

    Clinical research indicates that the epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) has shown potential in promoting locomotor recovery in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (ISCI). This paper presents the development of a fully implantable voltage-regulated stimulator with bi-directional wireless communication for investigating underlying neural mechanisms of ESCS facilitating motor function improvement. The stimulation system consists of a computer, an external controller, an implantable pulse generator (IPG), a magnet, the extension leads and a stimulation electrode. The telemetry transmission between the IPG and the external controller is achieved by a commercially available transceiver chip with 2.4GHz carrier band. The magnet is used to activate the IPG only when necessary to minimize the power consumption. The encapsulated IPG measures 33mm×24mm×8mm, with a total mass of ∼12.6g. Feasibility experiments are conducted in three Sprague-Dawley rats to validate the function of the stimulator, and to investigate the relationship between lumbar-sacral ESCS and hindlimb electromyography (EMG) responses. The results show that the stimulation system provides an effective tool for investigation of ESCS application in motor function recovery in small animals. PMID:22085835

  8. Preoperative Embolization of a Posterior Mediastinal Lipid-Poor Angiolipoma Mimicking a Paravertebral Nerve Sheath Tumor.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Luis; García-Poza, Javier; González-Gordaliza, María Cristina; Cabañero-Sánchez, Alberto; Muñoz-Molina, Gemma María; Saldaña-Garrido, David

    2015-08-01

    Mediastinal angiolipomas are extremely rare tumors within the thorax, and only 6 cases have been previously reported in the literature. We describe the case of a lipid-poor angiolipoma within the posterior mediastinum of a 63-year-old man who complained of chest pain. Interestingly, initial imaging of the posterior mediastinal mass of our patient suggested a nerve sheath tumor. A specimen from a percutaneous transthoracic core needle biopsy confirmed an angiolipoma. We decided to preoperatively embolize the posterior mediastinal mass to reduce intraoperative bleeding and to facilitate the excision of the tumor.

  9. Delayed Presentation of a Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess of Dental Origin after a Fall in an Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Margaret; Chin, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses are an uncommon cause of spinal cord injury but, depending on the size and presence of neurological deficits, urgent neurosurgical intervention may be required. We present a unique case of a patient presenting with a spinal epidural collection several days after a fall. While a spinal epidural hematoma was suspected based on the patient’s history and MRI findings, a spinal epidural abscess was found during surgery. The patient underwent laminectomy and instrumented fusion with successful treatment of her infection. PMID:27382529

  10. Combined Posterior and Anterior Ankle Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Peter E.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of combined anterior and posterior ankle pathology usually consists of either combined anterior and posterior arthrotomies or anterior ankle arthroscopy with an additional posterolateral portal. The first technique bears the risk of complications associated with the extensive exposure, the latter technique provides limited access to the posterior ankle joint. A case is described of combined anterior and posterior arthroscopy, with the patient lying prone and then turned supine, addressing both anterior and posterior ankle pathologies in one tempo. This minimally invasive combined approach allows quick recovery and early return to work and sports activities. PMID:23227391

  11. A double-blind comparison between epidural morphine and epidural clonidine in patients with chronic non-cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Glynn, C; Dawson, D; Sanders, R

    1988-08-01

    In a randomised double-blind study of 20 patients with chronic pain, epidural morphine 5 mg in 5 ml of saline was compared with epidural clonidine 150 micrograms in 5 ml of saline. Thirteen patients had a clinical and radiological diagnosis of arachnoiditis, 6 had low back pain and 1 had post-operative scar pain. There were 18 females and 2 males with an average age of 52 years, range 22-76 years. There was no difference found between the 2 solutions in the resultant analgesia measured by the visual analogue scale for pain, pain relief or the pain word score during the 3 h period of the study. No difference was found in the patient's mood which was also measured with the visual analogue scale. Two patients had no analgesia from either injection, 2 patients did not obtain any relief from clonidine and another 2 obtained no relief from morphine. Six patients reported that clonidine was better than morphine, 5 reported that morphine and clonidine were the same and 3 reported that morphine was better than clonidine. The duration of analgesia from the clonidine varied from 6 h to 1 month; the duration of analgesia from morphine varied from 6 to 24 h. Clonidine was associated with sedation and a fall in blood pressure of greater than 20 mm Hg in all patients, 1 patient required ephedrine to treat hypotension. Twelve patients had pruritus, 7 nausea and 2 vomiting following the morphine. Statistically there was no difference found between morphine and clonidine for short-term (3 h) analgesia in these patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Efficacy of continuous epidural analgesia and the implications for patient care in the early postoperative phase.

    PubMed

    Slack, J F; Faut-Callahan, M

    1990-06-01

    Management of postoperative pain has been shown to be inadequately controlled, and, in fact, can have significant deleterious effects on a patient's early postoperative recovery. Continuous epidural analgesia has recently been used to control postoperative pain. This mode of analgesia controls postoperative pain without the delays inherent in the PRN administration of systemic narcotics. This was a multidisciplinary, prospective, randomized, double-blind study of various epidural analgesic agents in 53 thoracic and 81 abdominal surgery patients. The focus of the study was to identify the benefits and problems of continuous epidural analgesia for postoperative pain management and the implications for the nursing care of the patients. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the analgesia was based on the following measures: (1) pain measured at regular intervals in the 72-hour period with a visual analog; (2) pain as measured after 72 hours with the word descriptor section of the McGill Pain Questionnaire; (3) amount of supplemental systemic narcotic analgesic needed; (4) recovery of ambulatory and respiratory function, including ability to perform coughing and deep-breathing exercises; (5) occurrence of adverse effects; and (6) the type and distribution of nursing care problems associated with continuous epidural infusions. The results of this study showed that the level of pain relief and recovery of postoperative function was superior to that provided by the more widely used (PRN) systemic administration of narcotics. With the exception of the report of back pain by patients receiving the normal saline epidural solution, complications did not occur in a significantly greater proportion when using the epidural route. Although some nursing care problems were identified, patients who received epidural analgesia were able to be cared for on general care units with no adverse effects reported. PMID:2285719

  13. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided epidural access at the lumbo-sacral space in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa; Busoni, Valeria; Carrozzo, Maria Valentina; Sandersen, Charlotte; Gabriel, Annick; Bolen, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Epidural injections are commonly performed blindly in veterinary medicine. The aims of this study were to describe the lumbosacral ultrasonographic anatomy and to assess the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique in dogs. A cross sectional anatomic atlas of the lumbosacral region and ex vivo ultrasound images were obtained in two cadavers to describe the ultrasound anatomy and to identify the landmarks. Sixteen normal weight canine cadavers were used to establish two variations of the technique for direct ultrasound-guided injection, using spinal needles or epidural catheters. The technique was finally performed in two normal weight cadavers, in two overweight cadavers and in five live dogs with radiographic abnormalities resulting of the lumbosacral spine. Contrast medium was injected and CT was used to assess the success of the injection. The anatomic landmarks to carry out the procedure were the seventh lumbar vertebra, the iliac wings, and the first sacral vertebra. The target for directing the needle was the trapezoid-shaped echogenic zone between the contiguous articular facets of the lumbosacral vertebral canal visualized in a parasagittal plane. The spinal needle or epidural catheter was inserted in a 45° craniodorsal-caudoventral direction through the subcutaneous tissue and the interarcuate ligament until reaching the epidural space. CT examination confirmed the presence of contrast medium in the epidural space in 25/25 dogs, although a variable contamination of the subarachnoid space was also noted. Findings indicated that this ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique is feasible for normal weight and overweight dogs, with and without radiographic abnormalities of the spine.

  14. Comparison of Transforaminal and Parasagittal Epidural Steroid Injections in Patients With Radicular Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Masoud; Aryani, Mohamad Reza; Momenzadeh, Sirus; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir; Esmilijah, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidural steroid injection (ESI), including transforaminal (TF) epidural injections and interlaminar (IL) epidural steroid injections are commonly performed procedures for the management of lumbosacral radicular pain. Parasagittal interlaminar (PIL) approach could enable higher ventral epidural spread, with fewer complications than TF. Objectives: This study aims to compare the effectiveness of PIL and TF ESI in relieving the pain and disability of patients with lumbosacral pain. Patients and Methods: This prospective study enrolled 64 patients, aged between 18 to 75 years, with a diagnosis of low back pain and unilateral lumbosacral radicular pain. The patients were randomized to receive fluoroscopically guided epidural injection, through either the PIL or TF approach. Patients were evaluated for effective pain relief [numerical rating scale (NRS) < 3] by 0 - 10 numeric rating scale (NRS) and functional improvement by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results: Effective pain relief [numeric rating scale (NRS) < 3] was observed in 77.3% (95% CI: 67‒90.5%) of patients in PIL group and 74.2% (95% CI: 62.4 - 89.4%) of patients in the TF group (P = 0.34), at 4 weeks. Mean NRS score was not significantly different between the PIL group compared to the TF group, at 4 weeks (P = 0.19). Number of patients with improved disability (measured by ODI < 20%) was not significantly different in PIL group (78% of cases) compared to the TF group (76% of cases), at 4 weeks (P = 0.21). There were no adverse effects observed in any of our patients. Conclusions: The PIL epidural injection is as effective as TF epidural injection in improving pain and functional status, in patients with chronic lumbosacral low back pain, due to disc degeneration. PMID:26587400

  15. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  16. Huge interparietal posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Manuel Filipe Dias; de Santa Barbara, Rita de Cassia

    2015-01-01

    Congenital encephalocele is a neural tube defect characterized by a sac-like protrusion of the brain, meninges, and other intracranial structures through the skull, which is caused by an embryonic development abnormality. The most common location is at the occipital bone, and its incidence varies according to different world regions. We report a case of an 1-month and 7-day-old male child with a huge interparietal-posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele, a rare occurrence. Physical examination and volumetric computed tomography were diagnostic. The encephalocele was surgically resected. Intradural and extradural approaches were performed; the bone defect was not primarily closed. Two days after surgery, the patient developed hydrocephaly requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The surgical treatment of the meningohydroencephalocele of the interparietal-posterior fontanel may be accompanied by technical challenges and followed by complications due to the presence of large blood vessels under the overlying skin. In these cases, huge sacs herniate through large bone defects including meninges, brain, and blood vessels. The latter present communication with the superior sagittal sinus and ventricular system. A favorable surgical outcome generally follows an accurate strategy taking into account individual features of the lesion. PMID:26484324

  17. Posterior cerebral artery territory infarctions.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Carlo; Carrera, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Infarctions in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) occur in about 5-10% of all ischemic strokes. The PCA can be divided into 'deep' (P1 and P2 segments) and 'superficial' (P3 and P4) segments. Occlusion of paramedian perforating arteries arising from P1 causes rostral midbrain infarction with or without thalamic lesion. The classical clinical triad after thalamomesencephalic infarcts is hypersomnolence, cognitive deficits and vertical oculomotor paresis. Two main arterial groups arise from P2: infarction in the territory of the thalamogeniculate arteries causes severe contralateral hypesthesia and ataxia, whereas infarction in the territory of the posterior choroidal arteries results in sectoranopia with involvement of the lateral geniculate body. After superficial PCA infarcts, visual field defects and somatosensory deficits are the most frequent signs. Additionally, disorders of reading may be seen after unilateral left infarction and disorientation for place and visual neglect after right lesion. After bilateral PCA infarcts, amnesia, cortical blindness (the patient cannot see but pretend he can) may occur. Acute thrombolysis is as useful after PCA infarctions as after anterior circulation strokes. Mortality after PCA strokes is low, but long-term behavioral and cognitive deficits are underestimated.

  18. The Effects of Rifampin, Povidone-Iodine and Hydrogen Peroxide on the Formation of Epidural Fibrosis in the Experimental Epidural Fibrosis Model.

    PubMed

    Kizilay, Zahir; Cetin, Nesibe Kahraman; İsmailoglu, Özgur; Yılmaz, Ali; Omurlu, İmran Kurt; Coskun, Mehmet Erdal; Aktaş, Serdar

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of direct application of rifampin, povidone-iodine, and hydrogen peroxide on the formation of epidural fibrosis in rats. Forty-eight adult male Wistar albino rats were equally and randomly divided into four groups (laminectomy, topical rifampin, topical povidone-iodine, and topical hydrogen peroxide). Laminectomy was performed at the T12 level in all rats. Four weeks later, the extent of epidural fibrosis was assessed both macroscopically and histopathologically. ANOVA test was used for the evaluation of dural thickness. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for the pathology and macroscopic evaluation. Chi-square test was used for evaluation of the arachnoid involvement. p value <0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. Our data revealed that topical application of both povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide were effective in reducing epidural fibrosis formation. The results of our study provide the experimental evidence of the preventive effects of topical application of povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide over epidural fibrosis. PMID:27251380

  19. The Effects of Rifampin, Povidone-Iodine and Hydrogen Peroxide on the Formation of Epidural Fibrosis in the Experimental Epidural Fibrosis Model.

    PubMed

    Kizilay, Zahir; Cetin, Nesibe Kahraman; İsmailoglu, Özgur; Yılmaz, Ali; Omurlu, İmran Kurt; Coskun, Mehmet Erdal; Aktaş, Serdar

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of direct application of rifampin, povidone-iodine, and hydrogen peroxide on the formation of epidural fibrosis in rats. Forty-eight adult male Wistar albino rats were equally and randomly divided into four groups (laminectomy, topical rifampin, topical povidone-iodine, and topical hydrogen peroxide). Laminectomy was performed at the T12 level in all rats. Four weeks later, the extent of epidural fibrosis was assessed both macroscopically and histopathologically. ANOVA test was used for the evaluation of dural thickness. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for the pathology and macroscopic evaluation. Chi-square test was used for evaluation of the arachnoid involvement. p value <0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. Our data revealed that topical application of both povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide were effective in reducing epidural fibrosis formation. The results of our study provide the experimental evidence of the preventive effects of topical application of povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide over epidural fibrosis.

  20. Effect of epidural saline washout on regression of sensory and motor block after epidural anaesthesia with 2% lidocaine and fentanyl in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Park, E Y; Kil, H K; Park, W S; Lee, N-H; Hong, J-Y

    2009-03-01

    Seventy elderly males received lumbar epidural anaesthesia with 12 ml of 2% lidocaine containing fentanyl 50 mug. At the end of transurethral surgery, the washout group (n = 33) received an epidural bolus of 30 ml saline while the control group (n = 34) did not. Mean (SD) times to 1-grade (17.2 (11.9) vs 32.7 (11.3) min) and 2-grade regression (23.8 (12.2) vs 56.0 (23.9) min) of motor block, 3-dermatomal sensory regression (31.4 (11.6) vs 42.2 (14.4) min for cold and 30.8 (15.6) vs 40.6 (14.2) min for pinprick), and regression to S1 (57.7 (16.1) vs 76.2 (20.2) min for cold and 56.8 (17.3) vs 69.2 (16.2) min for pinprick) were significantly shorter in the washout group than the control group. There were no differences in postoperative pain scores and side effects between the two groups. We concluded that epidural washout facilitates regression of both motor and sensory block following epidural anaesthesia without reducing the postoperative analgesic benefit.

  1. Pre-puncture ultrasound guided epidural insertion before vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mahmoud; Abdelazim, Ibrahim A

    2015-10-01

    Palpation method is widely used in clinical practice to identify the puncture site during combined spinal-epidural (CSE) blocks. Tuffier's line, is an anatomical landmark between two iliac crests (inter-cristal), which is widely used to identify the puncture site during CSE blocks is not always an indicator for specific vertebral level or inter-vertebral space. One hundred and Ten (110) women were scheduled for normal vaginal delivery and were randomized into two equal groups; palpation group and an ultrasound guided group to detect the efficacy of puncture ultrasound before CSE blocks to increase chances of successful CSE procedure on the first attempt and to reduce the number of attempts or punctures during insertion of CSE catheter. There were no significant differences between two studied groups regarding; maternal age, weight and height, while, there was a significant difference between two studied groups regarding; parity. Percentage of successful CSE procedure on the first attempt was significantly higher (67.27%) in ultrasound compared to palpation group (40%). Number of punctures (attempts) were significantly less in ultrasound (1.2 ± 0.6) compared to palpation group (2.3 ± 0.8) and the number of redirections was also significantly less in ultrasound (1.4 ± 0.5) compared to palpation group (2.8 ± 1.6). Although, time to identify puncture site was significantly longer in ultrasound compared to palpation group and total procedure time was longer in ultrasound (9.1 ± 1.5 min) compared to palpation group (6.2 ± 1.2 min), there was no significant difference between two studied groups regarding; time to identify puncture site and total procedure time. Two cases of dural puncture in palpation versus no cases in ultrasound group and two cases of intravascular catheter placement (one in each group), with no significant difference between two groups. Pre- puncture ultrasound guided epidural insertion before vaginal delivery, increases the chance of a

  2. Endoscopic management of posterior epistaxis: a review.

    PubMed

    McClurg, S W; Carrau, R

    2014-02-01

    The paradigm for the management of epistaxis, specifically posterior epistaxis, has undergone significant changes in the recent past. Recent prospective and retrospective data has shown that the endonasal surgical management of posterior epistaxis is superior to posterior nasal packing and angiography/embolization with regards to various factors including pain, cost-effectiveness, risk and overall control of bleeding. Endonasal endoscopic surgical techniques for posterior epistaxis include direct cauterization and transnasal endoscopic sphenopalatine/ posterior nasal artery ligation or cauterization with or without control of the anterior ethmoidal artery. Despite the evidence provided by the current literature, a universal treatment protocol has not yet been established. This review article provides an up-to-date assessment of the available literature, and presents a structured paradigm for the management of posterior epistaxis.

  3. Portable optical epidural needle-a CMOS-based system solution and its circuit design.

    PubMed

    Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Mandell, M Susan; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Chang, Yin; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2014-01-01

    Epidural anesthesia is a common anesthesia method yet up to 10% of procedures fail to provide adequate analgesia. This is usually due to misinterpreting the tactile information derived from the advancing needle through the complex tissue planes. Incorrect placement also can cause dural puncture and neural injury. We developed an optic system capable of reliably identifying tissue planes surrounding the epidural space. However the new technology was too large and cumbersome for practical clinical use. We present a miniaturized version of our optic system using chip technology (first generation CMOS-based system) for logic functions. The new system was connected to an alarm that was triggered once the optic properties of the epidural were identified. The aims of this study were to test our miniaturized system in a porcine model and describe the technology to build this new clinical tool. Our system was tested in a porcine model and identified the epidural space in the lumbar, low and high thoracic regions of the spine. The new technology identified the epidural space in all but 1 of 46 attempts. Experimental results from our fabricated integrated circuit and animal study show the new tool has future clinical potential.

  4. Is it necessary to rotate the epidural needle to obtain successful sacral segment block?

    PubMed

    Lin, C C; Fan, S Z; Huang, F Y; Lin, S Y

    1990-09-01

    The effect of rotating the level of touhy needle to obtain successful sacral blockade was controversial. During the rotation, dural puncture was reported by some studies. In our study, we divided forty patients into two groups randomly. They all belonged to ASA I-II, receiving epidural needle insertion at L 2-3 epidural space, before epidural catheter was inserted. Total of 10 mL of 2% xylocaine was injected into the epidural space. In group A, the level of Touhy needle was pointed upward, that is, parallel to the ligament flavum. In group B, the level was pointed caudally. We determined the cutaneous extension of loss of cold sensation by using a swab of cotton wool soaked with alcohol 15 min and 25 min after the test injection. Our result showed no different in loss of cold sensation in sacral area between these two groups. So we concluded that there is no need to rotate the epidural needle for sacral blockade.

  5. Portable Optical Epidural Needle-A CMOS-Based System Solution and Its Circuit Design

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Mandell, M. Susan; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Chang, Yin; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2014-01-01

    Epidural anesthesia is a common anesthesia method yet up to 10% of procedures fail to provide adequate analgesia. This is usually due to misinterpreting the tactile information derived from the advancing needle through the complex tissue planes. Incorrect placement also can cause dural puncture and neural injury. We developed an optic system capable of reliably identifying tissue planes surrounding the epidural space. However the new technology was too large and cumbersome for practical clinical use. We present a miniaturized version of our optic system using chip technology (first generation CMOS-based system) for logic functions. The new system was connected to an alarm that was triggered once the optic properties of the epidural were identified. The aims of this study were to test our miniaturized system in a porcine model and describe the technology to build this new clinical tool. Our system was tested in a porcine model and identified the epidural space in the lumbar, low and high thoracic regions of the spine. The new technology identified the epidural space in all but 1 of 46 attempts. Experimental results from our fabricated integrated circuit and animal study show the new tool has future clinical potential. PMID:25162150

  6. Lumbar epidural analgesia in labour: relation to fetal malposition and instrumental delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Hoult, I J; MacLennan, A H; Carrie, L E

    1977-01-01

    The incidence of instrumental delivery and malposition immediately before delivery was compared in patients who were given lumbar epidural analgesia and those who were not. Instrumental delivery was five times more common and a malposition of the fetal head was more than three times as common in the epidural group as in women who did not receive regional analgesia. Similar incidences were found even when the epidural was electively chosen before labour in the absence of medical indications. The instrumental delivery rate was affected by parity, the length of the second stage of labour, and the return of sensation by the second stage but not by other factors studied. The high incidence (20%) of malposition associated with epidural analgesia was not affected by any of the factors studied. The psychological and physical disadvantages of malposition and instrumental delivery have yet to be assessed. In the meantime, when there are no medical indications for epidural analgesia, the advantages of pain relief should be weighed against those of a normal spontaneous delivery. PMID:831964

  7. Efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone in providing postoperative analgesia: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jebaraj, B; Khanna, P; Baidya, DK; Maitra, S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dexamethasone is a potent anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antiemetic drug. Individual randomized controlled trials found a possible benefit of epidural dexamethasone. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to estimate the benefit of epidural dexamethasone on postoperative pain and opioid consumption and to formulate a recommendation for evidence-based practice. Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized controlled trials comparing the analgesic efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone combination, with local anesthetic alone for postoperative pain management after abdominal surgery, were planned to be included in this meta-analysis. PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, and Central Register of Clinical Trials of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL) databases were searched for eligible controlled trials using the following search words: “Epidural”, “dexamethasone”, and “postoperative pain”, until February 20, 2015. Results: Data from five randomized control trials have been included in this meta-analysis. Epidural dexamethasone significantly decreased postoperative morphine consumption (mean difference −7.89 mg; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −11.66 to −3.71) and number of patients required postoperative rescue analgesic boluses (risk ratio: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.41-0.63). Conclusion: The present data shows that the addition of dexamethasone to local anesthetic in epidural is beneficial for postoperative pain management. PMID:27375389

  8. Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections

    SciTech Connect

    Deli, Martin; Mateiescu, Serban Busch, Martin; Becker, Jan Garmer, Marietta Groenemeyer, Dietrich

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 {+-} 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 {+-} 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  9. Coagulation status using thromboelastography in patients receiving warfarin prophylaxis and epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Hepner, David L; Concepcion, Mercedes; Bhavani-Shankar, Kodali

    2002-09-01

    To determine the coagulation status of patients receiving postoperative warfarin and epidural analgesia using thromboelastography (TEG(R)).Prospective, observational, clinical study.Orthopedic postoperative division at a university hospital.52 ASA physical status II and III patients undergoing knee arthroplasty and receiving prophylactic warfarin and epidural analgesia.Patients' preoperative and postoperative coagulation status was determined by TEG(R). Daily TEG(R) parameters were obtained until the epidural catheter was removed. TEG(R) parameters include reaction time (R-time or time until the first significant levels of detectable clot formation), K-time (clot firmness), maximum amplitude (MA-clot strength), alpha angle (clot development), and coagulation index (overall coagulation). In addition, daily international normalized ratios (INRs) were obtained as per our routine practice. On the day of catheter removal reaction time was significantly increased compared with preoperative values (p < 0.0001), but it remained within normal ranges. There was no change in the coagulation index. However, INR was abnormal and significantly increased (INR = 1.48+/-0.3; p < 0.0001), compared with preoperative values, on the day when the epidural catheter was removed. When the epidural catheters are removed, overall coagulation status, as measured by TEG(R), and despite an elevated INR (mean INR <1.5), remained within normal limits in patients receiving low-dose warfarin prophylaxis.

  10. [Effect of epidural anesthesia on the function of hormonal regulation in the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis].

    PubMed

    Nagata, A; Yoshida, H; Imamura, K; Masuda, Y; Hosoyamada, A

    1990-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of epidural anesthesia on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, we examined the concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T). The effects of epidural anesthesia on plasma levels of LH, FSH and T were investigated in 8 men aged from 64 to 87 years, suffering from untreated prostate cancer. There were no significant differences in plasma levels of LH, FSH or T between patients under epidural anesthesia and patients under no anesthesia. The effects of epidural anesthesia on plasma levels of LH, FSH and T after LH releasing hormone (LH-RH) administration were studied in 10 men between 65 and 84 years with diagnoses of untreated prostate cancer. Plasma LH and FSH levels increased significantly after LH-RH administration under epidural anesthesia or no anesthesia. Plasma LH and FSH were lower under epidural anesthesia than under no anesthesia. No change in plasma T level was observed after LH-RH administration under epidural anesthesia. We conclude that there is no effect of epidural anesthesia on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis.

  11. Placement technique for direct posterior composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Javaheri, D S

    2001-04-01

    Due to improved materials, instrumentation, and placement techniques, composite resins have overcome the traditional complications associated with wear resistance, microleakage, sensitivity, and tight anatomical contacts. Composite resins have been utilized with increased frequency for direct posterior restorations capable of satisfying the growing aesthetic expectations of contemporary dental patients. When properly placed, posterior composites can provide successful and predictable restorations. This article presents clinical considerations for the aesthetic conservation of posterior restorations with composite resin materials.

  12. Epidural analgesia for labour and delivery. Current evidence.

    PubMed

    Marucci, M; Fiore, T

    2004-09-01

    Currently, evidence-based medicine indicates that epidural analgesia (EA) labor is not associated with cesarean and instrumental delivery for dystocia. This evidence was obtained from clinical investigations of variability in clinical labor management. An optimized balance between anesthesiological and obstetric practice is vitally important for securing spontaneous delivery. The total dose of local anesthetic for EA may be associated with operative delivery when there is a lack of obstetric care standardization and co-interventions reducing unintended EA effects. Furthermore, combining local anesthetic low dose and opioid low dose may produce a new balance with obstetric management. Physiological and pharmacological knowledge together with recent clinical findings suggest that combined opioid-local anesthetic low dose EA causes minimal negative effects on labor progress and is effective and safe in terms of maternal and neonatal outcome. Internal communication between obstetricians and anesthesiologists is essential for optimizing EA labor management. Processes of health care quality management, such as medical audit and peer review, should be routinely practiced to reach this goal. PMID:15467496

  13. [Hemodynamic repercussion of epidural bupivacaine in thoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Pérez Gallardo, A; Lajara Montell, A M; Manzanos Luna, A M

    1991-01-01

    Systemic and pulmonary hemodynamic effects of 8 to 10 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine containing 1:200,000 adrenaline administered at the midthoracic level were prospectively assessed in 20 patients (aged 45 +/- 16 years) with thoracic trauma presenting 6 +/- 2 rib fractures and pulmonary contusion of different extent and radiologic density. The study was carried out at comparable evolving times, 24 h after trauma, during the second or third day of treatment, and when the hemodynamic stability of the patient was achieved. Hemodynamic measurements were performed before and 30 min after administration of the analgesic agent using a Swan-Ganz catheter. The results indicate that administration of moderate doses of epidural bupivacaine at the middle thoracic level in patients with normovolemic thoracic traumatism were not followed by alterations in the hemodynamic function except for a slight decrease in systemic arterial and pulmonary pressure. The mean arterial pressure decreased by 8% (p less than 0.05), the cardiac index showed a 4% reduction (p = 0.05), and the mean pulmonary pressure experienced a 14% decrease (p less than 0.05).

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Reirradiation for Recurrent Epidural Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Floyd, Scott; Wong, Eric; Jeyapalan, Suriya; Groff, Michael; Kasper, Ekkehard

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: When patients show progression after conventional fractionated radiation for spine metastasis, further radiation and surgery may not be options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been successfully used in treatment of the spine and may be applicable in these cases. We report the use of SBRT for 60 consecutive patients (81 lesions) who had radiological progressive spine metastasis with epidural involvement after previous radiation for spine metastasis. Methods and Materials: SBRT was used with fiducial and vertebral anatomy-based targeting. The radiation dose was prescribed based on the extent of spinal canal involvement; the dose was 8 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 = 24 Gy when the tumor did not touch the spinal cord and 5 to 6 Gy x 5 = 25 to 30 Gy when the tumor abutted the cord. The cord surface received up to the prescription dose with no hot spots in the cord. Results: The median overall survival was 11 months, and the median progression-free survival was 9 months. Overall, 93% of patients had stable or improved disease while 7% of patients showed disease progression; 65% of patients had pain relief. There was no significant toxicity other than fatigue. Conclusions: SBRT is feasible and appears to be an effective treatment modality for reirradiation after conventional palliative radiation fails for spine metastasis patients.

  15. Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy and epidural involvement.

    PubMed

    Haas, R J; Helmig, M S; Meister, P

    1981-01-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML) was recognized as a new clinical-pathological entity in 1969. Up to the present 134 cases have been described. The disease is characterized by prominent cervical lymph node enlargment. Microscopic features include marked dilatation of sinuses with intrasinusal histiocytes and lymphophagocytosis. About 70% of the patients reported were affected during the first 2 decades of life. The disease is held to be benign on account of spontaneous resolution in some patients. A follow-up survey of 72 patients showed disappearance of the symptoms 10 years after the original diagnosis in 24 patients. In 42 patients the disease still persisted 6 months to 21 years later. Six patients died, but only one of them as a result of the disease. Extranodal involvement was seen in the orbit, eyelid, respiratory tract, skin, bone, salivary glands, and testis. In two cases, one of which will be reported here, paraparesis resulted from infiltration of the epidural space. Treatment with prednisolone was tried in some cases with excellent results. In our case treatment with prednisolone and vinblastine resulted in the disappearance of the neurological symptoms.

