Science.gov

Sample records for posterior interosseous nerve

  1. Radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Sassine, Tannus Jorge; Lima, Guilherme de Freitas; Rodrigues, Leandro Marano; Padua, David Victoria Hoffmann; Nadai, Anderson de

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the radial head and radial neck correspond to 1.7-5.4% of all fractures and approximately 30% may present associated injuries. In the literature, there are few reports of radial head fracture with posterior interosseous nerve injury. This study aimed to report a case of radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury.

  2. Neuralgic Amyotrophy Manifesting as Mimicking Posterior Interosseous Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin Seo; Kang, Suk Hyung; Choi, Eun Hi

    2015-01-01

    The upper trunk of the brachial plexus is the most common area affected by neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), and paresis of the shoulder girdle muscle is the most prevalent manifestation. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy is a rare presentation in patients with NA. It results in dropped finger on the affected side and may be misdiagnosed as entrapment syndrome or compressive neuropathy. We report an unusual case of NA manifested as PIN palsy and suggest that knowledge of clinical NA phenotypes is crucial for early diagnosis of peripheral nerve palsies. PMID:26713154

  3. Reconstruction of posterior interosseous nerve injury following biceps tendon repair: case report and cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Mokhtee, David B; Brown, Justin M; Mackinnon, Susan E; Tung, Thomas H

    2009-06-01

    Surgical repair of distal biceps tendon rupture is a technically challenging procedure that has the potential for devastating and permanently disabling complications. We report two cases of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) injury following successful biceps tendon repair utilizing both the single-incision and two-incision approaches. We also describe our technique of posterior interosseous nerve repair using a medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve graft (MABC) and a new approach to the terminal branches of the posterior interosseous nerve that makes this reconstruction possible. Finally, we advocate consideration for identification of the posterior interosseous nerve prior to reattachment of the biceps tendon to the radial tuberosity.

  4. Posterior interosseous neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kele, Henrich; Xia, Annie; Weiler, Markus; Schwarz, Daniel; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the spatial pattern of lesion dispersion in posterior interosseous neuropathy syndrome (PINS) by high-resolution magnetic resonance neurography. Methods: This prospective study was approved by the local ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. In 19 patients with PINS and 20 healthy controls, a standardized magnetic resonance neurography protocol at 3-tesla was performed with coverage of the upper arm and elbow (T2-weighted fat-saturated: echo time/repetition time 52/7,020 milliseconds, in-plane resolution 0.27 × 0.27 mm2). Lesion classification of the radial nerve trunk and its deep branch (which becomes the posterior interosseous nerve) was performed by visual rating and additional quantitative analysis of normalized T2 signal of radial nerve voxels. Results: Of 19 patients with PINS, only 3 (16%) had a focal neuropathy at the entry of the radial nerve deep branch into the supinator muscle at elbow/forearm level. The other 16 (84%) had proximal radial nerve lesions at the upper arm level with a predominant lesion focus 8.3 ± 4.6 cm proximal to the humeroradial joint. Most of these lesions (75%) followed a specific somatotopic pattern, involving only those fascicles that would form the posterior interosseous nerve more distally. Conclusions: PINS is not necessarily caused by focal compression at the supinator muscle but is instead frequently a consequence of partial fascicular lesions of the radial nerve trunk at the upper arm level. Neuroimaging should be considered as a complementary diagnostic method in PINS. PMID:27683851

  5. Guillain-Barré syndrome with secondary bilateral posterior interosseous nerve syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sucher, B M; Cavanaugh, J A

    1982-04-01

    A case of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), with secondary entrapment of the posterior interosseous nerve bilaterally, is presented. It is felt that this was caused by the edema associated with the primary GBS, which led to compression with an anatomically narrowed supinator space, previously aggravated by repetitive pronation-supination. Diagnosis of such cases demands careful serial physical examinations, electromyography, and nerve conduction velocity studies. Appropriate splinting and careful exercise to balance muscle return are essential in physiatric management.

  6. Transfer of the extensor indicis proprius branch of posterior interosseous nerve to reconstruct ulnar nerve and median nerve injured proximally: an anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei-ji; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Jia-ju; Zhou, Ju-pu; Zuo, Zhi-cheng; Wu, Bing-bing

    2017-01-01

    Proximal or middle lesions of the ulnar or median nerves are responsible for extensive loss of hand motor function. This occurs even when the most meticulous microsurgical techniques or nerve grafts are used. Previous studies had proposed that nerve transfer was more effective than nerve grafting for nerve repair. Our hypothesis is that transfer of the posterior interosseous nerve, which contains mainly motor fibers, to the ulnar or median nerve can innervate the intrinsic muscles of hands. The present study sought to investigate the feasibility of reconstruction of the deep branch of the ulnar nerve and the thenar branch of median nerve by transferring the extensor indicis proprius branch of the posterior interosseous nerve obtained from adult cadavers. The results suggested that the extensor indicis proprius branch of the posterior interosseous nerve had approximately similar diameters and number of fascicles and myelinated nerve fibers to those of the deep branch of ulnar nerve and the thenar branch of the median nerve. These confirm the feasibility of extensor indicis proprius branch of posterior interosseous nerve transfer for reconstruction of the deep branch of the ulnar nerve and the thenar branch of median nerve. This procedure could be a novel and effective method for the functional recovery of the intrinsic muscles of hands after ulnar nerve or median nerve injury. PMID:28250760

  7. Transient entrapment neuropathy of the posterior interosseous nerve in violin players.

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, N; Maffulli, F

    1991-01-01

    Eleven white male right handed violin players complained of transient muscular deficit of the extensor compartment of the left forearm during and after prolonged playing. This was associated with paraesthesiae and pain. Relief was achieved keeping the wrist and the elbow flexed, with the supinated forearm held by the contralateral hand. An anatomical study showed changes of the relationship of the posterior interosseous nerve with its surrounding structures with pronation and supination of the forearm. On the basis of the clinical features, the anatomical studies and the response to a simple physiotherapeutic regime, it is suggested that prolonged pronation of the forearm may cause transient entrapment of the nerve. Images PMID:1849172

  8. Transient entrapment neuropathy of the posterior interosseous nerve in violin players.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, N; Maffulli, F

    1991-01-01

    Eleven white male right handed violin players complained of transient muscular deficit of the extensor compartment of the left forearm during and after prolonged playing. This was associated with paraesthesiae and pain. Relief was achieved keeping the wrist and the elbow flexed, with the supinated forearm held by the contralateral hand. An anatomical study showed changes of the relationship of the posterior interosseous nerve with its surrounding structures with pronation and supination of the forearm. On the basis of the clinical features, the anatomical studies and the response to a simple physiotherapeutic regime, it is suggested that prolonged pronation of the forearm may cause transient entrapment of the nerve.

  9. Unexpected motor axons in the distal superficial radial and posterior interosseous nerves: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Okwueze, Martina I; Cardwell, Nancy L; Wolfort, Sean L; Nanney, Lillian B

    2007-10-01

    The prevalence of motor variations in the nerves supplying muscles of the first web space was evaluated by a visual dissection and immunohistochemical analysis from 56 cadaver hands. By microscopic visualization, 30% of the superficial radial nerves (SRNs) sent branches into muscles of the first web space. Since these unexpected penetrating branches were expected to be sensory or proprioceptive, markers of sensory and motor axons were used for confirmation. Positive identifications of motor axons (as identified by positive immunostaining for choline acetyltransferase) were made in 30% of SRNs and in 28.5% of posterior interosseous nerves. Classical teachings that the SRNs and PINs are exclusively sensory have been brought into question. Our data are in agreement with the rare clinical finding that motor function occasionally persists following devastating injury to both the ulnar and median nerves. Anatomic prevalence for this variation appears much higher than previous descriptions have indicated.

  10. Type III Monteggia fracture with posterior interosseous nerve injury in a child

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Min; Du, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Elbow injury in children by improper treatment or a delay of more than 3 weeks could lead to old unreduced Monteggia fracture, which are difficult to manage. Conservative or normal surgical methods usually fail. Patient concerns: Herein, we present a 6-year-old boy with sustaining injury approximately 1 month to his left elbow. Activity in his elbow was restricted, and his ability to extend his wrist and fingers was impaired. Diagnoses: Type III Monteggia elbow fracture-dislocation consisting of radial head dislocation and malunion of the ulna associated with posterior interosseous nerve palsy were confirmed, which requiring surgical treatment. Interventions: A closed reduction was performed with hyperplastic scar tissues erased and the radial head relocated. Outcomes: Follow-up 4 months later showed satisfactory recovery of function. Lessons: Forearm fractures in children may be misjudged, and that early anatomical reduction rather than conservative treatment may be required. PMID:28296780

  11. Posterior Interosseous Nerve Syndrome Resulting from Parosteal Lipoma of the Proximal Radius: An Elusive Diagnosis Yet Excellent Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Siddiui, Saad

    2017-01-01

    A 53-year old man presented with seven months history of progressive weakness of extension of the digits and the thumb of the left hand. The wrist extension was normal and sensations were also intact. The patient had also been noticing a progressively enlarging lump on the lower anterolateral aspect of the left antecubital fossa for the last three months. Physical examination andelectro diagnostic studies revealed motor deficit along the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) distribution with preservation of sensations. Also a soft tissue solitary lump (measuring 6×5 cm in its greatest dimensions) was palpable in the left antecubital fossa. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the forearm revealed a well-defined, non-enhancing, homogenous, fat intensity lesion in the left antecubital fossa, attached to the proximal radius. The patient underwent surgical excision of the lump with decompression of the PIN in the radial tunnel. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of parosteal lipoma. Although the diagnosis was elusive at the very outset, yet prudent clinical judgment, appropriate ancillary investigations and timely surgical intervention resulted in optimal functional recovery of the hand drop. There was complete motor recovery at 4-months follow up with no recurrence of the lipomaafter one year. PMID:28289621

  12. Delayed diagnosed intermuscular lipoma causing a posterior interosseous nerve palsy in a patient with cervical spondylosis: the “priceless” value of the clinical examination in the technological era

    PubMed Central

    COLASANTI, R.; IACOANGELI, M.; DI RIENZO, A.; DOBRAN, M.; DI SOMMA, L.; NOCCHI, N.; SCERRATI, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy may present with various symptoms, and may resemble cervical spondylosis. Case report We report about a 59-year-old patient with cervical spondylosis which delayed the diagnosis of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy due to an intermuscular lipoma. Initial right hand paraesthesias and clumsiness, together with MR findings of right C5–C6 and C6–C7 foraminal stenosis, misled the diagnostic investigation. The progressive loss of extension of all right hand fingers brought to detect a painless mass compressing the PIN. Electrophysiological studies confirmed a right radial motor neuropathy at the level of the forearm. Results Surgical tumor removal and nerve decompression resulted in a gradual motor deficits recovery. Conclusions A thorough clinical examination is paramount, and electrophysiology may differentiate between cervical and peripheral nerve lesions. Ultrasonography and MR offer an effective evaluation of lipomas, which represent a rare cause of PIN palsy. Surgical decompression and lipoma removal generally determine excellent prognoses, with very few recurrences. PMID:27142825

  13. [Incomplete anterior interosseous nerve syndrome in a guitar player].

    PubMed

    Rieck, B

    2005-12-01

    A rare case of median nerve compression syndrome is reported in a guitar player who had changed the posture and position of his instrument so that the edge of the guitar exerted sharp pressure on the median nerve close to the branching of the interosseous anterior nerve. There was partial paralysis of the interosseous anterior nerve with complete failure of the deep flexor of the index finger, while the flexor pollicis longus was intact. There was also paresthesia of the index finger. Treatment was conservative with a sleeve including a gel cushion which protected the forearm against the edge of the instrument. Function recurred completely within six weeks without ever interrupting instrument practice.

  14. The distally based posterior interosseous fasciocutaneous island flap in reconstruction of the hand in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Teo, T C; Richard, B M

    1997-01-01

    In leprosy a functionally useless hand can be the sequelae of resorption of the sensation-impaired thumb and fingers resulting from repeated trauma and infection. When this process shortens the thumb to the level of the proximal phalanx or metacarpal, the effect is to produce a relatively shallow first web space which together with the shortening, can prevent the most basic hand manoeuvre of a pincer or pinch grip. The reconstructive procedure commonly used in this situation is to widen and deepen the web space with a z-plasty combined with excision of the second metacarpal but the result can be inadequate. We have used the posterior interosseous fasciocutaneous island flap, both as a simple and a compound flap, to solve this challenging problem and we report here our experience with four patients.

  15. The prevalence of accessory heads of the flexor pollicis longus and the flexor digitorum profundus muscles in Egyptians and their relations to median and anterior interosseous nerves.

    PubMed

    El Domiaty, M A; Zoair, M M; Sheta, A A

    2008-02-01

    fingers. The FPLah was found between the median nerve anteriorly and the anterior interosseous nerve posteriorly. Both FPLah and FDPah took their nerve supply mainly from the anterior interosseous nerve and, less frequently, from the median nerve. The mean values of the total lengths of FPLah and FDPah were 74.66 mm and 208.33 mm, respectively. Cadaveric dissection in this study confirmed the prevalence of the FPLah and FDPah in Egyptians and demonstrated the relationship of the FPLah to the median nerve and its anterior interosseous branch. These findings may provide the surgeon with information for the differential diagnosis of the causes and sites of anterior interosseous nerve syndrome and entrapment neuropathy of the median nerve in the forearm

  16. Treatment of Distal Radius Fracture Nonunion With Posterior Interosseous Bone Flap

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Hossein; Shahryar-Kamrani, Reza; Ghane, Bahareh; Yavarikia, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Nonunion of distal radius fractures is disabling. Treatment is difficult and the results are not predictable. However, posterior interosseous bone flap (PIBF) has been successful in treating forearm nonunion. Objectives To treat distal radius fracture nonunion with PIBF as a new procedure. Patients and Methods This prospective non-randomized cohort study was performed at two hospitals in Tehran between January 2011 and September 2015. PIBFs were applied in nine patients (10 nonunions) with a mean age of 55 years. Union success rate, grip strength, wrist range of motion, and forearm rotation were then evaluated. Results Although four of the patients had a history of infection, all participants achieved fracture union at a mean time of 3.8 months. Grip strength improved by 12.4 kg. There was also 36° improvement in wrist flexion, 20° improvement in wrist extension, 60° improvement in forearm supination, and 46° improvement in forearm pronation. The range of motion and grip strength improvements were significant. Conclusions Pedicled PIBF is a new option for treating distal radius fracture nonunion. The results are predictable in achieving union and good function, and this technique can be successfully used in cases with extensive soft-tissue damage or infection. PMID:27703802

  17. The Number of Perforators Included in Reversed Flow Posterior Interosseous Artery Flap: Does It Affect the Incidence of Venous Congestion?

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Ayman A.; Elbarbary, Amir S.; Sayed, Mohamed A.; Elghareeb, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to decrease the incidence of venous congestion occurring in the reversed flow posterior interosseous artery flap used for coverage of hand defects. Methods: This may be achieved by studying the incidence of venous congestion in flaps including only 1 perforator and comparing the results with others including more than 1 perforator both in small and large sized flaps. Results: This study showed that inclusion of only 1 perforator in the flap decreased the incidence of venous congestion with complete flap loss in flaps to 5%. Also, it decreased the incidence of venous congestion with partial flap loss in flaps to 10%. Conclusions: The small sized reversed flow posterior interosseous artery flap should be less than 40 cm2 and should include only 1 perforator to decrease the incidence of venous congestion with partial and complete loss of the flap. The level of evidence for this study is the type II prospective comparative study. PMID:28293513

  18. Conservative management of posterior interosseous neuropathy in an elite baseball pitcher's return to play: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Robb, Andrew; Sajko, Sandy

    2009-12-01

    This report documents retrospectively a case of Posterior Interosseous Neuropathy (PIN) occurring in an elite baseball pitcher experiencing a deep ache in the radial aspect of the forearm and altered sensation in the dorsum of the hand on the throwing arm during his pitching motion. The initial clinical goal was to control for inflammation to the nerve and muscle with active rest, microcurrent therapy, low-level laser therapy, and cessation of throwing. Minimizing mechanosensitivity at the common extensor region of the right elbow and PIN, was achieved by employing the use of myofascial release and augmented soft tissue mobilization techniques. Neurodynamic mobilization technique was also administered to improve neural function. Implementation of a sport specific protocol for the purposes of maintaining throwing mechanics and overall conditioning was utilized. Successful resolution of symptomatology and return to pre-injury status was achieved in 5 weeks. A review of literature and an evidence-based discussion for the differential diagnoses, clinical examination, diagnosis, management and rehabilitation of PIN is presented.

  19. Conservative management of posterior interosseous neuropathy in an elite baseball pitcher’s return to play: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Andrew; Sajko, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    This report documents retrospectively a case of Posterior Interosseous Neuropathy (PIN) occurring in an elite baseball pitcher experiencing a deep ache in the radial aspect of the forearm and altered sensation in the dorsum of the hand on the throwing arm during his pitching motion. The initial clinical goal was to control for inflammation to the nerve and muscle with active rest, microcurrent therapy, low-level laser therapy, and cessation of throwing. Minimizing mechanosensitivity at the common extensor region of the right elbow and PIN, was achieved by employing the use of myofascial release and augmented soft tissue mobilization techniques. Neurodynamic mobilization technique was also administered to improve neural function. Implementation of a sport specific protocol for the purposes of maintaining throwing mechanics and overall conditioning was utilized. Successful resolution of symptomatology and return to pre-injury status was achieved in 5 weeks. A review of literature and an evidence-based discussion for the differential diagnoses, clinical examination, diagnosis, management and rehabilitation of PIN is presented. PMID:20037695

  20. Posterior tibial nerve lesions in ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cugat, Ramon; Ares, Oscar; Cuscó, Xavier; Garcia, Montserrat; Samitier, Gonzalo; Seijas, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Ankle arthroscopy provides a minimally invasive approach to the diagnosis and treatment of certain ankle disorders. Neurological complications resulting from ankle arthroscopy have been well documented in orthopaedic and podiatric literature. Owing to the superficial location of the ankle joint and the abundance of overlying periarticular neurovascular structures, complications reported in ankle arthroscopy are greater than those reported for other joints. In particular, all reported neurovascular injuries following ankle arthroscopy have been the direct result of distractor pin or portal placement. The standard posteromedial portal has recognized risks because of the proximity of the posterior neurovascular structures. There can be considerable variability in the course of these portals and their proximity to the neurovascular structures. We found one report of intra-articular damage to the posterior tibial nerve as a result of ankle arthroscopy in the English-language literature and we report this paper as a second case described in the literature.

  1. Upper limb reinnervation in C6 tetraplegia using a triple nerve transfer: case report.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Natasha; Hahn, Jodie B; Cooper, Catherine A; Weymouth, Michael D; Flood, Stephen J; Galea, Mary P

    2014-09-01

    Restoration of elbow extension, grasp, key pinch, and release are major goals in low-level tetraplegia. Traditionally, these functions are achieved using tendon transfers. In this case these goals were achieved using nerve transfers. We present a 21-year-old man with a C6 level of tetraplegia. The left upper limb was treated 6 months after injury with a triple nerve transfer. A teres minor nerve branch to long head of triceps nerve branch, brachialis nerve branch to anterior interosseous nerve, and supinator nerve branch to posterior interosseous nerve transfer were used successfully to reconstruct elbow extension, key pinch, grasp, and release simultaneously.

  2. Anatomic variations of posterior paranasal sinuses and optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Efendić, Alma; Muharemović, Edin; Skomorac, Rasim; Bečulić, Hakija; Šestić, Sabina; Halilović, Benjamin; Mahmić-Kaknjo, Mersiha

    2017-02-01

    Aim To define direct anatomical relations of the sphenoidal (alae minores), ethmoidal sinuses and optic nerve, with an emphasis on determining the effect of age on pneumatisation and dehiscence. Methods This retrospective, descriptive study involved 60 consecutive patients: 30 patients younger than 30 and30 patients older than 60 years of age. All patients underwent computerized tomography(CT). The relationship of the optic nerve and the sphenoidal and ethmoidal sinuses was classified. The presence of dehiscence in the bone structures, forming the optic canal, was checked. Dehiscence was defined as absence of visible bone density located between the sinus and the optic nerve. Protrusion of the optic nerve into the sphenoidal sinus was defined as optic nerve surrounded by pneumatised space. Results The most common type of relation between the optic nerve and sphenoidal sinus was type I, where the optic nerve was immediately adjacent to the lateral or superior wall of the sphenoidal sinus, without impression on the sinus wall. Dehiscence was documented in 15 (25%) cases, it was more common in older patients (8, 27%) than in younger ones (7, 23%). The pneumatisation processes were more frequent in patients over 60 (5, 17%) than in those younger than 30 years (4, 13%). Conclusion Surgeons and ophthalmologists should be aware of high frequency of dehiscence of sphenoidal sinus walls when treating adult patients in our population, especially when evaluating risks and complications of surgical procedures or when diagnosing inflammatory or tumorous processes in the close vicinity of posterior paranasal sinuses.

  3. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Shane M; Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca(2+) as it enters a cell, shaping Ca(2+) signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca(2+) entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in controlling pituitary Ca(2+) signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca(2+) after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca(2+) increments grew larger as free Ca(2+) rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca(2+) binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5-4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca(2+) signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones.

  4. Bacillus Panophthalmitis with Posterior Extension to the Prechiasmatic Optic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Notz, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    A rare case of Bacillus panophthlamitis with extension to the prechiasmatic optic nerve secondary to hematogenous spreading after intravenous drug use is presented. A 27-year-old man with a recent history of trauma to the left eye presented with severe left eye pain following a binge of intravenous drug use. Visual acuity (VA) was LP. On examination he had chemosis, proptosis, elevated intraocular pressure, and a complete hyphema. CT-scan identified preseptal swelling, but no evidence of any posterior extension of the anterior process or orbital fractures. Topical and systemic therapy were initiated. On follow-up clinical examination less than 12 hours after presentation he had signs of a keratitis with worsening ophthalmoplegia and repeat imaging demonstrated posterior extension to the prechiasmatic optic nerve. Shortly after the cornea ruptured with cultures growing Bacillus. The patient underwent enucleation and has had no further progression of infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Bacillus panophthalmitis presenting with signs of trauma with posterior extension to the prechiasmatic optic nerve. PMID:27994900

  5. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Shane M.; Chang, Che-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca2+ as it enters a cell, shaping Ca2+ signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca2+ buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca2+ entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca2+ buffers in controlling pituitary Ca2+ signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca2+ buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca2+ indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca2+ after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca2+ increments grew larger as free Ca2+ rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca2+ binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5–4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca2+ buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca2+ signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones. PMID:26880753

  6. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation as treatment for the overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Hammouda; Abdelwahab, Osama

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) as a treatment for the overactive bladder (OAB) resistant to medical treatment. Patients and methods The study included 60 patients, comprising 55 women (92%) and five men (8%) with a mean (SD) age of 41.4 (10.8) years, who presented to the Urology Department of Benha University Hospital from June 2010 to October 2012. All patients were assessed initially by taking a history, a physical examination, urine analysis, routine laboratory investigations, and a urodynamic evaluation in the form of flowmetry, cystometry, and a pressure-flow study in some cases. A voiding diary (daytime and night-time frequency, voiding volume, and leakage episodes) was completed by all patients, and all underwent 12 sessions of PTNS using a personal computer-based system, and were reassessed after the sixth session, at the end of the course, and at 3 and 6 months after the last session, using the same methods as in the baseline visit. Results There was a statistically significant improvement in all the variables assessed. No infection or failure of the PTNS mechanism was detected while using the technique, but there were rare instances of minor bleeding and a temporary painful feeling at the insertion site. Conclusion PTNS is safe, and gives statistically significant improvements in the patient’s assessment of OAB symptoms. PMID:26558070

  7. Arterial relationships to the nerves and some rigid structures in the posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Surchev, N

    2008-09-01

    The close relationships between the cranial nerves and the arterial vessels in the posterior cranial fossa are one of the predisposing factors for artery-nerve compression. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to some skull and dural structures and the nerves in the posterior cranial fossa. For this purpose, the skull bases and brains of 70 cadavers were studied. The topographic relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to the cranial nerves in the posterior cranial fossa were studied and the distances between the arteries and some osseous formations were measured. The most significant variations in arterial position were registered in the lower half of the basilar artery. Direct contact with an artery was established for the hypoglossal canal, jugular tubercle, and jugular foramen. The results reveal additional information about the relationships of the nerves and arteries to the skull and dural formations in the posterior cranial fossa. New quantitative information is given to illustrate them. The conditions for possible artery-nerve compression due to arterial dislocation are discussed and two groups (lines) of compression points are suggested. The medial line comprises of the brain stem points, usually the nerve root entry/exit zone. The lateral line includes the skull eminences, on which the nerves lie, or skull and dural foramina through which they exit the cranial cavity.

  8. Unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies associated with posterior fossa exploration surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Ayman; Clerkin, James; Mandiwanza, Tafadzwa; Green, Sandra; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Multiple cranial nerves palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment is a rare clinical presentation. This case report describes a young man who developed a unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment. There are different theories to explain this presentation, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We propose that this patient cranial nerve palsies developed following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, potentially as a consequence of rapid change in CSF dynamics. PMID:26951144

  9. Orbital extension of choroidal melanoma: within a long posterior ciliary nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Wolter, J R

    1983-01-01

    Following enucleation, an epithelioid type of malignant choroidal melanoma involving the posterior pole was grossly and histologically found to exhibit direct extraocular extension along the emissary for the long posterior ciliary artery and nerve on the temporal side. In addition to a small tumor nodule on the outside of the sclera, melanoma extension was found up to the cut end in the otherwise well preserved ciliary nerve. After tenonectomy, additional extraocular melanoma extension in the core of this long posterior ciliary nerve was demonstrated for a total distance of 5 mm. As a result of the present findings, intraneural melanoma extension into the orbit by the way of a ciliary nerve has to be added to the other possible ways of direct extraocular melanoma extension. Images FIGURE 5 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:6676977

  10. Cranial nerve assessment in posterior fossa tumors with fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA).

    PubMed

    Mikami, Takeshi; Minamida, Yoshihiro; Yamaki, Toshiaki; Koyanagi, Izumi; Nonaka, Tadashi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2005-10-01

    Steady-state free precession is widely used for ultra-fast cardiac or abdominal imaging. The purpose of this work was to assess fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and to evaluate its efficacy for depiction of the cranial nerve affected by the tumor. Twenty-three consecutive patients with posterior fossa tumors underwent FIESTA sequence after contrast agent administration, and then displacement of the cranial nerve was evaluated. The 23 patients with posterior fossa tumor consisted of 12 schwannomas, eight meningiomas, and three cases of epidermoid. Except in the cases of epidermoid, intensity of all tumors increased on FIESTA imaging of the contrast enhancement. In the schwannoma cases, visualization of the nerve became poorer as the tumor increased in size. In cases of encapsulated meningioma, all the cranial nerves of the posterior fossa were depicted regardless of location. The ability to depict the nerves was also significantly higher in meningioma patients than in schwannoma patients (P<0.05). In cases of epidermoid, extension of the tumors was depicted clearly. Although the FIESTA sequence offers similar contrast to other heavily T2-weighted sequences, it facilitated a superior assessment of the effect of tumors on cranial nerve anatomy. FIESTA sequence was useful for preoperative simulations of posterior fossa tumors.

  11. Topography of human ankle joint: focused on posterior tibial artery and tibial nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-Im; Kim, Yi-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Most of foot pain occurs by the entrapment of the tibial nerve and its branches. Some studies have reported the location of the tibial nerve; however, textbooks and researches have not described the posterior tibial artery and the relationship between the tibal nerve and the posterior tibial artery in detail. The purpose of this study was to analyze the location of neurovascular structures and bifurcations of the nerve and artery in the ankle region based on the anatomical landmarks. Ninety feet of embalmed human cadavers were examined. All measurements were evaluated based on a reference line. Neurovascular structures were classified based on the relationship between the tibial nerve and the posterior tibial artery. The bifurcation of arteries and nerves were expressed by X- and Y-coordinates. Based on the reference line, 9 measurements were examined. The most common type I (55.6%), was the posterior tibial artery located medial to the tibial nerve. Neurovascular structures were located less than 50% of the distance between M and C from M at the reference line. The bifurcation of the posterior tibial artery was 41% in X-coordinate, -38% in Y-coordinate, and that of the tibial nerve was 48%, and -10%, respectively. Thirteen measurements and classification showed statistically significant differences between both sexes (P<0.05). It is determined the average position of neurovascular structures in the human ankle region and recorded the differences between the sexes and amongst the populations. These results would be helpful for the diagnosis and treatment of foot pain. PMID:26140224

  12. The effect of intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Park, C; Choi, J B; Lee, Y-S; Chang, H-S; Shin, C S; Kim, S; Han, D W

    2015-04-01

    Posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy is common because full neck extension is required during the procedure. We evaluated the effect of intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on postoperative neck pain in patients undergoing total thyroidectomy under general anaesthesia. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups; 50 patients received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the trapezius muscle and 50 patients acted as controls. Postoperative posterior neck pain and anterior wound pain were evaluated using an 11-point numerical rating scale at 30 min, 6 h, 24 h and 48 h following surgery. The numerical rating scale for posterior neck pain was significantly lower in the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group compared with the control group at all time points (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the numerical rating scale for anterior wound pain at any time point. No adverse effects related to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation were observed. We conclude that intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the trapezius muscle reduced posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy.

  13. Results of nerve grafting in radial nerve injuries occurring proximal to the humerus, including those within the posterior cord.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Results of radial nerve grafting are largely unknown for lesions of the radial nerve that occur proximal to the humerus, including those within the posterior cord. METHODS The authors describe 13 patients with proximal radial nerve injuries who were surgically treated and then followed for at least 24 months. The patients' average age was 26 years and the average time between accident and surgery was 6 months. Sural nerve graft length averaged 12 cm. Recovery was scored according to the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) scale, which ranges from M0 to M5 (normal muscle strength). RESULTS After grafting, all 7 patients with an elbow extension palsy recovered elbow extension, scoring M4. Six of the 13 recovered M4 wrist extension, 6 had M3, and 1 had M2. Thumb and finger extension was scored M4 in 3 patients, M3 in 2, M2 in 2, and M0 in 6. CONCLUSIONS The authors consider levels of strength of M4 for elbow and wrist extension and M3 for thumb and finger extension to be good results. Based on these criteria, overall good results were obtained in only 5 of the 13 patients. In proximal radial nerve lesions, the authors now advocate combining nerve grafts with nerve or tendon transfers to reconstruct wrist, thumb, and finger extension.

  14. Vulnerability of the Femoral Nerve During Complex Anterior and Posterior Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Naroji, Swetha; Belin, Laurence J; Maltenfort, Mitchell Gil; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Schwartz, Daniel; Harrop, James S; Weinstein, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background: Femoral nerve palsy is not a common adverse effect of lumbar spinal surgery. Objective: To report 3 unique cases of femoral nerve neuropathy due to instrumentation and positioning during complex anterior and posterior spinal surgery. Methods: Case series Results: All 3 patients demonstrated femoral nerve neuropathy. The first patient presented postoperatively but after 6 months, the palsy resolved. Femoral nerve malfunctioning was documented in the second and third patients intraoperatively; however, with rapid patient repositioning and removal of offending instrumentation, postoperative palsy was avoided. Conclusions: Use of motor evoked potential monitoring of the femoral nerve during surgery is vital for the prevention of future neuropathies, an avoidable complication of spinal surgery. PMID:19777866

  15. Lateral Arm Free Flap With Preservation of the Posterior Antebrachial Cutaneous Nerve.

    PubMed

    Ki, Sae Hwi

    2016-05-01

    The lateral arm free flap offers many advantages in reconstruction of soft tissue defect and reconstruction of extremities. However, this free flap is associated with sensory loss at the posterior forearm due to injury of the posterior antebrachial cutaneous nerve (PABCN).The PABCN-sparing lateral arm free flaps were performed in 19 patients with various soft tissue defects of the extremity, and the outcomes of free flap reconstructions using this modification are evaluated. All flaps survived without partial necrosis. Three patients experienced transient sensory loss in the posterior area of the forearm after flap harvest.In this study, lateral arm free flaps can be elevated without necessarily sacrificing the PABCN. This nerve-sparing modification decreases the donor-site morbidity of lateral arm free flaps and further increases the overall usefulness of this flap in soft tissue reconstructions of the extremities.

  16. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation for treating neurologic bladder in women: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Tahereh; Teimoory, Nastaran; Miri, Elahe; Nikfallah, Abolghasem; Naeimi, Mahsa; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a disabling disorder. Treatment of cases with OAB includes behavioral, pharmacological, surgical interventions and peripheral electrical stimulation. The goal of this study was to determine effects of posterior tibial nerve stimulation on sexual function and pelvic disorders in women with Overactive bladder (OAB). Fifty women were randomly assigned to PTNS (posterior tibial nerve stimulation) plus tolterodine or tolterodine alone treatment. Tolterodine group received 4 mg tolterodine daily for three months while the other group received this treatment plus percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for 12 consequence weeks. Two in PTNS group and 8 in the control group withdrew from the study. Age, education level, and occupation status were not significantly different between two groups. Mean total FSFI and its subscales were not significantly different before and after treatment between two groups. Urine leakage associated with a feeling of urgency and loss of stool or gas from the rectum beyond patient's control became significantly different after treatment between two groups. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation could help urinary problems in women with a neurologic bladder.

  17. MRI-guided cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve for the treatment of neuropathy-mediated sitting pain.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Dharmdev H; Thawait, Gaurav K; Del Grande, Filippo; Fritz, Jan

    2017-03-15

    Neuropathy of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve may manifest as pain and paresthesia in the skin over the inferior buttocks, posterior thigh, and popliteal region. Current treatment options include physical and oral pain therapy, perineural injections, and surgical neurectomy. Perineural steroid injections may provide short-term pain relief; however, to our knowledge, there is currently no minimally invasive denervation procedure for sustained pain relief that could serve as an alternative to surgical neurectomy. Percutaneous cryoablation of nerves is a minimally invasive technique that induces a sustained nerve conduction block through temporary freezing of the neural layers. It can result in long-lasting pain relief, but has not been described for the treatment of neuropathy-mediated PFCN pain. We report a technique of MR-guided cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve resulting in successful treatment of PFCN-mediated sitting pain. Cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve seems a promising, minimally invasive treatment option that deserves further investigation.

  18. The effect of stimulus rate upon common peroneal, posterior tibial, and sural nerve somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Onishi, H; Yamada, T; Saito, T; Emori, T; Fuchigami, T; Hasegawa, A; Nagaoka, T; Ross, M

    1991-12-01

    We examined the effect of stimulus rate on somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) following stimulation of the common peroneal nerve (CPN) at the knee, and the posterior tibial nerve (PTN) and sural nerve (SN) at the ankle. We measured the amplitude of P40-N50 and N50-P60 in the PTN-SEP and corresponding amplitude of CPN-SEP and SN-SEP at the rate of 2.3, 3.4, 4.1, and 5.1 Hz. When the stimulation rate was increased from 2.3 to 5.1 Hz, the P40-N50 amplitude decreased by 50% for the CPN-SEP and 20% for the PTN-SEP. Also, the N50-P60 amplitude was reduced by 30% in the CPN-SEP and 20% in the PTN-SEP. In contrast, this change in stimulus rate produced no significant amplitude decline in the SN-SEP. Blocking the peroneal nerve with lidocaine just distal to the stimulating electrodes eliminated the descending peroneal nerve volley and abolished the amplitude attenuation observed with the faster stimulus rate. The findings suggest that at higher rates of stimulation, the afferent volleys induced by the movements that follow mixed nerve stimulation interfere with the SEP produced by electrical activation of the sensory afferents. The interference is greater when the more proximal site of the mixed nerve is stimulated.

  19. Optic nerve fast axonal transport abnormalities in primates. Occurrence after short posterior ciliary artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1980-11-01

    Fast axonal transport abnormalities in primate (Aotus trivirgatus) optic nerve were studied in ten eyes at various intervals after occlusion of the lateral short posterior ciliary circulation. Evidence of focal axonal ischemia, as indicated by swelling of mitochondria and dissolution of cytoplasmic detail, was noted as early as one hour after occlusion. Accumulation of mitochondria, microvesicles, and dense bodies, indicating focal interruption of axonal transport mechanisms, was noted in eyes examined at 2, 4, and 6 hours. This accumulation of organelles was limited to the region of the lamina cribrosa. Nerve head abnormalities were not seen in two eyes studied at two weeks.

  20. Origin of subcortical somatosensory evoked potentials in response to posterior tibial nerve stimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Urasaki, E; Wada, S; Yokota, A; Tokimura, T; Yasukouchi, H

    1993-06-01

    To identify the origin of short latency somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) to posterior tibial nerve stimulation, direct recordings were made from the cervical cord, the ventricular system and the frontal subcortex during 8 neurosurgical operations. The origin of each component of SSEPs was also studied in 7 selected patients with various lesions in the central nervous system. In addition, SSEPs to median nerve stimulation were investigated in 4 of 8 surgical cases and all 7 cases of the lesion study group. Bilateral posterior tibial nerve stimulation in 10 normal subjects showed spinal N28 on the skin of the posterior neck and far-field P30 and N33 components followed by a cortical P38 component at the scalp. Direct recordings made to the mid-brain through the medulla oblongata showed a negative potential with gradually increasing latency. The peak of the negativity in the vicinity of the dorsal column nucleus showed almost the same latency as that of the scalp far-field P30, and positivity with a stationary peak was found above the dorsal column nucleus. Above the mid-pons, there was a stationary negativity with no latency shift, showing the same peak latency as that of scalp N33. The spatiotemporal distributions of P30 and N33 to posterior tibial nerve stimulation were analogous to those of P14 and N18 by median nerve stimulation. Transesophageal and direct cervical cord recordings showed that the spinal N13 phase to median nerve stimulation was reversed between the dorsal and ventral sides of the cervical cord. No such reversal occurred for the spinal N28 potential. Clinical lesion studies showed that changes in P30 and P14, and in N33 and N18 correlated with one another: that is, 1) prolongation of latency of N33 was also observed for N18; 2) absence of P30 was paralleled by the absence of P14. These data suggest that spinal N28 originates from ascending activity such as a dorsal column volley, and scalp P30 comes from activity near the dorsal column

  1. Action potential propagation and propagation block by GABA in rat posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M B; Zhang, S J

    1995-01-01

    1. A theoretical model was developed to investigate action potential propagation in posterior pituitary nerve terminals. This model was then used to evaluate the efficacy of depolarizing and shunting GABA responses on action potential propagation. 2. Experimental data obtained from the posterior pituitary with patch clamp techniques were used to derive empirical expressions for the voltage and time dependence of the nerve terminal Na+ and K+ channels. The essential structure employed here was based on anatomical and cable data from the posterior pituitary, and consisted of a long cylindrical axon (diameter, 0.5 mm) with a large spherical swelling (diameter, 4-21 mm) in the middle. 3. In the absence of an inhibitory conductance, simulated action potentials propagated with high fidelity through the nerve terminal. Swellings could block propagation, but only when sizes exceeded those observed in the posterior pituitary. Adding axonal branches reduced the critical size only slightly. These results suggested that action potentials invade the entire posterior pituitary nerve terminal in the absence of inhibition or depression. 4. The addition of inhibitory conductance to a swelling caused simulated action potentials to fail at the swelling. Depolarizing inhibitory conductances were 1.6 times more effective than shunting inhibitory conductances in blocking propagation. 5. Inhibitory conductances within the range of experimentally observed magnitudes and localized to swellings in the observed range of sizes were too weak to block simulated action potentials. However, twofold enhancement of GABA responses by neurosteroid resulted in currents strong enough to block propagation in realistic swelling sizes. 6. GABA could block simulated propagation without neurosteroid enhancement provided that GABA was present throughout a region in the order of a few hundred micrometres. For this widespread inhibition depolarizing conductance was 2.2 times more effective than shunting

  2. Tarsal tunnel syndrome secondary to schwannoma of the posterior tibial nerve.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, Katrina; Vinokur, Jessica; Demski, Sarah; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly; Giurini, John

    2014-01-01

    Schwannoma is a benign tumor that arises from the peripheral nerve sheath. It presents as a discrete, often tender, and palpable nodule associated with neurogenic pain or paresthesia when compressed or traumatized. The growth rate is usually slow, and these lesions seldom exceed 2 cm in diameter. We report the case of a large schwannoma arising from the posterior tibial nerve located in the posterior medial ankle. The core needle biopsy findings were suggestive of a schwannoma, with spindle cells strongly and uniformly immunostaining for S-100 protein. The mass was marginally excised. The surgical specimen consisted of a grossly encapsulated white-yellow mass with irregular contours, measuring 3.7 × 3.5 × 2.7 cm. The cut surface showed areas of pin-point hemorrhage. The patient did not encounter any motor deficits; however, early results showed some subjective numbness. Few reports have been published of schwannomas arising from the tibial nerve. Marginal excision appears to be the recommended therapy for this tumor, without any evidence of recurrence at 9 months of follow-up.

  3. Sequential-digital image correlation for mapping human posterior sclera and optic nerve head deformation.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Jeffrey D; Genovese, Katia; Casaletto, Luciana; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    Optic nerve head (ONH) deformations may be involved in the onset or further development of glaucoma, including in patients with relatively normal intraocular pressures (IOPs). Characterizing posterior scleral deformations over physiological pressures may provide a better understanding of how changes in IOP lead to changes in the mechanical environment of the ONH and possibly retinal ganglion cell death. Pressure inflation measurement test protocols are commonly used to measure deformation of the peripapillary sclera with full-field noncontact optical methods. The purpose of this work was to develop and validate a new sequential 3D digital image correlation (S-DIC) approach for quantification of posterior scleral pressure induced deformation that improves z (in-depth) resolution of the DIC measurement without losing in-plane sensitivity, while also being able to contour and map deformations of the complex-shaped ONH. Our approach combines two orthogonal axes of parallax with standard 3D DIC methods using a single high-resolution camera. The enhanced capabilities of S-DIC with respect to standard 3D DIC has been demonstrated by carrying out a complete benchmark for shape, deformation, and strain measurement on an object of known complex geometry. Our S-DIC method provided a reconstruction accuracy of 0.17% and an uncertainty in z-position measurement of 8 μm. The developed methodology has also been applied to a human posterior scleral shell, including the full peripapillary sclera and optic nerve. The relatively inexpensive S-DIC approach may provide new information on the biomechanical deformations of the optic nerve head and, thus, the death of retinal ganglion cells in primary open angle glaucoma.

  4. Differences between Cervical Schwannomas of the Anterior and Posterior Nerve Roots in Relation to the Incidence of Postoperative Radicular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Ninomiya, Koshi; Moriwaki, Takashi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To assess the case files of patients who underwent surgery for cervical dumbbell schwannoma for determining the differences between schwannomas of the anterior and posterior nerve roots with respect to the incidence of postoperative radicular dysfunction. Overview of Literature The spinal roots giving origin to schwannoma are frequently nonfunctional, but there is a risk of postoperative neurological deficit once these roots are resected during surgery. Methods Fifteen patients with cervical dumbbell schwannomas were treated surgically. Ten men and 5 women, who were 35-79 years old (mean age, 61.5 years), presented with neck pain (n=6), radiculopathy (n=10), and myelopathy (n=11). Results Fourteen patients underwent gross total resection and exhibited no recurrence. Follow-ups were performed for a period of 6-66 months (mean, 28 months). Preoperative symptoms resolved in 11 patients (73.3%) but they persisted partially in 4 patients (26.7%). Six patients had tumors of anterior nerve root origin, and 9 patients had tumors of posterior nerve root origin. Two patients who underwent total resection of anterior nerve root tumors (33.3%) displayed minor postoperative motor weakness. One patient who underwent total resection of a posterior nerve root tumor (11.1%) showed postoperative numbness. Conclusions Appropriate tumor removal improved the neurological symptoms. In this study, the incidence of radicular dysfunction was higher in patients who underwent resection of anterior nerve root tumors than in patients who underwent resection of posterior nerve root tumors. PMID:25901239

  5. Unruptured internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm splitting the oculomotor nerve: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Shingo; Taki, Takuyu; Wakayama, Akatsuki; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-08-01

    Objective To report a rare case of unruptured internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (IC-PC) aneurysm splitting the oculomotor nerve treated by clipping and to review the previously published cases. Case Presentation A 42-year-old man suddenly presented with left oculomotor paresis. Three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography (3D DSA) demonstrated a left IC-PC aneurysm with a bulging part. During surgery, it was confirmed that the bulging part split the oculomotor nerve. After the fenestrated oculomotor nerve was dissected from the bulging part with a careful microsurgical technique, neck clipping was performed. After the operation, the symptoms of oculomotor nerve paresis disappeared within 2 weeks. Conclusions We must keep in mind the possibility of an anomaly of the oculomotor nerve, including fenestration, and careful observation and manipulation should be performed to preserve the nerve function during surgery, even though it is very rare.

  6. Superficial Ulnar Artery Associated with Anomalous Origin of the Common Interosseous and Ulnar Recurrent Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Pamidi, Narendra; Nayak, Satheesha B; Jetti, Raghu; Thangarajan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Occurrence of vascular variations in the upper limb is not uncommon and is well described in the medical literature. However, occurrence of superficial ulnar artery associated with unusual origin of the common interosseous and ulnar recurrent arteries is seldom reported in the literature. In the present case, we report the anomalous origin of common trunk of common interosseous, anterior and posterior ulnar recurrent arteries from the radial artery, in a male cadaver. Further, ulnar artery had presented superficial course. Knowledge of anomalous arterial pattern in the cubital fossa reported here is clinically important during the angiographic procedures and plastic surgeries. PMID:27437201

  7. Tarsal tunnel syndrome associated with a neurilemoma in posterior tibial nerve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Boya, Hakan; Ozcan, Ozal; Oztekin, Haluk H

    2008-09-01

    Compression neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve (PTN) and its branches in the tarsal tunnel is called tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) and has various aetiologies. Space-occupying lesions in the tunnel, such as neurilemomas, can cause such a disease. When a neurilemoma occupies the tarsal tunnel, it can compress the PTN directly or indirectly and results in restriction of the tunnel volume. Symptoms due to this restricted volume may vary in TTS. A case of neurilemoma of PTN in tarsal tunnel with a complaint of posteromedial ankle intermittent pain in a 20-year-old patient is presented here. A mass was observed at the ankle posteromedially during clinical examinations and the patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiological investigation. Radiographic evaluation of the ankle was normal. However, MRI was revealed a mass adjacent to the PTN in the tarsal tunnel. An ovoid, smooth-surfaced, encapsulated and eccentrically localized mass in the PTN was detected at surgery. The mass was excised from the nerve and pathological evaluation revealed a neurilemoma (schwannoma). Neurilemomas arising from the PTN in the tarsal tunnel should always be kept in mind as a differential diagnosis when a patient complains of a posteromedial ankle pain. Since it is a space-occupying lesion and encapsulated tumor in the tarsal tunnel, simple surgical resection is curative without a distinct morbidity.

  8. Magnetoneurographic registration of propagating magnetic fields in the lumbar spine after stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Anita; van Leeuwen, Peter; Hoormann, Jörg; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2006-06-01

    Stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve has been associated with different somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) recorded along the spine and thorax. The aim of this study was to register and describe the magnetic fields corresponding to different components of spinal SEP after stimulation of tibial nerves. In nine healthy subjects, right and left posterior tibial nerves were transcutaneously electrostimulated at the ankles. Neuromagnetic fields were registered over a circular 800 cm2 area of the lumbosacral spine using a 61-channel biomagnetometer. Magnetic field maps were constructed and examined visually for dipolar patterns. Equivalent current dipoles (ECD) were calculated for each somatosensory evoked field (SEF) using a least-squares fit in a spherical model. In seven subjects dipolar SEF were detected over the lower back at two separate latencies and locations and propagating ECD could be localized. Both the first and second components found agreed anatomically and functionally with respect to propagation in the underlying nerve fibers. It was possible to record and identify SEF which correspond to the SEP described in the literature. Dipole localization based on an equivalent current dipole model allowed a basic evaluation of the plausibility of the measurements with respect to the processes being examined.

  9. False aneurysm of the interosseous artery and anterior interosseous syndrome - an unusual complication of penetrating injury of the forearm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Palsies involving the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) comprise less than 1% of all upper extremity nerve palsies. Objectives This case highlights the potential vascular and neurological hazards of minimal penetrating injury of the proximal forearm and emphasizes the phenomenon of delayed presentation of vascular injuries following seemingly obscure penetrating wounds. Case Report We report a case of a 22-year-old male admitted for a minimal penetrating trauma of the proximal forearm that, some days later, developed an anterior interosseous syndrome. A Duplex study performed immediately after the trauma was normal. Further radiologic investigations i.e. a computer-tomographic-angiography (CTA) revealed a false aneurysm of the proximal portion of the interosseous artery (IA). Endovascular management was proposed but a spontaneous rupture dictated surgical revision with simple excision. Complete neurological recovery was documented at 4 months postoperatively. Conclusions/Summary After every penetrating injury of the proximal forearm we propose routinely a detailed neurological and vascular status and a CTA if Duplex evaluation is negative. PMID:20034382

  10. An Argument for Salvage in Severe Lower Extremity Trauma with Posterior Tibial Nerve Injury: The Ganga Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Momoh, Adeyiza O.; Kumaran, Senthil; Lyons, Daniel; Venkatramani, Hari; Ramkumar, Sanjai; Chung, Kevin C.; Sabapathy, S. Raja

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Absence of plantar sensation is a critical factor considered in favor of amputation for patients with lower limb-threatening injuries. This study aims to assess outcomes of limb salvage in a group of patients with severe lower extremity injuries associated with posterior tibial nerve transection. METHODS We studied eight cases of limb salvage after traumatic injuries with documented tibial nerve laceration managed at Ganga Hospital, India. Functional and health-related quality of life outcomes were assessed. Outcomes from this case series were compared to outcomes of studies from a systematic literature review on salvage of the severely injured lower extremity. RESULTS Patients in this case series reported mild pain (median score 20 on a 100 scale visual analog scale) with some return of plantar sensation in patients with tibial nerve repairs (median score 2/5). Patients demonstrated a decrease in ankle motion (27.5 degrees plantar flexion, 10 degrees extension) and muscle strength (median heel flexor score 3/5). All patients could ambulate independently. Quality of life and function measured by validated instruments revealed minimal disability. We identified 1,767 articles on lower extremity trauma and 14 articles were systematically reviewed. Relative to the case series, published articles reported similarly diminished ankle motion and muscle strength, with reports of mild pain in select studies. Patient reported outcome instruments found variations in the degree of physical disability based on time from the injury. CONCLUSIONS Though limited in number, this case series demonstrates the value of limb salvage even for patients with posterior tibial nerve injury. PMID:26270902

  11. Intrasubstance Schwannoma of Posterior Tibial Nerve Presenting as Lumbo-Sacral Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Banshelkikar, Santosh; Nistane, Pruthviraj

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral nerve tumours are rarely acknowledged as a cause of radiating pain in lower limbs and suspicion is almost always pointed towards lumbo-sacral causes. Schwannomas are tumours of peripheral nerve sheaths occurring anywhere along the peripheral nervous system. Often it can produce symptoms, which can be misleading in cases where obvious swelling is not present. The diagnosis may therefore be delayed by several years of emergence of symptoms. Very few such cases have been reported previously and none of them had an intrasubstance location of the tumour as in our case. Case Report: We present a case of a middle aged female patient presenting with radiating pain in left lower limb, which was diagnosed and treated as lumbo-sacral radiculopathy for five years before an obvious swelling appeared, which on further investigations led to diagnosis of schwannoma of tibial nerve. Intraoperatively, the schwannoma was found to be intrasubstance in location which has never been reported in the past literatures making its excision, without damaging the conducting elements, a challenge. Conclusion: The possibility of peripheral nerve tumour should always be kept in mind while dealing with long standing cases diagnosed as radiculopathy and which do not get better with treatment on similar lines. A thorough clinical examination of the entire limb including Tinel’s sign can clinch the diagnosis earlier in cases where obvious swelling is not present. Even unusual presentations, as in our case, can be dealt surgically with good results. PMID:27299039

  12. Superficial brachial artery: A possible cause for idiopathic median nerve entrapment neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nkomozepi, Pilani; Xhakaza, Nkosi; Swanepoel, Elaine

    2017-02-15

    Nerve entrapment syndromes occur because of anatomic constraints at specific locations in both upper and lower limbs. Anatomical locations prone to nerve entrapment syndromes include sites where a nerve courses through fibro-osseous or fibromuscular tunnels or penetrates a muscle. The median nerve (MN) can be entrapped by the ligament of Struthers; thickened biceps aponeurosis; between the superficial and deep heads of the pronator teres muscle and by a thickened proximal edge of flexor digitorum superficialis muscle. A few cases of MN neuropathies encountered are reported to be idiopathic. The superficial branchial artery (SBA) is defined as the artery running superficial to MN or its roots. This divergence from normal anatomy may be the possible explanation for idiopathic median nerve entrapment neuropathy. This study presents three cases with unilateral presence of the SBA encountered during routine undergraduate dissection at the University of Johannesburg. Case 1: SBA divided into radial and ulnar arteries. Brachial artery (BA) terminated as deep brachial artery. Case 2: SBA continued as radial artery (RA). BA terminated as ulnar artery (UA), anterior and posterior interosseous arteries. Case 3: SBA continued as UA. BA divided into radial and common interosseous arteries. Arteries that take an unusual course are more vulnerable to iatrogenic injury during surgical procedures and may disturb the evaluation of angiographic images during diagnosis. In particular, the presence of SBA may be a course of idiopathic neuropathies.

  13. Management of Limited Vertical Bone Height in the Posterior Mandible: Short Dental Implants Versus Nerve Lateralization With Standard Length Implants.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Erhan; Keceli, Huseyin Gencay; Uysal, Serdar; Güngör, Hamiyet; Muhtarogullari, Mehmet; Tözüm, Tolga Fikret

    2016-05-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve lateralization (IANL) and short dental implants (SDI) are 2 viable implant-based treatment approaches in the presence of atrophied posterior mandible. Despite the risks of dysfunction, infection, and pathologic fractures in IANL, it becomes possible to place standard implants. The purpose of this study was to compare SDI and IANL approaches from clinical and radiographic aspects. Fifteen subjects having unilateral atrophic mandibles were allocated to SDI and IANL treatment groups. Following surgical procedures, early postoperative complications, implant survival, and periimplant clinical and radiographic parameters including probing pocket depth, attachment level, keratinized tissue amount, vertical tissue recession, and marginal bone loss were recorded at baseline and 1-year after prosthetic rehabilitation. In both groups, no implant was lost. Except usual postoperative complications, 2 patients had transient paraesthesia after IANL. According to time-dependent evaluation, both groups showed significant increase in probing pocket depth and attachment level at 1-year follow-up compared with baseline (P < 0.05). Except a slight but significant increase in mesial surface of SDI group (P < 0.05), no remarkable time-dependent change was identified in vertical tissue recession. Keratinized tissue amount did not exhibit any inter- or intragroup difference during whole study period. Marginal bone loss did not show any difference between IANL and SDI groups at follow-up. SDI placement or standard length implant placement with IANL can be considered promising alternatives in the treatment of atrophic mandibular posterior regions. However, SDI may be preferred in terms of lower complication risk.

  14. Ptosis as partial oculomotor nerve palsy due to compression by infundibular dilatation of posterior communicating artery, visualized with three-dimensional computer graphics: case report.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yuta; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Takasago, Megumi; Saito, Kuniaki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2014-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) due to internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysm generally manifests as partial nerve palsy including pupillary dysfunction. In contrast, infundibular dilatation (ID) of the PcomA has no pathogenic significance, and mechanical compression of the cranial nerve is extremely rare. We describe a 60-year-old woman who presented with progressive ptosis due to mechanical compression of the oculomotor nerve by an ID of the PcomA. Three-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) accurately visualized the mechanical compression by the ID, and her ptosis was improved after clipping of the ID. ID of the PcomA may cause ONP by mechanical compression and is treatable surgically. 3DCG are effective for the diagnosis and preoperative simulation.

  15. Peripheral nerve injuries in athletes. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lorei, M P; Hershman, E B

    1993-08-01

    Peripheral nerve lesions are uncommon but serious injuries which may delay or preclude an athlete's safe return to sports. Early, accurate anatomical diagnosis is essential. Nerve lesions may be due to acute injury (e.g. from a direct blow) or chronic injury secondary to repetitive microtrauma (entrapment). Accurate diagnosis is based upon physical examination and a knowledge of the relative anatomy. Palpation, neurological testing and provocative manoeuvres are mainstays of physical diagnosis. Diagnostic suspicion can be confirmed by electrophysiological testing, including electromyography and nerve conduction studies. Proper equipment, technique and conditioning are the keys to prevention. Rest, anti-inflammatories, physical therapy and appropriate splinting are the mainstays of treatment. In the shoulder, spinal accessory nerve injury is caused by a blow to the neck and results in trapezius paralysis with sparing of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Scapular winging results from paralysis of the serratus anterior because of long thoracic nerve palsy. A lesion of the suprascapular nerve may mimic a rotator cuff tear with pain a weakness of the rotator cuff. Axillary nerve injury often follows anterior shoulder dislocation. In the elbow region, musculocutaneous nerve palsy is seen in weightlifters with weakness of the elbow flexors and dysesthesias of the lateral forearm. Pronator syndrome is a median nerve lesion occurring in the proximal forearm which is diagnosed by several provocative manoeuvres. Posterior interosseous nerve entrapment is common among tennis players and occurs at the Arcade of Froshe--it results in weakness of the wrist and metacarpophalangeal extensors. Ulnar neuritis at the elbow is common amongst baseball pitchers. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common neuropathy seen in sport and is caused by median nerve compression in the carpal tunnel. Paralysis of the ulnar nerve at the wrist is seen among bicyclists resulting in weakness of grip and

  16. Ultrasound assessment on selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part I: Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb - excluding carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the methods for imaging entrapment neuropathies, post-traumatic changes to nerves, nerve tumors and postoperative complications to nerves. This type of examination is becoming more and more popular, not only for economic reasons, but also due to its value in making accurate diagnosis. It provides a very precise assessment of peripheral nerve trunk pathology - both in terms of morphology and localization. During examination there are several options available to the specialist: the making of a dynamic assessment, observation of pain radiation through the application of precise palpation and the comparison of resultant images with the contra lateral limb. Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb are discussed in this study, with the omission of median nerve neuropathy at the level of the carpal canal, as extensive literature on this subject exists. The following pathologies are presented: pronator teres muscle syndrome, anterior interosseus nerve neuropathy, ulnar nerve groove syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome, Guyon's canal syndrome, radial nerve neuropathy, posterior interosseous nerve neuropathy, Wartenberg's disease, suprascapular nerve neuropathy and thoracic outlet syndrome. Peripheral nerve examination technique has been presented in previous articles presenting information about peripheral nerve anatomy [Journal of Ultrasonography 2012; 12 (49): 120-163 - Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the example of the median nerve; Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb; Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb]. In this article potential compression sites of particular nerves are discussed, taking into account pathomechanisms of damage, including predisposing anatomical variants (accessory muscles). The parameters of ultrasound assessment have been established - echogenicity and echostructure, thickness (edema and related increase

  17. The retinoic acid signaling pathway regulates anterior/posterior patterning in the nerve cord and pharynx of amphioxus, a chordate lacking neural crest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escriva, Hector; Holland, Nicholas D.; Gronemeyer, Hinrich; Laudet, Vincent; Holland, Linda Z.

    2002-01-01

    Amphioxus, the closest living invertebrate relative of the vertebrates, has a notochord, segmental axial musculature, pharyngeal gill slits and dorsal hollow nerve cord, but lacks neural crest. In amphioxus, as in vertebrates, exogenous retinoic acid (RA) posteriorizes the embryo. The mouth and gill slits never form, AmphiPax1, which is normally downregulated where gill slits form, remains upregulated and AmphiHox1 expression shifts anteriorly in the nerve cord. To dissect the role of RA signaling in patterning chordate embryos, we have cloned the single retinoic acid receptor (AmphiRAR), retinoid X receptor (AmphiRXR) and an orphan receptor (AmphiTR2/4) from amphioxus. AmphiTR2/4 inhibits AmphiRAR-AmphiRXR-mediated transactivation in the presence of RA by competing for DR5 or IR7 retinoic acid response elements (RAREs). The 5' untranslated region of AmphiTR2/4 contains an IR7 element, suggesting possible auto- and RA-regulation. The patterns of AmphiTR2/4 and AmphiRAR expression during embryogenesis are largely complementary: AmphiTR2/4 is strongly expressed in the cerebral vesicle (homologous to the diencephalon plus anterior midbrain), while AmphiRAR expression is high in the equivalent of the hindbrain and spinal cord. Similarly, while AmphiTR2/4 is expressed most strongly in the anterior and posterior thirds of the endoderm, the highest AmphiRAR expression is in the middle third. Expression of AmphiRAR is upregulated by exogenous RA and completely downregulated by the RA antagonist BMS009. Moreover, BMS009 expands the pharynx posteriorly; the first three gill slit primordia are elongated and shifted posteriorly, but do not penetrate, and additional, non-penetrating gill slit primordia are induced. Thus, in an organism without neural crest, initiation and penetration of gill slits appear to be separate events mediated by distinct levels of RA signaling in the pharyngeal endoderm. Although these compounds have little effect on levels of AmphiTR2/4 expression, RA

  18. Architectural properties of the first dorsal interosseous muscle.

    PubMed

    Infantolino, Benjamin W; Challis, John H

    2010-04-01

    Muscle architecture is considered to reflect the function of muscle in vivo, and is important for example to clinicians in designing tendon-transfer and tendon-lengthening surgeries. The purpose of this study was to quantify the architectural properties of the FDI muscle. It is hypothesized that there will be consistency, that is low variability, in the architectural parameters used to describe the first dorsal interosseous muscle because of its clear functional role in index finger motion. The important architectural parameters identified were those required to characterize a muscle adequately by modeling. Specifically the mass, cross-sectional area, and length of the tendon and muscle were measured in cadavers along with the muscle fiber optimum length and pennation angle, and the moment arm of the first dorsal interosseous at the metacarpophalangeal joint. These parameters provide a characterization of the architecture of the first dorsal interosseous, and were used to indicate the inherent variability between samples. The results demonstrated a large amount of variability for all architectural parameters measured; leading to a rejection of the hypothesis. Ratios designed to describe the functioning of the muscles in vivo, for example the ratio of tendon to fiber optimum lengths, also demonstrated a large variability. The results suggest that function cannot be deduced from form for the first dorsal interosseous, and that subject-specific architectural parameters may be necessary for the formulation of accurate musculoskeletal models or making clinical decisions.

  19. Identification of the Bony Canal of the Posterior Superior Alveolar Nerve and Artery in the Maxillary Sinus: Tomographic, Radiographic, and Macroscopic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    German, Iris Jasmin Santos; Buchaim, Daniela Vieira; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; Shinohara, Elio Hitoshi; Capelozza, Ana Lúcia Alvares; Shinohara, Andre Luis; Pereira, Mizael; Buchaim, Rogerio Leone

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the shape and route of the bony canal of the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) and posterior superior alveolar nerve (PSAN) using different identification methods, including computed tomography (CT), panoramic radiograph, and macroscopic evaluation (corpse and dry skull). Twenty-four patients were analyzed by CT and panoramic and posterior anterior (PA) radiographs; additionally, 90 dry skulls and 21 dissected anatomical specimens were examined. Three-dimensional-CT revealed that the lateral wall of the maxillary sinus resembled a tunnel format in 60% of the treated patients. Out of all 24 patients, the panoramic radiograph identified the bony canal in only one patient; whereas the PA radiograph identified it in 80% of the patients. The dry skulls showed tunnellike routes of the PSAA and PSAN in 65% of the cases. Moreover, the pathway was also visibly observed in the dissected anatomical specimens as a straight shape in 85% of the cases. Thus, our results demonstrated that the most common shape of the bony canal of the PSAA and PSAN is the tunnel format with a straight route by 3D-CT, posterior anterior radiography, and macroscopic evaluation. However, in the panoramic radiographs, it was difficult to identify this canal. PMID:25861685

  20. Alternative to the inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia when placing mandibular dental implants posterior to the mental foramen.

    PubMed

    Heller, A A; Shankland, W E

    2001-01-01

    Local anesthesia block of the inferior alveolar nerve is routinely taught throughout dental education. This commonly used technique eliminates all somatosensory perception of the mandible, mandibular teeth, floor of the mouth, ipsilateral tongue, and all but the lateral (buccal) gingivae. Generally, the dentist or surgeon desires these structures to be anesthetized. However, in the placement of mandibular implants, it may be useful for the patient to be able to sense when the inferior alveolar nerve is in danger of being damaged, possibly producing permanent paresthesia. In this article, the technique of mandibular infiltration prior to mandibular implant placement in the mandible is discussed.

  1. Macular Ganglion Cell Layer and Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer Thickness in Patients with Unilateral Posterior Cerebral Artery Ischaemic Lesion: An Optical Coherence Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Anjos, Rita; Vieira, Luisa; Costa, Livio; Vicente, André; Santos, Arnaldo; Alves, Nuno; Amado, Duarte; Ferreira, Joana; Cunha, João Paulo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study is to evaluate the macular ganglion cell layer (GCL) and peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with unilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) ischaemic lesions using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). A prospective, case-control study of patients with unilateral PCA lesion was conducted in the neuro-ophthalmology clinic of Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Central. Macular and peripapillary SD-OCT scans were performed in both eyes of each patient. Twelve patients with PCA lesions (stroke group) and 12 healthy normal controls were included in this study. Peripapillary RNFL comparison between both eyes of the same subject in the stroke group found a thinning in the superior-temporal (p = 0.008) and inferior-temporal (p = 0.023) sectors of the ipsilateral eye and nasal sector (p = 0.003) of the contralateral eye. Macular GCL thickness comparison showed a reduction temporally in the ipsilateral eye (p = 0.004) and nasally in the contralateral eye (p = 0.002). Peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly reduced in both eyes of patients with PCA compared with controls, affecting all sectors in the contralateral eye and predominantly temporal sectors in the ipsilateral eye. A statistically significant decrease in macular GCL thickness was found in both hemiretinas of both eyes of stroke patients when compared with controls (p < 0.05). This study shows that TRD may play a role in the physiopathology of lesions of the posterior visual pathway. PMID:27928376

  2. Prevention of ultrasonic coagulator-mediated mucoperiosteal flap injury and defects by using a clip manipulation in the resection of the posterior nasal nerve.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Yokoi, Hidenori; Saito, Tatsuya; Kawano, Kenji; Yao, Toru; Furukawa, Masayuki; Kusunoki, Takeshi

    2009-03-01

    We previously reported on the clinical effectiveness of functional inferior turbinosurgery utilizing modified vidian neurectomy, the resection of the posterior nasal nerve (PNN), combined with inferior turbinoplasty. In order to prevent re-innervation of the PNN after resection and to avoid postoperative massive hemorrhage--presumably resulting from insufficient fixation and unexpected exposure of the bony or cartilaginous fragments covered on the resected neurovascular bundle containing the sphenopalatine vessels and the PNN--we designed a surgical technique during which a vascular clip was used in order to provide traction of the mucoperiosteal flap. Then we compared it with the previous procedure (without the use of the clip). The injury and defects of the mucoperiosteal flap were evaluated by the degree of exposure to the bony or cartilaginous fragments and scored on a scale of 0 to 2 points. The defects of the mucoperiosteal flap were reduced by using a vascular clip. The average score of the defects was 0.97 +/- 0.73 (n = 64) in the conventional procedure without any manipulation and 0.27 +/- 0.45 (n = 60) in the procedure using a vascular clip. The difference observed between the two gropups was statistically significant (p < 0.001). These results demonstrated that this is a safe technique to prevent injury and defects of the mucoperiosteal flap in gaining access to expose the PNN. This should promote early wound healing, reduce the chance of recurrence and of postoperative massive hemorrhage.

  3. The intra-operative radius joystick test to diagnose complete disruption of the interosseous membrane.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, M; Ciais, G; Wassermann, V; Kalouche, I; Biau, D; Dumontier, C; Gagey, O

    2011-10-01

    Disruption of the interosseous membrane is easily missed in patients with Essex-Lopresti syndrome. None of the imaging techniques available for diagnosing disruption of the interosseous membrane are completely dependable. We undertook an investigation to identify whether a simple intra-operative test could be used to diagnose disruption of the interosseous membrane during surgery for fracture of the radial head and to see if the test was reproducible. We studied 20 cadaveric forearms after excision of the radial head, ten with and ten without disruption of the interosseous membrane. On each forearm, we performed the radius joystick test: moderate lateral traction was applied to the radial neck with the forearm in maximal pronation, to look for lateral displacement of the proximal radius indicating that the interosseous membrane had been disrupted. Each of six surgeons (three junior and three senior) performed the test on two consecutive days. Intra-observer agreement was 77% (95% confidence interval (CI) 67 to 85) and interobserver agreement was 97% (95% CI 92 to 100). Sensitivity was 100% (95% CI 97 to 100), specificity 88% (95% CI 81 to 93), positive predictive value 90% (95% CI 83 to 94), and negative predictive value 100%). This cadaveric study suggests that the radius joystick test may be useful for detecting disruption of the interosseous membrane in patients undergoing open surgery for fracture of the radial head and is reproducible. A confirmatory study in vivo is now required.

  4. Vascular anatomy of the metatarsal bones and the interosseous muscles of the foot.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, Murat Sahin; Orbay, Hakan; Uysal, Ahmet Cagri; Comert, Ayhan; Tuccar, Eray

    2009-09-01

    Utilization of the metatarsal bones and interosseous muscles in foot reconstruction should be based on the vascular anatomy of the metatarsal bones and interosseous muscles. We studied the vascular anatomy of the metatarsal bones and the interosseous muscles to design a split metacarpal musculoosseous flap and dorsal interosseous muscle flap. Twenty-two feet from eleven cadavers that had been embalmed in formalin were studied. Dissection was done using a dissection microscope (x3.5), delineating meticulously the arcuate artery, dorsal metatarsal arteries and the small branches arising from the metatarsal arteries. The dorsal metatarsal arteries do not course at the midline of the interosseous muscles. The first dorsal metatarsal artery proceeds close to the first metatarsal bone in the first metatarsal space. While proceeding to the distal, it shoots out a branch that individually feeds the lateral head of the first dorsal metatarsal muscle and medial face of the second metatarsus, thereby feeding muscle and bone. Except for this branch, the first dorsal metatarsal gives off segmental and periosteal branches that individually feed the medial heads of the first dorsal metatarsal muscle and first metatarsal bone. The second, third and fourth metatarsal arteries proceed close to the third, fourth and fifth metatarsal bones in the metatarsal spaces. In these courses, the arteries give out segmental branches to both faces of the interosseous muscles and periosteal branches to the medial face of metatarsal bones. For defects or disease of the ankle bones, the metatarsal bones can be split at the medial border distally, and a split metatarsal musculoosseous flap, based proximally on the dorsal metatarsal artery, can be done. Distal intermetatarsal anastomoses between the dorsal and plantar vascular networks enables a split metatarsal musculoosseous flap based distally, including the dorsal metatarsal artery for bony defects of the proximal phalanx.

  5. Symptomatic posterior mediastinal angioleiomyoma.

    PubMed

    I, Hoseok; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Choi, Kyung Un; Kim, Yeong-Dae

    2008-08-30

    We report a case of a symptomatic angioleiomyoma in the left posterior mediastinum. A 66-year-old woman presented with left back and flank pain for 6 months. Chest computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a well-circumscribed 4.3 cm round mass. The mass was initially diagnosed as nerve sheath tumor, because of her symptoms and its close location to the sympathetic trunk and intercostal nerve. It was uneventfully removed through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. The pathology revealed an angioleiomyoma.

  6. Chronic desmitis and enthesiophytosis of the radio-ulnar interosseous ligament in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Deffontaines, Jean-Baptiste; Lussier, Bertrand; Bolliger, Christian; Bédard, Agathe; Doré, Monique; Blevins, William E.

    2016-01-01

    A 10-year-old golden retriever dog was presented for chronic right forelimb lameness associated with a painful swelling at the lateral aspect of the proximal ulna. Proximal ulnar ostectomy and stabilization resulted in a good clinical outcome. The proposed diagnosis is chronic desmitis and enthesiophytosis of the radio-ulnar interosseous ligament. PMID:27152034

  7. Radius graft pedicled on the anterior interosseous artery for recurrent ulnar nonunion.

    PubMed

    Andro, C; Richou, J; Schiele, P; Hu, W; Le Nen, D

    2011-06-01

    Recurrent ulnar nonunion challenges the functional prognosis and raises major problems concerning the best therapeutic strategy to follow. The case of a female patient presenting recurrent nonunion of the ulnar diaphysis despite successive treatments is reported. The radius graft pedicled on the anterior interosseous artery from a retrograde approach obtained bone union in 3 months with no functional sequelae. For the first time, we propose a therapeutic alternative calling on a proximally pedicled anterior interosseous flap. This technique can be performed under locoregional anesthesia and does not sacrifice the main artery of the forearm. However, the size of the graft does not entirely compensate for segmentary bone loss. The radius graft pedicled on the anterior interosseus artery is an inventive technique that can solve the problem of difficult ulna nonunions without the disadvantages of vascularized fibula harvesting.

  8. Nerve root distribution of deltoid and biceps brachii muscle in cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a potential risk factor for postoperative shoulder muscle weakness after posterior decompression.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Kazuo; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Fujimoto, Hideaki; Toyoda, Kouichiro; Kawai, Shinya

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the nerve root distribution of deltoid and biceps brachii muscle, compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were recorded intraoperatively following nerve root stimulation in cervical spondylotic myelopathy. A total of 19 upper limbs in 12 patients aged 55-72 years (mean, 65.5 years) with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were examined. CMAPs were recorded from deltoid and biceps brachii muscle following C5 and C6 root stimulation. Although both C5 and C6 roots were innervated for deltoid and biceps brachii muscle in all subjects, the amplitude ratio of CMAPs (C5/C6) differed individually depending on the symptomatic intervertebral levels of the spinal cord. The C5 root predominantly innervated both deltoid and biceps brachii in patients with symptomatic cord lesions at the C4-C5 intervertebral level compared to patients with symptomatic cord lesions at the C5-C6 intervertebral level. Although no patients sustained postoperative radiculopathy in our study, severe weakness and unfavorable recovery are expected when the C5 root in patients with C4-C5 myelopathy is damaged. From the electrophysiological aspect, C4-C5 cord lesions are likely to be a potential risk factor for postoperative shoulder muscle weakness in patients with compressive cervical myelopathy.

  9. Mimicking turf-toe: myofasopathy of the first dorsal interosseous muscle treated with ART®

    PubMed Central

    Pajaczkowski, Jason A

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To present the diagnostic features and response to treatment of an unreported clinical entity, first dorsal interosseous myofasopathy mimicking turf-toe. Clinical features: The salient features include an insidious onset of pain in the first MTP joint which compromises forceful propulsion in the absence of ecchymosis and joint effusion. Range of motion may be restricted in both instances, however muscular palpation and resisted manual muscle testing will reproduce the patient's complaints and isolate the first dorsal interosseous muscle as the culprit versus the fibrous plantar plate and joint capsule. Intervention and outcome: Treatment involves eliminating inflammation, reducing muscular hypertonicity, and restricting the offending activity. Active Release Technique® was utilized to remove adhesions and promote the restoration of normal tissue texture with excellent results. No other soft tissue treatment methods were implemented. Alternatively, other soft tissue techniques or modalities aimed at reducing inflammation and pain (i.e. ice, IFC, gentle stretching, etc. ...) may be useful. Conclusion: Although the etiology and epidemiology of first dorsal interosseous myofasopathy mimicking turf-toe has yet to be elucidated the clinical implications regarding misdiagnosis and treatment are extremely important to allopathic and chiropractic practitioners alike.

  10. [Anatomical variants of the medial calcaneal nerve and the Baxter nerve in the tarsal tunnel].

    PubMed

    Martín-Oliva, X; Elgueta-Grillo, J; Veliz-Ayta, P; Orosco-Villaseñor, S; Elgueta-Grillo, M; Viladot-Perice, R

    2013-01-01

    The tarsal tunnel is composed of the posterior border of the medial malleoulus, the posterior aspect of the talus and the medial aspect of the calcaneus. The medial calcaneal nerve emerges from the posterior aspect of the posterior tibial nerve in 75% of cases and from the lateral plantar nerve in the remaining 25%. Finally, the medial calcaneal nerve ends as a single terminal branch in 79% of cases and in numerous terminal branches in the remaining 21%. To describe the anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches. To describe the steps for tarsal tunnel release. To describe Baxter nerve release. The anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches within the tarsal tunnel were studied. Then the Lam technique was performed; it consists of: 1) opening of the laciniate ligament, 2) opening of the fascia over the abductor hallucis muscle, 3) exoneurolysis of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches, identifying the emergence and pathway of the medial calcaneal branch, the lateral plantar nerve and its Baxter nerve branch and the medial plantar nerve. Baxter nerve was found in 100% of cases. In 100% of cases in our series the nerve going to the abductor digiti minimi muscle of the foot was found; 87.5% of cases had two terminal branches. The dissections proved that a crucial step was the release of the distal tarsal tunnel.

  11. Role of percutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation either alone or combined with an anticholinergic agent in treating patients with overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kızılyel, Sadık; Karakeçi, Ahmet; Ozan, Tunç; Ünüş, İhsan; Barut, Osman; Onur, Rahmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), either alone or combined with an anticholinergic agent, in treating patients with an overactive bladder (OAB) in whom previous conservative treatment failed. Material and methods In this study, we included a total of 30 female patients with OAB in whom all conventional therapies failed between January 2010 and April 2011. Patients were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1, PTNS group; Group 2, patients receiving an anticholinergic agent; and Group 3, patients receiving both PTNS and anticholinergic agent. PTNS treatment continued for 12 weeks with each session lasting 30 min. Results All parameters of the bladder diary significantly improved in all groups (p<0.05). Similarly, all scores measured by questionnaires (UDI-6, IIQ-7, and OABSS) revealed significant improvements in all groups. When the improvements in symptoms were compared among the groups, there was a statistically significantly higher improvement in groups 1 and 3 than in Group 2. Conclusion PTNS is a safe, simple, and minimally invasive treatment modality in patients with OAB, and it may be suggested either alone or in combination with anticholinergics when conventional treatments fail. PMID:26623150

  12. Imaging of the Posterior Skull Base.

    PubMed

    Job, Joici; Branstetter, Barton F

    2017-01-01

    The posterior skull base can be involved by a variety of pathologic processes. They can be broadly classified as: traumatic, neoplastic, vascular, and inflammatory. Pathology in the posterior skull base usually involves the lower cranial nerves, either as a source of pathology or a secondary source of symptoms. This review will categorize pathology arising in the posterior skull base and describe how it affects the skull base itself and surrounding structures.

  13. Restoration of hand function in C7-T1 brachial plexus palsies using a staged approach with nerve and tendon transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng-Gang; Dong, Zhen; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2014-11-01

    Brachial plexus palsies of C7-T1 result in the complete loss of hand function, including finger and thumb flexion and extension as well as intrinsic muscle function. The task of reanimating such a hand remains challenging, and so far there has been no reliable neurological reconstructive method for restoring hand function. The authors aimed to establish a reliable strategy to reanimate the paralyzed hand. Two patients had sustained C7-T1 complete lesions. In the first stage of the operative procedure, a supinator motor branch to posterior interosseous nerve transfer was performed with brachialis motor branch transfer to the median nerve to restore finger and thumb extension and flexion. In the second stage, the intact brachioradialis muscle was used for abductorplasty to restore thumb opposition. Both patients regained good finger extension and flexion. Thumb opposition was also attained, and overall hand function was satisfactory. The described strategy proved effective and reliable in restoring hand function after C7-T1 brachial plexus palsies.

  14. Facial nerve rerouting in skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Parhizkar, Nooshin; Hiltzik, David H; Selesnick, Samuel H

    2005-08-01

    Facial nerve rerouting techniques were developed to facilitate re-section of extensive tumors occupying the skull base. Facial nerve rerouting has its own limitations and risks, requiring microsurgical expertise, additional surgical time, and often some degree of facial nerve paresis. This article presents different degrees of anterior and posterior facial nerve rerouting, techniques of facial nerve rerouting, and a comprehensive review of outcomes. It then reviews anatomic and functional preservation of the facial nerve in acoustic neuroma resection, technical aspects of facial nerve dissection, intracranial facial nerve repair options, and outcomes for successful acoustic neuroma surgery.

  15. Glossopharyngeal Nerve Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Puzzilli, F.; Mastronardi, L.; Agrillo, U.; Nardi, P.

    1999-01-01

    Complete resection with conservation of cranial nerves is the primary goal of contemporary surgery for lower cranial nerve tumors. We describe the case of a patient with a schwannoma of the left glossopharyngeal nerve, operated on in our Neurosurgical Unit. The far lateral approach combined with laminectomy of the posterior arch of C1 was done in two steps. The procedure allowed total tumor resection and was found to be better than classic unilateral suboccipital or combined supra- and infratentorial approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of the far lateral transcondylar approach, compared to the other more common approaches, are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171083

  16. Prevention of upper limb symptoms and signs of nerve afflictions in computer operators: The effect of intervention by stretching

    PubMed Central

    Jepsen, Jorgen R; Thomsen, Gert

    2008-01-01

    Background In a previous study of computer operators we have demonstrated the relation of upper limb pain to individual and patterns of neurological findings (reduced function of muscles, sensory deviations from normal and mechanical allodynia of nerve trunks). The identified patterns were in accordance with neural afflictions at three specific locations (brachial plexus at chord level, posterior interosseous and median nerve on elbow level). We have introduced an intervention program aiming to mobilize nerves at these locations and tested its efficacy. Methods 125 and 59, respectively, computer operators in two divisions of an engineering consultancy company were invited to answer a questionnaire on upper limb symptoms and to undergo a blinded neurological examination. Participants in one division were subsequently instructed to participate in an upper limb stretching course at least three times during workdays in a six month period. Subjects from the other division served as controls. At the end of the intervention both groups were invited to a second identical evaluation by questionnaire and physical examination. Symptoms and findings were studied in the right upper limb. Perceived changes of pain were recorded and individual and patterns of physical findings assessed for both groups at baseline and at follow-up. In subjects with no or minimal preceding pain we additionally studied the relation of incident pain to the summarized findings for parameters contained in the definition of nerve affliction at the three locations. Results Summarized pain was significantly reduced in the intervention group but unchanged in controls. After the intervention, fewer neurological abnormalities in accordance with nerve affliction were recorded for the whole material but no conclusion could be drawn regarding the relation to the intervention of this reduction. Incident pain correlated to findings in accordance with the three locations of nerve affliction. Conclusion A six month

  17. Arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis: the posterior approach in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Carro, Luis Perez; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2007-04-01

    Arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis, as reported by Tasto, is done in the lateral decubitus position, and the portal sites are lateral. This report describes a new alternative method in which the patient is in the prone position and a posterior 2-portal approach is used, as described by van Dijk et al. The initial debridement and synovectomy are performed with 4- and 5-mm resectors. Debridement and decortication are done posterior to the interosseous ligament because only the posterior facet is fused. Denudation of the articular surfaces is performed with curettes, as well as 4.5- and 5.5-mm burs, to remove 2 mm of subchondral bone. Stabilization in 5 degrees of hindfoot valgus is accomplished with 2 percutaneous cannulated headless screws from the non-weight-bearing portion of the calcaneal tuberosity directed to a point 5 to 10 mm posterior to the anterior margin of the posterior facet. The advantages of this alternative treatment are better intra-articular visualization, more thorough preparation of the fusion site, and minimal bone removal of the lateral side with better control of the arthrodesis position and with less chance of malunion, as well as the possibility to perform a concomitant surgical fusion or debridement of the ankle joint during the same operative procedure with no need for additional portals or orientation.

  18. Posterior tibial vein aneurysm presenting as tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Micheal; Whisenhunt, Anumeha; Hong, EnYaw; Heller, Josh; Salvatore, Dawn; Abai, Babak; DiMuzio, Paul J

    2015-06-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a compressive neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve within the tarsal tunnel. Its etiology varies, including space occupying lesions, trauma, inflammation, anatomic deformity, iatrogenic injury, and idiopathic and systemic causes. Herein, we describe a 46-year-old man who presented with left foot pain. Work up revealed a venous aneurysm impinging on the posterior tibial nerve. Following resection of the aneurysm and lysis of the nerve, his symptoms were alleviated. Review of the literature reveals an association between venous disease and tarsal tunnel syndrome; however, this report represents the first case of venous aneurysm causing symptomatic compression of the nerve.

  19. Posterior Fossa Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Essam A.; Taibah, Abdel Kader; Achilli, Vittorio; Aristegui, Miguel; Mazzoni, Antonio; Sanna, Mario

    1994-01-01

    Posterior fossa meningioma is the second most common tumor in the cerebellopontine angle. It has a higher rate of postoperative morbidity and mortality compared to acoustic neuroma. Forty posterior fossa meningioma patients managed in our centers were reviewed. Thirty-nine patients were managed surgically with 42 surgical procedures. The approaches used were the translabyrinthine approach in 18 patients (43%), the modified transcochlear in 11 cases (26%), the petro-occipital transsigmoid in 5 cases (12%), the suboccipital in 4 cases (10%), the petro-occipital trassigmoid transcervical in 2 cases (5%), the petro-occipital transsigmoid transtentorial in 1 case (2%), and a subtemporal transtentorial for another case (2%). Facial nerve anatomical integrity was preserved in 87% of procedures but was interrupted in 5 cases, with 4 of the latter subsequently repaired. Total tumor removal was accomplished in 38 cases. A second-stage total tumor removal is planned for the remaining case. There was only one case of perioperative death and no cases of radiological recurrence so far. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4p206-bFigure 5p207-bFigure 5 PMID:17171173

  20. Reconstruction of the Distal Oblique Bundle of the Interosseous Membrane: A Technique to Restore Distal Radioulnar Joint Stability.

    PubMed

    Riggenbach, Michael D; Wright, Thomas W; Dell, Paul C

    2015-11-01

    The distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction is a technique that may be used for distal radioulnar joint instability without arthritis and failed nonsurgical management; clinical results demonstrate resolved or improved stability. Recent literature has focused on the distal oblique bundle of the interosseous membrane and its contributions to stability. This article describes a technically simple surgical technique to reconstruct the distal oblique bundle and restore distal radioulnar joint stability.

  1. Accessory nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Olarte, M; Adams, D

    1977-11-01

    After apparently uncomplicated excision of benign lesions in the posterior cervical triangle, two patients had shoulder pain. In one, neck pain and trapezius weakness were not prominent until one month after surgery. Inability to elevate the arm above the horizontal without externally rotating it, and prominent scapular displacement on arm abduction, but not on forward pushing movements, highlighted the trapezius dysfunction and differentiated it from serratus anterior weakness. Spinal accessory nerve lesions should be considered when minor surgical procedures, lymphadenitis, minor trauma, or tumours involved the posterior triangle of the neck.

  2. Interstitial fluid flow: simulation of mechanical environment of cells in the interosseous membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wei; Ding, Guang-Hong

    2011-08-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that subtle fluid flow environment plays a significant role in living biological tissues, while there is no in vivo practical dynamical measurement of the interstitial fluid flow velocity. On the basis of a new finding that capillaries and collagen fibrils in the interosseous membrane form a parallel array, we set up a porous media model simulating the flow field with FLUENT software, studied the shear stress on interstitial cells' surface due to the interstitial fluid flow, and analyzed the effect of flow on protein space distribution around the cells. The numerical simulation results show that the parallel nature of capillaries could lead to directional interstitial fluid flow in the direction of capillaries. Interstitial fluid flow would induce shear stress on the membrane of interstitial cells, up to 30 Pa or so, which reaches or exceeds the threshold values of cells' biological response observed in vitro. Interstitial fluid flow would induce nonuniform spacial distribution of secretion protein of mast cells. Shear tress on cells could be affected by capillary parameters such as the distance between the adjacent capillaries, blood pressure and the permeability coefficient of capillary's wall. The interstitial pressure and the interstitial porosity could also affect the shear stress on cells. In conclusion, numerical simulation provides an effective way for in vivo dynamic interstitial velocity research, helps to set up the vivid subtle interstitial flow environment of cells, and is beneficial to understanding the physiological functions of interstitial fluid flow.

  3. Computing motor unit number index of the first dorsal interosseous muscle with two different contraction tasks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Li, Xiaoyan; Rymer, William Zev

    2012-10-01

    Motor unit number index (MUNIX) is a recently developed novel neurophysiological technique providing an index proportional to the number of motor units in a muscle. The MUNIX is derived from maximum M wave and voluntary surface electromyogram (EMG) recordings. The objective of this study was to address a practical question for computing MUNIX in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI), a multifunctional muscle that generates torque about the second metacarpophalangeal joint, i.e., how will different lines of muscle activation influence its MUNIX estimates? To address this question, the MUNIX technique was applied in the FDI muscle of 15 neurologically intact subjects, using surface EMG signals from index finger abduction and flexion, respectively, while the maximum M wave remained the same. Across all subjects, the average MUNIX value of the FDI muscle was 228 ± 45 for index finger abduction, slightly smaller than the MUNIX estimate of 251 ± 56 for index finger flexion. Different FDI muscle activation patterns resulted in an approximately 10% difference in MUNIX estimates. The findings from this study suggest that appropriate definition of voluntary activation of the FDI muscle should be kept to ensure consistency in measurements and avoid source of error. The current study is limited by only assessing neurologically intact muscles. It is important to perform a similar analysis for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), given that ALS is the primary intention of the MUNIX method as a potential follow-up measurement for motor unit loss.

  4. Expression of extracellular matrix molecules typical of articular cartilage in the human scapholunate interosseous ligament.

    PubMed

    Milz, S; Aktas, T; Putz, R; Benjamin, M

    2006-06-01

    The scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) connects the scaphoid and lunate bones and plays a crucial role in carpal kinematics. Its rupture leads to carpal instability and impairment of radiocarpal joint function. As the ligament is one of the first structures affected in rheumatoid arthritis, we conducted an immunohistochemical study of cadaveric tissue to determine whether it contains known autoantigens for rheumatoid arthritis. We immunolabelled the ligament from one hand in 12 cadavers with monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules associated with both fibrous and cartilaginous tissues. The labelling profile has also enabled us to comment on how the molecular composition of the ligament relates to its mechanical function. All regions of the ligament labelled for types I, III and VI collagens, chondroitin 4 and 6 sulphates, keratan sulphate, dermatan sulphate, versican, tenascin and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). However, both entheses labelled strongly for type II collagen, aggrecan and link protein and were distinctly fibrocartilaginous. In some regions, the ligament attached to bone via a region of hyaline cartilage that was continuous with articular cartilage. Labelling for cartilage molecules in the midsubstance was most evident dorsally. We conclude that the SLIL has an ECM which is typical of other highly fibrocartilaginous ligaments that experience both tensile load and shear. The presence of aggrecan, link protein, COMP and type II collagen could explain why the ligament may be a target for autoantigenic destruction in some forms of rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Using spike-triggered averaging to characterize motor unit twitch vectors in the first dorsal interosseous.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Nina; Kuo, Art; Heckman, C J; Rymer, William Zev

    2012-01-01

    Earlier studies in multifunctional muscles such as the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) have demonstrated that the selection and control of motor units (MUs) can vary as a function of generated force direction. While directionally dependent motor unit recruitment and rate properties imply that there may also be differential mechanical action, this has yet to be directly demonstrated. Our objective was to determine whether there exists a range of force vectors from different motor units in the FDI muscle within individual subjects. We utilized the spike-triggered averaging (STA) method to derive force twitch estimates from single motor units. We derived MU twitch direction from the ratio of individual twitch estimates recorded concurrently from the load cell. Fifteen units from 2 subjects were used to determine MU force vectors. We were able to estimate force twitch vectors from 7-8 different MUs in each subject. The results of our study suggest that there is varied mechanical action of motor units in the FDI. It is thus possible that differential activation of individual MUs in the FDI is a function of varied mechanical action.

  6. Dorsal wrist joint pain in tetraplegic patients during and after rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yukihiro

    2003-03-01

    In a study of 42 tetraplegic patients, physiological, neurological, electrophysiological and radiological examinations were made in 11 patients with complete tetraplegia who had wrist pain after rehabilitation. Pain relief produced by a selective, posterior interosseous nerve lidocaine block indicated distal posterior interosseous nerve syndrome. This syndrome can sometimes be treated conservatively, but surgical excision was required after nerve scarification. Repetitive dorsiflexion, as in wheelchair handling, transfer and tenodesis-like movement, compresses the distal posterior interosseous nerve in some tetraplegic patients. Moreover, weakness of the wrist joint stabilizing muscles is likely to contribute to an increased weight load on the wrist joints. The aetiology of wrist pain in tetraplegia should be considered when there is carpal tunnel syndrome, Wartenberg syndrome, Kienböck syndrome or distal posterior interosseous nerve syndrome. The causes need to be adequately treated to reduce the negative impact of the resultant pain on carrying out the activities of daily life.

  7. Arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-11-01

    The arterial supply to the upper cranial nerves is derived from a complex network of branches derived from the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations. We performed a comprehensive literature review of the arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves with an emphasis on clinical considerations. Arteries coursing in close proximity to the cranial nerves regularly give rise to small vessels that supply the nerve. Knowledge of the arteries supplying the cranial nerves is of particular importance during surgical approaches to the skull base.

  8. Task dependence of responses in first dorsal interosseous muscle to magnetic brain stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    Flament, D; Goldsmith, P; Buckley, C J; Lemon, R N

    1993-05-01

    1. The response of the first dorsal interosseous (1DI) muscle to non-invasive magnetic and scalp electrical stimulation of the brain have been investigated during performance of different manual tasks. 2. The six tasks tested required activation of the 1DI muscle, either in isolation (during abduction of the index finger) or as part of a more complex pattern of muscle synergies (e.g. during power grip). The level of 1DI EMG activity across tasks was kept constant by providing subjects with visual feedback of their muscle activity. 3. In every subject (n = 14) magnetic stimulation produced larger responses during performance of complex tasks than during the simple index abduction task. The pooled results from all subjects showed that four of the five complex tasks were associated with significantly larger 1DI responses (paired t test, P < 0.05). 4. These results were confirmed at the single motor unit level for nine motor units recorded from six subjects. Subjects were requested to produce a steady discharge of the same motor unit during performance of different tasks. The probability of motor unit discharge in response to magnetic stimulation was significantly greater during complex tasks (rotation or pincer grips) than during abduction. 5. Scalp electrical stimulation was performed in three subjects with the cathode at the vertex and the anode over the contralateral motor cortex. The pattern of response amplitudes in the different tasks tended to parallel that obtained for magnetic stimulation, but the task-related differences were smaller. 6. These results suggest that during performance of the different tasks, the corticospinal volleys evoked by magnetic stimulation may vary in amplitude. The task-related cortical mechanisms that may contribute to this variability are discussed.

  9. Results of bypasses to the anterior tibial artery through the interosseous membrane.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Calio, F G; Bertagni, A; Martinelli, V

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of anatomically tunneled grafts to the anterior tibial artery for distal revascularization in terms of patency and limb salvage rates as well as local morbidity, which can lengthen the postoperative hospital stay. Twenty-three patients received 24 bypasses to the anterior tibial artery, with grafts tunneled through the interosseous membrane. The mean age was 67 years; 10 patients were diabetic, 12 were smokers, 9 presented with significant coronary artery disease, and 2 with chronic renal insufficiency. The donor vessel was the common femoral artery in 17 cases, the superficial femoral artery in 4, and the infra-articular popliteal artery in 3. The graft material consisted in the reversed saphenous vein in 4 cases, the non-reversed devalvulated ex situ saphenous vein in 11, composite polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) + inversed saphenous vein in 6, and PTFE alone in 3 cases. No postoperative mortality was observed, nor was there postoperative graft occlusion or need for major amputation. The average postoperative length of stay in the hospital was 9.7 days. Two local surgical wound complications were observed, which did not necessitate a postoperative hospital stay exceeding 15 days. Cumulative primary patency and limb salvage rates at 3 years were 50% and 70%, respectively. Anatomic tunneling of grafts to the anterior tibial artery yields patency and limb salvage rates comparable to those reported in the literature for distal bypasses and, considered overall, an acceptably low local morbidity and short hospital stay. Definitive superiority over externally tunneled grafts, however, is not definitely demonstrated by this study and should be prospectively tested.

  10. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Review Date 6/1/2015 ...

  11. Surface electromyogram analysis of the direction of isometric torque generation by the first dorsal interosseous muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Suresh, Nina L.; Zev Rymer, William

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a novel technique using high density surface electromyogram (EMG) recordings can be used to detect the directional dependence of muscle activity in a multifunctional muscle, the first dorsal interosseous (FDI). We used surface EMG recordings with a two-dimensional electrode array to search for inhomogeneous FDI activation patterns with changing torque direction at the metacarpophalangeal joint, the locus of action of the FDI muscle. The interference EMG distribution across the whole FDI muscle was recorded during isometric contraction at the same force magnitude in five different directions in the index finger abduction-flexion plane. The electrode array EMG activity was characterized by contour plots, interpolating the EMG amplitude between electrode sites. Across all subjects the amplitude of the flexion EMG was consistently lower than that of the abduction EMG at the given force. Pattern recognition methods were used to discriminate the isometric muscle contraction tasks with a linear discriminant analysis classifier, based on the extraction of two different feature sets of the surface EMG signal: the time domain (TD) feature set and a combination of autoregressive coefficients and the root mean square amplitude (AR+RMS) as a feature set. We found that high accuracies were obtained in the classification of different directions of the FDI muscle isometric contraction. With a monopolar electrode configuration, the average overall classification accuracy from nine subjects was 94.1 ± 2.3% for the TD feature set and 95.8 ± 1.5% for the AR+RMS feature set. Spatial filtering of the signal with bipolar electrode configuration improved the average overall classification accuracy to 96.7 ± 2.7% for the TD feature set and 98.1 ± 1.6% for the AR+RMS feature set. The distinct EMG contour plots and the high classification accuracies obtained from this study confirm distinct interference EMG pattern distributions as a

  12. Percutaneous Posterior Calcaneal Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Different types of posterior calcaneal osteotomy are used for calcaneal realignment in the management of hindfoot deformity. We describe a percutaneous technique of posterior calcaneal osteotomy that can be either a Dwyer-type closing wedge osteotomy or displacement osteotomy.

  13. Nerve distribution of canine pulmonary arteries and potential clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Chen, Weijie; Xu, Yanping; Liu, Hang; Chen, Yunlin; Yang, Hanxuan; Yin, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic activation plays an important pathophysiological role in the progression of pulmonary artery hypertension. Although adrenergic vasomotor fibers are present in the adventitia of pulmonary arteries, the anatomy of the peri-arterial pulmonary nerves is still poorly understood. The aim of the current study was to determine the sympathetic nerve distribution in canine pulmonary arteries. A total of 2160 sympathetic nerves were identified in six Chinese Kunming canines. Nerve counts were greatest in the proximal segment, with a slight decrease in the distal segment; the middle segment showed the least number of nerves. In the left and right pulmonary arteries, 77.61% and 78.97% of the nerves were located within a 1-3-mm range, respectively. The number of nerves in the posterior region of the bifurcation and pulmonary trunk outnumbered those in the anterior region. Furthermore, 65.33% of the nerves were located in the first 2-mm range of the posterior region of bifurcation, and 89.62% of the nerves were located within the 1-3-mm range of the posterior region of the pulmonary trunk. In conclusion, a great abundance of sympathetic nerves occurred in the proximal and distal segments of the bilateral pulmonary arteries. There is a clear predominance of sympathetic nerve distribution in the posterior region of the bifurcation and pulmonary trunk. This anatomic distribution may have implications for the future development of percutaneous pulmonary artery denervation. PMID:27158332

  14. Cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quan; Chen, Dongmei; Wang, Yonggang; Zhao, Xin; Zheng, Yang

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the distribution characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves and to explore the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia. DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed for papers examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerves, using heart, autonomic nerve, sympathetic nerve, vagus nerve, nerve distribution, rhythm and atrial fibrillation as the key words. SELECTION CRITERIA: A total of 165 studies examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerve were screened, and 46 of them were eventually included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The distribution and characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves were observed, and immunohistochemical staining was applied to determine the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase (main markers of cardiac autonomic nerve distribution). In addition, the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and cardiac arrhythmia was investigated. RESULTS: Cardiac autonomic nerves were reported to exhibit a disordered distribution in different sites, mainly at the surface of the cardiac atrium and pulmonary vein, forming a ganglia plexus. The distribution of the pulmonary vein autonomic nerve was prominent at the proximal end rather than the distal end, at the upper left rather than the lower right, at the epicardial membrane rather than the endocardial membrane, at the left atrium rather than the right atrium, and at the posterior wall rather than the anterior wall. The main markers used for cardiac autonomic nerves were tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase. Protein gene product 9.5 was used to label the immunoreactive nerve distribution, and the distribution density of autonomic nerves was determined using a computer-aided morphometric analysis system. CONCLUSION: The uneven distribution of the cardiac autonomic nerves is the leading cause of the occurrence of arrhythmia, and the cardiac autonomic nerves play an important role in

  15. Microsurgical anatomy of the ocular motor nerves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Hao; Liu, En-Zhong; Lin, You-Zhi; Zhao, Shi-Guang; Jing, Guo-Hua

    2010-08-01

    This study was designed to provide anatomic data to help surgeons avoid damage to the ocular motor nerves during intraorbital operations. The microsurgical anatomy of the ocular motor nerves was studied in 50 adult cadaveric heads (100 orbits). Dissections were performed with a microscope. The nerves were exposed and the neural and muscular relationships of each portion of the nerve were examined and measured. The superior division of the oculomotor nerve coursed between the optic nerve and the superior rectus muscle after it left the annular tendon, and its branches entered into the superior rectus muscle and levator muscle. A mean of five fibers (range 3-7) innervated the superior rectus muscle, and a mean of one fiber (range 1-2) followed a medial direction (84%) or went straight through the superior rectus muscle (16%). The inferior division of the oculomotor nerve branched into the medial rectus, inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscles. The trochlear nerve ended on the orbital side of the posterior one-third of the superior oblique muscle in 76 specimens. The abducens nerve ended on the posterior one-third of the lateral rectus muscle in 86 specimens. If the belly of the lateral rectus muscle was divided into three superior-inferior parts, the nerve commonly entered into the middle one-third in 74 specimens. Based on the observed data, microanatomical relationships of the orbital contents were revised.

  16. Neuromas of the calcaneal nerves.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Dellon, A L

    2001-11-01

    A neuroma of a calcaneal nerve has never been reported. A series of 15 patients with heel pain due to a neuroma of a calcaneal nerve are reviewed. These patients previously had either a plantar fasciotomy (n = 4), calcaneal spur removal (n = 2), ankle fusion (n = 2), or tarsal tunnel decompression (n = 7). Neuromas occurred on calcaneal branches that arose from either the posterior tibial nerve (n = 1), lateral plantar nerve (n = 1), the medial plantar nerve (n = 9), or more than one of these nerves (n = 4). Operative approach was through an extended tarsal tunnel incision to permit identification of all calcaneal nerves. The neuroma was resected and implanted into the flexor hallucis longus muscle. Excellent relief of pain occurred in 60%, and good relief in 33%. One patient (17%) had no improvement and required resection of the lateral plantar nerve. Awareness that the heel may be innervated by multiple calcaneal branches suggests that surgery for heel pain of neural origin employ a surgical approach that permits identification of all possible calcaneal branches.

  17. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - common peroneal nerve; Peroneal nerve injury; Peroneal nerve palsy ... type of peripheral neuropathy (damage to nerves outside the brain ... nerve injuries. Damage to the nerve disrupts the myelin sheath ...

  18. BAER suppression during posterior fossa dural opening

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Christopher B.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Jiang, Yi Dan; Yao, Tom; Zhang, Yi Ping; Sun, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative monitoring with brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) provides an early warning signal of potential neurological injury and may avert tissue damage to the auditory pathway or brainstem. Unexplained loss of the BAER signal in the operating room may present a dilemma to the neurosurgeon. Methods: This paper documents two patients who displayed a unique mechanism of suppression of the BAER apparent within minutes following dural opening for resection of a posterior fossa meningioma. Results: In two patients with anterior cerebellopontine angle and clival meningiomas, there was a significant deterioration of the BAER soon after durotomy but prior to cerebellar retraction and tumor removal. Intracranial structures in the posterior fossa lying between the tumor and dural opening were shifted posteriorly after durotomy. Conclusion: We hypothesized that the cochlear nerve and vessels entering the acoustic meatus were compressed or stretched when subjected to tissue shift. This movement caused cochlear nerve dysfunction that resulted in BAER suppression. BAER was partially restored after the tumor was decompressed, dura repaired, and bone replaced. BAER was not suppressed following durotomy for removal of a meningioma lying posterior to the cochlear complex. Insight into the mechanisms of durotomy-induced BAER inhibition would allay the neurosurgeon's anxiety during the operation. PMID:25883849

  19. Iodine-125 radiation of posterior uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S.

    1987-12-01

    Twenty-eight cases of posterior choroidal melanoma were treated with iodine-125 in gold eye plaques. Eleven cases were located within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve (group A), nine were within 3.0 mm of the fovea (group B), and eight were within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve and fovea (group C). The mean follow-up of group A was 46.3 months; group B, 25.5 months; and group C, 42.7 months. Complications included macular edema, cataract and tumor growth. Visual acuity remained within two lines of that tested preoperatively for 4 of 11 patients in group A, 4 of 9 in group B, and 5 of 8 in group C. These results with iodine-125 suggest it as an appropriate treatment for patients with choroidal melanoma located near optic nerve and/or macula.

  20. Establishing improved normal values for nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Buschbacher, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    Nerve conduction studies are commonly performed to diagnose injuries of the peripheral nerves. In the past, normal ranges have been derived on relatively small samples of normal subjects. These ranges were often suboptimal for clinical use. Therefore, this series of articles was created to establish an improved database of normative values. It highlights the key contributions of a number of authors. In this foreword, the contributions of the various authors to the special issue on the development of an improved database for nerve conduction studies are described. The authors are introduced, including their training, gifts, and which articles they were involved in writing. In addition, there is a brief review of each of the articles in this special supplement. The fundamentals of ulnar motor nerve conduction to the first dorsal interosseous muscle are described, as is the contribution of Nate Prahlow, MD. In addition, the median motor nerve conduction to the pronator teres muscle and flexor carpi radialis muscle is highlighted including the contributions of Brian Foley, MD. The radial sensory nerve and dorsal ulnar cutaneous sensory nerve studies are described, as well as the contributions of Van Evanoff, Jr., MD, in creating this research. Median motor conduction to the lumbrical muscles and ulnar motor conduction to the palmar interosseous muscles are described, again highlighting the contributions of Dr. Foley. In addition, medial and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve studies are described, along with the contributions of Dr. Nathan Prahlow. Median and ulnar sensory conduction studies recording from the fourth digit, as well as median and radial sensory conduction to the first digit, are described, as are the contributions of James Lohman, MD, and Andrew Berkson, DO. The side-to-side differences in median and ulnar sensory conduction studies and the importance of performing such studies are described, as are the contributions in this research of Dr. Nathan

  1. Immunohistochemical evidence for the coexistence of histidine decarboxylase-like and glutamate decarboxylase-like immunoreactivities in nerve cells of the magnocellular nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, N; Inagaki, S; Shiosaka, S; Taguchi, Y; Oertel, W H; Tohyama, M; Watanabe, T; Wada, H

    1984-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining of alternate consecutive sections revealed numerous histidine decarboxylase (L-histidine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.22)-like immunoreactive neurons that also contained glutamate decarboxylase (L-glutamate 1-carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.15)-like immunoreactive structures in the tuberal magnocellular nucleus, the caudal magnocellular nucleus, and the postmammillary caudal magnocellular nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus of rats. Furthermore, in immunohistochemical double-staining procedures, almost all neurons in the magnocellular nuclei had both histidine decarboxylase-like and glutamate decarboxylase-like immunoreactivities. These results suggest the coexistence of histamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid in single neurons in these nuclei. Images PMID:6594708

  2. Microsurgical anatomy of the trochlear nerve.

    PubMed

    Joo, Wonil; Rhoton, Albert L

    2015-10-01

    The trochlear nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest intracranial course, but also the thinnest. It is the only nerve that arises from the dorsal surface of the brainstem and decussates in the superior medullary velum. After leaving the dorsal surface of the brainstem, it courses anterolaterally around the lateral surface of the brainstem and then passes anteriorly just beneath the free edge of the tentorium. It passes forward to enter the cavernous sinus, traverses the superior orbital fissure and terminates in the superior oblique muscle in the orbit. Because of its small diameter and its long course, the trochlear nerve can easily be injured during surgical procedures. Therefore, precise knowledge of its surgical anatomy and its neurovascular relationships is essential for approaching and removing complex lesions of the orbit and the middle and posterior fossae safely. This review describes the microsurgical anatomy of the trochlear nerve and is illustrated with pictures involving the nerve and its surrounding connective and neurovascular structures.

  3. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Aker, PD; O’Connor, SM; Mior, SA; Beauchemin, D

    1989-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) has recently been recognized as a clinical entity. It is a rare condition, having a higher incidence in the Japanese population. It is characterized by hyperplasia of cartilage cells with eventual endochondral ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The radiographic signs are characteristic and consist of a linear band of ossified tissue along the posterior margin of the vertebral body. OPLL can be associated with mild to serious neurological complications due to spinal cord or nerve root compression, or it may be asymptomatic. This paper reviews the radiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of this rare condition. ImagesFigures 1 and 2Figures 3 and 4

  4. Gantzer muscle. An anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Edie Benedito; Sabongi, João José; Vieira, Luiz Ângelo; Caetano, Maurício Ferreira; Moraes, Daniel Vinhais

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relationship of Gantzer muscle to the median and anterior interosseous nerve is debated. METHODS: Ìn an anatomical study with 80 limbs from 40 cadavers the incidence, origin, insertion, nerve supply and relations of Gantzer muscle have been documented. RESULTS: The muscle was found in 54 forearms (68% of limbs) and was supplied by the anterior interosseous nerve. It arose from the deep surface of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, (42 limbs), coronoid process (eight limbs) and medial epicondyle (seven limbs). Its insertion was to the ulnar part of flexor pollicis longus muscle. The Gantzer muscle always lay posterior to both the median and anterior interosseous nerve. CONCLUSION: The Gantzer muscle may contribute to the median nerve and anterior interosseous nerve compression. The muscle was found in 68% of limbs and should be considered a normal anatomical pattern rather than an anatomical variation. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series . PMID:27069404

  5. Magnetic resonance neurography-guided nerve blocks for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jan; Chhabra, Avneesh; Wang, Kenneth C; Carrino, John A

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography - guided nerve blocks and injections describe a techniques for selective percutaneous drug delivery, in which limited MR neurography and interventional MR imaging are used jointly to map and target specific pelvic nerves or muscles, navigate needles to the target, visualize the injected drug and detect spread to confounding structures. The procedures described, specifically include nerve blocks of the obturator nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, pudendal nerve, posterior femoral cutaneous nerve, sciatic nerve, ganglion impar, sacral spinal nerve, and injection into the piriformis muscle.

  6. Nerve Blocks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sometimes the needle has to be inserted fairly deep to reach the nerve causing your problem. This ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  7. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACL connect your thighbone (femur) to your shinbone (tibia). If either ligament is torn, it might cause ... ligaments connect the thighbone (femur) to the shinbone (tibia). The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments form an " ...

  8. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases.

  9. Posterior transfer of the anterior tibial tendon in children who have a myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, G M; Aronson, D D

    1990-03-01

    Posterior transfer of the tendon of the anterior tibial muscle through the interosseous membrane to the calcaneus to prevent or correct a calcaneus deformity was performed in twenty patients (thirty-nine feet) who had a myelomeningocele. The average age of the patients at the time of the operation was 4.6 years, and they were followed for an average of six years. Satisfactory clinical and radiographic results were obtained in thirty-seven (95 per cent) of the thirty-nine feet. Two patients, one who was unable to walk and one who walked at home only, had a mild equinus deformity of the left foot. No patient had a clinical calcaneus deformity, but there was radiographic evidence of talipes calcaneus in one patient (two feet). The anterior tibial muscle functioned more consistently when the operation was performed after the patient was four years old and in patients who had a fifth lumbar or first sacral motor level.

  10. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nerve Decompression Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Optic Nerve Decompression John Lee, MD Introduction Optic nerve decompression is a surgical procedure aimed at ...

  11. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... compressed in the elbow, a problem called cubital tunnel syndrome may result. When damage destroys the nerve ...

  12. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Gala, Foram B; Aswani, Yashant

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication.

  13. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram B; Aswani, Yashant

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication. PMID:27857455

  14. Pressure distribution in the humeroradial joint and force transmission to the capitellum during rotation of the forearm: effects of the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure and incision of the interosseous membrane.