  16. Analgesia after Epidural Dexamethasone is Further Enhanced by IV Dipyrone, but Not IV Parecoxibe Following Minor Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Righeti, Claudia CF; Kitayama, Antonio T

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural administration of dexamethasone has been suggested for pain control after minor orthopedic surgery. This study was conducted to assess its efficacy after such surgery, combined or not to IV dipyrone, IV parecoxibe or their combination. Methods 91 patients were randomly assigned to seven groups. Patients were submitted to spinal bupivacaine anesthesia combined to epidural administration of either 10 ml saline or 10 mg dexamethasone diluted to 10-ml volume. Patients also received 10 ml IV saline or 1 gr dipyrone and/or 40 mg parecoxibe diluted to 10 ml with saline. Control group (CG) received epidural and IV saline. Dexamethasone group (DexG) received epidural dexamethasone and IV saline. Dipyrone group (DipG) received epidural saline and IV dipyrone. Dex-Dip G received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone. Parecoxibe group (ParG) received epidural saline and IV parecoxibe. Dex-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV parecoxibe. Finally, Dex-Dip-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone plus IV parecoxibe. Results The CG expressed 4h of analgesia and sooner requested pain killer. DexG was similar to DipG or ParG or Dex-ParG (7-hours), and they requested less ketoprofen compared to the CG (P < 0.05). However, the Dex-DipG and the Dex-Dip-ParG resulted in longer time to demand pain killer (17-hours) and less ketoprofen consumption in 24-hours (P < 0.002). Adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusions The analgesia secondary to epidural dexamethasone was enhanced by IV dipyrone, while no effects were observed by the addition of IV parecoxibe. PMID:25317284

  17. Epidural anaesthesia through caudal catheters for inguinal herniotomies in awake ex-premature babies.

    PubMed

    Peutrell, J M; Hughes, D G

    1993-02-01

    Ex-premature babies are at risk of apnoea after surgery. Regional anaesthesia has been used as an alternative to general anaesthesia for some surgical procedures in the belief that it may be safer. However, single dose caudal epidural and subarachnoid anaesthetics have a duration of action which may be insufficient for some operations. The level and duration of anaesthesia can be extended if local anaesthetic is given through an epidural catheter. In addition, the dose needed to provide adequate anaesthesia may be lower because the local anaesthetic is given at an appropriate segmental level. We report our experience of caudal epidural anaesthesia in nine, awake ex-premature babies who were having inguinal herniotomies. The anaesthesia was excellent in six babies. Two babies cried briefly with peritoneal or spermatic cord traction. One other baby needed supplementation with nitrous oxide in oxygen in order to complete the surgery. The majority of babies slept throughout surgery. There were no reported postoperative complications.

  18. Unilateral Horner Syndrome Following Epidural Anaesthesia in a Morbidly Obese Parturient.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Canan; Karasu, Derya; Özer, Demet; Çağlayan, Ümit; Karakaş, Oya

    2015-06-01

    Horner's syndrome is rarely observed in epidural anaesthesia; it is characterized by ptosis and enophthalmos on the affected side; miosis, anisocoria, and conjunctival hyperemia in the affected eye and anhydrosis, flushing on the affected side of the face. It is usually a complication spontaneously resolved without permanent neurological deficits. Intraoral anaesthesia, stellate, cervical and brachial plexus block, thoracic, lumbar and caudal epidural anaesthesia and intrapleural analgesia are the main causes associated with Horner's syndrome in anaesthesia. Among the other causes of Horner's syndrome are head and neck surgery, trauma and puncture of the internal jugular vein. We aimed to present a case with unilateral Horner's syndrome, which appeared in the morbidly obese parturient after lumbar epidural anaesthesia. PMID:27366494

  19. Cervical Epidural Abscess in Haemodialysis Patients by Catheter Related Infection: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gezici, Ali Riza

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in neuroimaging and neurosurgical treatment modalities, spinal epidural abscess remains a challenging problem. Early diagnosis is often difficult and treatment is always delayed. Spinal epidural abscess usually develops in patients with predisposing factors such as IV drug abuse, senillity, diabetes mellitus, spinal attempts, alcoholism, immunosuppression, liver diseases and catheterizations. It is rarely seen in cervical region. A successful treatment is only possible with early diagnosis and accurate surgical and medical treatment. Optimal management is unclear and morbidity and mortality are significant. We present two adult haemodialysis patients with end-stage renal insufficiency who developed cervical epidural abscess following central venous catheter placement. Early surgical intervention is mandatory in cases those have progressive neurological deficit and spinal deformity, and this is also increases the success rate of medical therapy. PMID:20052368

  20. Epidural anaesthesia through caudal catheters for inguinal herniotomies in awake ex-premature babies.

    PubMed

    Peutrell, J M; Hughes, D G

    1993-02-01

    Ex-premature babies are at risk of apnoea after surgery. Regional anaesthesia has been used as an alternative to general anaesthesia for some surgical procedures in the belief that it may be safer. However, single dose caudal epidural and subarachnoid anaesthetics have a duration of action which may be insufficient for some operations. The level and duration of anaesthesia can be extended if local anaesthetic is given through an epidural catheter. In addition, the dose needed to provide adequate anaesthesia may be lower because the local anaesthetic is given at an appropriate segmental level. We report our experience of caudal epidural anaesthesia in nine, awake ex-premature babies who were having inguinal herniotomies. The anaesthesia was excellent in six babies. Two babies cried briefly with peritoneal or spermatic cord traction. One other baby needed supplementation with nitrous oxide in oxygen in order to complete the surgery. The majority of babies slept throughout surgery. There were no reported postoperative complications. PMID:8460759

  1. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of UK practice.

    PubMed

    Middle, J V; Wee, M Y K

    2009-02-01

    Anaesthetists are legally obliged to obtain informed consent before performing regional analgesia in labour. A postal survey of consultant-led UK anaesthetic units was performed in September 2007 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent before inserting an epidural, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 72% (161/223). There was great variation between units regarding which risks women were informed about and the likely incidence of that risk. One hundred and twenty-three respondents out of 157 providing an epidural service (78%) supported a national standardised information card endorsed by the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association, with all the benefits and risks stated, to be shown to all women before consenting to an epidural in labour.

  2. [Accidental dural puncture during epidural injection of corticosteroids: a different approach?].

    PubMed

    Galindo Palazuelos, M; González Fernández, I; Fernández Abascal, A; Díaz Setién, N; Manso Marín, F J; Castro Ugalde, A

    2006-04-01

    We report 6 cases diagnosed with accidental dural puncture after epidural injection of corticosteroids for low back pain. All the patients reported postdural puncture headache during their stay in the postanesthetic recovery unit. For 3 patients, pain resolved with treatment given in the recovery unit. Two other patients also required mild analgesics for 1 week. In the last patient, a blood patch was used to treat incapacitating headache 22 days after the epidural procedure and mild analgesics were needed for 4 more weeks. It is important to establish a protocol for treating postdural puncture headache in pain clinics to facilitate decision making. Good physician-patient communication is necessary to avoid refusals for permission for other epidural techniques and to facilitate management of symptoms.

  3. [Cesarean delivery and exeresis of a pheochromocytoma performed under epidural and general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    García Hernández, E; González Rodríguez, J L; Vega Cruz, M S

    2004-04-01

    A 33-year-old pregnant woman with episodes of nocturnal tachycardia and anxiety diagnosed with extra-renal pheochromocytoma in her 28th month of gestation was admitted in her 38th week for an alpha-adrenergic block prior to elective cesarean section and tumor exeresis. The cesarean section was performed with the patient given an epidural lumbar block, and immediately after delivery of the fetus total intravenous anesthesia (with propofol, remifentanil, and rocuronium) was administered in addition to the continuous epidural analgesia used during tumor resection and postoperatively. No complications developed during surgery or recovery and the clinical courses were satisfactory for both mother and child. The use of propofol and remifentanil in combination with epidural anesthesia is not common in our clinical context. We point out that the multimodal technique affords good hemodynamic stability, guarantees satisfactory analgesia, and reduces the need for vasoactive drugs.

  4. Spinal epidural lipomatosis: An unusual cause of relapsing and remitting paraparesis

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Dinesh; Srivastava, Arun K.; Kumar, Raj

    2010-01-01

    Epidural lipomatosis is a rare entity to cause spinal cord compression and neurological deficits. This is usually associated with excess of steroids in the body either because of endogenous source as in Cushings disease or exogenous intake as in some diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus, in some endocrinopathies or in morbid obesity. But in some cases no cause has been found. Such idiopathic cases of spinal epidural lipomatosis have also been reported. Here, we report a case of idiopathic spinal epidural lipomatosis with relapsing and remitting paraparesis which is quite unusual. Treatment depends upon neurological status of the patient. We operated the patient as he had significant neurological compromise and he improved significantly. PMID:21559166

  5. The influence of epidural anesthesia on the electrical activity of heart atria

    PubMed Central

    Owczuk, Radoslaw; Wujtewicz, Magdalena A.; Wojciechowski, Jacek; Marjanski, Tomasz; Marciniak, Andrzej; Wujtewicz, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction High thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) causes blockade of sympathetic fibers involved in innervation of the heart (segments T1-T4), which results in changes of cardiac electrophysiology. The anti-arrhythmic effects of TEA on supraventricular arrhythmias, mainly atrial fibrillation, are controversial. The aim of the study The aim of the study was to assess the influence of epidural anesthesia on the electrical function of heart atria, including proven markers of increased risk of perioperative atrial fibrillation, such as P wave dispersion and P wave maximum duration. Material and methods The study involved 50 male patients, without a history of previous heart diseases, scheduled for elective surgical procedures. Patients received thoracic epidural anesthesia (group T, n = 25) or lumbar epidural anesthesia (group L, n = 25). The measurements were obtained from a continuous recording of ECG before epidural anesthesia and after the detection of blockade (T1 or T8 segment sensory block in groups T and L, respectively). Results The statistical analysis of electrocardiographic parameters, including the maximum, minimum and mean P wave duration; P wave dispersion; the maximum, minimum and mean PR interval duration; and PR interval dispersion, did not show any inter- or intragroup differences at selected time points. Conclusions Regardless of its location, epidural anesthesia and sympathetic blockade associated with this procedure do not significantly affect the electrical functions of the cardiac atria reflected in superficial ECG, including the electrocardiographic parameters that are considered to be markers of increased risk of perioperative atrial fibrillation, such as P wave dispersion and its maximum duration. PMID:26336414

  6. Effects of Systemic and Local Interferon Beta-1a on Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Işık, Semra; Doğan, Şeref; Özgün, Gonca; Ocakoğlu, Gökhan; Uğraş, Nesrin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Level 1 randomized controlled study. Purpose To investigate the effects of systemic and local interferon-beta-1a (IFN-β-1a) on prevention of epidural fibrosis using histopathological parameters. Overview of Literature Epidural fibrosis involves fibroblastic invasion of nerve roots into the epidural space. Formation of dense fibrous tissue causes lumbar and radicular pain. Many surgical techniques and several materials have been proposed in the literature, but no study has assessed the effect of IFN-β-1a on prevention of epidural fibrosis. Methods Forty-eight adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups of eight: sham group, control group, systemic 44 μg IFN-β-1a group and 22 μg IFN-β-1a group (after laminectomy and discectomy, 0.28 mL and 0.14 mL IFN-β-1a applied subcutaneously three times for a week, respectively), local 44 μg IFN-β-1a group (laminectomy and discectomy, followed by 0.28 mL IFN-β-1a on the surgical area), and local 22 μg IFN-β-1a group (laminectomy and discectomy, followed by 0.14 mL IFN-β-1a on the surgical area). All rats were sacrificed after 4 weeks and groups were evaluated histopathologically. Results Compared with sham and control groups, significantly less epidural fibrosis, dural adhesion, and fibroblast cell density were observed in the local and systemic 44 μg IFN-β-1a groups. No other differences were evident between the local and systemic groups. Conclusions IFN-β-1a is effective in preventing epidural fibrosis with systemic and local application. PMID:27340517

  7. Complications of intraoperative epidural steroid use in lumbar discectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Akinduro, Oluwaseun O; Miller, Brandon A; Haussen, Diogo C; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The authors' aim in this paper was to review the intraoperative use of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy surgery with a focus on surgical complications. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was done using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Relevant papers were retrieved and analyzed. The authors performed a meta-analysis of all available data. Search terms included epidural, steroids, discectomy, lumbar disc surgery, herniated lumbar disc, methylprednisolone, and perioperative.The primary outcome was surgical complications such as wound infection or need for reoperation. Secondary outcomes were pain and postoperative narcotic usage. RESULTS Sixteen trials and 1 retrospective study (a total of 1933 patients) were eligible for inclusion in this study. In all studies, steroids were added epidurally over the nerve root before closure in cases, and control patients underwent discectomy alone. The mean age (42.7 years vs 42.4 years; RR 0.30 [95% CI -0.30 to 0.90], p = 0.32), overall complication rates (2.69% vs 1.18%; RR 1.94 [95% CI 0.72-5.26], p = 0.19), and infectious complication rates (0.94% vs 0.08%; RR 4.58 [95% CI 0.75-27.95], p = 0.10) were similar between the steroid group and control group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS There is good evidence that epidural steroids can decrease pain in the short term and decrease the usage of postoperative narcotics after lumbar spinal surgery for degenerative spinal disease. The authors' results demonstrate a trend toward increased infection with epidural steroid use, but there was not a statistically significant difference. More studies are needed to validate the long-term risk/benefit ratio of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy. PMID:26424336

  8. Complications of intraoperative epidural steroid use in lumbar discectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Akinduro, Oluwaseun O; Miller, Brandon A; Haussen, Diogo C; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The authors' aim in this paper was to review the intraoperative use of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy surgery with a focus on surgical complications. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was done using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Relevant papers were retrieved and analyzed. The authors performed a meta-analysis of all available data. Search terms included epidural, steroids, discectomy, lumbar disc surgery, herniated lumbar disc, methylprednisolone, and perioperative.The primary outcome was surgical complications such as wound infection or need for reoperation. Secondary outcomes were pain and postoperative narcotic usage. RESULTS Sixteen trials and 1 retrospective study (a total of 1933 patients) were eligible for inclusion in this study. In all studies, steroids were added epidurally over the nerve root before closure in cases, and control patients underwent discectomy alone. The mean age (42.7 years vs 42.4 years; RR 0.30 [95% CI -0.30 to 0.90], p = 0.32), overall complication rates (2.69% vs 1.18%; RR 1.94 [95% CI 0.72-5.26], p = 0.19), and infectious complication rates (0.94% vs 0.08%; RR 4.58 [95% CI 0.75-27.95], p = 0.10) were similar between the steroid group and control group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS There is good evidence that epidural steroids can decrease pain in the short term and decrease the usage of postoperative narcotics after lumbar spinal surgery for degenerative spinal disease. The authors' results demonstrate a trend toward increased infection with epidural steroid use, but there was not a statistically significant difference. More studies are needed to validate the long-term risk/benefit ratio of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy.

  9. Pseudoaneurysm of the Posterior Tibial Artery After Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Elabdi, Monsef; Roukhsi, Redouane; Tijani, Youssef; Chtata, Hassan; Jaafar, Abdeloihab

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery is an uncommon condition that, left untreated, can lead to hemorrhage, thrombosis, or emboli. We present the case of a 54-year-old male who developed pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery 4 months after undergoing tibialis posterior tendon transfer for management of peroneal nerve palsy, which had developed as a complication of hip arthroplasty. PMID:26972754

  10. Giant pseudoaneurysm of posterior division of renal artery: a rare complication of pyelolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Ansari, M S; Dodamani, D; Seth, A

    2001-01-01

    Giant renal artery pseudoaneurysm after pyelolithotomy is an uncommon but important disorder. A case of giant pseudoaneurysm arising from the posterior division of right renal artery following pyelolithotomy is presented. The patient presented with a flank mass six months after pyelolithotomy. CT-scan as well as selective renal angiography revealed a giant pseudoaneurysm arising from the posterior division of renal artery. Nephrectomy was necessitated as selective embolization was not possible due to its extraordinarily large size. PMID:11583346

  11. Systemic effects of epidural methylprednisolone injection on glucose tolerance in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that in diabetic patients, the glycemic profile was disturbed after intra-articular injection of corticosteroids. Little is known about the impact of epidural injection in such patients. The goal of this study was double, at first comparing the glycaemic profile in diabetic patients after a unique injection of 80 mg of acetate methylprednisolone either intra-articular or epidural and secondly to compare the amount of systemic diffusion of the drug after both procedures. Methods Seventeen patients were included. Glycemic changes were compared in 9 diabetic patients following intra-articular (4 patients) and epidural injections (5 patients). Epidural injections were performed using the sacral route under fluoroscopic control in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Diabetes control had to stable for more than 10 days and the renal function to be preserved. Blood glucose was monitored using a validated continuous measuring device (GMS, Medtronic) the day before and for two days following the injection. Results were expressed in the form of daily glycemic profiles and as by mean, peak and minimal values +/- SD. The urinary excretion of methylprednisolone after the 2 routes of injection was analyzed in 8 patients (4 in each group). Urine samples were cropped one hour before the injections, then 4 times during the first day and 3 times a week for 2 weeks. The measurements included the free and conjugated fraction Results The glycaemic profile remains unchanged with no significant changes in the group of the 5 diabetic patients receiving epidural injections. On the other end, the average peak and and mean values were enhanced up to 3 mmol/l above baseline two days after the infiltration in the groups of the 4 diabetic patients infiltrated intra-articular. The mean urinary excretion of the steroid was about ten times higher in the intra-articular versus epidural group: 7000 ng/ml versus 700 ng/ml. Looking at each individual there were

  12. Successful treatment of cervical spinal epidural empyema secondary to grass awn migration in a cat.

    PubMed

    Granger, Nicolas; Hidalgo, Antoine; Leperlier, Dimitri; Gnirs, Kirsten; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Delisle, Françoise; Blot, Stéphane

    2007-08-01

    Spinal epidural empyema (SEE) represents a severe pyogenic infection of the epidural space. Clinical signs of the disease are non-specific--increased body temperature, intense neck pain, neurological signs of a transverse myelopathy--and can lead to severe and permanent neurological deficits. This report describes the diagnosis and successful surgical treatment of cervical SEE secondary to grass awn migration in a cat. Although it is uncommon, this disease should be suspected in cats with progressive myelopathy. Early diagnosis and emergency surgery combined with antibiotic therapy are required to allow a complete recovery. PMID:17449314

  13. Iterative epidural blood patch for recurrent spontaneous intracranial hypotension during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Grange, Joséphine; Lorre, Gilbert; Ducarme, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    A 30-year-old woman at 28 weeks presented with sudden onset of intense headache, epigastric pain, hot flushes, nausea, vomiting, and stiff neck. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging showed pathognonomic signs of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). Epidural blood patch was performed 2 times during pregnancy for symptoms relief in spite of medical treatments. No other recurrence was noted until the spontaneous delivery. SIH is a rare entity during pregnancy which may be diagnosed using magnetic resonance imaging. Iterative Epidural blood patch should be proposed to patients with SIH during pregnancy because it allowed faster symptoms improvement and patient relief with complete recovery than medical treatment only. PMID:27687382

  14. Spinal intraosseous epidural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary drainage obliterated with Onyx embolization: case report.

    PubMed

    Ou, Chang-Hsien; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Yang, Tzu-Hsien; Liang, Cheng-Loong; Wong, Ho-Fai

    2015-08-01

    The authors report an extremely rare case of spinal intraosseous epidural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with perimedullary vein reflux causing symptoms of myelopathy. The intraosseous fistula tracts were completely obliterated with Onyx embolic agent, resulting in a total resolution of symptoms. The unique features of this case include the rare location of the fistula in the vertebral body and the association of the fistula with a compressive fracture. Imaging studies confirmed these hemodynamic findings and provided clarity and direct evidence regarding the association of epidural AVF formation with the vertebral compressive fracture. The authors also propose a possible disease evolution based on the previously adduced reflux-impending mechanism.

  15. Delayed akathisia and suicidal attempts following epidural droperidol infusion--a case report.

    PubMed

    Hung, Y C; Ho, Y Y; Shen, C L

    1999-09-01

    Epidural administration of droperidol has been used to prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) caused by opioids, but the adverse reactions were relatively neglected. We present a patient who received patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) with bupivacaine-morphine-droperidol mixture for one and half days following hemorrhoidectomy, developed paroxysmal adverse reactions of akathisia, dysphoria, and suicidal attempts 3 days after the initiation of the treatment. The use of droperidol in PCEA for prevention of nausea and vomiting therefore needs to be re-evaluated according to the serious side effects occurring in our case.

  16. Doxorubicin-induced dilated cardiomyopathy for modified radical mastectomy: A case managed under cervical epidural anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Kishore, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an antineoplastic agent used in a wide variety of malignancies. Its use is limited because of a cumulative, dose-dependent irreversible cardiomyopathy. We report a case of Dox induced cardiomyopathy, posted for modified radical mastectomy. The patient had poor LV function along with moderate pulmonary hypertension. Regional anaesthesia was planned as the risk associated with general anaesthesia was more. A cervical epidural was placed and a block adequate for surgery could be achived. The haemodynamic parameters as measured by esophageal doppler showed a stable trend. The surgery could be managed well under cervical epidural and also provided a good postoperative pain relief. PMID:23825820

  17. Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Tarbé de Saint Hardouin, A-L; Grévent, D; Sainte-Rose, C; Angoulvant, F; Chéron, G

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma is uncommon in children, making rapid diagnosis difficult. In this report, we present a case of traumatic cervical epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy, diagnosed with computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Management was conservative and the lesion regressed spontaneously. The presentation in childhood is often nonspecific. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing these lesions. Conservative treatment has to be considered in cases with a benign clinical course and provided that the patient is followed up neurologically with repeated MRI.

  18. Delayed onset of a spinal epidural hematoma after facet joint injection

    PubMed Central

    Velickovic, Mirko; Ballhause, Tobias M

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of chronic back pain is a challenging problem. Facet joint infiltration is an established treatment for chronic low back pain caused by arthrosis of the lumbar facet joints. Due to the increasing number of patients with chronic low back pain, this therapy has become more frequent. We treated a 51-year-old male patient, who developed an epidural hematoma 2 months after infiltration therapy. Our case shows that even a delayed onset of spinal epidural hematoma is possible and should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute myelopathy after spinal intervention. PMID:27803810

  19. Low dose combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia for caesarean section in a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pirlet, M; Baird, M; Pryn, S; Jones-Ritson, M; Kinsella, S M

    2000-07-01

    A patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy was scheduled for elective caesarean section after stabilization on medical therapy. Wer performed a combined spinal epidural using one ml 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (5 mg) with 0.3 mg diamorphine for the spinal. The epidural was topped up with 10 mL bupivacaine 0.5%. Significant haemodynamic changes consisted of reduction in heart rate and hypotension after the spinal, and tachycardia after delivery. The benefits and risks of this approach are discussed. PMID:15321091

  20. Comparison between Thoracic Epidural Block and Thoracic Paravertebral Block for Post Thoracotomy Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Soniya; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Chaudhary, Ajay Kumar; Chandra, Girish; Prakash, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative pain after thoracotomy is being considered one of the most severe pain and if not treated well, can result in various respiratory and other complications. Aim Present study was conducted with the aim to compare continuous thoracic epidural infusion with continuous paravertebral infusion for postoperative pain using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and four point observer ranking. The secondary outcomes measured were pulmonary functions and any complication like hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, vomiting, urinary retention and neurological complications if any. Materials and Methods Sixty patients of age group 18-60 years posted for anterolateral thoracotomy surgery for lung resection were randomised either to epidural or paravertebral group in this randomised prospective double blind study. In Epidural group 7.5ml bolus of 0.125% Bupivacaine with 50μg Fentanyl and in Paravertebral group 15ml bolus of 0.125% Bupivacaine with 50μg Fentanyl was given 30 minutes before the anticipated end of surgery. Bolus dose was followed by infusion of 0.125% Bupivacaine with 2μg/ml Fentanyl at the rate of 5 ml/hr in both groups. Parameters noted were Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP), Heart Rate (HR), Oxygen Saturation (SpO2), Arterial Blood Gas (PaCO2, P/F ratio), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Four Point Observer Ranking Scale (FPORS) for pain, number of sensory segments blocked (by checking for pinprick sensation), requirement of infusion top ups and rescue analgesia (Tramadol), pre and postoperative pulmonary function test {(Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV)1, Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC, Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR)} and complications from start of infusion till 24 hours in the postoperative period. Results Both the techniques were effective in relieving pain but pain relief was significantly better with epidural. Postoperatively, HR, SpO2, P/F ratio and PaCO2 were comparable between group E and P. There was significant decline in FeV1

  1. Consistently inconsistent, the posterior vaginal wall.

    PubMed

    Hale, Douglass S; Fenner, Dee

    2016-03-01

    Posterior vaginal wall prolapse is one of the most common prolapses encountered by gynecological surgeons. What appears to be a straightforward condition to diagnose and treat surgically for physicians has proven to be frustratingly unpredictable with regard to symptom relief for patients. Functional disorders such as dyssynergic defecation and constipation are often attributed to posterior vaginal wall prolapse. Little scientific evidence supports this assumption, emphasizing that structure and function are not synonymous when treating posterior vaginal wall prolapse. Rectoceles, enteroceles, sigmoidoceles, peritoneoceles, rectal and intraanal intussusception, rectal prolapse, and descending perineal syndrome are all conditions that have an impact on the posterior vaginal wall. All too often these different anatomic conditions are treated with the same surgical approach, addressing a posterior vaginal wall bulge with a traditional posterior colporrhaphy. Studies that examine the correlation between stage of posterior wall prolapse and patient symptoms have failed to reliably do so. Surgical outcomes measured by prolapse staging appear successful, yet patient expectations are often not met. As increasing attention is being placed on patient satisfaction outcomes concerning surgical treatments, this fact will need to be addressed. Surgeons will have to clearly communicate what can and what cannot be expected with surgical repair of posterior vaginal wall prolapse.

  2. Postoperative rehabilitation of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Edson, Craig J; Fanelli, Gregory C; Beck, John D

    2010-12-01

    Diagnosis and management of posterior cruciate ligament injuries has evolved, and now the treatment often includes surgical intervention. The purpose of this paper is to define the current approach to postsurgical management after the posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, review conservative management, and discuss surgical outcomes using a specified program.

  3. Neurolinguistic Aspects of Finnish Posterior Aphasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, Jussi; Koivuselka-Sallinen, Paivi

    Examination of the lexical errors (phonological paraphasias and neologisms) of two posterior aphasic patients who are speakers of Finnish, a highly synthetic language, revealed that the lexical difficulties generally typical of posterior aphasics were found in these patients as well. The typical lexical difficulties clustered around open class…

  4. [Cysts in the posterior triangle of the neck in adults].

    PubMed

    Brea-Álvarez, Beatriz; Roldán-Hidalgo, Amaya

    2015-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the posterior triangle are a pathologic entity whose diagnosis is made in the first two years of life. Its presentation in adulthood is an incidental finding and the differential diagnosis includes cystic lymphangioma, lymphatic metastasis of thyroid cancer and branchial cyst. Often with the finding of a cervical lump, FNA is made before diagnostic imaging is performed, however, this procedure is not always advisable. We reviewed the cases of patients who came last year to our department with a cystic mass in this location and correlating the imaging findings with pathologic specimen. We show characteristic findings of these lesions in order to make an early diagnosis and thus to get the approach and treatment appropriate of adult patients with a cystic lesion in the posterior cervical triangle.

  5. Continence after posterior sagittal anorectoplasty.

    PubMed

    Langemeijer, R A; Molenaar, J C

    1991-05-01

    Posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) was introduced in 1982 by Peña and De Vries as a new operation for patients with a high anorectal malformation. The degree of postoperative continence is reported to be high. During the past decade, too, new insights have been gained into the embryology of anorectal malformations. Evaluation of PSARP in relation to current understanding of the development and anatomy of the anorectum and the pelvic floor has led us to conclude that optimal continence cannot be expected. Fifty patients with a high anorectal malformation underwent PSARP between June 1983 and May 1990. Postoperative follow-up consisted of anamnesis (subjective) and electrostimulation, defecography, and anorectal manometry (objective). All patients are alive, and all but one are being evaluated regularly. Subjectively, the majority of patients were more or less incontinent, with soiling of pants at least once a day. On the basis of objective criteria, virtually all patients appeared to be incontinent, and in only one patient was the mechanism of defecation almost unimpaired after PSARP. From this study, we conclude that although PSARP provides a good aesthetic result, patients will never acquire normal continence.