    PubMed

    Ofuchi, S; Takahashi, K; Yamagata, M; Rokkaku, T; Moriya, H; Hara, T

    2001-01-01

    A biomechanical study was undertaken, using four fresh cadaveric arms, to evaluate the changes in pressure distribution in the humeroradial joint (H-R joint) during rotation of the forearm before and after the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure (S-K procedure) and also after incision of the interosseous membrane (IOM) following the S-K procedure. The pressure distribution was measured with a pressure-sensitive conductive rubber sensor while the forearm was rotated. Force transmitted to the capitellum was calculated from the measured pressure. In the intact specimens, pressure was concentrated on the medial side of the capitellum in pronation and on the posterolateral side in supination. The pattern of change after the S-K procedure and that after incision of the IOM following the S-K procedure were almost the same as that in the intact forearm. Although the force transmitted to the capitellum increased after the S-K procedure, there were no significant differences between the forces before and after the S-K procedure. However, the force increased significantly after incision of the IOM following the S-K procedure when the forearm was supinated more than 35 degrees, and it was concentrated on the posterior side of the capitellum. The IOM seemed to have an important axial load-bearing function in the forearm position supinated more than 35 degrees. The S-K procedure in patients suffering from distal radioulnar joint disorders with IOM injury is likely to induce H-R joint osteoarthritis, so it should be avoided in these patients.

  15. Nerve transfers for restoration of finger flexion in patients with tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme A; Ghizoni, Marcos F

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this paper was to report the authors' results with finger flexion restoration by nerve transfer in patients with tetraplegia. METHODS Surgery was performed for restoration of finger flexion in 17 upper limbs of 9 patients (8 male and 1 female) at a mean of 7.6 months (SD 4 months) after cervical spinal cord injury. The patients' mean age at the time of surgery was 28 years (SD 15 years). The motor level according to the ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) classification was C-5 in 4 upper limbs, C-6 in 10, and C-7 in 3. In 3 upper limbs, the nerve to the brachialis was transferred to the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN), which was separated from the median nerve from the antecubital fossa to the midarm. In 5 upper limbs, the nerve to the brachialis was transferred to median nerve motor fascicles innervating finger flexion muscles in the midarm. In 4 upper limbs, the nerve to the brachioradialis was transferred to the AIN. In the remaining 5 upper limbs, the nerve to the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) was transferred to the AIN. Patients were followed for an average of 16 months (SD 6 months). At the final evaluation the range of finger flexion and strength were estimated by manual muscle testing according to the British Medical Research Council scale. RESULTS Restoration of finger flexion was observed in 4 of 8 upper limbs in which the nerve to the brachialis was used as a donor. The range of motion was incomplete in all 5 of these limbs, and the strength was M3 in 3 limbs and M4 in 1 limb. Proximal retrograde dissection of the AIN was associated with better outcomes than transfer of the nerve to the brachialis to median nerve motor fascicles in the arm. After the nerve to the brachioradialis was transferred to the AIN, incomplete finger flexion with M4 strength was restored in 1 limb; the remaining 3 limbs did not show any recovery. Full finger flexion with M4 strength was demonstrated in all 5 upper limbs in which the nerve

  16. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  17. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  18. The tibialis posterior tendon.

    PubMed

    Lhoste-Trouilloud, A

    2012-02-01

    The tibialis posterior tendon is the largest and anteriormost tendon in the medial ankle. It produces plantar flexion and supination of the ankle and stabilizes the plantar vault. Sonographic assessment of this tendon is done with high-frequency, linear-array transducers; an optimal examination requires transverse retromalleolar, longitudinal retromalleolar, and distal longitudinal scans, as well as dynamic studies. Disorders of the posterior tibial tendon include chronic tendinopathy with progressive rupture, tenosynovitis, acute rupture, dislocation and instability, enthesopathies. The most common lesion is a progressive "chewing gum" lesion that develops in a setting of chronic tendinopathy; it is usually seen in overweight women over 50 years of age with valgus flat feet. Medial ankle pain must also be carefully investigated, and the presence of instability assessed with dynamic maneuvers (forced inversion, or dorsiflexion) of the foot. Sonography plays an important role in the investigation of disorders involving the posterior tibial tendon.

  19. Posterior Fossa Tumors.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Lara A; Young Poussaint, Tina

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of death from solid tumors in childhood. The most common posterior fossa tumors in children are medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymoma, and brainstem glioma. Location, and imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) and conventional MR (cMR) imaging may provide important clues to the most likely diagnosis. Moreover, information obtained from advanced MR imaging techniques increase diagnostic confidence and help distinguish between different histologic tumor types. Here we discuss the most common posterior fossa tumors in children, including typical imaging findings on CT, cMR imaging, and advanced MR imaging studies.

  20. Posterior crossbites in children.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J F; Crevoisier, R; King, D L; Henry, R; Mills, C M

    1996-11-01

    Posterior crossbite, the most common malocclusion in young children, can be caused by a variety of skeletal, muscular, or dental factors. This condition produces insufficient maxillary arch width and is frequently associated with various oral sucking and postural habits. If left untreated, this problem can result in adverse skeletal growth changes. Various mechanical treatment modalities designed to expand the posterior maxillary arch width are available to correct this problem. The appropriate treatment method depends on the patient's age and level of cooperation as well as the determined etiology of the constriction.

  1. Tibialis Posterior Tendon Entrapment Within Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fragment.

    PubMed

    Fantry, Amanda; Lareau, Craig; Vopat, Bryan; Blankenhorn, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Management of posterior malleolus fractures continues to be controversial, with respect to both need for fixation and fixation methods. Fixation methods include an open posterior approach to the ankle as well as percutaneous reduction and fixation with or without arthroscopy for visualization of the articular surface. Plain radiographs are unreliable in identifying fracture pattern and intraoperative reduction, making arthroscopy a valuable adjunct to posterior malleolus fracture management. In this article, we report a case of tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus fracture, as identified by arthroscopy and managed with open reduction. Tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus has not been previously reported. Ankle arthroscopy for posterior malleolus fractures provides an opportunity to identify soft-tissue or tendinous entrapment, articular surface reduction, and articular cartilage injuries unlikely to be identified with fluoroscopy alone and should be considered in reduction and fixation of posterior malleolus fractures.

  2. A New Technique for Volar Capsulodesis for Isolated Palmar Scapholunate Interosseous Ligament Injuries: A Cadaveric Study and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    van Kampen, Robert J.; Bayne, Christopher O.; Moran, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Most surgical techniques for scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) repair address only the dorsal component of the ligament, potentially leading to high surgical failure rates. We introduce a new technique to reconstruct the volar SLIL using a portion of the long radiolunate ligament (LRL). A biomechanical evaluation was performed to evaluate the rupture strength of this repair, and a subsequent anatomic study was performed to verify that this repair would not compromise the blood supply to either the scaphoid or the lunate. Methods A reconstruction of the volar SLIL was developed utilizing a lunate-based strip of the LRL. Fourteen cadaver arms were injected with red-colored epoxide and latex. The blood supply of the volar wrist capsule was dissected. The vascular supply to the ligaments, scaphoid, and lunate were investigated. The biomechanical strength of this reconstruction was tested on five cadaver arms by potting the scaphoid, lunate, and radius and subjecting the repair to a tensile load using a servohydraulic vertical displacement testing machine. Results In all arms, a branch of the radial artery or radiocarpal arch supplied the radioscapholunate ligament at the medial border of the LRL. The proximal half of the scaphoid was supplied by dorsal branches of the radial artery. In all cases, a vessel entered the lunate on its ulnar volar side, away from the repair. The average strength of the intact LRL strip was 97.4 N, and the average strength of the ligament-suture interface used for the capsulodesis was 43.5 N. Conclusion This volar approach to the SLIL does not compromise the vascularity of the scaphoid or the lunate. This approach allows the possibility of repairing or augmenting the volar SLIL. The strength of this repair appears to be less than the strength of the native SLIL. Further clinical studies are warranted. PMID:26539326

  3. Accessory Upper Subscapular Nerve – The Neurotisation Tool

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Vishwajit Ravindra; Mandal, Rabindra Prasad; Kusuma, Harisha

    2016-01-01

    During the routine dissection classes for undergraduate students, uncommon variation in relation to the upper subscapular nerve of posterior cord of brachial plexus was observed. Normally upper subscapular nerve takes origin from the posterior cord, but in this case report, it arises in triplet fashion, just above the circumflex scapular artery. All these accessory nerves were supplying upper part of the subscapularis muscle. As per our knowledge, this is a rare variation of brachial plexus. Many variations are encountered in the formation of brachial plexus. The normal and the abnormal origin of nerves are important considering neurotisation surgeries as well as during the infraclavicular nerve block for various axillary and upper limb surgeries. PMID:27790416

  4. Morphology of Donor and Recipient Nerves Utilised in Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Limb Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Aurora; Van Zyl, Natasha; Weymouth, Michael; Flood, Stephen; Nunn, Andrew; Cooper, Catherine; Hahn, Jodie; Galea, Mary P.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of hand function after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) impacts heavily on independence. Multiple nerve transfer surgery has been applied successfully after cervical SCI to restore critical arm and hand functions, and the outcome depends on nerve integrity. Nerve integrity is assessed indirectly using muscle strength testing and intramuscular electromyography, but these measures cannot show the manifestation that SCI has on the peripheral nerves. We directly assessed the morphology of nerves biopsied at the time of surgery, from three patients within 18 months post injury. Our objective was to document their morphologic features. Donor nerves included teres minor, posterior axillary, brachialis, extensor carpi radialis brevis and supinator. Recipient nerves included triceps, posterior interosseus (PIN) and anterior interosseus nerves (AIN). They were fixed in glutaraldehyde, processed and embedded in Araldite Epon for light microscopy. Eighty percent of nerves showed abnormalities. Most common were myelin thickening and folding, demyelination, inflammation and a reduction of large myelinated axon density. Others were a thickened perineurium, oedematous endoneurium and Renaut bodies. Significantly, very thinly myelinated axons and groups of unmyelinated axons were observed indicating regenerative efforts. Abnormalities exist in both donor and recipient nerves and they differ in appearance and aetiology. The abnormalities observed may be preventable or reversible. PMID:27690115

  5. Posterior clinoidectomy: dural tailoring technique and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A Samy; van Loveren, Harry R

    2009-05-01

    The posterior clinoid process, a bony prominence at the superolateral aspect of the dorsum sellae, has a strategic importance in a transcavernous approach to basilar tip aneurysms. To further optimize this microsurgical technique during posterior clinoidectomy, we performed a cadaveric study of this regional anatomy, describe a technique called dural tailoring, and report initial results in the surgical treatment of upper basilar artery (BA) aneurysm. After 10 adult cadaver heads (silicone-injected) were prepared for dissection, a posterior clinoidectomy with dural tailoring was performed. The dura overlying the upper clivus was coagulated with bipolar electrocoagulation and incised. Stripping dura off the clivus and lateral reflection then exposed the ipsilateral posterior clinoid process and dorsum sellae, thus creating a dural flap. Posterior clinoidectomy with dural tailoring was then used in seven patients with upper BA aneurysms. Our stepwise modification of the posterior clinoidectomy with dural tailoring created a flap that afforded protection of the cavernous sinus and oculomotor nerve. During surgery, there were no recorded intraoperative injuries to neurovascular structures. One patient died postoperatively from morbidity related to severe-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage. Postoperative oculomotor nerve palsy occurred in 3 patients (43%). In all cases, the nerve was anatomically preserved and partial to complete recovery was recorded during the first postoperative year. This technique effectively provided exposure of retrosellar upper basilar aneurysms in seven patients (basilar tip 43% and superior cerebellar artery aneurysms 57%). Outcomes and safety are at least equivalent to or better than basilar aneurysm surgery performed without surgical adjuncts, presumably a less complex subset.

  6. Optic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lynn K

    2016-10-28

    Optic nerve diseases arise from many different etiologies including inflammatory, neoplastic, genetic, infectious, ischemic, and idiopathic. Understanding some of the characteristics of the most common optic neuropathies along with therapeutic approaches to these diseases is helpful in designing recommendations for individual patients. Although many optic neuropathies have no specific treatment, some do, and it is those potentially treatable or preventable conditions which need to be recognized in order to help patients regain their sight or develop a better understanding of their own prognosis. In this chapter several diseases are discussed including idiopathic intracranial hypertension, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathies, hereditary optic neuropathies, trauma, and primary tumors of the optic nerve. For each condition there is a presentation of the signs and symptoms of the disease, in some conditions the evaluation and diagnostic criteria are highlighted, and where possible, current therapy or past trials are discussed.

  7. Posterior fossa syndrome—a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Salima S.; Hettige, Samantha; Mankad, Kshtij

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa syndrome (PFS), or cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), is a collection of neurological symptoms that occur following surgical resection of a posterior fossa tumour, and is characterised by either a reduction or an absence of speech. Some authors suggest that CM is only one symptom of the CMS complex that also includes ataxia, hypotonia and irritability as well as cranial nerve deficits, neurobehavioral changes and urinary retention or incontinence. It is seen almost exclusively in children. In 1985 Rekate et al. published the first work describing CM as a clinical entity, occurring as a consequence of bilateral cerebellar injury. Other associated symptoms include visual impairment, altered mood, impaired swallowing and significant gross and fine motor deficits. The effects of this can have a devastating impact on both the patient and their carers, posing a significant clinical challenge to neurorehabilitation services. The reported incidence was between 8% and 31% of children undergoing surgery for posterior fossa tumour. The underlying pathologies include vasospasm, oedema, and axonal/neuronal injury. Neuroimaging has contributed to a better understanding of the anatomical location of postoperative injury. There have been a number of suggestions for treatment interventions for PFS. However, apart from some individual reports, there have been no clinical trials indicating possible benefit. Occupational therapy, speech and language therapy, as well as neurocognitive support, contribute to the recovery of these patients. PMID:27942479

  8. Posterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Go, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 20-25% of all acute strokes occur in the posterior circulation. These strokes can be rather difficult to diagnose because they present in such diverse ways, and can easily be mistaken for more benign entities. A fastidious history, physical exam, high clinical suspicion, and appropriate use of imaging are essential for the emergency physician to properly diagnose and treat these patients. Expert stroke neurologist consultation should be utilized liberally.

  9. Risk of Encountering Dorsal Scapular and Long Thoracic Nerves during Ultrasound-guided Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block with Nerve Stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Dong; Yu, Jae Yong; Shim, Junho; Heo, Hyun Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, ultrasound has been commonly used. Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) by posterior approach is more commonly used because anterior approach has been reported to have the risk of phrenic nerve injury. However, posterior approach also has the risk of causing nerve injury because there are risks of encountering dorsal scapular nerve (DSN) and long thoracic nerve (LTN). Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of encountering DSN and LTN during ultrasound-guided IBPB by posterior approach. Methods A total of 70 patients who were scheduled for shoulder surgery were enrolled in this study. After deciding insertion site with ultrasound, awake ultrasound-guided IBPB with nerve stimulator by posterior approach was performed. Incidence of muscle twitches (rhomboids, levator scapulae, and serratus anterior muscles) and current intensity immediately before muscle twitches disappeared were recorded. Results Of the total 70 cases, DSN was encountered in 44 cases (62.8%) and LTN was encountered in 15 cases (21.4%). Both nerves were encountered in 10 cases (14.3%). Neither was encountered in 21 cases (30.4%). The average current measured immediately before the disappearance of muscle twitches was 0.44 mA and 0.50 mA at DSN and LTN, respectively. Conclusions Physicians should be cautious on the risk of injury related to the anatomical structures of nerves, including DSN and LTN, during ultrasound-guided IBPB by posterior approach. Nerve stimulator could be another option for a safer intervention. Moreover, if there is a motor response, it is recommended to select another way to secure better safety. PMID:27413483

  10. A review of the management of posterior communicating artery aneurysms in the modern era

    PubMed Central

    Golshani, Kiarash; Ferrell, Andrew; Zomorodi, Ali; Smith, Tony P.; Britz, Gavin W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Technical advancements have significantly improved surgical and endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms. In this paper, we review the literature with regard to treatment of one of the most common intra-cranial aneurysms encountered by neurosurgeons and interventional radiologists. Conclusions: Anterior clinoidectomy, temporary clipping, adenosine-induced cardiac arrest, and intraoperative angiography are useful adjuncts during surgical clipping of these aneurysms. Coil embolization is also an effective treatment alternative particularly in the elderly population. However, coiled posterior communicating artery aneurysms have a particularly high risk of recurrence and must be followed closely. Posterior communicating artery aneurysms with an elongated fundus, true posterior communicating artery aneurysms, and aneurysms associated with a fetal posterior communicating artery may have better outcome with surgical clipping in terms of completeness of occlusion and preservation of the posterior communicating artery. However, as endovascular technology improves, endovascular treatment of posterior communicating artery aneurysms may become equivalent or preferable in the near future. One in five patients with a posterior communicating artery aneurysm present with occulomotor nerve palsy with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Factors associated with a higher likelihood of recovery include time to treatment, partial third nerve deficit, and presence of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Both surgical and endovascular therapy offer a reasonable chance of recovery. Based on level 2 evidence, clipping appears to offer a higher chance of occulomotor nerve palsy recovery; however, coiling will remain as an option particularly in elderly patients or patients with significant comorbidity. PMID:21206898

  11. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... polyneuropathy Tibial nerve dysfunction Ulnar nerve dysfunction Any peripheral neuropathy can cause abnormal results. Damage to the spinal ... Herniated disk Lambert-Eaton syndrome Mononeuropathy Multiple ... azotemia Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sciatica ...

  12. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  13. Complete Spinal Accessory Nerve Palsy From Carrying Climbing Gear.

    PubMed

    Coulter, Jess M; Warme, Winston J

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of spinal accessory nerve palsy sustained while transporting climbing gear. Spinal accessory nerve injury is commonly a result of iatrogenic surgical trauma during lymph node excision. This particular nerve is less frequently injured by blunt trauma. The case reported here results from compression of the spinal accessory nerve for a sustained period-that is, carrying a load over the shoulder using a single nylon rope for 2.5 hours. This highlights the importance of using proper load-carrying equipment to distribute weight over a greater surface area to avoid nerve compression in the posterior triangle of the neck. The signs and symptoms of spinal accessory nerve palsy and its etiology are discussed. This report is particularly relevant to individuals involved in mountaineering and rock climbing but can be extended to anyone carrying a load with a strap over one shoulder and across the body.

  14. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  15. The elbow: diagnosis and treatment of common injuries.

    PubMed

    Sellards, Robb; Kuebrich, Chris

    2005-03-01

    This article deals with common injuries to the elbow. Elbow anatomy is reviewed. Diagnosis and treatment of pronator syndrome,lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow), radial tunnel syndrome, posterior interosseous nerve syndrome, medial epicondylitis (golfer's elbow), ulnar collateral ligament injury, cubital tunnel syndrome,posterolateral rotatory instability, distal biceps injuries, tricepstendon injuries, and posterior elbow impingement are discussed.

  16. Topography and extent of pulmonary vagus nerve supply with respect to transthoracic oesophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Teus J; Ruurda, Jelle P; Luyer, Misha D P; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Bleys, Ronald L A W

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary complications are frequently observed after transthoracic oesophagectomy. These complications may be reduced by sparing the vagus nerve branches to the lung. However, current descriptions of the regional anatomy are insufficient. Therefore, we aimed to provide a highly detailed description of the course of the pulmonary vagus nerve branches. In six fixed adult human cadavers, bilateral microscopic dissection of the vagus nerve branches to the lungs was performed. The level of branching and the number, calibre and distribution of nerve branches were described. Nerve fibres were identified using neurofilament immunohistochemistry, and the nerve calibre was measured using computerized image analysis. Both lungs were supplied by a predominant posterior and a smaller anterior nerve plexus. The right lung was supplied by 13 (10-18) posterior and 3 (2-3) anterior branches containing 77% (62-100%) and 23% (0-38%) of the lung nerve supply, respectively. The left lung was supplied by a median of 12 (8-13) posterior and 3 (2-4) anterior branches containing 74% (60-84%) and 26% (16-40%) of the left lung nerve supply, respectively. During transthoracic oesophagectomy with en bloc lymphadenectomy and transection of the vagus nerves at the level of the azygos vein, 68-100% of the right lung nerve supply and 86-100% of the inferior left lung lobe nerve supply were severed. When vagotomy was performed distally to the last large pulmonary branch, 0-8% and 0-13% of the nerve branches to the right middle/inferior lobes and left inferior lobe, respectively, were lost. In conclusion, this study provides a detailed description of the extensive pulmonary nerve supply provided by the vagus nerves. During oesophagectomy, extensive mediastinal lymphadenectomy denervates the lung to a great extent; however, this can be prevented by performing the vagotomy distal to the caudalmost large pulmonary branch. Further research is required to determine the feasibility of sparing the

  17. Finite Element Modeling of the Posterior Eye in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feola, Andrew; Raykin, Julia; Mulugeta, Lealem; Gleason, Rudolph; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity experienced during spaceflight affects astronauts in various ways, including weakened muscles and loss of bone density. Recently, visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome has become a major concern for space missions lasting longer than 30 days. Astronauts suffering from VIIP syndrome have changes in ocular anatomical and visual impairment that persist after returning to earth. It is hypothesized that a cephalad fluid shift in microgravity may increase the intracranial pressure (ICP), which leads to an altered biomechanical environment of the posterior globe and optic nerve sheath (ONS).Currently, there is a lack of knowledge of how elevated ICP may lead to vision impairment and connective tissue changes in VIIP. Our goal was to develop a finite element model to simulate the acute effects of elevated ICP on the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath. We used a finite element (FE) analysis approach to understand the response of the lamina cribrosa and optic nerve to the elevations in ICP thought to occur in microgravity and to identify which tissue components have the greatest impact on strain experienced by optic nerve head tissues.

  18. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  19. Variations of Cords of Brachial Plexus and Branching Pattern of Nerves Emanating From Them.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajani

    2017-03-01

    Brachial plexus is complex network of nerves, formed by joining and splitting of ventral rami of spinal nerves C5, C6, C7, C8, and T1 forming trunks, divisions, and cords. The nerves emerging from trunks and cords innervate the upper limb and to some extent pectoral region. Scanty literature describes the variations in the formation of cords and nerves emanating from them. Moreover, the variations of cords of brachial plexus and nerves emanating from them have iatrogenic implications in the upper limb and pectoral region. Hence study has been carried out. Twenty-eight upper limbs and posterior triangles from 14 cadavers fixed in formalin were dissected and rare and new variations of cords were observed. Most common variation consisted of formation of posterior cord by fusion of posterior division of upper and middle trunk and lower trunk continued as medial cord followed by originating of 2 pectoral nerves from anterior divisions of upper and middle trunk. Other variations include anterior division of upper trunk continued as lateral cord and pierced the coracobrachialis, upper and middle trunk fused to form common cord which divided into lateral and posterior cords, upper trunk gave suprascapular nerve and abnormal lateral pectoral nerve and formation of median nerve by 3 roots. These variations were analyzed for diagnostic and clinical significance making the study relevant for surgeons, radiologists in arresting failure patients and anatomists academically in medical education.

  20. Study on Variant Anatomy of Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    V, Sangeetha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Sciatic Nerve (SN) is the nerve of the posterior compartment of thigh formed in the pelvis from the ventral rami of the L4 to S3 spinal nerves. It leaves the pelvis via the greater sciatic foramen below piriformis and divides into Common Peroneal Nerve (CPN) and Tibial Nerve (TN) at the level of the upper angle of the popliteal fossa. Higher division of the sciatic nerve is the most common variation where the TN and CPN may leave the pelvis through different routes. Such variation may lead to compression of the nerve and lead to Non-discogenic sciatica. Materials and Methods: Fifty lower limbs were used for the study from Department of Anatomy, J.J.M.M.C Davangere, Karnataka, India. Observation and Results: In our study on 25 cadavers (50 lower limbs), we have observed 4 (8 %) lower limbs high division of sciatic nerve was noted. High division of sciatic nerve in the back of thigh was noted in one specimen (2%), while high division within the pelvis was noted in 3 specimens (6%), while in 46 (92%) it occurred outside the pelvis. Conclusion: Knowledge regarding such variation and differences in the course of SN is important for the surgeons to plan for various surgical interventions pertaining to the gluteal region. The variant anatomy of SN may cause piriformis syndrome and failure of SN block. Hence present study is undertaken to know the level of division, exit, course, relationship to piriformis and variations in the branching pattern of SN. PMID:25302181

  1. Posterior arch C-1 screw technique: a cadaveric comparison study.

    PubMed

    Moisi, Marc; Fisahn, Christian; Tkachenko, Lara; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Reintjes, Stephen; Grunert, Peter; Norvell, Daniel C; Tubbs, R Shane; Page, Jeni; Newell, David W; Nora, Peter; Oskouian, Rod J; Chapman, Jens

    2017-03-17

    OBJECTIVE Posterior atlantoaxial stabilization and fusion using C-1 lateral mass screw fixation has become commonly used in the treatment of instability and for reconstructive indications since its introduction by Goel and Laheri in 1994 and modification by Harms in 2001. Placement of such lateral mass screws can be challenging because of the proximity to the spinal cord, vertebral artery, an extensive venous plexus, and the C-2 nerve root, which overlies the designated starting point on the posterior center of the lateral mass. An alternative posterior access point starting on the posterior arch of C-1 could provide a C-2 nerve root-sparing starting point for screw placement, with the potential benefit of greater directional control and simpler trajectory. The authors present a cadaveric study comparing an alternative strategy (i.e., a C-1 screw with a posterior arch starting point) to the conventional strategy (i.e., using the lower lateral mass entry site), specifically assessing the safety of screw placement to preserve the C-2 nerve root. METHODS Five US-trained spine fellows instrumented 17 fresh human cadaveric heads using the Goel/Harms C-1 lateral mass (GHLM) technique on the left and the posterior arch lateral mass (PALM) technique on the right, under fluoroscopic guidance. After screw placement, a CT scan was obtained on each specimen to assess for radiographic screw placement accuracy. Four faculty spine surgeons, blinded to the surgeon who instrumented the cadaver, independently graded the quality of screw placement using a modified Upendra classification. RESULTS Of the 17 specimens, the C-2 nerve root was anatomically impinged in 13 (76.5%) of the specimens. The GHLM technique was graded Type 1 or 2, which is considered "acceptable," in 12 specimens (70.6%), and graded Type 3 or 4 ("unacceptable") in 5 specimens (29.4%). In contrast, the PALM technique had 17 (100%) of 17 graded Type 1 or 2 (p = 0.015). There were no vertebral artery injuries found

  2. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  3. Posterior pole tumor update.

    PubMed

    Ou, Judy I; Wheeler, Sharon M; O'Brien, Joan M

    2002-12-01

    This chapter focuses on the diagnosis and management of choroidal melanoma in light of recent findings from the COMS. Retinoblastoma is emphasized to describe recent trends in primary treatment away from EBRT and toward chemoreduction with local therapy. In addition, vascular and glial tumors of the retina and tumors of the retinal pigment epithelium are described because of the association between these lesions and systemic disease. Recent advances in treatment and genetic testing for these diseases are discussed. Finally, ocular metastasis, intraocular lymphoid tumors, and intraocular leukemia are included because of their importance in determining systemic treatment and prognosis. The chapter gives an overview of important posterior pole tumors and highlights recent developments in the management of each intraocular disease process.

  4. Microsurgical anatomy of the posterior fossa cisterns.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, H; Rhoton, A L; Peace, D

    1988-07-01

    The microsurgical anatomy of the posterior fossa cisterns was examined in 15 cadavers using 3X to 40X magnification. Liliequist's membrane was found to split into two arachnoidal sheets as it spreads upward from the dorsum sellae: an upper sheet, called the diencephalic membrane, which attaches to the diencephalon at the posterior edge of the mamillary bodies, and a lower sheet, called the mesencephalic membrane, which attaches along the junction of the midbrain and pons. Several other arachnoidal membranes that separate the cisterns were identified. These include the anterior pontine membrane, which separates the prepontine and cerebellopontine cisterns; the lateral pontomesencephalic membrane, which separates the ambient and cerebellopontine cisterns; the medial pontomedullary membrane, which separates the premedullary and prepontine cisterns; and the lateral pontomedullary membrane, which separates the cerebellopontine and cerebellomedullary cisterns. The three cisterns in which the arachnoid trabeculae and membranes are the most dense and present the greatest obstacle at operation are the interpeduncular and quadrigeminal cisterns and the cisterna magna. Numerous arachnoid membranes were found to intersect the oculomotor nerves. The neural and vascular structures in each cistern are reviewed.

  5. Dynamic properties of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D S; Shindo, M; Sinha, U; Hast, M H; Rice, D H

    1994-12-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the contractile properties of the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle. Simultaneous measurements were made of the isometric force, temperature, and electromyographic activity of the dorsal cricoarytenoid muscle of anesthetized dogs during supramaximal stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve for twitch and tetanic contraction. The conduction delay between stimulation of the recurrent nerve at the level of the larynx and the onset of the muscle action potential averaged 2.0 +/- 0.2 milliseconds (ms), and the latent period between the onset of electrical activity of the muscle and the onset of contraction had a mean duration of 3.3 +/- 0.8 ms. The mean of isometric contraction times found was 33.3 +/- 2.0 ms, shorter than most previous studies of canine PCA muscle. Tetanic frequency defined as smooth contraction was higher than previous estimates. Considerations of scaling of physiological time based on animal mass were applied to analysis of the experimental findings to make possible systematic comparison of previous findings across species and animal size.

  6. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Marco Antonio; Ramalho, Gabriel Cardoso; Manzi, Marcello Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics. PMID:27433360

  7. Clinical and electrophysiological assessment of inferior alveolar nerve function after lateral nerve transposition.

    PubMed

    Nocini, P F; De Santis, D; Fracasso, E; Zanette, G

    1999-04-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) transposition surgery may cause some degree of sensory impairment. Accurate and reproducible tests are mandatory to assess IAN conduction capacity following nerve transposition. In this study subjective (heat, pain and tactile-discriminative tests) and objective (electrophysiological) assessments were performed in 10 patients receiving IAN transposition (bilaterally in 8 cases) in order to evaluate any impairment of the involved nerves one year post-operatively. All patients reported a tingling, well-tolerated sensation in the areas supplied by the mental nerve with no anaesthesia or burning paresthesia. Tactile discrimination was affected the most (all but 1 patient). No action potential was recorded in 4 patients' sides (23.5%); 12 sides showed a decreased nerve conduction velocity (NCV) (70.5%) and 1 side normal NCV values (6%). There was no significant difference in NCV decrease between partial and total transposition sides, if examined separately. Nerve conduction findings were related 2-point discrimination scores, but not to changes in pain and heat sensitivity. These findings show that lateral nerve transposition, though resulting in a high percentage of minor IAN injuries, as determined by electrophysiological testing, provides a viable surgical procedure to allow implant placement in the posterior mandible without causing severe sensory complaints. Considering ethical and forensic implications, patients should be fully informed that a certain degree of nerve injury might be expected to occur from the procedure. Electrophysiological evaluation is a reliable way to assess the degree of IAN dysfunction, especially if combined with a clinical examination. Intraoperative monitoring of IAN conduction might help identify the pathogenetic mechanisms of nerve injury and the surgical steps that are most likely to harm nerve integrity.

  8. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Algahtani, Abdulhadi; Aldarmahi, Ahmad; Hmoud, Mohammed; Marzuk, Yousef; Shirah, Bader

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological syndrome characterized by headache, altered mental status, seizures, or loss of vision. In this study, we report the largest series of PRES coming from Saudi Arabia and explore the etiology, clinical presentation, and outcome. We also report new imaging findings associated with this condition. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of all cases of PRES admitted to King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between the years 2005 and 2015. A neurologist reviewed all charts and analyzed the clinical presentations, etiological factors, and outcomes, and a neuroradiologist reviewed the imaging studies. Only patients with clinical and imaging features consistent with PRES were included in the study. Results: We collected 31 patients who had clinical and radiological features consistent with PRES. Females were more affected than males (18 females and 13 males), and patients’ age ranged from 6 to 95 years, with a mean of 38.3 years. Patients were treated by removing the precipitating causes and treating the underlying conditions. Resolution of neurologic signs occurred within 2 to 3 weeks in all patients. Conclusion: In our opinion, PRES itself is usually a benign condition with complete recovery if the condition is recognized early and managed appropriately. Although clinical signs are nonspecific, the constellation of symptoms including headache, visual problems, seizures, and altered level of consciousness should suggest the possibility of PRES, especially in high-risk group. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging are often characteristic and may be the first clue to the diagnosis. PMID:28042366

  9. Schwannoma of the Spinal Accessory Nerve: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Ritesh; Singh, Surinder; Gupta, Sahwani K.; Matreja, Prithpal S.

    2013-01-01

    We are reporting a rare case of a schwannoma which originated from the cervical portion of the spinal accessory nerve, which was located in the left posterior triangle of the neck and did not have any neurological deficit, which was diagnosed by the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan and confirmed histopathologically after surgery. PMID:24086895

  10. [Motor nerves of the face. Surgical and radiologic anatomy of facial paralysis and their surgical repair].

    PubMed

    Vacher, C; Cyna-Gorse, F

    2015-10-01

    Motor innervation of the face depends on the facial nerve for the mobility of the face, on the mandibular nerve, third branch of the trigeminal nerve, which gives the motor innervation of the masticator muscles, and the hypoglossal nerve for the tongue. In case of facial paralysis, the most common palliative surgical techniques are the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (the temporal is innervated by the mandibular nerve) and the hypoglossal-facial anastomosis. The aim of this work is to describe the surgical anatomy of these three nerves and the radiologic anatomy of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone. Then the facial nerve penetrates inside the parotid gland giving a plexus. Four branches of the facial nerve leave the parotid gland: they are called temporal, zygomatic, buccal and marginal which give innervation to the cutaneous muscles of the face. Mandibular nerve gives three branches to the temporal muscles: the anterior, intermediate and posterior deep temporal nerves which penetrate inside the deep aspect of the temporal muscle in front of the infratemporal line. The hypoglossal nerve is only the motor nerve to the tongue. The ansa cervicalis, which is coming from the superficial cervical plexus and joins the hypoglossal nerve in the submandibular area is giving the motor innervation to subhyoid muscles and to the geniohyoid muscle.

  11. Lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve with simultaneous implant placement: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Garg, A K; Morales, M J

    1998-01-01

    In the event of moderate to severe mandibular bone resorption posterior to the mental foramen, repositioning of the inferior alveolar nerve provides a greater amount of available bone for implant placement and reduces the risk of nerve injury. While neural paresthesia may initially occur, this altered sensation generally resolves spontaneously. Alveolar nerve repositioning may be possible in cases in which other procedures cannot be performed due to the extent of atrophy of the posterior mandibular alveolar crest. This article presents the surgical technique to achieve this objective.

  12. Delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yu; Toda, Masahiro; Shibao, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to consider the mechanism of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy after minor head trauma. Case Description: We report a rare case of delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma. A 19-year-old boy complained of double vision 1 day after a minor head trauma. Neuro-ophthalmic examination showed isolated left oculomotor nerve palsy. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examination revealed no abnormal findings and steroid therapy was administered for a week. Three months after the injury, the ptosis and extraocular movements had fully resolved, although the pupillary light reflex was still abnormal. Conclusions: Delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy may be caused by an injury at the point where the oculomotor nerve runs over the posterior petroclinoid ligament. Because edema of the damaged oculomotor nerve might result in constriction at the point where the nerve pierces the dura of the cavernous sinus, symptoms of oculomotor nerve palsy appeared late after trauma. Steroid treatment reducing edema could be effective for delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma. PMID:28217399

  13. Protection of Facial Nerves During Acoustic Neuroma Surgery.

    PubMed

    Xing, Hong-Shun; Wang, Shou-Xian; Wang, Zhe; Cao, Pei-Cheng; Ma, Yong-Qian; Wang, Zeng-Wu

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to summarize the experience about the protection of the facial nerve in surgery for acoustic neuroma surgery with the aim to improve the retention of facial nerve function and the quality of life. Forty-two patients with acoustic neuroma were recruited from the year 2010 to 2013. Using microsurgical techniques, the tumors were resected through the suboccipital approach over the posterior edge of the sigmoid sinus, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring of the facial nerve function was performed. The House-Brackmann (H-B) grading was used to evaluate the facial nerve function evaluation postoperatively. Total tumor resection was achieved in 32 cases, and partial resection in 10 cases, without any intraoperative deaths. Also facial nerves were retained in 35 of 42 cases (83.33 %). One week after surgery, the facial nerve H-B grading was grade I in 8 cases, grade II in 15 cases, grade III in 12 cases, grade IV in 6 cases, and grade V in 1 case. The key to improved protection of the facial nerve during acoustic neuroma surgery includes a complete understanding of the anatomy of the cerebellopontine angle, proper use of microsurgical techniques, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring of the status of facial nerve functions to avoid damage to the nerves.

  14. Posterior sampling with improved efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.

    1998-12-01

    The Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique provides a means to generate a random sequence of model realizations that sample the posterior probability distribution of a Bayesian analysis. That sequence may be used to make inferences about the model uncertainties that derive from measurement uncertainties. This paper presents an approach to improving the efficiency of the Metropolis approach to MCMC by incorporating an approximation to the covariance matrix of the posterior distribution. The covariance matrix is approximated using the update formula from the BFGS quasi-Newton optimization algorithm. Examples are given for uncorrelated and correlated multidimensional Gaussian posterior distributions.

  15. [Third cranial nerve palsy in sphenoid sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dores, Luís Almeida; Simão, Marco Alveirinho; Marques, Marta Canas; Dias, Éscar

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus disease is particular not only for its clinical presentation, as well as their complications. Although rare, these may present as cranial nerve deficits, so it is important to have a high index of suspicion and be familiar with its diagnosis and management. Symptoms are often nonspecific, but the most common are headache, changes in visual acuity and diplopia due to dysfunction of one or more ocular motor nerves. The authors report a case of a 59 years-old male, who was referred to the ENT emergency department with frontal headaches for one week which had progressively worsened and were associated, since the last 12 hours, with diplopia caused by left third cranial nerve palsy. Neurologic examination was normal aside from the left third cranial nerve palsy. Anterior and posterior rhinoscopy excluded the presence of nasal masses and purulent rhinorrhea. The CT scan revealed a soft tissue component and erosion of the roof of the left sphenoid sinus. Patient was admitted for intravenous antibiotics and steroids treatment without any benefit after 48 hours. He was submitted to endoscopic sinus surgery with resolution of the symptoms 10 days after surgery. The authors present this case for its rarity focusing on the importance of differential diagnosis in patients with headaches and cranial nerves palsies.

  16. The spinal nerves that constitute the lumbosacral plexus and their distribution in the chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Pereira, M A; Rickes, E M

    2011-09-01

    In this study, the spinal nerves that constitute the lumbosacral plexus (plexus lumbosacrales) (LSP) and its distribution in Chinchilla lanigera were investigated. Ten chinchillas (6 males and 4 females) were used in this research. The spinal nerves that constitute the LSP were dissected and the distribution of pelvic limb nerves originating from the plexus was examined. The iliohypogastric nerve arose from L1 and L2, giving rise to the cranial and caudal nerves, and the ilioinguinal nerve arose from L3. The other branch of L3 gave rise to the genitofemoral nerve and 1 branch from L4 gave rise to the lateral cutaneous femoral nerve. The trunk formed by the union of L4-5 divided into medial (femoral nerve) and lateral branches (obturator nerve). It was found that the LSP was formed by all the ventral branches of L4 at L6 and S1 at S3. At the caudal part of the plexus, a thick branch, the ischiadic plexus, was formed by contributions from L5-6 and S1. This root gave rise to the nerve branches which were disseminated to the posterior limb (cranial and caudal gluteal nerves, caudal cutaneous femoral nerve and ischiadic nerve). The ischiadic nerve divided into the caudal cutaneous surae, lateral cutaneous surae, common fibular and tibial nerve. The pudendal nerve arose from S1-2 and the other branch of S2 and S3 formed the rectal caudal nerve. The results showed that the origins and distribution of spinal nerves that constitute the LSP of chinchillas were similar to those of a few rodents and other mammals.

  17. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  18. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  19. Optic Nerve Pit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  20. Absence of Posterior Triangle: Clinical and Embryological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shikha; Loh, Hitendra Kumar; Mehta, Vandana; Suri, Rajesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and Trapezius (TM) muscle present in the cervical region serves as an important landmark in forming boundaries of posterior triangle of neck. This case reports a continuous muscle sheet obscuring the left posterior triangle in the neck of a 60-year-old Indian male cadaver. An unfamiliar oval gap was observed in its posterosuperior portion. Description of such a variant in anatomical literature is rare and is scarcely reported. An attempt has been made to portray its embryological and phylogenetic basis. In addition authors have endeavoured to discuss its clinical implications. Awareness of such anatomical variations is relevant for the operating surgeons in their endeavour to perform various reconstruction surgeries of head and neck, radiologists while concluding various levels in Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of the region and to the anaesthetists in their search for nerves and vessels while attempting various anaesthetic procedures. PMID:28384846

  1. Current approach in the diagnosis and management of posterior uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Sudharshan, S; Ganesh, Sudha K; Biswas, Jyotrimay

    2010-01-01

    Posterior uveitic entities are varied entities that are infective or non-infective in etiology. They can affect the adjacent structures such as the retina, vitreous, optic nerve head and retinal blood vessels. Thorough clinical evaluation gives a clue to the diagnosis while ancillary investigations and laboratory tests assist in confirming the diagnosis. Newer evolving techniques in the investigations and management have increased the diagnostic yield. In case of diagnostic dilemma, intraocular fluid evaluation for polymerase chain testing for the genome and antibody testing against the causative agent provide greater diagnostic ability. PMID:20029144

  2. Ossification of the Posterior Petroclinoid Dural Fold: A Cadaveric Study with Neurosurgical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, David; Kimball, Heather; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R. Shane; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, A. Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The roof of the porus trigeminus, composed of the posterior petroclinoid dural fold, is an important landmark to the skull base surgeon. Ossification of the posterior petroclinoid dural fold is an anatomical variation rarely mentioned in the literature. Such ossification results in the trigeminal nerve traversing a bony foramen as it enters Meckel cave. The authors performed this study to better elucidate this anatomical variation. Design Fifteen adult cadaveric head halves were subjected to dissection of the middle cranial fossa. Microdissection techniques were used to examine the posterior petroclinoid dural folds. Skull base osteology was also studied in 71 dry human skulls with attention paid to the attachment point of the posterior petroclinoid dural folds at the trigeminal protuberances. Setting Cadaver laboratory Main Outcome Measures Measurements were made using a microcaliper. Digital images were made of the dissections. Results Completely ossified posterior petroclinoid folds were present in 20% of the specimens. Of the 142 dry skull sides examined, 9% had large trigeminal protuberances. Conclusions Based on this study, the posterior petroclinoid dural fold may completely ossify in adults that may lead to narrowing of the porus trigeminus and potential compression of the trigeminal nerve at the entrance to Meckel cave. PMID:26225315

  3. Rerouting of the intratemporal facial nerve: an analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Selesnick, S H; Abraham, M T; Carew, J F

    1996-09-01

    Anterior rerouting of the intratemporal facial nerve in the infratemporal fossa approach is employed to access to the jugular bulb, hypotympanum, and lateral skull base, whereas posterior rerouting of the facial nerve, as employed in the transcochlear craniotomy, is most frequently used for surgery of the posterior fossa, cerebellopontine angle, prepontine region, and petrous apex. Facial nerve rerouting may lead to facial paresis or paralysis. This review of the literature is intended to define the physiologic "cost" of these procedures, so that the neurotologic surgeon can determine if the morbidity incurred in these techniques is worth the resultant exposure. Inconsistencies in reporting facial function places into question the validity of some of the cumulative data reported. Postoperatively, grades I-II facial nerve function was seen in 91% of patients undergoing short anterior rerouting, 74% of patients undergoing long anterior rerouting, and 26% of patients undergoing posterior complete rerouting. Although facial nerve rerouting allows unhindered exposure to previously inaccessible regions, it is achieved at the cost of facial nerve function. Facial nerve dysfunction increases with the length of facial nerve rerouted.

  4. Optic Nerve Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Aijaz; Janecka, Ivo P.; Kapadia, Silloo; Johnson, Bruce L.; McVay, William

    1996-01-01

    The length of the optic nerves is a reflection of normal postnatal cranio-orbital development. Unilateral elongation of an optic nerve has been observed in two patients with orbital and skull base neoplasms. In the first case as compared to the patient's opposite, normal optic nerve, an elongated length of the involved optic nerve of 45 mm was present. The involved optic nerve in the second patient was 10 mm longer than the normal opposite optic nerve. The visual and extraocular function was preserved in the second patient. The first patient had only light perception in the affected eye. In this paper, the embryology, anatomy, and physiology of the optic nerve and its mechanisms of stretch and repair are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 13 PMID:17170975

  5. Lingual Nerve Entrapment in Muscular and Osseous Structures

    PubMed Central

    Piagkou, Maria; Demesticha, Theano; Piagkos, Giannoulis; Georgios, Androutsos; Panagiotis, Skandalakis

    2010-01-01

    Running through the infratemporal fossa is the lingual nerve (i.e. the third branch of the posterior trunk of the mandibular nerve). Due to its location, there are various anatomic structures that might entrap and potentially compress the lingual nerve. These anatomical sites of entrapment are: (a) the partially or completely ossified pterygospinous or pterygoalar ligaments; (b) the large lamina of the lateral plate of the pterygoid process; and (c) the medial fibers of the anterior region of the lateral pterygoid muscle. Due to the connection between these nerve and anatomic structures, a contraction of the lateral pterygoid muscle, for example, might cause a compression of the lingual nerve. Any variations in the course of the lingual nerve can be of clinical significance to surgeons and neurologists because of the significant complications that might occur. To name a few of such complications, lingual nerve entrapment can lead to: (a) numbness, hypoesthesia or even anesthesia of the tongue's mucous glands; (b) anesthesia and loss of taste in the anterior two-thirds of the tongue; (c) anesthesia of the lingual gums; and (d) pain related to speech articulation disorder. Dentists should, therefore, be alert to possible signs of neurovascular compression in regions where the lingual nerve is distributed. PMID:21404967

  6. Morphology of nerve endings in vocal fold of human newborn.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves da Silva Leite, Janaina; Costa Cavalcante, Maria Luzete; Fechine-Jamacaru, Francisco Vagnaldo; de Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria; Leite, José Alberto Dias; Nascimento Coelho, Dulce Maria; Rabelo de Freitas, Marcos

    2016-10-01

    Sensory receptors are distributed throughout the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx. Laryngeal sensitivity is crucial for maintaining safe swallowing, thus avoiding silent aspiration. Morphologic description of different receptor types present in larynx vary because of the study of many different species, from mouse to humans. The most commonly sensory structures described in laryngeal mucosa are free nerve endings, taste buds, muscle spindles, glomerular and corpuscular receptors. This study aimed at describing the morphology and the distribution of nerve endings in premature newborn glottic region. Transversal serial frozen sections of the whole vocal folds of three newborns were analyzed using an immuno-histochemical process with a pan-neuronal marker anti-protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5). Imaging was done using a confocal laser microscope. Nerve fiber density in vocal cord was calculated using panoramic images in software Morphometric Analysis System v1.0. Some sensory structures, i.e. glomerular endings and intraepithelial free nerve endings were found in the vocal cord mucosa. Muscle spindles, complex nerve endings (Meissner-like, spherical, rectangular and growing) spiral-wharves nerve structures were identified in larynx intrinsic muscles. Nervous total mean density in vocal cord was similar in the three newborns, although they had different gestational age. The mean nerve fiber density was higher in the posterior region than anterior region of vocal cord. The present results demonstrate the occurrence of different morphotypes of sensory corpuscles and nerve endings premature newborn glottic region and provide information on their sensory systems.

  7. Assessment of nerve morphology in nerve activation during electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-10-01

    The distance between nerve and stimulation electrode is fundamental for nerve activation in Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation (TES). However, it is not clear the need to have an approximate representation of the morphology of peripheral nerves in simulation models and its influence in the nerve activation. In this work, depth and curvature of a nerve are investigated around the middle thigh. As preliminary result, the curvature of the nerve helps to reduce the simulation amplitude necessary for nerve activation from far field stimulation.

  8. New infectious etiologies for posterior uveitis.

    PubMed

    Khairallah, Moncef; Kahloun, Rim; Ben Yahia, Salim; Jelliti, Bechir; Messaoud, Riadh

    2013-01-01

    Emergent and resurgent arthropod vector-borne diseases are major causes of systemic morbidity and death and expanding worldwide. Among them, viral and bacterial agents including West Nile virus, Dengue fever, Chikungunya, Rift Valley fever, and rickettsioses have been recently associated with an array of ocular manifestations. These include anterior uveitis, retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis and optic nerve involvement. Proper clinical diagnosis of any of these infectious diseases is based on epidemiological data, history, systemic symptoms and signs, and the pattern of ocular involvement. The diagnosis is usually confirmed by the detection of a specific antibody in serum. Ocular involvement associated with emergent infections usually has a self-limited course, but it can result in persistent visual impairment. There is currently no proven specific treatment for arboviral diseases, and therapy is mostly supportive. Vaccination for humans against these viruses is still in the research phase. Doxycycline is the treatment of choice for rickettsial diseases. Prevention, including public measures to reduce the number of mosquitoes and personal protection, remains the mainstay for arthropod vector disease control. Influenza A (H1N1) virus was responsible for a pandemic human influenza in 2009, and was recently associated with various posterior segment changes.

  9. Infra-orbital nerve block anesthesia–extended coverage using intra-oral ‘molar approach’

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Nautiyal, Vijay P; Sharma, Praveen; Sharma, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    The maxillary teeth are supplied by the anterior, middle and posterior superior alveolar nerves. The anterior and middle superior alveolar (AMSA) nerves exit the skull from the infra-orbital foramen, where they can be blocked for procedures on the maxillary anteriors and premolars. Sometimes, the middle superior alveolar nerve has a variant course and is not blocked by the conventional block technique. A new technique has been described for blocking the AMSA nerves, keeping in view the alternate pathway of the middle superior alveolar nerve. PMID:25756021

  10. Rethinking "posterior" tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Currently, many clinicians who help with breastfeeding problems are diagnosing "posterior" tongue-tie in infants and performing or referring for frenotomy. In this "Speaking Out" article, I argue that the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie has successfully raised awareness of the importance of impaired tongue function in breastfeeding difficulty. However, the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie also applies a reductionist, medicalized theoretical frame to the complex problem of impaired tongue function, risking unintended outcomes. Impaired tongue function arises out of multiple interacting and co-evolving factors, including the interplay between social behaviors concerning breastfeeding and mother-infant biology. Consideration of theoretical frames is vital if we are to build an evidence base through efficient use of the scarce resources available for clinical breastfeeding research and minimize unintended outcomes.

  11. [A case of localized hypertrophic neuropathy in the sciatic nerve].

    PubMed

    Izumi, T; Kusaka, H; Imai, T

    1995-01-01

    A 26-year-old male patient gradually developed muscular atrophy of the right lower leg over a two-year period. Neurological examination revealed absent Achilles tendon reflex and muscular atrophy of the right lower leg and right hamstring muscles. Conduction velocity of the F waves was delayed in the right posterior tibial nerve. A computerized tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass lesion along the proximal segment of the right sciatic nerve. Exploration revealed a fusiformly swollen sciatic nerve. Histological examination showed that a swollen segment of the sciatic nerve was filled with onion-bulb formations of perineurial cells, consistent with the diagnosis of localized hypertrophic neuropathy. This condition should be added to several etiologies of monomelic amyotrophy. Electrophysiological studies and neuroimaging techniques were useful in obtaining differential diagnosis.

  12. Late sciatic nerve axonotmesis following acetabular reconstruction plate.

    PubMed

    Moreta, J; Foruria, X; Labayru, F

    2016-01-01

    Sciatic nerve injuries associated with acetabular fractures can be post-traumatic, perioperative or postoperative. Late postoperative injury is very uncommon and can be due to heterotopic ossifications, muscular scarring, or implant migration. A case is presented of a patient with a previous transverse acetabular fracture treated with a reconstruction plate for the posterior column. After 17 years, she presented with progressive pain and motor deficit in the sciatic territory. Radiological and neurophysiological assessments were performed and the patient underwent surgical decompression of the sciatic nerve. A transection of the nerve was observed that was due to extended compression of one of the screws. At 4 years postoperatively, her pain had substantially diminished and the paresthesias in her leg had resolved. However, her motor symptoms did not improve. This case report could be relevant due to this uncommon delayed sciatic nerve injury due to prolonged hardware impingement.

  13. Basic study on the influence of inhibition induced by the magnetic stimulation on the peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aya; Torii, Tetsuya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the inhibition mechanism of magnetic stimulation on motor function. A magnetic stimulator with a flat figure-eight coil was used to stimulate the peripheral nerve of the antebrachium. The intensity of magnetic stimulation was 0.8 T, and the stimulation frequency was 1 Hz. The amplitudes of the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) at the abductor pollicis brevis muscle and first dorsal interosseous muscle were used to evaluate the effects of magnetic stimulation. The effects of magnetic stimulation were evaluated by analyzing the MEP amplitude before and after magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex. The results showed that MEP amplitude after magnetic stimulation compared with before magnetic stimulation decreased. Because there were individual differences in MEP amplitude induced by magnetic stimulation, the MEP amplitude after stimulation was normalized by the amplitude of each participant before stimulation. The MEP amplitude after stimulation decreased by approximately 58% (p < 0.01) on average compared with before stimulation. Previous studies suggested that magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex induced an increase or a decrease in MEP amplitude. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that the alteration in MEP amplitude was induced by cortical excitability based on magnetic stimulation. The results of this study showed that MEP amplitude decreased following magnetic stimulation to the peripheral nerve. We suggest that the decrease in MEP amplitude found in this study was obtained via the feedback from a peripheral nerve through an afferent nerve to the brain. This study suggests that peripheral excitement by magnetic stimulation of the peripheral nerve may control the central nervous system via afferent feedback.

  14. Children's Understanding of Posterior Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girotto, Vittorio; Gonzalez, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Do young children have a basic intuition of posterior probability? Do they update their decisions and judgments in the light of new evidence? We hypothesized that they can do so extensionally, by considering and counting the various ways in which an event may or may not occur. The results reported in this paper showed that from the age of five,…

  15. Stereolithography for Posterior Fossa Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Celso; Dujovny, Manuel; Evenhouse, Raymond; Charbel, Fady T.; Sadler, Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Posterior fossa cranioplasty has been suggested for improvement of neurological symptoms following craniectomy. However, there is no particular recommendation in the literature about techniques for prosthesis manufacture and implantation. We report our experience using rapid prototyping technology and stereolithography for pre-surgical implant design and production of cranioplasties. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171056

  16. Planarian Hedgehog/Patched establishes anterior–posterior polarity by regulating Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Shigenobu; Umesono, Yoshihiko; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Tarui, Hiroshi; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2009-01-01

    Despite long-standing interest, the molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment of anterior–posterior (AP) polarity remain among the unsolved mysteries in metazoans. In the planarians (a family of flatworms), canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for posterior specification, as it is in many animals. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating the posterior-specific induction of Wnt genes according to the AP polarity have remained unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is responsible for the establishment of AP polarity via its regulation of the transcription of Wnt family genes during planarian regeneration. We found that RNAi gene knockdown of Dugesia japonica patched (Djptc) caused ectopic tail formation in the anterior blastema of body fragments, resulting in bipolar-tails regeneration. In contrast, RNAi of hedgehog (Djhh) and gli (Djgli) caused bipolar-heads regeneration. We show that Patched-mediated Hh signaling was crucial for posterior specification, which is established by regulating the transcription of Wnt genes via downstream Gli activity. Moreover, differentiated cells were responsible for the posterior specification of undifferentiated stem cells through Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Surprisingly, Djhh was expressed in neural cells all along the ventral nerve cords (along the AP axis), but not in the posterior blastema of body fragments, where the expression of Wnt genes was induced for posteriorization. We therefore propose that Hh signals direct head or tail regeneration according to the AP polarity, which is established by Hh signaling activity along the body's preexisting nervous system. PMID:20018728

  17. Microgravity-Driven Optic Nerve/Sheath Biomechanics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Current thinking suggests that the ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to cephalad fluid shifts resulting in altered fluid pressures [1]. In particular, we hypothesize that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) drives connective tissue remodeling of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS). We describe here finite element (FE) modeling designed to understand how altered pressures, particularly altered ICP, affect the tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS) in VIIP. METHODS: Additional description of the modeling methodology is provided in the companion IWS abstract by Feola et al. In brief, a geometric model of the posterior eye and optic nerve, including the ONS, was created and the effects of fluid pressures on tissue deformations were simulated. We considered three ICP scenarios: an elevated ICP assumed to occur in chronic microgravity, and ICP in the upright and supine positions on earth. Within each scenario we used Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to consider a range of ICPs, ONH tissue mechanical properties, intraocular pressures (IOPs) and mean arterial pressures (MAPs). The outcome measures were biomechanical strains in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve and retina; here we focus on peak values of these strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induce tissue remodeling. In 3D, the strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as first, second and third principal strains. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: For baseline material properties, increasing ICP from 0 to 20 mmHg significantly changed strains within the posterior eye and ONS (Fig. 1), indicating that elevated ICP affects ocular tissue biomechanics. Notably, strains in the lamina cribrosa and retina became less extreme as ICP increased; however, within the optic nerve, the occurrence of such extreme strains greatly increased as

  18. A Ten-Year Kuala Lumpur Review on Laser Posterior Cordectomy for Bilateral Vocal Fold Immobility

    PubMed Central

    Mawaddah, Azman; Marina, Mat Baki; Halimuddin, Sawali; Mohd Razif, Mohd Yunus; Abdullah, Sani

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral vocal fold immobility (BVFI) is commonly caused by injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) and leads to stridor and dyspnea of varying onsets. A retrospective study was done at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre on laser microsurgical posterior cordectomy for BVFI. The objectives were to identify the average duration of onset of stridor from the time of insult and to evaluate the outcome of laser posterior cordectomy as a surgical option. From 1997 to 2007, a total of 31 patients with BVFI were referred for surgery. Twelve patients had tracheostomy done prior to the procedure, whereas 19 patients were without tracheostomy. Ten patients were successfully decannulated, and only 4 patients had complications related to the procedure. The minimum onset of stridor was 7 months, maximum onset of stridor was 28 years, and the mean onset of stridor was 8.7 years. The commonest complication observed was posterior glottic adhesion following bilateral posterior cordectomy. Laser endolaryngeal posterior cordectomy is an excellent surgical option as it enables successful decannulation or avoidance of tracheostomy in patients with BVFI. The onset of stridor took years after the insult to the recurrent laryngeal nerves. PMID:27660547

  19. Type 2 Superior Labral Anterior to Posterior Lesion-Related Paralabral Cyst Causing Isolated Infraspinatus Paralysis: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Ki; Han, Eun Young; Choi, Sung Wook; Kim, Bo Ryun; Suh, Min Ji

    2015-10-01

    Type 2 superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion is a common cause of shoulder pain requiring surgical operation. SLAP tears are often associated with paralabral cysts, but they rarely cause nerve compression. However, we experienced two cases of type 2 SLAP-related paralabral cysts at the spinoglenoid notch which were confirmed as isolated nerve entrapment of the infraspinatus branch of the suprascapular nerve by electrodiagnostic assessment and magnetic resonance imaging. In these pathological conditions, comprehensive electrodiagnostic evaluation is warranted for confirmation of neuropathy, while surgical decompression of the paralabral cyst combined with SLAP repair is recommended.