  6. Postoperative posterior spinal wound infections.

    PubMed

    Massie, J B; Heller, J G; Abitbol, J J; McPherson, D; Garfin, S R

    1992-11-01

    The incidence of postoperative spinal infections increases with the complexity of the procedure. Diskectomy is associated with less than a 1% risk of infection; spinal fusion without instrumentation is associated with a 1%-5% risk; and fusion with instrumentation may be associated with a risk of 6% or more. Twenty-two postoperative posterior spinal infections that occurred during a three-year period were reviewed for this report. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism cultured (more than 50% of the cases). Other recurring organisms were Staphylococcus epidermis, Peptococcus, Enterobacter cloacae, and Bacteroides. Many patients had multiple organisms. Risk factors appeared to include advanced age, prolonged hospital bed rest, obesity, diabetes, immunosuppression, and infection at remote sites. Operative factors included prolonged surgery (greater than five hours), high volume of personnel moving through the operating room, and instrumentation. Postoperative contamination may occur and may be related to prolonged postoperative bed rest, skin maceration (thoracolumbosacral orthoses), and drainage tubes exiting distally from lumbar wounds (toward the rectum). Effective treatment includes early diagnosis, surgical debridement and irrigation, and parenteral antibiotics. Superficial infections were treated successfully with wound closure over outflow tubes, and deep infections with inflow-outflow systems. Maintaining the instrumentation in place was possible in most cases. Parenteral antibiotics were maintained for six weeks in every case. PMID:1395319

  7. The lucid interval associated with epidural bleeding: evolving understanding.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to elucidate the evolution of our understanding of the term "lucid interval." A number of texts were reviewed to assess their suitability for analysis. The primary requirement was that the text contain detailed descriptions of a series of patients. Details of the clinical course, the findings and timing of surgery, and, when relevant, the time of death and postmortem findings were required. Books written by Henri-François Le Dran, Percival Pott, and James Hill fulfilled these criteria. Surgical findings included the presence and type of fractures, changes in the bone, separation of periosteum, malodorous or purulent material, tense brain, and hematoma. Postmortem findings supplemented and/or complemented the surgical findings. The courses of the patients were then tabulated, and the correlation between different clinical and operative findings was thereby determined. Our understanding of a lucid interval began in the early 18th century with the work of Henri-François Le Dran and Percival Pott in London. They did not, however, demonstrate an interval without symptoms between trauma and deterioration in patients with epidural hematomas (EDHs). The interval they described was longer than usually expected with EDHs and occurred exclusively in patients who had a posttraumatic infection. In 1751, James Hill, from Dumfries, Scotland, described the first hematoma-related lucid interval in a patient with a subdural hematoma. The first case of a lucid interval associated with an EDH was described by John Abernethy. In the 19th century, Jonathan Hutchinson and Walter Jacobson described the interval as it is known today, in cases of EDH. The most recent work on the topic came from studies in Cincinnati and Oslo, where it was demonstrated that bleeding can separate dura mater and that hemorrhage into the epidural space can be shunted out via the veins. This shunting could delay the accumulation of a hematoma and thus the rise in intracranial pressure

  8. The lucid interval associated with epidural bleeding: evolving understanding.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to elucidate the evolution of our understanding of the term "lucid interval." A number of texts were reviewed to assess their suitability for analysis. The primary requirement was that the text contain detailed descriptions of a series of patients. Details of the clinical course, the findings and timing of surgery, and, when relevant, the time of death and postmortem findings were required. Books written by Henri-François Le Dran, Percival Pott, and James Hill fulfilled these criteria. Surgical findings included the presence and type of fractures, changes in the bone, separation of periosteum, malodorous or purulent material, tense brain, and hematoma. Postmortem findings supplemented and/or complemented the surgical findings. The courses of the patients were then tabulated, and the correlation between different clinical and operative findings was thereby determined. Our understanding of a lucid interval began in the early 18th century with the work of Henri-François Le Dran and Percival Pott in London. They did not, however, demonstrate an interval without symptoms between trauma and deterioration in patients with epidural hematomas (EDHs). The interval they described was longer than usually expected with EDHs and occurred exclusively in patients who had a posttraumatic infection. In 1751, James Hill, from Dumfries, Scotland, described the first hematoma-related lucid interval in a patient with a subdural hematoma. The first case of a lucid interval associated with an EDH was described by John Abernethy. In the 19th century, Jonathan Hutchinson and Walter Jacobson described the interval as it is known today, in cases of EDH. The most recent work on the topic came from studies in Cincinnati and Oslo, where it was demonstrated that bleeding can separate dura mater and that hemorrhage into the epidural space can be shunted out via the veins. This shunting could delay the accumulation of a hematoma and thus the rise in intracranial pressure

  9. Epidural Fibrosis after Lumbar Disc Surgery: Prevention and Outcome Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Razek, Naglaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design This is a prospective, randomized, controlled study designed and conducted over 10 years from 2002 to 2012. Purpose The study aimed to monitor the effect of suction drains (SD) on the incidence of epidural fibrosis (EF) and to test, if the use of SD alone, SD with local steroids application, SD combined with fat grafts and local steroids application, or SD combined with fat grafts and without local steroids application, would improve outcome. Overview of Literature EF contributes to significant unsatisfactory failed-back syndrome. Efforts have been tried to reduce postoperative EF, but none were ideal. Methods Between September 2002 and 2012, 290 patients with symptomatic unilateral or bilateral, single-level lumbar disc herniation were included in the study. Two groups were included, with 165 patients in group I (intervention group) and 125 patients in group II (control group). Group I was subdivided into four subgroups: group Ia (SD alone), group Ib (SD+fat graft), group Ic (SD+local steroids), and group Id (SD+fat graft+local steroids). Results The use of SD alone or combined with only fat grafts, fats grafts and local steroids application, or only local steroids application significantly improved patient outcome and significantly reduced EF as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Conclusions This study has clearly demonstrated the fact that the use of suction drainage alone or combined with only fat grafts, fats grafts and local steroids application, or only local steroids application significantly improved patient outcome with respect to pain relief and functional outcome and significantly reduced EF as measured by an MRI. A simple grading system of EF on MRI was described. PMID:26097652

  10. Ethnic differences in the use of intrapartum epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obstetric epidural analgesia (EA) is widely applied, but studies have reported that its use may be less extensive among immigrant women or those from minority ethnic groups. Our aim was to examine whether this was the case in our geographic area, which contains an important immigrant population, and if so, to describe the different components of this phenomenon. Methods Cross-sectional observational study. Setting: general acute care hospital, located in Marbella, southern Spain. Analysis of computer records of deliveries performed from 2004 to 2010. Comparison of characteristics of deliveries according to the mothers’ geographic origins and of vaginal deliveries noting whether EA was received, using univariate and bivariate statistical analysis and multiple logistic regression (MLR). Results A total of 21,034 deliveries were recorded, and 37.4% of these corresponded to immigrant women. EA was provided to 61.1% of the Spanish women and to 51.5% of the immigrants, with important variations according to geographic origin: over 52% of women from other European countries and South America received EA, compared with around 45% of the African women and 37% of the Asian women. These differences persisted in the MLR model after adjusting for the mother's age, type of labor initiation, the weight of the neonate and for single or multiple gestation. With the Spanish patients as the reference category, all the other countries of origin presented lower probabilities of EA use. This was particularly apparent for the patients from Asia (OR 0.38; 95%CI 0.31-0.46), Morocco (OR 0.49; 95%CI 0.43-0.54) and other Africa (OR 0.55; 95%CI 0.37-0.81). Conclusions We observed a different use of EA in vaginal deliveries, according to the geographic origin of the women. The explanation for this involves a complex set of factors, depending both on the patient and on the healthcare staff. PMID:22818255

  11. Distribution of Methylene Blue after Injection into the Epidural Space of Anaesthetized Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Xavier; García, Felix; Ferrer, Rosa Isabel; Santos, Laura; Aguilar, Adrià; Andaluz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the distribution of different volumes of methylene blue solution injected into the epidural space in anaesthetized pregnant and non-pregnant sheep, to evaluate its cranial distribution and to compare between them. Fifteen pregnant and fifteen non-pregnant sheep were included in the study. Sheep were anaesthetized and received 0.05, 0.1, or 0.2 mL/kg of a lumbosacral epidural solution containing 0.12% methylene blue in 0.9% saline. Thirty minutes after the epidural injection, the ewes were euthanized. The extension of the dye within the epidural space was measured, and the correlation between the volume of the dye injected and the number of stained vertebrae was evaluated. The cranial migration of the dye between pregnant and non-pregnant sheep was also compared. The results show that the volume of methylene blue injected epidurally into pregnant and non-pregnant sheep correlated directly with its cephalic distribution into the epidural space; and a volume of 0.1 mL/kg or 0.2 mL/kg stained up to the first lumbar segment in pregnant and non-pregnant sheep, respectively. Also, the results suggest that the volume of drugs administered into the epidural space of pregnant sheep should be half the volume that would be used in non-pregnant sheep. PMID:24709655

  12. Role of epidural anesthesia in a fast track liver resection protocol for cirrhotic patients - results after three years of practice

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Bardi, Tommaso; Laici, Cristiana; Gamberini, Elisa; Francorsi, Letizia; Faenza, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the potential benefits and risks of the use of epidural anaesthesia within an enhanced recovery protocol in this specific subpopulation. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted, including all cirrhotic patients who underwent open liver resection between January 2013 and December 2015 at Bologna University Hospital. Patients with an abnormal coagulation profile contraindicating the placement of an epidural catheter were excluded from the analysis. The control group was composed by patients refusing epidural anaesthesia. RESULTS Of the 183 cirrhotic patients undergoing open liver resections, 57 had contraindications to the placement of an epidural catheter; of the remaining 126, 86 patients received general anaesthesia and 40 combined anaesthesia. The two groups presented homogeneous characteristics. Intraoperatively the metabolic data did not differ between the two groups, whilst the epidural group had a lower mean arterial pressure (P = 0.041) and received more colloid infusions (P = 0.007). Postoperative liver and kidney function did not differ significantly. Length of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.003) and hospital stay (P = 0.032) were significantly lower in the epidural group. No complications related to the epidural catheter placement or removal was recorded. CONCLUSION The use of Epidural Anaesthesia within a fast track protocol for cirrhotic patients undergoing liver resections had a positive impact on the patient’s outcomes and comfort as demonstrated by a significantly lower length of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay in the epidural group. The technique appears to be safely manageable in this fragile population even though these results need confirmation in larger studies. PMID:27660677

  13. Exploring factors influencing patient request for epidural analgesia on admission to labor and delivery in a predominantly Latino population.

    PubMed

    Orejuela, Francisco J; Garcia, Tiffany; Green, Charles; Kilpatrick, Charlie; Guzman, Sara; Blackwell, Sean

    2012-04-01

    Ethnic disparities in labor pain management exist. Our purpose is to identify patients' attitudes and beliefs about epidural analgesia in order to develop a culturally competent educational intervention. A prospective observational study was conducted in patients admitted for vaginal delivery between July 1st-31st, 2009. Inclusion criteria were: singleton, term, cephalic, normal fetal heart tracing and no contraindications for epidural. Patients were surveyed regarding their wishes for analgesia, and their reasons for declining epidural. The obstetrics physician performed pain management counseling as is usually done. Patients were asked again about their choice for analgesia. Likert scale questionnaires were used. Wilcoxon signed ranked test was used for categorical variables. Logistic regression was performed to look for predictors of epidural request. Fifty patients were interviewed. Average age was (27.9 ± 6.7), gestational age (39.3 ± 1.3), and a median parity of 2 (range 0-6). 72% declined epidural upon admission, and 61% after counseling (P = 0.14). Most common reasons for declined epidural were 'women should cope with labor pain' (57%), 'fear of back pain' (54%) and 'family/friends advise against epidural' (36%). Acculturation was assessed by years living in the US (10 ± 6.3), preferred language (Spanish 80%) and ethnic self-identification (Hispanic 98%). 38% were high school graduates. In multivariate logistic regression, graduation from high school was the only variable associated to request for epidural in labor (OR 4.94, 95% CI 1.6-15.1). Educational level is associated to requesting an epidural in labor. Knowledge of patients' fears and expectations is essential to develop adequate counseling interventions.

  14. Role of epidural anesthesia in a fast track liver resection protocol for cirrhotic patients - results after three years of practice

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Bardi, Tommaso; Laici, Cristiana; Gamberini, Elisa; Francorsi, Letizia; Faenza, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the potential benefits and risks of the use of epidural anaesthesia within an enhanced recovery protocol in this specific subpopulation. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted, including all cirrhotic patients who underwent open liver resection between January 2013 and December 2015 at Bologna University Hospital. Patients with an abnormal coagulation profile contraindicating the placement of an epidural catheter were excluded from the analysis. The control group was composed by patients refusing epidural anaesthesia. RESULTS Of the 183 cirrhotic patients undergoing open liver resections, 57 had contraindications to the placement of an epidural catheter; of the remaining 126, 86 patients received general anaesthesia and 40 combined anaesthesia. The two groups presented homogeneous characteristics. Intraoperatively the metabolic data did not differ between the two groups, whilst the epidural group had a lower mean arterial pressure (P = 0.041) and received more colloid infusions (P = 0.007). Postoperative liver and kidney function did not differ significantly. Length of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.003) and hospital stay (P = 0.032) were significantly lower in the epidural group. No complications related to the epidural catheter placement or removal was recorded. CONCLUSION The use of Epidural Anaesthesia within a fast track protocol for cirrhotic patients undergoing liver resections had a positive impact on the patient’s outcomes and comfort as demonstrated by a significantly lower length of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay in the epidural group. The technique appears to be safely manageable in this fragile population even though these results need confirmation in larger studies.

  15. Posterior labral injury in contact athletes.

    PubMed

    Mair, S D; Zarzour, R H; Speer, K P

    1998-01-01

    Nine athletes (seven football offensive linemen, one defensive lineman, and one lacrosse player) were found at arthroscopy to have posterior labral detachment from the glenoid. In our series, this lesion is specific to contact athletes who engage their opponents with arms in front of the body. All patients had pain with bench pressing and while participating in their sport, diminishing their ability to play effectively. Conservative measures were ineffective in relieving their symptoms. Examination under anesthesia revealed symmetric glenohumeral translation bilaterally, without evidence of posterior instability. Treatment consisted of glenoid rim abradement and posterior labral repair with a bioabsorbable tack. All patients returned to complete at least one full season of contact sports and weightlifting without pain (minimum follow-up, > or = 2 years). Although many injuries leading to subluxation of the glenohumeral joint occur when an unanticipated force is applied, contact athletes ready their shoulder muscles in anticipation of impact with opponents. This leads to a compressive force at the glenohumeral joint. We hypothesize that, in combination with a posteriorly directed force at impact, the resultant vector is a shearing force to the posterior labrum and articular surface. Repeated exposure leads to posterior labral detachment without capsular injury. Posterior labral reattachment provides consistently good results, allowing the athlete to return to competition.

  16. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats

    PubMed Central

    Hermeto, Larissa C.; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C.; Jardim, Paulo H.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13–L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  17. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats.

    PubMed

    Hermeto, Larissa C; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C; Jardim, Paulo H A

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13-L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  18. An unusual and spectacular case of spindle cell lipoma of the posterior neck invading the spinal cervical canal and posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Petit, Damien; Menei, Philippe; Fournier, Henri-Dominique

    2011-11-01

    The authors describe the first case of spindle cell lipoma of the posterior neck invading the upper cervical spinal canal and the posterior cranial fossa. Spindle cell lipoma is an extremely rare variant of benign lipoma. It usually occurs as a solitary subcutaneous well-circumscribed lesion in the posterior neck or shoulders of adult men. Local aggressiveness is unusual. This 61-year-old man presented with an increased left cerebellar syndrome and headaches. He also had a posterior neck tumefaction, which had been known about for a long time. Computed tomography and MR imaging studies revealed a voluminous mass extending to the upper cervical canal and posterior cranial fossa and eroding the neighboring bones. The lesion was well delimited, and contrast enhancement was intense and heterogeneous. The tumor, which had initially developed under the muscles of the posterior neck, was totally resected. Histological assessment revealed numerous fat cells with spindle cells secreting collagen. The large size of the tumor and the submuscular location, bone erosion, and compression of the CNS were unusual in this rare subtype of benign adipose tumor. Its presentation could simulate a sarcoma.

  19. Evidence for using air or fluid when identifying the epidural space.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Curtis L; Rodriguez, Ricardo E; Schmidt, James; Austin, Paul N

    2013-02-01

    Lumbar epidural analgesia is frequently employed to provide pain relief for women during labor. Anesthesia providers use various methods to identify the epidural space. Some providers use air, some use fluid, and others use a combination of air and fluid during the loss of resistance technique. Loss of resistance to air has been speculated to result in a lesser quality of analgesia compared with loss of resistance to only fluid. A search strategy focusing on preappraised sources was used to locate evidence from interventional and observational studies. Four evidence sources were located, including a systematic review with meta-analysis of 4 older studies. The evidence reviewed was inconclusive in determining whether a difference in analgesia quality results from the use of air or fluid during the loss of resistance technique. Future studies should include an adequate number of subjects and address other problems such as operator experience, observer blinding, equivalence of subject characteristics, outcomes definition and measurement, and composition of epidural solution. Providers should consider other factors when selecting loss of resistance medium, such as the reported complications of large amounts of air injected into the epidural space and surrounding structures.

  20. Sudden onset of paraplegia caused by hemorrhagic spinal epidural angiolipoma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Akhaddar, Ali; Albouzidi, Abderrahmane; Elmostarchid, Brahim; Gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohamed

    2008-09-01

    Spinal epidural angiolipoma is a rare benign tumor containing vascular and mature adipose elements. A slow progressive clinical course was mostly presented and rarely a fluctuating course during pregnancy. The authors report the original case of spontaneous spinal epidural bleeding resulting from thoracic epidural angiolipoma who presented with hyperacute onset of paraplegia, simulating an extradural hematoma. The patient was admitted with sudden non-traumatic hyperacute paraplegia during a prolonged walk. Neurologic examination showed sensory loss below T6 and bladder disturbances. Spinal MRI revealed a non-enhanced heterogeneous thoracic epidural lesion, extending from T2 to T3. A bilateral T2-T4 laminectomy was performed to achieve resection of a lipomatous tumor containing area of spontaneous hemorrhage. The postoperative course was uneventful with complete neurologic recovery. Histologic examination revealed the tumor as an angiolipoma. Because the prognosis after rapid surgical management of this lesion is favorable, the diagnosis of spinal angiolipoma with bleeding should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperacute spinal cord compression.

  1. [A case of acute intracranial epidural hematoma caused by chronic nasal sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Kihara, Kazunori; Sato, Motoki; Kado, Ken; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Takao; Yamakami, Iwao

    2015-01-01

    Non-traumatic intracranial acute epidural hematoma(EDH)is rare. It is mostly caused by coagulation disorders, dural metastasis, or vascular malformations of the dura. We report a case of non-traumatic acute EDH caused by chronic nasal sinusitis and review the literature comprising 10 cases of acute EDH caused by chronic nasal sinusitis. A 16-year-old boy visited our outpatient clinic with a 2-day history of severe headache. He did not have fever or neurological abnormalities and showed no evidence of head trauma. Cranial computed tomography(CT)revealed sphenoid sinusitis and a small amount of epidural air in the middle fossa, but no other intracranial abnormalities. After eight days with no subsequent history of trauma, radiological exams showed a massive acute epidural hematoma in the left middle fossa and temporal convexity without any vascular lesion or skull fracture. The patient underwent a hematoma evacuation that revealed neither a skull fracture nor a vascular abnormality. In this adolescent, chronic nasal sinusitis caused fragility of the meningeal artery wall, an air collection in the epidural space, and the detachment of the dura mater from the inner surface of the skull, thereby resulting in a non-traumatic acute EDH.

  2. [Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) in clinical practice: effects, technique, complications and suggestions during anticoagulant treatment].

    PubMed

    Passarani, S; Pedrazzini, G; Paino, R; Paleari, G

    2001-03-01

    The effects of thoracic peridural analgesia (TEA) on the neuroendocrine response to surgery are well known, but, at the present this technique is not widely used especially in Italy. The aim of this paper is to give information and suggestions on thoracic epidural analgesia in thoracic and cardiac surgery, and to discuss how anticoagulant therapy may interfere on this technique.

  3. [Removal of an epidural catheter from a patient receiving anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy].

    PubMed

    Arnal, D; Anduezaa, A; García del Valle, S

    2009-04-01

    We describe the management of anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy to reduce the risk of hematoma on removal of an epidural catheter. The situation arose following major vascular surgery complicated by an acute myocardial infarction that required anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy following implantation of a coronary stent.

  4. [Prevention of headache from spinal anesthesia with the use of epidural cortisone].

    PubMed

    De Matteis, C; Pisana, G

    1991-04-01

    The Authors have analysed the etiopathogenetic factors of the post-dural puncture headache. To prevent this complication they have experimented an original method: in 74 patients they have injected 1.5 mg of betamethasone (diluted in physiological solution) into the epidural space after the anaesthetic infusion. They conclude supporting the validity of this method of prevention and its safety.

  5. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report.

  6. Acute Motor Weakness of Opposite Lower Extremity after Percutaneous Epidural Neuroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yong Seok; Park, Cheon Hee; Wee, Sang Woo; Sin, Sung Sik; Kim, Joon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, percutaneous epidural neuroplasty has become widely used to treat radicular pain caused by spinal stenosis or a herniated intervertebral disc. A 19-year-old female patient suffering from left radicular pain caused by an L4-L5 intervertebral disc herniation underwent percutaneous epidural neuroplasty of the left L5 nerve root using a Racz catheter. After the procedure, the patient complained of acute motor weakness in the right lower leg, on the opposite site to where the neuroplasty was conducted. Emergency surgery was performed, and swelling of the right L5 nerve root was discovered. The patient recovered her motor and sensory functions immediately after the surgery. Theoretically, the injection of a large volume of fluid in a patient with severe spinal stenosis during epidural neuroplasty can increase the pressure on the opposite side of the epidural space, which may cause injury of the opposite nerve by barotrauma from a closed compartment. Practitioners should be aware of this potential complication. PMID:25852837

  7. Acute intracranial epidural haematoma in a basketball player: a case report.

    PubMed

    Datti, R; Gentile, S L; Pisani, R

    1995-06-01

    A 35-year-old basketball player suffered a serious double head injury during a match. An acute left temporal epidural haematoma, which necessitated surgical drainage, developed. The exceptional circumstances of the trauma are discussed and the literature concerning basketball-related injuries is reviewed.

  8. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report. PMID:26844816

  9. Emulsified halothane produces long-term epidural anesthetic effect: a study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengshan; Liao, Daqing; Liu, Jin; Xiao, Lin; Guo, Jiao; Yi, Mingliang; Zhou, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that volatile anesthetics could produce local anesthesia. Emulsified isoflurane at 8% has been reported to produce epidural anesthetic effect in rabbits. This study was designed to investigate the long-term epidural anesthetic effect of emulsified halothane in rabbits. In this study, 40 healthy adult rabbits (weighting 2.0-2.5 kg) with an epidural catheter were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10/group), receiving epidural administration of 1% lidocaine (lido group), 8% emulsified isoflurane 1ml (8% E-iso group), 8% emulsified halothane (8% E-Halo group) and 12% emulsified halothane (12% E-Halo group). After administration, sensory and motor functions as well as consciousness state were assessed until 60 minutes after sensory and motor function returned to its baseline or at least for 180 min. After epidural anesthesia, all the rabbits were continuously observed for 7 days and sacrificed for pathological evaluations. As a result, all the four study solutions produced typical epidural anesthesia. Onset times of sensory and motor function blockade were similar among the four groups (P>0.05). Duration of sensory blockade in 12% E-Halo group (83±13 min) was significantly longer than other groups: 51±12 min in 8% E-Halo group (P<0.01), 57±8 min in 8% E-iso group (P<0.01) and 47±9 min in lido group (P<0.01). Duration of sensory blockade in 8% E-iso group is longer than lido group (P<0.05). Duration of motor blockade in 12% E-Halo group (81±12 min) was also significantly longer than other groups: 40±8 min in 8% E-Halo group (P<0.01), 37±3 min in 8% E-iso group (P<0.01), 37±6 min in lido group (P<0.01). Normal consciousness was found in the rabbits from 8% E-Halo, 8% E-iso and lido groups while there were four rabbits in 12% E-Halo group (4/10) showed a light sedation. For all the rabbits, no pathological injury was found. The present study demonstrates that emulsified halothane produces reversible concentration

  10. Associations Between Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Epidural Ropivacaine Consumption in Patients Undergoing Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Jiang, Yongdong; Pang, Da; Xi, Hongjie; Liu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Up to date, few published studies indicated the associations between genetic polymorphisms and epidural local anesthetics consumption. In this study, we investigated the associations between seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and epidural ropivacaine consumption during breast cancer surgery in women from northeastern China. These seven SNPs (rs3803662 and rs12443621 in TNCR9, rs889312 in MAP3K1, rs3817198 in LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35, rs13281615 at 8q24, and rs2046210 at 6q25.1) were identified by recent genome-wide association studies associated with tumor susceptibility. A total of 418 breast cancer women received thoracic epidural anesthesia with ropivacaine for elective mastectomy with axillary clearance. Their blood samples were genotyped for the seven SNPs using the SNaPshot method. For SNP rs13281615, the subjects with genotype AG and GG consumed a greater amount of the total epidural ropivacaine and the mean ropivacaine dose than the subjects with genotype AA (p=0.047 and p=0.003, respectively). Furthermore, no statistical differences were found in the total dose of ropivacaine, the mean consumption of ropivacaine, the onset of ropivacaine, or the initial dose of lidocaine among the three genotypic groups for the other six SNPs studied. Our study indicated that SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was associated with the consumption of epidural ropivacaine during breast cancer surgery in northeastern Chinese women. It might provide new insights into the mechanisms of ropivacaine action and metabolism and facilitate the development of personalized medicine. PMID:23577780

  11. The Impact of Epidural Steroid Injections on the Outcomes of Patients Treated for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Radcliff, Kristen; Hilibrand, Alan; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Delasotta, Lawrence; Rihn, Jeffrey; Zhao, Wenyan; Vaccaro, Alexander; Albert, Todd J.; Weinstein, James N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) is a prospective, multicenter study of operative versus nonoperative treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. It has been suggested that epidural steroid injections may help improve patient outcomes and lower the rate of crossover to surgical treatment. Methods: One hundred and fifty-four patients included in the intervertebral disc herniation arm of the SPORT who had received an epidural steroid injection during the first three months of the study and no injection prior to the study (the ESI group) were compared with 453 patients who had not received an injection during the first three months of the study or prior to the study (the No-ESI group). Results: There was a significant difference in the preference for surgery between groups (19% in the ESI group compared with 56% in the No-ESI group, p < 0.001). There was no difference in primary or secondary outcome measures at four years between the groups. A higher percentage of patients changed from surgical to nonsurgical treatment in the ESI group (41% versus 12% in the No-ESI, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Patients with lumbar disc herniation treated with epidural steroid injection had no improvement in short or long-term outcomes compared with patients who were not treated with epidural steroid injection. There was a higher prevalence of crossover to nonsurgical treatment among surgically assigned ESI-group patients, although this was confounded by the increased baseline desire to avoid surgery among patients in the ESI group. Given these data, we concluded that more studies are necessary to establish the value of epidural steroid injection for symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22739998

  12. Postoperative analgesic efficacy of epidural tramadol as adjutant to ropivacaine in adult upper abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anil P.; Singh, Dharmraj; Singh, Yashpal; Jain, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain control after major abdominal surgery is the prime concern of anesthesiologist. Among various methodologies, epidural analgesia is the most preferred technique because of the excellent quality of analgesia with minimum side-effects. Aim: The present study was designated to compare postoperative analgesic efficacy and safety of epidural tramadol as adjuvant to ropivacaine (0.2%) in adult upper abdominal surgery. Settings and Design: Prospective, randomized-controlled, double-blinded trial. Materials and Methods: Ninety patients planned for upper abdominal surgery under general anesthesia were randomized into three equal groups to receive epidural drug via epidural catheter at start of incisional wound closure: Group R to receive ropivacaine (0.2%); Group RT1 to receive tramadol 1 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%); and RT2 to receive tramadol 2 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%). Duration and quality of analgesia (visual analog scale [VAS] score), hemodynamic parameters, and adverse event were recorded and statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance test, Fisher's exact test/Chi-square test, whichever appropriate. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Mean duration of analgesia after epidural bolus drug was significantly higher in Group RT2 (584 ± 58 min) when compared with RT1 (394 ± 46 min) or R Group (283 ± 35 min). VAS score was always lower in RT2 Group in comparison to other group during the study. Hemodynamic parameter remained stable in all three groups. Conclusion: We conclude that tramadol 2 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%) provides more effective and longer-duration analgesia than tramadol 1 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%). PMID:26712976

  13. Comparison of epidural analgesia and intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia for post-thoracotomy pain control.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hui; Feng, Yi; Yang, Ba-Xian; Wang, Jun

    2008-04-01

    Epidural analgesia is regarded as the gold method for controlling post-thoracotomy pain. Intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia can also produce satisfactory analgesic effects, but is suspected to increase the incidence of chronic pain. However, randomized controlled trials comparing these two methods for post-thoracotomy acute pain analgesic effects and chronic pain incidents have not been conducted previously. We studied 107 adult patients, allocated randomly to thoracic epidural bupivacaine and morphine or intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia. Acute pain scores and opioid-related side effects were evaluated for three postoperative days. Chronic pain information, including the incidence, severity, and allodynia-like pain, was acquired on the first, third, sixth and twelfth months postoperatively. There was no significant difference on numeral rating scales (NRS) at rest or on motion between the two groups during the three postoperative days. The patient satisfaction results were also similar between the groups. The side effects, especially mild pruritus, were reported more often in the epidural group. Both groups showed high incidence of chronic pain (42.1-72.1%), and no significance between the groups. The incidence of allodynia-like pain reported in cryo group was higher than that in Epidural group on any postoperative month, with significance on the sixth and the twelfth months postoperatively (P<0.05). More patients rated their chronic pain intensity on moderate and severe in cryo group and interfered with daily life (P<0.05). Both thoracic epidural analgesia and intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia showed satisfactory analgesia for post-thoracotomy acute pain. The incidence of post-thoracotomy chronic pain is high. Cryoanalgesia may be a factor that increases the incidence of neuropathic pain. PMID:17870625

  14. Decoding continuous limb movements from high-density epidural electrode arrays using custom spatial filters

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, A R.; Taylor, D M

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to identify spatial filtering methods that would improve decoding of continuous arm movements from epidural field potentials as well as demonstrate the use of the epidural signals in a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) system in monkeys. Approach Eleven spatial filtering options were compared offline using field potentials collected from 64-channel high-density epidural arrays in monkeys. Arrays were placed over arm/hand motor cortex in which intracortical microelectrodes had previously been implanted and removed leaving focal cortical damage but no lasting motor deficits. Spatial filters tested included: no filtering, common average referencing (CAR), principle component analysis (PCA), and eight novel modifications of the common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm. The spatial filtering method and decoder combination that performed the best offline was then used online where monkeys controlled cursor velocity using continuous wrist position decoded from epidural field potentials in real time. Main results Optimized CSP methods improved continuous wrist position decoding accuracy by 69% over CAR and by 80% compared to no filtering. Kalman decoders performed better than linear regression decoders and benefitted from including more spatially-filtered signals but not from pre-smoothing the calculated power spectra. Conversely, linear regression decoders required fewer spatially-filtered signals and were improved by pre-smoothing the power values. The ‘position-to-velocity’ transformation used during online control enabled the animals to generate smooth closed-loop movement trajectories using the somewhat limited position information available in the epidural signals. The monkeys’ online performance significantly improved across days of closed-loop training. Significance Most published BMI studies that use electrocortographic signals to decode continuous limb movements either use no spatial filtering or CAR. This study suggests a

  15. Decoding continuous limb movements from high-density epidural electrode arrays using custom spatial filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marathe, A. R.; Taylor, D. M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Our goal was to identify spatial filtering methods that would improve decoding of continuous arm movements from epidural field potentials as well as demonstrate the use of the epidural signals in a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) system in monkeys. Approach. Eleven spatial filtering options were compared offline using field potentials collected from 64-channel high-density epidural arrays in monkeys. Arrays were placed over arm/hand motor cortex in which intracortical microelectrodes had previously been implanted and removed leaving focal cortical damage but no lasting motor deficits. Spatial filters tested included: no filtering, common average referencing (CAR), principle component analysis, and eight novel modifications of the common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm. The spatial filtering method and decoder combination that performed the best offline was then used online where monkeys controlled cursor velocity using continuous wrist position decoded from epidural field potentials in real time. Main results. Optimized CSP methods improved continuous wrist position decoding accuracy by 69% over CAR and by 80% compared to no filtering. Kalman decoders performed better than linear regression decoders and benefitted from including more spatially-filtered signals but not from pre-smoothing the calculated power spectra. Conversely, linear regression decoders required fewer spatially-filtered signals and were improved by pre-smoothing the power values. The ‘position-to-velocity’ transformation used during online control enabled the animals to generate smooth closed-loop movement trajectories using the somewhat limited position information available in the epidural signals. The monkeys’ online performance significantly improved across days of closed-loop training. Significance. Most published BMI studies that use electrocorticographic signals to decode continuous limb movements either use no spatial filtering or CAR. This study suggests a

  16. The efficacy and safety of low dose epidural butorphanol on postoperative analgesia following cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, K; Rahman, T R; Singh, S N; Bhattarai, B; Basnet, N; Khaniya, S

    2008-01-01

    Butorphanol is considered an effective and safe analgesic after cesarean delivery but is associated with profound dose-dependent sedation. Somnolence may cause hindrance in early mother-baby interaction. This study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy and to monitor side-effects of low doses (0.5 mg and 0.75 mg) of epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine compared to bupivacaine alone in parturients following cesarean delivery. One hundred and twenty parturients (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2) undergoing cesarean delivery were allocated into three groups: group 1 received epidural 0.125% bupivacaine while group 2 and 3 received an additional 0.5 mg and 0.75 mg butorphanol respectively. A combined spinal, epidural technique was used. Spinal anaesthesia was used for surgery. The epidural route was used for postoperative analgesia with the study drug. Onset, duration and quality of analgesia, lowest visual analogue scales (VAS) score, and side effects were noted. The onset and duration of analgesia in group 2 (4.1+/-2.6 min and 202.4+/-62.8 min) and group 3 (4.0+/-2.5 min and 192.3+/-69.1 min) were significantly different (P<0.01) from group 1 (6.6+/-2.7 min and 145.7+/-89.6 min). The quality of analgesia in terms of time to first independent movement and satisfactory VAS were statistically better (P<0.01) in group 2 (3.9+/-0.3 hour and 8.1+/-0.1 mm) and group 3 (3.8+/-0.4 hour and 8.1+/-0.9 mm) than in group 1 (5.2+/-0.4 hour and 6.3+/-1.3 mm). The incidence of sedation was 5% in all the three groups. A lower dose of epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine produces a significantly earlier onset, longer duration and better quality of analgesia than bupivacaine does. PMID:18709032

  17. Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment. PMID:23015944

  18. Congenital abnormalities of the posterior fossa.

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Orman, Gunes; Boltshauser, Eugen; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Nowadays, conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities has been demonstrated, including malformations (anomalies due to an alteration of the primary developmental program caused by a genetic defect) and disruptions (anomalies due to the breakdown of a structure that had a normal developmental potential). Familiarity with the spectrum of congenital posterior fossa anomalies and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. The authors discuss the spectrum of posterior fossa malformations and disruptions, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and risk of recurrence.

  19. Congenital abnormalities of the posterior fossa.

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Orman, Gunes; Boltshauser, Eugen; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Nowadays, conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities has been demonstrated, including malformations (anomalies due to an alteration of the primary developmental program caused by a genetic defect) and disruptions (anomalies due to the breakdown of a structure that had a normal developmental potential). Familiarity with the spectrum of congenital posterior fossa anomalies and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. The authors discuss the spectrum of posterior fossa malformations and disruptions, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and risk of recurrence. PMID:25590398

  20. Best approach for posterior mediastinal goiter removal: transcervical incision and lateral thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Ojanguren Arranz, Amaya; Baena Fustegueras, Juan Antonio; Ros López, Susana; Santamaría Gómez, Maite; Ojanguren Arranz, Iñigo; Olsina Kissle, Jorge Juan

    2014-06-01

    Surgical removal of intrathoracic goiter can be performed by a cervical approach in the majority of patients. Review of literature shows that experienced surgeons need to perform an extracervical approach in 2-3% of cases. In spite of surgical management of substernal goiter is well defined, there is little available information about surgical approach of intrathoracic goiters extending beyond the aortic arch into the posterior mediastinum. We report two cases and propose combination of cervical incision and muscle-sparing lateral thoracotomy for posterior mediastinal goiter removal. In such cases, we do not favour sternotomy as posterior mediastinum is inaccessible due to the presence of heart and great vessels anterior to the thyroidal mass that would lead to perform a perilous blind dissection. Based in our experience, transcervical and thoracotomy approach is indicated for a complete and safe posterior mediastinal goiter removal.

  1. [Pathogenesis of posterior capsule opacification in pseudophakia].

    PubMed

    Łukaszewska-Smyk, Agnieszka; Kałuzny, Józef

    2009-01-01

    The lens epithelial cells of A and E type are involved in pathogenesis of posterior capsule opacification (PCO). They undergo metaplasia into microfibroblasts, then migrate towards posterior capsule where they proliferate and form opacification. These processes are stimulated by cytokines and interleukines. The extracellular matrix which constitutes a scaffold for migration and attachment of epithelial cells plays an important role in PCO formation. Integrines intercede in this process.

  2. Posterior Wnts Have Distinct Roles in Specification and Patterning of the Planarian Posterior Region.

    PubMed

    Sureda-Gómez, Miquel; Pascual-Carreras, Eudald; Adell, Teresa

    2015-11-05

    The wnt signaling pathway is an intercellular communication mechanism essential in cell-fate specification, tissue patterning and regional-identity specification. A βcatenin-dependent signal specifies the AP (Anteroposterior) axis of planarians, both during regeneration of new tissues and during normal homeostasis. Accordingly, four wnts (posterior wnts) are expressed in a nested manner in central and posterior regions of planarians. We have analyzed the specific role of each posterior wnt and the possible cooperation between them in specifying and patterning planarian central and posterior regions. We show that each posterior wnt exerts a distinct role during re-specification and maintenance of the central and posterior planarian regions, and that the integration of the different wnt signals (βcatenin dependent and independent) underlies the patterning of the AP axis from the central region to the tip of the tail. Based on these findings and data from the literature, we propose a model for patterning the planarian AP axis.

  3. Vertigo due to posterior circulation stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Hyung

    2013-07-01

    Stroke in the distribution of the posterior circulation may present as acute onset spontaneous vertigo and imbalance. Although vertigo due to posterior circulation stroke is usually associated with other neurologic symptoms or signs, small infarcts in the cerebellum or brainstem can present with vertigo without other localizing symptoms. Approximately 17% of patients with isolated posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarction presented with isolated vertigo, nystagmus, and postural unsteadiness. A head impulse test can differentiate acute isolated vertigo associated with cerebellar stroke from more benign disorders involving the inner ear. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss can be the initial symptom of impending posterior circulation ischemic stroke (particularly within the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery). In this case, evaluation of isolated audiovestibular loss may prevent the progression of acute vertigo and hearing loss into more widespread areas of infarction in the posterior circulation. In this article, the clinical syndromes and signs of acute vestibular syndrome due to posterior circulation stroke involving the brainstem and cerebellum are summarized.

  4. Traumatic Rupture of A Posterior Mediastinal Teratoma following Motor-Vehicle Accident.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christopher; Domingo, Fernando; Miller, Ashley D; Smith, Jeremiah S; Headrick, James R

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a posterior mediastinal mature cystic teratoma with rupture secondary to blunt chest trauma in a 20-year-old male involved in a motor-vehicle accident. Initial treatment was guided by Advanced Trauma Life Support and a tube thoracostomy was performed for presumed hemothorax. The heterogeneous collection within the thoracic cavity was discovered to be the result of a ruptured cystic mass. Pathologic findings confirmed the mass consistent with a mature cystic teratoma. As mediastinal teratomas are most commonly described arising from the anterior mediastinum, the posterior location of the teratoma described in this report is exceedingly rare. PMID:27660731

  5. Traumatic Rupture of A Posterior Mediastinal Teratoma following Motor-Vehicle Accident

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Christopher; Domingo, Fernando; Smith, Jeremiah S.; Headrick, James R.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a posterior mediastinal mature cystic teratoma with rupture secondary to blunt chest trauma in a 20-year-old male involved in a motor-vehicle accident. Initial treatment was guided by Advanced Trauma Life Support and a tube thoracostomy was performed for presumed hemothorax. The heterogeneous collection within the thoracic cavity was discovered to be the result of a ruptured cystic mass. Pathologic findings confirmed the mass consistent with a mature cystic teratoma. As mediastinal teratomas are most commonly described arising from the anterior mediastinum, the posterior location of the teratoma described in this report is exceedingly rare. PMID:27660731

  6. Posterior urethral polyp with type I posterior urethral valves: a rare association in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Kesan, Krushnakumar V; Gupta, Rahul Kumar; Kothari, Paras; Gupta, Abhaya; Mudkhedkar, Kedar; Kamble, Ravikiran; Dikshit, K Vishesh

    2014-06-01

    Urethral polyp is a rare cause of bladder outlet obstruction, voiding dysfunction, and hematuria in the pediatric age group. Urethral polyps are rarely associated with other congenital urinary tract anomalies. In this study, we report a case of solitary posterior urethral polyp with type I posterior urethral valve in a 7-day-old neonate presented with urinary retention and deranged renal function. The polyp was diagnosed on cystoscopy. Transurethral resection of the polyp with posterior urethral valve fulguration was performed. Pathologic assessment revealed a fibroepithelial lesion, which was consistent with congenital posterior urethral polyp.

  7. [Interest of cervical epidural anesthesia in perioperative management of thyroidectomy with the high-risk anesthetic patient].

    PubMed

    Mahoungou Guimbi, K C; Itiere Odzili, F A; Soussa, G R

    2014-03-01

    Cervical epidural anesthesia is an anesthetic technique that can be useful in patients with high perioperative risk undergoing to cervical surgery. We report the case of a patient of 49 years old with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, epilepsy, left hemiparesis sequelae of stroke and congestive left ventricular failure. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy under cervical epidural anesthesia. No difficulty breathing or decompensation of chronic underlying diseases were noted in the postoperative.

  8. Low-dose spinal neostigmine further enhances the analgesic effect of spinal bupivacaine combined with epidural dexamethasone, following orthopedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lauretti, Gabriela Rocha; Veloso, Fabricio S.; Kitayama, Antonio T; Mattos, Anita Leocadia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Opioids are considered mainstream for combined spinal-epidural anesthesia, but frequently limited by adverse effects. The aim of this study was to examine whether low-dose spinal neostigmine, epidural dexamethasone or their combination enhances analgesia from spinal bupivacaine without adverse effects. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery were randomized to one of four groups and evaluated for 24-h after surgery for analgesia (time to first rescue analgesic) and rescue analgesic consumption. Patients received 15 mg bupivacaine plus the test drug intrathecally (saline or 1 microgram (μg) neostigmine). The epidural test drug was either saline or 10 mg dexamethasone. The Control group (CG) received spinal and epidural saline. The Neostigmine group (NG), spinal neostigmine and epidural saline; the Dexamethasone group (DG), spinal saline and epidural dexamethasone; and the Neostigmine-dexamethasone group (NDG), spinal neostigmine and epidural dexamethasone. Results: The CG (282 ± 163 min) and NG (524 ± 142 min) were similar in their times to first rescue analgesic and analgesic consumption. The time to first rescue analgesic was longer for the DG (966 ± 397 min) compared with CG and NG (P < 0.0002), and the DG had less ketoprofen consumption and lower overall visual analogue scale-pain sores compared with CG and NG (P < 0.0005). Addition of 1 mg-neostigmine (NDG) resulted in longer time to rescue analgesic (1205 ± 303 min; P < 0.02) and lower ketoprofen consumption (P < 0.05) compared to DG. Sporadic cases of vesical catheterization and emesis were observed, however adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusion: Spinal 1 microgram (μg) neostigmine further enhanced analgesia from spinal bupivacaine combined with epidural dexamethasone, without increasing the incidence of adverse effects. PMID:25535491

  9. Comparison of intramuscular and epidural morphine for postoperative analgesia in the grossly obese: influence on postoperative ambulation and pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Rawal, N; Sjöstrand, U; Christoffersson, E; Dahlström, B; Arvill, A; Rydman, H

    1984-06-01

    In a randomized double-blind study of thirty grossly obese patients undergoing gastroplasty for weight reduction, the effects of intramuscular and epidural morphine were compared as regards analgesia, ambulation, gastrointestinal motility, early and late pulmonary function, duration of hospitalization, and occurrence of deep vein thrombosis in the postoperative period. The patients were operated on under thoracic epidural block combined with light endotracheal anesthesia. A six-grade scale was devised to quantify postoperative mobilization. A radioactive isotope method using 99mTc -plasmin was employed to detect postoperative deep vein thrombosis. For 14 hr after the first analgesic injection, respiratory frequency was noted every 15 min and arterial blood gases were measured hourly. Peak expiratory flow was recorded daily until the patient was discharged from hospital. Spirometry was performed the day before and the day after surgery. Plasma concentrations of morphine were measured after both intramuscular and epidural administration. Both intramuscular and epidural morphine gave effective analgesia, but the average dose of intramuscular morphine was up to seven times greater than that required by the epidural route. A larger number of patients receiving epidural morphine postoperatively were able to sit, stand, or walk unassisted within 6, 12, and 24 hr, respectively. Being alert and more mobile as a result of superior postoperative analgesia from epidural morphine, patients in this group benefited more from vigorous physiotherapy routine, which resulted in fewer pulmonary complications. Furthermore, earlier postoperative recovery of peak expiratory flow and bowel function presumably contributed to a significantly shorter hospitalization in patients receiving epidural morphine. There was no evidence of prolonged respiratory depression in this high-risk category of patients. The 99mTc -plasmin tests revealed no significant difference between the two groups.

  10. [Pressure Ulcer Caused by Long-term Keeping of the Same Body Position during Epidural Labour Analgesia].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Satoshi; Uchizaki, Sakiko; Mimura, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Mizuki; Akinaga, Chieko; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman (height: 153 cm, weight : 62.4 kg, non-pregnant weight : 52 kg, uniparous) without underlying diseases who developed pressure ulcer due to keeping a similar body position during long-term epidural delivery. Induction of childbirth was started in gestational week 40, causing reduction of fetal heart rate, which improved after adoption of a right lateral recumbent position. Severe contractions occurred and epidural labour analgesia was started. The fetal heart rate decreased again and induction of childbirth was suspended, but the right lateral recumbent position was maintained. Epidural administration was continued due to persistent contractions. Next morning, induction of childbirth was restarted and birth occurred in approximately 6 hours. The right lateral recumbent position was maintained for approximately 20 hours. At childbirth, a pressure ulcer was present in the intertrochanteric part of the right femur. The causes included insufficient knowledge of medical staff about the risk of pressure ulcer during epidural delivery, and no position change. A decreased sensation and blocked motor nerve caused by epidural anesthesia might have accelerated pressure ulcer development. This case suggests that preventive measures against pressure ulcer are required in epidural anesthesia in pregnant women.

  11. Impact of Combination Epidural and General Anesthesia on the Long-Term Survival of Gastric Cancer Patients: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiangling; Guo, Wenjing; Wu, Qicheng; Zhang, Runze; Fang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether regional anesthesia is associated with tumor-free and long-term survival is controversial. Here, we focused on whether epidural anesthesia affects the long-term survival of gastric cancer patients after surgery. Material/Methods We obtained the records of 273 patients undergoing gastric cancer surgery between August 2006 and December 2010. All patients received elective surgery, and the end-point was death. The general anesthesia group comprised 116 patients and the epidural-supplemented group comprised 157 patients. The results were analyzed using a multivariable model to determine the relationship between epidural use and long-term survival. Results No obvious association was detected between epidural use and long-term survival according to the Cox model (P=0.522); the adjusted estimated hazard ratio was 0.919 (95% CI 0.71–1.19). However, according to Kaplan-Meier analysis, epidural anesthesia was associated with long-term survival among younger patients (age up to 64) (p=0.042, log-rank) (but not among older patients (p=0.203, log-rank). A lower American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class and less chemoradiotherapy exposure were also associated with a longer survival. However, advanced tumor stage still has a significant negative impact on survival. Conclusions No obvious difference was detected between the 2 anesthesia groups, but younger patients may benefit from epidural anesthesia. PMID:27386842

  12. [Pressure Ulcer Caused by Long-term Keeping of the Same Body Position during Epidural Labour Analgesia].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Satoshi; Uchizaki, Sakiko; Mimura, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Mizuki; Akinaga, Chieko; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman (height: 153 cm, weight : 62.4 kg, non-pregnant weight : 52 kg, uniparous) without underlying diseases who developed pressure ulcer due to keeping a similar body position during long-term epidural delivery. Induction of childbirth was started in gestational week 40, causing reduction of fetal heart rate, which improved after adoption of a right lateral recumbent position. Severe contractions occurred and epidural labour analgesia was started. The fetal heart rate decreased again and induction of childbirth was suspended, but the right lateral recumbent position was maintained. Epidural administration was continued due to persistent contractions. Next morning, induction of childbirth was restarted and birth occurred in approximately 6 hours. The right lateral recumbent position was maintained for approximately 20 hours. At childbirth, a pressure ulcer was present in the intertrochanteric part of the right femur. The causes included insufficient knowledge of medical staff about the risk of pressure ulcer during epidural delivery, and no position change. A decreased sensation and blocked motor nerve caused by epidural anesthesia might have accelerated pressure ulcer development. This case suggests that preventive measures against pressure ulcer are required in epidural anesthesia in pregnant women. PMID:27483666

  13. Bupivacaine versus bupivacaine plus fentanyl for epidural analgesia: effect on maternal satisfaction.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J D; Henderson, K; Bowden, M I; Lewis, M; Cooper, G M

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare a combination of epidural fentanyl and bupivacaine with bupivacaine alone for epidural analgesia in labour and to evaluate factors in addition to analgesia that may influence maternal satisfaction. DESIGN--A prospective randomised pilot study. SETTING--Birmingham Maternity Hospital. SUBJECTS--85 primiparous women who requested epidural analgesia in labour and their babies. INTERVENTIONS--Group 1 mothers were treated with bupivacaine conventionally, group 2 mothers with bupivacaine and fentanyl in a more complex way designed to provide satisfactory analgesia but with less troublesome side effects. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Overall maternal satisfaction, maternal perception of epidural analgesia and its side effects, and aspects of mothers' psychological states during labour, quantified using 100 mm visual linear analogue scales; the frequency of normal and operative deliveries; and measurements of neonatal wellbeing. RESULTS--Satisfaction was higher in group 2 mothers (median group difference +3 mm, 95% confidence interval +1 to +5, p = 0.012): this was associated with more normal deliveries (difference between proportions 0.23, 95% confidence interval +0.03 to +0.42); greater self control (median group difference -7 mm, -17 to -2, p = 0.003); and reduced unpleasantness of motor blockade (-10 mm, -19 to -5, p less than 0.001), sensory blockade (-5 mm, -11 to -2, p = 0.002) and shivering (-5 mm, -18 to 0, p = 0.046) at the expense of mild itching (0 mm, 0 to 0, p less than 0.001). Group 1 mothers found restricted movements more unpleasant (-1 mm, -11 to 0, p = 0.006) and were more sleepy (-4 mm, -20 to 0, p = 0.032). The addition of fentanyl to bupivacaine reduced the requirement for local anaesthetic (-33 mg, -55 to -15, p less than 0.001) without compromising analgesia. No adverse effects in neonates were attributed to the use of fentanyl. CONCLUSIONS--The already high maternal satisfaction from conventional epidural analgesia can be improved

  14. Optimal dose of an anesthetic in epidural anesthesia and its effect on labor duration and administration of vacuum extractor and forceps.

    PubMed

    Cutura, N; Soldo, V; Milovanović, S R; Orescanin-Dusić, Z; Curković, A; Tomović, B; Janković-Raznatović, S

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the factors that influence the optimal dose of epidural anesthesia (EA), its effect on labor duration, and the frequency of vacuum and forceps administration at the end of delivery. The study group included 100 women who underwent vaginal delivery with EA with administration of 0.125% bupivacaine. A control group included 100 vaginally delivered women, without EA administration. In both groups delivery was stimulated by syntocinon. The level of labor pain influenced the optimal bolus dose of EA more than the body mass. However, the maintenance dose was influenced by both of these factors equally. Labor in the study group was somewhat shorter. In the group with EA the percentage of forceps and vacuum extractor application was twice that in the control group. There was no difference in average value of 5-minute Apgar scor in newborns.

  15. A fully implantable stimulator with wireless power and data transmission for experimental use in epidural spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Li, Jun; Han, Wenjuan; Zhou, Houlun

    2011-01-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) combined with partial weight bearing therapy (PWBT) has been reported to facilitate recovery of functional walking for individuals after chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. This paper describes a low cost, fully implantable, advanced ESCS stimulator that can be manufactured in a research laboratory for use in small animals. The system is composed of four main parts: an external personal digital assistant (PDA), an external controller, an implantable pulse generator (IPG), lead extension and electrode. The PDA allows the experimenter to program the stimulation parameters through a user-friendly graphical interface. The external controller placed on the rat back communicates with PDA via RF telemetry. The IPG generates the biphasic charge-balanced voltage-regulated pulses, which are delivered to the bipolar electrode by the lead extension to achieve chronic ESCS in freely moving rats. A RF carrier from the Class-E amplifier in the external controller provides both data and power for the implanted circuitry through a closely coupled inductive link. The IPG is hermetically packaged using a silicon elastomer and measures 22 mm × 23 mm × 7 mm with a mass of ~3.78 g.

  16. A Fully Implantable Stimulator With Wireless Power and Data Transmission for Experimental Investigation of Epidural Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Hu, Dingyin; Duan, Bingyu; He, Jiping

    2015-07-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) combined with partial weight-bearing therapy (PWBT) has been shown to facilitate recovery of functional walking for individuals after spinal cord injury (SCI). The investigation of neural mechanisms of recovery from SCI under this treatment has been conducted broadly in rodent models, yet a suitable ESCS system is still unavailable. This paper describes a practical, programmable, and fully implantable stimulator for laboratory research on rats to explore fundamental neurophysiological principles for functional recovery after SCI. The ESCS system is composed of a personal digital assistant (PDA), an external controller, an implantable pulse generator (IPG), lead extension, and stimulating electrodes. The stimulation parameters can be programmed and adjusted through a graphical user interface on the PDA. The external controller is placed on the rat back and communicates with the PDA via radio-frequency (RF) telemetry. An RF carrier from the class-E power amplifier in the external controller provides both data and power for the IPG through an inductive link. The IPG is built around a microcontroller unit to generate voltage-regulated pulses delivered to the bipolar electrode for ESCS in rats. The encapsulated IPG measures 22 mm × 23 mm × 7 mm with a mass of  ∼  3.78 g. This fully implantable batteryless stimulator provided a simplified and efficient method to carry out chronic experiments in untethered animals for medical electro-neurological research. PMID:25680207

  17. A fully implantable stimulator with wireless power and data transmission for experimental use in epidural spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Li, Jun; Han, Wenjuan; Zhou, Houlun

    2011-01-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) combined with partial weight bearing therapy (PWBT) has been reported to facilitate recovery of functional walking for individuals after chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. This paper describes a low cost, fully implantable, advanced ESCS stimulator that can be manufactured in a research laboratory for use in small animals. The system is composed of four main parts: an external personal digital assistant (PDA), an external controller, an implantable pulse generator (IPG), lead extension and electrode. The PDA allows the experimenter to program the stimulation parameters through a user-friendly graphical interface. The external controller placed on the rat back communicates with PDA via RF telemetry. The IPG generates the biphasic charge-balanced voltage-regulated pulses, which are delivered to the bipolar electrode by the lead extension to achieve chronic ESCS in freely moving rats. A RF carrier from the Class-E amplifier in the external controller provides both data and power for the implanted circuitry through a closely coupled inductive link. The IPG is hermetically packaged using a silicon elastomer and measures 22 mm × 23 mm × 7 mm with a mass of ~3.78 g. PMID:22256007

  18. A rare tentorial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma in posterior cranial fossa: case report.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Anqi; Li, Zhenlin; He, Xin; You, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is a very rare malignant tumor with predilection site of frontoparietal falx cerebri. Only few cases of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma in posterior cranial fossa are reported. Here, we report a 23-year-old young man with a dura-attached mass in left posterior cranial fossa misdiagnosed as a tentorial meningioma preoperatively. According to the following operation, the lesion was confirmed as mesenchymal chondrosarcoma surgically and pathologically. On MRI, the tumor was characterized by lobulated soft-tissue mass with dura-attached base, patchy calcifications and heterogeneous signal intensities. On contrast-enhanced MRI, it was well-defined, with marked enhancement. We consider that these imaging features above might remind us to consider the diagnosis of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma in posterior cranial fossa. The postoperative treatment of radiotherapy is still controversial. As for our case, according to the 24 months follow-up after postoperative γ-knife, our patient shows an optimistic prognosis so far. PMID:25168329

  19. Posterior Predictive Bayesian Phylogenetic Model Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Paul O.; Xie, Wangang; Chen, Ming-Hui; Fan, Yu; Kuo, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    We present two distinctly different posterior predictive approaches to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection and illustrate these methods using examples from green algal protein-coding cpDNA sequences and flowering plant rDNA sequences. The Gelfand–Ghosh (GG) approach allows dissection of an overall measure of model fit into components due to posterior predictive variance (GGp) and goodness-of-fit (GGg), which distinguishes this method from the posterior predictive P-value approach. The conditional predictive ordinate (CPO) method provides a site-specific measure of model fit useful for exploratory analyses and can be combined over sites yielding the log pseudomarginal likelihood (LPML) which is useful as an overall measure of model fit. CPO provides a useful cross-validation approach that is computationally efficient, requiring only a sample from the posterior distribution (no additional simulation is required). Both GG and CPO add new perspectives to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection based on the predictive abilities of models and complement the perspective provided by the marginal likelihood (including Bayes Factor comparisons) based solely on the fit of competing models to observed data. [Bayesian; conditional predictive ordinate; CPO; L-measure; LPML; model selection; phylogenetics; posterior predictive.] PMID:24193892

  20. Detailed ophthalmologic evaluation of posterior microphthalmos.

    PubMed

    Alkin, Zeynep; Ozkaya, Abdullah; Karakucuk, Yalcin; Demirok, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    We performed various ophthalmic investigations in order to confirm the diagnosis and document the various features of posterior microphthalmos in a 21-year-old male. Ophthalmic examination revealed low vision with high hyperopia, papillomacular folds, midperipheral pigmentary changes and crowded optic discs. The optic discs were small and crowded with increased nerve fiber layer thickness. Fundus fluorescein angiography showed reduced diameter of a capillary free zone. Anterior segment (AS) optical coherence tomography demonstrated near normal anterior chamber depths, but markedly diminished anterior chamber angles. In spite of the increased corneal thickness and steep corneas, lens thickness and endothelial cell counts were normal. Sclerochoroidal thickening and foreshortening of the globes were detected with B-scan ultrasonography. Electroretinographic findings and visual field tests were similar to those in pigmentary retinopathy. Posterior microphthalmos is a complex eye disorder, which affects predominantly the posterior segment but also involves the AS of the eye.

  1. Posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Alehan, Füsun; Erol, Ilknur; Agildere, A Muhtesem; Ozcay, Figen; Baskin, Esra; Cengiz, Nurcan; Alioglu, Bülent; Haberal, Mehmet

    2007-04-01

    Posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is a recently identified clinical and radiologic entity. The characteristic radiologic findings are bilateral gray and white matter edema in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemispheres. This article reports clinical and radiologic findings in 10 consecutive episodes of posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome that were diagnosed in 9 children and adolescents. The causes were immunosuppressive therapy in 7 patients and a combination of renal failure and hypertension in 3. The most common presenting symptoms were seizure and altered consciousness; others included headache, sixth nerve palsy, and cortical blindness. Imaging demonstrated abnormalities in the parietal and occipital lobes in all 10 episodes. The signs and symptoms resolved after immunosuppressive agents were reduced or discontinued, or after uremia and hypertension were corrected. Four patients underwent follow-up cranial imaging, and the images showed nearly complete or complete resolution. The syndrome was clinically reversible in all patients.