  20. Surgical management of unruptured posterior carotid artery wall aneurysms.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Brian A; Getch, Christopher C; Bendok, Bernard R; Batjer, H Hunt

    2003-07-15

    Intracranial aneurysms arising from the posterior wall of the supraclinoid carotid artery are extremely common lesions. The aneurysm dilation typically occurs in immediate proximity to the origin of the posterior communicating artery and, less commonly, the anterior choroidal artery (AChA). Because of the increasingly widespread use of noninvasive neuroimaging methods to evaluate patients believed to harbor cerebral lesions, many of these carotid artery aneurysms are now documented in their unruptured state, prior to occurrence of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Based on these factors, the management of unruptured posterior carotid artery (PCA) wall aneurysms is an important element of any neurosurgical practice. Despite impressive recent advances in endovascular therapy, the placement of microsurgical clips to exclude aneurysms with preservation of all afferent and efferent vasculature remains the most efficacious and durable therapy. To date, an optimal outcome is only achieved when the neurosurgeon is able to combine systematic preoperative neurovascular assessment with meticulous operative technique. In this report, the authors review their surgical approach to PCA wall aneurysms, which is greatly based on the extensive neurovascular experience of the senior author. Focus is placed on their methods of preoperative evaluation and operative technique, with emphasis on neurovascular anatomy and the significance of oculomotor nerve compression. They conclude by discussing surgery-related complications, with a particular focus on intraoperative rupture of aneurysms and their management, and the postoperative ischemic AChA syndrome.

  1. Peripheral nerve surgery.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, I G

    1985-05-01

    In treating the three main surgical problems of peripheral nerves--nerve sheath tumors, entrapment neuropathies, and acute nerve injuries--the overriding consideration is the preservation and restoration of neurologic function. Because of this, certain other principles may need to be compromised. These include achieving a gross total excision of benign tumors, employing conservative therapy as long as a disease process is not clearly progressing, and delaying repair of a nerve transection until the skin wound has healed. Only three pathophysiologic processes need be considered: neurapraxia (focal segmental dymyelination), axonotmesis (wallerian degeneration caused by a lesion that does not disrupt fascicles of nerve fibers), and neurotmesis (wallerian degeneration caused by a lesion that interrupts fascicles). With nerve sheath tumors and entrapment neuropathies, the goal is minimize the extent to which neurapraxia progresses to axonotmesis. The compressive force is relieved without carrying out internal neurolysis, a procedure that is poorly tolerated, presumably because a degree of nerve ischemia exists with any long-standing compression. When the nerve has sustained blunt trauma (through acute compression, percussion, or traction), the result can be a total loss of function and an extensive neuroma-in-continuity (scarring within the nerve). However, the neural pathophysiology may amount to nothing more than axonotmesis. Although this lesion, in time, leads to full and spontaneous recovery, it must be differentiated from the neuroma-in-continuity that contains disrupted fascicles requiring surgery. Finally, with open nerve transection, the priority is to match the fascicles of the proximal stump with those of the distal stump, a goal that is best achieved if primary neurorrhaphy is carried out.

  2. Preoperative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for localizing superficial nerve paths.

    PubMed

    Natori, Yuhei; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-12-01

    During surgery, peripheral nerves are often seen to follow unpredictable paths because of previous surgeries and/or compression caused by a tumor. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a serious complication that must be avoided, and preoperative evaluation of nerve paths is important for preventing it. In this study, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was used for an in-depth analysis of peripheral nerve paths. This study included 27 patients who underwent the TENS procedure to evaluate the peripheral nerve path (17 males and 10 females; mean age: 59.9 years, range: 18-83 years) of each patient preoperatively. An electrode pen coupled to an electrical nerve stimulator was used for superficial nerve mapping. The TENS procedure was performed on patients' major peripheral nerves that passed close to the surgical field of tumor resection or trauma surgery, and intraoperative damage to those nerves was apprehensive. The paths of the target nerve were detected in most patients preoperatively. The nerve paths of 26 patients were precisely under the markings drawn preoperatively. The nerve path of one patient substantially differed from the preoperative markings with numbness at the surgical region. During surgery, the nerve paths could be accurately mapped preoperatively using the TENS procedure as confirmed by direct visualization of the nerve. This stimulation device is easy to use and offers highly accurate mapping of nerves for surgical planning without major complications. The authors conclude that TENS is a useful tool for noninvasive nerve localization and makes tumor resection a safe and smooth procedure.

  3. Distortions of posterior visual space.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Flip; Voshell, Martin G

    2009-01-01

    The study of spatial vision is a long and well traveled road (which, of course, converges to a vanishing point at the horizon). Its various distortions have been widely investigated empirically, and most concentrate, pragmatically, on the space anterior to the observer. The visual world behind the observer has received relatively less attention and it is this perspective the current experiments address. Our results show systematic perceptual distortions in the posterior visual world when viewed statically. Under static viewing conditions, observer's perceptual representation was consistently 'spread' in a hyperbolic fashion. Directions to distant, peripheral locations were consistently overestimated by about 11 degrees from the ground truth and this variability increased as the target was moved toward the center of the observer's back. The perceptual representation of posterior visual space is, no doubt, secondary to the more immediate needs of the anterior visual world. Still, it is important in some domains including certain sports, such as rowing, and in vehicular navigation.

  4. Optic nerve head biomechanics in aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Downs, J Crawford

    2015-04-01

    This nontechnical review is focused upon educating the reader on optic nerve head biomechanics in both aging and disease along two main themes: what is known about how mechanical forces and the resulting deformations are distributed in the posterior pole and ONH (biomechanics) and what is known about how the living system responds to those deformations (mechanobiology). We focus on how ONH responds to IOP elevations as a structural system, insofar as the acute mechanical response of the lamina cribrosa is confounded with the responses of the peripapillary sclera, prelaminar neural tissues, and retrolaminar optic nerve. We discuss the biomechanical basis for IOP-driven changes in connective tissues, blood flow, and cellular responses. We use glaucoma as the primary framework to present the important aspects of ONH biomechanics in aging and disease, as ONH biomechanics, aging, and the posterior pole extracellular matrix (ECM) are thought to be centrally involved in glaucoma susceptibility, onset and progression.

  5. Abducens nerve palsy caused by basilar impression associated with atlanto-occipital assimilation.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Y; Sagoh, M; Mayanagi, K; Murakami, H

    1998-06-01

    A 47-year-old male presented with abducens nerve palsy due to basilar impression associated with atlanto-occipital assimilation manifesting as slowly progressive bilateral trigeminal neuralgia and diplopia in the right lateral gaze. X-ray and computed tomography of the skull confirmed the diagnosis of basilar impression and atlanto-occipital assimilation, and magnetic resonance imaging disclosed tightness of the posterior cranial fossa. Surgical suboccipital decompression resulted in gradual resolution of the patient's complaints, and no additional symptoms were recognized. Impairment of the sixth cranial nerve is a rare symptom compared to those of the fifth or the eighth cranial nerve in a patient with a craniocervical malformation. However, the present case shows the possibility of cranial nerve dysfunction due to tightness of the posterior cranial fossa, and suggests that surgical treatment for basilar impression with atlanto-occipital assimilation should be considered in patients with uncommon and unusual symptoms.

  6. Avoiding injury to the inferior alveolar nerve by routine use of intraoperative radiographs during implant placement.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Jeffrey; Mastin, Chris; Le, Bach

    2008-01-01

    Injury to the inferior alveolar nerve during implant placement in the posterior atrophic mandible is a rare but serious complication. Although a preoperative computerized tomography scan can help determine the distance from the alveolar ridge to the nerve canal, variables such as magnification errors, ridge anatomy, and operator technique can increase the chance for complications. The routine use of intraoperative periapical radiographs during the drilling sequence is an inexpensive and reliable tool, allowing the operator to confidently adjust the direction and depth of the implant during placement. Most important, it helps avoid the risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve in cases in which there is limited vertical alveolar bone. Using this technique for 21 implants placed in the posterior atrophic mandible, with less than 10 mm of vertical bone to the inferior alveolar nerve canal, the authors observed no incidents of postoperative paresthesia.

  7. Peripapillary and posterior scleral mechanics--part I: development of an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model.

    PubMed

    Girard, Michaël J A; Downs, J Crawford; Burgoyne, Claude F; Suh, J-K Francis

    2009-05-01

    The sclera is the white outer shell and principal load-bearing tissue of the eye as it sustains the intraocular pressure. We have hypothesized that the mechanical properties of the posterior sclera play a significant role in and are altered by the development of glaucoma-an ocular disease manifested by structural damage to the optic nerve head. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model is presented to simulate the mechanical behavior of the posterior sclera under acute elevations of intraocular pressure. The constitutive model is derived from fiber-reinforced composite theory, and incorporates stretch-induced stiffening of the reinforcing collagen fibers. Collagen fiber alignment was assumed to be multidirectional at local material points, confined within the plane tangent to the scleral surface, and described by the semicircular von Mises distribution. The introduction of a model parameter, namely, the fiber concentration factor, was used to control collagen fiber alignment along a preferred fiber orientation. To investigate the effects of scleral collagen fiber alignment on the overall behaviors of the posterior sclera and optic nerve head, finite element simulations of an idealized eye were performed. The four output quantities analyzed were the scleral canal expansion, the scleral canal twist, the posterior scleral canal deformation, and the posterior laminar deformation. A circumferential fiber organization in the sclera restrained scleral canal expansion but created posterior laminar deformation, whereas the opposite was observed with a meridional fiber organization. Additionally, the fiber concentration factor acted as an amplifying parameter on the considered outputs. The present model simulation suggests that the posterior sclera has a large impact on the overall behavior of the optic nerve head. It is therefore primordial to provide accurate mechanical properties for this tissue. In a companion paper (Girard, Downs, Bottlang, Burgoyne, and Suh, 2009

  8. Mental nerve paresthesia secondary to initiation of endodontic therapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Sharique; Zia, Afaf; Khan, Masood Hasan; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Whenever endodontic therapy is performed on mandibular posterior teeth, damage to the inferior alveolar nerve or any of its branches is possible. Acute periapical infection in mandibular posterior teeth may also sometimes disturb the normal functioning of the inferior alveolar nerve. The most common clinical manifestation of these insults is the paresthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve or mental nerve paresthesia. Paresthesia usually manifests as burning, prickling, tingling, numbness, itching or any deviation from normal sensation. Altered sensation and pain in the involved areas may interfere with speaking, eating, drinking, shaving, tooth brushing and other events of social interaction which will have a disturbing impact on the patient. Paresthesia can be short term, long term or even permanent. The duration of the paresthesia depends upon the extent of the nerve damage or persistence of the etiology. Permanent paresthesia is the result of nerve trunk laceration or actual total nerve damage. Paresthesia must be treated as soon as diagnosed to have better treatment outcomes. The present paper describes a case of mental nerve paresthesia arising after the start of the endodontic therapy in left mandibular first molar which was managed successfully by conservative treatment. PMID:25110646

  9. Mental nerve paresthesia secondary to initiation of endodontic therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Andrabi, Syed Mukhtar-Un-Nisar; Alam, Sharique; Zia, Afaf; Khan, Masood Hasan; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-08-01

    Whenever endodontic therapy is performed on mandibular posterior teeth, damage to the inferior alveolar nerve or any of its branches is possible. Acute periapical infection in mandibular posterior teeth may also sometimes disturb the normal functioning of the inferior alveolar nerve. The most common clinical manifestation of these insults is the paresthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve or mental nerve paresthesia. Paresthesia usually manifests as burning, prickling, tingling, numbness, itching or any deviation from normal sensation. Altered sensation and pain in the involved areas may interfere with speaking, eating, drinking, shaving, tooth brushing and other events of social interaction which will have a disturbing impact on the patient. Paresthesia can be short term, long term or even permanent. The duration of the paresthesia depends upon the extent of the nerve damage or persistence of the etiology. Permanent paresthesia is the result of nerve trunk laceration or actual total nerve damage. Paresthesia must be treated as soon as diagnosed to have better treatment outcomes. The present paper describes a case of mental nerve paresthesia arising after the start of the endodontic therapy in left mandibular first molar which was managed successfully by conservative treatment.

  10. Histomorphometric measurements in human and dog optic nerve and an estimation of optic nerve pressure gradients in human.

    PubMed

    Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Morgan, William H; Johnstone, Victoria; Pandav, Surinder S; Cringle, Stephen J; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2009-11-01

    Intraocular pressure and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure are important determinants of the trans-laminar pressure gradient which is believed to be important in the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic nerve degeneration. Computational models and finite element calculations of optic nerve head biomechanics have been previously used to predict pressures and stresses in the human optic nerve. The purpose of this report is to morphometrically compare the optic nerve laminar and pia mater structure between humans and dogs, and to use previously reported tissue pressure measurements in the dog optic nerve to estimate individual-specific human optic nerve pressures and pressure gradients. High resolution light microscopy was used to acquire quantitative histological measurements from sagittal sections taken from the middle of the optic nerve in 34 human cadaveric eyes and 10 dog eyes. Parameters measured included the pre-laminar and lamina cribrosa thickness, distance from posterior boundary of lamina cribrosa to inner limiting membrane (ILM), shortest distance between anterior lamina cribrosa surface and subarachnoid space, shortest distance between ILM and inner surface of pia mater in contact with the subarachnoid space and optic nerve diameter. Pia mater thickness in the proximal 4 mm of post-laminar nerve was also determined. There was no significant difference in lamina cribrosa thickness between dog and human eyes (P = 0.356). The distance between the intraocular and subarachnoid space was greater in dogs (P < 0.001). Pia mater thickness was greatest at the termination of subarachnoid space in both species. In humans, pia mater thickness decreased over the proximal 500 mum to reach a constant value of approximately 60 mum. In dogs this decrease occurred over 1000 mum to reach a constant diameter of approximately 30 mum. Using previous measurements of optic nerve pressures and pressure gradients in dogs we estimate that at an IOP of 15 mmHg and a CSF pressure of 0

  11. Tarsal tunnel syndrome associated with a perforating branch from posterior tibial artery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kosiyatrakul, Arkaphat; Luenam, Suriya; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2015-03-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome, a compressive neuropathy of the tibial nerve or its branches with in the tarsal tunnel, is an uncommon condition. Various etiologies of the syndrome have been described. We report a rare case of tarsal tunnel syndrome associated with a perforating branch from the posterior tibial artery. A 56-year-old woman presented with 1-year history of paresthesia and hypoesthesia in the medial and lateral plantar area of the left foot. Tinel's sign was elicited at the tarsal tunnel. Electrodiagnostic studies confirmed the diagnosis of left tarsal tunnel syndrome. Intraoperatively, the perforating branch from posterior tibial artery which traveled through a split in the tibial nerve was encountered. The patient's symptom improved significantly at 2 years after tarsal tunnel release and vascular ligation. Only a minor degree of paresthesia remains in the forefoot.

  12. Modified skin incision for avoiding the lesser occipital nerve and occipital artery during retrosigmoid craniotomy: potential applications for enhancing operative working distance and angles while minimizing the risk of postoperative neuralgias and intraoperative hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Fries, Fabian N; Kulwin, Charles; Mortazavi, Martin M; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2016-10-01

    Chronic postoperative neuralgias and headache following retrosigmoid craniotomy can be uncomfortable for the patient. We aimed to better elucidate the regional nerve anatomy in an effort to minimize this postoperative complication. Ten adult cadaveric heads (20 sides) were dissected to observe the relationship between the lesser occipital nerve and a traditional linear versus modified U incision during retrosigmoid craniotomy. Additionally, the relationship between these incisions and the occipital artery were observed. The lesser occipital nerve was found to have two types of course. Type I nerves (60%) remained close to the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and some crossed anteriorly over the sternocleidomastoid muscle near the mastoid process. Type II nerves (40%) left the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and swung medially (up to 4.5cm posterior to the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle) as they ascended over the occiput. The lesser occipital nerve was near a midpoint of a line between the external occipital protuberance and mastoid process in all specimens with the type II nerve configuration. Based on our findings, the inverted U incision would be less likely to injure the type II nerves but would necessarily cross over type I nerves, especially more cranially on the nerve at the apex of the incision. As the more traditional linear incision would most likely transect the type I nerves and more so near their trunk, the U incision may be the overall better choice in avoiding neural and occipital artery injury during retrosigmoid approaches.

  13. Pathophysiology of nerve regeneration and nerve reconstruction in burned patients.

    PubMed

    Coert, J Henk

    2010-08-01

    In extensive burns peripheral nerves can be involved. The injury to the nerve can be direct by thermal or electrical burns, but nerves can also be indirectly affected by the systemic reaction that follows the burn. Mediators will be released causing a neuropathy to nerves remote from the involved area. Involved mediators and possible therapeutic options will be discussed. In burned patients nerves can be reconstructed using autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits. A key factor is an adequate wound debridement and a well-vascularized bed to optimize the outgrowth of the axons. Early free tissue transfers have shown promising results.

  14. Patterns of emergence of the human mental nerve.

    PubMed

    Kieser, Jules; Kuzmanovic, Dusan; Payne, Alan; Dennison, John; Herbison, Peter

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the path of emergence of the mental nerve in a number of human population groups. Skeletal material comprised 117 Negro skulls (53 males), 114 caucasoid skulls (62 males) and 100 pre-contact Maori skulls (70 males). In each case, the path of emergence was classified into posterior, anterior, right-angled or multiple. Those cases with severely resorbed alveolar ridges that made classification difficult were excluded from the study. Additionally, 56 cadaveric mandibles were examined, in which an osteotomy of 1cm was made on either side of the mental foramen to expose the nerve. The most common pattern of emergence in caucasoids and Maoris was a posterior direction (86.7% of caucasoid males, 90.2% of caucasoid females; 85.5% of Maori males, 93.1% of Maori females). In Negroes the most common pattern was a right-angled path of emergence (45.8% of males, 45.0% of females), with this difference between population groups being statistically significant (Pearson's chi(2): males=23.4, females=45-97; P<0.01). Multiple foramina were rare, with the highest incidence being in Maori and Negro males. Cadaveric data supported the findings of the skeletal investigation, with the dominant emergence recorded as posteriorly directed (80.7% of males, 86.6% of females). It was concluded that while the traditionally accepted ontogenetic explanation for the inclination of the mental nerve might be applicable to caucasoids and Maoris, it fails to explain the observed right-angled emergence pattern in Negroes. Hence, the nerve's emergence might be genetically, rather than functionally, determined. The study did not show a measurable anterior loop in the emergence of the mental nerve that would have any significant impact on treatment planning for implants in the anterior mandible.

  15. Posterior commissure of the human larynx revisited.

    PubMed

    Tucker, John A; Tucker, Sean T

    2010-05-01

    The existence of the posterior commissure (PC) of the human larynx has been disputed (Hirano M, Sato K, et al. The posterior glottis. Trans Am Laryngol Assoc. 1986;107:70-75). "The term posterior commissure has no relevance to anatomical structure. The term commissure means a joining together. The bilateral vocal folds never join at their posterior ends. The posterior aspect of the glottis is a wall. The posterior lateral aspect of the posterior glottis is also the lateral wall of the posterior glottis" (Hirano M, Sato K, et al. The posterior glottis. Trans Am Laryngol Assoc. 1986;107:70-75). This study is intended to clarify the development of anatomical and morphological aspects of the PC in conjunction with a clinical classification of the larynx in sagittal view. This study uses human embryo and fetal laryngeal sections from the Carnegie Collection of Human Embryos (the world standard) and whole organ laryngeal sections from the Tucker Laryngeal Fetal Collection. Correlation of histologic and gross anatomical structure is made with the Hirano et al atlas, the Vidić Photographic Atlas of the Human Body, and the O'Rahilly Embryonic Atlas. Embryologic data clearly describe and illustrate the posterior union of the cricoid cartilage with formation of the PC. The anatomical functional aspects of the posterior lateral cricoid lamina as the supporting buttress of the articulating arytenoid cartilages are illustrated.

  16. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  17. Optic Nerve Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... machines can help monitor and detect loss of optic nerve fibers. The Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) is a special ... keeping organized, you can establish a routine that works for you. Read more » Are You at Risk ...

  18. Axillary nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes Axillary nerve dysfunction is a form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ... Multiple mononeuropathy Muscle function loss Numbness and tingling Peripheral neuropathy Systemic Review Date 2/3/2015 Updated by: ...

  19. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tibial nerve dysfunction is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 76. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  20. Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2014-06-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality.

  1. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where it crosses the elbow, so prolonged pressure on the elbow or entrapment ...

  2. Optic Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of optic nerve disorders, including: Glaucoma is a group of diseases that are the leading cause of blindness in the United States. Glaucoma usually happens when the fluid pressure inside the eyes slowly rises and damages the ...

  3. Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathies)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may include numbness or insensitivity to pain or temperature a tingling, burning, or prickling sensation sharp pains ... from working properly, the body cannot regulate its temperature as it should. Nerve damage can also cause ...

  4. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  5. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  6. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  7. α-Synuclein pathology in the cranial and spinal nerves in Lewy body disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keiko; Mori, Fumiaki; Tanji, Kunikazu; Miki, Yasuo; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Yamada, Masahito; Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of phosphorylated α-synuclein in neurons and glial cells is a histological hallmark of Lewy body disease (LBD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Recently, filamentous aggregations of phosphorylated α-synuclein have been reported in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells, but not in axons, in the peripheral nervous system in MSA, mainly in the cranial and spinal nerve roots. Here we conducted an immunohistochemical investigation of the cranial and spinal nerves and dorsal root ganglia of patients with LBD. Lewy axons were found in the oculomotor, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal-vagus nerves, but not in the hypoglossal nerve. The glossopharyngeal-vagus nerves were most frequently affected, with involvement in all of 20 subjects. In the spinal nerve roots, Lewy axons were found in all of the cases examined. Lewy axons in the anterior nerves were more frequent and numerous in the thoracic and sacral segments than in the cervical and lumbar segments. On the other hand, axonal lesions in the posterior spinal nerve roots appeared to increase along a cervical-to-sacral gradient. Although Schwann cell cytoplasmic inclusions were found in the spinal nerves, they were only minimal. In the dorsal root ganglia, axonal lesions were seldom evident. These findings indicate that α-synuclein pathology in the peripheral nerves is axonal-predominant in LBD, whereas it is restricted to glial cells in MSA.

  8. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  9. Nerves and Tissue Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-21

    complete dependence on nerves. Organ culture of sciatic nerves, combined with an assay for axolotl transferrin developed earlier, allows quantitative study...axonal release of various unknown proteins. Combining this approach with the ELISA for quantitative measurement of axolotl transferrin developed with...light microscope autoradiographic analysis following binding of radiolabelled Tf. Studies of Tf synthesis will employ cDNA probes for axolotl Tf mRNA

  10. Traumatic facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linda N; Lyford-Pike, Sofia; Boahene, Kofi Derek O

    2013-10-01

    Facial nerve trauma can be a devastating injury resulting in functional deficits and psychological distress. Deciding on the optimal course of treatment for patients with traumatic facial nerve injuries can be challenging, as there are many critical factors to be considered for each patient. Choosing from the great array of therapeutic options available can become overwhelming to both patients and physicians, and in this article, the authors present a systematic approach to help organize the physician's thought process.

  11. Lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy.

  12. Intrathecal administration of nerve growth factor delays GAP 43 expression and early phase regeneration of adult rat peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akira; Masaki, Toshihiro; Motoyoshi, Kazuo; Kamakura, Keiko

    2002-07-19

    Whether nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration in vivo, in particular in adults, is controversial. We therefore examined the effect of exogenous NGF on nerve regeneration and the expression of GAP 43 (growth-associated protein 43) in adult rats. NGF was infused intrathecally via an osmotic mini-pump, while control rats received artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Two days after the infusion was initiated, the right sciatic nerves were transected or crushed, and the animals allowed to survive for 3 to 11 days. The right DRG, the right proximal stump of the transected sciatic nerve, and the posterior horn of the spinal cord were examined by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. GAP 43 immunoreactivity in the NGF-treated animals was significantly lower than in the aCSF-treated controls. Electron microscopy showed that the number of myelinated and unmyelinated axons decreased significantly in the NGF-treated rats as compared with the controls. These findings are indicative that exogenous NGF delayed GAP 43 induction and the early phase of peripheral nerve regeneration and supports the hypothesis that the loss of NGF supply from peripheral targets via retrograde transport caused by axotomy serves as a signal for DRG neurons to invoke regenerative responses. NGF administered intrathecally may delay the neurons' perception of the reduction of the endogenous NGF, causing a delay in conversion of DRG neurons from the normal physiological condition to regrowth state.

  13. Optic nerve aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lisi; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    We report a 55-year-old woman with optic nerve Aspergillosis. Aspergillus is an ubiquitous airborne saprophytic fungus. Inhaled Aspergillus conidia are normally eliminated in the immunocompetent host by innate immune mechanisms; however, in immunosuppressed patients, they can cause disease. The woman had a past medical history of hypertension and migraines. She presented 1 year prior to death with a new onset headache behind the left eye and later developed blurred vision and scotoma. A left temporal artery biopsy was negative for giant cell arteritis. One month prior to the current admission, she had an MRI showing optic nerve thickening with no other findings. Because of the visual loss and a positive antinuclear antibody test, she was given a trial of high dose steroids and while it significantly improved her headache, her vision did not improve. At autopsy, the left optic nerve at the level of the cavernous sinus and extending into the optic chiasm was enlarged in diameter and there was a 1.3 cm firm nodule surrounding the left optic nerve. Histologically, an abscess surrounded and involved the left optic nerve. Acute angle branching, angioinvasive fungal hyphae were identified on Grocott's methenamine silver stained sections, consistent with Aspergillus spp. No gross or microscopic evidence of systemic vasculitis or infection was identified in the body. The literature on optic nerve Aspergillosis is reviewed.

  14. Reduced voluntary drive during sustained but not during brief maximal voluntary contractions in the first dorsal interosseous weakened by spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Prak, Roeland F; Doestzada, Marwah; Thomas, Christine K; Tepper, Marga; Zijdewind, Inge

    2015-12-01

    In able-bodied (AB) individuals, voluntary muscle activation progressively declines during sustained contractions. However, few data are available on voluntary muscle activation during sustained contractions in muscles weakened by spinal cord injury (SCI), where greater force declines may limit task performance. SCI-related impairment of muscle activation complicates interpretation of the interpolated twitch technique commonly used to assess muscle activation. We attempted to estimate and correct for the SCI-related-superimposed twitch. Seventeen participants, both AB and with SCI (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale C/D) produced brief and sustained (2-min) maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) with the first dorsal interosseous. Force and electromyography were recorded together with superimposed (doublet) twitches. MVCs of participants with SCI were weaker than those of AB participants (20.3 N, SD 7.1 vs. 37.9 N, SD 9.5; P < 0.001); MVC-superimposed twitches were larger in participants with SCI (SCI median 10.1%, range 2.0-63.2%; AB median 4.7%, range 0.0-18.4% rest twitch; P = 0.007). No difference was found after correction for the SCI-related-superimposed twitch (median 6.7%, 0.0-17.5% rest twitch, P = 0.402). Thus during brief contractions, the maximal corticofugal output that participants with SCI could exert was similar to that of AB participants. During the sustained contraction, force decline (SCI, 58.0%, SD 15.1; AB, 57.2% SD 13.3) was similar (P = 0.887) because participants with SCI developed less peripheral (P = 0.048) but more central fatigue than AB participants. The largest change occurred at the start of the sustained contraction when the (corrected) superimposed twitches increased more in participants with SCI (SCI, 16.3% rest twitch, SD 20.8; AB, 2.7%, SD 4.7; P = 0.01). The greater reduction in muscle activation after SCI may relate to a reduced capacity to overcome fast fatigue-related excitability changes at the spinal level.

  15. Huge interparietal posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Manuel Filipe Dias; de Santa Barbara, Rita de Cassia

    2015-01-01

    Congenital encephalocele is a neural tube defect characterized by a sac-like protrusion of the brain, meninges, and other intracranial structures through the skull, which is caused by an embryonic development abnormality. The most common location is at the occipital bone, and its incidence varies according to different world regions. We report a case of an 1-month and 7-day-old male child with a huge interparietal-posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele, a rare occurrence. Physical examination and volumetric computed tomography were diagnostic. The encephalocele was surgically resected. Intradural and extradural approaches were performed; the bone defect was not primarily closed. Two days after surgery, the patient developed hydrocephaly requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The surgical treatment of the meningohydroencephalocele of the interparietal-posterior fontanel may be accompanied by technical challenges and followed by complications due to the presence of large blood vessels under the overlying skin. In these cases, huge sacs herniate through large bone defects including meninges, brain, and blood vessels. The latter present communication with the superior sagittal sinus and ventricular system. A favorable surgical outcome generally follows an accurate strategy taking into account individual features of the lesion. PMID:26484324

  16. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  17. [New treatment for peripheral nerve defects: nerve elongation].

    PubMed

    Kou, Y H; Jiang, B G

    2016-10-18

    Peripheral nerve defects are still a major challenge in clinical practice, and the most commonly used method of treatment for peripheral nerve defects is nerve transplantation, which has certain limitations and shortcomings, so new repair methods and techniques are needed. The peripheral nerve is elongated in limb lengthening surgery without injury, from which we got inspirations and proposed a new method to repair peripheral nerve defects: peripheral nerve elongation. The peripheral nerve could beelongated by a certain percent, but the physiological change and the maximum elongation range were still unknown. This study discussed the endurance, the physiological and pathological change of peripheral nerve elongation in detail, and got a lot of useful data. First, we developed peripheral nerve extender which could match the slow and even extension of peripheral nerve. Then, our animal experiment result confirmed that the peripheral nerve had better endurance for chronic elongation than that of acute elongation and cleared the extensibility of peripheral nerve and the range of repair for peripheral nerve defects. Our result also revealed the histological basis and changed the rule for pathological physiology of peripheral nerve elongation: the most important structure foundation of peripheral nerve elongation was Fontana band, which was the coiling of nerve fibers under the epineurium, so peripheral nerve could be stretched for 8.5%-10.0% without injury because of the Fontana band. We confirmed that peripheral nerve extending technology could have the same repair effect as traditional nerve transplantation through animal experiments. Finally, we compared the clinical outcomes between nerve elongation and performance of the conventional method in the repair of short-distance transection injuries in human elbows, and the post-operative follow-up results demonstrated that early neurological function recovery was better in the nerve elongation group than in the

  18. Isolated glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves palsy due to fracture involving the left jugular foramen.

    PubMed

    Alberio, N; Cultrera, F; Antonelli, V; Servadei, F

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a case of delayed post-traumatic glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves palsy (i.e. dysphonia and swallowing dysfunction). A high resolution CT study of the cranial base detected a fracture rim encroaching on the left jugular foramen. Treatment consisted in supportive measures with incomplete recovery during a one-year follow-up period. Lower cranial nerves palsies after head trauma are rare and, should they occur, a thorough investigation in search of posterior cranial base and cranio-cervical lesions is warranted. The presumptive mechanism in our case is a fracture-related oedema and ischemic damage to the nerves leading to the delayed occurrence of the palsy.

  19. Peripapillary and posterior scleral mechanics--part II: experimental and inverse finite element characterization.

    PubMed

    Girard, Michaël J A; Downs, J Crawford; Bottlang, Michael; Burgoyne, Claude F; Suh, J-K Francis

    2009-05-01

    The posterior sclera likely plays an important role in the development of glaucoma, and accurate characterization of its mechanical properties is needed to understand its impact on the more delicate optic nerve head--the primary site of damage in the disease. The posterior scleral shells from both eyes of one rhesus monkey were individually mounted on a custom-built pressurization apparatus. Intraocular pressure was incrementally increased from 5 mm Hg to 45 mm Hg, and the 3D displacements were measured using electronic speckle pattern interferometry. Finite element meshes of each posterior scleral shell were reconstructed from data generated by a 3D digitizer arm (shape) and a 20 MHz ultrasound transducer (thickness). An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model described in a companion paper (Girard, Downs, Burgoyne, and Suh, 2009, "Peripapillary and Posterior Scleral Mechanics--Part I: Development of an Anisotropic Hyperelastic Constitutive Model," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131, p. 051011), which includes stretch-induced stiffening and multidirectional alignment of the collagen fibers, was applied to each reconstructed mesh. Surface node displacements of each model were fitted to the experimental displacements using an inverse finite element method, which estimated a unique set of 13 model parameters. The predictions of the proposed constitutive model matched the 3D experimental displacements well. In both eyes, the tangent modulus increased dramatically with IOP, which indicates that the sclera is mechanically nonlinear. The sclera adjacent to the optic nerve head, known as the peripapillary sclera, was thickest and exhibited the lowest tangent modulus, which might have contributed to the uniform distribution of the structural stiffness for each entire scleral shell. Posterior scleral deformation following acute IOP elevations appears to be nonlinear and governed by the underlying scleral collagen microstructure as predicted by finite element modeling. The

  20. The Relationship of the Facial Nerve to the Condylar Process: A Cadaveric Study with Implications for Open Reduction Internal Fixation.

    PubMed

    Barham, H P; Collister, P; Eusterman, V D; Terella, A M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The mandibular condyle is the most common site of mandibular fracture. Surgical treatment of condylar fractures by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) demands direct visualization of the fracture. This project aimed to investigate the anatomic relationship of the tragus to the facial nerve and condylar process. Materials and Methods. Twelve fresh hemicadavers heads were used. An extended retromandibular/preauricular approach was utilized, with the incision being based parallel to the posterior edge of the ramus. Measurements were obtained from the tragus to the facial nerve and condylar process. Results. The temporozygomatic division of the facial nerve was encountered during each approach, crossing the mandible at the condylar neck. The mean tissue depth separating the facial nerve from the condylar neck was 5.5 mm (range: 3.5 mm-7 mm, SD 1.2 mm). The upper division of the facial nerve crossed the posterior border of the condylar process on average 2.31 cm (SD 0.10 cm) anterior to the tragus. Conclusions. This study suggests that the temporozygomatic division of the facial nerve will be encountered in most approaches to the condylar process. As visualization of the relationship of the facial nerve to condyle is often limited, recognition that, on average, 5.5 mm of tissue separates condylar process from nerve should help reduce the incidence of facial nerve injury during this procedure.

  1. The surgical anatomy of the radial nerve and the triceps aponeurosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Tahseen; Noor, Saqib; Maher, Ben; Bridger, John

    2010-03-01

    The radial nerve passes around the posterior aspect of the humerus where it is prone to injury in both humeral fractures and surgical exploration of this region. We examined 55 cadaveric limbs to determine whether the exact position of the radial nerve could be reliably predicted on the basis of superficial anatomical markings. We found that when there is considerable variability in the position of the nerve in relation to the lateral epicondyle, the nerve consistently passed adjacent to the lateral border of the triceps aponeurosis at a distance of 22-27 (+/-2) mm. It was never found to be closer than 13 (+/-1) mm to the aponeurosis. The lateral border of the triceps aponeurosis is easy to identify and our findings may help avoid iatrogenic injury to the radial nerve during exploration.

  2. Posterior peritoneal recesses: assessment using CT

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenstein, W.A.; Auh, Y.H.; Zirinsky, K.; Kneeland, J.B.; Whalen, J.P.; Kazam, E.

    1985-08-01

    Intraperitoneal compartments may extend posteriorly to the level of known retroperitoneal structures at several locations within the abdomen. These locations include the posterior subhepatic or hepatorenal space, the splenorenal space, the retropancreatic recess, the paracolic gutters, and the pararectal fossae. Because of their posterior location, fluid collections within these compartments may be mistaken radiologically for retroperitoneal masses. The sectional anatomy of these spaces and particularly their appearance on computed tomographic scans, are illustrated in this paper.

  3. Posterior ankle impingement in the dancer.

    PubMed

    Moser, Brad R

    2011-01-01

    Dancers spend a lot of time in the relevé position in demi-pointe and en pointe in their training and their careers. Pain from both osseous and soft tissue causes may start to occur in the posterior aspect of their ankle. This article reviews the potential causes of posterior ankle impingement in dancers. It will discuss the clinical evaluation of a dancer and the appropriate workup and radiographic studies needed to further evaluate a dancer with suspected posterior ankle impingement.

  4. Barriers of the peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, Sirkku; Alanne, Maria; Peltonen, Juha

    2013-01-01

    This review introduces the traditionally defined anatomic compartments of the peripheral nerves based on light and electron microscopic topography and then explores the cellular and the most recent molecular basis of the different barrier functions operative in peripheral nerves. We also elucidate where, and how, the homeostasis of the normal human peripheral nerve is controlled in situ and how claudin-containing tight junctions contribute to the barriers of peripheral nerve. Also, the human timeline of the development of the barriers of the peripheral nerve is depicted. Finally, potential future therapeutic modalities interfering with the barriers of the peripheral nerve are discussed. PMID:24665400

  5. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  6. Genes and nerves.

    PubMed

    Dieu, Tam; Johnstone, Bruce R; Newgreen, Don F

    2005-04-01

    The unpredictability of a brachial plexus graft, a median nerve repair, or a facial-nerve reconstruction is well known. No matter how precise the technical skills, a perfect recovery from a peripheral-nerve lesion is elusive. To resolve this problem, understanding of the normal development of the peripheral nervous system is needed. Presently, the development of the innervation in the upper limb is complex and not fully understood. However, many of the genes involved in this process are now known, and the link between anatomy and genetics is becoming clearer. This short review aims to acquaint the clinical surgeon with some of the main genes. The principal steps in the establishment of neural circuits will be summarized, in particular, the specification and development of neurons and glia, the pathfinding of cells and axons towards their target, and the downstream molecules that control the circuitry of these neurons.

  7. Cranial nerves in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, and in fossil relatives (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Kemp, A

    2017-02-01

    Three systems, two sensory and one protective, are present in the skin of the living Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, and in fossil lungfish, and the arrangement and innervation of the sense organs is peculiar to lungfish. Peripheral branches of nerves that innervate the sense organs are slender and unprotected, and form before any skeletal structures appear. When the olfactory capsule develops, it traps some of the anterior branches of cranial nerve V, which emerged from the chondrocranium from the lateral sphenotic foramen. Cranial nerve I innervates the olfactory organ enclosed within the olfactory capsule and cranial nerve II innervates the eye. Cranial nerve V innervates the sense organs of the snout and upper lip, and, in conjunction with nerve IX and X, the sense organs of the posterior and lateral head. Cranial nerve VII is primarily a motor nerve, and a single branch innervates sense organs in the mandible. There are no connections between nerves V and VII, although both emerge from the brain close to each other. The third associated system consists of lymphatic vessels covered by an extracellular matrix of collagen, mineralised as tubules in fossils. Innervation of the sensory organs is separate from the lymphatic system and from the tubule system of fossil lungfish.

  8. Innervation of the Human Cavum Conchae and Auditory Canal: Anatomical Basis for Transcutaneous Auricular Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, P; López, M; Larraya, I; Chamorro, J; Cobo, J L; Ordóñez, S; Vega, J A

    2017-01-01

    The innocuous transcutaneous stimulation of nerves supplying the outer ear has been demonstrated to be as effective as the invasive direct stimulation of the vagus nerve for the treatment of some neurological and nonneurological disturbances. Thus, the precise knowledge of external ear innervation is of maximal interest for the design of transcutaneous auricular nerve stimulation devices. We analyzed eleven outer ears, and the innervation was assessed by Masson's trichrome staining, immunohistochemistry, or immunofluorescence (neurofilaments, S100 protein, and myelin-basic protein). In both the cavum conchae and the auditory canal, nerve profiles were identified between the cartilage and the skin and out of the cartilage. The density of nerves and of myelinated nerve fibers was higher out of the cartilage and in the auditory canal with respect to the cavum conchae. Moreover, the nerves were more numerous in the superior and posterior-inferior than in the anterior-inferior segments of the auditory canal. The present study established a precise nerve map of the human cavum conchae and the cartilaginous segment of the auditory canal demonstrating regional differences in the pattern of innervation of the human outer ear. These results may provide additional neuroanatomical basis for the accurate design of auricular transcutaneous nerve stimulation devices.

  9. Innervation of the Human Cavum Conchae and Auditory Canal: Anatomical Basis for Transcutaneous Auricular Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, P.; López, M.; Larraya, I.; Chamorro, J.; Cobo, J. L.; Ordóñez, S.

    2017-01-01

    The innocuous transcutaneous stimulation of nerves supplying the outer ear has been demonstrated to be as effective as the invasive direct stimulation of the vagus nerve for the treatment of some neurological and nonneurological disturbances. Thus, the precise knowledge of external ear innervation is of maximal interest for the design of transcutaneous auricular nerve stimulation devices. We analyzed eleven outer ears, and the innervation was assessed by Masson's trichrome staining, immunohistochemistry, or immunofluorescence (neurofilaments, S100 protein, and myelin-basic protein). In both the cavum conchae and the auditory canal, nerve profiles were identified between the cartilage and the skin and out of the cartilage. The density of nerves and of myelinated nerve fibers was higher out of the cartilage and in the auditory canal with respect to the cavum conchae. Moreover, the nerves were more numerous in the superior and posterior-inferior than in the anterior-inferior segments of the auditory canal. The present study established a precise nerve map of the human cavum conchae and the cartilaginous segment of the auditory canal demonstrating regional differences in the pattern of innervation of the human outer ear. These results may provide additional neuroanatomical basis for the accurate design of auricular transcutaneous nerve stimulation devices.

  10. Minimally invasive tubular access for posterior cervical foraminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Byron C.; Hilton, Donald L.; Watts, Clark

    2015-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive tubular access for posterior cervical foraminotomy can be an effective and safe technique for decompression of the nerve root utilizing minimally invasive muscle splitting with routine outpatient discharge. This technique has come under scrutiny calling into question the associated learning curve, a subjective limited exposure provided, and an argument that the risks and complications are largely unknown. In response to previously published critiques, this study aims to describe the outcomes and complications associated with this technique in a large patient series. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed from 1999 to 2013 capturing a single surgeon's experience with the minimally invasive tubular access for posterior cervical foraminotomy technique from a single institution, encompassing 463 patients. Surgical outcome documented at follow-up and complications were obtained from this patient series. Additional variables analyzed include: Hospital length of stay, number of levels operated, targeted root for decompression, side operated, length of surgery, and estimated blood loss. Results: Outpatient discharge was achieved in 91.6% of cases. There were 10 complications (2.2%) among the 463 patients undergoing this technique from 1999 to 2013. Patients were followed for an average of 1 year and 2 months postoperatively. Improvement from the preoperative condition was observed in 98.2% of patients and excellent outcomes with patients reporting complete relief of symptoms with no or mild residual discomfort was seen in 92.2%. Conclusions: Compared with open techniques, minimally invasive tubular access for posterior cervical foraminotomy demonstrates comparable, if not superior, complication rates, and patient outcomes. PMID:26009705

  11. [Lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease].

    PubMed

    Shi, J G; Xu, X M; Sun, J C; Wang, Y; Guo, Y F; Yang, H S; Kong, Q J; Yang, Y; Shi, G D; Yuan, W; Jia, L S

    2017-03-21

    Objective: To define a novel disease-lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease, and propose the diagnostic criteria, while capsule surgery was performed and evaluated in the preliminary study. Methods: From June 2016 to December 2016, a total of 30 patients (22 male and 8 female; mean age of 55.1±9.7 years) with lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease were included in Department of Spine Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, the Second Military Medical University.Lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease was defined as axial hypertension of nerve root and spinal cord caused by congenital anomalies, which could be accompanied by other lesions as lumbar disc herniation, spinal cord stenosis or spondylolisthesis, or aggravated by iatrogenic lesions, resulting in neurological symptoms.This phenomenon is similar to a stretched string, the higher tension on each end the louder sound.Meanwhile, the shape of lumbosacral spine looks like a bow, thus, the disease is nominated as lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease.All the patients underwent capsule surgery and filled out Owestry disability index (ODI) and Tempa scale for kinesiophobia (TSK) before and after surgery. Results: The mean surgery time was (155±36) min, (4.3±0.4) segments were performed surgery.The pre-operative VAS, TSK and ODI scores were (7.6±0.8), (52.0±10.3) and (68.4±12.7), respectively.The post-operative VAS, TSK and ODI scores were (3.3±0.4), ( 24.6±5.2) and (32.1±7.4)(P<0.05, respectively), respectively. Conclusion: The definition and diagnostic criteria of lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease was proposed.Capsule surgery was an effective strategy with most patients acquired excellent outcomes as symptoms relieved and quality of life improved.

  12. Nerve Transfers in Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ida K

    2016-05-01

    Hand and upper extremity function is instrumental to basic activities of daily living and level of independence in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Nerve transfer surgery is a novel and alternate approach for restoring function in SCI. This article discusses the biologic basis of nerve transfers in SCI, patient evaluation, management, and surgical approaches. Although the application of this technique is not new; recent case reports and case series in the literature have increased interest in this field. The challenges are to improve function, achieve maximal gains in function, avoid complications, and to primum non nocere.

  13. Endoscopic decompression for intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of endoscopic decompression surgery for intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression in the lumbar spine. Methods The records from seventeen consecutive patients treated with endoscopic posterior decompression without fusion for intaforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression in the lumbar spine (7 males and 10 females, mean age: 67.9 ± 10.7 years) were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical procedures consisted of lateral or translaminal decompression with or without discectomy. The following items were investigated: 1) the preoperative clinical findings; 2) the radiologic findings including MRI and computed tomography-discography; and 3) the surgical outcome as evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale for lower back pain (JOA score). Results All patients had neurological findings compatible with a radiculopathy, such as muscle weakness and sensory disturbance. MRI demonstrated the obliteration of the normal increased signal intensity fat in the intervertebral foramen. Ten patients out of 14 who underwent computed tomography-discography exhibited disc protrusion or herniation. Selective nerve root block was effective in all patients. During surgery, 12 patients were found to have a protruded disc or herniation that compressed the nerve root. Sixteen patients reported pain relief immediately after surgery. Conclusions Intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression is a rare but distinct pathological condition causing severe radiculopathy. Endoscopic decompression surgery is considered to be an appropriate and less invasive surgical option. PMID:21439083

  14. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePlus

    ... and toxins. Some cranial nerve disorders interfere with eye movement. Eye movement is controlled by 3 pairs of muscles. These ... be able to move their eyes normally. How eye movement is affected depends on which nerve is affected. ...

  15. Nerve Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    MedlinePlus

    ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath (“insulation”) Figure 2: Nerve repair with realignment of bundles © ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath insulation Figure 2 - Nerve repair with realignment of bundles ...

  16. Optic nerve hypoplasia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, S. M.; Dutton, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is characterised by a diminished number of optic nerve fibres in the optic nerve(s) and until recently was thought to be rare. It may be associated with a wide range of other congenital abnormalities. Its pathology, clinical features, and the conditions associated with it are reviewed. Neuroendocrine disorders should be actively sought in any infant or child with bilateral ONH. Early recognition of the disorder may in some cases be life saving. Images PMID:2191713

  17. Therapy for thoracic lumbar and sacral vertebrae tumors using total spondylectomy and spine reconstruction through posterior or combined anterior-posterior approaches

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PINGLIN; HE, XIJING; LI, HAOPENG; ZANG, QUANJIN; WANG, GUOYU

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the indications, feasibility, safety and clinical effects of total spondylectomy and spine reconstruction through posterior or combined anterior-posterior approaches for thoracic lumbar and sacral vertebrae tumors. Between December 2009 and May 2012, 10 patients with thoracic lumbar and sacral vertebrae tumors were retrospectively analyzed. Different surgical indications and approaches were used according to the affected segments, the extent of lesion involvement and the specific pathology results. One-stage posterior or combined anterior-posterior total spondylectomy and reconstruction was used for the treatment of complicated thoracic lumbar and sacral vertebral malignant tumors and invasive benign tumors. The duration of surgery, levels of intraoperative blood loss and transfusions, and the clinical effects were observed. The average surgical duration was 6.8 h (range, 4.8–12 h), with an average blood loss level of 3,200 ml (range, 1,500–10,000 ml) and an average transfusion level of 2,500 ml. During the average 15 months (range, 3–29 months) follow up, two patients succumbed and one patient experienced tumor recurrence. Neither tumor reoccurrence nor metastasis was observed in all other patients. Personalized surgical indications and approaches according to the affected segments, the extent of lesion involvement and the specific pathology results would aid in the reduction of pain, the improvement of nerve function and the reduction of tumor recurrence. PMID:26998076

  18. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Abscess Diabetes Mononeuropathy Multiple mononeuropathy Myelin Peripheral neuropathy Polyarteritis nodosa Systemic Tumor Review Date 1/5/ ... Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Leg Injuries and Disorders Peripheral Nerve Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  19. Nerves and Tissue Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    axolotl limbs are transected the concentration of transferrin in the distal limb tissue declines rapidly and limb regeneration stops. These results...transferrin binding and expression of the transferrin gene in cells of axolotl peripheral nerve indicate that both uptake and synthesis of this factor occur

  20. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  1. The distance between the posterior communicating arteries and their relation to the endoscopic third ventriculostomy in adults: An anatomic study

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Alicia Del Carmen Becerra; da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires

    2011-01-01

    Background: The diencephalic leaf of the Liliequist's membrane is a continuous structure that should be perforated in the endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Its lateral borders are penetrated by the third cranial nerve and the posterior communicating arteries. The most important complication of endoscopic third ventriculostomy is the vascular injury, such as the posterior communicating artery. The purpose of this study is to measure the distance between posterior communicating arteries located below the third ventricle floor and anterior of the mammillary bodies. Methods: In this observational prospective study 20 fresh brains from cadavers were utilized to measure the distance between the posterior communicating arteries in April 2008 at the Death Check Unit of our Institution. A digital photograph of the posterior communicating arteries was taken and the distance between the arteries was measured. The measurement was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: In the descriptive analysis of the 20 specimens, the posterior communicating arteries distance was 9 to 18.9 mm, a mean of 12.5 mm, median of 12.2 mm, standard deviation of 2.3 mm. Conclusion: The detailed knowledge of vascular structures involved in the endoscopic third ventriculostomy as to the posterior communicating arteries distance provides a safe lateral vascular border when performing such procedure. PMID:21748043

  2. The adductor part of the adductor magnus is innervated by both obturator and sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Megumi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ito, Hajime; Fujimiya, Mineko; Uchiyama, Eiichi

    2014-07-01

    The hip adductor group, innervated predominantly by the obturator nerve, occupies a large volume of the lower limb. However, case reports of patients with obturator nerve palsy or denervation have described no more than minimal gait disturbance. Those facts are surprising, given the architectural characteristics of the hip adductors. Our aim was to investigate which regions of the adductor magnus are innervated by the obturator nerve and by which sciatic nerve and to consider the clinical implications. Twenty-one lower limbs were examined from 21 formalin-fixed cadavers, 18 males and 3 females. The adductor magnus was dissected and was divided into four parts (AM1-AM4) based on the locations of the perforating arteries and the adductor hiatus. AM1 was supplied solely by the obturator nerve. AM2, AM3, and AM4 received innervation from both the posterior branch of the obturator nerve and the tibial nerve portion of the sciatic nerve in 2 (9.5%), 20 (95.2%), and 6 (28.6%) of the cadavers, respectively. The double innervation in more than 90% of the AM3s is especially noteworthy. Generally, AM1-AM3 corresponds to the adductor part, traditionally characterized as innervated by the obturator nerve, and AM4 corresponds to the hamstrings part, innervated by the sciatic nerve. Here, we showed that the sciatic nerve supplies not only the hamstrings part but also the adductor part. These two nerves spread more widely than has generally been believed, which could have practical implications for the assessment and treatment of motor disability.

  3. Posterior repair and sexual function

    PubMed Central

    Komesu, Yuko M.; Rogers, Rebecca G.; Kammerer-Doak, Dorothy N.; Barber, Matthew D.; Olsen, Ambre L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of posterior repair (PR) on sexual function in patients who have undergone incontinence and/or pelvic reconstructive surgery. STUDY DESIGN A cohort study of women who underwent incontinence and/or prolapse surgery was performed. Participants completed the pelvic organ prolapse urinary incontinence sexual questionnaire (PISQ) before and after the operation. PISQ scores were compared between women who underwent PR and women who did not. RESULTS Of 73 study participants, 30 women underwent PR; 43 women did not (no PR). Although there was no difference in dyspareunia between groups pre-op, dyspareunia prevalence post-op was significantly lower in the no PR group. Preoperative PISQ scores were similar between groups. After the operation, both groups significantly improved their PISQ scores, without a difference between groups. CONCLUSION Although the incidence of dyspareunia differed between PR and no PR groups, overall improvement in sexual function was reflected in improved total PISQ scores that occurred irrespective of PR performance. PMID:17618777

  4. Anatomical evidence for the absence of a morphologically distinct cranial root of the accessory nerve in man.

    PubMed

    Lachman, Nirusha; Acland, Robert D; Rosse, Cornelius

    2002-01-01

    The accessory nerve is conventionally described as having a cranial and spinal root. According to standard descriptions the cranial root (or part) is formed by rootlets that emerge from the medulla between the olive and the inferior cerebellar peduncle. These rootlets are considered to join the spinal root, travel with it briefly, then separate within the jugular foramen to become part of the vagus nerve. In 15 fresh specimens we exposed the posterior cranial fossa with a coronal cut through the foramen magnum and explored the course of each posterior medullary rootlet (PMR) arising from within the retro-olivary groove. We chose the caudal end of the olive as the landmark for the caudal end of the medulla. In all specimens every PMR that did not contribute to the glossopharyngeal nerve joined the vagus nerve at the jugular foramen. The distance between the caudal limit of the olive and the origin of the most caudal PMR that contributed to the vagus nerve ranged from 1-21 mm (mean = 8.8 mm). All rootlets that joined the accessory nerve arose caudal to the olive. The distance from the caudal limit of the olive and the most rostral accessory rootlet ranged from 1-15 mm (mean = 5.4 mm). We were unable to demonstrate any connection between the accessory and vagus nerves within the jugular foramen. Our findings indicate that the accessory nerve has no cranial root; it consists only of the structure hitherto referred to as its spinal root.

  5. Modeling the Effects of Spaceflight on the Posterior Eye in VIIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A. J.; Raykin, J.; Mulugeta, L.; Gleason, R.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E. S.; Samuels, B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a new and significant health concern for long-duration space missions. Its etiology is unknown, but is thought to involve elevated intracranial pressure (ICP)that induces connective tissue changes and remodeling in the posterior eye (Alexander et al. 2012). Here we study the acute biomechanical response of the lamina cribrosa (LC) and optic nerve to elevations in ICP utilizing finite element (FE) modeling. Methods: Using the geometry of the posterior eye from previous axisymmetric FE models (Sigal et al. 2004), we added an elongated optic nerve and optic nerve sheath, including the pia and dura. Tissues were modeled as linear elastic solids. Intraocular pressure and central retinal vessel pressures were set at 15 mmHg and 55 mmHg, respectively. ICP varied from 0 mmHg (suitable for standing on earth) to 30 mmHg (representing severe intracranial hypertension, thought to occur in space flight). We focused on strains and deformations in the LC and optic nerve (within 1 mm of the LC) since we hypothesize that they may contribute to vision loss in VIIP. Results: Elevating ICP from 0 to 30 mmHg significantly altered the strain distributions in both the LC and optic nerve (Figure), notably leading to more extreme strain values in both tension and compression. Specifically, the extreme (95th percentile) tensile strains in the LC and optic nerve increased by 2.7- and 3.8-fold, respectively. Similarly, elevation of ICP led to a 2.5- and 3.3-fold increase in extreme (5th percentile) compressive strains in the LC and optic nerve, respectively. Conclusions: The elevated ICP thought to occur during spaceflight leads to large acute changes in the biomechanical environment of the LC and optic nerve, and we hypothesize that such changes can activate mechanosensitive cells and invoke tissue remodeling. These simulations provide a foundation for more comprehensive studies of microgravity effects on human vision, e

  6. Anatomical variations within the deep posterior compartment of the leg and important clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Hislop, M; Tierney, P

    2004-09-01

    The management of musculoskeletal conditions makes up a large part of a sports medicine practitioner's practice. A thorough knowledge of anatomy is an essential component of the armament necessary to decipher the large number of potential conditions that may confront these practitioners. To cloud the issue further, anatomical variations may be present, such as supernumerary muscles, thickened fascial bands or variant courses of nerves and blood vessels, which can themselves manifest as acute or chronic conditions that lead to significant morbidity or limitation of activity. There are a number of contentious areas within the literature surrounding the anatomy of the leg, particularly involving the deep posterior compartment. Conditions such as chronic exertional compartment syndrome, tibial periostitis (shin splints), peripheral nerve entrapment and tarsal tunnel syndrome may all be affected by subtle anatomical variations. This paper primarily focuses on the deep posterior compartment of the leg and uses the gross dissection of cadaveric specimens to describe definitively the anatomy of the deep posterior compartment. Variant fascial attachments of flexor digitorum longus are documented and potential clinical sequelae such as chronic exertional compartment syndrome and tarsal tunnel syndrome are discussed.

  7. Posterior subscapular dissection: An improved approach to the brachial plexus for human anatomy students.

    PubMed

    Hager, Shaun; Backus, Timothy Charles; Futterman, Bennett; Solounias, Nikos; Mihlbachler, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Students of human anatomy are required to understand the brachial plexus, from the proximal roots extending from spinal nerves C5 through T1, to the distal-most branches that innervate the shoulder and upper limb. However, in human cadaver dissection labs, students are often instructed to dissect the brachial plexus using an antero-axillary approach that incompletely exposes the brachial plexus. This approach readily exposes the distal segments of the brachial plexus but exposure of proximal and posterior segments require extensive dissection of neck and shoulder structures. Therefore, the proximal and posterior segments of the brachial plexus, including the roots, trunks, divisions, posterior cord and proximally branching peripheral nerves often remain unobserved during study of the cadaveric shoulder and brachial plexus. Here we introduce a subscapular approach that exposes the entire brachial plexus, with minimal amount of dissection or destruction of surrounding structures. Lateral retraction of the scapula reveals the entire length of the brachial plexus in the subscapular space, exposing the brachial plexus roots and other proximal segments. Combining the subscapular approach with the traditional antero-axillary approach allows students to observe the cadaveric brachial plexus in its entirety. Exposure of the brachial dissection in the subscapular space requires little time and is easily incorporated into a preexisting anatomy lab curriculum without scheduling additional time for dissection.

  8. Treatment implications of posterior fossa ependymoma subgroups.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2016-11-15

    Posterior fossa ependymoma comprises two distinct molecular entities, ependymoma_posterior fossa A (EPN_PFA) and ependymoma_posterior fossa B (EPN_PFB), with differentiable gene expression profiles. As yet, the response of the two entities to treatment is unclear. To determine the relationship between the two molecular subgroups of posterior fossa ependymoma and treatment, we studied a cohort of 820 patients with molecularly profiled, clinically annotated posterior fossa ependymomas. We found that the strongest predictor of poor outcome in patients with posterior fossa ependymoma across the entire age spectrum was molecular subgroup EPN_PFA, which was recently reported in the paper entitled "Therapeutic impact of cytoreductive surgery and irradiation of posterior fossa ependymoma in the molecular era: a retrospective multicohort analysis" in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Patients with incompletely resected EPN_PFA tumors had a very poor outcome despite receiving adjuvant radiation therapy, whereas a substantial proportion of patients with EPN_PFB tumors can be cured with surgery alone.

  9. Congenital basis of posterior fossa anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Cotes, Claudia; Bonfante, Eliana; Lazor, Jillian; Jadhav, Siddharth; Caldas, Maria; Swischuk, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    The classification of posterior fossa congenital anomalies has been a controversial topic. Advances in genetics and imaging have allowed a better understanding of the embryologic development of these abnormalities. A new classification schema correlates the embryologic, morphologic, and genetic bases of these anomalies in order to better distinguish and describe them. Although they provide a better understanding of the clinical aspects and genetics of these disorders, it is crucial for the radiologist to be able to diagnose the congenital posterior fossa anomalies based on their morphology, since neuroimaging is usually the initial step when these disorders are suspected. We divide the most common posterior fossa congenital anomalies into two groups: 1) hindbrain malformations, including diseases with cerebellar or vermian agenesis, aplasia or hypoplasia and cystic posterior fossa anomalies; and 2) cranial vault malformations. In addition, we will review the embryologic development of the posterior fossa and, from the perspective of embryonic development, will describe the imaging appearance of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. Knowledge of the developmental bases of these malformations facilitates detection of the morphological changes identified on imaging, allowing accurate differentiation and diagnosis of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. PMID:26246090

  10. Recurrent posterior shoulder instability. Diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pollock, R G; Bigliani, L U

    1993-06-01

    Recurrent posterior glenohumeral instability is regarded as a difficult problem to diagnose and treat. A careful history and physical examination are the most helpful tools in making this diagnosis. A positive posterior stress test, demonstrable posterior subluxation, and a sulcus sign are frequently present on examination. Special roentgenographic studies, such as the computerized arthrotomography (arthro-CT) scan, may be used in cases in which plain roentgenographs suggest bony glenoid abnormalities. When conservative therapy fails, there is no consensus on the operative treatment. Procedures that address the soft tissues, such as capsulorrhaphy and posterior labral repair, as well as those that alter the bony geometry of the joint, such as posterior bone blocks and glenoid or humeral osteotomies, have been described. Capsular laxity is the most common pathologic finding in the authors' experience, and they favor the use of a posterior-inferior capsular shift procedure to correct this problem. Augmentation of the repair with a posterior bone block is reserved for unusual cases, such as when glenoid hypoplasia is present or in certain revision situations.

  11. Posterior labral injury in contact athletes.

    PubMed

    Mair, S D; Zarzour, R H; Speer, K P

    1998-01-01

    Nine athletes (seven football offensive linemen, one defensive lineman, and one lacrosse player) were found at arthroscopy to have posterior labral detachment from the glenoid. In our series, this lesion is specific to contact athletes who engage their opponents with arms in front of the body. All patients had pain with bench pressing and while participating in their sport, diminishing their ability to play effectively. Conservative measures were ineffective in relieving their symptoms. Examination under anesthesia revealed symmetric glenohumeral translation bilaterally, without evidence of posterior instability. Treatment consisted of glenoid rim abradement and posterior labral repair with a bioabsorbable tack. All patients returned to complete at least one full season of contact sports and weightlifting without pain (minimum follow-up, > or = 2 years). Although many injuries leading to subluxation of the glenohumeral joint occur when an unanticipated force is applied, contact athletes ready their shoulder muscles in anticipation of impact with opponents. This leads to a compressive force at the glenohumeral joint. We hypothesize that, in combination with a posteriorly directed force at impact, the resultant vector is a shearing force to the posterior labrum and articular surface. Repeated exposure leads to posterior labral detachment without capsular injury. Posterior labral reattachment provides consistently good results, allowing the athlete to return to competition.

  12. Cavernous portion of the trochlear nerve with special reference to its site of entrance.

    PubMed Central

    Bisaria, K K

    1988-01-01

    In a study of 80 cavernous sinuses in 40 cadavers, the trochlear nerve entered the cavernous sinus in 87.5% of cases before the crossing, in 7.5% at the crossing and in 5.0% after the crossing of the free and the attached margins of the tentorium cerebelli. In 77.5% of specimens the trochlear nerve showed a marked bend with flattening at the site of its entrance into the cavernous sinus. The nerve ran between the superficial and deep layers of dura, partly between them, in the thickness of the deeper layer, or deep to the deep layer but adherent to it. These findings do not conform with the description of its course by other workers in the past. In 72.5% of specimens the size of the trochlear nerve was larger during its course in the cavernous sinuses but in 20.0% of specimens such an increase in thickness was noted even in the posterior cranial fossa. Only in one specimen was the trochlear nerve adherent to the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve. Cases showing the trochlear nerve entering the cavernous sinus after the crossing of the two margins of tentorium cerebelli and the splitting and branching of the trochlear nerve in the cavernous sinus have not hitherto been reported. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:3248970

  13. Morphometric characteristics of caudal cranial nerves at petroclival region in fetuses.

    PubMed

    Ozdogmus, Omer; Saban, Enis; Ozkan, Mazhar; Yildiz, Sercan Dogukan; Verimli, Ural; Cakmak, Ozgur; Arifoglu, Yasin; Sehirli, Umit

    2016-06-01

    Morphometric measurements of cranial nerves in posterior cranial fossa of fetus cadavers were carried out in an attempt to identify any asymmetry in their openings into the cranium. Twenty-two fetus cadavers (8 females, 14 males) with gestational age ranging between 22 and 38 weeks (mean 30 weeks) were included in this study. The calvaria were removed, the brains were lifted, and the cranial nerves were identified. The distance of each cranial nerve opening to midline and the distances between different cranial nerve openings were measured on the left and right side and compared. The mean clivus length and width were 21.2 ± 4.4 and 13.2 ± 1.5 mm, respectively. The distance of the twelfth cranial nerve opening from midline was shorter on the right side when compared with the left side (6.6 ± 1.1 versus 7.1 ± 0.8 mm, p = 0.038). Openings of other cranial nerves did not show such asymmetry with regard to their distance from midline, and the distances between different cranial nerves were similar on the left and right side. Cranial nerves at petroclival region seem to show minimal asymmetry in fetuses.

  14. Nerve root replantation.

    PubMed

    Carlstedt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic avulsion of nerve roots from the spinal cord is a devastating event that usually occurs in the brachial plexus of young adults following motor vehicle or sports accidents or in newborn children during difficult childbirth. A strategy to restore motor function in the affected arm by reimplanting into the spinal cord the avulsed ventral roots or autologous nerve grafts connected distally to the avulsed roots has been developed. Surgical outcome is good and useful recovery in shoulder and proximal arm muscles occurs. Pain is alleviated with motor recovery but sensory improvement is poor when only motor conduits have been reconstructed. In experimental studies, restoration of sensory connections with general improvement in the outcome from this surgery is pursued.

  15. Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment. PMID:23015944

  16. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Adib F, Curtis C, Bienkowski P Micheli LJ. Posterior cruciate ligament sprain. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, ...

  17. Piriformis Syndrome With Variant Sciatic Nerve Anatomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Emily; Tenforde, Adam S; Beaulieu, Christopher F; Ratliff, John; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    A 68-year-old male long distance runner presented with low back and left buttock pain, which eventually progressed to severe and debilitating pain, intermittently radiating to the posterior thigh and foot. A comprehensive workup ruled out possible spine or hip causes of his symptoms. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging neurogram with complex oblique planes through the piriformis demonstrated variant anatomy of the left sciatic nerve consistent with the clinical diagnosis of piriformis syndrome. The patient ultimately underwent neurolysis with release of the sciatic nerve and partial resection of the piriformis muscle. After surgery the patient reported significant pain reduction and resumed running 3 months later. Piriformis syndrome is uncommon but should be considered in the differential diagnosis for buttock pain. Advanced imaging was essential to guide management.

  18. Issues in the Optimal Selection of a Cranial Nerve Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Selesnick, Samuel H.; Goldsmith, Daniel F.

    1993-01-01

    Intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) is a safe technique that is of clear clinical value in the preservation of cranial nerves in skull base surgery and is rapidly becoming the standard of care. Available nerve monitoring systems vary widely in capabilities and costs. A well-informed surgeon may best decide on monitoring needs based on surgical case selection, experience, operating room space, availability of monitoring personnel, and cost. Key system characteristics that should be reviewed in the decision-making process include the monitoring technique (electromyography, pressure transducer, direct nerve monitoring, brainstem auditory evoked potential) and the stimulus technique (stimulating parameters, probe selection). In the past, IONM has been primarily employed in posterior fossa and temporal bone surgery, but the value of IONM is being recognized in more skull base and head and neck surgeries. Suggested IONM strategies for specific surgeries are presented. PMID:17170916

  19. Gibbs Sampling for Marginal Posterior Expectations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-19

    Achcar and Smith (1989) shows that performance of the Laplace method is often very sensitive to parametrization. Morris (1988) offers expansions based on...Berkeley Symp. 1, 453-468. Lindley, D.V. (1980). "Approximate Bayesian Methods" in Bayesian Statistics, J.M. Bernardo, M.H. DeGroot , D.V. Lindley...A.F.M. Smith, University Press, Valencia, Spain. Morris , C. "Approximating Posterior Distributions and Posterior Moments" In: Bayesian Statistics 3, J.M

  20. [Posterior cortical atrophy (Benson-syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Rózsa, Anikó; Szilvássy, Ildikó; Kovács, Krisztina; Boór, Krisztina; Gács, Gyula

    2010-01-30

    We present the characteristics of posterior cortical atrophy--a very rare cortical dementia--in a 69 year old woman's case. Our patient's symptoms began with a visual problem which was initially explained by ophthalmological disorder. After neurological exam visual agnosia was diagnosed apart from other cognitive disorder (alexia without agraphia, acalculia, prosopagnosia, constructional disorder, clock-time recognition disorder, dressing apraxia, visuospatial disorientation). The brain MRI showed bilateral asymmetric parieto-occipital atrophy which is characteristic of posterior cortical atrophy.

  1. [Local involvement of the optic nerve by acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Bernardczyk-Meller, Jadwiga; Stefańska, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The leucemias quite commonly involve the eyes and adnexa. In some cases it causes visual complants. Both, the anterior chamber of the eye and the posterior portion of the globe may sites of acute or chronic leukemia and leucemic relapse. We report an unique case of a 14 years old leucemic patient who suffered visual loss and papilloedema, due to a unilateral local involvement within optic nerve, during second relapse of acute lymphocytic leuemia. In spite of typical treatment of main disease, the boy had died. The authors present typical ophthalmic features of the leucemia, too.

  2. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Robert; Dailey, Travis; Duncan, Kelsey; Abel, Naomi; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27983642

  3. Nerve regeneration in nerve grafts conditioned by vibration exposure.

    PubMed

    Bergman, S; Widerberg, A; Danielsen, N; Lundborg, G; Dahlin, L B

    1995-01-01

    Regeneration distances were studied in nerves from vibration-exposed limbs. One hind limb of anaesthetized rats was attached to a vibration exciter and exposed to vibration (80 Hz/32 m/s2) for 5 h/day for 2 or 5 days. Seven days after the latest vibration period a 10-mm long nerve graft was taken from the vibrated sciatic nerve and sutured into a corresponding defect in the con-tralateral sciatic nerve and vice versa, thereby creating two different models within the same animal: (i) regeneration from a freshly transected unvibrated nerve into a vibrated graft and (ii) regeneration from a vibrated nerve into a fresh nerve graft (vibrated recipient side). Four, 6 or 8 days postoperatively (p.o.) the distances achieved by the regenerating axons were determined using the pinch reflex test. Two days of vibration did not influence the regeneration, but 5 days of vibration reduced the initial delay period and a slight reduction of regeneration rate was observed. After 5 days of vibration an increased regeneration distance was observed in both models at day 4 p.o. and at day 6 p.o. in vibrated grafts. This study demonstrates that vibration can condition peripheral nerves and this may be caused by local changes in the peripheral nerve trunk and in the neuron itself.

  4. Magnetoencephalographic analysis in patients with vagus nerve stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Thiele, Elizabeth A.; Madsen, Joseph R.; Bourgeois, Blaise F.; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of magnetoencephalography in epilepsy patients with vagus nerve stimulator. We performed magnetoencephalography in two patients (Patient 1 and 2) with medically intractable epilepsy who had a vagus nerve stimulator. Due to the artifacts caused by a vagus nerve stimulator, no spikes could be identified in the original magnetoencephalographic data in either patient. The temporally extended signal space separation method was used for removing artifacts. After processing by this method, left temporo-parietal spikes were clearly identified in Patient 1. Equivalent current dipoles calculated from these spikes were localized in the left posterior-temporal and parietal lobes. The location of the dipoles was consistent with the spike distribution on intracranial EEG. In Patient 2, bilateral, diffuse spikes were seen in the processed data. The contour maps demonstrated a bilateral pattern, not in agreement of single focal source. These findings supported the diagnosis of symptomatic generalized epilepsy in this patient. The present study demonstrates that magnetoencephalography may be a valuable option for evaluating intractable epilepsy patients with the vagus nerve stimulator. PMID:19818944

  5. Magnetoencephalographic analysis in patients with vagus nerve stimulator.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Madsen, Joseph R; Bourgeois, Blaise F; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of magnetoencephalography in epilepsy patients with a vagus nerve stimulator. Magnetoencephalography was performed in two patients with medically intractable epilepsy who had a vagus nerve stimulator. Because of the artifacts caused by the vagus nerve stimulator, no spikes could be identified in the original magnetoencephalographic data in either patient. The temporally extended signal space separation method was used to remove artifacts. After processing by this method, left temporoparietal spikes were clearly identified in patient 1. Equivalent current dipoles calculated from these spikes were localized in the left posterior-temporal and parietal lobes. The location of the dipoles was consistent with the spike distribution on intracranial electroencephalography. In patient 2, bilateral diffuse spikes were seen in the processed data. The contour maps demonstrated a bilateral pattern, not in agreement with a single focal source. These findings supported the diagnosis of symptomatic generalized epilepsy in this patient. Magnetoencephalography may thus be a useful option for evaluating patients with intractable epilepsy who have a vagus nerve stimulator.

  6. Posterior Wnts Have Distinct Roles in Specification and Patterning of the Planarian Posterior Region.

    PubMed

    Sureda-Gómez, Miquel; Pascual-Carreras, Eudald; Adell, Teresa

    2015-11-05

    The wnt signaling pathway is an intercellular communication mechanism essential in cell-fate specification, tissue patterning and regional-identity specification. A βcatenin-dependent signal specifies the AP (Anteroposterior) axis of planarians, both during regeneration of new tissues and during normal homeostasis. Accordingly, four wnts (posterior wnts) are expressed in a nested manner in central and posterior regions of planarians. We have analyzed the specific role of each posterior wnt and the possible cooperation between them in specifying and patterning planarian central and posterior regions. We show that each posterior wnt exerts a distinct role during re-specification and maintenance of the central and posterior planarian regions, and that the integration of the different wnt signals (βcatenin dependent and independent) underlies the patterning of the AP axis from the central region to the tip of the tail. Based on these findings and data from the literature, we propose a model for patterning the planarian AP axis.

  7. Vertigo due to posterior circulation stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Hyung

    2013-07-01

    Stroke in the distribution of the posterior circulation may present as acute onset spontaneous vertigo and imbalance. Although vertigo due to posterior circulation stroke is usually associated with other neurologic symptoms or signs, small infarcts in the cerebellum or brainstem can present with vertigo without other localizing symptoms. Approximately 17% of patients with isolated posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarction presented with isolated vertigo, nystagmus, and postural unsteadiness. A head impulse test can differentiate acute isolated vertigo associated with cerebellar stroke from more benign disorders involving the inner ear. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss can be the initial symptom of impending posterior circulation ischemic stroke (particularly within the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery). In this case, evaluation of isolated audiovestibular loss may prevent the progression of acute vertigo and hearing loss into more widespread areas of infarction in the posterior circulation. In this article, the clinical syndromes and signs of acute vestibular syndrome due to posterior circulation stroke involving the brainstem and cerebellum are summarized.

  8. Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis by Debridement, Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation via Posterior Approach Only.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming-xing; Zhang, Hong-qi; Wang, Yu-xiang; Guo, Chao-feng; Liu, Jin-yang

    2016-02-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis includes focal tuberculosis debridement, segmental stability reconstruction, neural decompression and kyphotic deformity correction. For the lesions mainly involved anterior and middle column of the spine, anterior operation of debridement and fusion with internal fixation has been becoming the most frequently used surgical technique for the spinal tuberculosis. However, high risk of structural damage might relate with anterior surgery, such as damage in lungs, heart, kidney, ureter and bowel, and the deformity correction is also limited. Due to the organs are in the front of spine, there are less complications in posterior approach. Spinal pedicle screw passes through the spinal three-column structure, which provides more powerful orthopedic forces compared with the vertebral body screw, and the kyphotic deformity correction effect is better in posterior approach. In this paper, we report a 68-year-old male patient with thoracic tuberculosis who underwent surgical treatment by debridement, interbody fusion and internal fixation via posterior approach only. The patient was placed in prone position under general anesthesia. Posterior midline incision was performed, and the posterior spinal construction was exposed. Then place pedicle screw, and fix one side rod temporarily. Make the side of more bone destruction and larger abscess as lesion debridement side. Resect the unilateral facet joint, and retain contralateral structure integrity. Protect the spinal cord, nerve root. Clear sequestrum, necrotic tissue, abscess of paravertebral and intervertebral space. Specially designed titanium mesh cages or bone blocks were implanted into interbody. Fix both side rods and compress both sides to make the mesh cages and bone blocks tight. Reconstruct posterior column structure with allogeneic bone and autologous bone. Using this technique, the procedures of debridement, spinal cord decompression, deformity correction, bone grafting

  9. Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome After Posterior Fossa Surgery: A Report of Two Cases of Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    GÜNDÜZ, Hasan Burak; YASSA, Mustafa İlker Kuntay; OFLUOĞLU, Ali Ender; POSTALCI, Lütfü; EMEL, Erhan

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a type of syndrome including decreased speech, hypotonia, ataxia and emotional instability which occurs after posterior fossa surgery. It has been first reported by Rekate et al. and Yonemasu in 1985. It is well known that long tract signs and lower cranial nerve involvement are not seen with this syndrome and understanding is preserved. However, the pathophysiology of cerebellar mutism has not been well clarified yet. It is mainly seen in patients with medulloblastoma and brainstem involvement. In this report, we present two extraordinary cases of cerebellar mutism after posterior fossa surgery. They were considered extraordinary because their hystopathological analysis results yielded pilocytic astrocytoma which is out of the predefined risk factors.

  10. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  11. Regional Variations in Mechanical Strain in the Posterior Human Sclera

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Massimo A.; Grytz, Rafael; Bruno, Luigi; Girard, Michael J. A.; Gardiner, Stuart; Girkin, Christopher A.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to establish sectorial and regional variability in the mechanical strain of peripapillary and mid-peripheral sclera in normal eyes from elderly human donors. Methods. Ten pairs of normal eyes from human donors aged 57 to 90 years old were mechanically inflation-tested within 48 hours post mortem. The intact posterior scleral shells were pressurized from 5 to 45 mm Hg while the full-field three-dimensional displacements of the scleral surface were measured using laser speckle interferometry. The displacement field was fit to continuous and differentiable analytical functions, from which the full strain tensor of the outer scleral surface was calculated. Mean maximum principal (tensile) strain was computed for eight circumferential sectors (45° wide) within the peripapillary and mid-peripheral regions surrounding the optic nerve head (ONH). Results. Overall, the peripapillary sclera exhibited significantly higher tensile strain (1.2%) than mid-peripheral sclera (0.95%) for a 40 mm Hg IOP elevation (P < 0.00001). In the peripapillary region, the inferotemporal sector exhibited the highest tensile strain (1.45%) while the superior sector had the lowest (1.19%; P < 0.00001). Mid-peripheral scleral strains were lower but exhibited a similar sectorial pattern. Conclusions. Human posterior sclera exhibits complex regional mechanical behavior in response to acute IOP elevations from 5 to 45 mm Hg. Results indicate 1) the peripapillary sclera is subjected to significantly higher tensile strain than the adjacent mid-peripheral sclera, and 2) strains are significantly higher in the temporal and inferior quadrants of the peripapillary sclera, which may contribute to the increased prevalence of glaucomatous damage associated with these regions of the ONH. PMID:22700704

  12. Magnetic resonance properties of hydrogen: imaging the posterior fossa

    SciTech Connect

    Young, I.R.; Burl, M.; Clarke, G.J.

    1981-11-01

    Posterior fossa scans were performed on five healthy volunteers using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) machine constructed by Thorn-EMI Ltd. Three different NMR scanning sequences were used. In the first, a type of saturation-recovery technique was used to produce images strongly dependent on the density of hydrogen nuclei, but with some dependence on the spin-lattice relaxation time (T/sub 1/). In the second, an inversion-recovery technique was used to produce images with a stronger dependence on the spin-lattice relaxation time. In the third, a spin-echo technique was used to obtain images with a dependence on the spin-spin relaxation time (T/sub 2/). All three types of NMR image were unaffected by bone artifact. Visualization of brain adjacent to the skull base was obtained without loss of detail due to partial-volume effect from bone. The saturation-recovery images highlighted arteries and veins that were clearly visible without the use of contrast agents. The inversion-recovery images showed remarkable gray-white matter differentiation enabling internal structure to be seen within the brainstem and cerebellum. The trigeminal nerve and ganglion were also seen outside the brain. Experience with the spin-echo technique is limited, but the images at the base of the brain show considerable soft-tissue detail. The NMR images of the posterior fossa in this study were comparable in quality to those obtained from a new rotate-rotate x-ray computed tomography machine and were superior in several respects.

  13. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  14. [Comparation of the antero-lateral and posterior approaches in primary total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Macedo, C A; Galia, C R; Rosito, R; Valin, M R; Kruel, A V; Muller, L; Rodríguez, F A

    1999-01-01

    Comparison between the antero-lateral and posterior approaches in primary total hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective study, 184 patients were enrolled, 95 submitted to the anterolateral (Watson jones) and 89 to the posterior approach (Moore) from June 1993 to June 1997. The outcomes assessed were perioperative data (operative time, hospital stay, time from surgery until hospital discharge, surgical bleeding and the need for blood transfusion), as well as late complications (deep venous thrombosis DVP, pulmonary embolism, periopheral nerve injury, prothesis instability and others). Both groups did not differ in terms of preoperative parameters. Those submitted to the posterior approach had shorter operative times (p < 0.001), as well as reduced bleeding (p < 0.05) and need for blood transfusion (p < 0.001) during surgery. The outcomes, such as late complications, had similar reduced frequency in both groups. The posterior approach has been successfully applied in our service and proves to be an excellent alternative surgical access to the total hip arthroplasty.

  15. [Familial posterior cortical atrophy with visual agnosia and Bálint's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Otsuki, M; Soma, Y; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, K; Tanno, Y; Uesugi, Y; Tsuji, S

    1995-12-01

    We report a patient of posterior cortical atrophy with progressive visual agnosia, Bálint's syndrome and dementia in which posterior cortical atrophy with similar characteristics on CT and progressive dementia were found in a sister. The patient was a 75-year-old woman who noted the onset of a progressive visual disorder at the age of 70, and whose family first noticed disoriented behavior at around the same period. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed mild cataract but no evidence of peripheral optic nerve or retinal lesions. Neuropsychological examination showed right homonymous hemianopia, visual agnosia, Bálint's syndrome, mild transcortical sensory aphasia, Gerstmann's syndrome, constructional apraxia, mild ideomotor apraxia and memory disorder. MRI showed marked dilatation of both lateral ventricles, especially the posterior horns, and severe atrophy of the occipital lobes, hippocampus, and the parahippocampal gyrus. Assessment of regional cerebral blood flow by IMP-SPECT revealed a generalized decrease in the temporo-parieto-occipital region bilaterally. The patient's sister began to show evidence of progressive dementia at 80 years of age and CT of the brain revealed marked atrophy, predominantly in the occipital lobes, similar to that of the patient. We believe this to be the first report of posterior cortical atrophy with a positive family history, suggesting the possibility of a hereditary syndrome.

  16. Circumferential flow of particles in the suprachoroidal space is impeded by the posterior ciliary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Bryce; Kim, Yoo Chun; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Microneedle injection into the suprachoroidal space (SCS) enables targeted drug delivery for treatment of posterior segment diseases (e.g., posterior uveitis). This study sought to identify and characterize anatomical barriers to circumferential spread of particles in the SCS of rabbit and human cadaver eyes. These barriers could make targeting specific regions within the SCS challenging. A hollow microneedle (33-gauge, 750 μm long) was used to inject fluorescent particles into albino New Zealand White rabbit eyes ex vivo at six different positions around the limbus and a limited number of conditions in vivo. SCS injections were also performed in human cadaver eyes 8 mm and 2 mm from the optic nerve (ON). Eyes were dissected and particle distribution was quantified. In rabbit eyes, injections made in the superior or inferior hemispheres (even when injected temporally immediately adjacent to the long posterior ciliary artery (LPCA)) did not significantly cross into the other hemisphere, apparently due to a barrier formed by the LPCA. The vortex veins had a minor effect on particle deposition, limited to only around the vortex vein root. In human eyes, the short posterior ciliary arteries (SPCAs) prevented circumferential spread towards the macula and ON. In conclusion, the rabbit LPCA and the human SPCA were anatomical barriers to particle spread within the SCS. Therefore, design of drug delivery protocols targeting the SCS need to account for barriers formed by anatomical structures in order for injected drug to reach target tissues. PMID:26976663

  17. Posterior urethral polyp with type I posterior urethral valves: a rare association in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Kesan, Krushnakumar V; Gupta, Rahul Kumar; Kothari, Paras; Gupta, Abhaya; Mudkhedkar, Kedar; Kamble, Ravikiran; Dikshit, K Vishesh

    2014-06-01

    Urethral polyp is a rare cause of bladder outlet obstruction, voiding dysfunction, and hematuria in the pediatric age group. Urethral polyps are rarely associated with other congenital urinary tract anomalies. In this study, we report a case of solitary posterior urethral polyp with type I posterior urethral valve in a 7-day-old neonate presented with urinary retention and deranged renal function. The polyp was diagnosed on cystoscopy. Transurethral resection of the polyp with posterior urethral valve fulguration was performed. Pathologic assessment revealed a fibroepithelial lesion, which was consistent with congenital posterior urethral polyp.

  18. Preservation of cranial nerves during removal of the brain for an enhanced student experience in neuroanatomy classes.

    PubMed

    Long, Jennifer; Roberts, David J H; Pickering, James D

    2014-01-01

    Neuroanatomy teaching at the University of Leeds includes the examination of isolated brains by students working in small groups. This requires the prosected brains to exhibit all 12 pairs of cranial nerves. Traditional methods of removing the brain from the skull involve elevating the frontal lobes and cutting each cranial nerve as the brain is reflected posteriorly. This can leave a substantial length of each nerve attached to the skull base rather than to the removed brain. We have found a posterior approach more successful. In this study, five adult heads were disarticulated at the level of the thyroid cartilage and placed, prone, in a head stand. A wedge of bone from the occipital region was removed before the cerebellum and brainstem were elevated to visualize the cranial nerves associated with the medulla oblongata, cerebellopontine angle and mesencephalic-pontine junction prior to cutting them as close to the skull as possible. Five brains were successfully removed from the skull, each having a full complement of cranial nerves of good length attached to them. This approach significantly increases the length and number of cranial nerves remaining attached to the brain, which supports student education. For integration into head and neck dissection courses, careful consideration will be required to ensure the necks are suitably dissected and to decide whether the cranial nerves are best left attached to the skull base or brain.

  19. Wnt-Ror signaling to SIA and SIB neurons directs anterior axon guidance and nerve ring placement in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kennerdell, Jason R.; Fetter, Richard D.; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Wnt signaling through Frizzled proteins guides posterior cells and axons in C. elegans into different spatial domains. Here we demonstrate an essential role for Wnt signaling through Ror tyrosine kinase homologs in the most prominent anterior neuropil, the nerve ring. A genetic screen uncovered cwn-2, the C. elegans homolog of Wnt5, as a regulator of nerve ring placement. In cwn-2 mutants, all neuronal structures in and around the nerve ring are shifted to an abnormal anterior position. cwn-2 is required at the time of nerve ring formation; it is expressed by cells posterior of the nerve ring, but its precise site of expression is not critical for its function. In nerve ring development, cwn-2 acts primarily through the Wnt receptor CAM-1 (Ror), together with the Frizzled protein MIG-1, with parallel roles for the Frizzled protein CFZ-2. The identification of CAM-1 as a CWN-2 receptor contrasts with CAM-1 action as a non-receptor in other C. elegans Wnt pathways. Cell-specific rescue of cam-1 and cell ablation experiments reveal a crucial role for the SIA and SIB neurons in positioning the nerve ring, linking Wnt signaling to specific cells that organize the anterior nervous system. PMID:19855022

  20. Posterior clinoid meningioma: A case report with discussion on terminology and surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Harsimrat Bir S.; Singla, Navneet; Gupta, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posterior clinoid process (PCP) meningiomas are rare lesions. In close proximity to these lesions are the perforators from internal carotid artery and the oculomotor nerve, which need to be considered while deciding the appropriate surgical approach. Case Description: We describe a basal frontotemporo-orbito-zygomatic approach with splitting of the sylvian fissure to resect an eccentrically placed PCP meningioma. Conclusion: A basal frontotemporo-orbito-zygomatic approach with splitting of the sylvian fissure is a safe approach to resect an eccentrically placed PCP meningioma. PMID:25722927

  1. Genomic study of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine

    PubMed Central

    IKEGAWA, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL) is a common disease after the middle age. OPLL frequently causes serious neurological problems due to compression of the spinal cord and/or nerve roots. OPLL occurs in patients with monogenic metabolic diseases including rickets/osteomalacia and hypoparathyroidism; however most of OPLL is idiopathic and is considered as a multi-factorial (polygenic) disease influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Genomic studies for the genetic factors of OPLL have been conducted, mainly in Japan, including linkage and association studies. This paper reviews the recent progress in the genomic study of OPLL and comments on its future direction. PMID:25504229

  2. Nerve blocks for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Shah, Atit

    2014-10-01

    Nerve blocks are often performed as therapeutic or palliative interventions for pain relief. However, they are often performed for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. When considering nerve blocks for chronic pain, clinicians must always consider the indications, risks, benefits, and proper technique. Nerve blocks encompass a wide variety of interventional procedures. The most common nerve blocks for chronic pain and that may be applicable to the neurosurgical patient population are reviewed in this article. This article is an introduction and brief synopsis of the different available blocks that can be offered to a patient.

  3. Nerves on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Batra, P.; Brown, K.

    1989-01-01

    Nerves are often visualized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the soft tissues on the chest and shoulder girdle. To learn the reasons for the contrast between the nerves and adjacent tissues, the authors obtained a fresh specimen containing part of the brachial plexus nerves from the left axilla and compared MRI with x-ray projections and photomicrographs of histologic sections. The results suggest that the high signals from the nerves stand out in contrast to the low signals from their rich vascular supply. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6A Figure 6B Figure 7 PMID:2733051

  4. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  5. Multiligament Injury of the Knee. First Intrarticular or Posterior

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Show our experience about the multiligament injury of the knee. In the surgical technique it is most popular and recommended stabilized first all posterior and lateral (Ligament cruciate Posterior (LCP) and postero-lateral corner) if is a case. We show our experience stabilized first all intra-articular ACL and LCP. Methods: Prospective study and Case Series. The study includes, 45 cases in 15 years of experience. The patients have two or more ligaments with rupture, and associated lesions, like meniscus, cartilages, fractures, etc. 45 cases with a ACL rupture, 40 PCL, 7 posteromedial corner, 25 postero-lateral corner, 30 meniscus medial, 28 meniscus lateral, 1 vascular lesion, and 3 fibular nerve. In the surgical technique always use autograft. Prefer hamstrings, quadricipital tendon, contralateral hamstrings, BTB and sometimes peroneus brevis. We hope 1 or 2 weeks for the surgery. I never use pump, and use tourniquet for two hours. We start for the meniscus lesions and cartilage lesion and first reconstruction ligaments intra-articular. Finalized we open the tourniquet and stabilized the postero-lateral o posteromedial corner if is necessary. In the first cases we did a surgery in two times, but now we stabilized in one surgical time. Results: 3 to 6 days in the hospital 2 weeks immobilized and star rehabilitation with brace for more two weeks. Use crutches for 4-6 weeks. Worked in rehabilitation for a one year and star competition in one year. Complications: 1 case of amputation for vascular lesion, 9 arthrofibrosis, 2 medial instability, 1 lateral instability and1 LCP instability. One case needs a revision two years after the first surgery, for a new trauma in the work. All other cases had a new surgery for revision the residual instability. Conclusion: The multiligament injury of the knee it is not frequently, but every year I receive more cases, and more difficult. In the surgical technique have two options. The more recommended stabilized first

  6. Initial Pattern of Optic Nerve Enhancement in Korean Patients with Unilateral Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dae Yong; Park, Kyung-Ah; Seok, Su Sie; Lee, Ju-Yeun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to demonstrate whether the pattern of optic nerve enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can help to differentiate between idiopathic optic neuritis (ON), neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and multiple sclerosis (MS) in unilateral ON. Methods An MRI of the brain and orbits was obtained in patients with acute unilateral ON. Patients with ON were divided into three groups: NMO, MS, and idiopathic ON. The length and location of the abnormal optic nerve enhancement were compared for ON eyes with and without NMO or MS. The correlation between the pattern of optic nerve enhancement and the outcome of visual function was analyzed. Results Of the 36 patients with ON who underwent an MRI within 2 weeks of the onset, 19 were diagnosed with idiopathic ON, 9 with NMO, and 8 with MS. Enhancement of the optic nerve occurred in 21 patients (58.3%) and was limited to the orbital segment in 12 patients. Neither the length nor the location of the optic nerve enhancement was significantly correlated with visual functions other than contrast sensitivity or the diagnosis of idiopathic ON, MS, or NMO. Patients with greater extent of optic nerve sheath enhancement and more posterior segment involvement showed higher contrast sensitivity. Conclusions Our data revealed that the pattern of optic nerve enhancement was not associated with diagnosis of idiopathic ON, NMO, or MS in Korean patients with unilateral ON. We believe further studies that include different ethnic groups will lead to a more definitive answer on this subject. PMID:28243026

  7. Safety profile of sural nerve in posterolateral approach to the ankle joint: MRI study.

    PubMed

    Ellapparadja, Pregash; Husami, Yaya; McLeod, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The posterolateral approach to ankle joint is well suited for ORIF of posterior malleolar fractures. There are no major neurovascular structures endangering this approach other than the sural nerve. The sural nerve is often used as an autologous peripheral nerve graft and provides sensation to the lateral aspect of the foot. The aim of this paper is to measure the precise distance of the sural nerve from surrounding soft tissue structures so as to enable safe placement of skin incision in posterolateral approach. This is a retrospective image review study involving 64 MRI scans. All measurements were made from Axial T1 slices. The key findings of the paper is the safety window for the sural nerve from the lateral border of tendoachilles (TA) is 7 mm, 1.3 cm and 2 cm at 3 cm above ankle joint, at the ankle joint and at the distal tip of fibula respectively. Our study demonstrates the close relationship of the nerve in relation to TA and fibula in terms of exact measurements. The safety margins established in this study should enable the surgeon in preventing endangerment of the sural nerve encountered in this approach.

  8. Surgeons’ assessment of internal anal sphincter nerve supply during TaTME - inbetween expectations and reality

    PubMed Central

    Kneist, Werner; Hanke, Laura; Kauff, Daniel W.; Lang, Hauke

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intraoperative identification of nerve fibers heading from the inferior rectal plexus (IRP) to the internal anal sphincter (IAS) is challenging. The transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) is said to better preserve pelvic autonomic nerves. The aim of this study was to investigate the nerve identification rates during TaTME by transanal visual and electrophysiological assessment. Material and methods: A total of 52 patients underwent TaTME for malignant conditions. The IRP with its posterior branches to the IAS and the pelvic splanchnic nerves (PSN) were visually assessed in 20 patients (v-TaTME). Electrophysiological nerve identification was performed in 32 patients using electric stimulation under processed electromyography of IAS (e-TaTME). Results: The indication profile for TaTME was comparable between the v-TaTME and the e-TaTME group. The identification of IRP was more meaningful under electrophysiological assessment than under visual assessment for the left pelvic side (81% vs. 45%, p = 0.008) as well as the right pelvic side (78% vs. 45%, p = 0.016). The identification rates for PSN did not significantly differ between both groups, respectively (81% vs. 75%, p = 0.420 and 84% vs. 70%, p = 0.187). Conclusions: The transanal approach facilitated visual identification of IAS nerve supply. In combination with electrophysiological nerve assessment the identification rate almost doubled. For further insights functional data are needed. PMID:27333465

  9. Giant intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor mimicking disc herniation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Cong; Xin, Xiaotang; Liu, Bo; Li, Wei; Yin, Dezhen; Mu, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Giant intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors arising in the sciatic nerve in the pelvic cavity are a rare occurrence and their symptomatology is usually misdiagnosed as intervertebral disc herniation. We herein report the case of a 46-year old woman presenting with pain, hypesthesia and weakness of the left lower extremity due to a giant intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the sciatic nerve. Prior to being referred to our institution, the patient was misdiagnosed as a case of sciatica due to a lumbar disc herniation and underwent an operation unsuccessfully, as there was little symptomatic improvement 2 months after the surgery. A magnetic resonance imaging examination of the pelvic cavity revealed a tumor of the sciatic nerve. The mass was resected via the posterior approach and histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are an uncommon cause of sciatica and are commonly misdiagnosed as lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Accurate diagnosis and complete surgical excision prior to metastasis are crucial for effective management of this condition. PMID:27900106

  10. C2 and Greater Occipital Nerve: The Anatomic and Functional Implications in Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peter L; Greenfield, Jeffrey P; Baaj, Ali A; Frempong-Boadu, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Posterior C1-C2 fusion is a highly successful treatment for atlantoaxial instability and other pathologies of the cervical spine, with fusion rates approaching 95%-100%. However, poor visualization of the lateral masses of C1 secondary to the course of the C2 nerve root along with blood loss from the venous plexus and compression of the C2 nerve from lateral mass screws are technical obstacles that can arise during surgery. Thus, sacrifice of the C2 nerve root has long since been debated in fusions involving the C1 and C2 vertebral bodies.  Methods Cadaveric dissections on four adult specimens were performed. Both intradural and extradural courses of C2 were studied in detail. The tentative site of C2 nerve root compression during placement of C1 lateral mass screws was studied in detail. Both the indication as well as the ease of C2 neurectomy were studied in relation to postoperative compression and entrapment. Results Four-six dorsal rootlets of C2 nerve were observed while studying the intradural course. The extradural course was studied with respect to the lateral mass of C1. The greater occipital nerve (GON) course was fairly consistent in all specimens. Transection of C2 around its ganglion would allow for proper C1 lateral mass screw placement as the course of C2 nerve interferes with proper placement of instrumentation. Conclusion C2 nerve root transection is associated with occipital numbness but this often has no effect on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The C2 nerve root preservation is often associated with entrapment neuropathy or occipital neuralgia, which greatly affects HRQOL. The C2 nerve root transection helps in better visualization, aids in optimal placement of C1 lateral mass screws, minimizes estimated blood loss and improves surgical outcome with successful fusion.

  11. The use of phentolamine mesylate to evaluate mandibular nerve damage following implant placement.

    PubMed

    Froum, Stuart J; Froum, Scott H; Malamed, Stanley F

    2010-09-01

    High success rates and long-term predictability of implant therapy have been well documented in the literature. However, complications in implant treatment can arise and include sensory disturbances, especially in the posterior mandible in areas close to the inferior alveolar nerve. Treatment efficacy of sensory disturbances caused by implant placement in this area relies on the expeditious diagnosis of an induced paresthesia. Recently, phentolamine mesylate has been introduced as a reversal agent of local anesthesia with the ability to decrease the requisite time for a patient to return to normal sensation. This article introduces a method for faster detection of a potential paresthesia induced by implant placement in the posterior mandible.

  12. Amplitude of sensory nerve action potential in early stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy: an analysis of 500 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunqian; Li, Jintao; Wang, Tingjuan; Wang, Jianlin

    2014-07-15

    Early diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is important for the successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we recruited 500 diabetic patients from the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University in China from June 2008 to September 2013: 221 cases showed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy (symptomatic group) and 279 cases had no symptoms of peripheral impairment (asymptomatic group). One hundred healthy control subjects were also recruited. Nerve conduction studies revealed that distal motor latency was longer, sensory nerve conduction velocity was slower, and sensory nerve action potential and amplitude of compound muscle action potential were significantly lower in the median, ulnar, posterior tibial and common peroneal nerve in the diabetic groups compared with control subjects. Moreover, the alterations were more obvious in patients with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Of the 500 diabetic patients, neural conduction abnormalities were detected in 358 cases (71.6%), among which impairment of the common peroneal nerve was most prominent. Sensory nerve abnormality was more obvious than motor nerve abnormality in the diabetic groups. The amplitude of sensory nerve action potential was the most sensitive measure of peripheral neuropathy. Our results reveal that varying degrees of nerve conduction changes are present in the early, asymptomatic stage of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  13. Fibrin Glue Injection for Cavernous Sinus Hemostasis Associated with Cranial Nerve Deficit: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tavanaiepour, Daryoush; Jernigan, Sarah; Abolfotoh, Mohamad; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin glue injection has been used to control intraoperative cavernous sinus (CS) venous bleeding. There have been no reported complications related to this maneuver. We present a case where a patient developed a sensory trigeminal nerve deficit after injection of fibrin glue into the posterior CS during resection of a petrosal meningioma. We believe that this deficit was due to the compression of the trigeminal ganglion similar to balloon compression procedures. Although fibrin glue injection may achieve satisfactory cavernous sinus homeostasis, the volume and rate of injection should be kept in mind to avoid a compressive lesion on traversing cranial nerves and surrounding structures, or retrograde filling of the venous tributaries. PMID:26251815

  14. Long thoracic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wiater, J M; Flatow, E L

    1999-11-01

    Injury to the long thoracic nerve causing paralysis or weakness of the serratus anterior muscle can be disabling. Patients with serratus palsy may present with pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation, and scapular winging with medial translation of the scapula, rotation of the inferior angle toward the midline, and prominence of the vertebral border. Long thoracic nerve dysfunction may result from trauma or may occur without injury. Fortunately, most patients experience a return of serratus anterior function with conservative treatment, but recovery may take as many as 2 years. Bracing often is tolerated poorly. Patients with severe symptoms in whom 12 months of conservative treatment has failed may benefit from surgical reconstruction. Although many surgical procedures have been described, the current preferred treatment is transfer of the sternal head of the pectoralis major tendon to the inferior angle of the scapula reinforced with fascia or tendon autograft. Many series have shown good to excellent results, with consistent improvement in function, elimination of winging, and reduction of pain.

  15. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at ...

  16. Posterior cruciate ligament removal contributes to abnormal knee motion during posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cromie, Melinda J; Siston, Robert A; Giori, Nicholas J; Delp, Scott L

    2008-11-01

    Abnormal anterior translation of the femur on the tibia has been observed in mid flexion (20-60 degrees ) following posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty. The underlying biomechanical causes of this abnormal motion remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to isolate the effects of posterior cruciate ligament removal on knee motion after total knee arthroplasty. We posed two questions: Does removing the posterior cruciate ligament introduce abnormal anterior femoral translation? Does implanting a posterior stabilized prosthesis change the kinematics from the cruciate deficient case? Using a navigation system, we measured passive knee kinematics of ten male osteoarthritic patients during surgery after initial exposure, after removing the anterior cruciate ligament, after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and after implanting the prosthesis. Passively flexing and extending the knee, we calculated anterior femoral translation and the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Removing the posterior cruciate ligament doubled anterior translation (from 5.1 +/- 4.3 mm to 10.4 +/- 5.1 mm) and increased the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began (from 31.2 +/- 9.6 degrees to 49.3 +/- 7.3 degrees). Implanting the prosthesis increased the amount of anterior translation (to 16.1 +/- 4.4 mm), and did not change the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Abnormal anterior translation was observed in low and mid flexion (0-60 degrees) after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and normal motion was not restored by the posterior stabilized prosthesis.

  17. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  18. Fundus autofluorescence imaging in posterior uveitis.

    PubMed

    Durrani, Khayyam; Foster, C Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Although the phenomenon of fundus autofluorescence has been known for decades, it has only recently been recognized as a measure of retinal pigment epithelial function and health. Characteristic fundus autofluorescence patterns have been described in eyes affected by inflammation of the posterior segment, and these patterns have provided insights into the pathogenesis of posterior uveitis entities. In addition, preliminary data indicate that fundus autofluorescence characteristics may serve as markers of disease activity, allow prediction of visual prognosis, and may help determine the adequacy of therapy. We provide an overview of the current state of fundus autofluorescence imaging technology and review our current knowledge of fundus autoflourescence findings and their clinical use in the posterior uveitis entities.

  19. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  20. Nerve glue for upper extremity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tse, Raymond; Ko, Jason H

    2012-11-01

    Nerve glue is an attractive alternative to sutures to improve the results of nerve repair. Improved axon alignment, reduced scar and inflammation, greater and faster reinnervation, and better functional results have been reported with the use of nerve glue. The different types of nerve glue and the evidence to support or oppose their use are reviewed. Although the ideal nerve glue has yet to be developed, fibrin sealants can be used as nerve glue in select clinical situations. Technology to allow suture-free nerve repair is one development that can potentially improve functional nerve recovery and the outcomes of upper extremity reconstruction.

  1. Reversible cortical blindness: posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Mondal, Kanchan Kumar; Das, Somnath; Gupta, Anindya; Biswas, Jaya; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Biswas, Gautam

    2010-11-01

    Cortical blindness is defined as visual failure with preserved pupillary reflexes in structurally intact eyes due to bilateral lesions affecting occipital cortex. Bilateral oedema and infarction of the posterior and middle cerebral arterial territory, trauma, glioma and meningioma of the occipital cortex are the main causes of cortical blindness. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) refers to the reversible subtype of cortical blindness and is usually associated with hypertension, diabetes, immunosuppression, puerperium with or without eclampsia. Here, 3 cases of PRES with complete or partial visual recovery following treatment in 6-month follow-up are reported.

  2. Posterior cortical atrophy: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, Howard S; Lavin, Patrick J M

    2006-11-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a striking clinical syndrome in which a dementing illness begins with visual symptoms. Initially, the problem may seem to be loss of elementary vision, but over time the patient develops features of visual agnosia, topographical difficulty, optic ataxia, simultanagnosia, ocular apraxia (Balint's syndrome), alexia, acalculia, right-left confusion, and agraphia (Gerstmann's syndrome), and later a more generalized dementia. Occasional patients have visual hallucinations and signs of Parkinson's disease or Lewy body dementia. A number of different neuropathologic disorders are associated with posterior cortical atrophy.

  3. Topography of Synchronization of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials Elicited by Stimulation of the Sciatic Nerve in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xuefeng; Yan, Jiaqing; Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Peixun; Liu, Xianzeng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Traditionally, the topography of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) is generated based on amplitude and latency. However, this operation focuses on the physical morphology and field potential-power, so it suffers from difficulties in performing identification in an objective manner. In this study, measurement of the synchronization of SEPs is proposed as a method to explore brain functional networks as well as the plasticity after peripheral nerve injury. Method: SEPs elicited by unilateral sciatic nerve stimulation in twelve adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in the normal group were compared with SEPs evoked after unilateral sciatic nerve hemisection in four peripheral nerve injured SD rats. The characterization of synchronized networks from SEPs was conducted using equal-time correlation, correlation matrix analysis, and comparison to randomized surrogate data. Eigenvalues of the correlation matrix were used to identify the clusters of functionally synchronized neuronal activity, and the participation index (PI) was calculated to indicate the involvement of each channel in the cluster. The PI value at the knee point of the PI histogram was used as a threshold to demarcate the cortical boundary. Results: Ten out of the twelve normal rats showed only one synchronized brain network. The remaining two normal rats showed one strong and one weak network. In the peripheral nerve injured group, only one synchronized brain network was found in each rat. In the normal group, all network shapes appear regular and the network is largely contained in the posterior cortex. In the injured group, the network shapes appear irregular, the network extends anteriorly and posteriorly, and the network area is significantly larger. There are considerable individual variations in the shape and location of the network after peripheral nerve injury. Conclusion: The proposed method can detect functional brain networks. Compared to the results of the traditional SEP

  4. Lumbosacral nerve root avulsion.

    PubMed

    Chin, C H; Chew, K C

    1997-01-01

    Lumbosacral nerve root avulsion is a rare clinical entity. Since the first description in 1955, only 35 cases have been reported. It is often associated with pelvic fractures and may be missed in the initial clinical examination as these patients usually present with multiple injuries. We present three such cases with clinical and radiological findings. These patients were involved in road traffic accidents. Two had fractures of the sacroiliac joint with diastasis of the symphysis pubis (Tile type C 1.2) and one had fractures of the public rami (Tile type B 2.1). All three had various degrees of sensory and motor deficit of the lower limbs. Lumbar myelogram shows characteristic pseudomeningoceles in the affected lumboscral region. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides an additional non-invasive modality to diagnose this condition.

  5. Posterior-Only Circumferential Decompression and Reconstruction in the Surgical Management of Lumbar Vertebral Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z.; Caridi, John; Cho, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The purpose of this report is to discuss the surgical management of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and present a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with instrumentation using an expandable titanium cage and without segmental nerve root sacrifice as an option in the treatment of this disease process. Methods We report a 42-year-old man who presented with 3 days of low back pain and chills who rapidly decompensated with severe sepsis following admission. Magnetic resonance imaging of his lumbosacral spine revealed intramuscular abscesses of the left paraspinal musculature and iliopsoas with SEA and L4 vertebral body involvement. The patient failed maximal medical treatment, which necessitated surgical treatment as a last resort for infectious source control. He underwent a previously undescribed procedure in the setting of SEA: a single-stage, posterior-only approach for circumferential decompression and reconstruction of the L4 vertebral body with posterior segmental instrumented fixation. Results After the surgery, the patient's condition gradually improved; however, he suffered a wound dehiscence necessitating a surgical exploration and deep wound debridement. Six months after the surgery, the patient underwent a revision surgery for adjacent-level pseudarthrosis. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and off narcotic pain medication and had returned to full activity. Conclusion This patient is the first reported case of lumbar osteomyelitis with SEA treated surgically with a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation. Although this approach is more technically challenging, it presents another viable option for the treatment of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis that may reduce the morbidity associated with an anterior approach. PMID:26835214

  6. Posterior-Only Circumferential Decompression and Reconstruction in the Surgical Management of Lumbar Vertebral Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Caridi, John; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The purpose of this report is to discuss the surgical management of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and present a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with instrumentation using an expandable titanium cage and without segmental nerve root sacrifice as an option in the treatment of this disease process. Methods We report a 42-year-old man who presented with 3 days of low back pain and chills who rapidly decompensated with severe sepsis following admission. Magnetic resonance imaging of his lumbosacral spine revealed intramuscular abscesses of the left paraspinal musculature and iliopsoas with SEA and L4 vertebral body involvement. The patient failed maximal medical treatment, which necessitated surgical treatment as a last resort for infectious source control. He underwent a previously undescribed procedure in the setting of SEA: a single-stage, posterior-only approach for circumferential decompression and reconstruction of the L4 vertebral body with posterior segmental instrumented fixation. Results After the surgery, the patient's condition gradually improved; however, he suffered a wound dehiscence necessitating a surgical exploration and deep wound debridement. Six months after the surgery, the patient underwent a revision surgery for adjacent-level pseudarthrosis. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and off narcotic pain medication and had returned to full activity. Conclusion This patient is the first reported case of lumbar osteomyelitis with SEA treated surgically with a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation. Although this approach is more technically challenging, it presents another viable option for the treatment of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis that may reduce the morbidity associated with an anterior approach.

  7. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Sunita; Lee, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSMs) grow slowly and, if untreated, patients may have stable visual function for up to several years. Treatment of an ONSM may lead to vision loss (radiation retinopathy or optic neuropathy). Therefore, observation is recommended for a patient with ONSM and relatively preserved visual acuity, color vision, pupils, and visual fields. Follow-up every 4 to 6 months initially is recommended extending to annual examinations if visual function and tumor size remain stable for a few years. Neuroimaging can be repeated every 12 months. An undisputed decline in visual function or any intracranial extension warrants treatment of the ONSM. The treatment of choice for a tumor confined to the orbit is stereotactic fractionated radiation. Stereotactic fractionated radiation uses multiple small doses of radiation using tight margins. A reasonable alternative, three-dimensional conformal fractionated radiation uses computed tomography-guided planning but usually requires wider margins. Conventional radiation uses much wider margins and would not be recommended for treatment of ONSM. The radiation can be administered during 5 to 6 weeks in 28 daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy/fraction to a total of 50.4 to 56 Gy. Many patients have improvement or stabilization of their visual function. Gamma knife radiosurgery does not have a role in ONSM because the required dose is toxic to the optic nerve. A tumor that extends intracranially may be treated with fractionated radiation if any vision remains. Surgical excision can be considered for significant intracranial extension but this often leads to complete vision loss in the ipsilateral eye. A blind, disfigured eye also may be treated with en bloc surgical resection of the meningioma.