  2. Comparison of Transversus Abdominis Plane Infiltration with Liposomal Bupivacaine versus Continuous Epidural Analgesia versus Intravenous Opioid Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Ayad, Sabry; Babazade, Rovnat; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Nadar, Vinayak; Lokhande, Chetan; Makarova, Natalya; Khanna, Rashi; Sessler, Daniel I.; Turan, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is considered the standard of care but cannot be provided to all patients Liposomal bupivacaine has been approved for field blocks such as transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks but has not been clinically compared against other modalities. In this retrospective propensity matched cohort study we thus tested the primary hypothesis that TAP infiltration are noninferior (not worse) to continuous epidural analgesia and superior (better) to intravenous opioid analgesia in patients recovering from major lower abdominal surgery. 318 patients were propensity matched on 18 potential factors among three groups (106 per group): 1) TAP infiltration with bupivacaine liposome; 2) continuous Epidural analgesia with plain bupivacaine; and; 3) intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA). We claimed TAP noninferior (not worse) over Epidural if TAP was noninferior (not worse) on total morphine-equivalent opioid and time-weighted average pain score (10-point scale) within first 72 hours after surgery with noninferiority deltas of 1 (10-point scale) for pain and an increase less of 20% in the mean morphine equivalent opioid consumption. We claimed TAP or Epidural groups superior (better) over IV PCA if TAP or Epidural was superior on opioid consumption and at least noninferior on pain outcome. Multivariable linear regressions within the propensity-matched cohorts were used to model total morphine-equivalent opioid dose and time-weighted average pain score within first 72 hours after surgery; joint hypothesis framework was used for formal testing. TAP infiltration were noninferior to Epidural on both primary outcomes (p<0.001). TAP infiltration were noninferior to IV PCA on pain scores (p = 0.001) but we did not find superiority on opioid consumption (p = 0.37). We did not find noninferiority of Epidural over IV PCA on pain scores (P = 0.13) and nor did we find superiority on opioid consumption (P = 0.98). TAP infiltration with liposomal bupivacaine and

  3. Plasma concentration and cardiovascular effects of lidocaine during continuous epidural administration in dogs anesthetized with isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Sakonju, Iwao; Maeda, Kenichi; Karasawa, Koichi; Tadokoro, Toshiyuki; Kakuta, Tomoko; Takase, Katsuaki

    2011-03-01

    The cardiovascular effects of continuous epidural administration (CEA) of lidocaine were investigated in anesthetized dogs. Loading epidural injections of 2, 4, or 6 mg/kg of lidocaine were followed by CEA with 1, 2, or 3 mg/kg/hr lidocaine, respectively, for 2 hr under 2.0% isoflurane anesthesia. Heart rate, direct blood pressure, cardiac index, and stroke volume decreased dose-dependently during CEA, whereas systemic vascular resistance did not significantly differ with dose, and no characteristic changes were observed in any groups. Plasma lidocaine concentration reached a steady state during CEA and increased in a dose-dependent manner. Circulatory suppression caused by lidocaine CEA was not attributable to peripheral vasodilation, but rather to the direct cardiac action of systemic lidocaine absorption from the peridural space. PMID:21048393

  4. Randomized study of intravenous fluid preload before epidural analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Pirlet, M; Mills, M S; Tuckey, J P; Thomas, T A

    2000-08-01

    We performed a randomized controlled trial of the effect of intravenous fluid preload on maternal hypotension and fetal heart rate (FHR) changes in labour after the first epidural injection. Group 1 (49 women) received 1 litre of crystalloid preload. Group 2 (46 women) received no preload. No statistically significant difference was shown between the two groups for either of the outcomes. Hypotension was found in three women in group 1 and five in group 2 (P = 0.4). Deterioration in FHR pattern was found in four women in group 1 and 11 in group 2 (P = 0.08). This study has not shown a significant increase in the incidence of hypotension when intravenous preload is omitted before epidural analgesia using a low concentration of bupivacaine during labour. Because of the clinical importance of the difference in the rate of FHR deterioration between the two groups, we continue to administer preload for high-risk cases.

  5. Paraspinal and Extensive Epidural Abscess: The Great Masqueraders of Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Chu, Andrew; Aung, Thu Thu; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Paraspinal and epidural abscesses are rare conditions often diagnosed later in the disease process that can have significant morbidity and mortality. Predisposing risk factors include diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and previous history of spinal surgery or injection. They can threaten the spinal cord by compressive effect, leading to sensory motor deficits and ultimately paralysis and death. Diagnosis may be a challenge due to the delayed presentation of nonspecific back pain or radicular pain such as chest pain or abdominal pain. We present a rare case on a patient with periumbilical pain, constipation, and urinary retention who was ultimately diagnosed with a paraspinal abscess extending into the epidural space from T1 to S2. He underwent decompressive laminectomy with incision and drainage of the abscesses. The patient made an excellent recovery postoperatively, and repeat magnetic resonance imaging at six weeks showed resolution of the abscess. PMID:26770847

  6. A Review of Current Analgesic Techniques in Cardiac Surgery. Is Epidural Worth it?

    PubMed Central

    Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Golzari, Samad EJ

    2014-01-01

    In this review we addressed the various analgesic techniques in cardiac surgery, especially regional methods such as thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA). There are many techniques available for management of postoperative pain after cardiac operation including intravenous administration of analgesic drugs, infiltration of local anesthetics, nerve blocks, and neuroaxial techniques. Although there are many evidences declaring the benefits of neuroaxial blockade in improving postoperative well-being and quality of care in these patients, some studies have revealed limited effect of TEA on overall morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. On the other hand, some investigators have raised the concern about epidural hematoma in altered coagulation and risks of infection and local anesthetics toxicity during and after cardiac procedures. In present review, we tried to discuss the most recent arguments in the field of this controversial issue. The final conclusion about either using regional anesthesia in cardiac surgery or not has been assigned to the readers. PMID:25320659

  7. Bilateral Traumatic Basal Ganglia Hemorrhage Associated With Epidural Hematoma: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; M. Rubiano, Andres; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic basal ganglia hematoma is a rare condition defined as presence of hemorrhagic lesions in basal ganglia or adjacent structures suchas internal capsule, putamen and thalamus. Bilateral basal ganglia hematoma are among the devastating and rare condition. We herein report a 28-year old man, a victim of car-car accident who was brought to our surgical emergency room by immediate loss of consciousness and was diagnosed to have hyperdense lesion in the basal ganglia bilaterally, with the presence of right parietal epidural hematoma. Craniotomy and epidural hematoma drainage were considered, associated to conservative management of gangliobasal traumatic contusions. On day 7 the patient had sudden neurologic deterioration, cardiac arrest unresponsive to resuscitation. Management of these lesions is similar to any other injury in moderate to severe traumatic injury. The use of intracranial pressure monitoring must be guaranteed. PMID:27162882

  8. Thoracic epidural analgesia to control malignant pain until viability in a pregnant patient

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Jaideep H; Gibson, Mary Elizabeth; Amaro-Driedger, David; Hussain, Mahammad N

    2016-01-01

    Management of nonobstetric pain in the pregnant patient presents unique challenges related to transplacental fetal exposure to opioids and the subsequent risk of neonatal withdrawal syndrome. We present the case of a pregnant patient suffering from the pain of a progressively enlarging thoracoabdominal sarcoma. Epidural analgesia (using local anesthetics with minimal opioid) was utilized over a span of weeks to manage oncologic pain, limiting fetal opioid exposure and culminating in the birth of a healthy infant. While nonobstetric abdominal pain during pregnancy is not that uncommon, neoplastic abdominal pain does appear to be rare. Combined local anesthetic and opioid continuous epidural infusion should be considered a viable option in the pain management approach to obstetric patients with nonobstetric pain associated with malignancy. PMID:27358573

  9. Paraspinal and Extensive Epidural Abscess: The Great Masqueraders of Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Andrew; Aung, Thu Thu; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Paraspinal and epidural abscesses are rare conditions often diagnosed later in the disease process that can have significant morbidity and mortality. Predisposing risk factors include diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and previous history of spinal surgery or injection. They can threaten the spinal cord by compressive effect, leading to sensory motor deficits and ultimately paralysis and death. Diagnosis may be a challenge due to the delayed presentation of nonspecific back pain or radicular pain such as chest pain or abdominal pain. We present a rare case on a patient with periumbilical pain, constipation, and urinary retention who was ultimately diagnosed with a paraspinal abscess extending into the epidural space from T1 to S2. He underwent decompressive laminectomy with incision and drainage of the abscesses. The patient made an excellent recovery postoperatively, and repeat magnetic resonance imaging at six weeks showed resolution of the abscess. PMID:26770847

  10. Randomized study of intravenous fluid preload before epidural analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Pirlet, M; Mills, M S; Tuckey, J P; Thomas, T A

    2000-08-01

    We performed a randomized controlled trial of the effect of intravenous fluid preload on maternal hypotension and fetal heart rate (FHR) changes in labour after the first epidural injection. Group 1 (49 women) received 1 litre of crystalloid preload. Group 2 (46 women) received no preload. No statistically significant difference was shown between the two groups for either of the outcomes. Hypotension was found in three women in group 1 and five in group 2 (P = 0.4). Deterioration in FHR pattern was found in four women in group 1 and 11 in group 2 (P = 0.08). This study has not shown a significant increase in the incidence of hypotension when intravenous preload is omitted before epidural analgesia using a low concentration of bupivacaine during labour. Because of the clinical importance of the difference in the rate of FHR deterioration between the two groups, we continue to administer preload for high-risk cases. PMID:10992845

  11. Solitary spinal epidural cavernous haemangiomas as a rare cause of myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Shamji, Mohammed F

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas rarely occur in the spinal epidural space. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who presented with myelopathy secondary to spinal cord compression from a purely epidural lesion. The imaging characteristics of cavernous haemangiomas are unique, reflecting a highly vascular lesion. Key differentiating features from intracranial or intramedullary lesions include the lack of a surrounding hemosiderin ring and popcorn appearance. An urgent referral to a neurosurgeon is recommended given the possibility of acute neurological deterioration from intralesional haemorrhage, and good recovery from early surgical resection. Preoperative planning with thorough patient counselling and availability of matched blood is important, and an en bloc resection approach should be taken to minimise blood loss. In this case, the patient experienced complete recovery after surgical resection. No recurrence after complete resection has been reported in the literature. This suggests a good long-term outcome for the patient and that no early adjuvant therapy is necessary. PMID:26409007

  12. Spinal Epidural Hematoma After Thrombolysis for Deep Vein Thrombosis with Subsequent Pulmonary Thromboembolism: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Young-Min Kwak, Ho-Sung; Jin, Gong-Young; Chung, Gyung-Ho; Song, Kyung-Jin

    2006-06-15

    A 38-year-old male was initially admitted for left leg swelling. He was diagnosed as having deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the left leg and a pulmonary thromboembolism by contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) with delayed lower extremity CT. The DVT was treated by thrombolysis and a venous stent. Four hours later, he complained of severe back pain and a sensation of separation of his body and lower extremities; he experienced paraplegia early in the morning of the following day. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a spinal epidural hematoma between T11 and L2, which decompressed following surgery. We, therefore, report a case of a spinal epidural hematoma after thrombolysis in a case of DVT with a pulmonary thromboembolism.

  13. [Cesarean Section Under Combined Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia for a Pregnant Woman with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Hyoda, Akira; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Matsunami, Sayuri; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-12-01

    We report the successful anesthetic management of a pregnant woman with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune hepatitis who underwent cesarean section. A 35 year-old pregnant woman with PBC was diagnosed with preterm rupture of membranes (PROM). Emergent cesarean section was scheduled. AST and ALT were elevated and she complained of itching due to PBC. Hydrocortisone 50 mg was intravenously administered. Spinal anesthesia was initiated with 2.4 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine hydrochloride and 10 µg fentanyl at L3-4; sensory loss (T2) was confirmed. Morphine was not included in spinal anesthesia to avoid worsening of the itching. Epidural anesthesia at T12-L1 was performed for postoperative pain control. Surgery proceeded uneventfully and postoperative pain control was satisfactory. Combined spinal and epidural anesthesia was beneficial for the perioperative management of a pregnant woman with PBC and autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:26790326

  14. Rupture of the retrocorporeal artery: a rare cause of spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Guédon, Alexis; Clarençon, Frédéric; Law-Ye, Bruno; Sourour, Nader; Gabrieli, Joseph; Rojas, Patricia; Chiras, Jacques; Peyre, Matthieu; Di Maria, Federico

    2016-06-01

    A 22-year-old man presented with a sudden backache and paraplegia (ASIA = B). Magnetic resonance imaging showed an anterior pan-spinal epidural haematoma. Digital subtraction angiography was performed and ruled out an underlying vascular malformation but showed an active contrast media leakage into the T-4 ventral epidural space with a pattern of pseudo-aneurysm. A rupture of a T-4 retrocorporeal artery was considered as the aetiology, possibly caused by a haemorrhagic sub-adventitial dissection. Treatment consisted in the embolisation of both the pseudo-aneurysm and the parent artery with liquid acrylic glue, followed by neurosurgical decompression in emergency. The patient had totally recovered (ASIA = E) by the 10-month clinical follow-up.

  15. Imaging the posterior mediastinum: a multimodality approach.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Mariaelena; Heidinger, Benedikt H; Franquet, Elisa; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Bankier, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    The posterior mediastinum contains several structures that can produce a wide variety of pathologic conditions. Descending thoracic aorta, esophagus, azygos and hemiazygos veins, thoracic duct, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, and nerves are all located in this anatomical region and can produce diverse abnormalities. Although chest radiography may detect many of these pathologic conditions, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are the imaging modalities of choice for further defining the relationship of posterior mediastinal lesions to neighboring structures and showing specific imaging features that narrow the differential diagnosis. This review emphasizes modality-related answers to morphologic questions, which provide precise diagnostic information. PMID:25993732

  16. Preformed posterior stainless steel crowns: an update.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P

    1999-02-01

    For almost 50 years, dentists have used stainless steel crowns for primary and permanent posterior teeth. No other type of restoration offers the convenience, low cost, durability, and reliability of such crowns when interim full-coronal coverage is required. Preformed stainless steel crowns have improved over the years. Better luting cements have been developed and different methods of crown manipulation have evolved. This article reviews stainless steel crown procedures for primary and permanent posterior teeth. Step-by-step placement of a primary molar stainless steel crown is documented and permanent molar stainless steel crown restoration is described. A method for repairing a worn-through crown also is reviewed.

  17. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes.

  18. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes. PMID:27599438

  19. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Duvekot, J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, J. W.; Gonzalez Candel, A.; van der Marel, C. D.; Adriaens, V. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour. PMID:27668095

  20. A comparison of thoracic or lumbar patient-controlled epidural analgesia methods after thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to compare patient-controlled thoracic or lumbar epidural analgesia methods after thoracotomy operations. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were prospectively randomized to receive either thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA group) or lumbar epidural analgesia (LEA group). In both groups, epidural catheters were administered. Hemodynamic measurements, visual analog scale scores at rest (VAS-R) and after coughing (VAS-C), analgesic consumption, and side effects were compared at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours postoperatively. Results The VAS-R and VAS-C values were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group at 2, 4, 8, and 16 hours after surgery (for VAS-R, P = 0.001, P = 0.01, P = 0.008, and P = 0.029, respectively; and for VAS-C, P = 0.035, P = 0.023, P = 0.002, and P = 0.037, respectively). Total 24-hour analgesic consumption was different between groups (175 +/- 20 mL versus 185 +/- 31 mL; P = 0.034). The comparison of postoperative complications revealed that the incidence of hypotension (21/57, 36.8% versus 8/63, 12.7%; P = 0.002), bradycardia (9/57, 15.8% versus 2/63, 3.2%; P = 0.017), atelectasis (1/57, 1.8% versus 7/63, 11.1%; P = 0.04), and the need for intensive care unit (ICU) treatment (0/57, 0% versus 5/63, 7.9%; P = 0.03) were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group. Conclusions TEA has beneficial hemostatic effects in comparison to LEA after thoracotomies along with more satisfactory pain relief profile. PMID:24885545

  1. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumours with the Patient Under Thoracic Epidural Anaesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pouliquen, Cassiopee; Kabbani, Youssef Saignac, Pierre; Gekiere, Jean-Pierre; Palussiere, Jean

    2011-02-15

    Radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours is a curative technique that is newly considered being offered to nonsurgical patients. It is of major interest because it enables local destruction of the tumour without surgery and spares healthy parenchyma. However, some patients have previous serious respiratory failure, thus ruling out mechanical ventilation. To operate with the patient under thoracic epidural is an answer to this problem. Our experience shows that the procedure is able to be performed completely without converting to general anaesthesia.

  2. Epidural insertion simulator of higher insertion resistance & drop rate after puncture.

    PubMed

    Naemura, K; Sakai, A; Hayashi, T; Saito, H

    2008-01-01

    Accidents such as dural puncture remain one of the problems of epidural anesthesia, and unskilled doctors can repeat such accidents. The purpose of the current research was to provide a new simulator for epidural insertion training. No reference data regarding the resistance force used when inserting a needle into patients have been reported. A comparative study was conducted to aid in the development of a new simulator. Pork loin (n=5) were employed as a substitute for patients. Thickness was set at 2 cm so as to improve the reproducibility. The authors took the conventional simulator apart, and picked a block as an analogue of muscle and ligamentum flavum. A new simulator was made of a melamine foam resin block and a latex rubber sheet. An epidural needle fixed on a motorized stage was inserted at the speed of 2 mm per second. The reaction force was measured while the needle was inserted into each specimen. Waveform of the pork loin exhibited two slopes of different inclines up to peaks and then falls after puncture. The conventional simulator showed a simple increase up to peak and a slow fall after puncture. In contrast, the new simulator showed two slopes up to peak and then a sudden fall after puncture. The insertion resistances were 2.5 N/s for the porcine, 0.8 N/s for the conventional and 2.1 N/s for the new simulator. The drop rates were 5 N/s for the porcine, 0.6 N/s for the conventional and 24 N/s for the new simulator. The higher insertion resistance and drop rate for the new simulator than the conventional simulator will be suitable for epidural insertion training.

  3. Fentanyl versus tramadol with levobupivacaine for combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Sharma, Sujata; Kumari, Pratibha; Sudha; Bali, Kusum

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neuraxial labor analgesia using new local anesthetics such as levobupivacaine has become very popular by virtue of the safety and lesser motor blockade caused by these agents. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) has become the preferred method for labor analgesia as it combines benefits of both spinal analgesia and flexibility of the epidural catheter. Adding opioids to local anesthetic drugs provide rapid onset and prolonged analgesia but may be associated with several maternal and fetal adverse effects. The purpose of this study is to compare fentanyl and tramadol used in CSEA in terms of duration of analgesia and frequency of the adverse fetomaternal outcome. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 primiparas with a singleton pregnancy in active labor were given CSEA after randomly allocating them in two groups of 30 each. Group I received intrathecal 2.5 mg levobupivacaine + 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top ups of 20 ml 0.125% solution of the same combination. Group II received 25 mg tramadol instead of fentanyl. Epidural top ups were given when parturient complained of two painful contractions (visual analogue scale ≥ 4). Data collected were demographic profile of the patients, analgesic qualities, side- effects and the fetomaternal outcome. Results: Patients in Group II had significantly prolonged analgesia (145 ± 9 minutes) than in Group I (95 ± 7 minutes). Patients receiving fentanyl showed rapid onset of analgesia, but there were more incidence of side-effects like shivering, pruritus, transient fetal bradycardia, hypotension, nausea and vomiting. Only side-effect in the tramadol group was nausea and vomiting. During labor, maternal satisfaction was excellent. Conclusions: Adding tramadol to local anesthetic provides prolonged analgesia with minimal side effects. Fentanyl, when used as adjuvant to local anesthetic, has a rapid onset of analgesia but has certain fetomaternal side-effects. PMID:26240543

  4. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Duvekot, J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, J. W.; Gonzalez Candel, A.; van der Marel, C. D.; Adriaens, V. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour.

  5. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation.

    PubMed

    van der Knijff-van Dortmont, A L M J; Dirckx, M; Duvekot, J J; Roos-Hesselink, J W; Gonzalez Candel, A; van der Marel, C D; Scoones, G P; Adriaens, V F R; Dons-Sinke, I J J

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour. PMID:27668095

  6. Evaluation of optimal electrode configurations for epidural spinal cord stimulation in cervical spinal cord injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Monzurul; Garcia-Alias, Guillermo; Shah, Prithvi K.; Gerasimenko, Yury; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidural spinal cord stimulation is a promising technique for modulating the level of excitability and reactivation of dormant spinal neuronal circuits after spinal cord injury (SCI). We examined the ability of chronically implanted epidural stimulation electrodes within the cervical spinal cord to (1) directly elicit spinal motor evoked potentials (sMEPs) in forelimb muscles and (2) determine whether these sMEPs can serve as a biomarker of forelimb motor function after SCI. New method We implanted EMG electrodes in forelimb muscles and epidural stimulation electrodes at C6 and C8 in adult rats. After recovering from a dorsal funiculi crush (C4), rats were tested with different stimulation configurations and current intensities to elicit sMEPs and determined forelimb grip strength. Results: sMEPs were evoked in all muscles tested and their characteristics were dependent on electrode configurations and current intensities. C6(−) stimulation elicited more robust sMEPs than stimulation at C8(−). Stimulating C6 and C8 simultaneously produced better muscle recruitment and higher grip strengths than stimulation at one site. Comparison with existing method(s) Classical method to select the most optimal stimulation configuration is to empirically test each combination individually for every subject and relate to functional improvements. This approach is impractical, requiring extensively long experimental time to determine the more effective stimulation parameters. Our proposed method is fast and physiologically sound. Conclusions Results suggest that sMEPs from forelimb muscles can be useful biomarkers for identifying optimal parameters for epidural stimulation of the cervical spinal cord after SCI. PMID:25791014

  7. Gallium-67 scintigraphy as an aid in the detection of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Klein, M; Ahn, C S; Drum, D E; Tow, D E

    1994-09-01

    Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is considered the study of choice for diagnosing spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Most of such cases, however, are not suspected initially, and thus do not benefit from the procedure. A case of SEA is described in which positive Ga-67 scintigraphy shortly before onset of lower extremity dysfunction was instrumental in obtaining an emergency gadolinium-enhanced MRI and establishing the diagnosis.

  8. [The characteristics of epidural analgesia during the removal of lumbar intervertebral disk hernias].

    PubMed

    Arestov, O G; Solenkova, A V; Lubnin, A Iu; Shevelev, I N; Konovalov, N A

    2000-01-01

    Epidural analgesia (EA) was used in 29 patients undergoing surgical removal of lumbar discal hernia. Marcain EA with controlled medicinal sleep and non-assisted breathing allowed to perform the whole operation in 27 patients. EA may be ineffective in combination of sequestrated disk hernia with scarry adhesive process. The technique of the operation demands a single use of the anesthetic drug which is potent enough to make blockade throughout the operation up to the end. PMID:10738758

  9. Iatrogenic Cushing Syndrome Secondary to Ritonavir-Epidural Triamcinolone Interaction: An Illustrative Case and Review

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Melody L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV positive patients on ritonavir-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) can develop iatrogenic Cushing syndrome (IACS) and adrenal insufficiency as a result of drug-drug interactions with inhaled or intranasal glucocorticoid therapy. Reports related to epidural triamcinolone injections are relatively uncommon but increasingly reported. We describe a 48-year-old woman with immunologically and virologically well-controlled HIV on ritonavir-based ART, who developed headache, dizziness, and candida and herpes simplex virus (HSV) ulcerative esophagitis 7 days after receiving an epidural triamcinolone injection for cervical radicular pain. Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome and relative adrenal insufficiency were suspected and proven. The patient's ART was changed to a non-HIV protease inhibitor- (PI-) containing program, her symptoms improved, and she did not require hydrocortisone replacement. In this paper, we review the literature on IACS and relative secondary adrenal insufficiency from epidural triamcinolone injections in HIV patients on ritonavir-containing ART regimens. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed for diagnosis. Prevention of drug-drug interactions by taking a thorough medication history for patients on ritonavir-containing ART regimens before prescribing any form of corticosteroid is crucial and effective and sustained interdisciplinary communication in the care of such patients. PMID:24895495

  10. Anesthetic management of a patient with multiple sclerosis undergoing cesarean section with low dose epidural bupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sameer; Kapil, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old Indian female 38 weeks pregnant, with a history of multiple sclerosis since 2008 was admitted in obstetric ward for safe confinement. She had a history of diminution of vision in both eyes and limb weakness, relapsing – remitting type with movement-induced muscle spasms, in all the four limbs. Her symptoms were usually diplopia, difficulty in vision and ataxic gait. Sh was then treated with methylprednisolone. She was on oral dimethyl fumarate trial, which was stopped at the beginning of pregnancy. Presently, she was completely asymptomatic. Epidural anesthesia with an indwelling catheter was administered with 15 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine in 5 ml increments. A total of 3 mg of epidural morphine was given for post-operative analgesia. The surgery evolved without any intercurrences and patient was discharged from the hospital 72 h after surgery without worsening of her symptoms. We report a safe anesthetic management of a patient with MS undergoing cesarean section with low dose epidural bupivacaine with the addition of morphine for post-operative analgesia. PMID:25191198

  11. Ibuprofen-conjugated hyaluronate/polygalacturonic acid hydrogel for the prevention of epidural fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Yi; Peng, Hsiu-Hui; Chen, Mei-Hsiu; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Chang, Chih-Ju; Liu, Tse-Ying; Chen, Ming-Hong

    2016-05-01

    The formation of fibrous tissue is part of the natural healing response following a laminectomy. Severe scar tissue adhesion, known as epidural fibrosis, is a common cause of failed back surgery syndrome. In this study, by combining the advantages of drug treatment with a physical barrier, an ibuprofen-conjugated crosslinkable polygalacturonic acid and hyaluronic acid hydrogel was developed for epidural fibrosis prevention. Conjugation was confirmed and measured by 1D(1)H NMR spectroscopy.In vitroanalysis showed that the ibuprofen-conjugated polygalacturonic acid-hyaluronic acid hydrogel showed low cytotoxicity. In addition, the conjugated ibuprofen decreased prostaglandin E2production of the lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 cells. Histological data inin vivostudies indicated that the scar tissue adhesion of laminectomized male adult rats was reduced by the application of our ibuprofen-conjugated polygalacturonic acid-hyaluronic acid hydrogel. Its use also reduced the population of giant cells and collagen deposition of scar tissue without inducing extensive cell recruitment. The results of this study therefore suggest that the local delivery of ibuprofenviaa polygalacturonic acid-hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel reduces the possibility of epidural fibrosis.

  12. Epidural anesthesia and analgesia in the neonate: a review of current evidences.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Souvik; Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Pawar, Dilip K; Arora, Mahesh Kumar; Khanna, Puneet

    2014-10-01

    The role of single shot spinal anesthesia has been established in ex-premature infants at risk of apnea. However, use of epidural anesthesia in neonates is on the rise. In this systematic analysis, we have reviewed the current evidence on the safety and efficacy of the use of single shot and continuous epidural anesthesia/analgesia in neonates. Current clinical practice is guided by evidence based mostly on non-randomized studies, prospective/retrospective case series and surveys. Single shot caudal blockade as a sole technique has been used in neonates mainly for inguinal hernia repair and circumcision. Use of continuous epidural anesthesia through the caudal route or caudo-thoracic advancement of the catheter for major thoracic and abdominal surgery offers good perioperative analgesia. Other observed benefits are early extubation, attenuation of stress response, early return of bowel function and reduction of general anesthesia-related postoperative complications. However, risk of procedure-related and drug-related complications to the developing neural structure remains a serious concern.

  13. Neuroprotective effect of epidural hypothermia after spinal cord lesion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Marcello Oliveira; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo; Ferreira, Ricardo; Marcon, Raphael Martus; de Barros Filho, Tarcisio Eloy Pessoa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES : To evaluate the neuroprotective effect of epidural hypothermia in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord lesion. METHODS: Wistar rats (n = 30) weighing 320-360 g were randomized to two groups (hypothermia and control) of 15 rats per group. A spinal cord lesion was induced by the standardized drop of a 10-g weight from a height of 2.5 cm, using the New York University Impactor, after laminectomy at the T9-10 level. Rats in the hypothermia group underwent epidural hypothermia for 20 minutes immediately after spinal cord injury. Motor function was assessed for six weeks using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan motor scores and the inclined plane test. At the end of the final week, the rats' neurological status was monitored by the motor evoked potential test and the results for the two groups were compared. RESULTS: Analysis of the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores obtained during the six-week period indicated that there were no significant differences between the two groups. There was no significant difference between the groups in the inclined plane test scores during the six-week period. Furthermore, at the end of the study, the latency and amplitude values of the motor evoked potential test were not significantly different between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Hypothermia did not produce a neuroprotective effect when applied at the injury level and in the epidural space immediately after induction of a spinal cord contusion in Wistar rats. PMID:25141116

  14. Bilateral interpleural versus lumbar epidural bupivacaine-morphine analgesia for upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Demian, Atef D; Wahba, Ashraf M; Atia, Emad M; Hussein, Sami H

    2003-10-01

    This randomized study was designed to compare the effectiveness of bilateral interpleural analgesia with lumbar epidural analgesia, on postoperative pain relief in upper abdominal surgery. The studied patients were randomely allocated into either interpleural group "IP" (n = 15) or epidural group "EP" (n = 15). In "IP" group, preanesthetic bilateral interpleural block was done using a mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (0.8 mg/kg) and 2 mg morphine diluted to 50 ml saline for each side. In "EP" group, the same mixture-diluted in 20 ml saline-was injected in the epidural space (L2-3). The general anesthetic technique was the same in both groups. Hemodynamic, gasometric, verbal pain score (VPS) values and complications were compared in both techniques. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) readings were in the accepted normal range in the perioperative period although significant lower readings were detected in "EP" group. No significant differences were displayed in blood gasometric variables between the two groups. There were considerable level of analgesia in both groups in the postoperative period although "EP" analgesia was superior to "IP". More pain free patients (9 versus 4) and significant lower consumption of nalbuphine were detected in "EP" group. The results of this study indicate that bilateral "IP" analgesia may offer a satisfactory analgesia for upper abdominal surgery when the use of other analgesic techniques may be contraindicated.

  15. Decoding of motor intentions from epidural ECoG recordings in severely paralyzed chronic stroke patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spüler, M.; Walter, A.; Ramos-Murguialday, A.; Naros, G.; Birbaumer, N.; Gharabaghi, A.; Rosenstiel, W.; Bogdan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Recently, there have been several approaches to utilize a brain-computer interface (BCI) for rehabilitation with stroke patients or as an assistive device for the paralyzed. In this study we investigated whether up to seven different hand movement intentions can be decoded from epidural electrocorticography (ECoG) in chronic stroke patients. Approach. In a screening session we recorded epidural ECoG data over the ipsilesional motor cortex from four chronic stroke patients who had no residual hand movement. Data was analyzed offline using a support vector machine (SVM) to decode different movement intentions. Main results. We showed that up to seven hand movement intentions can be decoded with an average accuracy of 61% (chance level 15.6%). When reducing the number of classes, average accuracies up to 88% can be achieved for decoding three different movement intentions. Significance. The findings suggest that ipsilesional epidural ECoG can be used as a viable control signal for BCI-driven neuroprosthesis. Although patients showed no sign of residual hand movement, brain activity at the ipsilesional motor cortex still shows enough intention-related activity to decode different movement intentions with sufficient accuracy.

  16. Bilateral interpleural versus lumbar epidural bupivacaine-morphine analgesia for upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Demian, Atef D; Wahba, Ashraf M; Atia, Emad M; Hussein, Sami H

    2003-10-01

    This randomized study was designed to compare the effectiveness of bilateral interpleural analgesia with lumbar epidural analgesia, on postoperative pain relief in upper abdominal surgery. The studied patients were randomely allocated into either interpleural group "IP" (n = 15) or epidural group "EP" (n = 15). In "IP" group, preanesthetic bilateral interpleural block was done using a mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (0.8 mg/kg) and 2 mg morphine diluted to 50 ml saline for each side. In "EP" group, the same mixture-diluted in 20 ml saline-was injected in the epidural space (L2-3). The general anesthetic technique was the same in both groups. Hemodynamic, gasometric, verbal pain score (VPS) values and complications were compared in both techniques. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) readings were in the accepted normal range in the perioperative period although significant lower readings were detected in "EP" group. No significant differences were displayed in blood gasometric variables between the two groups. There were considerable level of analgesia in both groups in the postoperative period although "EP" analgesia was superior to "IP". More pain free patients (9 versus 4) and significant lower consumption of nalbuphine were detected in "EP" group. The results of this study indicate that bilateral "IP" analgesia may offer a satisfactory analgesia for upper abdominal surgery when the use of other analgesic techniques may be contraindicated. PMID:14740589

  17. Spinal epidural neurostimulation for treatment of acute and chronic intractable pain: initial and long term results.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R R; Siqueira, E B; Cerullo, L J

    1979-09-01

    Spinal epidural neurostimulation, which evolved from dorsal column stimulation, has been found to be effective in the treatment of acute and chronic intractable pain. Urban and Hashold have shown that it is a safe, simplified alternative to dorsal column stimulation, especially because laminectomy is not required if the electrodes are inserted percutaneously. Percutaneous epidural neurostimulation is also advantageous because there can be a diagnostic trial period before permanent internalization and implantation. This diagnostic and therapeutic modality has been used in 36 patients during the past 3 years at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Eleven of these patients had acute intractable pain, which was defined as pain of less than 1 year in duration. Initial postimplantation results from the 36 patients indicate that spinal epidural neurostimulation is most effective in treating the intractable pain of diabetes, arachnoiditis, and post-traumatic and postamputation neuroma. Long term follow-up, varying from 1 year to 3 years postimplantation in the 20 initially responding patients, indicates that the neurostimulation continues to provide significant pain relief (50% or greater) in a majority of the patients who experienced initial significant pain relief.

  18. [Temperature changes and thermoregulatory responses during epidural anesthesia in women undergoing cesarean delivery].

    PubMed

    Negishi, C; Ozaki, M; Suzuki, H; Ohno, T

    1996-05-01

    Eleven healthy pregnant women were studied to determine temperature changes after induction of epidural anesthesia during cesarean delivery. Epidural anesthesia was induced by 2% lidocaine 15-20 ml (T 5 level) at 25 degrees C ambient temperature. Tympanic membrane and skin surface temperature, skin-temperature gradients (forearm-fingerchip, calf-toe), thermal perception (1-10 scale VAS) and the presence or absence of shivering were measured. Sixty minutes after induction, tympanic temperature decreased for 0.52 +/- 0.26 degrees C and average skin temperature increased for 0.56 +/- 0.17 degrees C. Central hypothermia and shivering did not produce a cold sensation. Temperature gradients of upper limb increased to 2.0 +/- 3.7 degrees C (50 minutes after induction) and the lower limbs decreased to -1.4 +/- 0.55 degrees C (30 minutes after induction). Shivering occurred in 3 patients. We conclude that epidural anesthesia impaired thermoregulatory control and induced redistribution hypothermia as in nonpregnant individuals.

  19. The Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Lumbar Epidural Injection for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Maseeh, Sadik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Failed back surgery syndrome is a chronic pain condition requiring rapid, effective, and efficient management. This study evaluates the effect of adding dexmedetomidine to lumbar epidural steroids in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Methods. Fifty patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were randomly assigned to one of two groups, receiving an epidural injection of 20 mL of either a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg) and bupivacaine 0.5 mg (group C) or a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg), bupivacaine 0.5 mg, and dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg) (group D) adjusted to the volume with normal saline. The effect was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), analgesic requirement, and Oswestry disability index 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after injection. Results. VAS and ibuprofen consumption showed a significant reduction in group D. The Oswestry disability index was significantly improved in group D. There were no records of hypotension, bradycardia, sedation, or hypoxemia in both groups. Conclusion. The present study demonstrated potential safe and effective usage of adding dexmedetomidine to epidural steroid to control pain in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. PMID:27630712

  20. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Abigail N.; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach. Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results. Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2-5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance. We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function.

  1. Insidious Onset of Tetraparesis due to Cervical Epidural Abscess from Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Soultanis, Konstantinos Chr; Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Starantzis, Konstantinos A; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of cervical epidural abscess from Enterococcus faecalis, which caused an insidious onset of tetraparesis. This 53-year-old female with a history of diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure under hemodialysis presented with pain and progressive weakness of upper and lower extremities without fever. Although a recent MRI she did at the beginning of symptoms showed no significant pathologies, except for a cervical disc herniation and adjacent spinal degeneration, and stenosis that confused the diagnostic procedure, newer imaging with CT and MRI, which was performed due to progression of tetraparesis, revealed the formation of a cervical epidural abscess. Surgical drainage was done after a complete infection workup. The patient showed immediate neurological improvement after surgery. She received antibiotics intravenously for 3 weeks and orally for another 6 weeks. The patient was free from complications 24 months after surgery. A high index of suspicion is most important in making a rapid and correct diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess. The classic clinical triad (fever, local pain, and neurologic deficits) is not sensitive enough for early detection. Continuous clinical, laboratory, and imaging monitoring are of paramount importance. Early diagnosis and surgical intervention could optimize the final functional outcome. PMID:23573096

  2. Consent for labour epidural analgesia: an observational study in a single institution.

    PubMed

    Trumble, J; Lee, J; Slater, P M; Sellors, J; Cyna, A M

    2015-05-01

    There is a wide range of practice amongst obstetric anaesthetists when obtaining consent for women requesting labour epidural analgesia. This is the first prospective observational study recording the number and types of risks mentioned and whether the risk was quantified. Statements of benefits and alternatives to the procedure were also noted. Fourteen anaesthetists, each consulting a single patient, were recorded during the process of obtaining consent and inserting the epidural. The most commonly mentioned risks (median 7) were headache/dural puncture, failure/difficulty with insertion, nerve damage, bleeding/haematoma and infection/epidural abscess. There was no difference between consultants and trainees, although consultants showed greater variance. It was uncommon for anaesthetists to state a benefit (21%) or mention an alternative option (21%), but there was usually a quantitative statement of risk (71%). Data showed a deviation from the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists guidelines and these findings may encourage anaesthetists to reflect on their own practice and guide future research.

  3. Spontaneously Resolved Recurrent Cervical Epidural Hematoma in a 37-Week Primigravida.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Deguchi, Masao; Hirata, Hitoshi; Kanamono, Toshihisa

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To describe a patient with a recurrent spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) during pregnancy that had spontaneous remission. Methods A 27-year-old primigravida at 37 weeks' gestation suddenly felt a strong left shoulder pain without any trauma. She had a history of fenestration for a spontaneous cervical hematoma when she was 18 years old. An emergency magnetic resonance imaging revealed a recurrence of the cervical epidural hematoma at the C4-T1 level, but she had no paralysis. Results The patient subsequently underwent a cesarean section and delivered a healthy male infant. Her spinal epidural hematoma disappeared. Multislice computed tomography showed no evidence for a vascular malformation or tumor. Three years after the initial cesarean section, she underwent a second one and delivered another male infant. Conclusions We report on a rare case of recurrent SSEH during pregnancy with no neurologic deficits that was treated nonoperatively with close observation and resulted in spontaneous resolution. In such patients with no neurologic deficits, nonoperative management with close observation may be a reasonable alternative. PMID:26430600

  4. [Treatment with desmopressin before epidural anesthesia in a patient with type I von Willebrand disease].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Barrero, P; Gil, L; Martínez, C; Bueno, A B; Casado, A I; Oro, J

    2003-12-01

    A 33-year-old primipara with von Willebrand disease type I was admitted in labor at 37 weeks, requesting epidural analgesia. The consultant hematologist advised treating with desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) before inserting an epidural catheter. Desmopressin at a dose of 0.3 microgram/Kg was administered intravenously and the catheter was inserted to L3-L4 to infuse 0.1% bupivacaine with 2 micrograms/mL of fentanyl at a rate of 12 mL/h. Four hours later the patient was brought to the operating room for forceps delivery of a healthy boy. One hour later, she had recovered normal motor tone followed by normal sensitivity in the lower extremities. The catheter was then withdrawn with no signs of bleeding. A woman with von Willebrand's disease can receive an epidural block for analgesia during childbirth. The decision to perform the block should be individualized, based on coagulation tests. DDAVP may play a role in improving hemostasis.

  5. The Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Lumbar Epidural Injection for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eskandr, Ashraf; Abdel Maseeh, Sadik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Failed back surgery syndrome is a chronic pain condition requiring rapid, effective, and efficient management. This study evaluates the effect of adding dexmedetomidine to lumbar epidural steroids in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Methods. Fifty patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were randomly assigned to one of two groups, receiving an epidural injection of 20 mL of either a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg) and bupivacaine 0.5 mg (group C) or a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg), bupivacaine 0.5 mg, and dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg) (group D) adjusted to the volume with normal saline. The effect was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), analgesic requirement, and Oswestry disability index 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after injection. Results. VAS and ibuprofen consumption showed a significant reduction in group D. The Oswestry disability index was significantly improved in group D. There were no records of hypotension, bradycardia, sedation, or hypoxemia in both groups. Conclusion. The present study demonstrated potential safe and effective usage of adding dexmedetomidine to epidural steroid to control pain in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. PMID:27630712

  6. The Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Lumbar Epidural Injection for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Maseeh, Sadik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Failed back surgery syndrome is a chronic pain condition requiring rapid, effective, and efficient management. This study evaluates the effect of adding dexmedetomidine to lumbar epidural steroids in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Methods. Fifty patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were randomly assigned to one of two groups, receiving an epidural injection of 20 mL of either a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg) and bupivacaine 0.5 mg (group C) or a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg), bupivacaine 0.5 mg, and dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg) (group D) adjusted to the volume with normal saline. The effect was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), analgesic requirement, and Oswestry disability index 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after injection. Results. VAS and ibuprofen consumption showed a significant reduction in group D. The Oswestry disability index was significantly improved in group D. There were no records of hypotension, bradycardia, sedation, or hypoxemia in both groups. Conclusion. The present study demonstrated potential safe and effective usage of adding dexmedetomidine to epidural steroid to control pain in patients with failed back surgery syndrome.

  7. Comparison of ultrasound imaging in transverse median and parasagittal oblique planes for thoracic epidurals: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Khemka, Rakhi; Rastogi, Sonal; Desai, Neha; Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Sinha, Subir

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The use of ultrasound (US) scanning to assess the depth of epidural space to prevent neurological complications is established in current practice. In this study, we hypothesised that pre-puncture US scanning for estimating the depth of epidural space for thoracic epidurals is comparable between transverse median (TM) and paramedian sagittal oblique (PSO) planes. Methods: We performed pre-puncture US scanning in 32 patients, posted for open abdominal surgeries. The imaging was done to detect the depth of epidural space from skin (ultrasound depth [UD]) and needle insertion point, in parasagittal oblique plane in PSO group and transverse median plane in TM group. Subsequently, epidural space was localised through the predetermined insertion point by ‘loss of resistance’ technique and needle depth (ND) to the epidural space was marked. Correlation between the UD and actual ND was calculated and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) was used to determine the degree of agreement between UD and ND in both the planes. Results: The primary outcome, i.e., the comparison between UD and ND, done using Pearson correlation coefficient, was 0.99 in both PSO and TM groups, and the CCC was 0.93 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.81–0.97) and 0.90 (95% CI: 0.74–0.96) in PSO and TM groups respectively, which shows a strong positive association between UD and ND in both groups. Conclusion: The use of pre-puncture US scanning in both PSO and TM planes for estimating the depth of epidural space at the level of mid- and lower-thoracic spine is comparable. PMID:27330197

  8. [Posterior longitudinal ligament ossification: case report].

    PubMed

    Tella, Oswaldo Inácio de; Herculano, Marco Antonio; Paiva Neto, Manoel Antonio; Faedo Neto, Atílio; Crosera, João Francisco

    2006-03-01

    Posterior longitudinal ligament ossification of cervical spine is a rare condition among caucasians. A 42 years old japanese patient with progressive walking difficulty was diagnosed with this pathology by CT scan and MRI and treated surgically by an anterior approach with arthrodesis. Pathophysiology, racial prevalence, clinical picture, radiological characteristics and surgical approaches options are revised.

  9. Posterior Probabilities for a Consensus Ordering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fligner, Michael A.; Verducci, Joseph S.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of consensus ordering is defined, and formulas for exact and approximate posterior probabilities for consensus ordering are developed under the assumption of a generalized Mallows' model with a diffuse conjugate prior. These methods are applied to a data set concerning 98 college students. (SLD)

  10. Posterior predictive Bayesian phylogenetic model selection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul O; Xie, Wangang; Chen, Ming-Hui; Fan, Yu; Kuo, Lynn

    2014-05-01

    We present two distinctly different posterior predictive approaches to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection and illustrate these methods using examples from green algal protein-coding cpDNA sequences and flowering plant rDNA sequences. The Gelfand-Ghosh (GG) approach allows dissection of an overall measure of model fit into components due to posterior predictive variance (GGp) and goodness-of-fit (GGg), which distinguishes this method from the posterior predictive P-value approach. The conditional predictive ordinate (CPO) method provides a site-specific measure of model fit useful for exploratory analyses and can be combined over sites yielding the log pseudomarginal likelihood (LPML) which is useful as an overall measure of model fit. CPO provides a useful cross-validation approach that is computationally efficient, requiring only a sample from the posterior distribution (no additional simulation is required). Both GG and CPO add new perspectives to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection based on the predictive abilities of models and complement the perspective provided by the marginal likelihood (including Bayes Factor comparisons) based solely on the fit of competing models to observed data. PMID:24193892

  11. A Complication of Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ankit; Charles, Loren; Ritchie, James

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of tibial nerve impingement by an anteroposterior screw inserted for stabilization of a posterior malleolar fracture. This specific complication has not previously been described in published studies, although numerous reports have described various forms of peripheral nerve entrapment. We discuss the merits of fixation of these fractures using a posterolateral approach.

  12. Posterior instability caused by batter's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kang, Richard W; Mahony, Gregory T; Harris, Thomas C; Dines, Joshua S

    2013-10-01

    In summary, batter’s shoulder is a rare and only recently recognized entity. This condition is posterior shoulder instability caused by a missed attempt at hitting a pitch, especially with an outside pitch. The lack of counterforce from hitting a ball produces increased forces imparted on the posterior capsulolabral complex of the lead shoulder during batting. If the player fails conservative management, she or he can undergo an arthroscopic posterior labral repair instead of debridement. After treatment, the player can expect to return to play after approximately 6 to 7 months. Initial results from a small, retrospective series demonstrate greater than 90% excellent results. These findings are similar to current literature for arthroscopic treatment of posterior instability, which reports success rates that range from 75% to 91%. Longer-term follow-up will be needed to determine the natural history and prognosis or batter’s shoulder. Based on initial results, the authors predict good to excellent results for most players with batter’s shoulder who undergo proper treatment. Additionally, with the exception of switch hitters, the nonthrowing arm is affected. This can also improve the athlete’s return to play.

  13. Posterior instability caused by batter's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kang, Richard W; Mahony, Gregory T; Harris, Thomas C; Dines, Joshua S

    2013-10-01

    In summary, batter’s shoulder is a rare and only recently recognized entity. This condition is posterior shoulder instability caused by a missed attempt at hitting a pitch, especially with an outside pitch. The lack of counterforce from hitting a ball produces increased forces imparted on the posterior capsulolabral complex of the lead shoulder during batting. If the player fails conservative management, she or he can undergo an arthroscopic posterior labral repair instead of debridement. After treatment, the player can expect to return to play after approximately 6 to 7 months. Initial results from a small, retrospective series demonstrate greater than 90% excellent results. These findings are similar to current literature for arthroscopic treatment of posterior instability, which reports success rates that range from 75% to 91%. Longer-term follow-up will be needed to determine the natural history and prognosis or batter’s shoulder. Based on initial results, the authors predict good to excellent results for most players with batter’s shoulder who undergo proper treatment. Additionally, with the exception of switch hitters, the nonthrowing arm is affected. This can also improve the athlete’s return to play. PMID:24079435

  14. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  15. Post extubation negative pressure pulmonary edema due to posterior mediastinal cyst in an infant.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Prakash Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A 3-month-old male child underwent uneventful inguinal herniotomy under general anesthesia. After extubation, airway obstruction followed by pulmonary edema appeared for which the baby was reintubated and ventilated. The baby made a complete recovery and extubated after about 2 h. A post-operative computed tomography scan revealed a posterior mediastinal cystic mass abutting the tracheal bifurcation. Presumably, extrinsic compression by the mass on the tracheal bifurcation led to the development of negative pressure pulmonary edema.

  16. Comparison Between the Use of Ropivacaine Alone and Ropivacaine With Sufentanil in Epidural Labor Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Xu, Shiqin; Qin, Xiang; Li, Xiaohong; Feng, Shan-Wu; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Shen, Xiaofeng; Wang, Fuzhou

    2015-10-01

    To compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of the sole local anesthetic ropivacaine with the combination of both local anesthetic ropivacaine and opioidergic analgesic sufentanil given epidurally on the labor pain control.After institutional review board approval and patient consent, a total of 500 nulliparas requesting epidural labor analgesia were enrolled and 481 eventually were randomized into 2 groups: a sole local anesthetic group (ropivacaine 0.125%) and a combination of local anesthetic and opioidergic analgesic group (0.125% ropivacaine + 0.3 μg/mL sufentanil). After the test dose, a 10-mL epidural analgesic solution was given in a single bolus, followed by intermittent bolus injection of 10 to 15 mL of the solution. The primary outcome was the analgesic efficacy measured using Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) of pain. Other maternal and infant variables were evaluated as secondary outcomes.A total of 346 participants completed the study. The median NRS pain score during the 1st stage of labor was significantly lower in the combination group 2.2 (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.8-2.7) comparing to the sole local analgesic group 2.4 (IQR: 2.0-2.8) (P < 0.0001). No significant difference was observed in NRS pain score prior epidural analgesia and during the 2nd stage of labor. Patients in both groups rated same satisfaction of analgesia. Patients in the sole local analgesic group experienced fewer side effects than those in the combination group (37.7% vs 47.2%, P = 0.082). The individual analgesia-related cost in the sole local analgesic group was less ($5.7 ± 2.06) than that in the combination group ($9.76 ± 3.54) (P < 0.0001). The incidence of 1-minute Apgar ≤ 7 was lower in the sole local analgesic group 2 (1.2%) than the combination group 10 (5.5%) (P = 0.038). No difference was found between other secondary outcomes.The sole local anesthetic ropivacaine produces a comparable labor analgesic effect as the combination of

  17. Postoperative epidural analgesia for patients undergoing pectus excavatum corrective surgery: a 10-year retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Asad; Tse, Andrew; Paul, James E; Fitzgerald, Peter; Teh, Bernice

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Managing postoperative pain in patients undergoing minimally invasive pectus excavatum repair (Nuss procedure) is challenging but essential in facilitating ambulation and minimizing the length of stay. Although multiple epidural regimens with varying opioids are presently used for pain management, there is currently no clinical consensus regarding which epidural regimen provides the best analgesia outcomes with the fewest side effects. This 10-year retrospective cohort study was performed to compare the quality of analgesia and the incidence of side effects associated with the three most common epidural regimens used at a tertiary care children’s hospital, in patients undergoing the Nuss procedure. Methods Seventy-two pediatric patients were identified as having been treated with one of three epidural regimens for postoperative pain management following the Nuss procedure: Group A (n=12) received 0.125% bupivacaine and 5 µg/mL fentanyl, Group B (n=21) received 0.125% bupivacaine and 10 µg/mL hydromorphone, and Group C (n=39) received 0.1% ropivacaine and 20 µg/mL hydromorphone. Our primary outcome was maximal daily pain scores (numerical rating scale 0–10), with an analytical focus on postoperative day 1 scores. The primary outcome was analyzed using linear regression. The secondary outcomes included the length of stay, side-effect profiles as reflected by the number of treatments for nausea and pruritus, pain scores according to epidural site insertion, occurrence of breakthrough pain, and presence of severe pain throughout their hospital stay. Secondary outcomes were analyzed using linear or logistic regression adjusted for pain scores at baseline. The criterion for statistical significance was set a priori at alpha =0.05. Results Group A had significantly higher day-1 pain scores (score 5.42/10) than Group B (4.52/10; P=0.030) and Group C (4.49/10; P=0.015) after adjusting for baseline pain and age. No significant difference in maximum daily

  18. Direction of catheter insertion and the incidence of paresthesia during continuous epidural anesthesia in the elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Hak; Lee, Jun Seop

    2013-01-01

    Background Continuous epidural anesthesia is useful for endoscopic urologic surgery, as mostly performed in the elderly patients. In such a case, it is necessary to obtain successful sacral anesthesia, and the insertion of epidural catheter in the caudad direction may be needed. However, continuous epidural catherization has been related to paresthesias. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the direction of the catheter insertion on the incidence of paresthesias in the elderly patients. Methods Two hundred elderly patients scheduled for endoscopic urologic surgery were enrolled. The epidural catheter was inserted at L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 using the Tuohy needle. In Group I (n = 100), the Tuohy needle with the bevel directed the cephalad during the catheter insertion. In Group II (n = 100), it directed the caudad. During the catheter insertion, an anesthesiologist evaluated the presence of paresthesias and the ease or difficulty during the catheter insertion. Results In Group I (n = 97), 15.5% of the patients had paresthesias versus 18.4% in Group II (n = 98), and there was no significant difference between the two groups. In paresthesia depending on the insertion site and the ease or difficulty during the catheter insertion, there were no significant differences between the two groups. Conclusions Our results concluded that the direction of epidural catheter insertion did not significantly influence the incidence of paresthesias in the elderly patients. PMID:23741568

  19. Efficacy of Platelet Rich Plasma via Lumbar Epidural Route in Chronic Prolapsed Intervertebral Disc Patients-A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar radiculopathy is a major health problem often treated by surgery or guided lumbar epidural steroids for pain relief. We have used Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) a novel therapeutic tool of autologous nature that has emerged strongly in recent years to treat patients of prolapsed intervertebral disc. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of PRP via interlaminar epidural route in treatment of pain in patients with prolapsed inter vertebral disc. Materials and Methods Ten patients were injected with five ml of autologous platelet rich plasma under fluoroscopic guidance via interlaminar lumbar epidural injection into area of affected nerve root. They were followed using VAS (Visual Analogue Scale), SLRT (Straight Leg Raising Test) and MODQ (Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire) for clinical improvement. Results Patients who had received epidural injections of autologous PRP showed improvements in their scores of evaluation tools. Improvement was sustained during the 3 month study period and was not associated with any complications. Conclusion Autologous PRP can be considered as a good alternative to epidural steroids and surgery in management of patients with chronic prolapsed intervertebral disc. PMID:27790553

  20. An Unusual Cause of Posterior Elbow Impingement: Detachment of a Hypertrophied Posterior Fat Pad

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Daisuke; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sugiura, Kosuke; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Suzue, Naoto; Goto, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Wada, Keizo; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 47-year-old woman who developed posterior impingement of the elbow due to detachment of a hypertrophied posterior fat pad. She reported acute left elbow pain after leaning back onto a hard object with her hand and subsequently experienced a “catching” sensation. Comparison with the magnetic resonance images of a normal elbow revealed a hypertrophied posterior fat pad interposed between the olecranon and olecranon fossa in both elbows, with the fat pad in the left elbow located more inferiorly than that in the right elbow. Elbow arthroscopy showed the olecranon fossa covered by the fat pad, a portion of which was detached from the rest of the pad. Debridement of the detached portion was performed until no impingement was evident. Postoperatively, full extension of the elbow did not elicit pain. Clinicians should include this pathology among the differential diagnoses for posterior elbow pain. PMID:26613057

  1. Long-term outcomes and prognostic analysis of modified open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion in treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Nan; Fei, Qi; Wang, Bingqiang; Li, Dong; Li, Jinjun; Meng, Hai; Yang, Yong; Guo, Ai

    2016-01-01

    the postoperation JOA scores were significantly affected by age, preoperative JOA scores, and preoperative ISI. Except one case of epidural hematoma, there were no complications associated with the surgery. Conclusion Treatment of CSM with posterior open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion is effective with few complications. In addition, the normal cervical lordosis was well maintained. Age, preoperative JOA scores, and preoperative ISI were the independent factors that significantly affect disease prognosis and surgical outcomes. PMID:27621642

  2. Long-term outcomes and prognostic analysis of modified open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion in treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Nan; Fei, Qi; Wang, Bingqiang; Li, Dong; Li, Jinjun; Meng, Hai; Yang, Yong; Guo, Ai

    2016-01-01

    the postoperation JOA scores were significantly affected by age, preoperative JOA scores, and preoperative ISI. Except one case of epidural hematoma, there were no complications associated with the surgery. Conclusion Treatment of CSM with posterior open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion is effective with few complications. In addition, the normal cervical lordosis was well maintained. Age, preoperative JOA scores, and preoperative ISI were the independent factors that significantly affect disease prognosis and surgical outcomes.

  3. Shining a light on posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Boeve, Bradley F; Cappa, Stefano F; Dickerson, Bradford C; Dubois, Bruno; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Lehmann, Manja; Mendez, Mario F; Pijnenburg, Yolande; Ryan, Natalie S; Scheltens, Philip; Shakespeare, Tim; Tang-Wai, David F; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Bain, Lisa; Carrillo, Maria C; Fox, Nick C

    2013-07-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome characterized by progressive decline in visual processing skills, relatively intact memory and language in the early stages, and atrophy of posterior brain regions. Misdiagnosis of PCA is common, owing not only to its relative rarity and unusual and variable presentation, but also because patients frequently first seek the opinion of an ophthalmologist, who may note normal eye examinations by their usual tests but may not appreciate cortical brain dysfunction. Seeking to raise awareness of the disease, stimulate research, and promote collaboration, a multidisciplinary group of PCA research clinicians formed an international working party, which had its first face-to-face meeting on July 13, 2012 in Vancouver, Canada, prior to the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. PMID:23274153

  4. Fractures of posterior teeth in adults.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Maxwell, E H; Braly, B V

    1986-02-01

    Examined in this study were 191 patients with 206 complete or incomplete fractures of posterior teeth. The patients ranged in age from 14 to 76 years, with 66.5% younger than 40 years. The number of fractures occurring in each arch was almost equal. The mandibular first molar was the most frequently fractured posterior tooth. The lingual cusps of mandibular molars fractured more often than did the buccal cusps of mandibular molars by a ratio of 2 to 1. In maxillary molars, buccal and lingual cusps fractured with almost equal frequency, but, in maxillary premolars, the lingual cusps fractured slightly more often than buccal cusps. Data gathered on the widths of the isthmuses of restorations in 109 teeth showed that fewer fractures occurred in teeth with more conservative restorations, with widths of isthmuses a quarter of the inter-cusp distance, and intact marginal ridges. PMID:3456380

  5. Thoracoscopic resection of functional posterior mediastinal paraganglioma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Mei, Jianong

    2014-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with posterior mediastinal mass was diagnosed as functional mediastinal paraganglioma during surgical exploration via open thoracotomy in another hospital. The operation was terminated because of severe hypertension when touching the tumor. He was transferred to our center later. After systemic evaluation, the patient was medicated with oral alpha- and beta-blockades, as well as intravenous fluid resuscitation for two weeks. His blood pressure became stable and a second operation was planned. The tumor was removed completely via the thoracoscopic approach, and was finally confirmed as functional paraganglioma by immunohistochemistry. The patient recovered uneventfully after surgery, with no recurrence during one year follow-up visit. PMID:25589992

  6. Technical advantages of the paramedian approach for lumbar epidural puncture and catheter introduction. A study using epiduroscopy in autopsy subjects.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, R G

    1988-10-01

    The lumbar epidural space of 14 autopsy subjects was examined by epiduroscopy. The aim was to compare the midline and paramedian approaches of locating the space, the estimated risk of accidental dural puncture, the course taken by the epidural catheter after introduction and with special attention to the influence of the dorsomedian connective tissue band. The paramedian needle passed a greater distance within the epidural space before contact with the dura mater and demonstrated a low risk of accidental dural puncture. The catheter passed by the paramedian approach did not cause any tenting of the dura and took a straight cephalad direction in all 14 cases. The midline catheter caused tenting of the dura in all 14 cases and the direction of travel was variable. Differences were statistically significant. Influence of the dorsomedian connective tissue band was greatest on the behaviour of the midline needle and catheter.

  7. Primary lumbar epidural abscess without spondylodiscitis caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum diagnosed by 16S rRNA PCR.

    PubMed

    Sanmillán, Jose Luis; Pelegrín, Iván; Rodríguez, David; Ardanuy, Carmen; Cabellos, Carmen

    2013-10-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old woman who presented a primary spinal epidural abscess caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. This is the second report in the medical literature to associate this organism with a primary spinal epidural abscess without spondylodiscitis. After treatment with emergency laminectomy followed by 8 weeks of antibiotic treatment the patient was cured. Oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 h) was the definitive choice of treatment. F. necrophorum spinal epidural abscess is rare, although samples for anaerobic culture should be collected in order to improve detection of anaerobic spinal infections. PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA permits early diagnosis in anaerobic infections.