  8. [Post-traumatic infraorbital nerve neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Sakavicius, Dalius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2002-01-01

    The authors have investigated functional state of infraorbital nerve of 479 patients with zygomatic fractures. The degree of nerve damage was evaluated according to changes of pain threshold during damaged nerve stimulation. It was estimated that in 64.3% of zygomatic fractures the infraorbital nerve was affected. The nerve damage degree could be mild, moderate and severe. In 43.18% of moderate and severe nerve damage cases the neuropathy develops. The symptoms, signs and treatment of neuropathy have been described. The neuropathy with clinical symptoms as permanent soreness and paresthesias (itch, "running ant", fibrillations of cheek tissues etc.) in the infraorbital nerve innervation zone occur to 43.18% of the patients after moderate and severe damage of the nerve. The treatment of neuropathy was analysed. In cases of moderate and severe nerve damages, authors recommend to perform decompression of the nerve, because if not applied, the function of nerve does not recover.

  9. Treatment rationale of fractured posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, A R; Singh, I

    1978-11-01

    The four types of fractures most frequently encountered in posterior teeth--obliquely directed complete fractures, vertically directed complete fractures, obliquely directed incomplete fractures, and vertically directed incomplete fractures--have been described. A detailed treatment approach for each type has been presented.

  10. Posterior Predictive Model Checking in Bayesian Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    This simulation study compared the utility of various discrepancy measures within a posterior predictive model checking (PPMC) framework for detecting different types of data-model misfit in multidimensional Bayesian network (BN) models. The investigated conditions were motivated by an applied research program utilizing an operational complex…

  11. Posterior Probabilities for a Consensus Ordering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fligner, Michael A.; Verducci, Joseph S.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of consensus ordering is defined, and formulas for exact and approximate posterior probabilities for consensus ordering are developed under the assumption of a generalized Mallows' model with a diffuse conjugate prior. These methods are applied to a data set concerning 98 college students. (SLD)

  12. Complicated posterior capsulorhexis: aetiology, management, and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Van Cauwenberge, F.; Rakic, J.; Galand, A.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND—A 1 year retrospective analysis of 650 patients, who underwent a posterior capsulorhexis on their intact capsules, was performed to examine the incidence of complications, their aetiologies, and the outcome.
METHODS—Data were analysed on 32 patients with complicated capsulorhexis for type of surgery, preoperative and postoperative factors, and relative risk factors for vitreous issue.
RESULTS—There were six patients with vitreous loss. The posterior capsulorhexis was uncontrolled in 14 cases and difficult to perform in 12 cases. Implantation into the capsular bag was possible in all cases. Systemic vascular hazard and old age (over 80 years) were found to be statistically significant risk factors for vitreous loss (p=0.002 and p=0.03 respectively). The mean follow up was 13.5 months (range 4-25 months). One patient developed a retinal detachment and two had a transient clinical cystoid macular oedema. Visual acuity of ≥ 20/40 was obtained in 93% of the patients.
CONCLUSION—Loss of control of the posterior capsulorhexis has a low incidence but can lead to serious problems during surgery. A good knowledge of the technique is necessary to complete the procedure with a posterior capsulorhexis of the optimum size without vitreous loss.

 PMID:9135382

  13. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  14. Fuchs's heterochromic cyclitis and posterior capsulotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, T J; Coster, D J

    1985-01-01

    We report a case of intractable glaucoma following an uncomplicated secondary posterior capsulotomy in a 48-year-old male with Fuchs's heterochromic cyclitis. The patient had been free of inflammation and glaucoma since cataract extraction 27 years previously. We also report the results of phenotypic analysis of lymphocytes removed from the anterior chamber. Images PMID:3859323

  15. Posterior dislocation of the shoulder in athletes.

    PubMed

    Samilson, R L; Prieto, V

    1983-07-01

    Although posterior dislocation of the shoulder is a rare injury in athletes, failure to recognize and properly manage acute dislocation may have serious consequences. The article discusses the incidence, mechanism of injury, classification, pathologic findings, clinical and radiologic diagnosis, and management.

  16. [Auriculo temporal nerve. Neuroanatomic bases of the Frey's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Decuadro-Sáenz, G; Castro, G; Sorrenti, N; Doassans, I; Deleon, S; Salle, F; Saibene, A; Santamaría, A; Pérez-Brignani, A; Soria-Vargas, V R

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to precise the relationships of the auriculotemporal nerve in the infratemporal and parotid regions. We realized micro-dissections of thirty-two infratemporal and parotid regions of human cadaver's formol-fixed. The pattern of origin was: one root: 15.4%, two roots: 73.1%, three roots: 11.5%. In all cases, the lateral root present the major diameter (2-2.5 mm). In those cases with two roots, these formed a neural loop round the middle meningeal artery in the 89.4% of the cases. The origin of the medial root was the posterior border of the inferior alveolar nerve. The median distance between the lateral root and the temporomandibular joint capsule was 1.5 mm, with asymmetric pattern: right: 2 mm (rank: 0-7 mm; ED: 1.90 mm); left: 1.25 mm (rank: 0-3 mm; ED: 0.88 mm). In 10 cases (31.3%) the lateral root was in direct contact with the articular capsule, with asymmetric pattern: left: 46.1%; right: 21%. The median distance between the superior aspect of the articular disk and the trunk of the auriculotemporal nerve in the posterior aspect of the temporomandibular joint was 10,5 mm (ED: 4.06 mm), with asymmetric pattern: right: 9 mm (rank: 5-18.0 mm; ED: 3.70 mm); left: 11.0 mm (rank: 3.0-20 mm; ED: 4.41 mm). We discussed the rol of this findings in the etiology of the Frey's syndrome.

  17. Anesthetic efficacy of lidocaine/meperidine for inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Bigby, Jason; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, single-blind study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of lidocaine with epinephrine to lidocaine plus meperidine with epinephrine for inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IAN) in patients with mandibular posterior teeth experiencing irreversible pulpitis. Forty-eight emergency patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth randomly received, in a single-blind manner, 36 mg of lidocaine with 18 mug epinephrine or 36 mg of lidocaine with 18 mug of epinephrine plus 36 mg meperidine with 18 mug epinephrine, using a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block. Endodontic access was begun 15 minutes after solution deposition, and all patients were required to have profound lip numbness. Success was defined as no or mild pain (visual analog scale recordings) upon endodontic access or initial instrumentation. The success rate for the inferior alveolar nerve block using the lidocaine solution was 26%, and for the lidocaine/meperidine solution, the success rate was 12%. There was no significant difference (p = 0.28) between the two solutions. In conclusion, for mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis, the addition of 36 mg of meperidine to a lidocaine solution administered in a conventional IAN block did not improve the success rate over a standard lidocaine solution.

  18. Gustatory responses of the mouse chorda tympani nerve vary based on region of tongue stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dana, Rachel M; McCaughey, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Different parts of the mouth vary in their taste responsiveness and gustatory transduction components. However, there have been few attempts to consider regional variation among areas innervated by a single nerve branch or containing only one type of gustatory papilla. Here, we examined whether taste-elicited responses of a single nerve, the chorda tympani (CT), depend on where taste solutions are delivered on the tongue in mice. In experiment 1, multiunit CT responses to NaCl and sucrose were larger if sapid taste solutions were applied to the tongue tip, which contains the anterior-most fungiform papillae, than if they were flowed over fungiform and foliate papillae on the posterior tongue. Further, the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) blocker amiloride suppressed NaCl responses to a greater degree for the tongue tip. In experiment 2, CT nerve responses were compared between the tongue tip and a region further back that contained only fungiform papillae. NaCl and sucrose solutions applied to posterior fungiform papillae produced smaller responses than did those elicited by the same taste stimuli applied to anterior fungiform papillae on the tongue tip. Amiloride suppressed the response to NaCl delivered to the anterior fungiform but not posterior fungiform papillae. These results indicate that the CT response is tongue-region dependent in the mouse. Furthermore, the spatial location of a fungiform papilla provides important information about its properties, such as whether sodium taste transduction is mediated by amiloride-sensitive ENaCs.

  19. Nanofibrous nerve conduit-enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xu; Mi, Ruifa; Hoke, Ahmet; Chew, Sing Yian

    2014-05-01

    Fibre structures represent a potential class of materials for the formation of synthetic nerve conduits due to their biomimicking architecture. Although the advantages of fibres in enhancing nerve regeneration have been demonstrated, in vivo evaluation of fibre size effect on nerve regeneration remains limited. In this study, we analyzed the effects of fibre diameter of electrospun conduits on peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15-mm critical defect gap in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. By using an electrospinning technique, fibrous conduits comprised of aligned electrospun poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) microfibers (981 ± 83 nm, Microfiber) or nanofibers (251 ± 32 nm, Nanofiber) were obtained. At three months post implantation, axons regenerated across the defect gap in all animals that received fibrous conduits. In contrast, complete nerve regeneration was not observed in the control group that received empty, non-porous PCL film conduits (Film). Nanofiber conduits resulted in significantly higher total number of myelinated axons and thicker myelin sheaths compared to Microfiber and Film conduits. Retrograde labeling revealed a significant increase in number of regenerated dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons in the presence of Nanofiber conduits (1.93 ± 0.71 × 10(3) vs. 0.98 ± 0.30 × 10(3) in Microfiber, p < 0.01). In addition, the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were higher and distal motor latency values were lower in the Nanofiber conduit group compared to the Microfiber group. This study demonstrated the impact of fibre size on peripheral nerve regeneration. These results could provide useful insights for future nerve guide designs.

  20. Unusual insidious spinal accessory nerve palsy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Isolated spinal accessory nerve dysfunction has a major detrimental impact on the functional performance of the shoulder girdle, and is a well-documented complication of surgical procedures in the posterior triangle of the neck. To the best of our knowledge, the natural course and the most effective way of handling spontaneous spinal accessory nerve palsy has been described in only a few instances in the literature. Case presentation We report the case of a 36-year-old Caucasian, Greek man with spontaneous unilateral trapezius palsy with an insidious course. To the best of our knowledge, few such cases have been documented in the literature. The unusual clinical presentation and functional performance mismatch with the imaging findings were also observed. Our patient showed a deterioration that was different from the usual course of this pathology, with an early onset of irreversible trapezius muscle dysfunction two months after the first clinical signs started to manifest. A surgical reconstruction was proposed as the most efficient treatment, but our patient declined this. Although he failed to recover fully after conservative treatment for eight months, he regained moderate function and is currently virtually pain-free. Conclusion Clinicians have to be aware that due to anatomical variation and the potential for compensation by the levator scapulae, the clinical consequences of any injury to the spinal accessory nerve may vary. PMID:20507553

  1. Solitary fibrous tumour of the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Scholsem, Martin; Scholtes, Felix

    2012-04-01

    We describe the complete removal of a foramen magnum solitary fibrous tumour in a 36-year-old woman. It originated on a caudal vagus nerve rootlet, classically described as the 'cranial' accessory nerve root. This ninth case of immunohistologically confirmed cranial or spinal nerve SFT is the first of the vagus nerve.

  2. The anatomical relationship between the position of the auriculotemporal nerve and mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Paulo R B; de Vasconsellos, Henrique A; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Bastos, Ricardo L; Maia, Mey L T

    2003-07-01

    Head, neck, face, and ear pains are commonly associated with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Several theories have been proposed regarding the functional relationship of the TMJ and the associated structures, and how they might contribute to certain painful conditions. This study was conducted to determine the anatomic relationship of the auriculotemporal nerve to the middle meningeal artery and the mandibular condyle. Forty human cadaver temporomandibular joints were dissected to locate the precise position of the auriculotemporal nerve to the mandibular condyle. The study findings revealed a significant variation in the relationship of the auriculotemporal nerve to the middle meningeal artery. The auriculotemporal nerve was found to be between 10-13 mm inferior to the superior surface of the condyle and 1-2 mm posterior to the neck of the condyle. The nerve was not found to be in a position that would likely create an entrapment with adjacent tissues. These findings may assist the clinician to locate the most appropriate injection site for an auriculotemporal nerve block.

  3. Delayed Presentation of Sciatic Nerve Injury after Total Hip Arthroplasty: Neurosurgical Considerations, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linda W.; Veeravagu, Anand; Azad, Tej D.; Harraher, Ciara; Ratliff, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Background  Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an established treatment for end-stage arthritis, congenital deformity, and trauma with good long-term clinical and functional outcomes. Delayed sciatic nerve injury is a rare complication after THA that requires prompt diagnosis and management. Methods  We present a case of sciatic nerve motor and sensory deficit in a 52-year-old patient 2 years after index left THA. Electromyography (EMG) results and imaging with radiographs and CT of the affected hip demonstrated an aberrant acetabular cup screw in the posterior-inferior quadrant adjacent to the sciatic nerve. Case Description  The patient underwent surgical exploration that revealed injury to the peroneal division of the sciatic nerve due to direct injury from screw impingement. A literature review identified 11 patients with late-onset neuropathy after THA. Ten patients underwent surgical exploration and pain often resolved after surgery with 56% of patients recovering sensory function and 25% experiencing full recovery of motor function. Conclusions  Delayed neuropathy of the sciatic nerve is a rare complication after THA that is most often due to hardware irritation, component failure, or wear-related pseudotumor formation. Operative intervention is often pursued to explore and directly visualize the nerve with limited results in the literature showing modest relief of pain and sensory symptoms and poor restoration of motor function. PMID:27602309

  4. Effect of Penetrating Keratoplasty and Keratoprosthesis Implantation on the Posterior Segment of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Črnej, Alja; Omoto, Masahiro; Dohlman, Thomas H.; Gonzalez-Andrades, Miguel; Paschalis, Eleftherios I.; Cruzat, Andrea; Vu, T. H. Khanh; Doorenbos, Marianne; Chen, Dong Feng; Dohlman, Claes H.; Dana, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effects of post-penetrating keratoplasty (PK) and post-keratoprosthesis (KPro) surgery-related inflammation on the posterior segment of the eye and to assess inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) on these effects. Methods BALB/C (syngeneic) or C57BL/6 (allogeneic) corneas were transplanted onto BALB/C host beds as part of PK or miniature KPro (m-KPro) implantation. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured via an intracameral pressure sensor; tissues were harvested and analyzed 8 weeks after surgery. Expression of TNFα and IL-1β in the retina was analyzed using real-time quantitative (q)PCR. Optic nerve degeneration (axon count, circularity, and area) was assessed quantitatively using ImageJ software. After m-KPro implantation, mice were treated with saline, anti-TNFα, or anti-IL-1β antibody, and axonal loss was assessed after 10 weeks. Results Mean IOP was within normal limits in the operated and fellow eyes in all groups. The mRNA expression of TNFα and IL-1β was highest in m-KPro groups with either syngeneic or an allogeneic carrier. We observed optic nerve degeneration in both allogeneic PK and m-KPro implanted eyes with an allogeneic carrier. However, TNFα blockade significantly reduced axonal loss by 35%. Conclusions Allogeneic PK and m-KPro implants with an allogeneic carrier lead to chronic inflammation in the posterior segment of the eye, resulting in optic nerve degeneration. In addition, blockade of TNFα prevents axonal degeneration in this preclinical model of allogeneic m-KPro (alloKPro) implantation. PMID:27054516

  5. Surgical management of painful peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Elliot, David

    2014-07-01

    This article deals with the classification, assessment, and management of painful nerves of the distal upper limb. The author's preferred surgical and rehabilitation techniques in managing these conditions are discussed in detail and include (1) relocation of end-neuromas to specific sites, (2) division and relocation of painful nerves in continuity (neuromas-in-continuity and scar-tethered nerves) involving small nerves to the same sites, and (3) fascial wrapping of painful nerves in continuity involving larger nerves such as the median and ulnar nerves. The results of these treatments are presented as justification for current use of these techniques.

  6. Overview of Optic Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... where the problem is in the pathway. Visual Pathways and the Consequences of Damage Nerve signals travel ... eyes. Damage to an eye or the visual pathway causes different types of vision loss depending on ...

  7. Nerve entrapment and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sud, Vipul

    2002-01-01

    Peripheral entrapment neuropathy is a common cause of upper-extremity pain, paresthesias, and weakness. Although any of the major nerves can be affected, compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel is the commonest site of clinically significant nerve compression. Etiologically, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has numerous causes, but the idiopathic group greatly outnumbers the rest. Moreover, the pathophysiology of CTS patients claiming work-related repetitive hand motion as a basis for their disorder has been the subject of intensive study because of its economic ramifications for industry. CTS can serve as a model for reviewing the pathophysiology and biochemical changes of the nerve and its exterior milieu at the cellular level, as well as the possibilities of modifying these changes at the molecular level.

  8. Schwannomatosis of Cervical Vagus Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical vagal schwannoma is a rare entity among lesions presenting as a neck mass. They are usually slow-growing benign lesions closely associated with the vagus nerve. They are usually solitary and asymptomatic. Multiple schwannomas occurring in patients without neurofibromatosis (NF) are rare and have recently been referred to as schwannomatosis. Here, we present a case of a neck mass that had imaging features suggestive of vagal schwannoma and was operated upon. Intraoperatively, it was discovered to be a case of multiple vagal cervical schwannoma, all directly related to the right vagus nerve, and could be resected from the nerve in toto preserving the function of the vagus nerve. Final HPR confirmed our pre-op suspicion of vagal schwannomatosis. PMID:27807496

  9. Corticotropin releasing factor excites neurons of posterior hypothalamic nucleus to produce tachycardia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, He-Ren; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; Li, Bin; Li, Hong-Zhao; Chen, Zhang-Peng; Wang, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Jing-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), a peptide hormone involved in the stress response, holds a key position in cardiovascular regulation. Here, we report that the central effect of CRF on cardiovascular activities is mediated by the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH), an important structure responsible for stress-induced cardiovascular changes. Our present results demonstrate that CRF directly excites PH neurons via two CRF receptors, CRFR1 and CRFR2, and consequently increases heart rate (HR) rather than the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Bilateral vagotomy does not influence the tachycardia response to microinjection of CRF into the PH, while β adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol almost totally abolishes the tachycardia. Furthermore, microinjecting CRF into the PH primarily increases neuronal activity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and rostral ventromedial medulla (RVMM), but does not influence that of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV). These findings suggest that the PH is a critical target for central CRF system in regulation of cardiac activity and the PH-RVLM/RVMM-cardiac sympathetic nerve pathways, rather than PH-DMNV-vagus pathway, may contribute to the CRF-induced tachycardia. PMID:26831220

  10. Corticotropin releasing factor excites neurons of posterior hypothalamic nucleus to produce tachycardia in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, He-Ren; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; Li, Bin; Li, Hong-Zhao; Chen, Zhang-Peng; Wang, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Jing-Ning

    2016-02-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), a peptide hormone involved in the stress response, holds a key position in cardiovascular regulation. Here, we report that the central effect of CRF on cardiovascular activities is mediated by the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH), an important structure responsible for stress-induced cardiovascular changes. Our present results demonstrate that CRF directly excites PH neurons via two CRF receptors, CRFR1 and CRFR2, and consequently increases heart rate (HR) rather than the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Bilateral vagotomy does not influence the tachycardia response to microinjection of CRF into the PH, while β adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol almost totally abolishes the tachycardia. Furthermore, microinjecting CRF into the PH primarily increases neuronal activity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and rostral ventromedial medulla (RVMM), but does not influence that of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV). These findings suggest that the PH is a critical target for central CRF system in regulation of cardiac activity and the PH-RVLM/RVMM-cardiac sympathetic nerve pathways, rather than PH-DMNV-vagus pathway, may contribute to the CRF-induced tachycardia.

  11. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    regeneration using our approach with an acellular nerve allograft to be equivalent to standard autograft repair in rodent models. An ongoing large animal ...be clinically acceptable for use in the animal studies in Aim 2. The anatomy of HAM is shown pictorially in Figure 7. In vivo, the epithelial...product. Given that the large animal studies with large caliber nerves in Aim 3 will use AxoGuard we feel that the single layer SIS material is totally

  12. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    around the nerve ends performed following application of 0.1% Rose Bengal dye in saline to wrap and epineurium with illumination at 532 nm. The HAM...results obtained with the three fixation methods under study (a) epineurial suture, (b) fibrin glue and (c) photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) with a...wrap material. All methods induced bonding between the nerve segments with bond strength in the order of suture>PTB> fibrin glue. Conventional

  13. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    performed following application of 0.1% Rose Bengal dye in saline to wrap and epineurium with illumination at 532 nm. The HAM wrap/nerve sample was then...the three fixation methods under study (a) epineurial suture, (b) fibrin glue and (c) photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) with a wrap material. All...methods induced bonding between the nerve segments with bond strength in the order of suture>PTB> fibrin glue. Conventional epineurial suturing using

  14. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    harvested from donor rats immediately post-euthanasia (Task 1g) and bonding of the wrap around the nerve ends performed following application of 0.1...a) epineurial suture, (b) fibrin glue and (c) photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) with a wrap material. All methods induced bonding between the nerve...segments with bond strength in the order of suture>PTB> fibrin glue. Conventional epineurial suturing using six 10.0 nylon sutures resulted in the

  15. Brain imaging signatures of the relationship between epidermal nerve fibers and heat pain perception.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Kong, Yazhuo; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2015-11-15

    Although the small-diameter primary afferent fibers in the skin promptly respond to nociceptive stimuli and convey sensory inputs to the central nervous system, the neural signatures that underpin the relationship between cutaneous afferent fibers and pain perception remain elusive. We combined skin biopsy at the lateral aspect of the distal leg, which is used to quantify cutaneous afferent fibers, with fMRI, which is used to assess brain responses and functional connectivity, to investigate the relationship between cutaneous sensory nerves and the corresponding pain perception in the brain after applying heat pain stimulation to the dorsum of the right foot in healthy subjects. During painful stimulation, the degree of cutaneous innervation, as measured by epidermal nerve fiber density, was correlated with individual blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the posterior insular cortex and of the thalamus, periaqueductal gray, and rostral ventromedial medulla. Pain perception was associated with the activation of the anterior insular cortex and with the functional connectivity from the anterior insular cortex to the primary somatosensory cortex during painful stimulation. Most importantly, both epidermal nerve fiber density and activity in the posterior insular cortex showed a positive correlation with the strength of coupling under pain between the anterior insular cortex and the primary somatosensory cortex. Thus, our findings support the notion that the neural circuitry subserving pain perception interacts with the cerebral correlates of peripheral nociceptive fibers, which implicates an indirect role for skin nerves in human pain perception.

  16. Posterior Wnts Have Distinct Roles in Specification and Patterning of the Planarian Posterior Region

    PubMed Central

    Sureda-Gómez, Miquel; Pascual-Carreras, Eudald; Adell, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The wnt signaling pathway is an intercellular communication mechanism essential in cell-fate specification, tissue patterning and regional-identity specification. A βcatenin-dependent signal specifies the AP (Anteroposterior) axis of planarians, both during regeneration of new tissues and during normal homeostasis. Accordingly, four wnts (posterior wnts) are expressed in a nested manner in central and posterior regions of planarians. We have analyzed the specific role of each posterior wnt and the possible cooperation between them in specifying and patterning planarian central and posterior regions. We show that each posterior wnt exerts a distinct role during re-specification and maintenance of the central and posterior planarian regions, and that the integration of the different wnt signals (βcatenin dependent and independent) underlies the patterning of the AP axis from the central region to the tip of the tail. Based on these findings and data from the literature, we propose a model for patterning the planarian AP axis. PMID:26556349

  17. Analgesic Efficacy and Technique of Ultrasound-Guided Suprascapular Nerve Catheters after Shoulder Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Elsharkawy, Hesham A.; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Cummings, Kenneth C.; Soliman, Loran Mounir

    2014-01-01

    Background Conventional approaches to brachial plexus blocks may not cover the suprascapular nerve. Accordingly, after shoulder arthroscopy, sensation from the posterior part of the shoulder is commonly spared. Most previous research involving suprascapular nerve blocks described single-injection techniques. However, with the widespread availability and fairly reasonable cost of disposable infusion pumps, continuous catheter techniques provide a more appealing method of prolonging postoperative analgesia. Case Report We describe 2 patients who were successfully treated with ultrasound-guided continuous suprascapular nerve catheters. With the patient seated, a high-frequency linear ultrasound probe was used. Both patients experienced excellent pain relief without complications. Conclusion Continuous suprascapular catheter techniques provide good pain relief and improve postoperative analgesia after shoulder arthroscopy. PMID:24940138

  18. [Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Sports].

    PubMed

    Tettenborn, B; Mehnert, S; Reuter, I

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries due to sports are relatively rare but the exact incidence is not known due to a lack of epidemiological studies. Particular sports activities tend to cause certain peripheral nerve injuries including direct acute compression or stretching, repetitive compression and stretching over time, or another mechanism such as ischemia or laceration. These nerve lesions may be severe and delay or preclude the athlete's return to sports, especially in cases with delayed diagnosis. Repetitive and vigorous use or overuse makes the athlete vulnerable to disorders of the peripheral nerves, and sports equipment may cause compression of the nerves. Depending on etiology, the treatment is primarily conservative and includes physiotherapy, modification of movements and sports equipment, shoe inserts, splinting, antiphlogistic drugs, sometimes local administration of glucocorticoids or, lately, the use of extracorporeal shock waves. Most often, cessation of the offending physical activity is necessary. Surgery is only indicated in the rare cases of direct traumatic nerve injury or when symptoms are refractory to conservative therapy. Prognosis mainly depends on the etiology and the available options of modifying measures.This article is based on the publications "Reuter I, Mehnert S. Engpasssyndrome peripherer Nerven bei Sportlern". Akt Neurol 2012;39:292-308 and Sportverl Sportschad 2013;27:130-146.

  19. [Damage to the inguino-femoral nerves in the treatment of hernias. An anatomical hazard of traditional and laparoscopic techniques].

    PubMed

    Chevallier, J M; Wind, P; Lassau, J P

    1996-01-01

    Laparoscopic techniques currently constitute an alternative proposed for the repair of hernias of the inguinofemoral region. Nerve injuries have led some teams to recommend technical principles based on the anatomical relations of these nerves with the subperitoneal fascia transversalis and inguinal fossae. An anatomical study consisting of dissection of nonembalmed cadavres, allowed, after evisceration, dissection of the lumbar plexus and its terminal branches, particularly those supplying the inguinofemoral region: iliohypogastric and ilio-inguinal nerves, the genitofemoral nerve, the femoral nerve and the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh. Via transperitoneal laparoscopy, the posterior surface of the anterior abdominal wall is centered on the deep inguinal ring, containing testicular vessels and the vas deferens. This deep inguinal ring receives the genitofemoral nerve. Medially, the anterior parietal peritoneum describes three folds formed by the outline of the epigastric artery, umbilical artery and urachus on the midline. The outline of Hesselbach's ligament separates the deep inguinal ring from Hesselbach's triangle, the zone of weakness of direct inguinal hernia. The iliac psoas muscle pass laterally underneath the inguinal ligament, while the external iliac vessels, subsequently becoming the femoral vessels, are located medially. Pectineal ligament lies on the posterior surface of the femoral ring between the umbilical artery and the epigastric artery. Installation of an abdominal wall prosthesis, either transperitoneally or retroperitoneally, must be centered on the deep inguinal ring, and its solid sutures are located medially to the pectineal ligament and anterior abdominal wall. On the other hand, the nerves at risk of being damaged are situated laterally: the ilio-inguinal and ilio-hypogastric nerves in the plane between external oblique and internal oblique above the anterior superior iliac spine, lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh under the

  20. Multiple muscular variations including tenuissimus and tensor fasciae suralis muscles in the posterior thigh of a human case.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Takamitsu; Kondo, Takahiro; Tsutsumi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yuko; Terashima, Toshio; Miki, Akinori

    2017-03-07

    The posterior thigh muscles on the right side of an 81-year-old male cadaver had multiple variations, denoted muscles I-IV. Muscle I originated from the posteromedial surface of the greater trochanter and divided into two muscle bellies. These muscle bellies fused with the long head of the biceps femoris and were innervated by two branches from muscular branches of the semitendinosus and the long head of the biceps. Muscle II separated from the medial surface of the long head of the biceps in the proximal third and fused with the semitendinosus in the distal fourth. Muscle III was a biventer muscle. Its superior belly separated from the medial surface of the long head of the biceps in the distal third. The inferior belly of this muscle fused with the posterior surface of the crural fascia and was innervated by the tibial nerve. Muscle IV separated from the adductor magnus muscle, passed between the long and short heads of the biceps, fused with the inferior belly of muscle III, and was innervated by the muscular branch of the common fibular nerve to the short head of the biceps. Peeling off the epineurium of the muscular branches to the inferior belly of muscle III showed that this nerve fascicle divided from the common trunk with branches to the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. The inferior bellies of muscle III and muscle IV were thought to be equivalent to the tensor fasciae suralis and tenuissimus muscles, respectively.

  1. [Manual rotation of occiput posterior presentation].

    PubMed

    Le Ray, C; Goffinet, F

    2011-10-01

    Delivery in occiput posterior position is associated with a higher risk of cesarean section, operative vaginal delivery and severe perineal tears. We report the technic of manual rotation described by Tarnier and Chantreuil and used daily in our maternity center. Only five studies were published on this topic; all of them demonstrate that manual rotation decreases the risk of cesarean section. Moreover, it could decrease the risk of prolonged second stage, chorioamnionitis and third and fourth degree tears in comparison with expectant management. However, manual rotation is associated with a two-fold higher risk of cervical and vaginal lacerations. Manual rotation performed with an adequate technic is an efficient and safe manœuvre to avoid complications associated with occiput posterior vaginal delivery.

  2. Acute traumatic posterior elbow dislocation in children.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Justus; Zundel, Sabine M; Luithle, Tobias; Fuchs, Jörg; Kirschner, Hans-Joachim

    2012-09-01

    Traumatic posterior dislocation of the elbow is often associated with significant morbidity and incomplete recovery. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyse the outcome of 33 children (median age 10.8 years). Patients underwent reduction and assessment of stability under general anaesthesia. Pure dislocations (n=10) were immobilized, whereas unstable fractures (n=23) were stabilized. Refixation of ligaments was performed if stability was not achieved by fracture stabilization alone. Immobilization was continued for 26 (pure dislocations) or 35 days (associated injuries), respectively. Results were excellent (n=9) or good (n=1) after pure dislocation. Results were excellent (n=15), good (n=7) or poor (n=1) in children with associated injuries. Accurate diagnosis, concentric stable reduction of the elbow as well as stable osteosynthesis of displaced fractures are associated with good results in children with acute posterior elbow dislocations.

  3. [Anatomy of the pancreatic nerve plexuses and significance of their dissection].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Wataru; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2011-05-01

    Although various therapeutic modalities for carcinoma of the pancreas are available, curative resection is the most important. Thus, the aim of surgery for carcinoma of the pancreas is local complete resection of the carcinoma. All of the important pancreaticoduodenal arcades of arteries, veins, and nerves are situated on the fusion fascia of Treits. The pancreatic parenchyma, extrapancreatic nerve plexuses, superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and portal vein are also covered within the fusion fascia and exist in the same area. Carcinoma of the head of the pancreas invades through the pancreatic parenchyma, following the arteries, veins, and especially nerves between the parenchyma and fusion fascia, and then spreads horizontally toward the SMA or celiac axis. The entire dissected end of the nerve plexus should be investigated during surgery using frozen specimens and confirmed to be negative for cancer. If the dissected end is positive for cancer, additional resection of the nerve plexus should be performed to achieve curative resection. It is not possible to investigate thoroughly whether the dissected end of the nerve plexus is positive or negative for carcinoma after surgery, since the end may be long and some specimens may be deformed by formalin fixation; thus it is difficult to identify the true surgically dissected end. The pancreaticoduodenal artery arises from the left side of the SMA and divides into two arteries: jejunal artery 1; and the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA), which runs behind and transversely to the right of both the anterior and posterior IPDA. A common origin of the anterior and posterior IPDA is found in 80% of cases. The postoperative course of patients with pancreatic head carcinoma with invasion of the perineural plexuses immediately behind the SMA is not as good as in that of patients without cancerous invasion, even if additional resection is performed so that the dissected end is confirmed to be negative during surgery

  4. Progressive visual agnosia with posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, M; Sartori, G; Liccione, D; Battelli, L; Campo, R

    1996-05-01

    A patient of posterior cortical atrophy characterized by early signs of progressive visual agnosia documented by repeated neuropsychological tests, is reported. SPECT and MRI findings showed left unilateral parieto-occipital involvement in the earlier stage. A PET study executed eight months later showed bilateral parieto-occipital hypometabolism, but predominantly in the left hemisphere. This suggests that the degeneration may have developed asymmetrically, progressing from left unilateral to bilateral.

  5. Endoscopic posterior interhemispheric complete corpus callosotomy.

    PubMed

    Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi; Altinok, Deniz; Luat, Aimee

    2016-12-01

    Traditionally corpus callosotomy is done through a craniotomy centered at the coronal suture, with the aid of a microscope. This involves dissecting through the interhemispheric fissure below the falx to reach the corpus callosum. The authors describe a posterior interhemispheric approach to complete corpus callosotomy with an endoscope, which bypasses the need to perform interhemispheric dissection because the falx is generally close to the corpus callosum in this region.

  6. Material Properties of the Posterior Human Sclera☆

    PubMed Central

    Grytz, Rafael; Fazio, Massimo A.; Girard, Michael J.A.; Libertiaux, Vincent; Bruno, Luigi; Gardiner, Stuart; Girkin, Christopher A.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the material properties of posterior and peripapillary sclera from human donors, and to investigate the macro- and micro-scale strains as potential control mechanisms governing mechanical homeostasis. Posterior scleral shells from 9 human donors aged 57–90 years were subjected to IOP elevations from 5 to 45 mmHg and the resulting full-field displacements were recorded using laser speckle interferometry. Eye-specific finite element models were generated based on experimentally measured scleral shell surface geometry and thickness. Inverse numerical analyses were performed to identify material parameters for each eye by matching experimental deformation measurements to model predictions using a microstructure-based constitutive formulation that incorporates the crimp response and anisotropic architecture of scleral collagen fibrils. The material property fitting produced models that fit both the overall and local deformation responses of posterior scleral shells very well. The nonlinear stiffening of the sclera with increasing IOP was well reproduced by the uncrimping of scleral collagen fibrils, and a circumferentially-aligned ring of collagen fibrils around the scleral canal was predicted in all eyes. Macroscopic in-plane strains were significantly higher in peripapillary region then in the mid-periphery. In contrast, the meso- and micro-scale strains at the collagen network and collagen fibril level were not significantly different between regions. The elastic response of the posterior human sclera can be characterized by the anisotropic architecture and crimp response of scleral collagen fibrils. The similar collagen fibril strains in the peripapillary and mid-peripheral regions support the notion that the scleral collagen architecture including the circumpapillary ring of collagen fibrils evolved to establish optimal load bearing conditions at the collagen fibril level. PMID:23684352

  7. Iris fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses.

    PubMed

    Yazdani-Abyaneh, Alireza; Djalilian, Ali R; Fard, Masoud Aghsaei

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a technique for iris fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) in which most of the procedure is done outside the eye. This minimizes intraocular manipulation, maximizes corneal endothelial preservation, and avoids the risk for IOL drop into the vitreous cavity intraoperatively. The IOL is fixated to the most peripheral part of the iris, resulting in a rounder pupil. Sutures are placed at exact positions on the haptics, resulting in a well-centered IOL.

  8. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  9. C5 Nerve root palsies following cervical spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Hollingsworth, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical C5 nerve root palsies may occur in between 0% and 30% of routine anterior or posterior cervical spine operations. They are largely attributed to traction injuries/increased cord migration following anterior/posterior decompressions. Of interest, almost all studies cite spontaneous resolution of these deficits without surgery with 3–24 postoperative months. Methods: Different studies cite various frequencies for C5 root palsies following anterior or posterior cervical spine surgery. In their combined anterior/posterior series involving C4-C5 level decompressions, Libelski et al. cited up to a 12% incidence of C5 palsies. In Gu et al. series, C5 root palsies occurred in 3.1% of double-door laminoplasty, 4.5% of open-door laminoplasty, and 11.3% of laminectomy. Miller et al. observed an intermediate 6.9% frequency of C5 palsies followed by posterior cervical decompressions and fusions (PCDF). Results: Gu et al. also identified multiple risk factors for developing C5 palsies following posterior surgery; male gender, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), narrower foramina, laminectomy, and marked dorsal spinal cord drift. Miller et al. also identified an average $1918 increased cost for physical/occupational therapy for patients with C5 palsies. Conclusions: The incidence of C5 root deficits for anterior/posterior cervical surgery at C4-C5 was 12% in one series, and ranged up to 11.3% for laminectomies, while others cited 0–30%. Although identification of preoperative risk factors for C5 root deficits may help educate patients regarding these risks, there is no clear method for their avoidance at this time. PMID:26005577

  10. Platysma Motor Nerve Transfer for Restoring Marginal Mandibular Nerve Function

    PubMed Central

    Jensson, David; Weninger, Wolfgang J.; Schmid, Melanie; Meng, Stefan; Tzou, Chieh-Han John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Injuries of the marginal mandibular nerve (MMN) of the facial nerve result in paralysis of the lower lip muscle depressors and an asymmetrical smile. Nerve reconstruction, when possible, is the method of choice; however, in cases of long nerve gaps or delayed nerve reconstruction, conventional nerve repairs may be difficult to perform or may provide suboptimal outcomes. Herein, we investigate the anatomical technical feasibility of transfer of the platysma motor nerve (PMN) to the MMN for restoration of lower lip function, and we present a clinical case where this nerve transfer was successfully performed. Methods: Ten adult fresh cadavers were dissected. Measurements included the number of MMN and PMN branches, the maximal length of dissection of the PMN from the parotid, and the distance from the anterior border of the parotid to the facial artery. The PMN reach for direct coaptation to the MMN at the level of the crossing with the facial artery was assessed. We performed histomorphometric analysis of the MMN and PMN branches. Results: The anatomy of the MMN and PMN was consistent in all dissections, with an average number of subbranches of 1.5 for the MMN and 1.2 for the PMN. The average maximal length of dissection of the PMN was 46.5 mm, and in every case, tension-free coaptation with the MMN was possible. Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that the MMN contained an average of 3,866 myelinated fiber counts per millimeter, and the PMN contained 5,025. After a 3-year follow-up of the clinical case, complete recovery of MMN function was observed, without the need of central relearning and without functional or aesthetic impairment resulting from denervation of the platysma muscle. Conclusions: PMN to MMN transfer is an anatomically feasible procedure for reconstruction of isolated MMN injuries. In our patient, by direct nerve coaptation, a faster and full recovery of lower lip muscle depressors was achieved without the need of central

  11. Electrocardiographic diagnosis of remote posterior wall myocardial infarction using unipolar posterior lead V9

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, M.W.; Imburgia, M.; King, T.R.; Fischer, K.C.; Kovach, K.L. )

    1989-09-01

    The accuracy of four electrocardiographic criteria for diagnosing remote posterior myocardial infarction was assessed prospectively in 369 patients undergoing exercise treadmill testing with thallium scintigraphy. Criteria included the following: (1) R-wave width greater than or equal to 0.04 s and R-wave greater than or equal to S-wave in V1; (2) R-wave greater than or equal to S-wave in V2; (3) T-wave voltage in V2 minus V6 greater than or equal to 0.38 mV (T-wave index); (4) Q-wave greater than or equal to 0.04 s in left paraspinal lead V9. Twenty-seven patients (7.3 percent) met thallium criteria for posterior myocardial infarction, defined as a persistent perfusion defect in the posterobase of the left ventricle. Sensitivities for the four criteria ranged from 4 to 56 percent, and specificities ranged from 64 to 99 percent. Posterior paraspinal lead V9 provided the best overall predictive accuracy (94 percent), positive predictive value (58 percent), and ability to differentiate patients with and without posterior myocardial infarction of any single criterion (p less than .0001). Combining the T-wave index with lead V9 further enhanced the diagnostic yield: the sensitivity for detecting posterior infarction by at least one of these criteria was 78 percent, and when both criteria were positive, specificity was 98.5 percent. It is concluded that a single, unipolar posterior lead in the V9 position is superior to standard 12-lead electrocardiographic criteria in diagnosing remote posterior myocardial infarction, and that combining V9 with the T-wave index maximizes the diagnostic yield.

  12. Neurological Complications in Thyroid Surgery: A Surgical Point of View on Laryngeal Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Varaldo, Emanuela; Ansaldo, Gian Luca; Mascherini, Matteo; Cafiero, Ferdinando; Minuto, Michele N.

    2014-01-01

    The cervical branches of the vagus nerve that are pertinent to endocrine surgery are the superior and the inferior laryngeal nerves: their anatomical course in the neck places them at risk during thyroid surgery. The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EB) is at risk during thyroid surgery because of its close anatomical relationship with the superior thyroid vessels and the superior thyroid pole region. The rate of EB injury (which leads to the paralysis of the cricothyroid muscle) varies from 0 to 58%. The identification of the EB during surgery helps avoiding both an accidental transection and an excessive stretching. When the nerve is not identified, the ligation of superior thyroid artery branches close to the thyroid gland is suggested, as well as the abstention from an indiscriminate use of energy-based devices that might damage it. The inferior laryngeal nerve (RLN) runs in the tracheoesophageal groove toward the larynx, close to the posterior aspect of the thyroid. It is the main motor nerve of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles, and also provides sensory innervation to the larynx. Its injury finally causes the paralysis of the omolateral vocal cord and various sensory alterations: the symptoms range from mild to severe hoarseness, to acute airway obstruction, and swallowing impairment. Permanent lesions of the RNL occur from 0.3 to 7% of cases, according to different factors. The surgeon must be aware of the possible anatomical variations of the nerve, which should be actively searched for and identified. Visual control and gentle dissection of RLN are imperative. The use of intraoperative nerve monitoring has been safely applied but, at the moment, its impact in the incidence of RLN injuries has not been clarified. In conclusion, despite a thorough surgical technique and the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring, the incidence of neurological complications after thyroid surgery cannot be suppressed, but should be maintained in a low range. PMID

  13. Neurological Manifestations of Acute Posterior Multifocal Placoid Pigment Epitheliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhotani, Ashjan; Shirah, Bader

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) is an immune-mediated chorioretinal disease that causes acute visual symptoms with characteristic ophthalmoscopic findings. Neurological complications are rarely reported in the literature. Here we report two new cases of APMPPE that presented with neurological manifestations, one of which was associated with peripheral neuropathy, which has not been described before. Methods A retrospective database review of all patients with a diagnosis of APMPPE was performed. Clinical, ophthalmological, and neurological data were analyzed, and only cases of APMPPE with neurological complications were included. A literature review of several databases was also performed, and previous case reports were reviewed and analyzed in detail. Results In total, 56 cases of APMPPE-associated neurological complications were included in the analyses: 54 from the literature and 2 from our own practice. The most common complication was cerebral vasculitis, which affected 28 patients (50%), followed by headaches in 15 patients (26.8%). The other complications include sixth-cranial-nerve palsy, transient hearing loss, meningoencephalitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and viral meningitis. Conclusions This report adds to the literature of a novel association of APMPPE with peripheral neuropathy, and comprehensively reviews the neurological manifestations of this disease. A high level of suspicion should be applied when dealing with a case of APMPPE. We recommend applying detailed clinical neurological examinations and magnetic resonance imaging to APMPPE patients, and then early steroid treatment if the examination is positive or even suspicious. Early treatment with steroids and long-term treatment with immunosuppressive azathioprine with interval neurological evaluations will contribute positively to the outcomes and avoid fatal complications, namely strokes. PMID:27819416

  14. Tissue-Engineered Nanofibrous Nerve Grafts for Enhancing the Rate of Nerve Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    bioactivity, transport features and mechanics ideal for enhancing the rate of nerve regeneration and healing critical sized nerve defects. We further...scaffolds in bioreactors prior to implantation in rat critical sized nerve defect model. 2. KEYWORDS: nerve regeneration, nerve guidance conduit...for an optimal nerve graft (Figure 1; Figure 2). Different wall thickness was achieved by using 6 different salt sizes . The 0.1mm wall thickness

  15. Microstructural Differences in the Human Posterior Sclera as a Function of Age and Race

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongmei; McPheeters, Sheridan; Johnson, Gregory; Utzinger, Urs

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to quantify the age and race-related differences in the microstructural organization of the human posterior sclera. Such differences may contribute to the predisposition of primary open-angle glaucoma in various high-risk populations. Methods. Posterior–temporal scleras from 75 right eyes were procured at an average distance of 3.5 mm from the center of the optic nerve head (ONH). A light-scattering device was used to investigate the matrix organization of posterior scleral fibers around the ONH. In addition to the degree of alignment (via eccentricity), the percentage occurrence of fiber angles within equatorial and meridionally aligned bins was quantified as a function of depth, sex, age, and race. There were 20 African Americans, 55 Caucasians, 49 males, 26 females, in this study, all falling within three age groups (<30, n = 8; 30–60, n = 33; and >60 years, n = 34). Three scleral layers, normalized for depth, were examined. Results. For all ages and both races, fibers were preferentially oriented equatorially at all layers (P < 0.001). The African Americans had a significantly higher percentage of occurrence of meridional fibers than did the Caucasians (P < 0.001). The percentage occurrence of meridional fibers decreased significantly from the inner to the outer layers of the posterior sclera (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Statistically significant microstructural differences were found in the posterior sclera between African American and Caucasian donors. Ongoing work is focused on identifying whether such microstructural differences play a role in the higher prevalence of glaucoma in African American populations. PMID:21051726

  16. Feasibility of thoracoscopic approach for retrosternal goitre (posterior mediastinal goitre): Personal experiences of 11 cases

    PubMed Central

    Bhargav, Panchangam Ramakanth; Amar, Vennapusa; Mahilvayganan, Sabaretnam; Nanganandadevi, Vimala

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Posterior mediastinal goitres constitute of a unique surgical thyroid disorder that requires expert management. Occasionally, they require thoracic approach for the completion of thyroidectomy. In this paper, we describe the feasibility and utility of a novel thoracoscopic approach for such goitres. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective study conducted at a tertiary care endocrine surgery department in South India over a period of 5 years from January 2010 to December 2014. We developed a novel thoracoscopic technique for posterior mediastinal goitres instead of a more morbid thoracotomy or sternotomy. All the clinical, investigative, operative, pathological and follow-up data were collected from our prospectively filled database. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS 15.0 version. Descriptive analysis was done. OPERATIVE TECHNIQUE OF THORACOSCOPIC THYROIDECTOMY: Single lumen endotracheal tube (SLETT) was used of anaesthetic intubation and general inhalational anaesthesia. Operative decubitus was supine with extension and abduction of the ipsilateral arm. Access to mediastinum was obtained by two working ports in the third and fifth intercostal spaces. Mediastinal extension was dissected thoracoscopically and delivered cervically. RESULTS: Out of 1,446 surgical goitres operated during the study period, 72 (5%) had retrosternal goitre. Also, 27/72 (37.5%) cases had posterior mediastinal extension (PME), out of which 11 cases required thoracic approach. We utilised thoracoscopic technique for these 11 cases. The post-operative course was uneventful with no major morbidity. There was one case of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury and hoarseness of voice in the third case. Histopathologies in 10 cases were benign, out of which two had subclinical hyperthyroidism. One case had multifocal papillary microcarcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: We opine that novel thoracoscopic technique is a feasibly optimal approach for posterior mediastinal goitre

  17. A Stable Thoracic Hox Code and Epimorphosis Characterize Posterior Regeneration in Capitella teleta

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Danielle M.; Seaver, Elaine C.

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration, the ability to replace lost tissues and body parts following traumatic injury, occurs widely throughout the animal tree of life. Regeneration occurs either by remodeling of pre-existing tissues, through addition of new cells by cell division, or a combination of both. We describe a staging system for posterior regeneration in the annelid, Capitella teleta, and use the C. teleta Hox gene code as markers of regional identity for regenerating tissue along the anterior-posterior axis. Following amputation of different posterior regions of the animal, a blastema forms and by two days, proliferating cells are detected by EdU incorporation, demonstrating that epimorphosis occurs during posterior regeneration of C. teleta. Neurites rapidly extend into the blastema, and gradually become organized into discrete nerves before new ganglia appear approximately seven days after amputation. In situ hybridization shows that seven of the ten Hox genes examined are expressed in the blastema, suggesting roles in patterning the newly forming tissue, although neither spatial nor temporal co-linearity was detected. We hypothesized that following amputation, Hox gene expression in pre-existing segments would be re-organized to scale, and the remaining fragment would express the complete suite of Hox genes. Surprisingly, most Hox genes display stable expression patterns in the ganglia of pre-existing tissue following amputation at multiple axial positions, indicating general stability of segmental identity. However, the three Hox genes, CapI-lox4, CapI-lox2 and CapI-Post2, each shift its anterior expression boundary by one segment, and each shift includes a subset of cells in the ganglia. This expression shift depends upon the axial position of the amputation. In C. teleta, thoracic segments exhibit stable positional identity with limited morphallaxis, in contrast with the extensive body remodeling that occurs during regeneration of some other annelids, planarians and acoel

  18. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    PubMed

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia.

  19. Multiple sclerosis and optic nerve: an analysis of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and color Doppler imaging parameters

    PubMed Central

    Akçam, H T; Capraz, I Y; Aktas, Z; Batur Caglayan, H Z; Ozhan Oktar, S; Hasanreisoglu, M; Irkec, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare both retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and orbital color Doppler ultrasonography parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) versus healthy controls. Methods This is an observational case–control study. Forty eyes from MS patients and twenty eyes from healthy volunteers were examined. Eyes were classified into three groups as group 1, eyes from MS patients with previous optic neuritis (n=20); group 2, eyes from MS patients without previous optic neuritis (n=20); and group 3, eyes from healthy controls (n=20). Following complete ophthalmologic examination and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurement for each group, blood flow velocities of posterior ciliary arteries, central retinal artery, ophthalmic artery, and superior ophthalmic vein were measured. Pourcelot index (resistive index), an indicator of peripheral vascular resistance, was also calculated. The statistical assessment was performed with the assistance of Pearson's Chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test, Kruskal–Wallis test, and Spearman's correlation test. Results The studied eyes exposed similar values in terms of intraocular pressure and central corneal thickness, implying no evidence in favor of glaucoma. All nerve fiber layer thickness values, except superior nasal quadrants, in group 1 were found to be significantly thinner than groups 2 and 3. Blood flow velocity and mean resistivity index parameters were similar in all the groups. Conclusions In MS patients, especially with previous optic neuritis, diminished retinal nerve fiber layer thickness was observed. Contrary to several studies in the current literature, no evidence supporting potential vascular origin of ocular involvement in MS was found. PMID:25081285

  20. Extracranial spinal accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Donner, T R; Kline, D G

    1993-06-01

    Eighty-three consecutive patients with extracranial accessory nerve injury seen over a 12-year period are reviewed. The most common etiology was iatrogenic injury to the nerve at the time of previous surgery. Such operations were usually minor in nature and often related to lymph node or benign tumor removal. Examination usually distinguished winging due to trapezius weakness from that of serratus anterior palsy. Trapezius weakness was seen in all cases. Sternocleidomastoid weakness was unusual. Patients with accessory palsy were evaluated by both clinical and electromyographic studies. Patients who exhibited no clinical or electrical evidence of regeneration were operated on (44 cases). Based on intraoperative nerve action potential studies, 8 lesions in continuity had neurolysis alone. Resection with repair either by end-to-end suture or by grafts was necessary in 31 cases. One case had suture removed from nerve, two had nerve placed into target muscle, and two had more proximal neurotization. Function was usually improved in both operative and nonoperative patients. Related anatomy is discussed.

  1. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Teresa; Verbist, Berit; van Buchem, Mark; van Osch, Thijs; Webb, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  2. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  3. Treatment of abdominal nerve entrapment syndrome using a nerve stimulator.

    PubMed Central

    McGrady, E. M.; Marks, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-six patients treated at York Pain Relief Clinic for Abdominal Nerve Entrapment Syndrome (ANES) between 1982 and 1986, using aqueous phenol and nerve stimulator control are reviewed. A questionnaire was sent to all the patients who had been discharged from the clinic to try to confirm that the initial improvements had been maintained and 60 patients replied. Group A (n = 44) had been diagnosed with confidence; 95% had gained complete or partial relief of symptoms. Group B (n = 32) had other symptoms making the diagnosis less certain; 50% gained some relief. Clinical presentation of ANES and the method of treatment are described. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2970241

  4. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics and Permeability in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Best, Lauren; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  5. Biomechanics of the Optic Nerve Sheath in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. Ross; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  6. Functional coupling between motor and sensory nerves through contraction of sphincters in the pudendal area of the female cat.

    PubMed

    Lagunes-Córdoba, Roberto; Hernández, Pablo Rogelio; Raya, José Guadalupe; Muñoz-Martínez, E J

    2010-01-01

    The question of whether skin receptors might help in the perception of muscle contraction and body movement has not been settled. The present study gives direct evidence of skin receptor firing in close coincidence with the contraction of the vaginal and anal sphincters. The distal stump of the sectioned motor pudendal nerve was stimulated. Single shocks induced a wavelike increase in the lumen pressure of the distal vagina and the anal canal, as well as constriction of the vaginal introitus and the anus. The constriction pulls on and moves the surrounding skin, which was initially detected visually. In the present experiments, a thin strain gauge that pressed on the skin surface detected its displacement. Single shocks to the motor nerve induced a wave of skin movement with maximal amplitude at 5 mm from the anus and propagated with decrement beyond 35 mm. The peripheral terminals of the sensory pudendal nerve and the posterior femoral nerve supply the skin that moves. Sensory axons from both nerves fired in response to both tactile stimulation and the skin movement produced by the constriction of the orifices (motor-sensory coupling). In cats with all nerves intact, a single shock to the sensory nerves induced reflex waves of skin movement and lumen pressure (sensory-motor coupling). Both couplings provide evidence for a feedforward action that might help to maintain the female posture during mating and to the perception of muscle contraction.

  7. Anterior-to-Posterior Migration of a Lumbar Disc Sequestration: Surgical Remarks and Technical Notes about a Tailored Microsurgical Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Frati, Alessandro; Palmieri, Mauro; Vangelista, Tommaso; Caruso, Riccardo; Salvati, Maurizio; Raco, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    Extrusion of disc material within the spinal canal complicates up to 28.6% of lumbar disc herniations. Due to the anatomical “corridors” created by the anterior midline septum and lateral membranes, relocation occurs with an anterior and anterolateral axial topography. Posterior migration is an extremely rare condition and anterior-to-posterior circumferential migration is an even rarer condition. Its radiological feature can be enigmatic and since, in more than 50% of cases, clinical onset is a hyperacute cauda equina syndrome, it may imply a difficult surgical decision in emergency settings. Surgery is the gold standard but when dealing with such huge sequestrations, standard microdiscectomy must be properly modified in order to minimize the risk of surgical trauma or traction on the nerve roots. PMID:28163949

  8. Embryonic anastomosis between hypoglossal nerves.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-López, S; Sanz-Casado, J V; Jiménez-Collado, J

    2009-12-01

    This article presents two cases of anastomosis of hypoglossal nerves in the suprahyoid region in human embryos of CR length 10.75 and 17.5 mm. This variation was studied in two human specimens at this stage of development and compared with the normal arrangement of the hypoglossal nerves in embryos at the same stage. The anastomotic branches were of similar caliber to the main trunks. In both cases the anastomosis was located dorsal to the origin of the geniohyoid muscles and caudal to the genioglossus muscles, lying transversally over the cranial face of the body of the hyoid bone anlage. The anastomosis formed a suprahyoid nerve chiasm on the midline in the embryo of 10.75 mm CR length.

  9. A precision mechanical nerve stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An electromechanical device, used to apply and monitor stimulating pulses to a mammalian motor nerve, has been successfully developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Two existing force transducers, a flight skin friction balance and a miniature skin friction balance which were designed for making aerodynamic drag measurements, were modified and incorporated to form this precision instrument. The nerve stimulator is a type one servomechanism capable of applying and monitoring stimulating pulses of 0 to 10 grams with a precision of better than +/- 0.05 grams. Additionally, the device can be independently used to apply stimulating pulses by displacing the nerve from 0 to 0.25 mm with a precision of better than +/- 0.001 mm while measuring the level of the load applied.