  8. [Morpho-functional characteristic of the lateral vaults of the epidural space of the spinal cord and their clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A A; Gaĭvoronskiĭ, I V; Gaĭvoronskiĭ, A I

    2014-01-01

    The study of the epidural space was performed on 362 samples of the vertebral column obtained from the fetuses aged from 16 weeks, newborns, children and adult persons aged up to 90 years, using anatomical and histological methods. Within the lateral parts of the epidural space, the lateral vaults were distinguished. A new anatomical interpretation of these structures is proposed, considering them as a complex of anatomical structures including the periosteum of the intervertebral foramen, the sleeve of dura mater, intervertebral veins, spinal arteries, adipose tissue, the system of the connective-tissue trabeculae, recurrent nerves controlling the blood flow in the vascular system of the vertebral channel and promoting the communication of the epidural space with the paravertebral areas. PMID:25552083

  9. Minimally invasive posterior cervical decompression using tubular retractor: The technical note and early clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jung-Woo; Kim, Jin-Sung; Shin, Myeong-Hoon; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this work is to present a novel decompression technique that approaches cervical spine posteriorly, but through minimal invasive method using tubular retractor avoiding detachment of posterior musculature. Methods: Six patients underwent minimally invasive posterior cervical decompression using the tubular retractor system and surgical microscope. Minimally invasive access to the posterior cervical spine was performed with exposure through a paramedian muscle-splitting approach. With the assistance of a specialized tubular retraction system and deep soft tissue expansion mechanism, multilevel posterior cervical decompression could be accomplished. This approach also allows safe docking of the retractor system on the lateral mass, thus avoiding the cervical spinal canal during exposure. A standard operating microscope was used with ×10 magnification and 400 mm focal length. The hospital charts, magnetic resonance imaging studies, and follow-up records of all the patients were reviewed. Outcome was assessed by neurological status and visual analog scale (VAS) for neck and arm pain. Results: There was no significant complication related to operation. The follow-up time was 4-12 months (mean, 9 months). Muscle weakness improved in all patients; sensory deficits resolved in four patients and improved in two patients. Analysis of the mean VAS for radicular pain and VAS for neck pain showed significant improvement. Conclusions: The preliminary experiences with good clinical outcome seem to promise that this minimally invasive technique is a valid alternative option for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy. PMID:24778922

  10. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Induced by Pazopanib

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is a clinical/radiological syndrome characterized by headache, seizures, impaired vision, acute hypertension, and typical magnetic resonance imaging findings. There are several reports in the literature that depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The list of common anticancer and supportive care drugs that predispose to reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is expanding and includes not only a large number of chemotherapeutic agents but also an increased number of new targeted drugs, particularly angiogenesis inhibitors such as bevacizumab,sorefenib and sunitinib. Pazopanib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit which after a positive phase III randomized clinical trial in patients with advanced renal cell cancer received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Until now no cases of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome induced by pazopanib have been reported. Case report We present the case of a 40 years old female patient with heavily pre-treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma who received pazopanib as salvage treatment. After 21 days of pazopanib therapy the patient referred to the emergency department with epileptic seizure, impaired vision at both eyes and headache. MRI of the brain revealed subcortical oedema at the occipital and parietal lobes bilaterally. She was treated with anticonvulsants, i.v. administration of mannitol and antihypertensives and she recovered completely from her symptoms and was discharged on the tenth hospital day. A brain MRI performed 3 weeks after showed that the subcortical oedema had been subsided. Conclusion In conclusion this is the first case of pazopanib induced reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Although usually reversible, this syndrome is a serious and potentially life threatening adverse

  11. A new matrix in esthetic posterior restorations.

    PubMed

    Rovatti, L; Cavalleri, G; Dallari, A

    1998-03-01

    Using composite resins in posterior esthetic restorations has become more acceptable in recent years as a result of improvements in materials. For this reason, innovative products such as Luciwedge and the SuperMat System have gained the attention of many practitioners. SuperMat, an improved translucent matrix, offers a new approach to matrices for use with multimaterial fillings. It makes the procedure easier and offers many other advantages, particularly in composite-compomer restorations.

  12. Posterior triangle pain: the os trigonum.

    PubMed

    Martin, B F

    1989-01-01

    Pain emanating from the region of the posterior triangle may present a difficult diagnostic problem for the practitioner. A case of os trigonum pathology with a logical plan for the diagnostic evaluation and resolution of this problem is presented. The use of bone scan and tomography is shown to be helpful for evaluation and arriving at the appropriate diagnosis. Both conservative and surgical treatments are discussed.

  13. The mechanism of continence after posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, Herman S.; Angermeier, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    The standard of care after a pelvic fracture urethral injury is a repair via a one-stage anastomotic posterior urethroplasty using a step-wise perineal approach. The initial injury, immediate postoperative management, and surgical repair can all affect urinary continence in these patients. Proximal continence mechanisms, particularly the bladder neck, are particularly important in maintaining urinary continence in these patients. Patients with bladder neck dysfunction should be counselled about the greater risk of urinary incontinence. PMID:26019981

  14. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  15. Bilateral posterior cervical cages provide biomechanical stability: assessment of stand-alone and supplemental fixation for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Voronov, Leonard I; Siemionow, Krzysztof B; Havey, Robert M; Carandang, Gerard; Phillips, Frank M; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Supplemental posterior instrumentation has been widely used to enhance stability and improve fusion rates in higher risk patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). These typically involve posterior lateral mass or pedicle screw fixation with significant inherent risks and morbidities. More recently, cervical cages placed bilaterally between the facet joints (posterior cervical cages) have been used as a less disruptive alternative for posterior fixation. The purpose of this study was to compare the stability achieved by both posterior cages and ACDF at a single motion segment and determine the stability achieved with posterior cervical cages used as an adjunct to single- and multilevel ACDF. Methods Seven cadaveric cervical spine (C2–T1) specimens were tested in the following sequence: intact, C5–C6 bilateral posterior cages, C6–C7 plated ACDF with and without posterior cages, and C3–C5 plated ACDF with and without posterior cages. Range of motion in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation was measured for each condition under moment loading up to ±1.5 Nm. Results All fusion constructs significantly reduced the range of motion compared to intact in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation (P<0.05). Similar stability was achieved with bilateral posterior cages and plated ACDF at a single level. Posterior cages, when placed as an adjunct to ACDF, further reduced range of motion in both single- and multilevel constructs (P<0.05). Conclusion The biomechanical effectiveness of bilateral posterior cages in limiting cervical segmental motion is comparable to single-level plated ACDF. Furthermore, supplementation of single- and multilevel ACDF with posterior cervical cages provided a significant increase in stability and therefore may be a potential, minimally disruptive option for supplemental fixation for improving ACDF fusion rates. PMID:27471414

  16. Efficacy of epidural analgesia for pain management of critically ill patients and the implications for nursing care.

    PubMed

    Slack, J F; Faut-Callahan, M

    1991-11-01

    Management of pain for critically ill patients has been shown to be inadequately controlled and can have serious deleterious effects on a patient's recovery. Continuous epidural analgesia can be used to control pain in critical care patients. This mode of analgesia administration provides pain relief without the delays inherent in the as-needed administration of analgesics. Fifteen critical care unit patients were part of a multidisciplinary, prospective, randomized, double-blind study of various epidural analgesic agents in 43 thoracic and 66 abdominal surgery patients. The purpose of the study was to identify the benefits and problems associated with continuous epidural analgesia administration and the implications for the nursing care of critically ill patients. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the analgesia was based on the following measures: 1) pain measured at regular intervals in the 72-hour period with a visual analog; 2) pain as measured after 72 hours with the word descriptor section of the McGill pain questionnaire; 3) amount of supplemental systemic narcotic analgesic needed; 4) recovery of ambulatory and respiratory function, including ability to perform coughing and deep-breathing exercises; 5) occurrence of adverse effects, and 6) the type and distribution of nursing care problems associated with continuous epidural infusions. The results of this study showed that the level of pain relief and recovery of postoperative function was superior to that provided by the more widely used as-needed systemic administration of narcotics. Although some nursing care problems were identified, continuous epidural analgesia can be used for pain relief in critical care patients, if the analgesia is administered by accurate reliable infusion systems and carefully monitored by nursing staff who are knowledgeable about the pharmacologic considerations of epidural analgesic agents and the management of patient care. PMID:1954060

  17. Venoconstrictor agents mobilize blood from different sources and increase intrathoracic filling during epidural anesthesia in supine humans

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton-Hicks, M.; Hoeck, A.S.; Stuehmeier, K.D.A.; Arndt, J.O.

    1987-03-01

    The authors studied the effects of dihydroergotamine (DHE) and etilefrine hydrochloride (E) on the regional distribution of /sup 99m/Tc-marked erythrocytes during epidural anesthesia in eight supine men to determine if vasoactive agents with venoconstrictor action would enhance cardiac filling during epidural anesthesia. Radioactivity was recorded with a gamma camera, and its distribution determined in the thorax, abdomen, and limbs. Arterial and central venous pressure, heart rate, and calf volume by plethysmography were measured. During epidural anesthesia with a sensory block up to T4/5, DHE (7.5 micrograms/kg) reduced the radioactivity, i.e., blood volume, in both the innervated (-5.9 +/- 3.5%) and denervated muscle/skin (-16.9 +/- 7%) regions, and increased it in both the intrathoracic (+7.0 +/- 2.3%), and splanchnic vasculature (+4.2 +/- 3.2). In contrast, E (6 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) decreased the blood volume most markedly in the splanchnic region (-5.4 +/- 0.7%) and increased it in the thorax (+2 +/- 0.6%). All these changes were statistically significant. The combined effects were estimated to be equivalent to a transfusion of nearly 1.01 of blood. Both drugs reversed the hypotensive action of epidural anesthesia. During epidural anesthesia, DHE preferentially constricted the capacitance vessels in skeletal muscle and skin irrespective of the state of innervation, whereas E preferentially constricted the splanchnic vasculature. In the doses used, the two agents replenished in an additive fashion the central circulation during epidural anesthesia.

  18. Comparative study of epidural bupivacaine with butorphanol and bupivacaine with tramadol for postoperative pain relief in abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Swathi, N.; Ashwini, N.; Shukla, Mukesh I.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To compare the efficacy of combination of epidural local anesthetic with tramadol and butorphanol in major abdominal surgeries. Aims: To evaluate duration of analgesia, analgesic efficacy, and safety profile of two groups of drugs-epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine and epidural tramadol with bupivacaine. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized controlled, double-blinded study was undertaken in 50 patients scheduled for major abdominal surgeries. Group B received epidural butorphanol 2 mg + bupivacaine 0.125% first dose and subsequent doses, butorphanol 1 mg + bupivacaine 0.125% (total volume 10 ml). Group T received epidural tramadol 2 mg/kg + bupivacaine 0.125% first dose and subsequent doses, tramadol 1 mg/kg + bupivacaine 0.125% (total volume 10 ml). Observed parameters were the quality of analgesia, sedation, and hemodynamic parameters in the intra and post-operative period. Time for request of rescue analgesia was noted in all the patients. Continuous data are analyzed by Student's t-test using IBM SPSS software version 20. P ≤0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. P ≤ 0.001 was considered to be statistically highly significant. Results: Visual analog scale better with butorphanol group than tramadol (0.12 ± 0.332 and 0.84 ± 0.746 for Group B and Group T) at 30 min after first dose. Onset of action (8.44 ± 1.158 min in Group B and 12.80 ± 1.354 min in Group T) faster with butorphanol but duration of analgesia longer with tramadol (5.92 ± 0.76 h in Group B vs. 7.68 ± 0.76 h in Group T). Sedation was seen in patients with butorphanol group. Nausea and vomiting more frequent with tramadol group. Conclusions: Epidural tramadol with antiemetic is better than butorphanol for its longer duration in ambulatory surgery, elderly patients, obese patients, and suitable high-risk patients. PMID:27746533

  19. Effect of epidural clonidine on characteristics of spinal anaesthesia in patients undergoing gynaecological surgeries: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rachna; Rao, RS Raghavendra; Turai, Ashwini; Prabha, P; Shreyavathi, R; Harsoor, Karuna

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Combined spinal–epidural (CSE) anaesthesia is being increasingly used for effective post-operative analgesia. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of epidural clonidine on characteristics of spinal anaesthesia for gynaecological surgeries. Methods: This was a prospective randomised, double-blind, controlled study involving sixty patients belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I and II who underwent gynaecological surgeries were randomly divided into clonidine (C) group and saline (S) group of thirty each. All patients received CSE anaesthesia. Ten minutes before subarachnoid block (SAB), Group C received clonidine 150 μg diluted to 5 ml in normal saline (NS) and Group S received NS epidurally. Hyperbaric bupivacaine (15 mg) was administered intrathecally for both groups after epidural injection. Sensory and motor block characteristics, analgesia, sedation and haemodynamics were observed. Statistical analysis was performed using appropriate tests. Results: Epidural clonidine produced faster onset (37.83 ± 8.58 s in Group C compared to 50.33 ± 8.80 s in Group S, P = 0.001) and prolonged duration of sensory block (241.17±18.65 minutes in group C compared to 150.33±19.16 minutes in group S, P = 0.001). Time for two segment regression of sensory block was193.67 ± 19.82 min in Group C and 109.33 ± 18.56 min Group S (P < 0.001). The duration of analgesia was 299.00 ± 43.38 min in Group C and 152.50 ± 21.04 min in Group S (P < 0.001). Haemodynamics and sedation scores were comparable between two groups. Conclusion: Administration of clonidine epidurally, 10 min before SAB, caused early onset and prolonged duration of motor blockade and analgesia, without any significant post-operative complication. PMID:27330201

  20. Electrocardiographic diagnosis of remote posterior wall myocardial infarction using unipolar posterior lead V9

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, M.W.; Imburgia, M.; King, T.R.; Fischer, K.C.; Kovach, K.L. )

    1989-09-01

    The accuracy of four electrocardiographic criteria for diagnosing remote posterior myocardial infarction was assessed prospectively in 369 patients undergoing exercise treadmill testing with thallium scintigraphy. Criteria included the following: (1) R-wave width greater than or equal to 0.04 s and R-wave greater than or equal to S-wave in V1; (2) R-wave greater than or equal to S-wave in V2; (3) T-wave voltage in V2 minus V6 greater than or equal to 0.38 mV (T-wave index); (4) Q-wave greater than or equal to 0.04 s in left paraspinal lead V9. Twenty-seven patients (7.3 percent) met thallium criteria for posterior myocardial infarction, defined as a persistent perfusion defect in the posterobase of the left ventricle. Sensitivities for the four criteria ranged from 4 to 56 percent, and specificities ranged from 64 to 99 percent. Posterior paraspinal lead V9 provided the best overall predictive accuracy (94 percent), positive predictive value (58 percent), and ability to differentiate patients with and without posterior myocardial infarction of any single criterion (p less than .0001). Combining the T-wave index with lead V9 further enhanced the diagnostic yield: the sensitivity for detecting posterior infarction by at least one of these criteria was 78 percent, and when both criteria were positive, specificity was 98.5 percent. It is concluded that a single, unipolar posterior lead in the V9 position is superior to standard 12-lead electrocardiographic criteria in diagnosing remote posterior myocardial infarction, and that combining V9 with the T-wave index maximizes the diagnostic yield.

  1. Posterior Ankle and Hind Foot Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gökkuş, Kemal; Aydın, Ahmet Turan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: While anterior ankle arthroscopy is a widely accepted technique, posterior ankle/hind foot arthroscopy is still a relatively new procedure. The arthroscopic visualisation was often initially limited and vulnerabilty of the posteromedial neurovascular structures to injury scared orthopaedic surgeons. The goal of this review is to highlight the indications, and to present the long term follow up results of posterior ankle/hind foot arthroscopy. Methods: The study included 21 ankles in 21 patients (12 male and 9 female ).The mean age was 37.7 , the mean duration of preoperative symptoms 12.8 months . Arthroscopy performed with the patient prone , under general and spinal anesthesia with tourniquet hemostasis . Preoperative intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis is performed (cefazolin 1g) , sand bag placed under ipsilateral anteresuperior iliac spine to correct natural external rotated posture of the ankle and ankle is left hanging of the table so that it can moved freely during surgery. We applied noninvasive distraction method with simple rope which tied and knotted waist of the surgeon . The posterolateral and posteromedial portals which described by Van Dijk was utilized . The arthroscopic visualisation was often initially limited and careful debritement of some adipose tissue of the kager fat pad (Kager's fat pad, also known as the pre-Achilles fat pad) was necessary to create more space to aid visualization .The most valuable point to stay clear from trouble is to understand , know and aware where the flexor hallucis longus tendon exist .So neurovascular structures located beyond this tendon. Principally the process must advance into lateral to medial manner. The mean follow up period was 55 months. The most common preoperative diagnoses were osteochondral lesions of talus (ten ),painful os trigonum syndrome with (five )or without (three) FHL tenosynovitis (total eight ), posterior talofibular ligament thickenning (two ), Haglund’s deformity (one

  2. Epidural diamorphine infusions with and without 0.167% bupivacaine for post-operative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lowson, S M; Alexander, J I; Black, A M; Bambridge, A D

    1994-09-01

    Forty patients who underwent upper or mid-abdominal surgery were randomly allocated to receive a post-operative epidural infusion of 0.083 mg ml-1 of diamorphine in either 0.167% bupivacaine or 0.9% NaCl solution. The nursing staff, who were unaware of which solution was being infused, managed the patients' pain according to a standardized scheme. They adjusted the epidural infusion rates to 3, 5 or 7 ml h-1 according to the patient's hourly reports of pain on a four point verbal rating scale (none, mild, moderate or severe), aiming to use the lowest allowed infusion rate to prevent or reduce any pain that was more than mild. Additional analgesia was given as diclofenac 75 mg intramuscularly if the patients report moderate pain while on the highest infusion rate. The nurses were instructed to summon anaesthetic help if pain relief was still unsatisfactory after diclofenac, but this was never necessary. Diclofenac was needed by six patients receiving diamorphine in saline and one receiving diamorphine in bupivacaine (P < 0.05). The range of average hourly epidural infusion rates was constrained by design to between 3 and 7 ml h-1 but the median of these values was 5 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-saline group and 3.35 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group (P < 0.02). In patients receiving diamorphine in saline, a median of 6 (range 0-16) of the 24 h reports were of more than mild pain, whereas in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group, the corresponding figures were 2 (range 0-13) (P < 0.02)).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Circulatory collapse following epidural bolus for Caesarean section a profound vasovagal reaction? A case report

    PubMed Central

    Oddby, Eva; Hein, Anette; Jakobsson, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Reduced blood pressure is commonly seen associated to spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean section and efforts to reduce its occurrence and its magnitude is common practice. Cardiovascular collapse requiring cardio-pulmonary resuscitation after putting the spinal/epidural block for Caesarean section is however a rare but most dramatic event. Presentation of case We describe a case with sudden short loss of circulation, circulatory collapse, short after start of emergency Caesarean section in top up epidural anaesthesia (3 + 12 ml ropivaciane 7.5 mg/ml), requiring CPR. The neonate was delivered during CPR with Apgar 1, 10, 10 at 1, 5 and 10 min. Circulation was restored following 60–90 s of CPR and administration of 0.5 mg adrenaline. No cardioversion was administered sinus rhythm was regained spontaneously. The mother and child had a further uncomplicated course. No signs of cardiac damage/anomaly, emboli, septicaemia, pereclampisa or local anaesthetic toxicity was found. The patient had prior to the decision about Caesarean section had fever and was subsequently relatively dehydrated. Discussion The patient had a fast return of sinus rhythm following birth of the child, without cardioversion. None of common causes for cardiac arrest was found and the patient an uncomplicated post Caesarean section course. The combination of epidural induced sympathetic block and reduced preload possibly triggered a Bezold-Jarisch reflex with a profound vasovagal reaction. Concluiosn A structured plan for the handling of cardiovascular crisis must be available wherever Caesarean section are performed. Adequate volume loading, left tilt and vigilant control of circulation following regional block performance is of outmost importance. PMID:27100952

  4. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Abigail N; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2–5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function. PMID:24654267

  5. [Patient-controlled intravenous versus epidural analgesia after major joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Peng, W L; Wu, G J; Sun, W Z; Fan, S Z; Chen, T L; Huang, F Y

    1992-06-01

    The analgesic efficacy, side effects, and satisfaction of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with intravenous and epidural morphine for postoperative pain were evaluated in this study. Twenty patients undergoing major joint replacement surgery were randomly allocated to intravenous PCA (IPCA) group or epidural PCA (EPCA) group. All patients had a standardized balanced anesthesia, and an epidural catheter was introduced after the operation in EPCA group. Postoperative pain relief was evaluated with verbal pain scale. The result showed that pain intensity and pain relief were similar in either group without significant difference (p greater than 0.05). Morphine consumption in IPCA group was 1.72 +/- 0.30 mg/h in the postoperative 0 - 12 h and 1.14 +/- 0.44 mg/h in 12 - 24 h. In EPCA group, relatively low doses of morphine were used, i.e., 0.20 +/- 0.07 mg/h in the postoperative 0 - 12 h and 0.17 +/- 0.07 mg/h in 12 - 24 h. Both groups showed an "incomplete" but satisfactory analgesia with relatively low doses of morphine. The "equianalgesic dose ratio" of IPCA to EPCA with morphine was approximately 8.5:1. Sedation was minimal in both groups. No respiratory depression developed in all patients. Nausea and vomiting were the most prominent side effects which might limit the usefulness of PCA. The incidence was 5 out of 10 patients in IPCA group and 4 out of 10 patients in EPCA group, despite under the treatment of droperidol (15 micrograms/kg, iv, prn) for most of the patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Epidural diamorphine infusions with and without 0.167% bupivacaine for post-operative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lowson, S M; Alexander, J I; Black, A M; Bambridge, A D

    1994-09-01

    Forty patients who underwent upper or mid-abdominal surgery were randomly allocated to receive a post-operative epidural infusion of 0.083 mg ml-1 of diamorphine in either 0.167% bupivacaine or 0.9% NaCl solution. The nursing staff, who were unaware of which solution was being infused, managed the patients' pain according to a standardized scheme. They adjusted the epidural infusion rates to 3, 5 or 7 ml h-1 according to the patient's hourly reports of pain on a four point verbal rating scale (none, mild, moderate or severe), aiming to use the lowest allowed infusion rate to prevent or reduce any pain that was more than mild. Additional analgesia was given as diclofenac 75 mg intramuscularly if the patients report moderate pain while on the highest infusion rate. The nurses were instructed to summon anaesthetic help if pain relief was still unsatisfactory after diclofenac, but this was never necessary. Diclofenac was needed by six patients receiving diamorphine in saline and one receiving diamorphine in bupivacaine (P < 0.05). The range of average hourly epidural infusion rates was constrained by design to between 3 and 7 ml h-1 but the median of these values was 5 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-saline group and 3.35 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group (P < 0.02). In patients receiving diamorphine in saline, a median of 6 (range 0-16) of the 24 h reports were of more than mild pain, whereas in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group, the corresponding figures were 2 (range 0-13) (P < 0.02)).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7988577

  7. Continuous thoracic epidural anesthesia induces segmental sympathetic block in the awake rat.

    PubMed

    Freise, Hendrik; Anthonsen, Sören; Fischer, Lars G; Van Aken, Hugo K; Sielenkämper, Andreas W

    2005-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) is used increasingly in critical care, especially for cardiac and intestinal sympathetic block. In this study we evaluated cardiorespiratory function and sympathetic activity in a new model of continuous TEA in awake rats. Thirteen rats received epidural saline control (CON) or bupivacaine 0.5% epidural infusion (EPI) at 15 microl/h for 2 h on day 1 and day 3. Mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate, arterial PCO2, and motor score were recorded at baseline and after 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. Skin temperature was measured at front paws, high-thoracic, mid-thoracic, and low-thoracic, hind paws, and the proximal and distal tail. Changes in sympathetic activity were assessed by skin temperature changes from baseline (DeltaT). In the EPI group, hemodynamics and respiration remained unchanged and only mild motor deficits occurred. DeltaT in thoracic segments was higher in the EPI than in the CON group (P <0.001 at all times at high-thoracic, mid-thoracic, and low-thoracic segments). Skin temperature decreased in the distal tail in the EPI group, e.g., after 90 min DeltaT=-0.86 +/- 0.25 degrees C (EPI) versus 0.4 +/- 0.12 degrees C (CON) (P <0.05 at 60, 90, and 120 min). DeltaT on day 3 was comparable to day 1. TEA induced stable segmental sympathetic block without cardiorespiratory and motor side effects in awake rats. This new technique may be applied in prolonged models of critical illness. PMID:15616087

  8. An unusual recurrent bilateral posterior mediastinal goiter after subtotal thyroidectomy: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Aziret, Mehmet; Topçuoğlu, Mehmet Şah; Özçelik, Cemal; Özkaya, Muharrem

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Surgical treatment of benign thyroid diseases need to be followed up closely, since recurrent thyroid nodules can be seen after subtotal thyroidectomy. Intrathoracic goiter (ITG) occurs in 10–30% of patients following subtotal thyroidectomy. In general these goiters are benign, having a malignant rate of only 2–22%. ITG grows slowly but steadily and in its process of development, it narrows the thoracic inlet by compressing the surrounding structures. Most of these can not located in the anterior mediastinum, others located in posterior retrovascular area. Bilateral posterior retrovascular goiters are very rare. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case involving a 61-year-old woman with history of gradual-onset dyspnea who was referred to us for evaluation of a large mediastinal mass. She had undergone bilateral thyroid lobectomy for a cervical goiter 10 years ago. The mass was removed successfully via median sternotomy without complication. The patient recovered well and was discharged in 1 week. DISCUSSION Most anterior mediastinal goiters can be resected through a transcervical approach, but if those extending beyond the aortic arch into the posterior mediastinum are better dealt with by sternotomy or lateral thoracotomy. CONCLUSION Bilateral recurrent posterior mediastinal and retrovascular large goiters are better resected via sternotomy rather than lateral thoracotomy. The reason for that are the possibility of injury to large vascular structures and the difficulty of their management through lateral thoracotomy when cardiopulmonary bypass needed. PMID:24973529

  9. Epidural infusions of sufentanil with and without bupivacaine: comparison with diamorphine-bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Black, A M; Wolf, A; McKenzie, I M; Tonkin, P A; Inglis, S T; Prys-Roberts, C

    1994-07-01

    The requirements for supplementary 3 ml epidural injections of bupivacaine 0.5% (top-ups) were used in a randomized double-blind study to compare the effects of five types of thoracic epidural infusions given at 2.5 ml h-1 for the first 24 h after major surgery to the upper abdomen in 99 patients and the lower abdomen in 72. The infusions were: bupivacaine 0.167% alone; diamorphine 0.167 mg ml-1 (0.417 mg h-1) in bupivacaine 0.167%; sufentanil 2 micrograms ml-1 (5 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; and sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in normal saline. The patients who had upper abdominal surgery were on average older than those having lower abdominal surgery and a larger proportion of them were female. They received on average fewer top-ups. After both upper and lower abdominal surgery, epidural infusions of bupivacaine alone required the most frequent supplementation (inter-quartile range 6-14 top-ups in 24 h) and the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures required the fewest (interquartile range 0-12 top-ups in 24 h). The infusions of sufentanil without bupivacaine were significantly less effective than the sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures after upper (but not lower) abdominal surgery. Although the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures were indistinguishable in analgesic effectiveness after either upper or lower abdominal surgery, the lower (5 micrograms h-1) dose rate of sufentanil gave a significantly higher average breathing rate and lower average PaCO2 for the first 24 h after lower (but not upper) abdominal surgery. Blood samples were taken (as an afterthought) from 11 patients receiving sufentanil 10 micrograms h-1, just before the epidural infusion was stopped. The concentrations were mostly above the range for systemic analgesia, but below the values that would have been expected if a steady state had been achieved.

  10. Primary Epidural Varicosis as a Rare Cause of Sciatica: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Fathi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Non-discogenic sciatica can be caused by any lesion along the course of the lumbosacral nerve roots and sciatic nerve. We aim to present a rare case of refractory sciatica in an otherwise healthy 25-year-old man. He complained of left leg pain without significant back pain. Extensor hallucis longus muscle was weak on the left side with limited straight leg rising. On magnetic resonance imaging, a space-occupying lesion resembling a sequestrated disc was noted that after surgical decompression, epidural varicosis was demonstrated. PMID:26538785

  11. Isolation of Brucella melitensis biotype 3 from epidural empyema in a Bosnian immigrant in Germany.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Melzer, Falk; Schmoock, Gernot; Elschner, Mandy; Lâm, Thiên-Trí; Abele-Horn, Marianne; Stetter, Christian

    2012-09-01

    Brucellosis is a regionally emerging infectious disease in Mediterranean countries with an increasing number of human cases and high morbidity rates. Here, we describe a case of severe B. melitensis biotype 3 infection in an immigrant who had contact with ruminants during a short-term stay in Bosnia before he returned to Germany. The patient developed thoracic spondylodiscitis accompanied by a large epidural empyema and neurological deficits. The isolated strain was characterized and compared to other strains from the Mediterranean region by multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis, showing minor differences between emerging strains from neighbouring geographical areas.

  12. Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection for Painful Spasticity in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun; Chun, Seong Min; Park, Hee Won; Bang, Moon Suk

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old male with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). He could not maintain a standing position because of painful spasticity in his lower limbs. A magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography indicated chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy, explaining his chronic low back pain before the injury. For diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes, transforaminal epidural steroid injection (ESI) to the right L5 root was performed. After the intervention, the spasticity decreased and his ambulatory function improved. This case illustrates that lumbar radiculopathy concomitant with a cervical SCI can produce severe spasticity and it can be dramatically improved by ESI. PMID:26361605

  13. Distribution in cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and lymph of epidurally injected morphine and inulin in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, P.A.; Yaksh, T.L.

    1986-06-01

    We describe procedures for catheterizing the epidural space, the azygos vein, and the thoracic lymph duct of dogs without using fluoroscopy. The success rates of the procedures were 100, 80, and 50%, respectively (n = 10). To assess the validity of the model, /sup 3/H-morphine and unlabeled morphine (2 mg) were injected epidurally in ten dogs. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), azygos venous blood, arterial blood, and lymph were sampled before and 5, 20, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 min after injection. During the first 20 min, morphine levels in the azygos vein were about three and ten times greater than arterial and lymphatic levels, respectively (n = 3; P less than 0.01). Morphine levels were significantly greater in the azygos vein (n = 8) and the femoral artery (n = 10) during the first 20 and 60 min than they were later, respectively (P less than 0.05). In the lymph (n = 5), the levels of morphine at 60 min were statistically greater (P less than 0.05) than levels at 4, 5, and 6 hr. At no time were the concurrent arterial and lymph levels different from each other. In the lumbar CSF, the morphine peak concentration was reached 5-60 min after epidural injection and ranged between 5 and 93 micrograms/ml. In the CSF, the levels of morphine were significantly greater during the first 20 min than later (n = 7; P less than 0.05). The washout of the lumbar CSF curve for morphine appeared to be fitted by a two-compartment open model. The t1/2-alpha and t1/2-beta values were 14.7 +/- 7.2 min and 106 +/- 45 min, respectively (mean +/- SD). Cumulative percentages of the epidural dose of morphine passed into the azygos system within the first 5, 20, 60, and 120 min after injection were calculated to be 4.0 +/- 2.1, 23.5 +/- 14.6, 49.2 +/- 34.2, and 55.9 +/- 35.3, respectively (mean +/- SD; n = 8).