  10. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  11. Posterior ventricular anchoring neochordal repair of degenerative mitral regurgitation efficiently remodels and repositions posterior leaflet prolapse†

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Y. Joseph; MacArthur, John W.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Mitral valve repair techniques for degenerative disease typically entail leaflet resection or neochordal construction, which may require extensive resection, leaflet detachment/reattachment, reliance on diseased native chords or precise neochordal measuring. Occasionally, impaired leaflet mobility, reduced coaptation surface and systolic anterior motion (SAM) may result. We describe a novel technique for addressing posterior leaflet prolapse/flail, which both simplifies repair and addresses these issues. METHODS Fifty-four patients (age 62 ± 11 years) with degenerative MR underwent this new repair, 36 of whom minimally-invasively. A CV5 Gore-Tex suture was placed into the posterior left ventricular myocardium underneath the prolapsing segment as an anchor. This suture was then used to imbricate a portion of the prolapsed segment into the ventricle, creating a smooth, broad, non-prolapsed coapting surface on a leaflet with preserved mobility, additional neochordal support and posteriorly positioned enough to preclude SAM. RESULTS Repair was successful in all patients. The mean MR grade was reduced from +3.8 to +0.1 with 50 of 54 patients having zero MR and 4 of the 54 having trace or mild MR. All patients had proper antero-posterior location of the coaptation line of a mean length of 10.2 mm, and preserved posterior leaflet mobility. No patients had SAM or mitral stenosis. All patients were discharged and are currently doing well. CONCLUSION This new technique facilitated efficient single-suture repair of the prolapsed posterior leaflet mitral regurgitation without the need for resection or sliding annuloplasty. It precluded the need for precise neochordal measurement and preserved the leaflet coaptation surface. PMID:23449863

  12. Talar Osteochondroma Fracture Presenting as Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Ercin, Ersin; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Avsar, Serdar

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondromas are the most common benign bone tumors. They are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. When symptomatic, the symptoms are usually due to its location and size. Fracture of an osteochondroma presenting as posterior ankle impingement is a rare condition. We describe a 22-year-old man with solitary exostosis who presented with a posterior ankle mass and posterior ankle impingement with 2 years of follow-up. Surgical intervention was the treatment of choice in this patient, and histologic examination revealed a benign osteochondroma. Osteochondromas found in the posterior aspect of the talus can be complicated by fracture due to persistent motion of the ankle. Talar osteochondroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement causes. Posterior talar osteochondromas, especially when a stalk is present, should be treated surgically before it is more complicated by a fracture and posterior ankle impingement.

  13. Direct Administration of Nerve-Specific Contrast to Improve Nerve Sparing Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Connor W.; Gibbs, Summer L.

    2017-01-01

    Nerve damage remains a major morbidity following nerve sparing radical prostatectomy, significantly affecting quality of life post-surgery. Nerve-specific fluorescence guided surgery offers a potential solution by enhancing nerve visualization intraoperatively. However, the prostate is highly innervated and only the cavernous nerve structures require preservation to maintain continence and potency. Systemic administration of a nerve-specific fluorophore would lower nerve signal to background ratio (SBR) in vital nerve structures, making them difficult to distinguish from all nervous tissue in the pelvic region. A direct administration methodology to enable selective nerve highlighting for enhanced nerve SBR in a specific nerve structure has been developed herein. The direct administration methodology demonstrated equivalent nerve-specific contrast to systemic administration at optimal exposure times. However, the direct administration methodology provided a brighter fluorescent nerve signal, facilitating nerve-specific fluorescence imaging at video rate, which was not possible following systemic administration. Additionally, the direct administration methodology required a significantly lower fluorophore dose than systemic administration, that when scaled to a human dose falls within the microdosing range. Furthermore, a dual fluorophore tissue staining method was developed that alleviates fluorescence background signal from adipose tissue accumulation using a spectrally distinct adipose tissue specific fluorophore. These results validate the use of the direct administration methodology for specific nerve visualization with fluorescence image-guided surgery, which would improve vital nerve structure identification and visualization during nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. PMID:28255352

  14. Direct Administration of Nerve-Specific Contrast to Improve Nerve Sparing Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Barth, Connor W; Gibbs, Summer L

    2017-01-01

    Nerve damage remains a major morbidity following nerve sparing radical prostatectomy, significantly affecting quality of life post-surgery. Nerve-specific fluorescence guided surgery offers a potential solution by enhancing nerve visualization intraoperatively. However, the prostate is highly innervated and only the cavernous nerve structures require preservation to maintain continence and potency. Systemic administration of a nerve-specific fluorophore would lower nerve signal to background ratio (SBR) in vital nerve structures, making them difficult to distinguish from all nervous tissue in the pelvic region. A direct administration methodology to enable selective nerve highlighting for enhanced nerve SBR in a specific nerve structure has been developed herein. The direct administration methodology demonstrated equivalent nerve-specific contrast to systemic administration at optimal exposure times. However, the direct administration methodology provided a brighter fluorescent nerve signal, facilitating nerve-specific fluorescence imaging at video rate, which was not possible following systemic administration. Additionally, the direct administration methodology required a significantly lower fluorophore dose than systemic administration, that when scaled to a human dose falls within the microdosing range. Furthermore, a dual fluorophore tissue staining method was developed that alleviates fluorescence background signal from adipose tissue accumulation using a spectrally distinct adipose tissue specific fluorophore. These results validate the use of the direct administration methodology for specific nerve visualization with fluorescence image-guided surgery, which would improve vital nerve structure identification and visualization during nerve sparing radical prostatectomy.

  15. Simultaneous anterior vertebral column resection-distraction and posterior rod contouring for restoration of sagittal balance: report of a technique

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Shaishav; Rai, Am S.

    2016-01-01

    With an increasingly aging population, adult spinal deformity is becoming more common. This can be associated with increased morbidity. Results from multicentre studies of deformity surgery correction confirm complication rates as high as 40 percent. Most often a bad result is associated with inadequate restoration of the sagittal balance. Posterior vertebral body resection has been described as a method to correct significant deformity, but this is a complicated procedure. It is possible to do this in the thoracic spine where nerve roots can be sacrificed, but it is difficult in the lumbar spine due to the significant role of the lumbar nerve roots. We describe a safer technique for correction of deformity using a three stage process. This appears to be a good technique for revision surgery. PMID:27757434

  16. Surgical management of posterior fossa metastases.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Geraint J; Jenkinson, Michael D; Zakaria, Rasheed

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis of brain metastases is associated with a poor prognosis reflecting uncontrolled primary disease that has spread to the relative sanctuary of the central nervous system. 20 % of brain metastases occur in the posterior fossa and are associated with significant morbidity. The risk of acute hydrocephalus and potential for sudden death means these metastases are often dealt with as emergency cases. This approach means a full pre-operative assessment and staging of underlying disease may be neglected and a proportion of patients undergo comparatively high risk surgery with little or no survival benefit. This study aimed to assess outcomes in patients to identify factors that may assist in case selection. We report a retrospective case series of 92 consecutive patients operated for posterior fossa metastases between 2007 and 2012. Routine demographic data was collected plus data on performance status, primary cancer site, details of surgery, adjuvant treatment and survival. The only independent positive prognostic factors identified on multivariate analysis were good performance status (if Karnofsky performance score >70, hazard ratio (HR) for death 0.36, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.18-0.69), adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (HR 0.37, 95 % CI 0.21-0.65) and adjuvant chemotherapy where there was extracranial disease and non-synchronous presentation (HR 0.51, 95 % CI 0.31-0.82). Patients presenting with posterior fossa metastases may not be investigated as thoroughly as those with supratentorial tumours. Staging and assessment is essential however, and in the meantime emergencies related to tumour mass effect should be managed with steroids and cerebrospinal fluid diversion as required.

  17. [Posterior dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint].

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Tatu; Madanat, Rami; Heinänen, Mikko; Brinck, Tuomas; Pajarinen, Jarkko

    2013-01-01

    Posterior dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint is a rare injury. It can be associated with life-threatening complications. Computed tomography is the imaging modality of choice with which possible associated injuries can be detected. Acute injuries are managed with closed reduction under general anaesthesia. A fracture-dislocation is inherently more unstable than an isolated dislocation. Surgical treatment is advocated in cases of delayed diagnosis or failed closed reduction. With early diagnosis and treatment, the long-term outcome of this injury is good.

  18. Guided bone regeneration by means of a preformed titanium foil: A case of severe atrophy of edentulous posterior mandible.

    PubMed

    Andreasi Bassi, M; Andrisani, C; Lopez, M A; Gaudio, R M; Lombardo, L; Carinci, F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to evaluate the potential of preformed titanium foil (PTF) as membrane, used together with a mouldable allograft paste, for guided bone regeneration in a case of severe mandibular posterior atrophy involving the alveolar nerve. In order to create a rigid barrier to the competitive growth of soft tissues and a stable volume for the colonization of the osteoprogenitor cells, a foil of pure titanium was pre-shaped by means of a stereolithographic model, obtained from a CT-scan of the patient. This procedure showed promising results, allowing to maximize the outcome and simplifying the surgical phase.

  19. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  20. Decompression of Posterior Ankle Impingement With Concomitant Anterior Ankle Pathology by Posterior Ankle Arthroscopy in the Supine Position.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle endoscopy is a safe and effective approach for treatment of posterior ankle impingement. This is usually performed with the patient in prone position. The purpose of this technical note is to describe an arthroscopic approach of decompression of posterior ankle impingement with the patient in supine position. This is indicated if there is posterior ankle impingement together with other ankle pathology requiring anterior ankle arthroscopy. This approach allows treatment of both anterior ankle and posterior ankle pathology with the patient in the supine position. Concomitant anterior ankle arthroscopy can be performed with the usual orientation without the need of change of patient's position.

  1. Anesthetic efficacy of a combination of hyaluronidase and lidocaine with epinephrine in inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    PubMed Central

    Ridenour, S.; Reader, A.; Beck, M.; Weaver, J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of a buffered lidocaine with epinephrine solution compared to a combination buffered lidocaine with epinephrine plus hyaluronidase solution in inferior alveolar nerve blocks. Thirty subjects randomly received an inferior alveolar nerve block using 1 of the 2 solutions at 2 separate appointments using a repeated-measures design. Mandibular anterior and posterior teeth were blindly pulp tested at 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes postinjection. No response from the subject to the maximum output (80 reading) of the pulp tester was used as the criterion for pulpal anesthesia. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive readings of 80 were obtained. A postoperative survey was used to measure pain and trismus. The results demonstrated 100% of the subjects had profound lip numbness with both solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. The anesthetic success rates for individual teeth ranged from 20 to 80%. There were no significant differences (P > .05) between the 2 solutions. However, the combination lidocaine/hyaluronidase solution resulted in a significant increase in postoperative pain and trismus. It was concluded that adding hyaluronidase to a buffered lidocaine solution with epinephrine did not statistically increase the incidence of pulpal anesthesia in inferior alveolar nerve blocks and, because of its potential tissue damaging effect, it should not be added to local anesthetic solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. PMID:11495405

  2. Serratus muscle stimulation effectively treats notalgia paresthetica caused by long thoracic nerve dysfunction: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Currently, notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a poorly-understood condition diagnosed on the basis of pruritus, pain, or both, in the area medial to the scapula and lateral to the thoracic spine. It has been proposed that NP is caused by degenerative changes to the T2-T6 vertebrae, genetic disposition, or nerve entrapment of the posterior rami of spinal nerves arising at T2-T6. Despite considerable research, the etiology of NP remains unclear, and a multitude of different treatment modalities have correspondingly met with varying degrees of success. Here we demonstrate that NP can be caused by long thoracic nerve injury leading to serratus anterior dysfunction, and that electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) of the serratus anterior can successfully and conservatively treat NP. In four cases of NP with known injury to the long thoracic nerve we performed transcutaneous EMS to the serratus anterior in an area far lateral to the site of pain and pruritus, resulting in significant and rapid pain relief. These findings are the first to identify long thoracic nerve injury as a cause for notalgia paresthetica and electrical muscle stimulation of the serratus anterior as a possible treatment, and we discuss the implications of these findings on better diagnosing and treating notalgia paresthetica. PMID:19772656

  3. Serratus muscle stimulation effectively treats notalgia paresthetica caused by long thoracic nerve dysfunction: a case series.

    PubMed

    Wang, Charlie K; Gowda, Alpana; Barad, Meredith; Mackey, Sean C; Carroll, Ian R

    2009-09-22

    Currently, notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a poorly-understood condition diagnosed on the basis of pruritus, pain, or both, in the area medial to the scapula and lateral to the thoracic spine. It has been proposed that NP is caused by degenerative changes to the T2-T6 vertebrae, genetic disposition, or nerve entrapment of the posterior rami of spinal nerves arising at T2-T6. Despite considerable research, the etiology of NP remains unclear, and a multitude of different treatment modalities have correspondingly met with varying degrees of success. Here we demonstrate that NP can be caused by long thoracic nerve injury leading to serratus anterior dysfunction, and that electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) of the serratus anterior can successfully and conservatively treat NP. In four cases of NP with known injury to the long thoracic nerve we performed transcutaneous EMS to the serratus anterior in an area far lateral to the site of pain and pruritus, resulting in significant and rapid pain relief. These findings are the first to identify long thoracic nerve injury as a cause for notalgia paresthetica and electrical muscle stimulation of the serratus anterior as a possible treatment, and we discuss the implications of these findings on better diagnosing and treating notalgia paresthetica.

  4. Deep gluteal space problems: piriformis syndrome, ischiofemoral impingement and sciatic nerve release

    PubMed Central

    Carro, Luis Perez; Hernando, Moises Fernandez; Cerezal, Luis; Navarro, Ivan Saenz; Fernandez, Ana Alfonso; Castillo, Alexander Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Deep gluteal syndrome (DGS) is an underdiagnosed entity characterized by pain and/or dysesthesias in the buttock area, hip or posterior thigh and/or radicular pain due to a non-discogenic sciatic nerve entrapment in the subgluteal space. Multiple pathologies have been incorporated in this all-included “piriformis syndrome”, a term that has nothing to do with the presence of fibrous bands, obturator internus/gemellus syndrome, quadratus femoris/ischiofemoral pathology, hamstring conditions, gluteal disorders and orthopedic causes. Methods This article describes the subgluteal space anatomy, reviews known and new etiologies of DGS, and assesses the role of the radiologist and orthopaedic surgeons in the diagnosis, treatment and postoperative evaluation of sciatic nerve entrapments. Conclusion DGS is an under-recognized and multifactorial pathology. The development of periarticular hip endoscopy has led to an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying piriformis syndrome, which has supported its further classification. The whole sciatic nerve trajectory in the deep gluteal space can be addressed by an endoscopic surgical technique. Endoscopic decompression of the sciatic nerve appears useful in improving function and diminishing hip pain in sciatic nerve entrapments, but requires significant experience and familiarity with the gross and endoscopic anatomy. Level of evidence IV. PMID:28066745

  5. Assessment of temporal dispersion in motor nerves with normal conduction velocity.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Mattler, W J; Jakob, M; Zierz, S

    1999-04-01

    Demyelinated nerves attenuate high-frequency components of propagating action potentials. In order to study if there is diagnostic use of this in motor nerves, the spectral energy above 49 Hz, amplitude, area, and duration of the compound muscle action potentials were measured; values after distal and proximal stimulation of posterior tibial nerves were compared. Normative data were collected in 48 control subjects. The same measurements were made in 20 patients with polyneuropathy and reduced motor nerve conduction velocity, in 21 patients with mild polyneuropathy but normal motor nerve conduction velocity, and in 8 patients with myasthenia gravis. Overall, high-frequency attenuation was closely correlated with amplitude decay (r = 0.63, P<10(-19)) and with increase of action potential duration (r = 0.34, P = 10(-5)). In the group of patients with normal NCV, high-frequency attenuation was abnormal in 9 (43%), amplitude decay was abnormal in two (10%), and area decay was abnormal in one (5%) patient. The action potential duration was normal in all of these patients. High-frequency attenuation was not influenced by stimulus intensity, thus it is not changed by conduction block, and it was not influenced by impaired neuromuscular transmission. Hence, high-frequency attenuation, both sensitively and specifically does indicate abnormal temporal dispersion. In conclusion, the simple measurement of high-frequency attenuation markedly improves detection and characterization of demyelination of human motor fibers.

  6. Primary Gliosarcoma of the Optic Nerve: A Unique Adult Optic Pathway Glioma.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Patrick J; Sychev, Yevgeniy V; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Mudumbai, Raghu C; Keene, C Dirk

    2016-10-11

    A 90-year-old woman presented with 1-year history of right-sided progressive proptosis, neovascular glaucoma, blindness, and worsening ocular pain. No funduscopic examination was possible because of a corneal opacity. Head CT scan without contrast demonstrated a heterogeneous 4.1 cm (anterior-posterior) by 1.7 cm (transverse) cylindrical mass arising in the right optic nerve and extending from the retrobulbar globe to the optic canal. She underwent palliative enucleation with subtotal resection of the orbital optic nerve and tumor. Pathological examination showed effacement of the optic nerve by an infiltrative high-grade glial neoplasm with biphasic sarcomeric differentiation. Invasion into the uvea and retina was present. The neoplasm was negative for melan-A, HMB45, tyrosinase, synaptophysin, smooth muscle actin, and epithelial membrane antigen. The glioma had strongly intense, but patchy immunopositivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein. Multiple foci of neoplastic cells had pericellular reticulin staining. The overall features were diagnostic of a gliosarcoma (World Health Organization grade IV) of the optic nerve. Postoperative MRI demonstrated postsurgical changes and residual gliosarcoma with extension into the optic chiasm. The patient died 2 and a half months after her enucleation surgery at her nursing home. Autopsy was unavailable due to the caregiver wishes, making a definitive cause of death unknown. Gliosarcoma is a rare variant of glioblastoma, and this is the first documented case presenting as a primary neoplasm of the optic nerve.

  7. Medial and Lateral Plantar Nerve Entrapment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems Achilles Tendon Bursitis Achilles Tendon Enthesopathy Bunion Corns and Calluses Damage to the Nerves in the ... Problems Achilles Tendon Bursitis Achilles Tendon Enthesopathy Bunion Corns and Calluses Damage to the Nerves in the ...

  8. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Evidence-based Guideline for PATIENTS and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you understand how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American ...

  9. Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP

    MedlinePlus

    ... lowest part of the brain down through the spinal column. In humans, spinal nerves branch off from the ... are grouped according to where they leave the spinal column. There are eight pairs of neck (cervical) nerves, ...

  10. Infraspinatus muscle atrophy from suprascapular nerve compression.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Christopher B; Owens, Brett D

    2014-02-01

    Muscle weakness without pain may signal a nerve compression injury. Because these injuries should be identified and treated early to prevent permanent muscle weakness and atrophy, providers should consider suprascapular nerve compression in patients with shoulder muscle weakness.

  11. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM, Weill Cornell Medical College; ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  12. Indirect optic nerve injury in two-wheeler riders in northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Kasturi; Jain, Lokesh; Sarma, Gitumoni; Sarma, Angshuman Sen; Medhi, Jnanankar; Das, Dipankar; Buragohain, Sanjoy Kr

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of posterior indirect traumatic optic neuropathy and superior temporal orbital rim injury in two-wheeler riders and documentation of the clinical profile of such cases. Design: Retrospective observational study. Materials and Methods: Records of all patients reporting with cranio-orbital injury and vision loss following road traffic accidents between October 1994 and April 2006 were reviewed and from them cases with vision loss solely from indirect optic nerve injury were taken up for study. The prognostic significance of different presenting features, role of intravenous methyl prednisolone (IVMP) and relative risk of superior orbital rim injury to posterior indirect traumatic optic neuropathy (at 95% confidence interval) was calculated. Results: Out of 129 consecutive cases of cranio-orbital injury, 35 had posterior indirect traumatic optic neuropathy with minor ipsilateral superior temporal orbital rim trauma and none used any protective headwear. Presenting clinical features like relative afferent pupillary defect (P= 0.365), optic disc status (P= 0.518) and visual evoked potential (VEP) (P= 0.366) were disproportionate to visual loss. Only VEP had prognostic significance. The IVMP did not provide any added therapeutic benefit. The remaining 94 cases sustained direct blinding ocular trauma and 28 of them had associated intracranial pathology. The relative risk of superior temporal orbital rim injury to posterior indirect optic nerve trauma was 2.25. Conclusion: Superior temporal orbital rim injury, even when minor, carries a potential risk for development of blindness from indirect posterior indirect traumatic optic neuropathy in two-wheeler drivers. Presenting signs do not correlate with visual status. Only VEP has prognostic significance and the condition is untreatable. PMID:18974518

  13. Traumatic posterior dislocation of hip in children.

    PubMed

    Kutty, S; Thornes, B; Curtin, W A; Gilmore, M F

    2001-02-01

    Traumatic posterior dislocation of the hip joint in children is an uncommon injury. It constitutes a true orthopedic emergency. It makes up over 80% of pediatric hip dislocations. In children, it can occur as a result of minimal trauma, which is attributed to a soft pliable acetabulum and ligamentous laxity. In skeletally mature adolescents, a greater force is required to dislocate the hip joint. Delay in reduction is associated with long-term complications such as avascular necrosis and degenerative arthritis. Avascular necrosis is related to the duration of dislocation. A poorer prognosis is associated with delay in reduction beyond 6 hours, advanced skeletal maturity, or multiple traumas. Prompt reduction minimizes complications. We report two cases of traumatic posterior dislocation of hip in children aged 3 and 14 years. Both were reduced within 6 hours of dislocation, and review at 6 months revealed normal examination and no evidence of any post-traumatic changes. Post-reduction treatment remains without a consensus. This review highlights the clinical presentation, management, and time-sensitive complications of the injury.

  14. Management of an Uncomplicated Posterior Elbow Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Blackard, Douglas; Sampson, Jo-Ann

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To present a case of an uncomplicated posterior elbow dislocation in a US World Cup athlete and discuss her rehabilitation. Background: Traditional protocol for management of this injury has been splint immobilization for several weeks, but research suggests a shortened duration of immobilization and early active motion. Differential Diagnosis: Elbow dislocation with possible fracture. Treatment: The dislocation was reduced and a compression bandage and sling were applied. The sports medicine staff and athlete determined that rehabilitation would involve limited immobilization with a posterior splint. Also, active range-of- motion exercises were to be incorporated early in the range-of- motion program to decrease pain at the articulation. Uniqueness: The athlete was not immobilized and her aggressive five-phase rehabilitation program progressed according to decrease in inflammation and increase in range of motion and strength. Conclusions: Shortened immobilization and return to World Championship competition 6 weeks postinjury had no longterm adverse effects on the athlete. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4.Fig. 5. PMID:16558436

  15. Posterior malleolar fractures of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, J; Rammelt, S; Tuček, M; Naňka, O

    2015-12-01

    Despite an increasing awareness of injuries to PM in ankle fracture-dislocations, there are still many open questions. The mere presence of a posterior fragment leads to significantly poorer outcomes. Adequate diagnosis, classification and treatment require preoperative CT examination, preferably with 3D reconstructions. The indication for surgical treatment is made individually on the basis of comprehensive assessment of the three-dimensional outline of the PM fracture and all associated injuries to the ankle including syndesmotic instability. Anatomic fixation of the avulsed posterior tibiofibular ligament will contribute to syndesmotic stability and restore the integrity of the incisura tibiae thus facilitating anatomic reduction of the distal fibula. A necessary prerequisite is mastering of posterolateral and posteromedial approaches and the technique of direct reduction and internal fixation. Further clinical studies with higher numbers of patients treated by similar methods and evaluation of pre- and postoperative CT scans will be necessary to determine reliable prognostic factors associated with certain types of PM fractures and associated injuries to the ankle.

  16. Patterned substrates and methods for nerve regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Heath, Carole; Shanks, Howard; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija

    2004-01-13

    Micropatterned substrates and methods for fabrication of artificial nerve regeneration conduits and methods for regenerating nerves are provided. Guidance compounds or cells are seeded in grooves formed on the patterned substrate. The substrates may also be provided with electrodes to provide electrical guidance cues to the regenerating nerve. The micropatterned substrates give physical, chemical, cellular and/or electrical guidance cues to promote nerve regeneration at the cellular level.

  17. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-09-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons.

  18. Routine exposure of recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery can prevent nerve injury★

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chenling; Xiang, Mingliang; Wu, Hao; Ma, Yan; Chen, Li; Cheng, Lan

    2013-01-01

    To determine the value of dissecting the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery with respect to preventing recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, we retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 5 344 patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Among these cases, 548 underwent dissection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, while 4 796 did not. There were 12 cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following recurrent laryngeal nerve dissection (injury rate of 2.2%) and 512 cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury in those not undergoing nerve dissection (injury rate of 10.7%). This difference remained statistically significant between the two groups in terms of type of thyroid disease, type of surgery, and number of surgeries. Among the 548 cases undergoing recurrent laryngeal nerve dissection, 128 developed anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (incidence rate of 23.4%), but no recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was found. In addition, the incidence of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was significantly lower in patients with the inferior parathyroid gland and middle thyroid veins used as landmarks for locating the recurrent laryngeal nerve compared with those with the entry of the recurrent laryngeal nerve into the larynx as a landmark. These findings indicate that anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve are common, and that dissecting the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery is an effective means of preventing nerve injury. PMID:25206452

  19. [Transformation of trigeminal nerve tumor into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST)].

    PubMed

    Nenashev, E A; Cherekaev, V A; Kadasheva, A B; Kozlov, A V; Rotin, D L; Stepanian, M A

    2012-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare entity with only 18 cases of trigeminal nerve MPNST described by now and only one report of malignant transformation of trigeminal nerve tumor into MPNST published up to date. One more case of malignant transformation of trigeminal nerve (1st division) tumor into MPNST is demonstrated.

  20. Simultaneous paresthesia of the lingual nerve and inferior alveolar nerve caused by a radicular cyst.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshiki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Akiko; Kondoh, Toshirou; Suzuki, Mami; Noguchi, Kazuhide; Ito, Ko; Seto, Kanichi

    2005-10-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve is sometimes affected by periapical pathoses and mandibular cysts. However, mandibular intraosseous lesions have not been reported to disturb the lingual nerve. A case of simultaneous paresthesia of the right lingual nerve and the right inferior alveolar nerve is presented. The possible mechanisms of this extremely uncommon condition are discussed.

  1. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  2. Rehabilitation of the atrophic posterior mandible with short (4-mm) implants: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Roberto; Barausse, Carlo; Checchi, Luigi; Felice, Pierto

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a successful implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of an atrophic posterior mandible with 4-mm-long implants. The patient refused to undergo any reconstructive surgery, and because the available bone up to the inferior alveolar nerve was only 5 mm or less, the patient received four implants of 4-mm length. Four months after implant placement, a provisional prosthesis was put in place; after another 4 months, this was then in turn replaced with a definitive prosthesis. The use of such short implants allows a fixed prosthetic solution without the need for vertically augmenting the mandibular bone. This procedure considerably reduces intra- and postoperative patient discomfort compared with reconstructive surgery for the placement of longer implants. The follow-up time was 1 year after implant loading.

  3. Posterior rat eye during acute intraocular pressure elevation studied using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fialová, Stanislava; Augustin, Marco; Fischak, Corinna; Schmetterer, Leopold; Handschuh, Stephan; Glösmann, Martin; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Baumann, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) operating at 840 nm with axial resolution of 3.8 µm in tissue was used for investigating the posterior rat eye during an acute intraocular pressure (IOP) increase experiment. IOP was elevated in the eyes of anesthetized Sprague Dawley rats by cannulation of the anterior chamber. Three dimensional PS-OCT data sets were acquired at IOP levels between 14 mmHg and 105 mmHg. Maps of scleral birefringence, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) retardation and relative RNFL/retina reflectivity were generated in the peripapillary area and quantitatively analyzed. All investigated parameters showed a substantial correlation with IOP. In the low IOP range of 14-45 mmHg only scleral birefringence showed statistically significant correlation. The polarization changes observed in the PS-OCT imaging study presented in this work suggest that birefringence of the sclera may be a promising IOP-related parameter to investigate. PMID:28101419

  4. Prehension Movements in a Patient (AC) with Posterior Parietal Cortex Damage and Posterior Callosal Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frak, Victor; Paulignan, Yves; Jeannerod, Marc; Michel, Francois; Cohen, Henri

    2006-01-01

    Prehension movements of the right hand were recorded in a right-handed man (AC), with an injury to the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and with a section of the left half of the splenium. The kinematic analysis of AC's grasping movements in direct and perturbed conditions was compared to that of five control subjects. A novel effect in…

  5. GNSS integer ambiguity validation based on posterior probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zemin; Bian, Shaofeng

    2015-10-01

    GNSS integer ambiguity validation is considered to be a challenge task for decades. Several kinds of validation tests are developed and widely used in these years, but theoretical basis is their weakness. Ambiguity validation theoretically is an issue of hypothesis test. In the frame of Bayesian hypothesis testing, posterior probability is the canonical standard that statistical decision should be based on. In this contribution, (i) we derive the posterior probability of the fixed ambiguity based on the Bayesian principle and modify it for practice ambiguity validation. (ii) The optimal property of the posterior probability test is proved based on an extended Neyman-Pearson lemma. Since validation failure rate is the issue users most concerned about, (iii) we derive the failure rate upper bound of the posterior probability test, so the user can use the posterior probability test either in the fixed posterior probability or in the fixed failure rate way. Simulated as well as real observed data are used for experimental validations. The results show that (i) the posterior probability test is the most effective within the R-ratio test, difference test, ellipsoidal integer aperture test and posterior probability test, (ii) the posterior probability test is computational efficient and (iii) the failure rate estimation for posterior probability test is useful.

  6. Visual input to the mouse lateral posterior and posterior thalamic nuclei: photoreceptive origins and retinotopic order

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Annette E.; Procyk, Christopher A.; Howarth, Michael; Walmsley, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Key points The lateral posterior and posterior thalamic nuclei have been implicated in aspects of visually guided behaviour and reflex responses to light, including those dependent on melanopsin photoreception.Here we investigated the extent and basic properties of visually evoked activity across the mouse lateral posterior and posterior thalamus.We show that a subset of retinal projections to these regions derive from melanopsin‐expressing retinal ganglion cells and find many cells that exhibit melanopsin‐dependent changes in firing.We also show that subsets of cells across these regions integrate signals from both eyes in various ways and that, within the lateral posterior thalamus, visual responses are retinotopically ordered. Abstract In addition to the primary thalamocortical visual relay in the lateral geniculate nuclei, a number of other thalamic regions contribute to aspects of visual processing. Thus, the lateral posterior thalamic nuclei (LP/pulvinar) appear important for various functions including determining visual saliency, visually guided behaviours and, alongside dorsal portions of the posterior thalamic nuclei (Po), multisensory processing of information related to aversive stimuli. However, despite the growing importance of mice as a model for understanding visual system organisation, at present we know very little about the basic visual response properties of cells in the mouse LP or Po. Prompted by earlier suggestions that melanopsin photoreception might be important for certain functions of these nuclei, we first employ specific viral tracing to show that a subset of retinal projections to the LP derive from melanopsin‐expressing retinal ganglion cells. We next use multielectrode electrophysiology to demonstrate that LP and dorsal Po cells exhibit a variety of responses to simple visual stimuli including two distinct classes that express melanopsin‐dependent changes in firing (together comprising ∼25% of neurons we recorded). We also

  7. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, C J; Godoy, F; ALQahtani, E

    2015-01-01

    We review ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in childhood and highlight many of the features that differentiate these from their occurrence in adulthood. The clinical characteristics of cranial nerve palsies in childhood are affected by the child's impressive ability to repair and regenerate after injury. Thus, aberrant regeneration is very common after congenital III palsy; Duane syndrome, the result of early repair after congenital VI palsy, is invariably associated with retraction of the globe in adduction related to the innervation of the lateral rectus by the III nerve causing co-contraction in adduction. Clinical features that may be of concern in adulthood may not be relevant in childhood; whereas the presence of mydriasis in III palsy suggests a compressive aetiology in adults, this is not the case in children. However, the frequency of associated CNS abnormalities in III palsy and the risk of tumour in VI palsy can be indications for early neuroimaging depending on presenting features elicited through a careful history and clinical examination. The latter should include the neighbouring cranial nerves. We discuss the impact of our evolving knowledge of congenital cranial dysinnervation syndromes on this field. PMID:25572578

  8. Fate of combat nerve injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    Exoskeletal Orthosis are promising, even in patients complicated by the presence of a foot drop (0/5 motor strength to the peroneal nerve), allowing them...after limb salvage. J Trauma. 2011;71:S120 S124. 32. Patzkowski JC, Blanck RV, Owens JG, et al. Can an ankle-foot orthosis change hearts and minds? J

  9. Peripheral nerve injury during anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lieblich, S E

    1990-01-01

    A case is presented where a peripheral nerve injury occurred due to the pressure of a restraint buckle causing a postoperative motor and sensory deficit. Because these are iatrogenic injuries it is useful to review the mechanism of injury and means of prevention.

  10. Peripheral nerve injury during anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Lieblich, S. E.

    1990-01-01

    A case is presented where a peripheral nerve injury occurred due to the pressure of a restraint buckle causing a postoperative motor and sensory deficit. Because these are iatrogenic injuries it is useful to review the mechanism of injury and means of prevention. Images Figure 1 PMID:2096751

  11. Endoscopic-assisted infraorbital nerve release

    PubMed Central

    Sosin, Michael; De La Cruz, Carla; Christy, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic-assisted techniques in plastic and craniofacial surgeries are limited. We present a patient with infraorbital nerve entrapment following traumatic facial injury that failed conservative management. Compression of the nerve was treated with an endoscopic-assisted nerve release of the surrounding soft tissue with a circumferential foraminal osteotomy. PMID:27252952

  12. Vagus nerve stimulation in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Albu-Soda, Ahmed; Aziz, Qasim

    2016-11-02

    The diverse array of end organ innervations of the vagus nerve, coupled with increased basic science evidence, has led to vagus nerve stimulation becoming a management option in a number of clinical disorders. This review discusses methods of electrically stimulating the vagus nerve and its current and potential clinical uses.

  13. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  17. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  18. Trigeminal nerve: Anatomic correlation with MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Pech, P.; Pojunas, K.W.; Kilgore, D.P.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1986-06-01

    Through correlation with cryomicrotic sections, the appearance of the trigeminal nerve and its branches on magnetic resonance images is described in healthy individuals and in patients with tumors involving this nerve. Coronal images are best for defining the different parts of the nerve and for making a side-to-side comparison. Sagittal images are useful to demonstrate tumors involving the Gasserian ganglion.

  19. Extensive lipoma causing suprascapular nerve entrapment.

    PubMed

    Zvijac, John E; Sheldon, Daniel A; Schürhoff, Matthias R

    2003-03-01

    Suprascapular nerve entrapment is a frequently misdiagnosed phenomenon. In this case report, we describe a benign lipomatous tumor causing suprascapular nerve entrapment in the spinoglenoid notch, and we describe the history, clinical examination, and radiographic evaluation. Benign lipomatous tumor compressing the suprascapular nerve is mentioned in the literature, but we believe this is the first case report.

  20. Nerve Degeneration and Regeneration Associated with NF1 Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Infiltrating peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) are associated with significant neurological deficits and nerve damage. An initial aim of this project is...nerve graft implanted to bridge the gap and restore nerve continuity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS peripheral nerve sheath tumor, neurofibroma, photodynamic...7 1 INTRODUCTION Infiltrating   peripheral  nerve  sheath  tumors  (PNST

  1. Morphological changes of the peripheral nerves evaluated by high-resolution ultrasonography are associated with the severity of diabetic neuropathy, but not corneal nerve fiber pathology in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Fukashi; Taniguchi, Miki; Kojima, Rie; Kawasaki, Asami; Kosaka, Aiko; Uetake, Harumi

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction To evaluate the morphological changes of the median and posterior tibial nerve using high-resolution ultrasonography, and the corneal C fiber pathology by corneal confocal microscopy in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods The cross-sectional area, hypoechoic area and maximum thickness of the nerve fascicle of both nerves were measured by high-resolution ultrasonography in 200 type 2 diabetic patients, stratified by the severity of diabetic neuropathy, and in 40 age- and sex-matched controls. These parameters were associated with corneal C fiber pathology visualized by corneal confocal microscopy, neurophysiological tests and severity of diabetic neuropathy. Results The cross-sectional area, hypoechoic area and maximum thickness of the nerve fascicle of both nerves in patients without diabetic neuropathy were larger than those in control subjects (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001), and further increased relative to the severity of neuropathy (P < 0.0001). All morphological changes of both nerves were negatively associated with motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity (P = 0.01 to P < 0.0001), and directly associated with 2,000-Hz current perception threshold (P = 0.009 to P < 0.001). The significant corneal C fiber pathology occurred before developing the neuropathy, and deteriorated only in patients with the most severe neuropathy. The association between the morphological changes of both nerves and corneal C fiber pathology was poor. Conclusions The morphological changes in peripheral nerves of type 2 diabetic patients were found before the onset of neuropathy, and were closely correlated with the severity of diabetic neuropathy, but not with corneal C fiber pathology. PMID:25969719

  2. Neurosurgical procedures, spinal nerve roots - one stage removal of thoracic dumb-bell tumor: role of spinal evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Dharmendra Kumar; Singh, Deepak; Tiwari, Bhuwan Chandra; Awasthi, Namarata; Hussain, Nuzhat

    2014-02-01

    We report a rare case of benign thoracic dumb-bell tumor in the upper posterior mediastinum, which was successfully removed by posterolateral thoracotomy and foraminotomy, using intraoperative monitoring of spinal motor-evoked potentials. This technique has many advantages including minimal morbidity and mortality, a single incision, one-step complete resection with adequate exposure, spinal stabilization, avoidance of laminectomy, nerve root identification, and good predicted postoperative function.

  3. Sacral neuromodulation and peripheral nerve stimulation in patients with anal incontinence: an overview of techniques, complications and troubleshooting

    PubMed Central

    Zbar, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) therapy has revolutionized the management of many forms of anal incontinence, with an expanded use and a medium-term efficacy of 75% overall. This review discusses the technique of SNM therapy, along with its complications and troubleshooting and a discussion of the early data pertaining to peripheral posterior tibial nerve stimulation in incontinent patients. Future work needs to define the predictive factors for neurostimulatory success, along with the likely mechanisms of action of their therapeutic action. PMID:24759349

  4. Application of implantable wireless biomicrosystem for monitoring nerve impedance of rat after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ting; Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Lung-Tai; Lin, Wen-Shan; Chu, Chun-Hsun; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is usually applied percutaneously for facilitating peripheral nerve regeneration. However, few studies have conducted long-term monitoring of the condition of nerve regeneration. This study implements an implantable biomicrosystem for inducing pulse current for aiding nerve repair and monitoring the time-course changes of nerve impedance for assessing nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve injury rat model. For long-term implantation, a transcutaneous magnetic coupling technique is adopted for power and data transmission. For in vivo study, the implanted module was placed in the rat's abdomen and the cuff electrode was wrapped around an 8-mm sciatic nerve gap of the rat for nerve impedance measurement for 42 days. One group of animals received monophasic constant current via the cuff electrode and a second group had no stimulation between days 8-21. The nerve impedance increased to above 150% of the initial value in the nerve regeneration groups with and without stimulation whereas the group with no nerve regeneration increased to only 113% at day 42. The impedance increase in nerve regeneration groups can be observed before evident functional recovery. Also, the nerve regeneration group that received electrical stimulation had relatively higher myelinated fiber density than that of no stimulation group, 20686 versus 11417 fiber/mm (2). The developed implantable biomicrosystem is proven to be a useful experimental tool for long-term stimulation in aiding nerve fiber growth as well as impedance assessment for understanding the time-course changes of nerve regeneration.

  5. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  6. Changes in posterior scleral collagen microstructure in canine eyes with an ADAMTS10 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Palko, Joel R.; Sorensen, Thomas; Mohammadvali, Ashkan; Elsheikh, Ahmed; Komáromy, András M.; Pan, Xueliang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to characterize alterations in the posterior scleral collagen microstructure before detectable disease onset in a canine model of open-angle glaucoma caused by an ADAMTS10 mutation. Methods Collagen orientation, anisotropy degree (proportion of preferentially aligned collagen), and relative density were measured at 0.4 mm spatial resolution using synchrotron wide-angle X-ray scattering. For statistical evaluation of structure parameters, regional averages of the peripapillary and mid-posterior sclera were compared between ADAMTS10 mutant (affected) dogs (n = 3) and age-matched (carrier) controls (n = 3). Results No marked differences in the general pattern of preferential collagen fibril orientation were noted between the control and affected dogs. The peripapillary sclera of all specimens featured strongly aligned circumferential collagen ringing the optic nerve head. Collagen anisotropy was significantly reduced in the mid-posterior sclera of the affected dogs (carrier: 0.27±0.11; affected: 0.24±0.10; p = 0.032) but was not statistically significantly different in the peripapillary sclera (carrier: 0.46±0.15; affected: 0.45±0.17; p = 0.68). Collagen density was statistically significantly reduced in the affected dogs for the mid-posterior sclera (carrier: 28.1±9.14; affected: 18.3±5.12; p<0.0001) and the peripapillary sclera (carrier: 34.6±9.34; affected: 21.1±6.97; p = 0.0002). Conclusions Significant alterations in the posterior scleral collagen microstructure are present before the onset of clinical glaucoma in ADAMTS10 mutant dogs. A reduction in fibrous collagen density is likely an important contributory factor in the previously reported mechanical weakening of the sclera in this model. Baseline scleral abnormalities have the potential to interact with intraocular pressure (IOP) elevations in determining the course of glaucoma progression in animal models of the disease, and potentially in human glaucoma. PMID:27212875

  7. Pharmacology of airway afferent nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Undem, Bradley J; Carr, Michael J

    2001-01-01

    Afferent nerves in the airways serve to regulate breathing pattern, cough, and airway autonomic neural tone. Pharmacologic agents that influence afferent nerve activity can be subclassified into compounds that modulate activity by indirect means (e.g. bronchial smooth muscle spasmogens) and those that act directly on the nerves. Directly acting agents affect afferent nerve activity by interacting with various ion channels and receptors within the membrane of the afferent terminals. Whether by direct or indirect means, most compounds that enter the airspace will modify afferent nerve activity, and through this action alter airway physiology. PMID:11686889

  8. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  9. Polycythemia causing posterior segment vascular occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Suganeswari; Raman, Rajiv; Sharma, Tarun

    2017-01-01

    A 44-year-old male patient presented with features suggestive of transient central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) followed by permanent CRAO and lateral posterior ciliary artery occlusion. He had diagnostic features of polycythemia vera (PV). When presented for the first time, the patient had features of ocular ischemia such as ocular pain, conjunctival congestion, and retinal opacification but with normal arm-to-retina time and normal arteriovenous transit time. During the second presentation, he had ocular pain, congested conjunctiva, retinal opacification, cherry red spot with box-carrying of retinal vessels, and choroidal infarct (Amalric's sign). He had lost light perception in that eye. Patients with polycythemia are prone to multifocal vascular occlusions and this can be the presenting feature in PV. A timely diagnosis and prompt management can prevent these repeated thromboembolic occlusive episodes. PMID:28298862

  10. Hemifacial spasm and posterior auricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Kiziltan, M; Sahin, R; Uzun, N; Kiziltan, G

    2006-09-01

    We aimed to investigate to which extent posterior auricular muscle (PAM) was affected and whether it contributed to the reflex activity in hemifacial spasm (HFS) patients. 19 HFS patients' spasm activities were recorded from facial muscles. Spasm activity of PAM was recorded synchronously on the symptomatic side in all patients. Lateral spread of blink reflex to orbicularis oris and PAMs were recorded in all but two patients. Botulinum toxin was applied to the PAM with the 14 patients presenting tinnitus, "clicking" or a "ticking" sound on the sane side and other positive auricular symptoms. After treatment, there was symptomatic improvement in 9 of 14 patients. The patients presenting with auricular symptoms and showing spasm activity in their PAMs can be thought as a candidate for botulinum toxin treatment scheme.

  11. Cranial nerves XIII and XIV: nerves in the shadows

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Zanier, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for over a century that these cranial nerves exist, and that they are not typographical errors nor a sensational event reported in the medical literature. A number of scientific articles on anatomy highlight how textbooks on descriptive anatomy do not always consider variables such as differences related to the geographical areas where people live, and these differences do exist. This is an important concept not only for surgeons, but also for all medical professionals who use manual techniques when treating their patients, ie, osteopaths, chiropractors, physiotherapists, and other manual therapists. This paper highlights the latest developments regarding these cranial nerves, offering at the same time some ideas for further reflection when looking at clinical scenarios that appear to bear little relationship to each other. Inclusion of these concepts in everyday anamnesis is encouraged. PMID:23516138

  12. Bladder neck incompetence at posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2015-01-01

    The finding of an incompetent bladder neck (BN) at the time of posterior urethroplasty will necessarily exacerbate the already difficult situation. In such cases the aim of the treatment is not only to restore urethral continuity by end-to-end urethral anastomosis, but also to restore the function of the BN to maintain urinary continence. Fortunately, the incidence of incompetence of the BN at posterior urethroplasty is uncommon, usually ≈4.5%. It seems that pelvic fracture-related BN injuries, in contrast to urethral injuries which result from a shearing force, are due to direct injury by the sharp edge of the fractured and displaced pubic bone. The risk of injuries to the BN is greater in children, in patients with a fracture involving both superior and inferior pubic rami on the same side, and in those managed initially by primary realignment. An incompetent BN is suspected by finding an open rectangular BN on cystography, and a fixedly open BN on suprapubic cystoscopy. An incompetent BN can be treated either subsequent to or concomitant with the urethral repair, according to whether a perineal or a perineo-abdominal urethroplasty is used, respectively. Several options have been reported to treat pelvic fracture-related BN incompetence, including reconstructing the BN, forming a new sphincter by tubularisation of a rectangular flap of the anterior bladder wall, and mechanical occlusion by an artificial sphincter or collagen injection. Reconstruction of the BN by the Young-Dees-Leadbetter∗∗ procedure probably provides the most successful results. PMID:26019982

  13. Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion Caused by Hyaluronic Acid Injections Into the Forehead: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiu Zhuo; Hu, Jun Yan; Wu, Peng Sen; Yu, Sheng Bo; Kikkawa, Don O; Lu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Although cosmetic facial soft tissue fillers are generally safe and effective, improper injections can lead to devastating and irreversible consequences. We represent the first known case of posterior ciliary artery occlusion caused by hyaluronic acid. A 41-year-old female presented with right visual loss 7 hours after receiving cosmetic hyaluronic acid injections into her forehead. Examination revealed no light perception in the right eye and multiple dark ischemic area of injection over the forehead and nose. The right fundus revealed a pink retina with optic nerve edema. Fluorescein angiogram showed several filling defects in the choroidal circulation and late hyperfluorescence in the choroid. A right posterior ciliary artery occlusion and embolic occlusion of facial artery braches was diagnosed. With hyaluronidase injection, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, oral aspirin, oral acetazolamide and dexamethasone venotransfuse treatment, the patient's forehead and nasal skin improved and vision recovered to hand movements. With proper technique, vascular occlusion is rare following facial filler injection. Vision consequences can be severe if filler emboli enter the ocular circulation. Physicians should be aware of this potential side effect, recognize its presentation, and be knowledgeable of effective management.

  14. Biomechanics of the Human Posterior Sclera: Age- and Glaucoma-Related Changes Measured Using Inflation Testing

    PubMed Central

    Coudrillier, Baptiste; Tian, Jing; Alexander, Stephen; Myers, Kristin M.; Quigley, Harry A.; Nguyen, Thao D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The objective of this study was to measure the biomechanical response of the human posterior sclera in vitro and to estimate the effects of age and glaucoma. Methods. Scleral specimens from 22 donors with no history of glaucoma and 11 donors with a history of glaucoma were excised 3 mm posterior to the equator and affixed to an inflation chamber. Optic nerve cross-sections were graded to determine the presence of axon loss. The time-dependent inflation response was measured in a series of pressure-controlled load–unload tests to 30 mm Hg and creep tests to 15 and 30 mm Hg. Circumferential and meridional strains were computed from the digital image correlation displacements, and midposterior stresses were determined from pressure and deformed geometry. Results. Among normal specimens, older age was predictive of a stiffer response and a thinner sclera. In the age group 75 to 93, diagnosed glaucoma eyes with axon damage were thicker than normal eyes. Both damaged and undamaged glaucoma eyes had a different strain response in the peripapillary sclera characterized by a stiffer meridional response. Undamaged glaucoma eyes had slower circumferential creep rates in the peripapillary sclera than normal eyes. Glaucoma eyes were not different from normal eyes in stresses and strains in the midposterior sclera. Conclusions. The observed differences in the biomechanical response of normal and glaucoma sclera may represent baseline properties that contribute to axon damage, or may be characteristics that result from glaucomatous disease. PMID:22395883

  15. Extended transsphenoidal approach with submucosal posterior ethmoidectomy for parasellar tumors. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Kitano, M; Taneda, M

    2001-06-01

    The authors have developed an extended transsphenoidal approach with submucosal posterior ethmoidectomy for resection of tumors located in the cavernous sinus or the suprasellar region that are difficult to remove via the conventional transsphenoidal approach. Surgery was performed using this approach in 14 patients with large pituitary adenomas, three patients with craniopharyngiomas, and one patient with a meningioma of the tuberculum sellae. The submucosal dissection of the nasal septum used in the conventional transsphenoidal approach was extended to the superior lateral wall of the nasal cavity to expose the bony surface of the superior turbinate lying under the nasal mucosa. Submucosal posterior ethmoidectomy widened the area visualized through the conventional transsphenoidal approach both superiorly and laterally. This provided a safer and less invasive access to lesions in the cavernous sinus or the suprasellar region through the sphenoid sinus. Using this approach the authors encountered no postoperative complications, such as olfactory disturbance, cranial nerve palsy, or arterial injury. In this article the authors present the surgical methods used in this approach.

  16. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    guide conduits (NGCs) made of biodegradable materials offer a potential solution to this problem. Based on our previous accomplishments in developing...completed Task 2 and finalized the design of the nerve conduits. Optimizing Nanofiber Guidance (tasks 2a-2d) Final Composition of the Optimized NGC...WL, Cui FZ, Korgel BA, Gerecht S, Mao HQ. Creating polymer hydrogel microfibres with internal alignment via electrical and mechanical stretching

  17. Effects of taurine deficiency and chronic methanol administration on rat retina, optic nerve and brain amino acids and monoamines.

    PubMed

    González-Quevedo, A; Obregón, F; Urbina, M; Roussó, T; Lima, L

    2003-08-01

    A chronic methanol (MeOH) intoxication scheme (2 g/kg/day ip for 2 weeks) was carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats, previously depleted of folates with methotrexate (MTX). beta-Alanine (beta-Ala), 5%, was also administered to some animals in the drinking water. Amino acids were determined in plasma, retina, optic nerve, hippocampus and posterior cortex by HPLC with fluorescence detection and monoamines in retina, hippocampus and posterior cortex by electrochemical detection. Beta-Ala administration reduced taurine (Tau) levels in plasma, hippocampus and posterior cortex, but not in retina and optic nerve. Aspartate (Asp) concentration in the optic nerve was increased in MTX-MeOH treated animals, and the administration of beta-Ala did not modify this elevation. The association of beta-Ala with MTX-MeOH produced an increase of threonine, and a decrease of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the retina without modifying 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, whereas in the hippocampus an elevation of asparagine was observed. We conclude that, in the retina, beta-Ala in combination with MTX-MeOH increased serotonin and decreased dopamine (DA) turnover rate, and resulted in changes in the amino acid balance, that could affect glycinergic activity. On the other hand, in the hippocampus, Asp metabolism could be affected by Tau depletion with beta-Ala.

  18. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Lateralization and Transposition for Dental Implant Placement. Part I: a Systematic Review of Surgical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this first part of a two-part series was to review the literature concerning the indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages and surgical techniques of the lateralization and transposition of the inferior alveolar nerve, followed by the placement of an implant in an edentulous atrophic posterior mandible. Material and Methods A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed and PMC database, academic sites and books. The articles were searched from January 1997 to July 2014 and comprised English-language articles that included adult patients between 18 and 80 years old with minimal residual bone above the mandibular canal who had undergone inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) repositioning with a minimum 6 months of follow-up. Results A total of 16 studies were included in this review. Nine were related to IAN transposition, 4 to IAN lateralization and 3 to both transposition and lateralization. Implant treatment results and complications were presented. Conclusions Inferior alveolar nerve lateralization and transposition in combination with the installation of dental implants is sometimes the only possible procedure to help patients to obtain a fixed prosthesis, in edentulous atrophic posterior mandibles. With careful pre-operative surgical and prosthetic planning, imaging, and extremely precise surgical technique, this procedure can be successfully used for implant placement in edentulous posterior mandibular segments. PMID:25937873

  19. 'Nerves': folk idiom for anxiety and depression?

    PubMed

    Nations, M K; Camino, L A; Walker, F B

    1988-01-01

    This study suggests that 'nerves' as presented in a primary care clinic is a lay idiom for emotional distress and documents a relationship between the folk ailment 'nerves' and anxiety and depression. One hundred and forty-nine patients at a Virginia clinic were studied, 47 with 'nerves', and 102 controls. Testing with the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) showed 'nerves' patients to be more anxious and depressed than controls. 'Nerves' patients had a mean GHQ score of 13.0 compared to 5.8 for controls (P less than 0.0001) and a BDI score of 7.6 compared to 2.5 for controls (P less than 0.0001). Testing with the Holmes-Rahe Social Readjustment Rating Scale showed 'nerves' patients to suffer more recent life stresses than controls: 'nerves' patients had a mean score of 187.1 compared to 119.3 for controls (P less than 0.05). 'Nerves' patients had somatic symptoms including gastrointestinal disturbances, headaches and shaking. 'Nerves' is most common among women and housewives, and is often attributed to misfortune and tragedy. The ethnomedical illness 'nerves' encompasses a rich array of cultural meanings reflecting the lifestyle and worldview of its sufferers. Despite its chronic debilitating nature, it is rarely recognized by physicians; it is, however, treated by alternative healers. Clinical implications are discussed and recommendations advanced, among them that physicians work with such healers in the recognition and treatment of 'nerves'.

  20. Vagus nerve stimulation regulates hemostasis in swine.

    PubMed

    Czura, Christopher J; Schultz, Arthur; Kaipel, Martin; Khadem, Anna; Huston, Jared M; Pavlov, Valentin A; Redl, Heinz; Tracey, Kevin J

    2010-06-01

    The central nervous system regulates peripheral immune responses via the vagus nerve, the primary neural component of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve suppresses proinflammatory cytokine release in response to endotoxin, I/R injury, and hypovolemic shock and protects against lethal hypotension. To determine the effect of vagus nerve stimulation on coagulation pathways, anesthetized pigs were subjected to partial ear resection before and after electrical vagus nerve stimulation. We observed that electrical vagus nerve stimulation significantly decreased bleeding time (pre-electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 1033 +/- 210 s versus post-electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 585 +/- 111 s; P < 0.05) and total blood loss (pre-electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 48.4 +/- 6.8 mL versus post-electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 26.3 +/- 6.7 mL; P < 0.05). Reduced bleeding time after vagus nerve stimulation was independent of changes in heart rate or blood pressure and correlated with increased thrombin/antithrombin III complex generation in shed blood. These data indicate that electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve attenuates peripheral hemorrhage in a porcine model of soft tissue injury and that this protective effect is associated with increased coagulation factor activity.

  1. Diagnostics for insufficiencies of posterior calculations in Bayesian signal inference.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Sebastian; Oppermann, Niels; Ensslin, Torsten A

    2013-11-01

    We present an error-diagnostic validation method for posterior distributions in Bayesian signal inference, an advancement of a previous work. It transfers deviations from the correct posterior into characteristic deviations from a uniform distribution of a quantity constructed for this purpose. We show that this method is able to reveal and discriminate several kinds of numerical and approximation errors, as well as their impact on the posterior distribution. For this we present four typical analytical examples of posteriors with incorrect variance, skewness, position of the maximum, or normalization. We show further how this test can be applied to multidimensional signals.

  2. Parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Tani, Akiko; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Omori, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    Parotid lymphangioma is a relatively rare disease that is usually detected in infancy or early childhood, and which has typical features. Clinical reports of facial nerve paralysis caused by lymphangioma, however, are very rare. Usually, facial nerve paralysis in a child suggests malignancy. Here we report a very rare case of parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis. A 7-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a rapidly enlarging mass in the left parotid region. Left peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis was also noted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging also revealed multiple cystic lesions. Open biopsy was undertaken in order to investigate the cause of the facial nerve paralysis. The histopathological findings of the excised tumor were consistent with lymphangioma. Prednisone (40 mg/day) was given in a tapering dose schedule. Facial nerve paralysis was completely cured 1 month after treatment. There has been no recurrent facial nerve paralysis for eight years.

  3. Microsurgical anatomy of the trigeminal nerve.

    PubMed

    Joo, Wonil; Yoshioka, Fumitaka; Funaki, Takeshi; Mizokami, Koji; Rhoton, Albert L

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to review surgical anatomy of the trigeminal nerve. We also demonstrate some pictures involving the trigeminal nerve and its surrounding connective and neurovascular structures. Ten adult cadaveric heads were studied, using a magnification ranging from 3× to 40×, after perfusion of the arteries and veins with colored latex. The trigeminal nerve is the largest and most complex of the cranial nerves. It serves as a major conduit of sensory input from the face and provides motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. Because of its size and complexity, it is essential to have thorough knowledge of the nerve before diagnoses and treatment of the pathologic processes in the orofacial, temporomandibular, infratemporal, and pterygopalatine areas. The trigeminal nerve is encountered with imaging or surgery of the skull base surgery. Thus, a comprehensive knowledge of the anatomy of the trigeminal nerve is crucial for performing the surgical procedures without significant complication.

  4. Posterior tibial subluxation and short-term arthritis resulting from failed posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mavrodontidis, Alexandros N; Papadonikolakis, Anastasios; Moebius, Ulf G; Gelalis, Ioannis; Motsis, Efstathios; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2003-01-01

    Posterior tibial subluxations because of combined or isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries require detailed evaluation. PCL reconstructions are difficult procedures because of the low rate of such injuries and the complex anatomy of the ligament. We report on 2 cases of failed PCL reconstruction because of malpositioned femoral tunnels. These 2 cases support the existing biomechanical evidence that the correct placement of the tunnels, especially in the femur, is a major factor in defining the outcome. It seems that the drilling of the tunnels, especially in the femur, during PCL reconstruction must be performed with accuracy and always be evaluated in cases of graft failure. In addition, failed PCL reconstructions are usually accompanied by a short-term excessive arthritis that results in poor functional outcome.

  5. Characteristics and surgical strategies for posterior clinoid process meningioma: two case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Takase, Hajime; Kawasaki, Takafumi; Tateishi, Kensuke; Yokoyama, Taka-Akira; Murata, Hidetoshi; Kawahara, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Clinical and radiological features or characteristics of posterior clinoid process (PCP) meningiomas have rarely been described because of their extreme scarcity and terminological confusion. Therefore, the strategies in the surgical intervention for PCP meningiomas have not been well established. Moreover, the presence of deep and critical neuroanatomical structures and relatively high morbidity, which can be difficult to predict preoperatively, make their surgical excision more challenging. We report two surgical cases of PCP meningioma and discuss the appropriate assessment of preoperative features and surgical strategies with review of the literature. Our study suggests that PCP meningioma may be characterized by the anterior displacement of internal carotid artery, and infero-laterally shifted posterior communicating arteries, and homonymous hemianopsia, a distinctive clinical feature. One of the key issues in PCP meningioma surgery is preservation of the optic nerve. Unlocking the optic nerve by anterior clinoidectomy and dissection, the falciform ligament is the important step to preserve vision for larger tumors. Complication with the perforators is also hazardous of these challenging surgeries than anterior clinoid meningiomas for their specific neuroanatomical structures and might not be feasible to avoid even with additional techniques and critical monitoring. A combination and multi-staged-surgical approach can be options of tailor-made surgical strategy in cases with tumor adhesion to the perforators.

  6. Detection of preperimetric glaucoma using Bruch membrane opening, neural canal and posterior pole asymmetry analysis of optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Rui; Gangwani, Rita; Guo, Lei; McGhee, Sarah; Ma, Xiaoli; Li, Jun; Yao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    We analysed retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) defects in eyes with normal circumpapillary RNFL (cpRNFL) thickness using posterior pole asymmetry analysis (PPAA) and investigated the parameters of Bruch membrane opening (BMO) and neural canals using enhanced depth imaging spectral domain optical coherence tomography (EDI-SDOCT). A total of 112 preperimetric glaucomatous eyes of 92 patients were examined to obtain cpRNFL thickness using SD-OCT. Posterior pole asymmetry analysis (PPAA) and central cross-sectional images of the optic nerve head (ONH) were obtained using EDI-SDOCT. Minimal and horizontal distances between the BMO and ONH surfaces (BMOM, BMOH) and the terminal of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and ONH surfaces (RPEM, RPEH) were measured. The distribution of the absolute black cells in PPAA was more concentrated in eyes with “U”-shaped neural canals (p < 0.0001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the ratio of RPEM to RPEH (RPE-R, 0.771 ± 0.08) was significantly larger than the ratio of BMOM to BMOH (BMO-R, 0.719 ± 0.009) for PPAA results. A U-shaped neural canal, lower ratio of RPEM to RPEH, and lower ratio of BMOM to BMOH were considered early indicators of RNFL defects in preperimetric glaucomatous eyes with normal cpRNFL. PMID:26883374

  7. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-yuan; Wang, Zhong-chao; Wang, Pin; Lan, Yu-yan; Tu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypoglossal nerve crush injury and gave intraperitoneal injections of exogenous nerve growth factor to rats for 14 days. p38MAPK activity in the damaged neurons was increased following hypoglossal nerve crush injury; exogenous nerve growth factor inhibited this increase in acitivity and increased the survival rate of motor neurons within the hypoglossal nucleus. Under transmission electron microscopy, we found that the injection of nerve growth factor contributed to the restoration of the morphology of hypoglossal nerve after crush injury. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous nerve growth factor can protect damaged neurons and promote hypoglossal nerve regeneration following hypoglossal nerve crush injury. PMID:26889186

  8. Functional gait evaluation of collagen chitosan nerve guides for sciatic nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minal; Vandevord, Pamela J; Matthew, Howard W; Desilva, Stephen; Wu, Bin; Wooley, Paul H

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this work was to use a functional gait analysis technique to evaluate sciatic nerve repair through tissue-engineered nerve guides in a rodent animal model. The nerve guides were fabricated by blending collagen with chitosan material and evaluated over a 12-week period for motor and sensory nerve recovery assessed by gait analysis and behavioral testing. Gastrocnemius muscle weight measurements were obtained at the end of each experimental time point and correlated to motor nerve recovery. Functional gait analysis studied both the stance and swing phase angle formations during a normal gait cycle. During the stance phase, functional results revealed that blended nerve guides promoted increased motor nerve recovery than unblended chitosan nerve guides. Similar results were obtained from behavioral tests, indicating that blended nerve guides created increased sensitivity to applied stimulus compared to unblended nerve guides. Muscle strength also correlated with functional recovery and was significantly higher when compared to the unblended nerve guides. From this study, we conclude that collagen-blended chitosan nerve guides enhanced motor and sensory nerve recovery assayed through gait and behavioral testing compared to unblended nerve guides.

  9. Vascularized Nerve Grafts and Vascularized Fascia for Upper Extremity Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kostopoulos, Vasileios K.

    2009-01-01

    Since 1976, experimental and clinical studies have suggested the superiority of vascularized nerve grafts. In this study, a 27-year experience of the senior author is presented regarding vascularized nerve grafts and fascia for complex upper extremity nerve reconstruction. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts is presented. Since 1981, 21 vascularized nerve grafts, other than vascularized ulnar nerve, were used for reconstruction of nerve injuries in the upper extremity. Indications were prolonged denervation time, failure of the previously used conventional nerve grafts, and excessive scar in the recipient site. Injury was in the hand/wrist area (n = 5), in the forearm (n = 4), in the elbow (n = 2), in the arm (n = 4), or in the plexus (n = 6). Vascularized sural (n = 9), saphenous (n = 8), superficial radial (n = 3), and peroneal (superficial and deep) nerves were used. The mean follow-up was 31.4 months. Vascularized nerve grafts for upper extremity injuries provided good to excellent sensory return in severely scarred upper extremities in patients in whom conventional nerve grafts had failed. They have also provided relief of causalgia after painful neuroma resection and motor function recovery in selective cases even for above the elbow injuries. Small diameter vascularized nerve grafts should be considered for bridging long nerve gaps in regions of excessive scar or for reconstructions where conventional nerve grafts have failed. PMID:19381727

  10. Pleiotrophin and peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li; Jianghai, Chen; Juan, Liu; Hao, Kang

    2009-10-01

    The proto-oncogene pleiotrophin, discovered in 1989, was considered as a multifunctional growth factor, which played an important role in tumor occurrence, development, and central nervous system. The latest research showed that pleiotrophin signal pathway probably participated in neural repair after peripheral nerve injury, especially in the following critical points, such as the protection of spinal cord neuron, the promotion of the speed of neuron axon regeneration, the guidance of neuron axon regeneration, skeleton muscle reinnervation, and so on. It potentially plays a key role in the guidance of neural axon regeneration in peripheral nervous system and muscle reinnervation. With the deepening of related researches, pleiotrophin gene would become a controllable target for improving the repairing effect of peripheral nerve injury and reconstruction of the neuromuscular junction.

  11. Costello syndrome: Analysis of the posterior cranial fossa in children with posterior fossa crowding.

    PubMed

    Calandrelli, Rosalinda; D'Apolito, Gabriella; Marco, Panfili; Zampino, Giuseppe; Tartaglione, Tommaso; Colosimo, Cesare

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to assess changes in the posterior cranial fossa (PCF) to shed light on the mechanism of cerebellar herniation in children with Costello syndrome (CS) and posterior fossa crowding. We performed a morphovolumetric PCF analysis on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in seven children with CS (mean age 31 ± 16 months) comparing the MRI scans with those of seven age-matched healthy subjects.PCF volume (PCFV), PCF brain volume (PCFBV) and cerebellar volume (CeV) were assessed on axial T2-weighted MRI. Morphometric parameters (diameters of the foramen magnum, tentorial angle, basiocciput, supraocciput, basisphenoid and exocciput lengths) were measured on sagittal T1-weighted MRI. The volume of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces was calculated as PCFV minus PCFBV.Five out of seven CS children showed tonsillar herniation in the upper cervical canal; no child had hydrocephalus but three out of seven children showed ventriculomegaly. In addition, the PCFV/PCFBV ratio, PCFV, CSF spaces volume, basiocciput, basisphenoid and exocciput lengths and latero-lateral and antero-posterior diameters of the foramen magnum were significantly reduced, whereas no significant changes were found in supraocciput length, PCFBV, CeV or hindbrain volume. The volumetric reduction of the PCF due to bony posterior fossa hypoplasia is a predisposing factor for developing cerebellar tonsillar herniation through the foramen magnum in children with CS. The altered anatomy of the foramen magnum and upward expansion of the PCF secondary to an increased tentorial slope serves to explain the possible mechanism of cerebellar herniation in patients with CS.

  12. Costello syndrome: Analysis of the posterior cranial fossa in children with posterior fossa crowding

    PubMed Central

    D’Apolito, Gabriella; Panfili, Marco; Zampino, Giuseppe; Tartaglione, Tommaso; Colosimo, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess changes in the posterior cranial fossa (PCF) to shed light on the mechanism of cerebellar herniation in children with Costello syndrome (CS) and posterior fossa crowding. We performed a morphovolumetric PCF analysis on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in seven children with CS (mean age 31 ± 16 months) comparing the MRI scans with those of seven age-matched healthy subjects. PCF volume (PCFV), PCF brain volume (PCFBV) and cerebellar volume (CeV) were assessed on axial T2-weighted MRI. Morphometric parameters (diameters of the foramen magnum, tentorial angle, basiocciput, supraocciput, basisphenoid and exocciput lengths) were measured on sagittal T1-weighted MRI. The volume of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces was calculated as PCFV minus PCFBV. Five out of seven CS children showed tonsillar herniation in the upper cervical canal; no child had hydrocephalus but three out of seven children showed ventriculomegaly. In addition, the PCFV/PCFBV ratio, PCFV, CSF spaces volume, basiocciput, basisphenoid and exocciput lengths and latero-lateral and antero-posterior diameters of the foramen magnum were significantly reduced, whereas no significant changes were found in supraocciput length, PCFBV, CeV or hindbrain volume The volumetric reduction of the PCF due to bony posterior fossa hypoplasia is a predisposing factor for developing cerebellar tonsillar herniation through the foramen magnum in children with CS. The altered anatomy of the foramen magnum and upward expansion of the PCF secondary to an increased tentorial slope serves to explain the possible mechanism of cerebellar herniation in patients with CS. PMID:26246091

  13. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    approach with an acellular nerve allograft to be equivalent to standard autograft repair in rodent models. An ongoing large animal validation study...the animal studies in Aim 2. The anatomy of HAM is shown pictorially in Figure 7. In vivo, the epithelial layer is in contact with the amniotic...AxoGuard and Oasis SIS products are manufactured by Cook Medical. AxoGuard is simply a multi-layered SIS product. Given that the large animal studies with

  14. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    in rodent models. An ongoing large animal validation study will pave the way for human studies of this technology. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY...to be clinically acceptable for use in the animal studies in Aim 2. The anatomy of HAM is shown pictorially in Figure 7. In vivo, the epithelial... animal studies with large caliber nerves in Aim 3 will use AxoGuard we feel that the single layer SIS material is totally appropriate for these small

  15. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple technique. Aim and Objective: The objective of this study is to find an alternative inferior alveolar nerve block that has a higher success rate than other routine techniques. To this purpose, a simple painless inferior alveolar nerve block was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Oral surgery department of Vinayaka Mission's dental college Salem from May 2009 to May 2011. Five hundred patients between the age of 20 years and 65 years who required extraction of teeth in mandible were included in the study. Out of 500 patients 270 were males and 230 were females. The effectiveness of the IANB was evaluated by using a sharp dental explorer in the regions innervated by the inferior alveolar, lingual, and buccal nerves after 3, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Conclusion: This study concludes that inferior alveolar nerve block is an appropriate alternative nerve block to anesthetize inferior alveolar nerve due to its several advantages. PMID:25885503

  16. Effects of melatonin on peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Mehmet; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2011-05-01

    In the available literature, there are thousands of studies on peripheral nerve regeneration using many nerves of several animals at different ages with various types of lesions and different methods of evaluation at certain time of follow-up. Despite many experimental data and clinical observations, there is still no ideal treatment method enhancing peripheral nerve regeneration. In clinical practice, various types of surgical nerve repair techniques do not frequently result in complete recovery due to neuroma formation, lipid peroxidative damage, ischemia and other factors. Recently, a number of neuroscientists demonstrated that pineal neurohormone melatonin (MLT) has an effect on the morphologic features of the nerve tissue, suggesting its neuroprotective, free radical scavenging, antioxidative, and analgesic effects in degenerative diseases of peripheral nerves. At present, it is widely accepted that MLT has a useful effect on axon length and sprouting after traumatic events to peripheral nerves. Our studies using various experimental injury models clearly suggest positive effects of MLT on the number of axons, thickness of myelin sheath by inhibition of collagen accumulation and neuroma formation following traumatic events to peripheral nerves, myelination of developing peripheral nerve after intrauterine ethanol exposure. Nevertheless, further experimental and randomized controlled clinical studies are vital to identify the clinical use of MLT hormone. This is an overview of recent patents and current literature in terms of the effects of MLT on peripheral nerve regeneration based on a critical analysis of electrophysiological, biochemical and light and electron microscopic findings, in addition to functional observations.

  17. Diverse mechanisms for assembly of branchiomeric nerves.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jane A; Lamora, Angela; Johnson, Stephen L; Voigt, Mark M

    2011-09-15

    The formation of branchiomeric nerves (cranial nerves V, VII, IX and X) from their sensory, motor and glial components is poorly understood. The current model for cranial nerve formation is based on the Vth nerve, in which sensory afferents are formed first and must enter the hindbrain in order for the motor efferents to exit. Using transgenic zebrafish lines to discriminate between motor neurons, sensory neurons and peripheral glia, we show that this model does not apply to the remaining three branchiomeric nerves. For these nerves, the motor efferents form prior to the sensory afferents, and their pathfinding show no dependence on sensory axons, as ablation of cranial sensory neurons by ngn1 knockdown had no effect. In contrast, the sensory limbs of the IXth and Xth nerves (but not the Vth or VIIth) were misrouted in gli1 mutants, which lack hindbrain bmn, suggesting that the motor efferents are crucial for appropriate sensory axon projection in some branchiomeric nerves. For all four nerves, peripheral glia were the intermediate component added and had a critical role in nerve integrity but not in axon guidance, as foxd3 null mutants lacking peripheral glia exhibited defasciculation of gVII, gIX, and gX axons. The bmn efferents were unaffected in these mutants. These data demonstrate that multiple mechanisms underlie formation of the four branchiomeric nerves. For the Vth, sensory axons initiate nerve formation, for the VIIth the sensory and motor limbs are independent, and for the IXth/Xth the motor axons initiate formation. In all cases the glia are patterned by the initiating set of axons and are needed to maintain axon fasciculation. These results reveal that coordinated interactions between the three neural cell types in branchiomeric nerves differ according to their axial position.

  18. Posterior regeneration in Isodiametra pulchra (Acoela, Acoelomorpha)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Regeneration is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom, but the capacity to restore damaged or missing tissue varies greatly between different phyla and even within the same phylum. However, the distantly related Acoelomorpha and Platyhelminthes share a strikingly similar stem-cell system and regenerative capacity. Therefore, comparing the underlying mechanisms in these two phyla paves the way for an increased understanding of the evolution of this developmental process. To date, Isodiametra pulchra is the most promising candidate as a model for the Acoelomorpha, as it reproduces steadily under laboratory conditions and is amenable to various techniques, including the silencing of gene expression by RNAi. In order to provide an essential framework for future studies, we report the succession of regeneration events via the use of cytochemical, histological and microscopy techniques, and specify the total number of cells in adult individuals. Results Isodiametra pulchra is not capable of regenerating a new head, but completely restores all posterior structures within 10 days. Following amputation, the wound closes via the contraction of local muscle fibres and an extension of the dorsal epidermis. Subsequently, stem cells and differentiating cells invade the wound area and form a loosely delimited blastema. After two days, the posterior end is re-patterned with the male (and occasionally the female) genital primordium being apparent. Successively, these primordia differentiate into complete copulatory organs. The size of the body and also of the male and female copulatory organs, as well as the distance between the copulatory organs, progressively increase and by nine days copulation is possible. Adult individuals with an average length of 670 μm consist of approximately 8100 cells. Conclusion Isodiametra pulchra regenerates through a combination of morphallactic and epimorphic processes. Existing structures are “re-modelled” and provide a

  19. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  20. Vertical muscle transposition with silicone band belting in VI nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    A woman aged 60 years developed a Millard-Gubler syndrome after a diagnosis of a cavernous angioma in the median and paramedian areas of the pons. In this context, she presented a right VI nerve palsy, right conjugate gaze palsy, facial palsy and left hemiparesis. To improve the complete VI nerve palsy, we planned a modified transposition approach, in which procedure we made a partial transposition of vertical rectus with a silicone band that was fixated posteriorly. After the procedure, the patient gained the ability to slightly abduct the right eye. We found no compensatory torticollis in the primary position of gaze. There was also an improvement of elevation and depression movements of the right eye. We obtained satisfactory results with a theoretically reversible technique, which is adjustable intraoperatively with no need of muscle detachment, preventing anterior segment ischaemia and allowing simultaneous recession of the medial rectus muscles, if necessary. PMID:27974341

  1. Radiation therapy in and about the retina, optic nerve, and anterior visual pathway. Psychophysical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, C.R.; Enoch, J.M.; Temme, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    Visual changes may develop in patients receiving radiation therapy for malignant neoplasms in and about the optic nerve and anterior visual pathway. Cases have been studied using a series of psychophysical tests, including kinetic perimetry, increment threshold determinations, Flashing Repeat Static Test, and sustained- and transient-like functions. A characteristic time-dependent reduction in sensitivity has been identified in these patients. This finding, in addition to the presence of nerve fiber bundle defects, appears to place the pathologic changes in the axon of the ganglion cell posterior to the lamina cribrosa. Any change in the sustained- and transient-like functions, the organization of which appears to be in the neural retina, was seen only if a concomitant radiation retinopathy was identified.

  2. Radiation therapy in and about the retina, optic nerve, and anterior visual pathway: psychophysical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, C.R.; Enoch, J.M.; Temme, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    Visual changes may develop in patients receiving radiation therapy for malignant neoplasms in and about the optic nerve and anterior visual pathway. Cases have been studied using a series of psychophysical tests, including kinetic perimetry, increment threshold determinations, Flashing Repeat Static Test, and sustained- and transient-like functions. A characteristic time-dependent reduction in sensitivity has been identified in these patients. This finding, in addition to the presence of nerve fiber bundle defects, appears to place the pathologic changes in the axon of the ganglion cell posterior to the lamina cribrosa. Any change in the sustained- and transient-like functions, the organization of which appears to be in the neural retina, was seen only if a concomitant radiation retinopathy was identified.

  3. Compression of the suprascapular nerve by a ganglion cyst of the spinoglenoid notch: the arthroscopic solution.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Sven; Magosch, Petra; Habermeyer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated an all arthroscopic technique for treating suprascapular nerve entrapment by cyst formation in the spinoglenoid notch. Eight patients showed positive MRI and EMG findings with clinical sign of weakness and pain and with atrophy of the muscle. All patients underwent an all-arthroscopic procedure. The patients were evaluated preoperatively and 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively and for the latest follow-up by clinical examination, MRI, and EMG. All patients improved in terms of pain, strength, and function. We found six superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions. In these patients the cyst was drained, and the SLAP lesion was repaired. In two patients there was no communication between the joint and the cyst, and therefore capsulotomy was performed and left open. The results of our study show that arthroscopic decompression of the suprascapular nerve can be achieved by an all arthroscopic technique if the cyst formation is located at the spinoglenoid notch.

  4. CT-clinical approach to patients with symptoms related to the V, VII, IX-XII cranial nerves and cervical sympathetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalovidouris, A.; Mancuso, A.A.; Dillon, W.

    1984-06-01

    Forty-three patients who had signs and symptoms possibly related to the extracranial course of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X-XII, and the cervical sympathetics were examined prospectively using high resolution CT to obtain images of thin sections during rapid drip infusion of contrast material. Anatomic areas in the scan protocols included the posterior fossa, cavernous and paranasal sinuses, skull base, temporal bone, nasopharynx, parotid gland, tongue base, and neck. Nine of the 23 patients with possible fifth nerve deficits had extracranial structural lesions that explained the symptoms; none of these nine, however, had typical trigeminal neuralgia. Of eight patients with peripheral seventh nerve abnormalities, two had positive findings on scans. Of five patients presenting with referred ear pain, three had carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The authors' experience suggests that patients at high risk for structural lesions responsible for cranial nerve deficits can be selected by clinical criteria. Protocols for each clinical setting are presented.

  5. On the vagal cardiac nerves, with special reference to the early evolution of the head-trunk interface.

    PubMed

    Higashiyama, Hiroki; Hirasawa, Tatsuya; Oisi, Yasuhiro; Sugahara, Fumiaki; Hyodo, Susumu; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2016-09-01

    The vagus nerve, or the tenth cranial nerve, innervates the heart in addition to other visceral organs, including the posterior visceral arches. In amniotes, the anterior and posterior cardiac branches arise from the branchial and intestinal portions of the vagus nerve to innervate the arterial and venous poles of the heart, respectively. The evolution of this innervation pattern has yet to be elucidated, due mainly to the lack of morphological data on the vagus in basal vertebrates. To investigate this topic, we observed the vagus nerves of the lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii), and mouse (Mus musculus), focusing on the embryonic patterns of the vagal branches in the venous pole. In the lamprey, no vagus branch was found in the venous pole throughout development, whereas the arterial pole was innervated by a branch from the branchial portion. In contrast, the vagus innervated the arterial and venous poles in the mouse and elephant shark. Based on the morphological patterns of these branches, the venous vagal branches of the mouse and elephant shark appear to belong to the intestinal part of the vagus, implying that the cardiac nerve pattern is conserved among crown gnathostomes. Furthermore, we found a topographical shift of the structures adjacent to the venous pole (i.e., the hypoglossal nerve and pronephros) between the extant gnathostomes and lamprey. Phylogenetically, the lamprey morphology is likely to be the ancestral condition for vertebrates, suggesting that the evolution of the venous branch occurred early in the gnathostome lineage, in parallel with the remodeling of the head-trunk interfacial domain during the acquisition of the neck. J. Morphol. 277:1146-1158, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery: Let's tell someone

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In a recent study entitled: “More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF): A review”, Epstein documented that more nerve root injuries occurred utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) versus open lumbar surgery for diskectomy, decompression of stenosis (laminectomy), and/or fusion for instability. Methods: In large multicenter Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial reviews performed by Desai et al., nerve root injury with open diskectomy occurred in 0.13–0.25% of cases, occurred in 0% of laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion cases, and just 2% for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion. Results: In another MIS series performed largely for disc disease (often contained nonsurgical disc herniations, therefore unnecessary procedures) or spondylolisthesis, the risk of root injury was 2% for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus 7.8% for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Furthermore, the high frequencies of radiculitis/nerve root/plexus injuries incurring during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIF: 15.8%) versus extreme lumbar interbody fusions (XLIF: 23.8%), addressing disc disease, failed back surgery, and spondylolisthesis, were far from acceptable. Conclusions: The incidence of nerve root injuries following any of the multiple MIS lumbar surgical techniques (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) resulted in more nerve root injuries when compared with open conventional lumbar surgical techniques. Considering the majority of these procedures are unnecessarily being performed for degenerative disc disease alone, spine surgeons should be increasingly asked why they are offering these operations to their patients? PMID:26904373

  7. [Optic nerve neuropathy following a lightning accident--electrophysiologic and computerized tomography findings].

    PubMed

    Alexandridis, A; Fotiou, F; Dimitriadis, A; Tsitsopoulos, P; Stefani, F H

    1987-01-01

    A case is described in which the patient had been struck by lightning, with involvement of one eye and the visual pathways. Ophthalmological examination revealed a posterior capsule cataract in the right eye and peripheral constriction of the visual field of the left eye, although central vision in the left eye was not affected. The peak latency of the pattern reversal-evoked potentials in the left eye was longer and their amplitude lower. The skin ERG was normal. The CT scan revealed a thickening of the left optic nerve. The importance of electrophysiological and CT scan examination in the diagnosis and etiology of abnormalities caused in the eye by lightning is emphasized.

  8. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) of mandible: solving the perplexity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shilpa; Pathak, Jigna; Dekate, Kamlesh; Mohanty, Neeta

    2015-03-11

    We present an extremely rare case of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) in a 30-year-old woman without associated neurofibromatosis 1. The patient presented with an 8 cm×4 cm lesion extending from 46 to the retro molar region involving the ramus of the right mandible associated with regional paraesthesia. Incisional biopsy revealed spindle cells with vesicular nuclei arranged in fascicles leading to a diagnosis of spindle cell lesion. Posterior segmental mandibulectomy was performed under general anaesthesia. On excisional biopsy, a definitive diagnosis of low-grade MPNST was established on the basis of immunohistochemistry. The patient was then lost to follow-up.

  9. Analysis of the spinal nerve roots in relation to the adjacent vertebral bodies with respect to a posterolateral vertebral body replacement procedure

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Waleed; Bourget-Murray, Jonathan; Zeiadin, Nadil; Mejia, Juan P; Steffen, Thomas; Algarni, Abdulrahman D; Alsaleh, Khalid; Ouellet, Jean; Weber, Michael; Jarzem, Peter F

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to improve the understanding of the anatomic variations along the thoracic and lumbar spine encountered during an all-posterior vertebrectomy, and reconstruction procedure. This information will help improve our understanding of human spine anatomy and will allow better planning for a vertebral body replacement (VBR) through either a transpedicular or costotransversectomy approach. Summary of Background Data: The major challenge to a total posterior approach vertebrectomy and VBR in the thoracolumbar spine lies in the preservation of important neural structures. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis. Hundred normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spinal studies (T1–L5) on sagittal T2-weighted MRI images were studied to quantify: (1) mid-sagittal vertebral body (VB) dimensions (anterior, midline, and posterior VB height), (2) midline VB and associated intervertebral discs height, (3) mean distance between adjacent spinal nerve roots (DNN) and mean distance between the inferior endplate of the superior vertebrae to its respective spinal nerve root (DNE), and (4) posterior approach expansion ratio (PAER). Results: (1) The mean anterior VB height gradually increased craniocaudally from T1 to L5. The mean midline and posterior VB height showed a similar pattern up to L2. Mean posterior VB height was larger than the mean anterior VB height from T1 to L2, consistent with anterior wedging, and then measured less than the mean anterior VB height, indicating posterior wedging. (2) Midline VB and intervertebral disc height gradually increased from T1 to L4. (3) DNN and DNE were similar, whereby they gradually increased from T1 to L3. (5) Mean PAER varied between 1.69 (T12) and 2.27 (L5) depending on anatomic level. Conclusions: The dimensions of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae and discs vary greatly. Thus, any attempt at carrying out a VBR from a posterior approach should take into account the specifications at each spinal level. PMID

  10. Nanofibrous nerve conduits for repair of 30-mm-long sciatic nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Pouya, Majid; Rad, Hadi; Nava, Melody Omrani; Azarbakhsh, Mohammad; Hooshmand, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    It has been confirmed that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit can promote peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. However, its efficiency in repair of over 30-mm-long sciatic nerve defects needs to be assessed. In this study, we used a nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit to bridge a 30-mm-long gap in the rat sciatic nerve. At 4 months after nerve conduit implantation, regenerated nerves were cally observed and histologically assessed. In the nanofibrous graft, the rat sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed by restoration of nerve continuity and formation of myelinated nerve fiber. There were Schwann cells and glial cells in the regenerated nerves. Masson's trichrome staining showed that there were no pathological changes in the size and structure of gastrocnemius muscle cells on the operated side of rats. These findings suggest that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit is suitable for repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25206536

  11. Polymeric biomaterials for nerve regeneration: fabrication and implantation of a biodegradable nerve guide.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Wesley N; Bliley, Jacqueline M; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-01-01

    Optimizing the quantity, quality, and speed of axon regeneration is important in maximizing functional outcomes following peripheral nerve injury. When severed, injured nerves must be able to regenerate and reconnect to the structures they previously controlled within 12-18 months before sensation and motion are permanently lost. Nerve sprouts from the proximal stump will spontaneously migrate toward the distal stump in the event of a nerve transection. However, surgical intervention remains necessary to repair transection injuries. Regeneration becomes particularly troublesome with large gaps, where autologous nerve grafts or nerve guides are used to repair transected nerves. Nerve conduits function as therapeutic adjuncts, guiding axonal regeneration across gap defects. Despite the availability of several FDA-approved nerve conduits, functional outcomes following their use remain less than optimal. Much work has been focused on developing nerve conduits to improve peripheral nerve repair outcomes. This chapter describes fabrication of a poly(caprolactone) nerve guide and demonstrates its use in a rat sciatic nerve model.

  12. Sciatic nerve regeneration using a nerve growth factor-containing fibrin glue membrane.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengzhong; Peng, Changliang; Wu, Shiqing; Wu, Dongjin; Gao, Chunzheng

    2013-12-25

    Our previous findings confirmed that the nerve growth factor-containing fibrin glue membrane provides a good microenvironment for peripheral nerve regeneration; however, the precise mechanism remains unclear. p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) plays an important role in the regulation of peripheral nerve regeneration. We hypothesized that a nerve growth factor-containing fibrin glue membrane can promote neural regeneration by up-regulating p75(NTR) expression. In this study, we used a silicon nerve conduit to bridge a 15 mm-long sciatic nerve defect and injected a mixture of nerve growth factor and fibrin glue at the anastomotic site of the nerve conduit and the sciatic nerve. Through RT-PCR and western blot analysis, nerve growth factor-containing fibrin glue membrane significantly increased p75(NTR) mRNA and protein expression in the Schwann cells at the anastomotic site, in particular at 8 weeks after injection of the nerve growth factor/fibrin glue mixture. These results indicate that nerve growth factor-containing fibrin glue membrane can promote peripheral nerve regeneration by up-regulating p75(NTR) expression in Schwann cells.

  13. Wnt signaling and the evolution of embryonic posterior development.

    PubMed

    Martin, Benjamin L; Kimelman, David

    2009-03-10

    During vertebrate embryogenesis, most of the mesodermal tissue posterior to the head forms from a progenitor population that continuously adds blocks of muscles (the somites) from the back end of the embryo. Recent work in less commonly studied arthropods--the flour beetle Tribolium and the common house spider--provides evidence suggesting that this posterior growth process might be evolutionarily conserved, with canonical Wnt signaling playing a key role in vertebrates and invertebrates. We discuss these findings as well as other evidence that suggests that the genetic network controlling posterior growth was already present in the last common ancestor of the Bilateria. We also highlight other interesting commonalities as well as differences between posterior growth in vertebrates and invertebrates, suggest future areas of research, and hypothesize that posterior growth may facilitate evolution of animal body plans.

  14. Management of the posterior capsule during pediatric intraocular lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Buckley, E G; Klombers, L A; Seaber, J H; Scalise-Gordy, A; Minzter, R

    1993-06-15

    One of the major obstacles in pediatric intraocular lens implantation has been the subsequent dense opacification of the posterior capsule. We used a modification of the standard pediatric cataract surgical procedure, which involved endocapsular cataract extraction, posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation, pars plana posterior capsulotomy, and pars plana anterior vitrectomy in 20 consecutive patients with unilateral traumatic, radiation-induced, and developmental cataracts. Visual axes were rapidly restored in all patients without further intervention for posterior capsule opacification. Visual acuity returned to 20/40 or better in all patients and 75% of all patients (15 patients) reached maximum improvement by five weeks. No complications attributed to intraoperative removal of the posterior capsule occurred.

  15. Nerve fibre tracing of branches to the coracobrachialis muscle in a Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus).

    PubMed

    Kawashima, T; Yoshitomi, S; Sasaki, H

    2007-02-01

    A detailed anatomical analysis of the left brachial plexus, composed of the fourth cervical to first thoracic spinal nerve roots, was performed in an adult male orangutan obtained from the Osaka Museum of Natural History. Although the medial and posterior cords fused into a common trunk, a nerve fibre analysis revealed that the cords were not actually connected. A superficial branch (Rs) running ventral to the musculocutaneous nerve (MC) and a deep branch (Rp) running dorsal to the MC innervated the coracobrachialis muscle, which was also innervated by coracobrachialis branches (Rmc) from the MC. Koizumi (1989: Acta Anat. Nippon, 64, 18) reported that the Rmc and Rs innervated the superficial region of the coracobrachialis muscle corresponding to superficial coracobrachialis muscle in prosimians, whereas the Rp innervated the deep region. However, the detailed innervation of the coracobrachialis muscle in orangutans was not included in Koizumi and Sakai's (1995: J. Anat. 186, 395) report. Our observations in an orangutan did not seem to support generalisation, because the common trunk of the Rp and Rmc appeared to innervate both the superficial and deep regions of the coracobrachialis muscle. Therefore, a nerve fibre analysis of the common trunk was performed as a detailed examination. The analysis confirmed that the Rp in the orangutan only innervated the deep region of the coracobrachialis muscle, similar to the innervation pattern seen in other apes and humans.

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Obturator Nerve Block: A Focused Review on Anatomy and Updated Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Tatsuo; Kamibayashi, Takahiko

    2017-01-01

    This review outlines the anatomy of the obturator nerve and the indications for obturator nerve block (ONB). Ultrasound-guided ONB techniques and unresolved issues regarding these procedures are also discussed. An ONB is performed to prevent thigh adductor jerk during transurethral resection of bladder tumor, provide analgesia for knee surgery, treat hip pain, and improve persistent hip adductor spasticity. Various ultrasound-guided ONB techniques can be used and can be classified according to whether the approach is distal or proximal. In the distal approach, a transducer is placed at the inguinal crease; the anterior and posterior branches of the nerve are then blocked by two injections of local anesthetic directed toward the interfascial planes where each branch lies. The proximal approach comprises a single injection of local anesthetic into the interfascial plane between the pectineus and obturator externus muscles. Several proximal approaches involving different patient and transducer positions are reported. The proximal approach may be superior for reducing the dose of local anesthetic and providing successful blockade of the obturator nerve, including the hip articular branch, when compared with the distal approach. This hypothesis and any differences between the proximal ONB techniques need to be explored in future studies. PMID:28280738

  17. Collagen Architecture of the Posterior Pole: High-Resolution Wide Field of View Visualization and Analysis Using Polarized Light Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Ning-Jiun; Lathrop, Kira; Sigal, Ian A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to leverage polarized light microscopy (PLM) to visualize the collagen fiber architecture of posterior pole and optic nerve head with micrometer-scale resolution and to identify and quantify major organizational components. Methods Eight sheep posterior poles were cryosectioned and imaged using PLM. Collagen fiber orientation was determined by using custom scripts, and the resulting orientation maps were inspected and quantified to identify major structural elements and tested for differences in mean fiber orientation and anisotropy, using linear mixed effect models. Results Images revealed an intricate organization of collagen fibers in the posterior pole. In the lamina cribrosa, interweaving fibers formed large knots and wrapped around nerve fiber pores, with beam insertions into the scleral canal wall that were either narrow and straight or wide. In the peripapillary sclera, three significantly different (P < 0.0001) components were identified: fibers oriented circumferentially proximal to the canal, radially in the innermost sclera, and unaligned with interweaving fibers. The radial fibers were between 60 and 180 μm thick, extending at least 3 mm from the canal. Conclusions PLM revealed structural aspects of the lamina cribrosa and sclera that may have important biomechanical roles but that were previously unreported or not characterized quantitatively. In the lamina cribrosa, these roles included wide and narrow beam insertions and details of collagen fibers interweaving and wrapping around the pores. In the sclera, we described regions of circumferential, radial, and unaligned “random” fibers. Although there is consensus that circumferential fibers protect neural tissues by resisting canal expansion, the role of the radial fibers remains unclear. PMID:28146238

  18. The influence of nerve conduits diameter in motor nerve recovery after segmental nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Guilherme; Shin, Richard H; Lee, Joo-Yup; Mattar, Tiago G; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2014-11-01

    Many conduits have demonstrated potential to substitute nerve autografts; however, the influence of conduit inner diameter (ID) has never been studied as a separate parameter. This experimental study compared motor recovery after segmental nerve repair with two different ID collagen conduits: 1.5 and 2.0 mm. In addition, the conduits were analyzed in vitro to determine the variations of ID before and after hydration. Thirty rats were divided into three groups: 2.0 mm ID, 1.5 mm ID, and a control group autograft. After 12 weeks, the 1.5 mm ID group demonstrated significant increase in force (P < 0.0001) and weight (P < 0.0001) of the tibialis anterior muscle and better histomorphometry results of the peroneal nerve (P < 0.05) compared to 2.0 mm ID group; nevertheless, autograft results outperformed both conduits (P < 0.0001). Conduits ID were somewhat smaller than advertised, measuring 1.59 ± 0.03 mm and 1.25 ± 0.0 mm. Only the larger conduit showed a 6% increase in ID after hydration, changing to 1.69 ± 0.02 mm. Although autografts perform best, an improvement in motor recovery can be achieved with collagen conduits when a better size match conduit is being used. Minimal changes in collagen conduits ID can be expected after implantation.

  19. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Leff, Alexander P.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Methods: Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Results: Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%–270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. PMID:26138948

  20. Automatic quantification of posterior capsule opacification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Sarah A.; Uyyanonvara, Bunyarit; Boyce, James F.; Sanguinetti, Giorgia; Hollick, Emma J.; Meacock, William R.; Spalton, David J.; Paplinski, Andrew P.

    2000-06-01

    After Cataract surgery where a plastic implant lens is implanted into the eye to replace the natural lens, many patients suffer from cell growth across a membrane situated at the back of the lens which degrades their vision. The cell growth is known as Posterior Capsule Opacification (or PCO). It is important to be able to quantify PCO so that the effect of different implant lens types and surgical techniques may be evaluated. Initial results obtained using a neural network to detect PCO from implant lenses are compared to an established but less automated method of detection, which segments the images using texture segmentation in conjunction with co- occurrence matrices. Tests show that the established method performs well in clinical validation and repeatability trials. The requirement to use a neural network to analyze the implant lens images evolved from the analysis of over 1000 images using the established co-occurrence matrix segmentation method. The work shows that a method based on neural networks is a promising tool to automate the procedure of calculating PCO.

  1. Representation of numerosity in posterior parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roitman, Jamie D.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.; Platt, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Humans and animals appear to share a similar representation of number as an analog magnitude on an internal, subjective scale. Neurological and neurophysiological data suggest that posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is a critical component of the circuits that form the basis of numerical abilities in humans. Patients with parietal lesions are impaired in their ability to access the deep meaning of numbers. Acalculiac patients with inferior parietal damage often have difficulty performing arithmetic (2 + 4?) or number bisection (what is between 3 and 5?) tasks, but are able to recite multiplication tables and read or write numerals. Functional imaging studies of neurologically intact humans performing subtraction, number comparison, and non-verbal magnitude comparison tasks show activity in areas within the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Taken together, clinical cases and imaging studies support a critical role for parietal cortex in the mental manipulation of numerical quantities. Further, responses of single PPC neurons in non-human primates are sensitive to the numerosity of visual stimuli independent of low-level stimulus qualities. When monkeys are trained to make explicit judgments about the numerical value of such stimuli, PPC neurons encode their cardinal numerical value; without such training PPC neurons appear to encode numerical magnitude in an analog fashion. Here we suggest that the spatial and integrative properties of PPC neurons contribute to their critical role in numerical cognition. PMID:22666194

  2. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy: beyond the original description].

    PubMed

    Avecillas-Chasín, Josué M; Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Bautista-Balbás, Luis

    2015-07-16

    Introduccion. La encefalopatia posterior reversible (EPR) es una entidad clinicorradiologica caracterizada tipicamente por cuadros de cefalea, alteraciones visuales y crisis epilepticas, asociada a edema vasogeno corticosubcortical reversible en la neuroimagen. Objetivo. Presentar una revision de los aspectos fisiopatologicos de esta entidad y tambien de las asociaciones de la EPR descritas en la bibliografia. Desarrollo. Existe una serie de factores desencadenantes bien conocidos, como las crisis hipertensivas, la eclampsia o ciertos medicamentos. La descripcion de cada vez mas casos atipicos desde un punto de vista clinico y radiologico, asi como de posibles nuevos factores desencadenantes, obliga a una redefinicion de la entidad. Conclusiones. La EPR es un conjunto de manifestaciones clinicas y radiologicas que no se pueden enmarcar dentro la palabra 'sindrome'. Aunque la EPR se ha comunicado como irreversible en ciertos casos, el concepto de reversibilidad debe mantenerse en la definicion de esta entidad, ya que, en la mayor parte de los casos, el rapido control de la condicion desencadenante de la EPR permite la reversibilidad de las lesiones.

  3. Ganglion cysts of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Gautam M; Nha, Kyung Wook; Patil, Sachin P; Chae, Dong Ju; Kang, Ki Hoon; Yoon, Jung Ro; Choo, Suk Kyu; Yi, Jeong Woo; Kim, Ji Hoon; Baek, Jong Ryoon

    2008-08-01

    Ganglion cysts of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) are uncommon lesions found incidentally on MRI and arthroscopy. Twenty patients (11 males and nine females) with the mean age of 35 years presenting with a variety of knee signs and symptoms were found to have PCL cysts on MRI. Out of these, thirteen patients (65%) had isolated symptomatic PCL cysts and seven patients had associated chondral and meniscal lesions. Eight out of the 20 patients (40%) gave a history of antecedent trauma. On arthroscopy, the majority of the cysts were situated at the midsubstance of the ligament with inter-cruciate distension and no involvement of the substance of the ligament. The content of the cysts varied with the majority having yellowish viscous fluid and three containing serous and bloody fluid. All cysts were successfully treated arthroscopically through standard anterior, posteromedial and posterolateral portals with no signs of recurrence on MRI at a mean followup of 24 months. PCL cysts may clinically mimic meniscal or chondral lesions and preoperatively, MRI is essential for the diagnosis of ganglion cysts arising from the PCL. Ganglion cysts of the PCL can be successfully treated arthroscopically using standard portals.

  4. Posterior Probability Matching and Human Perceptual Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Murray, Richard F; Patel, Khushbu; Yee, Alan

    2015-06-01

    Probability matching is a classic theory of decision making that was first developed in models of cognition. Posterior probability matching, a variant in which observers match their response probabilities to the posterior probability of each response being correct, is being used increasingly often in models of perception. However, little is known about whether posterior probability matching is consistent with the vast literature on vision and hearing that has developed within signal detection theory. Here we test posterior probability matching models using two tools from detection theory. First, we examine the models' performance in a two-pass experiment, where each block of trials is presented twice, and we measure the proportion of times that the model gives the same response twice to repeated stimuli. We show that at low performance levels, posterior probability matching models give highly inconsistent responses across repeated presentations of identical trials. We find that practised human observers are more consistent across repeated trials than these models predict, and we find some evidence that less practised observers more consistent as well. Second, we compare the performance of posterior probability matching models on a discrimination task to the performance of a theoretical ideal observer that achieves the best possible performance. We find that posterior probability matching is very inefficient at low-to-moderate performance levels, and that human observers can be more efficient than is ever possible according to posterior probability matching models. These findings support classic signal detection models, and rule out a broad class of posterior probability matching models for expert performance on perceptual tasks that range in complexity from contrast discrimination to symmetry detection. However, our findings leave open the possibility that inexperienced observers may show posterior probability matching behaviour, and our methods provide new tools

  5. Mitral Valve Mechanics Following Posterior Leaflet Patch Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Azadeh; Rasmussen, Ann Q.; Honge, Jesper L.; Ostli, Bjorn; Levine, Robert A.; Hagège, Albert; Nygaard, Hans; Nielsen, Sten L.; Jensen, Morten O.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim of the study Attention towards the optimization of mitral valve repair methods is increasing. Patch augmentation is one strategy used to treat functional ischemic mitral regurgitation (FIMR). The study aim was to investigate the force balance changes in specific chordae tendineae emanating from the posterior papillary muscle in a FIMR-simulated valve, following posterior leaflet patch augmentation. Methods Mitral valves were obtained from 12 pigs (body weight 80 kg). An in vitro test set-up simulating the left ventricle was used to hold the valves. The left ventricular pressure was regulated with water to simulate different static pressures during valve closure. A standardized oval pericardial patch (17 × 29 mm) was introduced into the posterior leaflet from mid P2 to the end of the P3 scallop. Dedicated miniature transducers were used to record the forces exerted on the chordae tendineae. Data were acquired before and after 12 mm posterior and 5 mm apical posterior papillary muscle displacement to simulate the effect from one of the main contributors of FIMR, before and after patch augmentation. Results The effect of displacing the posterior papillary muscle induced tethering on the intermediate chordae tendineae to the posterior leaflet, and resulted in a 39.8% force increase (p = 0.014). Posterior leaflet patch augmentation of the FIMR valve induced a 31.1% force decrease (p = 0.007). There was no difference in force between the healthy and the repaired valve simulations (p = 0.773). Conclusion Posterior leaflet patch augmentation significantly reduced the forces exerted on the intermediate chordae tendineae from the posterior papillary muscle following FIMR simulation. As changes in chordal tension lead to a redistribution of the total stress exerted on the valve, patch augmentation may have an adverse long-term influence on mitral valve function and remodeling. PMID:23610985

  6. Posterior Probability Matching and Human Perceptual Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Richard F.; Patel, Khushbu; Yee, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Probability matching is a classic theory of decision making that was first developed in models of cognition. Posterior probability matching, a variant in which observers match their response probabilities to the posterior probability of each response being correct, is being used increasingly often in models of perception. However, little is known about whether posterior probability matching is consistent with the vast literature on vision and hearing that has developed within signal detection theory. Here we test posterior probability matching models using two tools from detection theory. First, we examine the models’ performance in a two-pass experiment, where each block of trials is presented twice, and we measure the proportion of times that the model gives the same response twice to repeated stimuli. We show that at low performance levels, posterior probability matching models give highly inconsistent responses across repeated presentations of identical trials. We find that practised human observers are more consistent across repeated trials than these models predict, and we find some evidence that less practised observers more consistent as well. Second, we compare the performance of posterior probability matching models on a discrimination task to the performance of a theoretical ideal observer that achieves the best possible performance. We find that posterior probability matching is very inefficient at low-to-moderate performance levels, and that human observers can be more efficient than is ever possible according to posterior probability matching models. These findings support classic signal detection models, and rule out a broad class of posterior probability matching models for expert performance on perceptual tasks that range in complexity from contrast discrimination to symmetry detection. However, our findings leave open the possibility that inexperienced observers may show posterior probability matching behaviour, and our methods provide new tools

  7. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    months 24-33) 3d. Retrograde labeling and tissue harvesting (months 32-33) 3e. Nerve morphometry (months 33-35) 3f. Histopathological evaluations...divided into specific tasks related to various components of optimization schemes. In vitro fiber size dependent Schwann cell migration for...5/7/13 17 4 S(design medium 1200 0 Uniform 6/27/13 Tier(5 18 4 S(Design medium 1200 0 Shallow(Gradient(60L180 6/28/13 19 8 S(Design medium 1200 0

  8. Imaging the Facial Nerve: A Contemporary Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Mends, Francine; Hagiwara, Mari; Fatterpekar, Girish; Roehm, Pamela C.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging plays a critical role in the evaluation of a number of facial nerve disorders. The facial nerve has a complex anatomical course; thus, a thorough understanding of the course of the facial nerve is essential to localize the sites of pathology. Facial nerve dysfunction can occur from a variety of causes, which can often be identified on imaging. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful for identifying bony facial canal and soft tissue abnormalities, respectively. Ultrasound of the facial nerve has been used to predict functional outcomes in patients with Bell's palsy. More recently, diffusion tensor tractography has appeared as a new modality which allows three-dimensional display of facial nerve fibers. PMID:23766904

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  10. Drug Delivery for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    hydrogels. The shortcomings of current devices in terms of burst effect , nonuniform dosage, and uneven drug delivery, necessitates a new approach to...Specific Aim 2 -- To evaluate the effectiveness of the conduit- drug delivery device to enhance nerve regeneration across a 15mm nerve gap in a rat sciatic...main tasks of Aim 1. Specific Aim 2 -- To evaluate the effectiveness of the conduit- drug delivery device to enhance nerve regeneration across a

  11. Drug Delivery for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    require special bridging strategies for tension-free repair. Autologous nerve grafts serve as the state-of-the-art in repairing such gaps but numerous...the regenerating nerves and can allow for tension free bridging without the need to harvest donor nerve. A number of research groups have proposed...Optimize nanoporous membrane dimensions ......................(Gale)(months 2-3) c. Optimize reservoir dimensions

  12. NERVE AS MODEL TEMPERATURE END ORGAN

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, C. G.; Granit, Ragnar

    1946-01-01

    Rapid local cooling of mammalian nerve sets up a discharge which is preceded by a local temperature potential, the cooled region being electronegative relative to a normal portion of the nerve. Heating the nerve locally above its normal temperature similarly makes the heated region electronegative relative to a region at normal temperature, and again a discharge is set up from the heated region. These local temperature potentials, set up by the nerve itself, are held to serve as "generator potentials" and the mechanism found is regarded as the prototype for temperature end organs. PMID:19873460

  13. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; de Morais, Andreia Lopes; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura and is a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its antimigraine effect. Unilateral vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either noninvasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the nerve. Systemic physiology was monitored throughout the study. Both noninvasive transcutaneous and invasive direct vagus nerve stimulations significantly suppressed spreading depression susceptibility in the occipital cortex in rats. The electrical stimulation threshold to evoke a spreading depression was elevated by more than 2-fold, the frequency of spreading depressions during continuous topical 1 M KCl was reduced by ∼40%, and propagation speed of spreading depression was reduced by ∼15%. This effect developed within 30 minutes after vagus nerve stimulation and persisted for more than 3 hours. Noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation was as efficacious as direct invasive vagus nerve stimulation, and the efficacy did not differ between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Our findings provide a potential mechanism by which vagus nerve stimulation may be efficacious in migraine and suggest that susceptibility to spreading depression is a suitable platform to optimize its efficacy.

  14. Raman microspectroscopy for visualization of peripheral nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Koizumi, Noriaki; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2013-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery is essential for improving quality of life of patients. To preserve peripheral nerves, detection of ne peripheral nerves that cannot be identi ed by human eye or under white light imaging is necessary. In this study, we sought to provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerve tissues against adjacent tissues that employs spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy. A line-illumination confocal Raman microscope was used for the experiment. A laser operating at the wavelength of 532 nm was used as an excitation laser light. We obtained Raman spectra of peripheral nerve, brous connective tissue, skeletal muscle, blood vessel, and adipose tissue of Wistar rats, and extracted speci c spectral features of peripheral nerves and adjacent tissues. By applying multivariate image analysis, peripheral nerves were clearly detected against adjacent tissues without any preprocessing neither xation nor staining. These results suggest the potential of the Raman spectroscopic observation for noninvasive and label-free nerve detection, and we expect this method could be a key technique for nerve-sparing surgery.

  15. Tissue engineered constructs for peripheral nerve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P. J.; Wood, M. D.; Moore, A. M.; Mackinnon, S. E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Tissue engineering has been defined as “an interdisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life sciences toward the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve tissue function or a whole organ”. Traumatic peripheral nerve injury resulting in significant tissue loss at the zone of injury necessitates the need for a bridge or scaffold for regenerating axons from the proximal stump to reach the distal stump. Methods A review of the literature was used to provide information on the components necessary for the development of a tissue engineered peripheral nerve substitute. Then, a comprehensive review of the literature is presented composed of the studies devoted to this goal. Results Extensive research has been directed toward the development of a tissue engineered peripheral nerve substitute to act as a bridge for regenerating axons from the proximal nerve stump seeking the distal nerve. Ideally this nerve substitute would consist of a scaffold component that mimics the extracellular matrix of the peripheral nerve and a cellular component that serves to stimulate and support regenerating peripheral nerve axons. Conclusions The field of tissue engineering should consider its challenge to not only meet the autograft “gold standard” but also to understand what drives and inhibits nerve regeneration in order to surpass the results of an autograft. PMID:24385980

  16. Ventral nerve cord in Phoronopsis harmeri larvae.

    PubMed

    Temereva, Elena N

    2012-01-15

    The nervous system organization is considered a phylogenetically important character among metazoans. The phylum Phoronida is included in a supraphyletic taxon known as Lophotrochozoa. Many lophotrochozoans possess a metameric ventral nerve cord as adults or larvae. Phoronids do not exhibit external metamery either as larvae or as adults. The current study describes the ventral nerve cord in the young larva of Phoronopsis harmeri. This structure is apparent both in the serotonergic and FMRF-amidergic nervous system in young larvae. The ventral nerve cord extends from the mouth to the tentacular ridge. Both serotonergic and FMRF-amidergic components consist of two ventrolateral nerves, each with several unipolar neurons. The ventrolateral nerves connect to each other by means of thin repetitive transversal nerves ("commissures"). The abundance of neurons and nerves in the epidermis of the oral field of actinotrocha larva likely reflects the importance of this area in collection of food particles. The ventral nerve cords of the actinotrocha and the metatrochophore differ in their positions with respect to ciliated bands: the cord is located between the preoral and postoral ciliated bands in the actinotrocha but between the postoral ciliated band and telotroch in the metatrochophore. The presence of the ventral nerve cord, which contains repetitive elements (neurons and "commissures"), in the early development of P. harmeri may recapitulate some stages of nervous system development during phoronid phylogeny. The larval nervous system does not contain nervous centers under the tentacular ridge that can correlate with the catastrophic metamorphosis and unique body plan of phoronids.

  17. Nerve Transfers to Restore Shoulder Function.

    PubMed

    Leechavengvongs, Somsak; Malungpaishorpe, Kanchai; Uerpairojkit, Chairoj; Ng, Chye Yew; Witoonchart, Kiat

    2016-05-01

    The restoration of shoulder function after brachial plexus injury represents a significant challenge facing the peripheral nerve surgeons. This is owing to a combination of the complex biomechanics of the shoulder girdle, the multitude of muscles and nerves that could be potentially injured, and a limited number of donor options. In general, nerve transfer is favored over tendon transfer, because the biomechanics of the musculotendinous units are not altered. This article summarizes the surgical techniques and clinical results of nerve transfers for restoration of shoulder function.

  18. Facial Nerve Schwannoma of the Cerebellopontine Angle

    PubMed Central

    Lassaletta, Luis; Roda, José María; Frutos, Remedios; Patrón, Mercedes; Gavilán, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Facial nerve schwannomas are rare lesions that may involve any segment of the facial nerve. Because of their rarity and the lack of a consistent clinical and radiological pattern, facial nerve schwannomas located at the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC) represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. In this report, a case of a CPA/IAC facial nerve schwannoma is presented. Contemporary diagnosis and management of this rare lesion are analyzed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17167683

  19. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-06-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the "elevator technique". All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the "Journal of Ultrasonography".

  20. Permanent nerve damage from inferior alveolar nerve blocks: a current update.

    PubMed

    Pogrel, M Anthony

    2012-10-01

    Permanent nerve involvement has been reported following inferior alveolar nerve blocks. This study provides an update on cases reported to one unit in the preceding six years. Lidocaine was associated with 25 percent of cases, articaine with 33 percent of cases, and prilocaine with 34 percent of cases. It does appear that inferior alveolar nerve blocks can cause permanent nerve damage with any local anesthetic, but the incidences may vary.