  14. Epidural infusions of sufentanil with and without bupivacaine: comparison with diamorphine-bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Black, A M; Wolf, A; McKenzie, I M; Tonkin, P A; Inglis, S T; Prys-Roberts, C

    1994-07-01

    The requirements for supplementary 3 ml epidural injections of bupivacaine 0.5% (top-ups) were used in a randomized double-blind study to compare the effects of five types of thoracic epidural infusions given at 2.5 ml h-1 for the first 24 h after major surgery to the upper abdomen in 99 patients and the lower abdomen in 72. The infusions were: bupivacaine 0.167% alone; diamorphine 0.167 mg ml-1 (0.417 mg h-1) in bupivacaine 0.167%; sufentanil 2 micrograms ml-1 (5 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; and sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in normal saline. The patients who had upper abdominal surgery were on average older than those having lower abdominal surgery and a larger proportion of them were female. They received on average fewer top-ups. After both upper and lower abdominal surgery, epidural infusions of bupivacaine alone required the most frequent supplementation (inter-quartile range 6-14 top-ups in 24 h) and the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures required the fewest (interquartile range 0-12 top-ups in 24 h). The infusions of sufentanil without bupivacaine were significantly less effective than the sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures after upper (but not lower) abdominal surgery. Although the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures were indistinguishable in analgesic effectiveness after either upper or lower abdominal surgery, the lower (5 micrograms h-1) dose rate of sufentanil gave a significantly higher average breathing rate and lower average PaCO2 for the first 24 h after lower (but not upper) abdominal surgery. Blood samples were taken (as an afterthought) from 11 patients receiving sufentanil 10 micrograms h-1, just before the epidural infusion was stopped. The concentrations were mostly above the range for systemic analgesia, but below the values that would have been expected if a steady state had been achieved. PMID:7925334

  15. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Orthopedic Surgery under Combined Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Vilhena, Ditza; Pereira, Luís; Duarte, Delfim; Oliveira, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative hearing loss following nonotologic surgery is rare. For patients undergoing subarachnoid anesthesia, the loss of cerebral spinal fluid and hence the drop in intracranial pressure can result in hearing loss and cranial nerve palsy. We report a case in which a patient sustained orthopedic surgery under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia complicated by severe and persistent sensorineural hearing loss. This report is a reminder that postoperative sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a poorly understood complication. A high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis of this complication, although prompt treatment does not guarantee a good outcome. PMID:26904339

  16. Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess Complicated with Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Oki, Masayuki; Ueda, Akihiro; Tsuda, Ayumi; Yanagi, Hidetaka; Ozawa, Hideki; Takagi, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Infection with non-typhoidal Salmonella often results in a self-limited acute gastroenteritis. Extra-intestinal Salmonella infection is relatively rare and occurs predominantly in infants and adults with significant underlying conditions. We describe a 54-year-old Japanese man with a history of heavy alcohol consumption and daily contact with a dog, who developed bacteremia complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis, spinal epidural abscess, and meningitis, due to Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis. This case suggests that Salmonella should be considered as an etiologic pathogen in adult patients with perivertebral infection or meningitis. PMID:27628612

  17. Spinal subdural hematoma with cauda equina syndrome: A complication of combined spinal epidural anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Neha; Sethi, Priyanka; Jain, Jitesh Kumar; Agarwal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSE) is considered safe in lower limb surgeries. We report a case of sudden neurological deterioration in a stable postoperative patient who was given CSE for total knee replacement and low molecular weight heparin in postoperative period. On the 4th postoperative day, she developed sudden onset weakness in left lower limb along with bladder incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging spine revealed a subdural hematoma at L2-L3 level. Immediate laminectomy along with cord decompression was done and patient recovered well except for a persistent foot drop on left side. PMID:25948911

  18. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Coexisting Guillan-Barré Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Hyung; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord compression, especially in children. Clinical features are usually nonspecific, although cervicothoracic location of hematoma could be presented with progressive paraplegia. Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is clinically defined as an acute peripheral neuropathy causing progressive limb weakness. Because SSEH and GBS have very similar signs and symptoms, SSEH could be misdiagnosed as GBS. Nevertheless, they can be presented together. We describe a rare case of SSEH coexisting with GBS. PMID:27800000

  19. Role of Epidural Analgesia within an ERAS Program after Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: A Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Nader Kamal; Chapuis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural analgesia has been a cornerstone of any ERAS program for open colorectal surgery. With the improvements in anesthetic and analgesic techniques as well as the introduction of the laparoscopy for colorectal resection, the role of epidural analgesia has been questioned. The aim of the review was to assess through a meta-analysis the impact of epidural analgesia compared to other analgesic techniques for colorectal laparoscopic surgery within an ERAS program. Methods. Literature research was performed on PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. All randomised clinical trials that reported data on hospital stay, postoperative complications, and readmissions rates within an ERAS program with and without an epidural analgesia after a colorectal laparoscopic resection were included. Results. Five randomised clinical trials were selected and a total of 168 patients submitted to epidural analgesia were compared to 163 patients treated by an alternative analgesic technique. Pooled data show a longer hospital stay in the epidural group with a mean difference of 1.07 (95% CI 0.06–2.08) without any significant differences in postoperative complications and readmissions rates. Conclusion. Epidural analgesia does not seem to offer any additional clinical benefits to patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery within an ERAS program.

  20. Role of Epidural Analgesia within an ERAS Program after Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: A Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Studies.

    PubMed

    Borzellino, Giuseppe; Francis, Nader Kamal; Chapuis, Olivier; Krastinova, Evguenia; Dyevre, Valérie; Genna, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural analgesia has been a cornerstone of any ERAS program for open colorectal surgery. With the improvements in anesthetic and analgesic techniques as well as the introduction of the laparoscopy for colorectal resection, the role of epidural analgesia has been questioned. The aim of the review was to assess through a meta-analysis the impact of epidural analgesia compared to other analgesic techniques for colorectal laparoscopic surgery within an ERAS program. Methods. Literature research was performed on PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. All randomised clinical trials that reported data on hospital stay, postoperative complications, and readmissions rates within an ERAS program with and without an epidural analgesia after a colorectal laparoscopic resection were included. Results. Five randomised clinical trials were selected and a total of 168 patients submitted to epidural analgesia were compared to 163 patients treated by an alternative analgesic technique. Pooled data show a longer hospital stay in the epidural group with a mean difference of 1.07 (95% CI 0.06-2.08) without any significant differences in postoperative complications and readmissions rates. Conclusion. Epidural analgesia does not seem to offer any additional clinical benefits to patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery within an ERAS program. PMID:27642630

  1. Role of Epidural Analgesia within an ERAS Program after Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: A Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Nader Kamal; Chapuis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural analgesia has been a cornerstone of any ERAS program for open colorectal surgery. With the improvements in anesthetic and analgesic techniques as well as the introduction of the laparoscopy for colorectal resection, the role of epidural analgesia has been questioned. The aim of the review was to assess through a meta-analysis the impact of epidural analgesia compared to other analgesic techniques for colorectal laparoscopic surgery within an ERAS program. Methods. Literature research was performed on PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. All randomised clinical trials that reported data on hospital stay, postoperative complications, and readmissions rates within an ERAS program with and without an epidural analgesia after a colorectal laparoscopic resection were included. Results. Five randomised clinical trials were selected and a total of 168 patients submitted to epidural analgesia were compared to 163 patients treated by an alternative analgesic technique. Pooled data show a longer hospital stay in the epidural group with a mean difference of 1.07 (95% CI 0.06–2.08) without any significant differences in postoperative complications and readmissions rates. Conclusion. Epidural analgesia does not seem to offer any additional clinical benefits to patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery within an ERAS program. PMID:27642630

  2. Complications when augmenting the posterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, Paul; Melnick, Philip R; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary posterior edentulous region presents a challenge when planning for restoring missing teeth with a dental implant. The available bone in such cases is often not dense and not adequate for the placement of a properly sized implant because of maxillary sinus pneumatization and alveolar bone loss. Maxillary sinus lift is a predictable procedure to provide adequate bone height for the purpose of implant placement. However, complications are encountered during or after the execution of the sinus lift procedure. In this article, the prevention and management of maxillary sinus complications are discussed. PMID:25434561

  3. Factors influencing the quality of postoperative epidural analgesia: an observational multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Wranicz, Piotr; Andersen, Hege; Nordbø, Arve; Kongsgaard, Ulf E

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural analgesia (EDA) is used widely for postoperative pain treatment. However, studies have reported a failure rate of EDA of up to 30%. We aimed to evaluate the quality of postoperative EDA in patients undergoing a laparotomy in five Norwegian hospitals. Methods This was a multicenter observational study in patients undergoing a laparotomy with epidural-based postoperative analgesia. Data were registered at three time points. Technical aspects, infusion rates, pain intensity, assessment procedures, side effects, and satisfaction of patients and health personnel were recorded. The use of other pain medications and coanalgesics was registered. Results Three hundred and seventeen patients were included. Pain control at rest was satisfactory in 89% of patients at 24 hours and in 91% at 48 hours. Pain control when coughing was satisfactory in 62% at 24 hours and in 59% at 48 hours. The spread of hypoesthesia was consistent for each individual patient but varied between patients. The hypoesthetic area was not associated with pain intensity, and the precision of the EDA insertion point was not associated with the pain score. Few side effects were reported. EDA was regarded as effective and functioning well by 64% of health personnel. Conclusion EDA was an effective method for postoperative pain relief at rest but did not give sufficient pain relief during mobilization. The use of cold stimulation to assess the spread of EDA had limited value as a clinical indicator of the efficacy of postoperative pain control. Validated tools for the control of EDA quality are needed. PMID:25206312

  4. Multimodal Approach to the Management of Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression (MESCC) Due to Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tancioni, Flavio; Navarria, Pierina; Lorenzetti, Martin A.; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Masci, Giovanna; Mancosu, Pietro; Alloisio, Marco; Morenghi, Emanuela; Santoro, Armando; Rodriguez y Baena, Riccardo; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of a multidisciplinary approach for treatment of patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression in terms of feasibility, local control, and survival. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine consecutive patients treated between January 2004 and December 2007 were included. The most common primary cancers were lung, breast, and kidney cancers. Ninety-eight surgical procedures were performed. Radiotherapy was performed within the first month postoperatively. Clinical outcome was evaluated by modified visual analog scale for pain, Frankel scale for neurologic deficit, and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scan. Nearly all patients (93%) had back pain before treatment, whereas major or minor preoperative neurologic deficit was present in 62 cases (63%). Results: Clinical remission of pain was obtained in the vast majority of patients (91%). Improvement of neurologic deficit was observed in 45 cases (72.5%). Local relapse occurred in 10%. Median survival was 11 months (range, 0-46 months). Overall survival at 1 year was 43.6%. Type of primary tumor significantly affected survival. Conclusions: In patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression, the combination of surgery plus radiotherapy is feasible and provides clinical benefit in most patients. The discussion of each single case within a multidisciplinary team has been of pivotal importance in implementing the most appropriate therapeutic approach.

  5. A Novel Actuator for Simulation of Epidural Anesthesia and Other Needle Insertion Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Magill, John C.; Byl, Marten F.; Hinds, Michael F.; Agassounon, William; Pratt, Stephen D.; Hess, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction When navigating a needle from skin to epidural space, a skilled clinician maintains a mental model of the anatomy and uses the various forms of haptic and visual feedback to track the location of the needle tip. Simulating the procedure requires an actuator that can produce the feel of tissue layers even as the needle direction changes from the ideal path. Methods A new actuator and algorithm architecture simulate forces associated with passing a needle through varying tissue layers. The actuator uses a set of cables to suspend a needle holder. The cables are wound onto spools controlled by brushless motors. An electromagnetic tracker is used to monitor the position of the needle tip. Results Novice and expert clinicians simulated epidural insertion with the simulator. Preliminary depth-time curves show that the user responds to changes in tissue properties as the needle is advanced. Some discrepancy in clinician response indicates that the feel of the simulator is sensitive to technique, thus perfect tissue property simulation has not been achieved. Conclusions The new simulator is able to approximately reproduce properties of complex multilayer tissue structures, including fine-scale texture. Methods for improving fidelity of the simulation are identified. PMID:20651481

  6. Use of infusion devices for epidural or intrathecal administration of spinal opioids.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J W

    1990-08-01

    The use of infusion devices for epidural or intrathecal administration of spinal opioids is described. The risks of infection and mechanical catheter complications, the need for escalating doses, reservoir volume, drug stability, and cost are practical considerations associated with use of both external and internal infusion systems. Use of patient criteria to identify suitable candidates for intraspinal administration of pain medication helps ensure successful management. The criteria for intraspinal delivery pumps are safety, accuracy, reliability, ease of management by the patient and the health-care professional, and compatibility of the drug with the pump components. The primary factors to consider when comparing pumps to be used for intraspinal delivery of pain medication are the volume and flow rate requirements of the devices. External portable infusion devices are classified according to the mechanism of operation into three primary groups: syringe pumps, peristaltic mechanisms, and elastomeric reservoir pumps. Portable patient-controlled analgesia pumps that have syringes, flexible reservoir bags, and elastomeric reservoirs have been developed. Implanted systems with flow rates that are preset at the factory make pain management more difficult when the patient requires changes or escalations in doses over time. A programmable implanted pump is available. Two advantages of continuous epidural or intrathecal infusion are (1) the peaks and valleys of pain relief with bolus injections are eliminated and (2) the need for multiple injections is reduced. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pumps enhance the efficacy of continuous infusions by allowing the patient to administer bolus doses to control acute pain. PMID:2202209

  7. Primary spinal epidural lymphoma: Patients' profile, outcome, and prognostic factors: A multicenter Rare Cancer Network study

    SciTech Connect

    Monnard, Virginie; Sun, Alex; Epelbaum, Ron; Poortmans, Philip; Miller, Robert C.; Verschueren, Tom; Scandolaro, Luciano; Villa, Salvador; Majno, Sabine Balmer; Ostermann, Sandrine; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Mirimanoff, Rene-Olivier . E-mail: rene-olivier.mirimanoff@chuv.ch

    2006-07-01

    Purpose To assess the clinical profile, treatment outcome, and prognostic factors in primary spinal epidural lymphoma (PSEL). Methods and Materials Between 1982 and 2002, 52 consecutive patients with PSEL were treated in nine institutions of the Rare Cancer Network. Forty-eight patients had an Ann Arbor stage IE and four had a stage IIE. Forty-eight patients underwent decompressive laminectomy, all received radiotherapy (RT) with (n = 32) or without chemotherapy (n = 20). Median RT dose was 36 Gy (range, 6-50 Gy). Results Six (11%) patients progressed locally and 22 (42%) had a systemic relapse. At last follow-up, 28 patients were alive and 24 had died. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were 69%, 57%, and 88%, respectively. In univariate analyses, favorable prognostic factors were younger age and complete neurologic response. Multivariate analysis showed that combined modality treatment, RT volume, total dose more than 36 Gy, tumor resection, and complete neurologic response were favorable prognostic factors. Conclusions Primary spinal epidural lymphoma has distinct clinical features and outcome, with a relatively good prognosis. After therapy, local control is excellent and systemic relapse occurs in less than half the cases. Combined modality treatment appears to be superior to RT alone.

  8. A thin film polyimide mesh microelectrode for chronic epidural electrocorticography recording with enhanced contactability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Jeyeon; Byeon, Hang jin; Choi, Hoseok; Kim, In Young; Lee, Kyoung-Min; Jungho Pak, James; Jang, Dong Pyo; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Epidural electrocorticography (ECoG) activity may be more reliable and stable than single-unit-activity or local field potential. Invasive brain computer interface (BCI) devices are limited by mechanical mismatching and cellular reactive responses due to differences in the elastic modulus and the motion of stiff electrodes. We propose a mesh-shaped electrode to enhance the contactability between surface of dura and electrode. Approach. We designed a polyimide (PI) electrode with a mesh pattern for more conformal contact with a curved surface. We compared the contact capability of mesh PI electrodes with conventionally used sheet PI electrode. The electrical properties of the mesh PI electrode were evaluated for four weeks. We recorded the epidural ECoG (eECoG) activity on the surface of rhesus monkey brains while they performed a saccadic task for four months. Main results. The mesh PI electrode showed good contact with the agarose brain surface, as evaluated by visual inspection and signal measurement. It was about 87% accurate in predicting the direction of saccade eye movement. Significance. Our results indicate that the mesh PI electrode was flexible and good contact on the curved surface and can record eECoG activity maintaining close contact to dura, which was proved by in vivo and in vitro test.

  9. Effects of General-epidural Anaesthesia on Haemodynamics in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X-Z; Wei, C-W; Wang, H-Y; Ge, Y-H; Chen, J; Wang, J; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The current study aims to explore the effects of general-epidural anaesthesia (GEA) on the perioperative haemodynamics in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), as well as their extubation time. Methods: A total of 42 MG patients (Ossermann I–II b types) receiving elective total thymectomy were randomized into GEA (n = 20) and general anaesthesia alone (GA; n = 22) groups. Changes in their mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded before anesthesia and at the time of intubation, skin incision, sternotomy and extubation. Dosages of general anaesthetics during time unit and the time of extubation and complete recovery from the ending of the operation were also recorded. Results: After anaesthesia, both groups displayed increased MAPs and HRs, with those in the GA group significantly higher than those in the GEA group (p < 0.05). The total consumption of general anaesthetics in the GA group was markedly higher than that in the GEA group (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The GEA group had shorter postoperative extubation and recovery time than the GA group (p < 0.01). General-epidural anaesthesia stabilizes perioperative haemodynamics, reduces the consumption of general anaesthetics and shortens extubation time. It is a feasible and ideal anaesthetic method at present. PMID:26360681

  10. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma management with minimally invasive surgery through tubular retractors

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chao-Feng; Zhuang, Yuan-Dong; Chen, Chun-Mei; Cai, Gang-Feng; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Zhao, Wei; Ahmada, Said Idrissa; Devi, Ramparsad Doorga; Kibria, Md Golam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To report a minimally invasive paraspinal approach in the treatment of a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). We additionally aim to review the relevant literature to enhance our knowledge of this disease. SSEH is an uncommon but potentially catastrophic disease. Currently, most appropriate management is emergence decompression laminectomy and hematoma evacuation. An 81-year-old woman was admitted to the neurology department with a chief complaint of bilateral numbness and weakness of the lower limbs and difficulty walking for 4 days with progressive weakness developed over the following 3 days accompanied with pain in the lower limbs and lower back. No history of trauma was reported. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracolumbar spine demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from T-12 to L-5 with thecal sac and cauda equina displacement anterior. The patient was treated in our department with a minimally invasive approach. This operation method had been approved by Chinese Independent Ethics Committee. Three months following the operation, the patient had regained the ability to walk with the aid of a cane and myodynamia tests revealed normal results for the left lower limb and a 4/5 grade for the right limb. Importantly, no complications were exhibited from the surgical operation. The minimally invasive paraspinal approach through tubular retractors is demonstrated here as an effective alternative method for the treatment of SSEH. PMID:27367986

  11. [Continuous cervical epidural with ropivacaine in carotid surgery. Description of a case].

    PubMed

    Musinu, C; Cagetti, M

    1998-12-01

    In the light of the recent addition of ropivacaine as a local anesthetic to our pharmacopeia, its effects at the cervical level are examined. A patient undergoing TEAC was given continuous epidural anesthesia with ropivacaine 0.5% (total dose: 167.5 mg in three hours) at C6-C7. No supplementary i.v. anesthetic was administered intraoperatively. The results obtained were compared with those of a similar case as to type of pathology and anesthetic technique, who was anesthetised with bupivacaine 0.375% (total dose: 112.5 mg in three hours-continuous epidural anesthesia) + fentanyl (0.18 mg), supplemented intravenously with ketoprophene (200 mg) + fentanyl (0.15 mg) for analgesic reasons. From this comparison, ropivacaine 0.5% was found to have greater anesthetic potential than bupivacaine 0.375%. However, it did not appear that ropivacaine exerted a protective effect on cardiovascular conditions in the course of carotid surgery. Further anesthesiologic experiences are needed to define the validity of ropivacaine in cervical surgery.

  12. Endovascular embolization of a giant aneurysm in medial posterior choroidal artery with associated arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Alshumrani, Ghazi Adlan; Al-Qahtani, Sultan

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old male adolescent who presented with vomiting and headache and in the emergency department had a loss of consciousness, was discovered to have a large mass compressing the brainstem. CT scan showed two adjacent mass lesions. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed a giant aneurysm in the posterior medial choroidal artery, subsequently embolized with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs). Ten GDCs were used to embolize the aneurysm and the distal aspect of its parent artery. Postembolization DSA confirmed complete embolization of the aneurysm. Endovasular embolization of giant aneurysms in the medial posterior choroidal artery with GDCs is technically feasible and represents a successful therapeutic option. In unruptured giant intracranial aneurysms, simultaneous packing of the aneurysm with coils and occlusion of the distal parent artery can have a good outcome.

  13. The posterior impingement sign: diagnosis of rotator cuff and posterior labral tears secondary to internal impingement in overhand athletes.

    PubMed

    Meister, Keith; Buckley, Bernadette; Batts, Joel

    2004-08-01

    We conducted this study to determine whether a test, the posterior impingement maneuver, could be used to prospectively identify articular side tears of the rotator cuff and/or posterior labrum. Sixty-nine athletes presented with posterior shoulder pain that developed during overhand athletics. Injured shoulders were placed into 90 degrees to 110 degrees of abduction, slight extension, and maximum external rotation, and an effort was made to elicit pain deep within the posterior aspect. Overall sensitivity of the test was 75.5%, and specificity was 85%. When only athletes with noncontact injuries (gradual onset of pain) were considered, sensitivity was 95% and specificity was 100%. A positive posterior impingement sign correlated highly with undersurface tearing of the rotator cuff and/or tearing of the posterior labrum in athletes with gradual onset of posterior shoulder pain during overhand athletics. PMID:15379239

  14. Reporting of 'hypotension' after epidural analgesia during labour. Effect of choice of arm and timing of baseline readings.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Black, A M

    1998-02-01

    We studied 20 women in labour to see how reporting 'hypotension' after obstetric epidural analgesia is affected by position of the blood pressure cuff and baseline definition. Blood pressure was recorded from both arms simultaneously while the woman was semirecumbent and then in the left lateral position. Three readings were then taken after epidural bupivacaine, one left lateral and the remainder right lateral. Before the epidural, blood pressure in the dependent arm in the lateral position was similar to blood pressure in either arm in the semirecumbent position and an average of 10 mmHg (systolic) and 14 mmHg (diastolic) higher than blood pressure in the uppermost arm (p < or = 0.00005). This difference persisted in both lateral positions as epidural analgesia became established. Choosing different definitions of hypotension, baselines and arm to measure blood pressure resulted in 'hypotension rates' between 0% and 75%. For blood pressure measurement in the lateral position, the blood pressure cuff should be placed on the dependent arm.

  15. Comparison of dexmedetomidine and clonidine as an adjuvant to ropivacaine for epidural anesthesia in lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Arunkumar, Sruthi; Hemanth Kumar, V.R; Krishnaveni, N.; Ravishankar, M.; Jaya, Velraj; Aruloli, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The quality and duration of analgesia is improved when a local anesthetic is combined with alpha 2 adrenergic agonist. Though, the effects of clonidine on local anesthetics have been extensively studied, there are limited studies demonstrating the effects of epidural dexmedetomidine on local anesthetics. The aim of our study is to compare the effect of clonidine and dexmedetomidine when used as an adjuvant to epidural ropivacaine in lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomized into two groups-group ropivacaine with clonidine (RC) received 15 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1 μg/kg clonidine and group ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine (RD) received 15 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine epidurally. Onset of sensory analgesia using cold swab, onset of motor blockade using Bromage scale, time to 2 dermatome regression of sensory level, time to first demand for analgesia, sedation using Ramsay sedation scale, intra operative hemodynamic parameters and complications were assessed. Results: The onset (RD-8.53 ± 1.81, RC-11.93 ± 1.96) and duration of sensory blockade (RD-316 ± 31.5, RC-281 ± 37, sedation were found to be significantly better in the dexmedetomidine group. No significant difference was found in terms of onset of motor blockade and hemodynamic changes. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine at doses of 1 μg/kg is an effective adjuvant to ropivacaine for epidural anesthesia, which is comparable to clonidine. PMID:26543457

  16. Epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin, a GnRH analogue, for the resolution of follicular cysts in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Annalisa; Annalisa, Rizzo; Campanile, Debora; Debora, Campanile; Mutinati, Maddalena; Maddalena, Mutinati; Minoia, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Minoia; Spedicato, Massimo; Massimo, Spedicato; Sciorsci, Raffaele Luigi; Luigi, Sciorsci Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Bovine follicular cysts are an ovarian disorder of dairy cows associated with abnormal estrous behaviour and infertility. The treatment of choice is intramuscular administration of a GnRH analogue, which acts by triggering pituitary release of LH. However, the presence of GnRH and GnRH receptors on spinal cord and ovary in some species, and the kind of innervation of the ovary, let us hypothesize that GnRH and its analogues may also act when administered by epidural route, as happens for other drugs. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare the effects of epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin (a GnRH analogue) on FC regression, estrus detection and pregnancy outcomes. The study was conducted on 220 Friesian cows affected by follicular cysts, divided among 4 groups: Group L(epid) and Group L(im) received, respectively 50 μg of lecirelin in the epidural space and intramuscular; Group C(epid) and Group C(im) were used as control groups. In Group L(epid), estrus induction and pregnancy rates were significantly higher than in Group L(im). The results of this study show that the epidural administration of lecirelin promoted the remission of follicular cysts and an improvement of reproductive parameters compared to intramuscular administration. Thus, an alternative therapeutical approach is available for FC treatment, in order to obtain an easier restoration of the ovarian activity, especially in those cases refractory to classical therapeutic approaches.

  17. Paraesthesia during the needle-through-needle and the double segment technique for combined spinal epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ahn, H J; Choi, D H; Kim, C S

    2006-07-01

    Paraesthesia during regional anaesthesia is an unpleasant sensation for patients and, more importantly, in some cases it is related to neurological injury. Relatively few studies have been conducted on the frequency of paraesthesia during combined spinal epidural anaesthesia. We compared two combined spinal epidural anaesthesia techniques: the needle-through-needle technique and the double segment technique in this respect. We randomly allocated 116 parturients undergoing elective Caesarean section to receive anaesthesia using one of these techniques. Both techniques were performed using a 27G pencil point needle, an 18G Tuohy needle, and a 20G multiport epidural catheter from the same manufacturer. The overall frequency of paraesthesia was higher in the needle-through-needle technique group (56.9% vs. 31.6%, p = 0.011). The frequency of paraesthesia at spinal needle insertion was 20.7% in the needle-through-needle technique group and 8.8% in the double segment technique group; whereas the frequency of paraesthesia at epidural catheter insertion was 46.6% in the needle-through-needle technique group and 24.6% in the double segment technique group.

  18. AANA journal course: update for nurse anesthetists-improving the safety of subarachnoid and epidural blocks--Part A.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, M A

    1997-08-01

    Hypotension caused by reduced venous return to the heart is a common hazard during subarachnoid and epidural anesthesia. Reduced venous return can also cause severe bradycardia and even cardiac arrest. The infusion of a crystalloid intravenous preload prior to the injection of local anesthetic helps prevent these complications. Unfortunately, intravenous fluid preloading prior to subarachnoid or epidural block is neither appropriate for all patients nor is it always effective. Vasopressor infusions and lower extremity compression, though not completely studied, may allow for further decreases in the incidence of hypotension and bradycardia. When dosing an epidural catheter, making each dose a test dose and observing for signs of subarachnoid or intravascular injection decreases the incidence of hypotension, seizure, and cardiotoxicity. The pathophysiology of cardiac arrest and resuscitation is different during major conduction block due primarily to changes in peripheral vascular tone and venous return to the heart. Neural injury associated with regional anesthesia is due to needle trauma, hematoma, injectate toxicity, ischemia, and compression. Though neural injury is rare, it is more commonly associated with blocks performed in the lumbar region (spinals and epidurals) than in other types of blocks. PMID:9281920

  19. Reporting of 'hypotension' after epidural analgesia during labour. Effect of choice of arm and timing of baseline readings.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Black, A M

    1998-02-01

    We studied 20 women in labour to see how reporting 'hypotension' after obstetric epidural analgesia is affected by position of the blood pressure cuff and baseline definition. Blood pressure was recorded from both arms simultaneously while the woman was semirecumbent and then in the left lateral position. Three readings were then taken after epidural bupivacaine, one left lateral and the remainder right lateral. Before the epidural, blood pressure in the dependent arm in the lateral position was similar to blood pressure in either arm in the semirecumbent position and an average of 10 mmHg (systolic) and 14 mmHg (diastolic) higher than blood pressure in the uppermost arm (p < or = 0.00005). This difference persisted in both lateral positions as epidural analgesia became established. Choosing different definitions of hypotension, baselines and arm to measure blood pressure resulted in 'hypotension rates' between 0% and 75%. For blood pressure measurement in the lateral position, the blood pressure cuff should be placed on the dependent arm. PMID:9534634

  20. [Management of transient radicular pain after receiving an epidural blood patch for headaches due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Melo, M C; Revuelta, M E; Santeularia, T; Genové, M; Català, E

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache is an uncommon disease that resolves spontaneously in most of the cases and in a short period of time. The initial treatment should be symptomatic. In some patients the symptomatology is extremely disabling, and in these cases both the diagnosis and treatment may be performed by an epidural blood patch. A 49-year-old Caucasian woman, with no previous record of epidural or intrathecal puncture, consulted in the Emergency Department complaining of a 9-day history of frontal headache and diplopia, along with nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache. Considering the symptomatology and the uncontrolled pain, the Pain Unit of our hospital performed an epidural blood patch. In the first 24h the patient reported a remarkable relief of both headache and diplopia but developed a left lumbar radiculopathy that was treated successfully with supportive measures. Transient lumbar radiculopathy is a common and acceptable event secondary to the use of epidural blood patch as a treatment for spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache.