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Sample records for posterior por toxoplasma

  1. Macular infarction in a patient with Toxoplasma retinochoroditis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Takkar, Brijesh; Chandra, Parijat; Kumar, Atul

    2016-01-11

    Toxoplasma retinochoroditis is one of the commonest causes of infectious posterior uveitis and may lead to occlusive retinitis. We present a case of a patient with Toxoplasma retinochoroditis who developed macular infarction after initial improvement on pharmacotherapy. The potential aetiology and outcome are described.

  2. Toxoplasma gondii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasmosis, caused by Toxoplasma gondii, is one of the most common parasitic infections of humans and other warmblooded animals. It has been found worldwide, and nearly one third of humans have been exposed to the parasite. Congenital infection occurs when a woman becomes infected during pregnanc...

  3. Toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma infection) Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Toxoplasmosis ( Toxoplasma infection) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Toxoplasmosis General Information Toxoplasmosis FAQs Toxoplasmosis & Pregnancy FAQs Epidemiology & ...

  4. Toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma infection) Disease Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Toxoplasmosis ( Toxoplasma infection) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Toxoplasmosis General Information Toxoplasmosis FAQs Toxoplasmosis & Pregnancy FAQs Epidemiology & ...

  5. Serological cross-reactions between toxoplasma and hammondia.

    PubMed

    Weiland, G; Rommel, M; von Seyerl, F

    1979-07-01

    Toxoplasma and Hammondia infected mice, dogs, rabbits, and pigs were tested for Toxoplasma antibodies by means of 5 serological methods. All Toxoplasma infected animals showed Toxoplasma-specific antibodies. Only sera of Hammondia infected mice and dogs showed positive serological reactions with Toxoplasma antigen in the SFT, CFT, and ELISA. IFAT and IHA, however, proved to be Toxoplasma-specific. The influence of Hammondia infections on the Toxoplasma serology is discussed.

  6. Toxoplasma gondii and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Yolken, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies indicate that infectious agents may contribute to some cases of schizophrenia. In animals, infection with Toxoplasma gondii can alter behavior and neurotransmitter function. In humans, acute infection with T. gondii can produce psychotic symptoms similar to those displayed by persons with schizophrenia. Since 1953, a total of 19 studies of T. gondii antibodies in persons with schizophrenia and other severe psychiatric disorders and in controls have been reported; 18 reported a higher percentage of antibodies in the affected persons; in 11 studies the difference was statistically significant. Two other studies found that exposure to cats in childhood was a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia. Some medications used to treat schizophrenia inhibit the replication of T. gondii in cell culture. Establishing the role of T. gondii in the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia might lead to new medications for its prevention and treatment. PMID:14725265

  7. Lytic Cycle of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Black, Michael W.; Boothroyd, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular pathogen within the phylum Apicomplexa. This protozoan parasite is one of the most widespread, with a broad host range including many birds and mammals and a geographic range that is nearly worldwide. While infection of healthy adults is usually relatively mild, serious disease can result in utero or when the host is immunocompromised. This sophisticated eukaryote has many specialized features that make it well suited to its intracellular lifestyle. In this review, we describe the current knowledge of how the asexual tachyzoite stage of Toxoplasma attaches to, invades, replicates in, and exits the host cell. Since this process is closely analogous to the way in which viruses reproduce, we refer to it as the Toxoplasma “lytic cycle.” PMID:10974128

  8. Toxoplasma gondii and Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Erol; Türkoğlu, Şule Aydın; Orallar, Hayriye

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic parasite can be seen in all the vital organ; in the acute phase, it can be found in the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, semen, tears, saliva, urine, and in almost all body fluids. Transplasental infection can lead to fetal damage and miscarriage. Its last hosts are felines and intermediate hosts are all mammals, including humans. People infected by the ingestion of meat containing cysts in undercooked or raw, are thrown oocysts with cat felines By taking in water and food, from mother to fetus transplacental way, the infected organ transplantation, blood transfusion, laboratory accidents and kaprofaj transmitted by mechanical vectors of the invertebrates. Suppression of the immune system is being transformed to the shape and texture of the cysts with bradyzoite. The parasite settles in the cells of the tissue cysts and causes change in the cellular mechanisms, such as cytokinin task. Depending on changes and type of neurotransmitter (GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine) levels in CSF in ions (Ca, K, Cl, Mg), it is believed that there is a change in their concentration. In this review, literature about the relationship between T. gondii and epilepsy and epileptiform activity the importance of parasites, which settle in the brain, will be highlighted. PMID:27594290

  9. Salicylanilide inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immunocompromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study foc...

  10. Posterior malleolus fracture.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Todd A; Lien, John; Kadakia, Anish R

    2013-01-01

    Posterior malleolus fractures are a common component of ankle fractures. The morphology is variable; these fractures range from small posterolateral avulsion injuries to large displaced fracture fragments. The integrity of the posterior malleolus and its ligamentous attachment is important for tibiotalar load transfer, posterior talar stability, and rotatory ankle stability. Fixation of posterior malleolus fractures in the setting of rotational ankle injuries has certain benefits, such as restoring articular congruity and rotatory ankle stability, as well as preventing posterior talar translation, but current indications are unclear. Fragment size as a percentage of the anteroposterior dimension of the articular surface is often cited as an indication for fixation, although several factors may contribute to the decision, such as articular impaction, comminution, and syndesmotic stability. Outcome studies show that, in patients with ankle fractures, the presence of a posterior malleolus fracture negatively affects prognosis. Notable variability is evident in surgeon practice. PMID:23281469

  11. Effect of alveolar macrophages on Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Ryning, F W; Remington, J S

    1977-01-01

    As pulmonary involvement can occur in disseminated toxoplasmosis in immunosuppressed patients, studies were initiated to define local mechanisms of resistance of the lung to Toxoplasma gondii. Alveolar macrophages were obtained from normal mice and mice chronically infected with T. gondii by bronchopulmonary lavage and cultured in vitro. Although normal alveolar macrophages were difficult to infect with Toxoplasma, they supported intracellular multiplication of this organism. When exposed to Toxoplasma that had been pretreated with heat-inactivated serum containing specific antibody, the number of intracellular organisms increased remarkably, and the macrophages destroyed the coated parasites. After development of chronic infections with Toxoplasma, there was a transient period during which a striking increase in numbers of alveolar macrophages was observed in lavage specimens. These macrophages differed from those of normal alveolar macrophages. There was a greater percentage of large cells, a greater tendency to spread on glass, and an increased number of intracellular Toxoplasma, and the cells were activated to kill or inhibit multiplication of the parasite. During the period when activated macrophages were demonstrable in bronchopulmonary washings, histological changes in the lungs revealed a marked mononuclear cell infiltrate. These studies support a role for the activated alveolar macrophage as an effector in resistance of the lung to infection with Toxoplasma. PMID:591065

  12. Salicylanilide inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P; Ferreira, Leandra R; Hickman, Mark R; Lee, Patricia J; Leed, Susan E; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Welsh, William J; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-10-11

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose antiapicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles.

  13. Salicylanilide Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D.; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P.; Ferriera, Leandra R.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patricia J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Welsh, William J.; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose anti-apicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles. PMID:22970937

  14. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  15. Indirect posterior composite resins.

    PubMed

    Leinfelder, Karl F

    2005-07-01

    The use of indirect posterior composite restorations has facilitated the generation of ideal anatomic form, marginal adaptation, and appropriate proximal contact and contour. Unfortunately, however, the use of post-cure heat treatments has done little to enhance the overall clinical performance of the restoration. The development of new curing techniques in conjunction with modifications of the formulae have contributed to a substantial improvement in both the mechanical characteristics and long-term clinical performance of indirect posterior composite resins.

  16. Toxoplasma

    EPA Science Inventory

    T. gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that can infect all warm blooded animals ranging from: humans, pets, livestock, to marine aquatic animals. The definitive host is the feline species (both domestic and wild cats), where the sexual stage of the life cycle o...

  17. The tibialis posterior tendon.

    PubMed

    Lhoste-Trouilloud, A

    2012-02-01

    The tibialis posterior tendon is the largest and anteriormost tendon in the medial ankle. It produces plantar flexion and supination of the ankle and stabilizes the plantar vault. Sonographic assessment of this tendon is done with high-frequency, linear-array transducers; an optimal examination requires transverse retromalleolar, longitudinal retromalleolar, and distal longitudinal scans, as well as dynamic studies. Disorders of the posterior tibial tendon include chronic tendinopathy with progressive rupture, tenosynovitis, acute rupture, dislocation and instability, enthesopathies. The most common lesion is a progressive "chewing gum" lesion that develops in a setting of chronic tendinopathy; it is usually seen in overweight women over 50 years of age with valgus flat feet. Medial ankle pain must also be carefully investigated, and the presence of instability assessed with dynamic maneuvers (forced inversion, or dorsiflexion) of the foot. Sonography plays an important role in the investigation of disorders involving the posterior tibial tendon.

  18. Tibialis Posterior Tendon Entrapment Within Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fragment.

    PubMed

    Fantry, Amanda; Lareau, Craig; Vopat, Bryan; Blankenhorn, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Management of posterior malleolus fractures continues to be controversial, with respect to both need for fixation and fixation methods. Fixation methods include an open posterior approach to the ankle as well as percutaneous reduction and fixation with or without arthroscopy for visualization of the articular surface. Plain radiographs are unreliable in identifying fracture pattern and intraoperative reduction, making arthroscopy a valuable adjunct to posterior malleolus fracture management. In this article, we report a case of tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus fracture, as identified by arthroscopy and managed with open reduction. Tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus has not been previously reported. Ankle arthroscopy for posterior malleolus fractures provides an opportunity to identify soft-tissue or tendinous entrapment, articular surface reduction, and articular cartilage injuries unlikely to be identified with fluoroscopy alone and should be considered in reduction and fixation of posterior malleolus fractures.

  19. Tibialis Posterior Tendon Entrapment Within Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fragment.

    PubMed

    Fantry, Amanda; Lareau, Craig; Vopat, Bryan; Blankenhorn, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Management of posterior malleolus fractures continues to be controversial, with respect to both need for fixation and fixation methods. Fixation methods include an open posterior approach to the ankle as well as percutaneous reduction and fixation with or without arthroscopy for visualization of the articular surface. Plain radiographs are unreliable in identifying fracture pattern and intraoperative reduction, making arthroscopy a valuable adjunct to posterior malleolus fracture management. In this article, we report a case of tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus fracture, as identified by arthroscopy and managed with open reduction. Tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus has not been previously reported. Ankle arthroscopy for posterior malleolus fractures provides an opportunity to identify soft-tissue or tendinous entrapment, articular surface reduction, and articular cartilage injuries unlikely to be identified with fluoroscopy alone and should be considered in reduction and fixation of posterior malleolus fractures. PMID:26991573

  20. Mechanics of the Toxoplasma gondii oocyst wall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of microorganisms to survive under extreme conditions is closely related to the physicochemical properties of their wall. In the ubiquitous protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the oocyst stage possesses a bilayered wall that protects the dormant but potentially infective parasites from...

  1. Macrophages as a Battleground for Toxoplasma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary sentence In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Jensen et al. show clonal lineages of Toxoplasma gondii have evolved distinct ways of subverting their favored host cell, the macrophage. The results suggest that T. gondii and the ROP kinases can be used to probe immune signaling pathways. PMID:21669391

  2. RESEARCH NOTE: AUTOFLUORESCENCE OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII OOCYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the first report of a blue autofluorescence as a useful characteristic in the microscopic identification of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts. This autofluorescence appears to be of high intensity. Similar to the autofluorescence of related coccidia, the oocysts glow pale blue ...

  3. Impact of the Toxoplasma gondii genome project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this review is to provide some assessment of the extent to which the promise of Toxoplasma gondii genomics yet been realized. To do so, I will first describe the available genomic resources. I then provide an overview of those aspects of toxoplasmosis research that have grown most (...

  4. Experimental Models of Ocular Infection with Toxoplasma Gondii

    PubMed Central

    Dukaczewska, Agata; Tedesco, Roberto; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocular toxoplasmosis is a vision-threatening disease and the major cause of posterior uveitis worldwide. In spite of the continuing global burden of ocular toxoplasmosis, many critical aspects of disease including the therapeutic approach to ocular toxoplasmosis are still under debate. To assist in addressing many aspects of the disease, numerous experimental models of ocular toxoplasmosis have been established. In this article, we present an overview on in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models of ocular toxoplasmosis available to date. Experimental studies on ocular toxoplasmosis have recently focused on mice. However, the majority of murine models established so far are based on intraperitoneal and intraocular infection with Toxoplasma gondii. We therefore also present results obtained in an in vivo model using peroral infection of C57BL/6 and NMRI mice that reflects the natural route of infection and mimics the disease course in humans. While advances have been made in ex vivo model systems or larger animals to investigate specific aspects of ocular toxoplasmosis, laboratory mice continue to be the experimental model of choice for the investigation of ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:26716018

  5. Posterior microphthalmos pigmentary retinopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pehere, Niranjan; Jalali, Subhadra; Deshmukh, Himanshu; Kannabiran, Chitra

    2011-04-01

    Posterior Microphthalmos Pigmentary Retinopathy Syndrome (PMPRS). Posterior microphthalmos (PM) is a relatively infrequent type of microphthalmos where posterior segment is predominantly affected with normal anterior segment measurements. Herein, we report two siblings with posterior microphthalmos retinopathy syndrome with postulated autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A 13-year-old child had PM and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and his 7-year-old sister had PM, RP, and foveoschisis. The genetics of this syndrome and variable phenotype is discussed. Importance of being aware of posterior microphthalmos and its posterior segment associations is highlighted.

  6. Toxoplasma seroprevalence in animals in northern India.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, M B; Gupta, S L; Gautam, O P

    1985-06-01

    In a serological survey of latent Toxoplasma prevalence on 3761 animals in northern India by the microtitre indirect haemagglutination test, 23.7 per cent were found to have antibody titres ranging from 1:4 to 1:1024. Seropositivity was recorded in 25.3 per cent of 1227 sheep, 30.3 per cent of 961 goats, 11.8 per cent of 603 horses, 19.3 per cent of 243 cattle, 15.7 per cent of 108 water buffaloes, 31.5 per cent of 178 pigs, 30.9 per cent of 175 dogs, 33.7 per cent of 80 cats and in 9.7 per cent of 186 bandicoot rats. Relevant epidemiological data has been furnished. High seropositivity in food animals and frequent isolations of Toxoplasma highlight the likely public health implications of the findings.

  7. Posterior Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  8. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  9. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  10. Toxoplasma gondii infection in horses. A review.

    PubMed

    Tassi, P

    2007-06-01

    This review updates those written by Dubey and Beattie in 1988 (1988a) and by Tenter et al in 2000, on pathological and epidemiological aspects of Toxoplasma infection in horses. Under natural conditions, seroprevalence may variate from 0% up to 90%. This wide variation may be due to the sensitivity of the serological methods, to the age of animals, to the geographical area, and even to the hygienic condition of the farms and farm management. With few exceptions, horses are considered one of the less sensitive specie to the pathogenic effect of Toxoplasma gondii. In fact, neither under experimental nor under natural condition a genuine pathologic picture related to the toxoplasmic infection has been described. In one occasion the organism has been isolated from an eye condition and in others a connection between a higher frequency of unspecified pathological conditions and a positive response to serological test for Toxoplasma has been speculated. Diaplacental transmission and the following abortion have been only occasionally reported, and at least in one case in a quite trustworthy way, therefore it must be considered possible, though rare. Although infection of humans due to the consumption of horse meat has never been reported, the existence of a possible risk arouses by the demonstration of the presence of parasite stages in either naturally or experimentally infected horses, which resulted to be infective for mice and/or cats.

  11. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in cats from Colombo, Sri Lanka

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cats are essential in the life cycle of Toxoplasma gondii because they are the only hosts that can excrete the environmentally-resistant oocysts in nature. Nothing is known of the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in cats from Sri Lanka. Serum samples from 86 cats from Colombo, Sri Lanka were tested f...

  12. Inhibition of Toxoplasma gondii protein synthesis by azithromycin.

    PubMed Central

    Blais, J; Garneau, V; Chamberland, S

    1993-01-01

    Azithromycin was shown to specifically inhibit the protein synthesis of Toxoplasma gondii in experimental systems by using free tachyzoites and T. gondii-infected mouse macrophages. RNA synthesis of the parasite was not affected by azithromycin. Inhibition of protein synthesis was also proportional to the relative anti-Toxoplasma activity of three macrolides. PMID:8215287

  13. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  14. Contribution of the Residual Body in the Spatial Organization of Toxoplasma gondii Tachyzoites within the Parasitophorous Vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Muñiz-Hernández, S.; González del Carmen, M.; Mondragón, M.; Mercier, C.; Cesbron, M. F.; Mondragón-González, S. L.; González, S.; Mondragón, R.

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii proliferates and organizes within a parasitophorous vacuole in rosettes around a residual body and is surrounded by a membranous nanotubular network whose function remains unclear. Here, we characterized structure and function of the residual body in intracellular tachyzoites of the RH strain. Our data showed the residual body as a body limited by a membrane formed during proliferation of tachyzoites probably through the secretion of components and a pinching event of the membrane at the posterior end. It contributes in the intravacuolar parasite organization by the membrane connection between the tachyzoites posterior end and the residual body membrane to give place to the rosette conformation. Radial distribution of parasites in rosettes favors an efficient exteriorization. Absence of the network and presence of atypical residual bodies in a ΔGRA2-HXGPRT knock-out mutant affected the intravacuolar organization of tachyzoites and their exteriorization. PMID:22190852

  15. TOXOPLASMA GONDII IN MESOCARNIVORES IN CANADA SEROPREVALENCE OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII IN MESOCARNIVORE OF THE CANADIAN PRAIRIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The protozoon Toxoplasma gondii has a worldwide distribution and affects many species of warm-blooded animals. In the Canadian prairies, mesocarnivores such as striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) and raccoons (Procyon lotor) have experienced an increase in density and distribution and are in close c...

  16. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  17. Toxoplasma-induced abortion in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P

    1981-04-01

    Fifteen pregnant goats serologically negative for Toxoplasma gondii were inoculated orally with 10, 100, or 1,000 infective oocysts of the GT-1 strain of T gondii. Four goats received 10 oocysts, 6 received 100 oocysts, and 5 received 1,000 oocysts. Six pregnant goats served as noninoculated controls. All inoculated goats became pyretic (40-41 C) and were dyspneic between 4 and 12 days after inoculation (DAI). Two goats inoculated in early pregnancy (68 and 70 days) with 100 oocysts had enlarged uteri; fetal membranes but no fetuses were found when they were killed 86 and 88 DAI. Three goats aborted or had a stillborn kid 9, 10, and 11 DAI. The remaining 10 goats delivered kids infected with T gondii; 8 goats had at least 1 stillborn kid, and 2 goats had infected but otherwise normal kids at birth. Placenta and tissues of fetuses and kids were inoculated into mice for determination of Toxoplasma infectivity. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from the fetal placenta of 6 of 7 goats as early as 10 DAI and as late as 62 DAI. The organism was isolated from every fetus or kid that was born 18 DAI but not from fetuses or kids born 9, 10, and 11 DAI. Two kids were born 15 DAI; T gondii was isolated from 1 kid but not from the other, suggesting that T gondii invaded fetal tissues between 11 and 15 DAI. Of the 20 transplacentally infected kids, T gondii was isolated more frequently from the skeletal muscle, heart, lung, and brain than from other tissues.

  18. Toxoplasma oocysts as a public health problem.

    PubMed

    Torrey, E Fuller; Yolken, Robert H

    2013-08-01

    Waterborne outbreaks of Toxoplasma gondii have focused attention on the importance of oocysts shed in the feces of infected cats. Cat feces deposited annually into the environment in the United States total approximately 1.2 million metric tons. The annual oocyst burden measured in community surveys is 3 to 434 oocysts per square foot and is greater in areas where cats selectively defecate. Because a single oocyst can possibly cause infection, this oocyst burden represents a major potential public health problem. The proper disposal of cat litter, keeping cats indoors, reducing the feral cat population, and protecting the play areas of children might potentially reduce the oocyst burden. PMID:23849140

  19. Detection Method of TOXOPLASMA GONDII Tachyzoites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eassa, Souzan; Bose, Chhanda; Alusta, Pierre; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Tachyzoites are considered to be the most important stage of Toxoplasma gondii which causes toxoplasmosis. T. gondii is, an obligate intracellular parasite which infects a wide range of cells. The present study was designed to develop a method for an early detection of T. gondii tachyzoites. The method comprised of a binding assay which was analyzed using principal component and cluster analysis. Our data showed that glycoconjugates GC1, GC2, GC3 and GC10 exhibit a significantly higher binding affinity for T. gondii tachyzoites as compared to controls (T. gondii only, PAA only, GC 1, 2, 3, and 10 only).

  20. Transmission of toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma gondii) by foods.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Karen Signori; Franco, Regina M B; Leal, Diego A G

    2010-01-01

    Protozoan foodborne diseases are generally underrecognized. Toxoplasma gondii is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, one of the most prevalent parasitic infections to humans and domestic animals. The most likely source of T. gondii occurring through food is the consumption of raw or undercooked meat contaminated with tissue cysts. Sporulated T. gondii oocysts, from the feces of infected cats, present in the environment are a potential source of infection. The ingestion of water contaminated with oocysts and the eating of unwashed raw vegetables or fruits were identified as an important risk factor in most epidemiological studies. This review presents information and data to show the importance of T. gondii transmission by foods. PMID:20691951

  1. Toxoplasma gondii and the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Feustel, Sabrina M.; Meissner, Markus; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is characterized by asymptomatic latent infection in the central nervous system and skeletal muscle tissue in the majority of immunocompentent individuals. Life-threatening reactivation of the infection in immunocompromized patients originates from rupture of Toxoplasma cysts in the brain. While major progress has been made in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of infection the mechanism(s) of neuroinvasion of the parasite remains poorly understood. The present review presents the current understanding of blood-brain barrier (patho)physiology and the interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with cells of the blood-brain barrier. PMID:22460645

  2. Gossypiboma mimicking posterior urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bindey; Kumar, Prem; Sinha, Sanjay Kumar; Sinha, Neelam; Hasan, Zaheer; Thakur, Vinit Kumar; Anand, Utpal; Priyadarshi, Rajiv Nayan; Mandal, Manish

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Foreign bodies in the urogenital tract are not uncommon. Hairpins, glass rods, umbilical tapes, ball point pen are described in lower urogenital tract. Retained gauze piece (gossypiboma) in posterior urethra may cause diagnostic dilemma. Symptoms and investigations may mimic stricture of posterior urethra. PRESENTATION OF CASE Two cases of retained gauze pieces in the urethra are described here. The micturating cystourethrogram was suggestive of posterior urethral stricture. DISCUSSION Two cases described here had retained gauze piece as a cause of filling defect and abnormal appearance in the micturating cystourethrogram. Gossypiboma may be a possibility where posterior urethral stricture are seen after previous surgery in paediatric age group. CONCLUSION In the setting of previous urogenital surgery gossypiboma should be kept in the differential diagnosis where posterior urethral stricture are seen in the paediatric age group. PMID:23500749

  3. Injuries of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Moyer, R A; Marchetto, P A

    1993-04-01

    A review of the anatomy and biomechanics of the posterior cruciate ligament, and the systematic approach for the diagnosis and treatment of isolated posterior cruciate ligament injuries and posterior cruciate ligament insufficiency in combination with other ligamentous instabilities is discussed.

  4. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cun; Xu, Shichao; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Sun, Shuqing; Feng, Teilin; Zi, Yan; Liang, Chu; Luo, Hao

    2009-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a kind of microscopic parasite that may infect humans, and there are increasing concerns on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. This research highlights a new type of molecular beacon (MB) fluorescent probe for Toxoplasma DNA testing. We combined high-efficiency fluorescent inorganic core-shell quantum dots-CdTe/ZnS (as fluorescent energy donor) and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) to the single-strand DNA of Toxoplasma gondii, and a molecular beacon sensing system based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was achieved. Core-shell quantum dots CdTe/ZnS was firstly prepared in aqueous solution, and the influencing factor of its fluorescent properties, including CdTe/Na2S/Zn(CH3COO)2 (v/v), dependence of reaction time, temperature, and pH, is investigated systematically. The synthesized quantum dots and molecular beacon were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis), fluorescent spectrophotometer (FS), respectively. The TEM results showed that CdTe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots is ~11nm in size, and the quantum dots is water-soluble well. The sensing ability of target DNA of assembled MB was investigated, and results showed that the target Toxoplasma gonddi DNA can be successfully detected by measuring the change of fluorescence intensity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  5. Comparison of aesthetic posterior restorations.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, R D

    1991-09-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased desire by the profession and the public for an aesthetic restoration that will restore a posterior tooth to its original form and function. The currently available aesthetic posterior restoration materials and techniques are porcelain, cast ceramic, direct composite, direct-indirect composite, indirect composite, and CAD-CAM fabrications. The indications and contraindications of these restorative materials and proper diagnosis and case selection are described.

  6. Development of forward genetics in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, L. David

    2009-01-01

    The development of forward genetics as a functional system in Toxoplasma gondii spanned more than three decades from the mid-1970s until now. The initial demonstration of experimental genetics relied on chemically-induced drug resistant mutants that were crossed by co-infecting cats, collecting oocysts, sporulating and hatching progeny in vitro. To capitalize on this, genetic markers were employed to develop linkage maps by tracking inheritance through experimental crosses. In all, three generations of genetic maps were developed to define the chromosomes, estimate recombination rates, and provide a system for linkage analysis. Ultimately this genetic map would become the foundation for the assembly of the T. gondii genome, which was derived from whole genome shotgun sequencing, into a chromosome-centric view. Finally, application of forward genetics to multigenic biological traits showed the potential to map and identify specific genes that control complex phenotypes including virulence. PMID:19254720

  7. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in Western Romania.

    PubMed

    Olariu, Tudor Rares; Petrescu, Cristina; Darabus, Gheorghe; Lighezan, Rodica; Mazilu, Octavian

    2015-08-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that most commonly causes asymptomatic infection in immunocompetent hosts, but can have devastating consequences in congenitally infected infants and immunocompromised patients. We evaluated the seroprevalence of T. gondii in the general population in Western Romania. Sera from 304 individuals were analysed with the Pastorex Toxo test, which allows the simultaneous detection of T. gondii IgG and/or IgM antibodies. T. gondii antibodies were demonstrated in 197 individuals (64.8%) and the prevalence increased with age: 35.0% in those < 20 years versus 76.8% in those ≥ 70 years (p < 0.001). There was a higher prevalence of T. gondii antibodies in rural areas (76.9%) than in urban regions (55.3%) (p < 0.001). Our results suggest a high prevalence of T. gondii antibodies in Western Romania.

  8. Clinical spectrum, diagnostic criteria, and polymerase chain reaction of aqueous humor in viral and toxoplasma detection in Fuchs’ uveitis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sabhapandit, Swapnali; Murthy, Somasheila I; Balne, Praveen K; Sangwan, Virender Singh; Sumanth, V; Reddy, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to describe the clinical features and diagnostic criteria of Fuchs’ uveitis (FU) and to determine whether it has an association with virus and toxoplasma in the aqueous humor during cataract surgery. Setting and Design: This is a prospective, case–control study. Materials and Methods: Patients with FU (n = 25), anterior uveitis (n = 15), and no uveitis (normal) (n = 50) were included based on predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria for all three groups. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of aqueous humor and serum for rubella, herpes simplex virus (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), and toxoplasma was done using conventional uniplex PCR. Statistical Analysis: It was done using SPSS software using Chi-square test for categorical variables, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Ninety patients were enrolled in the study in three groups, comparable for age, gender, and laterality of ocular involvement. All patients had diffuse keratic precipitates in FU group (P = 0001) with none having posterior synechiae (P = 0.046) which was statistically significant when compared to anterior uveitis patients. Iris nodules were noted in one case in both groups. Serum and aqueous PCR was negative for detection of VZV, CMV, toxoplasma, and rubella in all groups. PCR for HSV was positive in one patient in “normal” group but was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Our study shows that diagnosis of FU is mainly clinical. There appears to be no role of aqueous humor testing for viruses by PCR to aid in etiological diagnosis. PMID:27688274

  9. Children's understanding of posterior probability.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Vittorio; Gonzalez, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Do young children have a basic intuition of posterior probability? Do they update their decisions and judgments in the light of new evidence? We hypothesized that they can do so extensionally, by considering and counting the various ways in which an event may or may not occur. The results reported in this paper showed that from the age of five, children's decisions under uncertainty (Study 1) and judgments about random outcomes (Study 2) are correctly affected by posterior information. From the same age, children correctly revise their decisions in situations in which they face a single, uncertain event, produced by an intentional agent (Study 3). The finding that young children have some understanding of posterior probability supports the theory of naive extensional reasoning, and contravenes some pessimistic views of probabilistic reasoning, in particular the evolutionary claim that the human mind cannot deal with single-case probability. PMID:17391661

  10. Rethinking "posterior" tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Currently, many clinicians who help with breastfeeding problems are diagnosing "posterior" tongue-tie in infants and performing or referring for frenotomy. In this "Speaking Out" article, I argue that the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie has successfully raised awareness of the importance of impaired tongue function in breastfeeding difficulty. However, the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie also applies a reductionist, medicalized theoretical frame to the complex problem of impaired tongue function, risking unintended outcomes. Impaired tongue function arises out of multiple interacting and co-evolving factors, including the interplay between social behaviors concerning breastfeeding and mother-infant biology. Consideration of theoretical frames is vital if we are to build an evidence base through efficient use of the scarce resources available for clinical breastfeeding research and minimize unintended outcomes.

  11. Unsuccessful outcomes after posterior urethroplasty.

    PubMed

    Engel, Oliver; Fisch, Margit

    2015-03-01

    Posterior urethroplasty is the most common strategy for the treatment of post-traumatic urethral injuries. Especially in younger patients, post-traumatic injuries are a common reason for urethral strictures caused by road traffic accidents, with pelvic fracture or direct trauma to the perineum. In many cases early endoscopic realignment is the first attempt to restore the junction between proximal and distal urethra, but in some cases primary realignment is not possible or not enough to treat the urethral injury. In these cases suprapubic cystostomy alone and delayed repair by stricture excision and posterior urethroplasty is an alternative procedure to minimise the risk of stricture recurrence.

  12. A high prevalence of Toxoplasma in Australian chickens.

    PubMed

    Chumpolbanchorn, K; Lymbery, A J; Pallant, L J; Pan, S; Sukthana, Y; Thompson, R C A

    2013-09-01

    A small survey was undertaken of commercially reared free-range chickens in Western Australia using serology and molecular detection. Eighteen out of 20 serum samples showed antibody responses with titers of 1:64 in 5 chickens and ≥ 1:128 in 13 chickens. DNA extracted from 22 out of 50 tissue samples, 10 brains and 12 spleens, were positive by nested PCR, and sequencing at the B1 locus on DNA from 3 brain and 3 spleen samples confirmed that 2 isolates were Toxoplasma gondii, Type I, and 4 Type II/III. The high prevalence of Toxoplasma infection found in commercial, free-range chickens raises public health issues with respect to both exposure in the workplace, during carcass processing, and subsequent transmission during food handling and/or consumption as food. The results of this study emphasize the need for more data on the incidence of Toxoplasma infection in domestic animals and humans in Australia.

  13. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in domestic sheep in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Verhelst, D; De Craeye, S; Vanrobaeys, M; Czaplicki, G; Dorny, P; Cox, E

    2014-09-15

    Even though infected sheep are a potential source of Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans, information is lacking concerning the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in sheep in Belgium. We examined 3170 serum samples for anti-Toxoplasma IgG in sheep by total lysate antigen (TLA) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). IgG to T. gondii was demonstrated in 87.4% of the tested sheep and in 96.2% of the 209 tested flocks. The seroprevalences in Antwerp (65.2%) and Wallonia (68.6%) are statistically lower than in the other regions in Belgium (96.7-97.8%) (P<0.05). The present study is the first report that analyzed the prevalence of T. gondii infection in sheep in Belgium and confirms the high prevalence of Toxoplasma-specific IgG antibodies in the sheep population.

  14. Stereolithography for Posterior Fossa Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Celso; Dujovny, Manuel; Evenhouse, Raymond; Charbel, Fady T.; Sadler, Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Posterior fossa cranioplasty has been suggested for improvement of neurological symptoms following craniectomy. However, there is no particular recommendation in the literature about techniques for prosthesis manufacture and implantation. We report our experience using rapid prototyping technology and stereolithography for pre-surgical implant design and production of cranioplasties. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171056

  15. Neonatal posterior fossa subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Coker, S; Beltran, R; Fine, M

    1987-07-01

    Hemorrhage into the posterior fossa is a rare neurosurgical emergency in neonates. CT scanning is diagnostic. Blood layering under the apex of the tentorium cerebelli, however, may resemble a dilated vascular structure, and the rigidity of the pressured tentorium may prevent upward transmission of increased intracranial pressure, resulting in a soft fontanelle.

  16. Recent advances in Toxoplasma gondii immunotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sherene Swee-Yin; Othman, Rofina Yasmin

    2014-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. T. gondii is widespread globally and causes severe diseases in individuals with impaired immune defences as well as congenitally infected infants. The high prevalence rate in some parts of the world such as South America and Africa, coupled with the current drug treatments that trigger hypersensitivity reactions, makes the development of immunotherapeutics intervention a highly important research priority. Immunotherapeutics strategies could either be a vaccine which would confer a pre-emptive immunity to infection, or passive immunization in cases of disease recrudescence or recurrent clinical diseases. As the severity of clinical manifestations is often greater in developing nations, the development of well-tolerated and safe immunotherapeutics becomes not only a scientific pursuit, but a humanitarian enterprise. In the last few years, much progress has been made in vaccine research with new antigens, novel adjuvants, and innovative vaccine delivery such as nanoparticles and antigen encapsulations. A literature search over the past 5 years showed that most experimental studies were focused on DNA vaccination at 52%, followed by protein vaccination which formed 36% of the studies, live attenuated vaccinations at 9%, and heterologous vaccination at 3%; while there were few on passive immunization. Recent progress in studies on vaccination, passive immunization, as well as insights gained from these immunotherapeutics is highlighted in this review.

  17. Recent Advances in Toxoplasma gondii Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Rofina Yasmin

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. T. gondii is widespread globally and causes severe diseases in individuals with impaired immune defences as well as congenitally infected infants. The high prevalence rate in some parts of the world such as South America and Africa, coupled with the current drug treatments that trigger hypersensitivity reactions, makes the development of immunotherapeutics intervention a highly important research priority. Immunotherapeutics strategies could either be a vaccine which would confer a pre-emptive immunity to infection, or passive immunization in cases of disease recrudescence or recurrent clinical diseases. As the severity of clinical manifestations is often greater in developing nations, the development of well-tolerated and safe immunotherapeutics becomes not only a scientific pursuit, but a humanitarian enterprise. In the last few years, much progress has been made in vaccine research with new antigens, novel adjuvants, and innovative vaccine delivery such as nanoparticles and antigen encapsulations. A literature search over the past 5 years showed that most experimental studies were focused on DNA vaccination at 52%, followed by protein vaccination which formed 36% of the studies, live attenuated vaccinations at 9%, and heterologous vaccination at 3%; while there were few on passive immunization. Recent progress in studies on vaccination, passive immunization, as well as insights gained from these immunotherapeutics is highlighted in this review. PMID:25548409

  18. Recently Acquired Toxoplasma gondii Infection, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Muccioli, Cristina; Belfort, Rubens; Holland, Gary N.; Roberts, Jacquelin M.; Silveira, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    The city of Erechim, Brazil, has a 17% prevalence of ocular toxoplasmosis, and type 1 Toxoplasma gondii predominates. To examine risk factors for acute T. gondii infection in this area, we administered a questionnaire to recently infected persons (n = 131) and seronegative controls (n = 110). Eating undercooked meat; having a garden; working in the garden or yard more than once per week; eating rare meat; eating cured, dried, or smoked meat; eating frozen lamb; and being male increased risk for T. gondii infection in univariate analysis. Risk factors independently associated with acute T. gondii infection in multivariate analysis were working in the garden (odds ratio [OR] 2.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27–4.33) and eating frozen lamb (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.15–3.67). Among women (n = 86), having had children markedly increased the risk for T. gondii infection (OR 14.94, 95% CI 3.68–60.73). PMID:16704805

  19. Characterization of aspartyl aminopeptidase from Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Cheng, Ziying; Jia, Honglin; Zheng, Yonghui

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidases have emerged as new promising drug targets for the development of novel anti-parasitic drugs. An aspartyl aminopeptidase-like gene has been identified in the Toxoplasma gondii genome (TgAAP), although its function remains unknown. In this study, we characterized TgAAP and performed functional analysis of the gene product. Firstly, we expressed a functional recombinant TgAAP (rTgAAP) protein in Escherichia coli, and found that it required metal ions for activity and showed a substrate preference for N-terminal acidic amino acids Glu and Asp. Then, we evaluated the function and drug target potential of TgAAP using the CRISPR/Cas9 knockout system. Western blotting demonstrated the deletion of TgAAP in the knockout strain. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis showed that TgAAP was localized in the cytoplasm of the wild-type parasite, but was not expressed in the knockout strain. Phenotype analysis revealed that TgAAP knockout inhibited the attachment/invasion, replication, and substrate-specific activity in T. gondii. Finally, the activity of drug CID 23724194, previously described as targeting Plasmodium and malarial parasite AAP, was tested against rTgAAP and the parasite. Overall, TgAAP knockout affected the growth of T. gondii but did not completely abolish parasite replication and growth. Therefore, TgAAP may comprise a useful adjunct drug target of T. gondii. PMID:27678060

  20. Toxoplasma gondii Chitinase Induces Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Sardinha-Silva, Aline; da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Pessoni, André Moreira; Pinzan, Camila Figueiredo; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Cecílio, Nerry Tatiana; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Damásio, André Ricardo Lima; Pedersoli, Wellington Ramos; Mineo, José Roberto; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite found worldwide that is able to chronically infect almost all vertebrate species, especially birds and mammalians. Chitinases are essential to various biological processes, and some pathogens rely on chitinases for successful parasitization. Here, we purified and characterized a chitinase from T. gondii. The enzyme, provisionally named Tg_chitinase, has a molecular mass of 13.7 kDa and exhibits a Km of 0.34 mM and a Vmax of 2.64. The optimal environmental conditions for enzymatic function were at pH 4.0 and 50°C. Tg_chitinase was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of highly virulent T. gondii RH strain tachyzoites, mainly at the apical extremity. Tg_chitinase induced macrophage activation as manifested by the production of high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, a pathogenic hallmark of T. gondii infection. In conclusion, to our knowledge, we describe for the first time a chitinase of T. gondii tachyzoites and provide evidence that this enzyme might influence the pathogenesis of T. gondii infection. PMID:26659253

  1. Molecular detection of Toxoplasma gondii in snakes.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Vahid; Teymurzadeh, Shohreh; Karimi, Gholamreza; Nasiri, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite, is responsible for one of the most common zoonotic parasitic diseases in almost all warm-blooded vertebrates worldwide, and it is estimated that about one-third of the world human population is chronically infected with this parasite. Little is known about the circulation of T. gondii in snakes and this study for the first time aimed to evaluate the infection rates of snakes by this parasite by PCR methods. The brain of 68 Snakes, that were collected between May 2012 and September 2015 and died after the hold in captivity, under which they were kept for taking poisons, were examined for the presence of this parasite. DNA was extracted and Nested-PCR method was carried out with two of pairs of primers to detect the 344 bp fragment of T. gondii GRA6 gene. Five positive nested-PCR products were directly sequenced in the forward and reverse directions by Sequetech Company (Mountain View, CA). T. gondii GRA6 gene were detected from 55 (80.88%) of 68 snakes brains. Sequencing of the GRA6 gene revealed 98-100% of similarity with T. gondii sequences deposited in GenBank. To our knowledge, this is the first study of molecular detection of T. gondii in snakes and our findings show a higher frequency of this organism among them.

  2. Molecular detection of Toxoplasma gondii in snakes.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Vahid; Teymurzadeh, Shohreh; Karimi, Gholamreza; Nasiri, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite, is responsible for one of the most common zoonotic parasitic diseases in almost all warm-blooded vertebrates worldwide, and it is estimated that about one-third of the world human population is chronically infected with this parasite. Little is known about the circulation of T. gondii in snakes and this study for the first time aimed to evaluate the infection rates of snakes by this parasite by PCR methods. The brain of 68 Snakes, that were collected between May 2012 and September 2015 and died after the hold in captivity, under which they were kept for taking poisons, were examined for the presence of this parasite. DNA was extracted and Nested-PCR method was carried out with two of pairs of primers to detect the 344 bp fragment of T. gondii GRA6 gene. Five positive nested-PCR products were directly sequenced in the forward and reverse directions by Sequetech Company (Mountain View, CA). T. gondii GRA6 gene were detected from 55 (80.88%) of 68 snakes brains. Sequencing of the GRA6 gene revealed 98-100% of similarity with T. gondii sequences deposited in GenBank. To our knowledge, this is the first study of molecular detection of T. gondii in snakes and our findings show a higher frequency of this organism among them. PMID:27522027

  3. Creep of posterior dental composites.

    PubMed

    Papadogianis, Y; Boyer, D B; Lakes, R S

    1985-01-01

    The creep of microspecimens of posterior dental composites was studied using a torsional creep apparatus. Shear stresses were maintained for 3 h and recovery was followed for 50 h. Creep curves were obtained at 21, 37, and 50 degrees C and four torque levels. The effect of conditioning the specimens in water up to 8 weeks was studied. The posterior composites exhibited linear viscoelastic behavior at low deformations. They had higher shear moduli and greater resistance to creep than conventional and microfilled composites. In aging experiments, maximum shear moduli occurred when specimens were 48 h to 1 week old. Subsequent softening was attributed to water absorption. Residual strain was highest when the composites were stressed within 24 h of initiating polymerization. Residual strain was very low in specimens 48 h to 8 weeks of age.

  4. Posterior cruciate ligament of the knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a powerful ligament extending from the top-rear surface of the tibia to the bottom-front surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from posterior instability.

  5. Osteosarcoma of the posterior maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Prabhusankar, K.; Karande, Amol; Jerry, Jeethu J.; Rishal, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a very uncommon tumor of the maxillofacial region. Due to the occurrence of the tumor at a young age and its aggressive nature, radical surgery forms the only modality of treatment. A combination of radiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy has been used for the management of this tumor. A case report of osteosarcoma of the posterior maxilla in an adolescent with a 1-year disease-free follow-up is presented in this report. PMID:27652252

  6. Osteosarcoma of the posterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Prabhusankar, K; Karande, Amol; Jerry, Jeethu J; Rishal, Yousef

    2016-08-01

    Osteosarcoma is a very uncommon tumor of the maxillofacial region. Due to the occurrence of the tumor at a young age and its aggressive nature, radical surgery forms the only modality of treatment. A combination of radiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy has been used for the management of this tumor. A case report of osteosarcoma of the posterior maxilla in an adolescent with a 1-year disease-free follow-up is presented in this report. PMID:27652252

  7. Osteosarcoma of the posterior maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Prabhusankar, K.; Karande, Amol; Jerry, Jeethu J.; Rishal, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a very uncommon tumor of the maxillofacial region. Due to the occurrence of the tumor at a young age and its aggressive nature, radical surgery forms the only modality of treatment. A combination of radiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy has been used for the management of this tumor. A case report of osteosarcoma of the posterior maxilla in an adolescent with a 1-year disease-free follow-up is presented in this report.

  8. Detection of toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Sun, Bo; Zheng, Guo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a microscopic parasite that may infect humans, so there is an increasing concern on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. We currently report a rapid and sensitive method for Toxoplasma gondii based on molecular beacon (MB) probe. The probe based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with a stem-loop DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with CdTe/ZnS quantum dots (energy donor) at 5' end and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) at 3' end, respectively. The probe was synthesized in PBS buffer at pH 8.2, room temperature for 24 h. Then target DNA was injected under the condition of 37°C, hybridization for 2 h, in Tris-HCl buffer. The data from fluorescence spectrum (FS) showed that ca 65% of emitted fluorescence was quenched, and about 50% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed after adding target DNA, which indicated that the target DNA was successfully detected by MB probe. The detecting limitation was determined as ca 5 nM. Moreover, specificity of the probe was investigated by adding target DNA with one-base-pair mismatch, the low fluorescence recovery indicated the high specificity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  9. Identification of a sporozoite-specific antigen from Toxoplasma gondii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is an apicomplexan parasite that causes the disease toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasmosis results in the loss of life, sight, cognitive and motor function, and hearing in congenitally infected individuals. While the sources of T. gondii infection have been established, the factors influen...

  10. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in marine mammals in Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii infection in marine mammals is important because they are considered as a sentinel for contamination of seas with T. gondii oocysts, and toxoplasmosis causes mortality in these animals, particularly sea otters. Seroprevalence of T. gondii infection was determined in 75 captive mari...

  11. Genetic diversity among sea otter isolates of Toxoplasma gondii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) have been reported to become infected with Toxoplasma gondii and at times succumb to clinical disease. The mode of marine contamination has been the subject of recent papers. Because of their susceptibility these animals can serve as a sentinel for contamination of marine...

  12. ISOLATION OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII FROM BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS (TURSIOPS TRUNCATUS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii infection in marine mammals is intriguing and indicative of contamination of the ocean environment and coastal waters with oocysts. In previous serological surveys > 90% of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from the coasts of Florida, South Carolina, and California had antib...

  13. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in seabirds from Abrolhos Archipelago, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a coccidian parasite that infects almost all warm-blooded animals, including birds. Abrolhos is an archipelago of five islands, located in the Atlantic Ocean, 56 nautical kilometers from the south coast of the state of Bahia, northeastern Brazil. Part of this archipelago is a Na...

  14. SPORULATION AND SURVIVAL OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII OOCYSTS IN SEA WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1992, we have been collaborating in studies on southern sea otters (Enhdyra lutris nereis) as part of a program to define factors which may be responsible for limiting the growth of the southern sea otter population. We previously demonstrated Toxoplasma gondii in sea otter...

  15. Toxoplasma gondii: epidemiology, feline clinical aspects, and prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite of birds and mammals. Cats are the only definitive host and thus the only source of infective oocysts, but other mammals and birds can develop tissue cysts. While feline infections are typically asymptomatic, infection during human pregnancy can cause severe disease i...

  16. ISOLATION OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII FROM ANIMALS IN DURANGO, MEXICO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known concerning the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in people and animals in rural Mexico. Serum samples and tissues from 150 dogs, 150 cats, 65 opossums (Didelphis virginianus), 249 rats (Rattus spp.), 127 mice (Mus musculus), and 69 squirrels (Spermophilus variegatus) from t...

  17. Genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii in animals and humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most common parasites of domestic, wild, and companion animals, and it also infects approximately 25% of the world’s human population. T. gondii has a complex life cycle. Sexual development occurs only in the cat gut, while asexual replication and transmission occur i...

  18. The neurotropic parasite Toxoplasma gondii increases dopamine metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The common parasite Toxoplasma gondii induces behavioral alterations in its hosts including phenotypes increasing the likelihood of its transmission in rodents and reports of psychobehavioral alterations in humans. We have found that elevated levels of dopamine are associated with the encysted stage...

  19. Population genetics, diversity and spread of virulence in Toxoplasma gondii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Globally, an estimated third of the human population harbors infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a single-celled eukaryotic parasite belonging to the phylum Apicomplexa (Dubey, 2010). Most infected persons are unaware of, and evidently unharmed by, the parasite cysts established in their muscles and/...

  20. Toxoplasma gondii infection in Blanford's fox (Vulpes cana)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatal toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a Blanford's fox (Vulpes cana) from the United Arab Emirates. Toxoplasma gondii-like tachyzoites were found associated with necrosis in intestine, spleen, liver, kidneys, lungs, skeletal muscle, brain and heart. Protozoal tachyzoites reacted positively with T. go...

  1. Experimental toxoplasma gondii infection in striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-three striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) without demonstrable antibodies in 1:25 serum dilution in the modified agglutination test (MAT) were fed sporulated Toxoplasma gondii oocysts (9 skunks) or tissue cysts (10 skunks), and 4 skunks (controls) were not given T. gondii. Skunks were bled be...

  2. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in wild carnivores from Spain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serum samples from 282 wild carnivores from different regions of Spain were tested for antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii by the modified agglutination test using a cut-off value of 1:25. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 22 of 27 (81.5%) of Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus), three of six European wildc...

  3. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII ISOLATES FROM CHICKENS FROM BRAZIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Until recently, Toxoplasma gondii was considered clonal with very little genetic variability. Recent studies indicate that T. gondii isolates from Brazil are genetically and biologically different from T. gondii isolates from USA and Europe. In the present study, we retyped 151 free range chicken is...

  4. The history and life cycle of Toxoplasma gondii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii are widely prevalent in humans and other animals on all continents. There are many thousands of references to this parasite in the literature, and it is not possible to give equal treatment to all authors and discoveries. The objective of this c...

  5. Toxoplasma gondii: from animals to humans

    PubMed Central

    Tenter, Astrid M.; Heckeroth, Anja R.; Weiss, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is one of the more common parasitic zoonoses world-wide. Its causative agent, Toxoplasma gondii, is a facultatively heteroxenous, polyxenous protozoon that has developed several potential routes of transmission within and between different host species. If first contracted during pregnancy, T. gondii may be transmitted vertically by tachyzoites that are passed to the foetus via the placenta. Horizontal transmission of T. gondii may involve three life-cycle stages, i.e. ingesting infectious oocysts from the environment or ingesting tissue cysts or tachyzoites which are contained in meat or primary offal (viscera) of many different animals. Transmission may also occur via tachyzoites contained in blood products, tissue transplants, or unpasteurised milk. However, it is not known which of these routes is more important epidemiologically. In the past, the consumption of raw or undercooked meat, in particular of pigs and sheep, has been regarded as a major route of transmission to humans. However, recent studies showed that the prevalence of T. gondii in meat-producing animals decreased considerably over the past 20 years in areas with intensive farm management. For example, in several countries of the European Union prevalences of T. gondii in fattening pigs are now <1%. Considering these data it is unlikely that pork is still a major source of infection for humans in these countries. However, it is likely that the major routes of transmission are different in human populations with differences in culture and eating habits. In the Americas, recent outbreaks of acute toxoplasmosis in humans have been associated with oocyst contamination of the environment. Therefore, future epidemiological studies on T. gondii infections should consider the role of oocysts as potential sources of infection for humans, and methods to monitor these are currently being developed. This review presents recent epidemiological data on T. gondii, hypotheses on the major routes of

  6. Toxoplasma gondii impairs memory in infected seniors.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Patrick D; Falkenstein, Michael; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    Almost 30% of humans present a Toxoplasma gondii positive antibody status and its prevalence increases with age. The central nervous system is the main target. However, little is known about the influence of asymptomatic i.e. latent Toxoplasmosis on cognitive functions in humans. To investigate neurocognitive dysfunctions in asymptomatic older adults with T. gondii positive antibody status a double-blinded neuropsychological study was conducted. The participants were classified from a population-based sample (N=131) of healthy participants with an age of 65 years and older into two groups with 42 individuals each: Toxoplasmosis positive (T-pos; IgG>50 IU/ml) and Toxoplasmosis negative (T-neg; IgG=0 IU/ml). The outcome measures were a computer-based working-memory test (2-back) and several standardized psychometric tests of memory and executive cognitive functions. T-pos seniors showed an impairment of different aspects of memory. The rate of correctly detected target symbols in a 2-back task was decreased by nearly 9% (P=0.020), corresponding to a performance reduction of about 35% in working memory relative to the T-neg group. Moreover, T-pos seniors had a lower performance in a verbal memory test, both regarding immediate recall (10% reduction; P=0.022), delayed recognition (6%; P=0.037) and recall from long-term memory assessed by the word fluency tests (12%; P=0.029). In contrast, executive functions were not affected. The effects remained mostly unchanged after controlling for medication. The impairment of memory functions in T-pos seniors was accompanied by a decreased self-reported quality of life. Because of the high prevalence of asymptomatic Toxoplasmosis and an increasing population of older adults this finding is of high relevance for public health.

  7. Combined Posterior and Anterior Ankle Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Peter E.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of combined anterior and posterior ankle pathology usually consists of either combined anterior and posterior arthrotomies or anterior ankle arthroscopy with an additional posterolateral portal. The first technique bears the risk of complications associated with the extensive exposure, the latter technique provides limited access to the posterior ankle joint. A case is described of combined anterior and posterior arthroscopy, with the patient lying prone and then turned supine, addressing both anterior and posterior ankle pathologies in one tempo. This minimally invasive combined approach allows quick recovery and early return to work and sports activities. PMID:23227391

  8. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy: beyond the original description].

    PubMed

    Avecillas-Chasín, Josué M; Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Bautista-Balbás, Luis

    2015-07-16

    Introduccion. La encefalopatia posterior reversible (EPR) es una entidad clinicorradiologica caracterizada tipicamente por cuadros de cefalea, alteraciones visuales y crisis epilepticas, asociada a edema vasogeno corticosubcortical reversible en la neuroimagen. Objetivo. Presentar una revision de los aspectos fisiopatologicos de esta entidad y tambien de las asociaciones de la EPR descritas en la bibliografia. Desarrollo. Existe una serie de factores desencadenantes bien conocidos, como las crisis hipertensivas, la eclampsia o ciertos medicamentos. La descripcion de cada vez mas casos atipicos desde un punto de vista clinico y radiologico, asi como de posibles nuevos factores desencadenantes, obliga a una redefinicion de la entidad. Conclusiones. La EPR es un conjunto de manifestaciones clinicas y radiologicas que no se pueden enmarcar dentro la palabra 'sindrome'. Aunque la EPR se ha comunicado como irreversible en ciertos casos, el concepto de reversibilidad debe mantenerse en la definicion de esta entidad, ya que, en la mayor parte de los casos, el rapido control de la condicion desencadenante de la EPR permite la reversibilidad de las lesiones.

  9. TOXOPLASMA AND VIRAL ANTIBODIES AMONG HIV PATIENTS AND INMATES IN CENTRAL JAVA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Sari, Yulia; Haryati, Sri; Raharjo, Irvan; Prasetyo, Afiono Agung

    2015-11-01

    In Indonesia, Toxoplasma and its associations with blood-borne viruses have been poorly studied. In order to study the association between anti-Toxoplasma antibodies and blood-borne viral antibodies, blood samples from 497 participants (375 inmates from four prisons in Central Java, Indonesia and 122 HIV patients at a Voluntary Counseling and Testing Clinic in Surakarta, Indonesia) were tested for serological markers of Toxoplasma, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II (HTLV-1/2). Anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM positivity rates were 41.6% and 3.6%, respectively. One point two percent of participants was positive for both anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies. Sixteen point five percent, 11.3%, 2.6% and 2.8% of participants were positive for anti- Toxoplasma IgG combined with anti-HCV antibodies, anti-Toxoplasma IgG combined with anti-HIV antibodies, anti-Toxoplasma IgM combined with anti-HIV antibodes and anti-Toxoplasma IgG combined with both anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, respectively. Anti-Toxoplasma IgM seropositivity was associated with anti-HIV (aOR = 4.3; 95% CI: 1.112-16.204, p = 0.034). Anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies were associated with anti-HCV (aOR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.749-4.538, p < 0.001) and history of injection drug use (aOR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.905-5.093, p < 0.001). In conclusion, we recommend patients with HIV, HCV infection and injection drug users should be screened for Toxoplasma infection in Indonesia. PMID:26867355

  10. TOXOPLASMA AND VIRAL ANTIBODIES AMONG HIV PATIENTS AND INMATES IN CENTRAL JAVA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Sari, Yulia; Haryati, Sri; Raharjo, Irvan; Prasetyo, Afiono Agung

    2015-11-01

    In Indonesia, Toxoplasma and its associations with blood-borne viruses have been poorly studied. In order to study the association between anti-Toxoplasma antibodies and blood-borne viral antibodies, blood samples from 497 participants (375 inmates from four prisons in Central Java, Indonesia and 122 HIV patients at a Voluntary Counseling and Testing Clinic in Surakarta, Indonesia) were tested for serological markers of Toxoplasma, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II (HTLV-1/2). Anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM positivity rates were 41.6% and 3.6%, respectively. One point two percent of participants was positive for both anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies. Sixteen point five percent, 11.3%, 2.6% and 2.8% of participants were positive for anti- Toxoplasma IgG combined with anti-HCV antibodies, anti-Toxoplasma IgG combined with anti-HIV antibodies, anti-Toxoplasma IgM combined with anti-HIV antibodes and anti-Toxoplasma IgG combined with both anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, respectively. Anti-Toxoplasma IgM seropositivity was associated with anti-HIV (aOR = 4.3; 95% CI: 1.112-16.204, p = 0.034). Anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies were associated with anti-HCV (aOR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.749-4.538, p < 0.001) and history of injection drug use (aOR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.905-5.093, p < 0.001). In conclusion, we recommend patients with HIV, HCV infection and injection drug users should be screened for Toxoplasma infection in Indonesia.

  11. Prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in sport horses from Qazvin, Iran.

    PubMed

    Hajialilo, Elham; Ziaali, Naser; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Saraei, Mehrzad; Hajialilo, Mohammad

    2010-10-01

    In the present study, the prevalence of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in sport horses of Qazvin was examined using modified agglutination test (MAT). On 52 horse sera totally examined for anti-Toxoplasma antibodies, 37 horses (71.2%) were seropositive by MAT. Results of the present study showed a high rate of Toxoplasma infection in horses in Qazvin area. More comprehensive study on equine toxoplasmosis is recommended. PMID:20383793

  12. Early detection of Toxoplasma gondii-infected cats by interferon-gamma release assay.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qing; El-Ashram, Saeed; Liu, Xian-Yong; Suo, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Felines, the only definitive hosts that shed the environmentally-durable oocysts, are the key in the transmission of Toxoplasma gondii to all warm-blooded animals. They seroconvert as late as the third week and begin to shed oocysts as early as 3-8 days after being fed tissue cysts. Early detection of Toxoplasma-infected cats is crucial to evaluate Toxoplasma-contaminated environment and potential risks to public health. Moreover, it is fundamental for Toxoplasma infection control. Interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is a blood-based test assessing the presence of IFN-γ released by the T-lymphocytes directed against specific antigens, which is an ideal assay for early detection of Toxoplasma-infected cats. Here, cats were orally infected with the tissue cysts and blood was collected for toxoplasmic antigen stimulation, and the released IFN-γ was measured by ELISA. Results showed that Toxoplasma-infection was detected by IGRA as early as 4 days post-infection (dpi); while serum Toxoplasma IgM and IgG were detected by ELISA at 10 dpi and 14 dpi, respectively. Our findings demonstrated that IGRA-positive and ELISA-negative samples revealed an early Toxoplasma infection in cats, indicating a new strategy for the early diagnosis of Toxoplasma infection by combining IGRA and ELISA. Therefore, IGRA could emerge as a reliable diagnostic tool for the exploration of cat toxoplasmosis prevalence and its potential risks to public health.

  13. Foraminotomia cervical posterior en el tratamiento de conflictos foraminales

    PubMed Central

    Campero, Álvaro; Barrera, Ramiro; Ajler, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Introducción: La foraminomotima cervical posterior es un procedimiento utilizado para la descompresion radicular por via posterior y constituye una alternativa a la via clásica anterior. En este trabajo evaluamos nuestra serie de pacientes tratados por esta via. Método: Desde enero de 2008 a diciembre de 2011, 17 pacientes (18 foraminotomías) fueron operados por presentar cervicobraquialgia a causa de un conflicto foraminal, realizando un foraminotomía cervical posterior. Los pacientes fueron evaluados en el postoperatorio inmediato, al mes y a los 3 meses de la cirugía. Los parámetros para valorar los resultados fueron la Escala Análoga del Dolor (VAS), la Neck Disability Index y los criterios de Odom. Resultados: El dolor radicular por conflicto foraminal secundario a hernia de disco cervical fue el síntoma y la patología predominante. El nivel más afectado fue C5-C6. La resolución completa del dolor radicular se observó en casi todos los pacientes. La VAS preoperatoria en promedio fue de 8.8 (mínimo 8 – máximo 10), con una franca mejoría en todos los casos (0.4 en el último control). La media en la Neck Disability Index al inicio fue de 35.3 (mínimo 32 – máximo 45), con una evolución favorable en la evaluación final (0.6). Los Criterios de Odom para la evaluación de pacientes operados de columna cervical fueron satisfactorios con un promedio de 1.17. Se observaron complicaciones en 4 pacientes (23%), todas tuvieron una evolución favorable. No hubo infecciones, discitis ni empeoramiento de los síntomas preexistentes en ningún paciente. Conclusión: La foraminotomía cervical posterior es un procedimiento efectivo para el tratamiento del dolor radicular en los conflictos foraminales PMID:23596556

  14. Concentrating Toxoplasma gondii and Cyclospora cayetanensis from Surface Water and Drinking Water by Continuous Separation Channel Centrifugation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of continuous separation channel centrifugation for concentrating Toxoplasma gondii and Cyclospora cayetanensis from drinking water and environmental waters. Methods and Results: Ready-to-seed vials with known quantities of Toxoplasma gondii a...

  15. Sexual transmission of Toxoplasma gondii in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Rodriguez, Joana D'Ark; Souza, Fernando A; dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; dos Santos, Ricardo Silva; Rosanese, Walter Matheus; Lopes, Werik Renato Zanetti; Sakamoto, Cláudio Alessandro; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2013-07-01

    Male sheep of reproductive age were distributed into three groups: GI, a sheep inoculated (oral) with 2.0×10(5) oocysts of the P strain of Toxoplasma gondii; GII, a sheep infected (subcutaneous) with 1.0×10(6) tachyzoites of the RH strain of T. gondii; and GIII, a sheep kept as a control (not infected). After the inoculation of the males, 12 breeding ewes, which were not pregnant and which were serologically negative for reproductive diseases (particularly toxoplasmosis), were distributed into three groups, synchronized, and subsequently exposed to natural mating with previously inoculated males. The distribution was as follows: five ewes that underwent natural mating with the GI male, five ewes that were exposed to natural mating with the GII male, and two ewes that were mated with the non-infected male (control). Serum samples of all the ewes were collected on days -30, -14, -7, -1, and 0 (days before natural mating) and on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 11, 14, and weekly until birth; the presence of serum antibodies against T. gondii was assessed by IFAT. Using a bioassay and PCR, T. gondii was isolated from the semen of the infected reproducing sheep before mating. Following natural mating, 5 of the 12 females displayed antibodies specific for T. gondii; of these animals, two of the ewes underwent natural mating with the male inoculated with oocysts (GI) and three with the male infected with tachyzoites (GII). One of the females that displayed antibodies specific to this coccidian and that underwent natural mating with the GII sheep had a macerated fetus on the 70th day following coverage. Using a bioassay after the birth, it was possible to isolate T. gondii from samples of the "pool" of tissues from the five females that seroconverted after natural mating and from their respective lambs. Using PCR, the DNA of T. gondii was isolated from the "pool" of tissues from one and two females exposed to natural mating with the reproductive males infected with the oocysts and

  16. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  17. Huge interparietal posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Manuel Filipe Dias; de Santa Barbara, Rita de Cassia

    2015-01-01

    Congenital encephalocele is a neural tube defect characterized by a sac-like protrusion of the brain, meninges, and other intracranial structures through the skull, which is caused by an embryonic development abnormality. The most common location is at the occipital bone, and its incidence varies according to different world regions. We report a case of an 1-month and 7-day-old male child with a huge interparietal-posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele, a rare occurrence. Physical examination and volumetric computed tomography were diagnostic. The encephalocele was surgically resected. Intradural and extradural approaches were performed; the bone defect was not primarily closed. Two days after surgery, the patient developed hydrocephaly requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The surgical treatment of the meningohydroencephalocele of the interparietal-posterior fontanel may be accompanied by technical challenges and followed by complications due to the presence of large blood vessels under the overlying skin. In these cases, huge sacs herniate through large bone defects including meninges, brain, and blood vessels. The latter present communication with the superior sagittal sinus and ventricular system. A favorable surgical outcome generally follows an accurate strategy taking into account individual features of the lesion. PMID:26484324

  18. Posterior cerebral artery territory infarctions.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Carlo; Carrera, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Infarctions in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) occur in about 5-10% of all ischemic strokes. The PCA can be divided into 'deep' (P1 and P2 segments) and 'superficial' (P3 and P4) segments. Occlusion of paramedian perforating arteries arising from P1 causes rostral midbrain infarction with or without thalamic lesion. The classical clinical triad after thalamomesencephalic infarcts is hypersomnolence, cognitive deficits and vertical oculomotor paresis. Two main arterial groups arise from P2: infarction in the territory of the thalamogeniculate arteries causes severe contralateral hypesthesia and ataxia, whereas infarction in the territory of the posterior choroidal arteries results in sectoranopia with involvement of the lateral geniculate body. After superficial PCA infarcts, visual field defects and somatosensory deficits are the most frequent signs. Additionally, disorders of reading may be seen after unilateral left infarction and disorientation for place and visual neglect after right lesion. After bilateral PCA infarcts, amnesia, cortical blindness (the patient cannot see but pretend he can) may occur. Acute thrombolysis is as useful after PCA infarctions as after anterior circulation strokes. Mortality after PCA strokes is low, but long-term behavioral and cognitive deficits are underestimated.

  19. Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection with a magnetic molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma Gondii infection is widespread in humans worldwide and reported infection rates range from 3%-70%, depending on the populations or geographic areas, and it has been recognized as a potential food safety hazard in our daily life. A magnetic molecular beacon probe (mMBP), based on theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), was currently reported to detect Toxoplasma Gondii DNA. Nano-sized Fe3O4 were primarily prepared by coprecipitation method in aqueous phase with NaOH as precipitator, and was used as magnetic core. The qualified coreshell magnetic quantum dots (mQDs), i.e. CdTe(symbol)Fe3O4, were then achieved by layer-by-layer method when mol ratio of Fe3O4/CdTe is 1/3, pH at 6.0, 30 °C, and reactant solution was refluxed for 30 min, the size of mQDs were determined to be 12-15 nm via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over 70% overlap between emission spectrum of mQDs and absorbance spectrum of BHQ-2 was observed, this result suggests the synthesized mQDs and BHQ-2 can be utilized as energy donor and energy acceptor, respectively. The sensing probe was fabricated and a stem-loop Toxoplasma Gondii DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively. Target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected under conditions of 37 °C, hybridization for 2h, at pH8.0 in Tris-HCl buffer. About 30% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed via fluorescence spectrum (FS) after the Toxoplasma gondii DNA was added, which suggested that the Toxoplasma Gondii DNA was successfully detected. Specificity investigation of the mMBP indicated that relative low recovery of fluorescence intensity was obtained when the target DNA with one-base pair mismatch was added, this result indicated the high specificity of the sensing probe. Our research simultaneously indicated that mMBP can be conveniently separated from the unhybridized stem-loop DNA and target DNA, which will be meaningful in DNA sensing and purification process.

  20. Endoscopic management of posterior epistaxis: a review.

    PubMed

    McClurg, S W; Carrau, R

    2014-02-01

    The paradigm for the management of epistaxis, specifically posterior epistaxis, has undergone significant changes in the recent past. Recent prospective and retrospective data has shown that the endonasal surgical management of posterior epistaxis is superior to posterior nasal packing and angiography/embolization with regards to various factors including pain, cost-effectiveness, risk and overall control of bleeding. Endonasal endoscopic surgical techniques for posterior epistaxis include direct cauterization and transnasal endoscopic sphenopalatine/ posterior nasal artery ligation or cauterization with or without control of the anterior ethmoidal artery. Despite the evidence provided by the current literature, a universal treatment protocol has not yet been established. This review article provides an up-to-date assessment of the available literature, and presents a structured paradigm for the management of posterior epistaxis.

  1. Placement technique for direct posterior composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Javaheri, D S

    2001-04-01

    Due to improved materials, instrumentation, and placement techniques, composite resins have overcome the traditional complications associated with wear resistance, microleakage, sensitivity, and tight anatomical contacts. Composite resins have been utilized with increased frequency for direct posterior restorations capable of satisfying the growing aesthetic expectations of contemporary dental patients. When properly placed, posterior composites can provide successful and predictable restorations. This article presents clinical considerations for the aesthetic conservation of posterior restorations with composite resin materials.

  2. In vivo anti-Toxoplasma activity of aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Saraei, Mehrzad; Samadzadeh, Nafiseh; Khoeini, Javad; Shahnazi, Mojtaba; Nassiri-Asl, Marjan; Jahanihashemi, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): There are supportive evidences about the possible role of latent Toxoplasma. gondii infections on the behavior and neurologic functions, such as increased dopamine levels in the brain. The aim of this study was to examine anti-toxoplasma activity of aripiprazole that is an atypical anti-psychotic drug in mice. Materials and Methods: Mice were randomly divided into four groups, including; control, vehicle, aripiprazole 10 mg/kg, and aripiprazole 20 mg/kg. The mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with mice brain suspension containing tissue cysts. At the end of second month, the number of cysts was counted in smears prepared from brain homogenate by optical microscope. Results: There was no significant difference between mean logarithms of brain cyst numbers of aripiprazole groups compared with control. Conclusion: Results indicate that in aripiprazole groups, the brain cystogenesis was not decrease. Further study needs to investigate the role of anti-psychotic drugs on T. gondii. PMID:26523226

  3. Toxoplasma gondii infection in two common wombats (Vombatus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Hartley, M P

    2006-03-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a common cause of death in wild and captive Australian marsupials, yet descriptions of clinical disease, diagnosis and pathological lesions are limited and incomplete. Infection with Toxoplasma gondii was diagnosed, using immunohistochemical techniques, following the acute death of a juvenile common wombat, Vombatus ursinus, that was being bottle raised by wildlife carers. This animal's cage mate developed dyspnoea, tachycardia and anorexia 3 weeks later. Serum was collected prior to euthanasia and necropsy examination. Pathological lesions in both animals were similar and toxoplasma cysts were seen in most organs examined but particularly in the neurological and respiratory systems. Serological testing of the second wombat supported the histological diagnosis and indicated that the tests have valuable roles in both diagnosing infections ante-mortem and in distinguishing between acute and chronic infections. PMID:16555559

  4. A novel Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Tzen, M; Benarous, R; Dupouy-Camet, J; Roisin, M P

    2007-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects all types of cells in humans. A family of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), previously identified as important in the development of plants and protists, was recently shown to play a role in the infectivity of apicomplexans, and in motility and host cell invasion in particular. We report here the isolation of a new calcium-dependent protein kinase gene from the human toxoplasmosis parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. The gene consists of 12 exons. The encoded protein, TgCDPK4, consists of the four characteristic domains of members of the CDPK family and is most similar to PfCDPK2 from Plasmodium falciparum. We measured TgCDPK4 activity, induced by calcium influx, using a kinase assay. A calcium chelator (EGTA) inhibited this activity. These findings provide evidence of signal transduction involving members of the CDPK family in T. gondii.

  5. Toxoplasma gondii infection in two common wombats (Vombatus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Hartley, M P

    2006-03-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a common cause of death in wild and captive Australian marsupials, yet descriptions of clinical disease, diagnosis and pathological lesions are limited and incomplete. Infection with Toxoplasma gondii was diagnosed, using immunohistochemical techniques, following the acute death of a juvenile common wombat, Vombatus ursinus, that was being bottle raised by wildlife carers. This animal's cage mate developed dyspnoea, tachycardia and anorexia 3 weeks later. Serum was collected prior to euthanasia and necropsy examination. Pathological lesions in both animals were similar and toxoplasma cysts were seen in most organs examined but particularly in the neurological and respiratory systems. Serological testing of the second wombat supported the histological diagnosis and indicated that the tests have valuable roles in both diagnosing infections ante-mortem and in distinguishing between acute and chronic infections.

  6. Virus-Like Nanoparticle Vaccine Confers Protection against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Su Hwa; Kim, Ah Ra; Quan, Fu Shi

    2016-01-01

    The inner membrane complex (IMC) of Toxoplasma gondii as a peripheral membrane system has unique and critical roles in parasite replication, motility and invasion. Disruption of IMC sub-compartment protein produces a severe defect in T. gondii endodyogeny, the form of internal cell budding. In this study, we generated T. gondii virus-like particle particles (VLPs) containing proteins derived from IMC, and investigated their efficacy as a vaccine in mice. VLP vaccination induced Toxoplasma gondii-specific total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a antibody responses in the sera and IgA antibody responses in the feces. Upon challenge infection with a lethal dose of T. gondii (ME49), all vaccinated mice survived, whereas all naïve control mice died. Vaccinated mice showed significantly reduced cyst load and cyst size in the brain. VLP vaccination also induced IgA and IgG antibody responses in feces and intestines, and antibody-secreting plasma cells, mixed Th1/Th2 cytokines and CD4+/CD8+ T cells from spleen. Taken together, these results indicate that non-replicating VLPs containing inner membrane complex of T. gondii represent a promising strategy for the development of a safe and effective vaccine to control the spread of Toxoplasma gondii infection. PMID:27548677

  7. Women infected with parasite Toxoplasma have more sons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaňková, Š.; Šulc, J.; Nouzová, K.; Fajfrlík, K.; Frynta, D.; Flegr, J.

    2007-02-01

    The boy-to-girl ratio at birth (secondary sex ratio) is around 0.51 in most populations. The sex ratio varies between societies and may be influenced by many factors, such as stress and immunosuppression, age, primiparity, the sex of the preceding siblings and the socioeconomic status of the parents. As parasite infection affects many immunological and physiological parameters of the host, we analyzed the effect of latent toxoplasmosis on sex ratios in humans. Clinical records of 1,803 infants born from 1996 to 2004 contained information regarding the mother’s age, concentration of anti- Toxoplasma antibodies, previous deliveries and abortions and the sex of the newborn. The results of our retrospective cohort study suggest that the presence of one of the most common parasites (with a worldwide prevalence from 20 to 80%), Toxoplasma gondii, can influence the secondary sex ratio in humans. Depending on the antibody concentration, the probability of the birth of a boy can increase up to a value of 0.72, C.I.95 = (0.636, 0.805), which means that for every 260 boys born, 100 girls are born to women with the highest concentration of anti- Toxoplasma antibodies. The toxoplasmosis associated with immunosuppression or immunomodulation might be responsible for the enhanced survival of male embryos. In light of the high prevalence of latent toxoplasmosis in most countries, the impact of toxoplasmosis on the human population might be considerable.

  8. Virus-Like Nanoparticle Vaccine Confers Protection against Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Su Hwa; Kim, Ah Ra; Quan, Fu Shi

    2016-01-01

    The inner membrane complex (IMC) of Toxoplasma gondii as a peripheral membrane system has unique and critical roles in parasite replication, motility and invasion. Disruption of IMC sub-compartment protein produces a severe defect in T. gondii endodyogeny, the form of internal cell budding. In this study, we generated T. gondii virus-like particle particles (VLPs) containing proteins derived from IMC, and investigated their efficacy as a vaccine in mice. VLP vaccination induced Toxoplasma gondii-specific total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a antibody responses in the sera and IgA antibody responses in the feces. Upon challenge infection with a lethal dose of T. gondii (ME49), all vaccinated mice survived, whereas all naïve control mice died. Vaccinated mice showed significantly reduced cyst load and cyst size in the brain. VLP vaccination also induced IgA and IgG antibody responses in feces and intestines, and antibody-secreting plasma cells, mixed Th1/Th2 cytokines and CD4+/CD8+ T cells from spleen. Taken together, these results indicate that non-replicating VLPs containing inner membrane complex of T. gondii represent a promising strategy for the development of a safe and effective vaccine to control the spread of Toxoplasma gondii infection. PMID:27548677

  9. Prevalence of encysted Toxoplasma gondii in raptors from Alabama.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, D S; Smith, P C; Hoerr, F J; Blagburn, B L

    1993-12-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of encysted Toxoplasma gondii in wild birds. We examined the hearts and breast muscles from 101 raptors for encysted T. gondii. All of the raptors had been submitted for necropsy to the State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Auburn, Alabama. Tissues were digested in acid-pepsin solution and inoculated into groups of 3-5 laboratory mice. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from 27 of 101 (26.7%) raptors: 8 of 12 (66.7%) red-shouldered hawks (Buteo lineatus), 13 of 27 (41.1%) red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), 1 of 4 (25%) Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperi), 1 of 5 (20%) great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), 4 of 15 (26.7%) barred owls (Strix varia), and 1 of 3 (33.3%) kestrels (Falco sparverius). Toxoplasma gondii was not isolated from 3 broad-winged hawks (Buteo platypterus), 3 sharp-shinned hawks (Accipiter striatus), 6 barn owls (Tyto alba), 9 screech owls (Asio otus), a Mississippi kite (Ictinia misisippiensis), 2 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), 4 ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), 4 turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), or 2 black vultures (Coragyps atratus). No significant difference (P > 0.05) in prevalence was detected based on sex using chi-square analysis. Chi-square analysis of the data demonstrated that adult raptors had encysted stages of T. gondii significantly (P < 0.05) more often than did immature raptors. PMID:8277379

  10. Immobilization of the Type XIV Myosin Complex in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Terezina M.; Rajfur, Zenon; Jacobson, Ken

    2007-01-01

    The substrate-dependent movement of apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium sp. is driven by the interaction of a type XIV myosin with F-actin. A complex containing the myosin-A heavy chain, a myosin light chain, and the accessory protein GAP45 is attached to the membranes of the inner membrane complex (IMC) through its tight interaction with the integral membrane glycoprotein GAP50. For the interaction of this complex with F-actin to result in net parasite movement, it is necessary that the myosin be immobilized with respect to the parasite and the actin with respect to the substrate the parasite is moving on. We report here that the myosin motor complex of Toxoplasma is firmly immobilized in the plane of the IMC. This does not seem to be accomplished by direct interactions with cytoskeletal elements. Immobilization of the motor complex, however, does seem to require cholesterol. Both the motor complex and the cholesterol are found in detergent-resistant membrane domains that encompass a large fraction of the inner membrane complex surface. The observation that the myosin XIV motor complex of Toxoplasma is immobilized within this cholesterol-rich membrane likely extends to closely related pathogens such as Plasmodium and possibly to other eukaryotes. PMID:17538016

  11. Seroprevalence and correlates of Toxoplasma gondii infection in domestic pigs in Veracruz State, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii infection in pigs has epidemiological concern for its contributing role in human infections. We determined seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in 402 domestic pigs raised in backyards in Veracruz State, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT, cut off 1:25); 182...

  12. Morbid attraction to leopard urine in Toxoplasma-infected chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Poirotte, Clémence; Kappeler, Peter M; Ngoubangoye, Barthelemy; Bourgeois, Stéphanie; Moussodji, Maick; Charpentier, Marie J E

    2016-02-01

    Parasites are sometimes capable of inducing phenotypic changes in their hosts to improve transmission [1]. Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan that infects a broad range of warm-blooded species, is one example that supports the so-called 'parasite manipulation hypothesis': it induces modifications in rodents' olfactory preferences, converting an innate aversion for cat odor into attraction and probably favoring trophic transmission to feline species, its only definitive hosts [2]. In humans, T. gondii induces behavioral modifications such as personality changes, prolonged reaction times and decreased long-term concentration [3]. However, modern humans are not suitable intermediate hosts because they are no longer preyed upon by felines. Consequently, behavioral modifications in infected people are generally assumed to be side effects of toxoplasmosis or residual manipulation traits that evolved in appropriate intermediate hosts. An alternative hypothesis, however, states that these changes result from parasite manipulative abilities that evolved when human ancestors were still under significant feline predation [3,4]. As such, T. gondii also alters olfactory preferences in humans; infected men rate cat urine, but not tiger urine, as pleasant while non-infected men do not [5]. To unravel the origin of Toxoplasma-induced modifications in humans, we performed olfactory tests on a living primate still predated by a feline species. We found in our closest relative, the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes), that Toxoplasma-infected (TI) animals lost their innate aversion towards the urine of leopards (Panthera pardus), their only natural predator. By contrast, we observed no clear difference in the response of TI and Toxoplasma-non-infected (TN) animals towards urine collected from other definitive feline hosts that chimpanzees do not encounter in nature. Although the adaptive value of parasitically induced behavior should be assessed carefully, we suggest that the

  13. Pseudoaneurysm of the Posterior Tibial Artery After Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Elabdi, Monsef; Roukhsi, Redouane; Tijani, Youssef; Chtata, Hassan; Jaafar, Abdeloihab

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery is an uncommon condition that, left untreated, can lead to hemorrhage, thrombosis, or emboli. We present the case of a 54-year-old male who developed pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery 4 months after undergoing tibialis posterior tendon transfer for management of peroneal nerve palsy, which had developed as a complication of hip arthroplasty. PMID:26972754

  14. Consistently inconsistent, the posterior vaginal wall.

    PubMed

    Hale, Douglass S; Fenner, Dee

    2016-03-01

    Posterior vaginal wall prolapse is one of the most common prolapses encountered by gynecological surgeons. What appears to be a straightforward condition to diagnose and treat surgically for physicians has proven to be frustratingly unpredictable with regard to symptom relief for patients. Functional disorders such as dyssynergic defecation and constipation are often attributed to posterior vaginal wall prolapse. Little scientific evidence supports this assumption, emphasizing that structure and function are not synonymous when treating posterior vaginal wall prolapse. Rectoceles, enteroceles, sigmoidoceles, peritoneoceles, rectal and intraanal intussusception, rectal prolapse, and descending perineal syndrome are all conditions that have an impact on the posterior vaginal wall. All too often these different anatomic conditions are treated with the same surgical approach, addressing a posterior vaginal wall bulge with a traditional posterior colporrhaphy. Studies that examine the correlation between stage of posterior wall prolapse and patient symptoms have failed to reliably do so. Surgical outcomes measured by prolapse staging appear successful, yet patient expectations are often not met. As increasing attention is being placed on patient satisfaction outcomes concerning surgical treatments, this fact will need to be addressed. Surgeons will have to clearly communicate what can and what cannot be expected with surgical repair of posterior vaginal wall prolapse.

  15. Postoperative rehabilitation of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Edson, Craig J; Fanelli, Gregory C; Beck, John D

    2010-12-01

    Diagnosis and management of posterior cruciate ligament injuries has evolved, and now the treatment often includes surgical intervention. The purpose of this paper is to define the current approach to postsurgical management after the posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, review conservative management, and discuss surgical outcomes using a specified program.

  16. Neurolinguistic Aspects of Finnish Posterior Aphasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, Jussi; Koivuselka-Sallinen, Paivi

    Examination of the lexical errors (phonological paraphasias and neologisms) of two posterior aphasic patients who are speakers of Finnish, a highly synthetic language, revealed that the lexical difficulties generally typical of posterior aphasics were found in these patients as well. The typical lexical difficulties clustered around open class…

  17. Continence after posterior sagittal anorectoplasty.

    PubMed

    Langemeijer, R A; Molenaar, J C

    1991-05-01

    Posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) was introduced in 1982 by Peña and De Vries as a new operation for patients with a high anorectal malformation. The degree of postoperative continence is reported to be high. During the past decade, too, new insights have been gained into the embryology of anorectal malformations. Evaluation of PSARP in relation to current understanding of the development and anatomy of the anorectum and the pelvic floor has led us to conclude that optimal continence cannot be expected. Fifty patients with a high anorectal malformation underwent PSARP between June 1983 and May 1990. Postoperative follow-up consisted of anamnesis (subjective) and electrostimulation, defecography, and anorectal manometry (objective). All patients are alive, and all but one are being evaluated regularly. Subjectively, the majority of patients were more or less incontinent, with soiling of pants at least once a day. On the basis of objective criteria, virtually all patients appeared to be incontinent, and in only one patient was the mechanism of defecation almost unimpaired after PSARP. From this study, we conclude that although PSARP provides a good aesthetic result, patients will never acquire normal continence.

  18. Postoperative posterior spinal wound infections.

    PubMed

    Massie, J B; Heller, J G; Abitbol, J J; McPherson, D; Garfin, S R

    1992-11-01

    The incidence of postoperative spinal infections increases with the complexity of the procedure. Diskectomy is associated with less than a 1% risk of infection; spinal fusion without instrumentation is associated with a 1%-5% risk; and fusion with instrumentation may be associated with a risk of 6% or more. Twenty-two postoperative posterior spinal infections that occurred during a three-year period were reviewed for this report. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism cultured (more than 50% of the cases). Other recurring organisms were Staphylococcus epidermis, Peptococcus, Enterobacter cloacae, and Bacteroides. Many patients had multiple organisms. Risk factors appeared to include advanced age, prolonged hospital bed rest, obesity, diabetes, immunosuppression, and infection at remote sites. Operative factors included prolonged surgery (greater than five hours), high volume of personnel moving through the operating room, and instrumentation. Postoperative contamination may occur and may be related to prolonged postoperative bed rest, skin maceration (thoracolumbosacral orthoses), and drainage tubes exiting distally from lumbar wounds (toward the rectum). Effective treatment includes early diagnosis, surgical debridement and irrigation, and parenteral antibiotics. Superficial infections were treated successfully with wound closure over outflow tubes, and deep infections with inflow-outflow systems. Maintaining the instrumentation in place was possible in most cases. Parenteral antibiotics were maintained for six weeks in every case. PMID:1395319

  19. The FIKK kinase of Toxoplasma gondii is not essential for the parasite's lytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Skariah, S; Walwyn, O; Engelberg, K; Gubbels, M-J; Gaylets, C; Kim, N; Lynch, B; Sultan, A; Mordue, D G

    2016-05-01

    FIKK kinases are a novel family of kinases unique to the Apicomplexa. While most apicomplexans encode a single FIKK kinase, Plasmodium falciparum expresses 21 and piroplasms do not encode a FIKK kinase. FIKK kinases share a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain, but the N-terminal region is highly variable and contains no known functional domains. To date, FIKK kinases have been primarily studied in P. falciparum and Plasmodium berghei. Those that have been studied are exported from the parasite and associate with diverse locations in the infected erythrocyte cytosol or membrane. Deletion of individual P. falciparum FIKK kinases indicates that they may play a role in modification of the infected erythrocyte. The current study characterises the single FIKK gene in Toxoplasma gondii to evaluate the importance of the FIKK kinase in an apicomplexan that has a single FIKK kinase. The TgFIKK gene encoded a protein of approximately 280kDa. Endogenous tagging of the FIKK protein with Yellow Fluorescent Protein showed that the FIKK protein exclusively localised to the posterior end of tachyzoites. A Yellow Fluorescent Protein-tagged FIKK and a Ty-tagged FIKK both co-localised with T. gondii membrane occupation and recognition nexus protein to the basal complex and were localised apical to inner membrane complex protein-5 and Centrin2. Deletion of TgFIKK, surprisingly, had no detectable effect on the parasite's lytic cycle in vitro in human fibroblast cells or in acute virulence in vivo. Thus, our results clearly show that while the FIKK kinase is expressed in tachyzoites, it is not essential for the lytic cycle of T. gondii.

  20. Posterior labral injury in contact athletes.

    PubMed

    Mair, S D; Zarzour, R H; Speer, K P

    1998-01-01

    Nine athletes (seven football offensive linemen, one defensive lineman, and one lacrosse player) were found at arthroscopy to have posterior labral detachment from the glenoid. In our series, this lesion is specific to contact athletes who engage their opponents with arms in front of the body. All patients had pain with bench pressing and while participating in their sport, diminishing their ability to play effectively. Conservative measures were ineffective in relieving their symptoms. Examination under anesthesia revealed symmetric glenohumeral translation bilaterally, without evidence of posterior instability. Treatment consisted of glenoid rim abradement and posterior labral repair with a bioabsorbable tack. All patients returned to complete at least one full season of contact sports and weightlifting without pain (minimum follow-up, > or = 2 years). Although many injuries leading to subluxation of the glenohumeral joint occur when an unanticipated force is applied, contact athletes ready their shoulder muscles in anticipation of impact with opponents. This leads to a compressive force at the glenohumeral joint. We hypothesize that, in combination with a posteriorly directed force at impact, the resultant vector is a shearing force to the posterior labrum and articular surface. Repeated exposure leads to posterior labral detachment without capsular injury. Posterior labral reattachment provides consistently good results, allowing the athlete to return to competition.

  1. GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII FROM RECENTLY INFECTED ABORTED EGYPTIAN WOMEN.

    PubMed

    Badr, Mohamed S; Attia, Samar S; El-Sherbiny, Walid S; Abd-Allah M A, El Ebidi; Hefny, Hesham M; Salem, Ahmed N M

    2016-04-01

    Toxoplasmosis caused by Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in human beings. Human toxoplasmosis can be associated with serious clinical manifestations, particularly in developing fetus. The aim of the current study was to identify the possible lineage type of Toxoplasma gondii, molecularly detected in placental samples of women whose pregnancies were spontaneously terminated in the first trimester. Preliminary detection of Toxoplasma genomic materials was done by a SYBR green qPCR technology. Subsequent identification of Toxoplasma strain was done for the positive samples using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) at the SAG2 loci of T. gondii using restriction enzymes HhaI and Sau3AI. Out of 72 tested samples, Toxoplasma B1 gene was detected in 9 cases. Toxoplasma genotypes I and II in addition to unknown type were identified in 4, 3 and 2 cases respectively, while type III was not detected in our samples, hence excluded as a leading cause of abortion in humans in our preliminary study. Nevertheless, it remains uncertain to what extent the genotype of the parasite directly contributes to the clinical severity of human toxoplasmosis. Certainly, advanced molecular techniques targeting different Toxoplasma strains are crucial for better understanding of human toxoplasmosis. For more elucidation, additional studies are recommended intended for genetic characterization of such serious parasitic infection using larger number of samples. PMID:27363040

  2. Toxoplasma gondii - Prevalence and Risk Factors in HIV-infected Patients from Songklanagarind Hospital, Southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chemoh, Waenurama; Sawangjaroen, Nongyao; Siripaitoon, Pisut; Andiappan, Hemah; Hortiwakul, Thanaporn; Sermwittayawong, Natthawan; Charoenmak, Bunsri; Nissapatorn, Veeranoot

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is one of the most common opportunistic parasitic diseases in patients living with HIV/AIDS. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma infection in HIV-infected patients and to identify associated risk factors in Toxoplasma seropositive patients. This study was conducted at a regional public hospital in Hat Yai, southern Thailand during October 2009 to June 2010. Blood samples were collected from 300 HIV-infected patients. Each subject also answered a socio-demographic and risk factors associated with Toxoplasma infection. The prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies in HIV-infected patients was 109 (36.3%), of which 83 (76.2%) had past infection and 26 (23.9%) had recently acquired Toxoplasma infection as indicated by their IgG avidity. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression showed that gender difference (adjusted OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.05-2.72) was the only factor associated with Toxoplasma infection. From the results obtained, these HIV-infected patients could be at high risk of developing clinical evidence of severe toxoplasmosis. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce primary behavioral practices to prevent Toxoplasma infection among HIV-infected patients. PMID:26635769

  3. Biological and molecular characterizations of Toxoplasma gondii strains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, R.A.; Lindsay, D.S.; Howe, D.K.; Roderick, Constance L.; Dubey, J.P.; Thomas, N.J.; Baeten, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from brain or heart tissue from 15 southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) in cell cultures. These strains were used to infect mice that developed antibodies to T. gondii as detected in the modified direct agglutination test and had T. gondii tissue cysts in their brains at necropsy. Mouse brains containing tissue cysts from 4 of the strains were fed to 4 cats. Two of the cats excreted T. gondii oocysts in their feces that were infectious for mice. Molecular analyses of 13 strains indicated that they were all type II strains, but that they were genetically distinct from one another.

  4. Toxoplasma gondii infection in Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Wang, Y H; Meng, P; Ye, Q; Zhang, D L

    2013-02-18

    Camel is important to the economy of many countries. We report Toxoplasma gondii infection in Bactrian camels (Camelus bactrianus), first for this host. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in sera of 7 of 234 C. bactrianus from Qinghai Province, northwestern China. Sera were tested by a commercial indirect hemagglutination test at a cut-off of 1:64. Age or the gender of the camel did not significantly affect the seroprevalence. Results are of public health and economic importance because camel milk and meat are used for human consumption in many countries, including China.

  5. Evidence of Toxoplasma gondii exposure among horses in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Lee, Sang-Eun; Seo, Min-Goo; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Cho, Kwang-Hyun; Cho, Gil-Jae; Kwon, Oh-Deog; Kwak, Dongmi; Lee, Won-Ja

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigated the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) antibodies by ELISA in horses reared in Korea. Serum samples were collected from 2009 through 2013 from 816 horses reared in Korea. Analysis was performed using a commercial toxoplasmosis ELISA kit to detect anti-T. gondii antibodies. Overall, 24 out of 816 horses (2.9%) were seropositive for T. gondii. The result was analyzed by age, gender, breed and region. Significant differences were observed according to breed and region (P<0.05). This is the first nationwide serological investigation of T. gondii in horses reared in Korea. The study results reveal that T. gondii occurs nationwide in Korean horses.

  6. Serologic survey for Toxoplasma gondii in grizzly bears from Alaska.

    PubMed

    Zarnke, R L; Dubey, J P; Kwok, O C; Ver Hoef, J M

    1997-04-01

    Blood samples were collected from 892 grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Alaska (USA) from 1973 to 1987. Sera were tested for evidence of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii by means of the modified agglutination test. Two hundred twenty sera (25%) had titers > or = 25, the minimum threshold titer. Six hundred seventy-two sera (75%) had titers < 25. Antibody prevalence ranged from 9% (18 positive of 196 tested) in southern areas to 37% (162 of 433 tested) in northern areas. There was no readily apparent explanation for these discrepancies in location-specific prevalence.

  7. Toxoplasma gondii haemagglutinating antibody titers in Indonesian goats.

    PubMed

    Cross, J H; Van Peenen, P F; Hsu, N H; Koesharjono, C; Simanjuntak, G M; Amdani, S K

    1976-12-01

    Sera of 465 goats from several of the Indonesian islands were tested for indirect haemagglutinating (IHA) antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii. Titers greater than or equal to 1:16 were found in 24% of the animals with approximately 11% having titers of greater than or equal to 1:256. Sera from pigs, cows, water buffaloes and horses were also tested and only pig sera had IHA antibodies at titers above greater than or equal to 1:16. The possible role of goats in transmission of toxoplasmosis is discussed briefly.

  8. The early years of Toxoplasma research: What’s past is prologue

    PubMed Central

    Morrissette, Naomi S.; Ajioka, James W.

    2009-01-01

    In the century since the first description of Toxoplasma gondii, history and circumstance have led scientists to define this organism in diverse contexts. From its discovery by researchers shaped by early 20th century versions of the germ theory to its more recent roles as an important globally distributed pathogen and a model apicomplexan, our definitions of Toxoplasma are as much a reflection of our frame of reference as they are an absolute definition of this organism. Although these transformations act as portals for new avenues of investigation, the essential questions that inform current research are founded in the work of early investigators who studied Toxoplasma. PMID:19250939

  9. Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment. PMID:23015944

  10. Congenital abnormalities of the posterior fossa.

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Orman, Gunes; Boltshauser, Eugen; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Nowadays, conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities has been demonstrated, including malformations (anomalies due to an alteration of the primary developmental program caused by a genetic defect) and disruptions (anomalies due to the breakdown of a structure that had a normal developmental potential). Familiarity with the spectrum of congenital posterior fossa anomalies and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. The authors discuss the spectrum of posterior fossa malformations and disruptions, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and risk of recurrence.

  11. Congenital abnormalities of the posterior fossa.

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Orman, Gunes; Boltshauser, Eugen; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Nowadays, conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities has been demonstrated, including malformations (anomalies due to an alteration of the primary developmental program caused by a genetic defect) and disruptions (anomalies due to the breakdown of a structure that had a normal developmental potential). Familiarity with the spectrum of congenital posterior fossa anomalies and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. The authors discuss the spectrum of posterior fossa malformations and disruptions, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and risk of recurrence. PMID:25590398

  12. [Pathogenesis of posterior capsule opacification in pseudophakia].

    PubMed

    Łukaszewska-Smyk, Agnieszka; Kałuzny, Józef

    2009-01-01

    The lens epithelial cells of A and E type are involved in pathogenesis of posterior capsule opacification (PCO). They undergo metaplasia into microfibroblasts, then migrate towards posterior capsule where they proliferate and form opacification. These processes are stimulated by cytokines and interleukines. The extracellular matrix which constitutes a scaffold for migration and attachment of epithelial cells plays an important role in PCO formation. Integrines intercede in this process.

  13. Posterior Wnts Have Distinct Roles in Specification and Patterning of the Planarian Posterior Region.

    PubMed

    Sureda-Gómez, Miquel; Pascual-Carreras, Eudald; Adell, Teresa

    2015-11-05

    The wnt signaling pathway is an intercellular communication mechanism essential in cell-fate specification, tissue patterning and regional-identity specification. A βcatenin-dependent signal specifies the AP (Anteroposterior) axis of planarians, both during regeneration of new tissues and during normal homeostasis. Accordingly, four wnts (posterior wnts) are expressed in a nested manner in central and posterior regions of planarians. We have analyzed the specific role of each posterior wnt and the possible cooperation between them in specifying and patterning planarian central and posterior regions. We show that each posterior wnt exerts a distinct role during re-specification and maintenance of the central and posterior planarian regions, and that the integration of the different wnt signals (βcatenin dependent and independent) underlies the patterning of the AP axis from the central region to the tip of the tail. Based on these findings and data from the literature, we propose a model for patterning the planarian AP axis.

  14. Vertigo due to posterior circulation stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Hyung

    2013-07-01

    Stroke in the distribution of the posterior circulation may present as acute onset spontaneous vertigo and imbalance. Although vertigo due to posterior circulation stroke is usually associated with other neurologic symptoms or signs, small infarcts in the cerebellum or brainstem can present with vertigo without other localizing symptoms. Approximately 17% of patients with isolated posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarction presented with isolated vertigo, nystagmus, and postural unsteadiness. A head impulse test can differentiate acute isolated vertigo associated with cerebellar stroke from more benign disorders involving the inner ear. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss can be the initial symptom of impending posterior circulation ischemic stroke (particularly within the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery). In this case, evaluation of isolated audiovestibular loss may prevent the progression of acute vertigo and hearing loss into more widespread areas of infarction in the posterior circulation. In this article, the clinical syndromes and signs of acute vestibular syndrome due to posterior circulation stroke involving the brainstem and cerebellum are summarized.

  15. Posterior urethral polyp with type I posterior urethral valves: a rare association in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Kesan, Krushnakumar V; Gupta, Rahul Kumar; Kothari, Paras; Gupta, Abhaya; Mudkhedkar, Kedar; Kamble, Ravikiran; Dikshit, K Vishesh

    2014-06-01

    Urethral polyp is a rare cause of bladder outlet obstruction, voiding dysfunction, and hematuria in the pediatric age group. Urethral polyps are rarely associated with other congenital urinary tract anomalies. In this study, we report a case of solitary posterior urethral polyp with type I posterior urethral valve in a 7-day-old neonate presented with urinary retention and deranged renal function. The polyp was diagnosed on cystoscopy. Transurethral resection of the polyp with posterior urethral valve fulguration was performed. Pathologic assessment revealed a fibroepithelial lesion, which was consistent with congenital posterior urethral polyp.

  16. [Detection of Toxoplasma antibodies using the c-ELISA method].

    PubMed

    Sýkora, J; Pokorný, J; Zástĕra, M; Frühbauer, Z; Svandová, E

    1989-05-01

    Sensitive and high capacity ELISA techniques introduced for the detection of toxoplasmatic antibodies so far do not correlate very well with standard serological examination systems used in common diagnosis of Toxoplasmosis. The most frequently used method in the CSSR - SFT using tween-ether soluble antigen extract, and displaying very satisfactory agreement with the Sabin-Feldman test, was compared with the system of direct ELISA, using the same antigen extract and the described c-ELISA method. The latter method uses for antibody detection whole non-disintegrated formol-treated trophozoites of Toxoplasma gondii and thus in the reaction in particular membrane antigens, incl. latent ones, are involved. Parallel examination of 160 sera of subjects with clinical suspicion of toxoplasma infection by the standard CFT, method and methods ELISA and c-ELISA revealed a better correlation between CFT and c-ELISA (r = 0.8031) than between CFT and ELISA with soluble antigen (r = 0.6016). Other positive specific features of the c-ELISA method are the use of commercially produced antigen for the immunofluorescence test, considerable elimination of selective adsorption of the polystyrene carrier and the perspective of the long-term preservation of plates with the fixed antigen.

  17. The immunobiology of the innate response to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Miller, Catherine M; Boulter, Nicola R; Ikin, Rowan J; Smith, Nicholas C

    2009-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a unique intracellular parasite. It can infect a variety of cells in virtually all warm-blooded animals. It has a worldwide distribution and, overall, around one-third of people are seropositive for the parasite, with essentially the entire human population being at risk of infection. For most people, T. gondii causes asymptomatic infection but the parasite can cause serious disease in the immunocompromised and, if contracted for the first time during pregnancy, can cause spontaneous abortion or congenital defects, which have a substantial emotional, social and economic impact. Toxoplasma gondii provokes one of the most potent innate, pro-inflammatory responses of all infectious disease agents. It is also a supreme manipulator of the immune response so that innate immunity to T. gondii is a delicate balance between the parasite and its host involving a coordinated series of cellular interactions involving enterocytes, neutrophils, dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Underpinning these interactions is the regulation of complex molecular reactions involving Toll-like receptors, activation of signalling pathways, cytokine production and activation of anti-microbial effector mechanisms including generation of reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates.

  18. Identification of new Palmitoylated Proteins in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Marina C.; Alonso, Andrés M.; Deng, Bin; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley; Corvi, María M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein palmitoylation has been shown to be an important post-translational modification in eukaryotic cells. This modification alters the localization and/or the function of the targeted protein. In the recent years protein palmitoylation has risen in importance in apicomplexan parasites as well. In Toxoplasma gondii, some proteins have been reported to be modified by palmitate. With the development of new techniques that allow the isolation of palmitoylated proteins, this significant post-translational modification has begun to be studied in more detail in T. gondii. Here we describe the palmitoylome of the tachyzoite stage of T. gondii using a combination of the acyl-biotin exchange chemistry method and mass spectrometry analysis. We identified 401 proteins found in multiple cellular compartments, with a wide range of functions that vary from metabolic processes, gliding and host-cell invasion to even regulation of transcription and translation. Besides, we found that more rhoptry proteins than the ones already described for Toxoplasma are palmitoylated, suggesting an important role for this modification in the invasion mechanism of the host-cell. This study documents that protein palmitoylation is a common modification in T. gondii that could have an impact on different cellular processes. PMID:26825284

  19. Obtaining Highly Purified Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts by a Discontinuous Cesium Chloride Gradient

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan pathogen that commonly infects humans. It is a well characterized apicomplexan associated with causing food- and water-borne disease outbreaks. The definitive host is the feline species where sexual replication occurs res...

  20. Environmental Exposures Are Important Risk Factors for Infection Toxoplasma gondii and Helicobacter pylori

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: An estimated 70% of Americans suffer chronic infections. Helicobacter pylori and Toxoplasma gondii affect an estimated 35% and 15% of Americans, respectively. Despite their heavy burden, environmental transmission of these infections is not well understood. Object...

  1. Toxoplasma gondii infection and abdominal hernia: evidence of a new association

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We performed a retrospective, observational study in 1156 adult subjects from the general population of Durango City, Mexico, Fifty five subjects with a history of abdominal hernia repair and 1101 subjects without hernia were examined with enzyme-linked immunoassays for the presence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies. Results The seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies and IgG titers was significantly higher in subjects with abdominal hernia repair than those without hernia. There was a tendency for subjects with hernia repair to have a higher seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgM antibodies than subjects without hernia. The seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies in subjects with hernia repair was significantly higher in subjects ≥ 50 years old than those < 50 years old. Further analysis in subjects aged ≥ 50 years showed that the seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies was also significantly higher in individuals with hernia repair than those without hernia (OR = 2.72; 95% CI: 1.10-6.57). Matching by age and sex further showed that the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma infection was significantly higher in patients with hernia repair than those without hernia (OR: 4.50; 95% CI: 1.22-17.33). Conclusions Results indicate that infection with Toxoplasma is associated with abdominal hernia. The contributing role of infection with Toxoplasma in abdominal hernia was observed mainly in subjects aged ≥ 50 years old. Our results might have clinical, prevention and treatment implications and warrant for further investigation. PMID:21682896

  2. Posterior Predictive Bayesian Phylogenetic Model Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Paul O.; Xie, Wangang; Chen, Ming-Hui; Fan, Yu; Kuo, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    We present two distinctly different posterior predictive approaches to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection and illustrate these methods using examples from green algal protein-coding cpDNA sequences and flowering plant rDNA sequences. The Gelfand–Ghosh (GG) approach allows dissection of an overall measure of model fit into components due to posterior predictive variance (GGp) and goodness-of-fit (GGg), which distinguishes this method from the posterior predictive P-value approach. The conditional predictive ordinate (CPO) method provides a site-specific measure of model fit useful for exploratory analyses and can be combined over sites yielding the log pseudomarginal likelihood (LPML) which is useful as an overall measure of model fit. CPO provides a useful cross-validation approach that is computationally efficient, requiring only a sample from the posterior distribution (no additional simulation is required). Both GG and CPO add new perspectives to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection based on the predictive abilities of models and complement the perspective provided by the marginal likelihood (including Bayes Factor comparisons) based solely on the fit of competing models to observed data. [Bayesian; conditional predictive ordinate; CPO; L-measure; LPML; model selection; phylogenetics; posterior predictive.] PMID:24193892

  3. [Studies on the correlation of toxoplasma antibody between mothers and their infants in toxoplasmosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Nakachi, H

    1982-12-01

    The author examined immunoglobulin and toxoplasma antibody titer using a routine serologic test in 55 pregnant women with positive antibody titer and their infants (including one twin). After evaluation of the immunological correlationship between mothers and infants, the toxoplasma antibody titer half life in infants and its decay curve were derived from IgG toxoplasma antibody titer in infants. The IgG toxoplasma antibody titer at delivery well correlated with the titer transition in infants thereafter, and the infants were divided into the following three groups for comparison with mothers' titer at delivery. Group A (mothers' titer = infants' titer), group B (mothers' titer greater than infants' titer), group C (mothers' titer less than infants' titer). The antibody titer in group A and C decreased to negative at one year of age, the value in group B, however, at 6 months after delivery. Toxoplasma antibody titer (X) and antibody half life (T) from delivery to one month, from one month to 3 months and from 3 months to 6 months respectively, were derived as follows: (formula; see text) When the antibody titer of an infant is higher than the decay curve, toxoplasma infection is strongly indicated.

  4. Inhibitory effect of prolactin on Toxoplasma proliferation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Dzitko, K; Lawnicka, H; Gatkowska, J; Dziadek, B; Komorowski, J; Długońska, H

    2012-06-01

    Despite many years of studies on the mechanisms of immunological defence responses induced in host organisms by Toxoplasma, no satisfactory immunoprophylaxis or chemotherapy have yet been established for humans. Thus, alternative methods to prevent toxoplasmosis and to enhance the efficacy of currently used antitoxoplasmic drugs are under evaluation. In this work, we strove to determine the influence of human prolactin (endogenous present in serum--sPRL and recombinant--rhPRL) on the course of Toxoplasma infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) originating from female hyperprolactinemia patients. This study revealed that exogenous rhPRL as well as autologous sPRL from inactivated sera significantly restricted intracellular growth of Toxoplasma in PBMC cultures. Moreover, analysis of IL-10 production by PBMC infected with Toxoplasma and cultured in the presence of sPRL showed a positive correlation between sPRL concentration and the level of IL-10. The obtained results could indicate the possible protective action of PRL in a host organism infected with Toxoplasma and suggest that a significant increase in the serum PRL level, during pregnancy for instance, might significantly limit the risk of Toxoplasma spreading and could play an important role in natural protection against toxoplasmosis. The mechanism of inhibitory effect of PRL needs further detailed study.

  5. Detailed ophthalmologic evaluation of posterior microphthalmos.

    PubMed

    Alkin, Zeynep; Ozkaya, Abdullah; Karakucuk, Yalcin; Demirok, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    We performed various ophthalmic investigations in order to confirm the diagnosis and document the various features of posterior microphthalmos in a 21-year-old male. Ophthalmic examination revealed low vision with high hyperopia, papillomacular folds, midperipheral pigmentary changes and crowded optic discs. The optic discs were small and crowded with increased nerve fiber layer thickness. Fundus fluorescein angiography showed reduced diameter of a capillary free zone. Anterior segment (AS) optical coherence tomography demonstrated near normal anterior chamber depths, but markedly diminished anterior chamber angles. In spite of the increased corneal thickness and steep corneas, lens thickness and endothelial cell counts were normal. Sclerochoroidal thickening and foreshortening of the globes were detected with B-scan ultrasonography. Electroretinographic findings and visual field tests were similar to those in pigmentary retinopathy. Posterior microphthalmos is a complex eye disorder, which affects predominantly the posterior segment but also involves the AS of the eye.

  6. Posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Alehan, Füsun; Erol, Ilknur; Agildere, A Muhtesem; Ozcay, Figen; Baskin, Esra; Cengiz, Nurcan; Alioglu, Bülent; Haberal, Mehmet

    2007-04-01

    Posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is a recently identified clinical and radiologic entity. The characteristic radiologic findings are bilateral gray and white matter edema in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemispheres. This article reports clinical and radiologic findings in 10 consecutive episodes of posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome that were diagnosed in 9 children and adolescents. The causes were immunosuppressive therapy in 7 patients and a combination of renal failure and hypertension in 3. The most common presenting symptoms were seizure and altered consciousness; others included headache, sixth nerve palsy, and cortical blindness. Imaging demonstrated abnormalities in the parietal and occipital lobes in all 10 episodes. The signs and symptoms resolved after immunosuppressive agents were reduced or discontinued, or after uremia and hypertension were corrected. Four patients underwent follow-up cranial imaging, and the images showed nearly complete or complete resolution. The syndrome was clinically reversible in all patients.

  7. Imaging the posterior mediastinum: a multimodality approach.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Mariaelena; Heidinger, Benedikt H; Franquet, Elisa; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Bankier, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    The posterior mediastinum contains several structures that can produce a wide variety of pathologic conditions. Descending thoracic aorta, esophagus, azygos and hemiazygos veins, thoracic duct, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, and nerves are all located in this anatomical region and can produce diverse abnormalities. Although chest radiography may detect many of these pathologic conditions, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are the imaging modalities of choice for further defining the relationship of posterior mediastinal lesions to neighboring structures and showing specific imaging features that narrow the differential diagnosis. This review emphasizes modality-related answers to morphologic questions, which provide precise diagnostic information. PMID:25993732

  8. Preformed posterior stainless steel crowns: an update.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P

    1999-02-01

    For almost 50 years, dentists have used stainless steel crowns for primary and permanent posterior teeth. No other type of restoration offers the convenience, low cost, durability, and reliability of such crowns when interim full-coronal coverage is required. Preformed stainless steel crowns have improved over the years. Better luting cements have been developed and different methods of crown manipulation have evolved. This article reviews stainless steel crown procedures for primary and permanent posterior teeth. Step-by-step placement of a primary molar stainless steel crown is documented and permanent molar stainless steel crown restoration is described. A method for repairing a worn-through crown also is reviewed.

  9. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes.

  10. Large posterior abdominal masses: computed tomographic localization.

    PubMed

    Engel, I A; Auh, Y H; Rubenstein, W A; Whalen, J P; Kazam, E

    1983-10-01

    Large posterior abdominal masses, particularly those in the right upper abdomen, may be difficult to localize correctly into the peritoneal or retroperitoneal compartments. The following signs were found to be reliable CT indicators of retroperitoneal location: obliteration of the perinephric fat outlining the psoas muscle; lateral displacement of the fat outlining the posterior right lobe of the liver; rotation of the intrahepatic portal veins to the left; anterior displacement of the inferior vena cava and renal veins; and anterior displacement of the ascending colon, descending duodenum, or pancreatic head.

  11. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes. PMID:27599438

  12. Serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii in captive Neotropical felids from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Leila Sabrina; da Silva, Rodrigo Costa; de Moraes, Wanderlei; Cubas, Zalmir Silvino; dos Santos, Leonilda Correia; Hoffmann, Juliano Leônidas; Moreira, Nei; Guimaraes, Ana Marcia Sa; Montaño, Patrícia; Langoni, Helio; Biondo, Alexander Welker

    2010-08-27

    Toxoplasma gondii is the causative intracellular protozoan of toxoplasmosis in human being and animals. Members of the Felidae family are considered the single definitive host for the infection; both wild and domestic cats are able to excrete oocysts in the environment. Wild cats maintained in captivity may serve as source of infection for other clinically susceptible animals in the same environment. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of T. gondii IgG antibodies in 57 neotropical felids (1 Leopardus geoffroyi; 3 Puma yagouaroundi; 17 Leopardus wiedii; 22 Leopardus tigrinus; and 14 Leopardus pardalis) kept at the Bela Vista Biological Sanctuary, Itaipu Binacional, Southern Brazil, by the modified agglutination test (MAT) using titer 16 as cut-off point. Seropositivity was observed in 38/57 (66.67%; 95% CI 53.66-77.51%) samples, with higher frequency in ocelots (71.43%). Wild-caught felids were three times more likely to be infected when compared to zoo-born animals (P=0.05) and age of wild-caught animals (P=0.6892; 95% CI=0.7528-1.66) was not significant as a risk factor for the infection, the same occurring with zoo-born animals (P=0.05; 95% CI=0.6267-24.052). These results suggest that, despite efforts to control T. gondii infection in zoo facilities, such as individual pens, hygiene monitoring, veterinary care and pre-frozen meat offered as food, non-domestic felids kept in captivity, particularly the wild-caught specimens, may be invariably exposed to infection due to other environmental sources.

  13. Fatal Toxoplasma gondii infection in the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongyu; Wang, Zedong; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Caiwu; Wei, Feng; Liu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii can infect nearly all warm-blooded animals. We report an acute fatal T. gondii infection in the endangered giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in a zoo in China, characterized by acute gastroenteritis and respiratory symptoms. T. gondii infection was confirmed by immunological and molecular methods. Multilocus nested PCR-RFLP revealed clonal type I at the SAG1 and c29-2 loci, clonal type II at the SAG2, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, and L358 loci, and clonal type III at the alternative SAG2 and SAG3 loci, thus, a potential new genotype of T. gondii in the giant panda. Other possible pathogens were not detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical toxoplasmosis in a giant panda.

  14. Fatal Toxoplasma gondii infection in the giant panda

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongyu; Wang, Zedong; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Caiwu; Wei, Feng; Liu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii can infect nearly all warm-blooded animals. We report an acute fatal T. gondii infection in the endangered giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in a zoo in China, characterized by acute gastroenteritis and respiratory symptoms. T. gondii infection was confirmed by immunological and molecular methods. Multilocus nested PCR-RFLP revealed clonal type I at the SAG1 and c29-2 loci, clonal type II at the SAG2, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, and L358 loci, and clonal type III at the alternative SAG2 and SAG3 loci, thus, a potential new genotype of T. gondii in the giant panda. Other possible pathogens were not detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical toxoplasmosis in a giant panda. PMID:26514595

  15. Encephalomyelitis by Toxoplasma gondii in a captive fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox).

    PubMed

    Corpa, J M; García-Quirós, A; Casares, M; Gerique, A C; Carbonell, M D; Gómez-Muñoz, M T; Uzal, F A; Ortega, J

    2013-03-31

    Encephalomyelitis due to Toxoplasma gondii was diagnosed in a fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox). The animal had ataxia, atrophy of hind limb muscles and progressive wasting before dying 12 months after the onset of clinical signs. Toxoplasmosis was suspected antemortem based on clinical signs and the detection of T. gondii DNA by PCR on EDTA-blood from live animal. Necropsy revealed necrotizing gastritis and severe emaciation. The main histological lesions included non-suppurative encephalomyelitis, with dilation of myelin sheaths and swollen axons in the spinal cord, and multifocal gliosis in the brain with intralesional protozoan cysts that stained positive for T. gondii immunohistochemistry. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of toxoplasmosis in a fossa, and a new host record.

  16. Toxoplasma gondii in an African crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Moorman, Jamee Black; Bolin, Steven R; Grosjean, Nicole L; Lim, Ailam; Fitzgerald, Scott D

    2007-03-01

    An adult female crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata) was evaluated for acute onset of neurologic signs including head tilt, circling, and ataxia. She was found dead in her holding area 2 days after initially exhibiting clinical signs. Necropsy was unremarkable. Histopathology of brain tissue revealed the presence of protozoal cysts associated with inflammation as the underlying cause of clinical signs and death. Immunohistochemical staining of brain tissue for Toxoplasma gondii was strongly positive. PCR on fresh brain confirmed T. gondii as the causative organism. An adult male in the same enclosure has demonstrated similar neurologic signs over the past 3 years and has failed to respond to various medical treatments. Clinical disease associated with T. gondii has not been previously reported in this porcupine species or any other Old World porcupines, although there are several reports of clinical toxoplasmosis involving New World porcupine species. PMID:17402616

  17. Recent advances in developing vaccines against Toxoplasma gondii: an update.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nian-Zhang; Wang, Meng; Xu, Ying; Petersen, Eskild; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, a significant public health risk, is able to infect almost all warm-blooded animals including humans, and it results in economic losses in production animals. In the last three years, a large number of vaccination experiments have been performed to control T. gondii infection, with the target of limiting the acute infection and reducing or eliminating tissue cysts in the intermediate hosts. In this paper, we summarize the latest results of the veterinary vaccines against T. gondii infection since 2013. Immunization with live-attenuated whole organisms of non-reverting mutants has been shown to induce remarkably potent immune responses associated with control of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. The non-cyst-forming mutants are promising new tools for the development of veterinary vaccines against T. gondii infection.

  18. Is it toxoplasma encephalitis, HIV encephalopathy or brain tuberculoma?

    PubMed

    Nimir, Amal Rashad; Osman, Emilia; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Abdel Aziz; Saliem, Ahmed M

    2013-01-01

    A 31-year-old Malaysian man was presented with an episode of seizures by the roadside, after having been recently diagnosed as HIV positive accompanied with miliary tuberculosis. On physical examination, he was oriented to person, but not to time or place. There was no neck stiffness or papilloedema. The other systemic examination was unremarkable. Chest examination revealed crepitations at the upper zone of the right lung. After diagnosis suspicion, the case was confirmed as toxoplasma encephalitis by MRI and serological tests. Patient was treated with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole 480-2400 mg/day with folinic acid supplement for 60 days. Two months later, a repeat brain MRI showed resolution of the cerebral lesions.

  19. Is it toxoplasma encephalitis, HIV encephalopathy or brain tuberculoma?

    PubMed Central

    Nimir, Amal Rashad; Osman, Emilia; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Abdel Aziz; Saliem, Ahmed M

    2013-01-01

    A 31-year-old Malaysian man was presented with an episode of seizures by the roadside, after having been recently diagnosed as HIV positive accompanied with miliary tuberculosis. On physical examination, he was oriented to person, but not to time or place. There was no neck stiffness or papilloedema. The other systemic examination was unremarkable. Chest examination revealed crepitations at the upper zone of the right lung. After diagnosis suspicion, the case was confirmed as toxoplasma encephalitis by MRI and serological tests. Patient was treated with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole 480–2400 mg/day with folinic acid supplement for 60 days. Two months later, a repeat brain MRI showed resolution of the cerebral lesions. PMID:23580678

  20. [A modified immunofluorescence test to demonstrate toxoplasma antibodies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sylvester, B; Schöning, C; Neuhaus, B

    1975-01-01

    A modified test to demonstrate toxoplasma antibodies by immunofluorescence is described in detail. This test was used in more than 16 000 cases. The antibody content of a patient's serum is assessed from a single dilution of 1:4 by two criteria: 1. The number of toxoplasms in the assay is kept constant. The percentage of antibody loaded cells varies with the concentration of antibodies in the patient's serum. 2. The intensity of fluorescence is correlated to the antibody content of the serum and the latter can be determined by means of standard sera. The results of this method are expressed in degrees of brightness. We compared three different methods and found an identical behaviour of the FATOX III and the Sabin-Feldman test. Between the complement-fixation test and the FATOX III there is the same relation as between JFT and SFT. This is shown in tables presenting the results for 1621 sera. The method is described in detail.

  1. The role of ticks in transmission cycle of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed

    Skotarczak, Bogumiła

    2016-10-01

    Toxoplasmosis is globally distributed, water- and food borne zoonosis caused by the single protozoan Toxoplasma gondii and probably one-third of the world’s human population is infected with this pathogen. Domestic and wild felids are definitive hosts of this pathogen and intermediate hosts for great variety of other homoeothermic animals. Human as other of the intermediate hosts may become infected in the main route of infection; it is the ingestion of parasite oocysts in contaminated water or soil and undercooked meat. However, the mechanism which this parasite uses to so large spread is not fully understood, because oral transmission does not explain the common event of this parasite in a variety of hosts, such as herbivorous animals or rodents and birds, as well as routes of spread to domestic hosts. Such a wide circle of hosts suggests a possibility of other paths of transmission and a role of ticks, the bloodseeking arthropods was considered in the transmission of T. gondii.

  2. Global Analysis of Palmitoylated Proteins in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Foe, Ian T; Child, Matthew A; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Krishnamurthy, Shruthi; van der Linden, Wouter A; Ward, Gary E; Martin, Brent R; Bogyo, Matthew

    2015-10-14

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as palmitoylation are critical for the lytic cycle of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. While palmitoylation is involved in invasion, motility, and cell morphology, the proteins that utilize this PTM remain largely unknown. Using a chemical proteomic approach, we report a comprehensive analysis of palmitoylated proteins in T. gondii, identifying a total of 282 proteins, including cytosolic, membrane-associated, and transmembrane proteins. From this large set of palmitoylated targets, we validate palmitoylation of proteins involved in motility (myosin light chain 1, myosin A), cell morphology (PhIL1), and host cell invasion (apical membrane antigen 1, AMA1). Further studies reveal that blocking AMA1 palmitoylation enhances the release of AMA1 and other invasion-related proteins from apical secretory organelles, suggesting a previously unrecognized role for AMA1. These findings suggest that palmitoylation is ubiquitous throughout the T. gondii proteome and reveal insights into the biology of this important human pathogen.

  3. Toxoplasma gondii in an African crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Moorman, Jamee Black; Bolin, Steven R; Grosjean, Nicole L; Lim, Ailam; Fitzgerald, Scott D

    2007-03-01

    An adult female crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata) was evaluated for acute onset of neurologic signs including head tilt, circling, and ataxia. She was found dead in her holding area 2 days after initially exhibiting clinical signs. Necropsy was unremarkable. Histopathology of brain tissue revealed the presence of protozoal cysts associated with inflammation as the underlying cause of clinical signs and death. Immunohistochemical staining of brain tissue for Toxoplasma gondii was strongly positive. PCR on fresh brain confirmed T. gondii as the causative organism. An adult male in the same enclosure has demonstrated similar neurologic signs over the past 3 years and has failed to respond to various medical treatments. Clinical disease associated with T. gondii has not been previously reported in this porcupine species or any other Old World porcupines, although there are several reports of clinical toxoplasmosis involving New World porcupine species.

  4. The impact of Toxoplasma gondii on the mammalian genome.

    PubMed

    Müller, Urs B; Howard, Jonathan C

    2016-08-01

    Nobody doubts that infections have imposed specialisations on the mammalian genome. However sufficient information is usually missing to attribute a specific genomic modification to pressure from a specific pathogen. Recent studies on mechanisms of mammalian resistance against the ubiquitous protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, have shown that the small rodents presumed to be largely responsible for transmission of the parasite to its definitive host, the domestic cat, possess distinctive recognition proteins, and interferon-inducible effector proteins (IRG proteins) that limit the potential virulence of the parasite. The phylogenetic association of the recognition proteins, TLR11 and TLR12, with T. gondii resistance is weak, but there is evidence for reciprocal polymorphism between parasite virulence proteins and host IRG proteins that strongly suggests current or recent coevolution. PMID:27128504

  5. The prevalence and incidence of Toxoplasma antibodies in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Franklin, D M; Dror, Z; Nishri, Z

    1993-05-01

    A group of 213 pregnant Jewish women of Israeli and North-African/Asian origin in the Upper Gallilee in Israel were tested for Toxoplasma antibody, first at 4-12 weeks gestation and again 5-6 months later. Immunofluorescent antibody, Sabin-Feldman tests, and specific IgM estimation were used. The prevalence rates for seropositive women were lower in both groups (total 21%) than the rate found in a 1973 study in Israel. The incidence rate for infection acquired in pregnancy was 1.4%. There were no cases of congenital toxoplasmosis, as far as is known up to 3 years of age. More information on the prevalence and incidence of seropositivity, and on congenital toxoplasmosis, is required before a policy decision can be taken as to whether an antenatal screening program for toxoplasmosis should be instituted in Israel.

  6. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in wildlife from Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Shen, Jilong; Su, Chunlei; Sundermann, Christine A

    2013-03-01

    The genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife is of interest to understand the transmission of this parasite in the environment. In the present study, we genetically characterized five T. gondii isolates from different wild animals including two isolates from a bobcat (Lynx rufus), one from a red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus), one from a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and one from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Genotyping of these samples using 11 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism markers (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico) revealed two types, including type I (ToxoDB#10) and type 12 (ToxoDB#5). This is the first report of genetic characterization of T. gondii strains in wildlife from Alabama and from a red-shouldered hawk. PMID:23160892

  7. Fatal Toxoplasma gondii infection in the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongyu; Wang, Zedong; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Caiwu; Wei, Feng; Liu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii can infect nearly all warm-blooded animals. We report an acute fatal T. gondii infection in the endangered giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in a zoo in China, characterized by acute gastroenteritis and respiratory symptoms. T. gondii infection was confirmed by immunological and molecular methods. Multilocus nested PCR-RFLP revealed clonal type I at the SAG1 and c29-2 loci, clonal type II at the SAG2, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, and L358 loci, and clonal type III at the alternative SAG2 and SAG3 loci, thus, a potential new genotype of T. gondii in the giant panda. Other possible pathogens were not detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical toxoplasmosis in a giant panda. PMID:26514595

  8. Bartonella and Toxoplasma Infections in Stray Cats from Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, Alexandra D.; McMillan-Cole, Audrey C.; Kasten, Rickie W.; Stuckey, Matthew J.; Kass, Philip H.; Chomel, Bruno B.

    2013-01-01

    Because of overpopulation, stray/feral cats were captured on military bases in Iraq as part of the US Army Zoonotic Disease Surveillance Program. Blood samples were collected from 207 cats, mainly in Baghdad but also in North and West Iraq, to determine the prevalence of Bartonella and Toxoplasma infections. Nine (4.3%) cats, all from Baghdad, were bacteremic with B. henselae type I. Seroprevalence was 30.4% for T. gondii, 15% for B. henselae, and 12.6% for B. clarridgeiae. Differences in Bartonella prevalence by location were statistically significant, because most of the seropositive cats were from Baghdad. There was no association between T. gondii seropositivity and either of the two Bartonella species surveyed. This report is the first report on the prevalence of Bartonella and T. gondii among stray cats in Iraq, which allows for better evaluation of the zoonotic risk potential to the Iraqi people and deployed military personnel by feral cat colonies. PMID:24062480

  9. [Cloning and Bioinformatics Analysis of Toxoplasma gondii ROP21 Gene].

    PubMed

    Shi, Shi-jun; Cui, Yong; Li, Jin; Wang, Hong-fa; Yin, Kun; Wei, Qing-kuan; Huang, Bing-cheng; Sun, Hui; Liu, Gong-zhen

    2015-08-01

    The full-length gene sequence of Toxoplasma gondii ROP21 (TgROP21) gene was amplified with PCR. The signaling peptide and transmembrane domain of TgROP21 protein were predicted by SignaIP and TMHMM online predictive sites, and the hydrophilicity and antigenic index of this protein were ananlyzed with DNAStar software. Meanwhile, the functional domains and tertiary structure were modeled by combined use of ExPASY and PRODATA online sites. As expected, the PCR results revealed one band at 2,022 bp. The signaling peptide, transmembrane domain, hydrophilicity, antigen index, functional domain and 3D structure of TgROP21 were successfully predicted. This work may provide a theoretical foundation for further verification of TgROP21 function. PMID:26672223

  10. Clinically Available Medicines Demonstrating Anti-Toxoplasma Activity

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Andrew J.; Zach, Sydney J.; Wang, Xiaofang; Larson, Joshua J.; Judge, Abigail K.; Davis, Lisa A.; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an apicomplexan parasite of humans and other mammals, including livestock and companion animals. While chemotherapeutic regimens, including pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine regimens, ameliorate acute or recrudescent disease such as toxoplasmic encephalitis or ocular toxoplasmosis, these drugs are often toxic to the host. Moreover, no approved options are available to treat infected women who are pregnant. Lastly, no drug regimen has shown the ability to eradicate the chronic stage of infection, which is characterized by chemoresistant intracellular cysts that persist for the life of the host. In an effort to promote additional chemotherapeutic options, we now evaluate clinically available drugs that have shown efficacy in disease models but which lack clinical case reports. Ideally, less-toxic treatments for the acute disease can be identified and developed, with an additional goal of cyst clearance from human and animal hosts. PMID:26392504

  11. Bartonella and Toxoplasma infections in stray cats from Iraq.

    PubMed

    Switzer, Alexandra D; McMillan-Cole, Audrey C; Kasten, Rickie W; Stuckey, Matthew J; Kass, Philip H; Chomel, Bruno B

    2013-12-01

    Because of overpopulation, stray/feral cats were captured on military bases in Iraq as part of the US Army Zoonotic Disease Surveillance Program. Blood samples were collected from 207 cats, mainly in Baghdad but also in North and West Iraq, to determine the prevalence of Bartonella and Toxoplasma infections. Nine (4.3%) cats, all from Baghdad, were bacteremic with B. henselae type I. Seroprevalence was 30.4% for T. gondii, 15% for B. henselae, and 12.6% for B. clarridgeiae. Differences in Bartonella prevalence by location were statistically significant, because most of the seropositive cats were from Baghdad. There was no association between T. gondii seropositivity and either of the two Bartonella species surveyed. This report is the first report on the prevalence of Bartonella and T. gondii among stray cats in Iraq, which allows for better evaluation of the zoonotic risk potential to the Iraqi people and deployed military personnel by feral cat colonies.

  12. Genetic Mapping of Pathogenesis Determinants in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Michael S; Dubey, J P; Sibley, L David

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread parasite of warm-blooded vertebrates that also causes opportunistic infections in humans. Rodents are a natural host for asexually replicating forms, whereas cats serve as the definitive host for sexual development. The laboratory mouse provides a model to study pathogenesis. Strains of T. gondii are globally diverse, with more than 16 distinct haplogroups clustered into 6 major clades. Forward genetic analysis of genetic crosses between different lineages has been used to define the molecular basis of acute virulence in the mouse. These studies have identified a family of secretory serine/threonine rhoptry kinases that target innate immune pathways to protect intracellular parasites from destruction. Rhoptry kinases target immunity-related GTPases, a family of immune effectors that is expanded in rodents. Similar forward genetic studies may be useful to define the basis of pathogenesis in other hosts, including humans, where infections of different strains present with variable clinical severity.

  13. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in wildlife from Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Shen, Jilong; Su, Chunlei; Sundermann, Christine A

    2013-03-01

    The genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife is of interest to understand the transmission of this parasite in the environment. In the present study, we genetically characterized five T. gondii isolates from different wild animals including two isolates from a bobcat (Lynx rufus), one from a red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus), one from a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and one from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Genotyping of these samples using 11 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism markers (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico) revealed two types, including type I (ToxoDB#10) and type 12 (ToxoDB#5). This is the first report of genetic characterization of T. gondii strains in wildlife from Alabama and from a red-shouldered hawk.

  14. The known and missing links between Toxoplasma gondii and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Elsheikha, Hany M; Büsselberg, Dietrich; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-08-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular protozoan parasite, has a striking predilection for infecting the Central Nervous System and has been linked to an increased incidence of a number of psychiatric diseases. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that T. gondii infection can affect the structure, bioenergetics and function of brain cells, and alters several host cell processes, including dopaminergic, tryptophan-kynurenine, GABAergic, AKT1, Jak/STAT, and vasopressinergic pathways. These mechanisms underlying the neuropathology of latent toxoplasmosis seem to operate also in schizophrenia, supporting the link between the two disorders. Better understanding of the intricate parasite-neuroglial communications holds the key to unlocking the mystery of T. gondii-mediated schizophrenia and offers substantial prospects for the development of disease-modifying therapies. PMID:27041387

  15. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in donkeys (Equus asinus) in Italy.

    PubMed

    Machacova, Tereza; Bartova, Eva; Di Loria, Antonio; Sedlak, Kamil; Mariani, Ugo; Fusco, Giovanna; Fulgione, Domenico; Veneziano, Vincenzo; Dubey, Jitender P

    2014-03-01

    Toxoplasmosis, an important zoonosis, can be transmitted by eating meat or drinking milk of animals infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Samples were collected from 238 donkeys in the year 2010 in Italy, which included 207 females and 31 males of five breeds and crossbreeds with the average age 9 years (1 month-24 years). Sera were tested for T. gondii antibodies using a latex agglutination test and the indirect fluorescent antibody test; 5 and 8% seropositivity were recorded, respectively. We found significant correlation between the presence of T. gondii antibodies and sex, age, grazing and presence of cats on the farms and their access to donkey feed. This is the first detection of T. gondii antibodies in donkeys in Italy.

  16. Potential contamination of drinking water with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Aramini, J. J.; Stephen, C.; Dubey, J. P.; Engelstoft, C.; Schwantje, H.; Ribble, C. S.

    1999-01-01

    The world's first documented toxoplasmosis outbreak associated with a municipal water supply was recognized in 1995 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. It was hypothesized that domestic cat (Felis catus) or cougar (Felis concolor) faeces contaminated a surface water reservoir with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts. An extensive investigation of the Victoria watershed 1 year following the outbreak documented the presence of an endemic T. gondii cycle involving the animals inhabiting the area. Cats and cougars were observed throughout the watershed. Serological evidence of T. gondii infection was demonstrated among domestic cats living in the Victoria area. Cougars were found to shed T. gondii oocysts. Serological evidence of T. gondii infection in deer mice living in the riparian environments of the watershed suggested that T. gondii oocysts were being shed near the water edge. Contamination of Victoria's water supply with T. gondii oocysts potentially occurred during the study period and future waterborne toxoplasmosis outbreaks in this and other communities are possible. PMID:10355797

  17. Toxoplasma gondii aspartic protease 1 is not essential in tachyzoites.

    PubMed

    Polonais, Valerie; Shea, Michael; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    Aspartic proteases are important virulence factors for pathogens and are recognized as attractive drug targets. Seven aspartic proteases (ASPs) have been identified in Toxoplasma gondii genome. Bioinformatics and phylogenetic analyses regroup them into five monophyletic groups. Among them, TgASP1, a coccidian specific aspartic protease related to the food vacuole plasmepsins, is associated with the secretory pathway in non-dividing cells and relocalizes in close proximity to the nascent inner membrane complex (IMC) of daughter cells during replication. Despite a potential role for TgASP1 in IMC formation, the generation of a conventional knockout of the TgASP1 gene revealed that this protease is not required for T. gondii tachyzoite survival or for proper IMC biogenesis.

  18. Lytic Cycle of Toxoplasma gondii: 15 Years Later.

    PubMed

    Blader, Ira J; Coleman, Bradley I; Chen, Chun-Ti; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is the clinical and pathological consequence of acute infection with the obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Symptoms result from tissue destruction that accompanies lytic parasite growth. This review updates current understanding of the host cell invasion, parasite replication, and eventual egress that constitute the lytic cycle, as well as the ways T. gondii manipulates host cells to ensure its survival. Since the publication of a previous iteration of this review 15 years ago, important advances have been made in our molecular understanding of parasite growth and mechanisms of host cell egress, and knowledge of the parasite's manipulation of the host has rapidly progressed. Here we cover molecular advances and current conceptual frameworks that include each of these topics, with an eye to what may be known 15 years from now.

  19. CD4-mediated and CD8-mediated cytotoxic and proliferative immune responses to Toxoplasma gondii in seropositive humans.

    PubMed Central

    Purner, M B; Berens, R L; Nash, P B; van Linden, A; Ross, E; Kruse, C; Krug, E C; Curiel, T J

    1996-01-01

    Both CD4+ and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are part of the human immune response to Toxoplasma gondii infection. To further our understanding of Toxoplasma immunity, we investigated factors influencing stimulation of CD4+ or CD8+ human T. gondii-specific immune cells. Both antigen-pulsed and Toxoplasma-infected antigen-presenting cells (APC) induced cell proliferation. Toxoplasma-infected APC elicited strong proliferation of CD4+ cells, but little or no proliferation of CD8+ cells, unless high antigen loads were used. Toxoplasma-infected APC stimulated specific cytotoxicity poorly or not at all, owing to death of stimulated cultures, whereas antigen-pulsed APC strongly elicited specific cytotoxicity. Cytotoxicity elicited by either type of APC resided exclusively in CD4+ T cells in polyclonal cultures. Thus, Toxoplasma-infected APC elicited stronger CD4-mediated than CD8-mediated cell proliferation and generated CD4+ CTL more readily than CD8+ CTL. Nonetheless, specific CD8+ memory cells were demonstrated, and rare CD8+ Toxoplasma-specific CTL were subcloned. Fixed Toxoplasma-infected APC (which induce CD8+ CTL) also elicited cell proliferation, but polyclonal cultures stimulated with these infected APC did not die. Unfixed Toxoplasma-infected APC strongly inhibited phytohemagglutinin-induced cell proliferation, whereas fixed APC did not. These data suggested that infected APC were inhibitory or lethal to some immune cells. Further investigations into interactions between immune cells and Toxoplasma-infected cells likely will help elucidate factors involved in the immunopathogenesis of Toxoplasma infection. As other intracellular parasites, including Plasmodium spp. and Leishmania spp., also elicit CD4+ CTL, such work may help establish paradigms governing immunity to intracellular parasites. PMID:8926107

  20. Toxoplasma gondii Actively Inhibits Neuronal Function in Chronically Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, Fahad; Händel, Ulrike; Angenstein, Frank; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Kreutzmann, Peter; Lison, Holger; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Scheich, Henning; Wetzel, Wolfram; Schlüter, Dirk; Budinger, Eike

    2012-01-01

    Upon infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, fast replicating tachyzoites infect a broad spectrum of host cells including neurons. Under the pressure of the immune response, tachyzoites convert into slow-replicating bradyzoites, which persist as cysts in neurons. Currently, it is unclear whether T. gondii alters the functional activity of neurons, which may contribute to altered behaviour of T. gondii–infected mice and men. In the present study we demonstrate that upon oral infection with T. gondii cysts, chronically infected BALB/c mice lost over time their natural fear against cat urine which was paralleled by the persistence of the parasite in brain regions affecting behaviour and odor perception. Detailed immunohistochemistry showed that in infected neurons not only parasitic cysts but also the host cell cytoplasm and some axons stained positive for Toxoplasma antigen suggesting that parasitic proteins might directly interfere with neuronal function. In fact, in vitro live cell calcium (Ca2+) imaging studies revealed that tachyzoites actively manipulated Ca2+ signalling upon glutamate stimulation leading either to hyper- or hypo-responsive neurons. Experiments with the endoplasmatic reticulum Ca2+ uptake inhibitor thapsigargin indicate that tachyzoites deplete Ca2+ stores in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Furthermore in vivo studies revealed that the activity-dependent uptake of the potassium analogue thallium was reduced in cyst harbouring neurons indicating their functional impairment. The percentage of non-functional neurons increased over time In conclusion, both bradyzoites and tachyzoites functionally silence infected neurons, which may significantly contribute to the altered behaviour of the host. PMID:22530040

  1. Isolation of Toxoplasma gondii from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Fair, P A; Sundar, N; Velmurugan, G; Kwok, O C H; McFee, W E; Majumdar, D; Su, C

    2008-08-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection in marine mammals is intriguing and indicative of contamination of the ocean environment and coastal waters with oocysts. In previous serological surveys, >90% of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from the coasts of Florida, South Carolina, and California had antibodies to T. gondii by the modified agglutination test (MAT). In the present study, attempts were made to isolate T. gondii from dead T. truncatus. During 2005, 2006, and 2007, serum or blood clot, and tissues (brain, heart, skeletal muscle) of 52 T. truncatus stranded on the coasts of South Carolina were tested for T. gondii. Antibodies to T. gondii (MAT 1:25 or higher) were found in 26 (53%) of 49 dolphins; serum was not available from 3 animals. Tissues (heart, muscle, and sometimes brain) of 32 dolphins (26 seropositive, 3 seronegative, and 3 without accompanying sera) were bioassayed for T. gondii in mice, or cats, or both. Tissues of the recipient mice were examined for T. gondii stages. Feces of recipient cats were examined for shedding of T. gondii oocysts, but none excreted oocysts. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from hearts of the 3 dolphins (2 with MAT titers of 1:200, and 1 without accompanied serum) by bioassay in mice. Genotyping of these 3 T. gondii isolates (designated TgDoUs1-3) with the use of 10 PCR-RFLP markers (SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico) revealed 2 genotypes. Two of the 3 isolates have Type II alleles at all loci and belong to the clonal Type II lineage. One isolate has a unique genotype. This is the first report of isolation of viable T. gondii from T. truncatus. PMID:18576793

  2. GITR Activation Positively Regulates Immune Responses against Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Frederico R. C.; Mota, Caroline M.; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Silva, Murilo V.; Ferreira, Marcela D.; Fonseca, Denise M.; Silva, João S.; Mineo, José R.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread parasite responsible for causing clinical diseases especially in pregnant and immunosuppressed individuals. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor (GITR), which is also known as TNFRS18 and belongs to the TNF receptor superfamily, is found to be expressed in various cell types of the immune system and provides an important costimulatory signal for T cells and myeloid cells. However, the precise role of this receptor in the context of T. gondii infection remains elusive. Therefore, the current study investigated the role of GITR activation in the immunoregulation mechanisms induced during the experimental infection of mice with T. gondii. Our data show that T. gondii infection slightly upregulates GITR expression in Treg cells and B cells, but the most robust increment in expression was observed in macrophages and dendritic cells. Interestingly, mice infected and treated with an agonistic antibody anti-GITR (DTA-1) presented a robust increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine production at preferential sites of parasite replication, which was associated with the decrease in latent brain parasitism of mice under treatment with DTA-1. Several in vivo and in vitro analysis were performed to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in GITR activation upon infection, however no clear alterations were detected in the phenotype/function of macrophages, Tregs and B cells under treatment with DTA-1. Therefore, GITR appears as a potential target for intervention during infection by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, even though further studies are still necessary to better characterize the immune response triggered by GITR activation during T. gondii infection. PMID:27027302

  3. The Crystal Structure of Toxoplasma gondii Pyruvate Kinase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bakszt, R.; Wernimont, A; Allali-Hassani, A; Mok, M; Hills, T; Hui, R; Pizarro, J

    2010-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK), which catalyzes the final step in glycolysis converting phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate, is a central metabolic regulator in most organisms. Consequently PK represents an attractive therapeutic target in cancer and human pathogens, like Apicomplexans. The phylum Aplicomplexa, a group of exclusively parasitic organisms, includes the genera Plasmodium, Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma, the etiological agents of malaria, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis respectively. Toxoplasma gondii infection causes a mild illness and is a very common infection affecting nearly one third of the world's population. We have determined the crystal structure of the PK1 enzyme from T. gondii, with the B domain in the open and closed conformations. We have also characterized its enzymatic activity and confirmed glucose-6-phosphate as its allosteric activator. This is the first description of a PK enzyme in a closed inactive conformation without any bound substrate. Comparison of the two tetrameric TgPK1 structures indicates a reorientation of the monomers with a concomitant change in the buried surface among adjacent monomers. The change in the buried surface was associated with significant B domain movements in one of the interacting monomers. We hypothesize that a loop in the interface between the A and B domains plays an important role linking the position of the B domain to the buried surface among monomers through two {alpha}-helices. The proposed model links the catalytic cycle of the enzyme with its domain movements and highlights the contribution of the interface between adjacent subunits. In addition, an unusual ordered conformation was observed in one of the allosteric binding domains and it is related to a specific apicomplexan insertion. The sequence and structural particularity would explain the atypical activation by a mono-phosphorylated sugar. The sum of peculiarities raises this enzyme as an emerging target for drug discovery.

  4. [Posterior longitudinal ligament ossification: case report].

    PubMed

    Tella, Oswaldo Inácio de; Herculano, Marco Antonio; Paiva Neto, Manoel Antonio; Faedo Neto, Atílio; Crosera, João Francisco

    2006-03-01

    Posterior longitudinal ligament ossification of cervical spine is a rare condition among caucasians. A 42 years old japanese patient with progressive walking difficulty was diagnosed with this pathology by CT scan and MRI and treated surgically by an anterior approach with arthrodesis. Pathophysiology, racial prevalence, clinical picture, radiological characteristics and surgical approaches options are revised.

  5. Posterior Probabilities for a Consensus Ordering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fligner, Michael A.; Verducci, Joseph S.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of consensus ordering is defined, and formulas for exact and approximate posterior probabilities for consensus ordering are developed under the assumption of a generalized Mallows' model with a diffuse conjugate prior. These methods are applied to a data set concerning 98 college students. (SLD)

  6. Posterior predictive Bayesian phylogenetic model selection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul O; Xie, Wangang; Chen, Ming-Hui; Fan, Yu; Kuo, Lynn

    2014-05-01

    We present two distinctly different posterior predictive approaches to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection and illustrate these methods using examples from green algal protein-coding cpDNA sequences and flowering plant rDNA sequences. The Gelfand-Ghosh (GG) approach allows dissection of an overall measure of model fit into components due to posterior predictive variance (GGp) and goodness-of-fit (GGg), which distinguishes this method from the posterior predictive P-value approach. The conditional predictive ordinate (CPO) method provides a site-specific measure of model fit useful for exploratory analyses and can be combined over sites yielding the log pseudomarginal likelihood (LPML) which is useful as an overall measure of model fit. CPO provides a useful cross-validation approach that is computationally efficient, requiring only a sample from the posterior distribution (no additional simulation is required). Both GG and CPO add new perspectives to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection based on the predictive abilities of models and complement the perspective provided by the marginal likelihood (including Bayes Factor comparisons) based solely on the fit of competing models to observed data. PMID:24193892

  7. A Complication of Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ankit; Charles, Loren; Ritchie, James

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of tibial nerve impingement by an anteroposterior screw inserted for stabilization of a posterior malleolar fracture. This specific complication has not previously been described in published studies, although numerous reports have described various forms of peripheral nerve entrapment. We discuss the merits of fixation of these fractures using a posterolateral approach.

  8. Posterior instability caused by batter's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kang, Richard W; Mahony, Gregory T; Harris, Thomas C; Dines, Joshua S

    2013-10-01

    In summary, batter’s shoulder is a rare and only recently recognized entity. This condition is posterior shoulder instability caused by a missed attempt at hitting a pitch, especially with an outside pitch. The lack of counterforce from hitting a ball produces increased forces imparted on the posterior capsulolabral complex of the lead shoulder during batting. If the player fails conservative management, she or he can undergo an arthroscopic posterior labral repair instead of debridement. After treatment, the player can expect to return to play after approximately 6 to 7 months. Initial results from a small, retrospective series demonstrate greater than 90% excellent results. These findings are similar to current literature for arthroscopic treatment of posterior instability, which reports success rates that range from 75% to 91%. Longer-term follow-up will be needed to determine the natural history and prognosis or batter’s shoulder. Based on initial results, the authors predict good to excellent results for most players with batter’s shoulder who undergo proper treatment. Additionally, with the exception of switch hitters, the nonthrowing arm is affected. This can also improve the athlete’s return to play.

  9. Posterior instability caused by batter's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kang, Richard W; Mahony, Gregory T; Harris, Thomas C; Dines, Joshua S

    2013-10-01

    In summary, batter’s shoulder is a rare and only recently recognized entity. This condition is posterior shoulder instability caused by a missed attempt at hitting a pitch, especially with an outside pitch. The lack of counterforce from hitting a ball produces increased forces imparted on the posterior capsulolabral complex of the lead shoulder during batting. If the player fails conservative management, she or he can undergo an arthroscopic posterior labral repair instead of debridement. After treatment, the player can expect to return to play after approximately 6 to 7 months. Initial results from a small, retrospective series demonstrate greater than 90% excellent results. These findings are similar to current literature for arthroscopic treatment of posterior instability, which reports success rates that range from 75% to 91%. Longer-term follow-up will be needed to determine the natural history and prognosis or batter’s shoulder. Based on initial results, the authors predict good to excellent results for most players with batter’s shoulder who undergo proper treatment. Additionally, with the exception of switch hitters, the nonthrowing arm is affected. This can also improve the athlete’s return to play. PMID:24079435

  10. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  11. Chronic Toxoplasma Infection Modifies the Structure and the Risk of Host Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, Cristina; Paixão, Vitor B.; Costa, Rui M.

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma has an indirect life cycle, in which felids are the definitive host. It has been suggested that this parasite developed mechanisms for enhancing its transmission rate to felids by inducing behavioral modifications in the intermediate rodent host. For example, Toxoplasma-infected rodents display a reduction in the innate fear of predator odor. However, animals with Toxoplasma infection acquired in the wild are more often caught in traps, suggesting that there are manipulations of intermediate host behavior beyond those that increase predation by felids. We investigated the behavioral modifications of Toxoplasma-infected mice in environments with exposed versus non-exposed areas, and found that chronically infected mice with brain cysts display a plethora of behavioral alterations. Using principal component analysis, we discovered that most of the behavioral differences observed in cyst-containing animals reflected changes in the microstructure of exploratory behavior and risk/unconditioned fear. We next examined whether these behavioral changes were related to the presence and distribution of parasitic cysts in the brain of chronically infected mice. We found no strong cyst tropism for any particular brain area but found that the distribution of Toxoplasma cysts in the brain of infected animals was not random, and that particular combinations of cyst localizations changed risk/unconditioned fear in the host. These results suggest that brain cysts in animals chronically infected with Toxoplasma alter the fine structure of exploratory behavior and risk/unconditioned fear, which may result in greater capture probability of infected rodents. These data also raise the possibility that selective pressures acted on Toxoplasma to broaden its transmission between intermediate predator hosts, in addition to felid definitive hosts. PMID:22431975

  12. An Unusual Cause of Posterior Elbow Impingement: Detachment of a Hypertrophied Posterior Fat Pad

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Daisuke; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sugiura, Kosuke; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Suzue, Naoto; Goto, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Wada, Keizo; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 47-year-old woman who developed posterior impingement of the elbow due to detachment of a hypertrophied posterior fat pad. She reported acute left elbow pain after leaning back onto a hard object with her hand and subsequently experienced a “catching” sensation. Comparison with the magnetic resonance images of a normal elbow revealed a hypertrophied posterior fat pad interposed between the olecranon and olecranon fossa in both elbows, with the fat pad in the left elbow located more inferiorly than that in the right elbow. Elbow arthroscopy showed the olecranon fossa covered by the fat pad, a portion of which was detached from the rest of the pad. Debridement of the detached portion was performed until no impingement was evident. Postoperatively, full extension of the elbow did not elicit pain. Clinicians should include this pathology among the differential diagnoses for posterior elbow pain. PMID:26613057

  13. The posterior sagittal trans-sphincteric approach.

    PubMed

    Peña, A; Hong, A

    2004-01-01

    The posterior sagittal, transphincteric approach to treat different pelvic problems has been known since last century. Although some surgeons have embraced it and have enthusiastically advocated it s use, it has never become an overly popular technique. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the approach, both from an historical perspective and from the authors experience. The international literature on the subject was reviewed since 1877 up to the present date. A retrospective evaluation of the authors experience was conducted, and the results reviewed. Specific attention was paid to the final result obtained in the treatment of the original condition, surgical complications and the effect of the surgical approach on bowel and urinary control. The experiential review included 114 cases. They were divided into two groups. A included 85 patients who underwent a posterior sagittal transphincteric approach that included 49 cases of Hirschsprung s disease (primary 21, secondary 28), 15 presacral masses; 10 rectaltumors; 7 acquired recto-genito-urinary fistulae; and 4 cases of idiopathic rectal prolapse. Group B included 29 patients who underwent a posterior sagittal trans-anorectal approach, in which the anterior wall of the rectum and the sphincter was divided as well.. This group included 12 cases of urogenital sinuses; 8 acquired urethral stricture or atresia after trauma; and 9 posterior urethral masses. Post-operative bowel control was normal all cases except in those patients whose basic condition had resulted in fecal incontinence, or who had sustained an irreversible injury prior tothe operation. Urinary control was normal except in cases with pre-operative incontinence. Complications included recurrence of recto-genitourinary fistulae in 3 cases, recto-cutaneous fistula in 3 Hirschsprung s patients and 2 partial wound dehisences. The posterior sagittal trans-sphincteric approach represents a useful technical alternative

  14. Optimization of the cryopreservation of biological resources, Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Mzabi, Alexandre; Escotte-Binet, Sandie; Le Naour, Richard; Ortis, Naïma; Audonnet, Sandra; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Aubert, Dominique; Villena, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    The conservation of Toxoplasma gondii strains isolated from humans and animals is essential for conducting studies on Toxoplasma. Conservation is the main function of the French Biological Toxoplasma Resource Centre (BRC Toxoplasma, France, http://www.toxocrb.com/). In this study, we have determined the suitability of a standard cryopreservation methodology for different Toxoplasma strains using the viability of tachyzoites assayed by flow cytometry with dual fluorescent labelling (calcein acetoxymethyl ester and propidium iodide) of tachyzoites. This method provides a comparative quantitative assessment of viability after thawing. The results helped to define and refine quality criteria before tachyzoite cryopreservation and optimization of the cryopreservation parameters. The optimized cryopreservation method uses a volume of 1.0 mL containing 8 × 10(6) tachyzoites, in Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's Medium (IMDM) containing 10% foetal calf serum (FCS). The cryoprotectant additive is 10% v/v Me2SO without incubation. A cooling rate of ∼1 °C/min to -80 °C followed, after 48 h, by storage in liquid nitrogen. Thawing was performed using a 37 °C water bath that produced a warming rate of ∼100 °C/min, and samples were then diluted 1:5 in IMDM with 5% FCS, and centrifuged and resuspended for viability assessment.

  15. The HU Protein Is Important for Apicoplast Genome Maintenance and Inheritance in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Reiff, Sarah B.; Vaishnava, Shipra

    2012-01-01

    The apicoplast, a chloroplast-like organelle, is an essential cellular component of most apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. The apicoplast maintains its own genome, a 35-kb DNA molecule that largely encodes proteins required for organellar transcription and translation. Interference with apicoplast genome maintenance and function is a validated target for drug therapy for malaria and toxoplasmosis. However, the many proteins required for genome maintenance and inheritance remain largely unstudied. Here we genetically characterize a nucleus-encoded homolog to the bacterial HU protein in Toxoplasma gondii. In bacteria, HU is a DNA-binding structural protein with fundamental roles in transcription, replication initiation, and DNA repair. Immunofluorescence assays reveal that in T. gondii this protein localizes to the apicoplast. We have found that the HU protein from Toxoplasma can successfully complement bacterial ΔhupA mutants, supporting a similar function. We were able to construct a genetic knockout of HU in Toxoplasma. This Δhu mutant is barely viable and exhibits significant growth retardation. Upon further analysis of the mutant phenotype, we find that this mutant has a dramatically reduced apicoplast genome copy number and, furthermore, suffers defects in the segregation of the apicoplast organelle. Our findings not only show that the HU protein is important for Toxoplasma cell biology but also demonstrate the importance of the apicoplast genome in the biogenesis of the organelle. PMID:22611021

  16. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection among patients with non-schizophrenic neurodevelopmental disorders in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Amany I; Hassanein, Faika I; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad

    2016-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic parasite with neurotropic characteristics that can mediate neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental, behavioral and personality aspects of their hosts. Therefore, the seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma antibodies has been studied in patients with different neurological disorders from different localities. On searching online databases, however, we could not find published studies on the seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma antibodies among patients with neurodevelopmental disorders in Egypt. Therefore, the present preliminary study was conducted to determine the serological profile of T. gondii infection among patients with non-schizophrenic neurodevelopmental disorders in Alexandria, Egypt. Data and blood samples were collected from 188 patients recruited for the study from four mental rehabilitation centers in the period from July 2014 to March 2015. The overall seropositivity rates of IgM and IgG among patients were 16.5% (31/188) and 50.0% (94/188), respectively. Of the studied patients' characteristics, only age was significantly associated with anti-Toxoplasma IgG seropositivity, with older patients being about twice more likely exposed to infection. However, no statistically significant association was found with IgM. In addition, seropositivity of anti-Toxoplasma IgG, but not IgM, was significantly associated with non-schizophrenic neurodevelopmental disorders; however, neither IgG nor IgM showed a significant association with cognitive impairment as indicated by the intelligence quotient scores.

  17. Neurons are the Primary Target Cell for the Brain-Tropic Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Carla M; Tuladhar, Shraddha; Dietrich, Hans K; Nguyen, Elizabeth; MacDonald, Wes R; Trivedi, Tapasya; Devineni, Asha; Koshy, Anita A

    2016-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, a common brain-tropic parasite, is capable of infecting most nucleated cells, including astrocytes and neurons, in vitro. Yet, in vivo, Toxoplasma is primarily found in neurons. In vitro data showing that interferon-γ-stimulated astrocytes, but not neurons, clear intracellular parasites suggest that neurons alone are persistently infected in vivo because they lack the ability to clear intracellular parasites. Here we test this theory by using a novel Toxoplasma-mouse model capable of marking and tracking host cells that directly interact with parasites, even if the interaction is transient. Remarkably, we find that Toxoplasma shows a strong predilection for interacting with neurons throughout CNS infection. This predilection remains in the setting of IFN-γ depletion; infection with parasites resistant to the major mechanism by which murine astrocytes clear parasites; or when directly injecting parasites into the brain. These findings, in combination with prior work, strongly suggest that neurons are not incidentally infected, but rather they are Toxoplasma's primary in vivo target.

  18. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection among patients with non-schizophrenic neurodevelopmental disorders in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Amany I; Hassanein, Faika I; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad

    2016-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic parasite with neurotropic characteristics that can mediate neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental, behavioral and personality aspects of their hosts. Therefore, the seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma antibodies has been studied in patients with different neurological disorders from different localities. On searching online databases, however, we could not find published studies on the seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma antibodies among patients with neurodevelopmental disorders in Egypt. Therefore, the present preliminary study was conducted to determine the serological profile of T. gondii infection among patients with non-schizophrenic neurodevelopmental disorders in Alexandria, Egypt. Data and blood samples were collected from 188 patients recruited for the study from four mental rehabilitation centers in the period from July 2014 to March 2015. The overall seropositivity rates of IgM and IgG among patients were 16.5% (31/188) and 50.0% (94/188), respectively. Of the studied patients' characteristics, only age was significantly associated with anti-Toxoplasma IgG seropositivity, with older patients being about twice more likely exposed to infection. However, no statistically significant association was found with IgM. In addition, seropositivity of anti-Toxoplasma IgG, but not IgM, was significantly associated with non-schizophrenic neurodevelopmental disorders; however, neither IgG nor IgM showed a significant association with cognitive impairment as indicated by the intelligence quotient scores. PMID:26656562

  19. Oxidative stress generated during monensin treatment contributes to altered Toxoplasma gondii mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Charvat, Robert A.; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The ionophore monensin displays potent activities against several coccidian parasites of veterinary and medical importance including the opportunistic pathogen of humans, Toxoplasma gondii. While monensin is used widely in animals, toxicity impedes its use in humans. Nonetheless, given its potency, understanding its mode of action would reveal vulnerable aspects of the parasite that can be exploited for drug development. We previously established that monensin induces Toxoplasma to undergo cell cycle arrest and an autophagy-like cell death. Interestingly, these effects are dependent on the mitochondrion-localized TgMSH-1 protein, suggesting that monensin disrupts mitochondrial function. We demonstrate that monensin treatment results in decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and altered morphology. These effects are mitigated by the antioxidant compound N-acetyl-cysteine suggesting that monensin causes an oxidative stress, which was indeed the case based on direct detection of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, over-expression of the antioxidant proteins glutaredoxin and peroxiredoxin 2 protect Toxoplasma from the deleterious effects of monensin. Thus, our studies show that the effects of monensin on Toxoplasma are due to a disruption of mitochondrial function caused by the induction of an oxidative stress and implicate parasite redox biology as a viable target for the development of drugs against Toxoplasma and related pathogenic parasites. PMID:26976749

  20. Shining a light on posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Boeve, Bradley F; Cappa, Stefano F; Dickerson, Bradford C; Dubois, Bruno; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Lehmann, Manja; Mendez, Mario F; Pijnenburg, Yolande; Ryan, Natalie S; Scheltens, Philip; Shakespeare, Tim; Tang-Wai, David F; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Bain, Lisa; Carrillo, Maria C; Fox, Nick C

    2013-07-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome characterized by progressive decline in visual processing skills, relatively intact memory and language in the early stages, and atrophy of posterior brain regions. Misdiagnosis of PCA is common, owing not only to its relative rarity and unusual and variable presentation, but also because patients frequently first seek the opinion of an ophthalmologist, who may note normal eye examinations by their usual tests but may not appreciate cortical brain dysfunction. Seeking to raise awareness of the disease, stimulate research, and promote collaboration, a multidisciplinary group of PCA research clinicians formed an international working party, which had its first face-to-face meeting on July 13, 2012 in Vancouver, Canada, prior to the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. PMID:23274153

  1. Fractures of posterior teeth in adults.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Maxwell, E H; Braly, B V

    1986-02-01

    Examined in this study were 191 patients with 206 complete or incomplete fractures of posterior teeth. The patients ranged in age from 14 to 76 years, with 66.5% younger than 40 years. The number of fractures occurring in each arch was almost equal. The mandibular first molar was the most frequently fractured posterior tooth. The lingual cusps of mandibular molars fractured more often than did the buccal cusps of mandibular molars by a ratio of 2 to 1. In maxillary molars, buccal and lingual cusps fractured with almost equal frequency, but, in maxillary premolars, the lingual cusps fractured slightly more often than buccal cusps. Data gathered on the widths of the isthmuses of restorations in 109 teeth showed that fewer fractures occurred in teeth with more conservative restorations, with widths of isthmuses a quarter of the inter-cusp distance, and intact marginal ridges. PMID:3456380

  2. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Induced by Pazopanib

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is a clinical/radiological syndrome characterized by headache, seizures, impaired vision, acute hypertension, and typical magnetic resonance imaging findings. There are several reports in the literature that depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The list of common anticancer and supportive care drugs that predispose to reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is expanding and includes not only a large number of chemotherapeutic agents but also an increased number of new targeted drugs, particularly angiogenesis inhibitors such as bevacizumab,sorefenib and sunitinib. Pazopanib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit which after a positive phase III randomized clinical trial in patients with advanced renal cell cancer received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Until now no cases of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome induced by pazopanib have been reported. Case report We present the case of a 40 years old female patient with heavily pre-treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma who received pazopanib as salvage treatment. After 21 days of pazopanib therapy the patient referred to the emergency department with epileptic seizure, impaired vision at both eyes and headache. MRI of the brain revealed subcortical oedema at the occipital and parietal lobes bilaterally. She was treated with anticonvulsants, i.v. administration of mannitol and antihypertensives and she recovered completely from her symptoms and was discharged on the tenth hospital day. A brain MRI performed 3 weeks after showed that the subcortical oedema had been subsided. Conclusion In conclusion this is the first case of pazopanib induced reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Although usually reversible, this syndrome is a serious and potentially life threatening adverse

  3. A new matrix in esthetic posterior restorations.

    PubMed

    Rovatti, L; Cavalleri, G; Dallari, A

    1998-03-01

    Using composite resins in posterior esthetic restorations has become more acceptable in recent years as a result of improvements in materials. For this reason, innovative products such as Luciwedge and the SuperMat System have gained the attention of many practitioners. SuperMat, an improved translucent matrix, offers a new approach to matrices for use with multimaterial fillings. It makes the procedure easier and offers many other advantages, particularly in composite-compomer restorations.

  4. Posterior triangle pain: the os trigonum.

    PubMed

    Martin, B F

    1989-01-01

    Pain emanating from the region of the posterior triangle may present a difficult diagnostic problem for the practitioner. A case of os trigonum pathology with a logical plan for the diagnostic evaluation and resolution of this problem is presented. The use of bone scan and tomography is shown to be helpful for evaluation and arriving at the appropriate diagnosis. Both conservative and surgical treatments are discussed.

  5. The mechanism of continence after posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, Herman S.; Angermeier, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    The standard of care after a pelvic fracture urethral injury is a repair via a one-stage anastomotic posterior urethroplasty using a step-wise perineal approach. The initial injury, immediate postoperative management, and surgical repair can all affect urinary continence in these patients. Proximal continence mechanisms, particularly the bladder neck, are particularly important in maintaining urinary continence in these patients. Patients with bladder neck dysfunction should be counselled about the greater risk of urinary incontinence. PMID:26019981

  6. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  7. Electrocardiographic diagnosis of remote posterior wall myocardial infarction using unipolar posterior lead V9

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, M.W.; Imburgia, M.; King, T.R.; Fischer, K.C.; Kovach, K.L. )

    1989-09-01

    The accuracy of four electrocardiographic criteria for diagnosing remote posterior myocardial infarction was assessed prospectively in 369 patients undergoing exercise treadmill testing with thallium scintigraphy. Criteria included the following: (1) R-wave width greater than or equal to 0.04 s and R-wave greater than or equal to S-wave in V1; (2) R-wave greater than or equal to S-wave in V2; (3) T-wave voltage in V2 minus V6 greater than or equal to 0.38 mV (T-wave index); (4) Q-wave greater than or equal to 0.04 s in left paraspinal lead V9. Twenty-seven patients (7.3 percent) met thallium criteria for posterior myocardial infarction, defined as a persistent perfusion defect in the posterobase of the left ventricle. Sensitivities for the four criteria ranged from 4 to 56 percent, and specificities ranged from 64 to 99 percent. Posterior paraspinal lead V9 provided the best overall predictive accuracy (94 percent), positive predictive value (58 percent), and ability to differentiate patients with and without posterior myocardial infarction of any single criterion (p less than .0001). Combining the T-wave index with lead V9 further enhanced the diagnostic yield: the sensitivity for detecting posterior infarction by at least one of these criteria was 78 percent, and when both criteria were positive, specificity was 98.5 percent. It is concluded that a single, unipolar posterior lead in the V9 position is superior to standard 12-lead electrocardiographic criteria in diagnosing remote posterior myocardial infarction, and that combining V9 with the T-wave index maximizes the diagnostic yield.

  8. A novel multifunctional oligonucleotide microarray for Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microarrays are invaluable tools for genome interrogation, SNP detection, and expression analysis, among other applications. Such broad capabilities would be of value to many pathogen research communities, although the development and use of genome-scale microarrays is often a costly undertaking. Therefore, effective methods for reducing unnecessary probes while maintaining or expanding functionality would be relevant to many investigators. Results Taking advantage of available genome sequences and annotation for Toxoplasma gondii (a pathogenic parasite responsible for illness in immunocompromised individuals) and Plasmodium falciparum (a related parasite responsible for severe human malaria), we designed a single oligonucleotide microarray capable of supporting a wide range of applications at relatively low cost, including genome-wide expression profiling for Toxoplasma, and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genotyping of both T. gondii and P. falciparum. Expression profiling of the three clonotypic lineages dominating T. gondii populations in North America and Europe provides a first comprehensive view of the parasite transcriptome, revealing that ~49% of all annotated genes are expressed in parasite tachyzoites (the acutely lytic stage responsible for pathogenesis) and 26% of genes are differentially expressed among strains. A novel design utilizing few probes provided high confidence genotyping, used here to resolve recombination points in the clonal progeny of sexual crosses. Recent sequencing of additional T. gondii isolates identifies >620 K new SNPs, including ~11 K that intersect with expression profiling probes, yielding additional markers for genotyping studies, and further validating the utility of a combined expression profiling/genotyping array design. Additional applications facilitating SNP and transcript discovery, alternative statistical methods for quantifying gene expression, etc. are also pursued at pilot scale to inform

  9. Survey for Toxoplasma gondii by PCR detection in meat for human consumption in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Franco-Hernandez, Erika N; Acosta, Alejandro; Cortés-Vecino, Jesús; Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique

    2016-02-01

    The overall risk for toxoplasmosis in meat produced in Colombia is unknown. We analyzed by PCR assay meat samples for human consumption in two types of plants in Colombia: 120 samples from class I plants (60 samples from chicken, 30 from swine and 30 from beef) and 60 from class II plants (30 samples from beef and 30 from swine). Presence of Toxoplasma DNA was established by targeted B1 nested PCR assay. We detected 79 (43%) samples that were positive by B1 nested PCR (33 from chicken, 22 from beef, and 24 from pork). No differences were found by region or species. Eleven positive samples were confirmed by sequencing of the B1 repeated region. Some polymorphisms were detected without relation with clonal groups nor meat species. Food animals are highly exposed to Toxoplasma in Colombia. Detailed studies are needed to establish the reasons for differences in Toxoplasma prevalence between farms, regarding practices of animal food production.

  10. Toxoplasma on the Brain: Understanding Host-Pathogen Interactions in Chronic CNS Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kamerkar, Sushrut; Davis, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a prevalent obligate intracellular parasite which chronically infects more than a third of the world's population. Key to parasite prevalence is its ability to form chronic and nonimmunogenic bradyzoite cysts, which typically form in the brain and muscle cells of infected mammals, including humans. While acute clinical infection typically involves neurological and/or ocular damage, chronic infection has been more recently linked to behavioral changes. Establishment and maintenance of chronic infection involves a balance between the host immunity and parasite evasion of the immune response. Here, we outline the known cellular interplay between Toxoplasma gondii and cells of the central nervous system and review the reported effects of Toxoplasma gondii on behavior and neurological disease. Finally, we review new technologies which will allow us to more fully understand host-pathogen interactions. PMID:22545203

  11. Direct genotyping of animal and human isolates of Toxoplasma gondii from Colombia (South America).

    PubMed

    Gallego, Carolina; Saavedra-Matiz, Carlos; Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique

    2006-02-01

    Genetic analysis of the SAG2 locus was performed to determine the prevalence of the main genotypes of Toxoplasma gondii (SAG2 types I, II, and III) associated with humans, cats, birds and guinea pig toxoplasmosis in Colombia. This typing was directly performed on clinical samples and autopsy material from human or animals. A total of 50 from 146 samples were positive by specific B1 Toxoplasma PCR assay and then were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism in PCR-amplified SAG2 products. Characterization of the SAG2 gene was successful in 33 (66%) of the samples. Genotyping indicated that 31 (93.9%) were SAG2 type I, 1 was SAG2 type III and 1 was atypical. In birds and cats all samples were SAG2 type I. Results support a predominance of the Toxoplasma SAG2 type I circulating in human and animals in South America.

  12. Survey for Toxoplasma gondii by PCR detection in meat for human consumption in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Franco-Hernandez, Erika N; Acosta, Alejandro; Cortés-Vecino, Jesús; Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique

    2016-02-01

    The overall risk for toxoplasmosis in meat produced in Colombia is unknown. We analyzed by PCR assay meat samples for human consumption in two types of plants in Colombia: 120 samples from class I plants (60 samples from chicken, 30 from swine and 30 from beef) and 60 from class II plants (30 samples from beef and 30 from swine). Presence of Toxoplasma DNA was established by targeted B1 nested PCR assay. We detected 79 (43%) samples that were positive by B1 nested PCR (33 from chicken, 22 from beef, and 24 from pork). No differences were found by region or species. Eleven positive samples were confirmed by sequencing of the B1 repeated region. Some polymorphisms were detected without relation with clonal groups nor meat species. Food animals are highly exposed to Toxoplasma in Colombia. Detailed studies are needed to establish the reasons for differences in Toxoplasma prevalence between farms, regarding practices of animal food production. PMID:26481490

  13. Posterior Ankle and Hind Foot Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gökkuş, Kemal; Aydın, Ahmet Turan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: While anterior ankle arthroscopy is a widely accepted technique, posterior ankle/hind foot arthroscopy is still a relatively new procedure. The arthroscopic visualisation was often initially limited and vulnerabilty of the posteromedial neurovascular structures to injury scared orthopaedic surgeons. The goal of this review is to highlight the indications, and to present the long term follow up results of posterior ankle/hind foot arthroscopy. Methods: The study included 21 ankles in 21 patients (12 male and 9 female ).The mean age was 37.7 , the mean duration of preoperative symptoms 12.8 months . Arthroscopy performed with the patient prone , under general and spinal anesthesia with tourniquet hemostasis . Preoperative intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis is performed (cefazolin 1g) , sand bag placed under ipsilateral anteresuperior iliac spine to correct natural external rotated posture of the ankle and ankle is left hanging of the table so that it can moved freely during surgery. We applied noninvasive distraction method with simple rope which tied and knotted waist of the surgeon . The posterolateral and posteromedial portals which described by Van Dijk was utilized . The arthroscopic visualisation was often initially limited and careful debritement of some adipose tissue of the kager fat pad (Kager's fat pad, also known as the pre-Achilles fat pad) was necessary to create more space to aid visualization .The most valuable point to stay clear from trouble is to understand , know and aware where the flexor hallucis longus tendon exist .So neurovascular structures located beyond this tendon. Principally the process must advance into lateral to medial manner. The mean follow up period was 55 months. The most common preoperative diagnoses were osteochondral lesions of talus (ten ),painful os trigonum syndrome with (five )or without (three) FHL tenosynovitis (total eight ), posterior talofibular ligament thickenning (two ), Haglund’s deformity (one

  14. The correlation between Toxoplasma gondii infection and Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mahami Oskouei, Mahmoud; Hamidi, Faezeh; Talebi, Mahnaz; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Taheraghdam, Ali Akbar; Kazemi, Tohid; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Fallah, Esmaeil

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects all nucleate cells of vertebrates. Human infected by vertical transmission and also using raw or undercooked meat or food and water that contaminated with mature oocysts. Parkinson's disease as neurodegenerative disease affects people above 60 years. Due to high prevalence of toxoplasmosis in Iran and evidence about effects of T. gondii on neurodegenerative diseases, this study has been conducted to investigate possible correlation between Toxoplasma and Parkinson's disease in Iran. Seventy five Parkinson's patients and equal healthy volunteers were enrolled. After obtaining informed consent and sociodemographic features, 5 ml blood sample were collected and then anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM levels were examined by ELISA method. Data was analyzed with Chi-squre and Fisher's test by usig stata 11 software. Binary logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis in assessing the correlation between toxoplasmosis and Parkinson. Eighty five percent of Parkinson's group and 90.3 % of control group were positive for anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody. In this investigation no statically differences were observed between groups and age, gender, residency and using raw or undercooked meat. There is no significant association between IgG positive titer and Parkinson's disease. However, statistically significant association was found between Parkinson and keeping cat (P = 0.03) as well as the using of undercooked egg (P = 0.004). Although there is high level of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody in Parkinson's patients which reflects chronic Toxoplasma infection; we couldn't detect any statistical association between T. gondii infection and Parkinson's disease.

  15. Comparison of Four Commercially Available Avidity Tests for Toxoplasma gondii-Specific IgG Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Breit, L.; Cimon, B.; Franck, J.; Fricker-Hidalgo, H.; Godineau, N.; Houze, S.; Paris, L.; Pelloux, H.; Villena, I.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma infection in pregnant women may cause congenital toxoplasmosis. Diagnosis of infection is based on serological tests aimed at detecting IgM and IgG antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii. However, IgM antibodies are not an accurate marker for discriminating between acute and latent infection. Detection of residual or persistent IgM may occur months or even years after primary infection, while the IgG avidity test is a rapid means of identifying latent infections in pregnant women who exhibit both IgG and IgM anti-Toxoplasma antibodies on initial testing during pregnancy. In this study, we assessed and compared the performances of four commercially available Toxoplasma IgG avidity tests in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients with acute and latent toxoplasmosis. The positive predictive value of high avidity to confirm latent toxoplasmosis was 100% for all the assays, indicating that high avidity is a hallmark of latent infection. However, the negative predictive value of high avidity ranged from 99.2% (bioMérieux) to 95.3% (Abbott), indicating that acute toxoplasmosis could not be reliably diagnosed based on low IgG avidity alone. Thus, the avidity test provides a rapid means for identifying latent Toxoplasma infection in immunocompetent pregnant women presenting both IgG and IgM anti-Toxoplasma antibodies on initial testing. In terms of cost-effectiveness, avidity testing is a powerful tool that optimizes screening and follow-up of pregnant women while minimizing the costs of screening by avoiding subsequent costly maternal and fetal investigation and unnecessary treatment. The cheapest assay, Vidas Toxo IgG Avidity, also had the best performance for the diagnosis of latent toxoplasmosis. PMID:23239801

  16. The correlation between Toxoplasma gondii infection and Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mahami Oskouei, Mahmoud; Hamidi, Faezeh; Talebi, Mahnaz; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Taheraghdam, Ali Akbar; Kazemi, Tohid; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Fallah, Esmaeil

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects all nucleate cells of vertebrates. Human infected by vertical transmission and also using raw or undercooked meat or food and water that contaminated with mature oocysts. Parkinson's disease as neurodegenerative disease affects people above 60 years. Due to high prevalence of toxoplasmosis in Iran and evidence about effects of T. gondii on neurodegenerative diseases, this study has been conducted to investigate possible correlation between Toxoplasma and Parkinson's disease in Iran. Seventy five Parkinson's patients and equal healthy volunteers were enrolled. After obtaining informed consent and sociodemographic features, 5 ml blood sample were collected and then anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM levels were examined by ELISA method. Data was analyzed with Chi-squre and Fisher's test by usig stata 11 software. Binary logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis in assessing the correlation between toxoplasmosis and Parkinson. Eighty five percent of Parkinson's group and 90.3 % of control group were positive for anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody. In this investigation no statically differences were observed between groups and age, gender, residency and using raw or undercooked meat. There is no significant association between IgG positive titer and Parkinson's disease. However, statistically significant association was found between Parkinson and keeping cat (P = 0.03) as well as the using of undercooked egg (P = 0.004). Although there is high level of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody in Parkinson's patients which reflects chronic Toxoplasma infection; we couldn't detect any statistical association between T. gondii infection and Parkinson's disease. PMID:27605800

  17. Fierce Competition between Toxoplasma and Chlamydia for Host Cell Structures in Dually Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Julia D.; de Beaumont, Catherine; Carrasco, Jose A.; Ehrenman, Karen; Bavoil, Patrik M.

    2013-01-01

    The prokaryote Chlamydia trachomatis and the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, two obligate intracellular pathogens of humans, have evolved a similar modus operandi to colonize their host cell and salvage nutrients from organelles. In order to gain fundamental knowledge on the pathogenicity of these microorganisms, we have established a cell culture model whereby single fibroblasts are coinfected by C. trachomatis and T. gondii. We previously reported that the two pathogens compete for the same nutrient pools in coinfected cells and that Toxoplasma holds a significant competitive advantage over Chlamydia. Here we have expanded our coinfection studies by examining the respective abilities of Chlamydia and Toxoplasma to co-opt the host cytoskeleton and recruit organelles. We demonstrate that the two pathogen-containing vacuoles migrate independently to the host perinuclear region and rearrange the host microtubular network around each vacuole. However, Toxoplasma outcompetes Chlamydia to the host microtubule-organizing center to the detriment of the bacterium, which then shifts to a stress-induced persistent state. Solely in cells preinfected with Chlamydia, the centrosomes become associated with the chlamydial inclusion, while the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole displays growth defects. Both pathogens fragment the host Golgi apparatus and recruit Golgi elements to retrieve sphingolipids. This study demonstrates that the productive infection by both Chlamydia and Toxoplasma depends on the capability of each pathogen to successfully adhere to a finely tuned developmental program that aims to remodel the host cell for the pathogen's benefit. In particular, this investigation emphasizes the essentiality of host organelle interception by intravacuolar pathogens to facilitate access to nutrients. PMID:23243063

  18. Fierce competition between Toxoplasma and Chlamydia for host cell structures in dually infected cells.

    PubMed

    Romano, Julia D; de Beaumont, Catherine; Carrasco, Jose A; Ehrenman, Karen; Bavoil, Patrik M; Coppens, Isabelle

    2013-02-01

    The prokaryote Chlamydia trachomatis and the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, two obligate intracellular pathogens of humans, have evolved a similar modus operandi to colonize their host cell and salvage nutrients from organelles. In order to gain fundamental knowledge on the pathogenicity of these microorganisms, we have established a cell culture model whereby single fibroblasts are coinfected by C. trachomatis and T. gondii. We previously reported that the two pathogens compete for the same nutrient pools in coinfected cells and that Toxoplasma holds a significant competitive advantage over Chlamydia. Here we have expanded our coinfection studies by examining the respective abilities of Chlamydia and Toxoplasma to co-opt the host cytoskeleton and recruit organelles. We demonstrate that the two pathogen-containing vacuoles migrate independently to the host perinuclear region and rearrange the host microtubular network around each vacuole. However, Toxoplasma outcompetes Chlamydia to the host microtubule-organizing center to the detriment of the bacterium, which then shifts to a stress-induced persistent state. Solely in cells preinfected with Chlamydia, the centrosomes become associated with the chlamydial inclusion, while the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole displays growth defects. Both pathogens fragment the host Golgi apparatus and recruit Golgi elements to retrieve sphingolipids. This study demonstrates that the productive infection by both Chlamydia and Toxoplasma depends on the capability of each pathogen to successfully adhere to a finely tuned developmental program that aims to remodel the host cell for the pathogen's benefit. In particular, this investigation emphasizes the essentiality of host organelle interception by intravacuolar pathogens to facilitate access to nutrients.

  19. Plasticity between MyoC- and MyoA-Glideosomes: An Example of Functional Compensation in Toxoplasma gondii Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Frénal, Karine; Marq, Jean-Baptiste; Jacot, Damien; Polonais, Valérie; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    The glideosome is an actomyosin-based machinery that powers motility in Apicomplexa and participates in host cell invasion and egress from infected cells. The central component of the glideosome, myosin A (MyoA), is a motor recruited at the pellicle by the acylated gliding-associated protein GAP45. In Toxoplasma gondii, GAP45 also contributes to the cohesion of the pellicle, composed of the inner membrane complex (IMC) and the plasma membrane, during motor traction. GAP70 was previously identified as a paralog of GAP45 that is tailored to recruit MyoA at the apical cap in the coccidian subgroup of the Apicomplexa. A third member of this family, GAP80, is demonstrated here to assemble a new glideosome, which recruits the class XIV myosin C (MyoC) at the basal polar ring. MyoC shares the same myosin light chains as MyoA and also interacts with the integral IMC proteins GAP50 and GAP40. Moreover, a central component of this complex, the IMC-associated protein 1 (IAP1), acts as the key determinant for the restricted localization of MyoC to the posterior pole. Deletion of specific components of the MyoC-glideosome underscores the installation of compensatory mechanisms with components of the MyoA-glideosome. Conversely, removal of MyoA leads to the relocalization of MyoC along the pellicle and at the apical cap that accounts for residual invasion. The two glideosomes exhibit a considerable level of plasticity to ensure parasite survival. PMID:25393004

  20. Transient Transfection and Expression in the Obligate Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, Dominique; Boothroyd, John C.

    1993-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan pathogen that produces severe disease in humans and animals. This obligate intracellular parasite provides an excellent model for the study of how such pathogens are able to invade, survive, and replicate intracellularly. DNA encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was introduced into T. gondii and transiently expressed with the use of three vectors based on different Toxoplasma genes. The ability to introduce genes and have them efficiently and faithfully expressed is an essential tool for understanding the structure-function relation of genes and their products.

  1. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii IgG antibodies in juvenile great grey kangaroos, Macropus giganteus giganteus.

    PubMed

    Miller, David S; Faulkner, Charles; Patton, Sharon

    2003-06-01

    Serial IgG antibody titers to Toxoplasma gondii from three juvenile great grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus giganteus) with clinical signs consistent with toxoplasmosis were compared with titers from three clinically normal juveniles of similar age. The modified agglutination test was used to measure antibodies to T. gondii. Results demonstrated declining antibody titers to T. gondii in five of six animals. Antibody titers were similar in animals with and without clinical signs. This was interpreted as an indication that maternal IgG antibodies to T. gondii were transferred to juveniles, presumably in milk, rather than an indication of clinical disease. Therefore, clinicians should interpret Toxoplasma serology results in juvenile macropods cautiously.

  2. Anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in working donkeys and donkey's milk in greater Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Haridy, Fouad M; Saleh, Nagla Mostafa K; Khalil, Hazem H M; Morsy, Tosson A

    2010-08-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the important zoonotic parasites of worldwide zoological & geographical distribution. ELISA prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in Egyptian locally bred working donkeys in greater Cairo was evaluated. The donkeys were 75 females & 25 males aged between 3-10 years. The results showed that ELISA antibodies of T. gondii were found in 45 out of 100 (45%) working donkeys. Donkeys' milk obtained from fifteen pregnant females was T. gondii positive in seven (46.3%). The zoonotic role of donkeys and their milk were discussed.

  3. The Import of Proteins into the Mitochondrion of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    van Dooren, Giel G; Yeoh, Lee M; Striepen, Boris; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2016-09-01

    Outside of well characterized model eukaryotes, relatively little is known about the translocons that transport proteins across the two membranes that surround the mitochondrion. Apicomplexans are a phylum of intracellular parasites that cause major diseases in humans and animals and are evolutionarily distant from model eukaryotes such as yeast. Apicomplexans harbor a mitochondrion that is essential for parasite survival and is a validated drug target. Here, we demonstrate that the apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii harbors homologues of proteins from all the major mitochondrial protein translocons present in yeast, suggesting these arose early in eukaryotic evolution. We demonstrate that a T. gondii homologue of Tom22 (TgTom22), a central component of the translocon of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) complex, is essential for parasite survival, mitochondrial protein import, and assembly of the TOM complex. We also identify and characterize a T. gondii homologue of Tom7 (TgTom7) that is important for parasite survival and mitochondrial protein import. Contrary to the role of Tom7 in yeast, TgTom7 is important for TOM complex stability, suggesting the role of this protein has diverged during eukaryotic evolution. Together, our study identifies conserved and modified features of mitochondrial protein import in apicomplexan parasites. PMID:27458014

  4. THE DEVELOPMENT AND BIOLOGY OF BRADYZOITES OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Louis M.; Kim, Kami

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite of mammals and birds that is an important human pathogen. Infection with this Apicomplexan parasite results in its dissemination throughout its host via the tachyzoite life-stage. After dissemination these tachyzoites differentiate into bradyzoites within cysts that remain latent. These bradyzoites can transform back into tachyzoites and in immunosupressed individuals this often results in symptomatic disease. Both tachyzoites and bradyzoites develop in tissue culture and thus this crucial differentiation event can be studied. Recent advances in the genetic manipulation of T. gondii have expanded the molecular tools that can be applied to studies on bradyzoite differentiation. Evidence is accumulating that this differentiation event is stress mediated and may share common pathways with other stress-induced differentiation events in other eukaryotic organisms. Study of the stress response and signaling pathways are areas of active research in this organism. In addition, characterization of unique bradyzoite-specific structures, such as the cyst wall, should lead to a further understanding of T. gondii biology. This review focuses on the biology and development of bradyzoites and current approaches to the study of the tachyzoite to bradyzoite differentiation process. PMID:10762601

  5. Functional characterization of X-prolyl aminopeptidase from Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingfa; Zheng, Jun; Jia, Honglin; Song, Mingxin

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, a recombinant aminopeptidase P (rTgAPP) from Toxoplasma gondii was expressed in Escherichia coli to evaluate its enzyme parameters. The rTgAPP showed strong activity against a synthetic substrate for aminopeptidase P at pH 8·0 with a K m value of 0·255 µ m and a k cat value of 35·6 s-1. The overall catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m) of the rTgAPP was 139·6 × 105 M-1 s-1. The activity of rTgAPP was enhanced by the addition of divalent cations and inhibited by bestatin. Deletion of TgAPP gene in the parasite through a CRISPR/Cas9 system resulted in inhibition of growth indicating the importance of TgAPP. Thus our findings reveal that TgAPP is an active enzyme in T. gondii and provide an insight into the function of TgAPP. PMID:27220680

  6. The Import of Proteins into the Mitochondrion of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    van Dooren, Giel G; Yeoh, Lee M; Striepen, Boris; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2016-09-01

    Outside of well characterized model eukaryotes, relatively little is known about the translocons that transport proteins across the two membranes that surround the mitochondrion. Apicomplexans are a phylum of intracellular parasites that cause major diseases in humans and animals and are evolutionarily distant from model eukaryotes such as yeast. Apicomplexans harbor a mitochondrion that is essential for parasite survival and is a validated drug target. Here, we demonstrate that the apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii harbors homologues of proteins from all the major mitochondrial protein translocons present in yeast, suggesting these arose early in eukaryotic evolution. We demonstrate that a T. gondii homologue of Tom22 (TgTom22), a central component of the translocon of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) complex, is essential for parasite survival, mitochondrial protein import, and assembly of the TOM complex. We also identify and characterize a T. gondii homologue of Tom7 (TgTom7) that is important for parasite survival and mitochondrial protein import. Contrary to the role of Tom7 in yeast, TgTom7 is important for TOM complex stability, suggesting the role of this protein has diverged during eukaryotic evolution. Together, our study identifies conserved and modified features of mitochondrial protein import in apicomplexan parasites.

  7. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in wild kangaroos using an ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, N.; O'Handley, RM.; Grigg, ME.; Fenwick, SG.; Thompson, RCA.

    2009-01-01

    Infection with Toxoplasma gondii is a significant problem in Australian marsupials, and can lead to devastating disease and predispose animals to predation. T. gondii infection in kangaroos is also of public health significance due to the kangaroo meat trade. A moderate seroprevalence of T. gondii was observed in a study of western grey kangaroos located in the Perth metropolitan area in Western Australia. Of 219 kangaroos tested, 15.5% (95%CI: 10.7-20.3) were positive for T. gondii antibodies using an ELISA developed to detect T. gondii IgG in macropod marsupials. When compared with the commercially available MAT (modified agglutination test), the ELISA developed was in absolute agreement and yielded a κ coefficient of 1.00. Of 18 kangaroos tested for the presence of T. gondii DNA by PCR, the 9 ELISA positive kangaroos tested PCR positive and the 9 ELISA negative kangaroos tested PCR negative indicating the ELISA protocol was both highly specific and sensitive and correlated 100% with the more labour intensive PCR assay. PMID:19567231

  8. Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in Dogs in Zhanjiang, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai-Hai; Li, Ming-Wei; Xu, Min-Jun; Cong, Wei; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-08-01

    Toxoplasmosis, caused by Toxoplasma gondii, is a parasitic zoonosis with worldwide distribution. The present study investigated the prevalence of T. gondii in dogs in Zhanjiang city, southern China, using both serological and molecular detection. A total of 364 serum samples and 432 liver tissue samples were collected from the slaughter house between December 2012 and January 2013 and were examined for T. gondii IgG antibody by ELISA and T. gondii DNA by semi-nested PCR based on B1 gene, respectively. The overall seroprevalence of T. gondii IgG antibody was 51.9%, and T. gondii DNA was detected in 37 of 432 (8.6%) liver tissue samples. These positive DNA samples were analyzed by PCR-RFLP at 3'- and 5'-SAG2. Only 8 samples gave the PCR-RFLP data, and they were all classified as type I, which may suggest that the T. gondii isolates from dogs in Zhanjiang city may represent type I or type I variant. This study revealed the high prevalence of T. gondii infection in dogs in Zhanjiang city, southern China. Integrated measures should be taken to prevent and control toxoplasmosis in dogs in this area for public health concern.

  9. Identifying Novel B Cell Epitopes within Toxoplasma gondii GRA6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Cai, Jian Ping

    2016-01-01

    The study of antigenic epitopes from Toxoplasma gondii has not only enhanced our understanding of the structure and function of antigens, the reactions between antigens and antibodies, and many other aspects of immunology, but it also plays a significant role in the development of new diagnostic reagents and vaccines. In the present study, T. gondii GRA6 epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools and a synthetic peptide technique. The potential B cell epitopes of GRA6 predicted by bioinformatics tools concentrated upon 3 regions of GRA6, 1-20 aa, 44-103 aa, and 172-221 aa. Ten shorter peptides from the 3 regions were synthesized and assessed by ELISA using pig sera from different time points after infection. Three of the 10 peptides (amino acids 44-63, 172-191, and 192-211) tested were recognized by all sera and determined to be immunodominant B-cell epitopes of GRA6. The results indicated that we precisely and accurately located the T. gondii GRA6 epitopes using pig sera collected at different time points after infection. The identified epitopes may be very useful for further studies of epitope-based vaccines and diagnostic reagents. PMID:27658594

  10. The seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in Ontario sheep flocks

    PubMed Central

    Waltner-Toews, David; Mondesire, Roy; Menzies, Paula

    1991-01-01

    In a random sample of 103 sheep farms in Ontario, 99% of the farms had some sheep serologically positive for Toxoplasma gondii, based on an enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The percent of sheep affected within farms ranged from 3.8% to 97.8%, with an average flock prevalence of 57.6%. When farm management variables were considered in a multivariate analysis, significantly lower rates of serologically positive sheep were associated with neutering of female cats and clipping of ewes' perineums before lambing; significantly higher prevalence rates were found on farms where sheep were purchased from other flocks, pigs were raised on the same farm, sheep shared pasture with other animals, flowing water was available at pasture, and pastured replacements had access to housing. As well, in univariate analyses, higher prevalence was positively associated with an increasing number of cat litters born over the previous two years and offering creep feed or forage to lambs, and inversely with the amount of labor expended on sheep rearing. PMID:17423914

  11. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in seabirds from Abrolhos Archipelago, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gennari, Solange M; Niemeyer, Claudia; Soares, Herbert S; Musso, Cesar M; Siqueira, Glauber C C; Catão-Dias, José L; Dias, Ricardo A; Dubey, Jitender P

    2016-08-15

    Toxoplasma gondii is a coccidian parasite that infects almost all warm-blooded animals, including birds. Abrolhos is an archipelago of five islands, located in the Atlantic Ocean, 56 nautical kilometers from the south coast of the state of Bahia, northeastern Brazil. Part of this archipelago is a National Marine Park, which is a conservation area protected by the Brazilian government. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence of T. gondii antibodies in sera of seabird's species Sula spp. and Phaeton spp. from breeding colonies located in the Islands of Santa Bárbara and Redonda, Abrolhos's archipelago. Sera were tested by modified agglutination test, first screened at 1:5 dilution (cut-off point) and the positive samples were titrated at a two-fold serial dilution. Serum samples were obtained from 69 birds of four species: Sula dactylatra (23 birds), Sula leucogaster (19 birds), Phaeton aethereus (25 birds) and Phaeton lepturus (2 birds). Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 24 (34.8%) of 69 seabirds with titers that ranged from 5 to 640. Occurrence value in S. dactylatra was 34.8% (8/23), in S. leucogaster was 47.4% (9/19), in P. aethereus was 28% (7/25) and the 2 P. lepturus were negative. This is the first description of T. gondii antibodies in free ranging seabirds of the orders Suliformes and Phaethontiformes. PMID:27514883

  12. Phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate is involved in toxoplasma apicoplast biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tawk, Lina; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Montcourrier, Philippe; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Merezegue, Fabrice; Richard, Véronique; Payrastre, Bernard; Meissner, Markus; Vial, Henri J; Roy, Christian; Wengelnik, Kai; Lebrun, Maryse

    2011-02-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause devastating diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. They harbour a plastid-like, non-photosynthetic organelle of algal origin, the apicoplast, which fulfils critical functions for parasite survival. Because of its essential and original metabolic pathways, the apicoplast has become a target for the development of new anti-apicomplexan drugs. Here we show that the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate (PI3P) is involved in apicoplast biogenesis in Toxoplasma gondii. In yeast and mammalian cells, PI3P is concentrated on early endosomes and regulates trafficking of endosomal compartments. Imaging of PI3P in T. gondii showed that the lipid was associated with the apicoplast and apicoplast protein-shuttling vesicles. Interference with regular PI3P function by over-expression of a PI3P specific binding module in the parasite led to the accumulation of vesicles containing apicoplast peripheral membrane proteins around the apicoplast and, ultimately, to the loss of the organelle. Accordingly, inhibition of the PI3P-synthesising kinase interfered with apicoplast biogenesis. These findings point to an unexpected implication for this ubiquitous lipid and open new perspectives on how nuclear encoded proteins traffic to the apicoplast. This study also highlights the possibility of developing specific pharmacological inhibitors of the parasite PI3-kinase as novel anti-apicomplexan drugs. PMID:21379336

  13. First record of Toxoplasma gondii in Chaetophractus villosus in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Kin, Marta S; Fort, Marcelo; Giménez, Hugo D; Casanave, Emma B

    2014-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite that causes abortion and reproductive disorder in domestic animals. T. gondii is a common worldwide disease in homeothermic animals, including birds and humans. The aim of the present study was to determine the presence of antibodies against T. gondii in the armadillo Chaetophractus villosus in the province of La Pampa, Argentina. Serum samples were collected from 150 individuals (70 males and 80 females). For serological detection of T. gondii, a latex agglutination test was first performed and then positive sera were confirmed with an indirect hemagglutination test, using 1:4 to 1:64 dilutions. Results showed that 27% (41) of the samples presented titers for antibodies against T. gondii. There were not significant differences between the presence of antibodies against T. gondii and age or sexes of the armadillos. Results show that presence of T. gondii antibodies in armadillos were associated with presence of pigs, and sheep, however there was not association with chickens and dairy cattle in capture site. T. gondii has an important presence in C. villosus population, suggesting a potential zoonotic risk for humans and wildlife animals when C. villosus meats are consumed raw or undercooked. This is the first record of the presence of antibodies against T. gondii in C. villosus. PMID:26204031

  14. Caspase-11 Modulates Inflammation and Attenuates Toxoplasma gondii Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl L; Doran, John T; Campbell, Caroline; Williams, Tere M; Lindsay, David S; Allen, Irving C

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is the etiologic agent responsible for toxoplasmosis. Infection with T. gondii results in activation of nucleotide binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing receptors (NLRs). NLR activation leads to inflammasome formation, the activation of caspase-1, and the subsequent cleavage of IL-1β and IL-18. Recently, a noncanonical inflammasome has been characterized which functions through caspase-11 and appears to augment many biological functions previously considered to be dependent upon the canonical inflammasome. To better elucidate the function of this noncanonical inflammasome in toxoplasmosis, we utilized Asc (-/-) and Casp11 (-/-) mice and infected these animals with T. gondii. Our data indicates that caspase-11 modulates the innate immune response to T. gondii through a mechanism which is distinct from that currently described for the canonical inflammasome. Asc (-/-) mice demonstrated increased disease pathogenesis during the acute phase of T. gondii infection, whereas Casp11 (-/-) mice demonstrated significantly attenuated disease pathogenesis and reduced inflammation. This attenuated host response was associated with reduced local and systemic cytokine production, including diminished IL-1β. During the chronic phase of infection, caspase-11 deficiency resulted in increased neuroinflammation and tissue cyst burden in the brain. Together, our data suggest that caspase-11 functions to protect the host by enhancing inflammation during the early phase of infection in an effort to minimize disease pathogenesis during later stages of toxoplasmosis. PMID:27378827

  15. Caspase-11 Modulates Inflammation and Attenuates Toxoplasma gondii Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl L.; Doran, John T.; Campbell, Caroline; Williams, Tere M.; Lindsay, David S.; Allen, Irving C.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is the etiologic agent responsible for toxoplasmosis. Infection with T. gondii results in activation of nucleotide binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing receptors (NLRs). NLR activation leads to inflammasome formation, the activation of caspase-1, and the subsequent cleavage of IL-1β and IL-18. Recently, a noncanonical inflammasome has been characterized which functions through caspase-11 and appears to augment many biological functions previously considered to be dependent upon the canonical inflammasome. To better elucidate the function of this noncanonical inflammasome in toxoplasmosis, we utilized Asc−/− and Casp11−/− mice and infected these animals with T. gondii. Our data indicates that caspase-11 modulates the innate immune response to T. gondii through a mechanism which is distinct from that currently described for the canonical inflammasome. Asc−/− mice demonstrated increased disease pathogenesis during the acute phase of T. gondii infection, whereas Casp11−/− mice demonstrated significantly attenuated disease pathogenesis and reduced inflammation. This attenuated host response was associated with reduced local and systemic cytokine production, including diminished IL-1β. During the chronic phase of infection, caspase-11 deficiency resulted in increased neuroinflammation and tissue cyst burden in the brain. Together, our data suggest that caspase-11 functions to protect the host by enhancing inflammation during the early phase of infection in an effort to minimize disease pathogenesis during later stages of toxoplasmosis. PMID:27378827

  16. Characterization of the Chloroquine Resistance Transporter Homologue in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Warring, Sally D.; Dou, Zhicheng; Carruthers, Vern B.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) protein confer resistance to the antimalarial drug chloroquine. PfCRT localizes to the parasite digestive vacuole, the site of chloroquine action, where it mediates resistance by transporting chloroquine out of the digestive vacuole. PfCRT belongs to a family of transporter proteins called the chloroquine resistance transporter family. CRT family proteins are found throughout the Apicomplexa, in some protists, and in plants. Despite the importance of PfCRT in drug resistance, little is known about the evolution or native function of CRT proteins. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii contains one CRT family protein. We demonstrate that T. gondii CRT (TgCRT) colocalizes with markers for the vacuolar (VAC) compartment in these parasites. The TgCRT-containing VAC is a highly dynamic organelle, changing its morphology and protein composition between intracellular and extracellular forms of the parasite. Regulated knockdown of TgCRT expression resulted in modest reduction in parasite fitness and swelling of the VAC, indicating that TgCRT contributes to parasite growth and VAC physiology. Together, our findings provide new information on the role of CRT family proteins in apicomplexan parasites. PMID:24859994

  17. Isolation of Toxoplasma gondii from animals in Durango, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Velmurugan, G V; Alvarado-Esquivel, C; Alvarado-Esquivel, D; Rodríguez-Peña, S; Martínez-García, S; González-Herrera, A; Ferreira, L R; Kwok, O C H; Su, C

    2009-04-01

    Little is known concerning the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in people and animals in rural Mexico. Serum samples and tissues from 150 dogs (Canis familaris), 150 cats (Felis catus), 65 opossums (Didelphis virginianus), 249 rats (Rattus spp.), 127 mice (Mus musculus), and 69 squirrels (Spermophilus variegatus) from the Durango area were evaluated for T. gondii infection. Using a modified agglutination test and a serum dilution of 1:25, antibodies to this parasite were found in 68 (45.3%) of 150 dogs, 14 (9.3%) of 150 cats, 11 (16.6%) of 66 opossums, 2 (0.8%) of 249 rats, 4 (3.1%) of 127 mice, and 0 of 69 squirrels. Tissues (brain and heart) of dogs, cats, opossums, rats, mice, and squirrels were bioassayed in mice for the presence of T. gondii. Viable T. gondii was isolated in tissues from 3 of 28 seropositive dogs and 5 of 8 seropositive cats, but not from the other animals. The DNA obtained from the 3 T. gondii isolates from dogs, 6 isolates from 5 cats, and 4 isolates from free-range chickens from Mexico, previously isolated, were genotyped. The PCR-RFLP typing, which used 11 markers (B 1, SAGI, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico), identified 5 genotypes. One genotype (the 4 chicken isolates) belongs to the clonal Type III lineage, three genotypes were reported in previous reports, and 1 genotype is unique.

  18. Genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from chickens from India.

    PubMed

    Sreekumar, C; Graham, D H; Dahl, E; Lehmann, T; Raman, M; Bhalerao, D P; Vianna, M C B; Dubey, J P

    2003-12-30

    The present study was undertaken to isolate and genotype Toxoplasma gondii from free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) from villages in Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu states of central and south India, respectively. Blood, heart, and brain from a total of 741 chickens were examined for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii, as assayed with the modified agglutination test (MAT >or = 1:5) were found in 133 (17.9%) chickens. Hearts and brains of 186 chickens were bioassayed in mice. Additionally, hearts and/or brains of most of the seronegative (MAT < 1:5) chickens were fed to 20 T. gondii-free cats, while 32 seropositive chickens (MAT 1:5) were fed to 3 cats. T. gondii was not isolated from any of the chickens by mouse bioassay. Five of the cats that were fed seronegative chickens shed oocysts, while isolates were not obtained from any of the other cats fed seropositive chickens. These five isolates, along with the two that were previously isolated in India through cat bioassay, were genetically analyzed. Genotyping using the SAG 2 locus indicated that two isolates were type II and five were type III. Microsatellite analysis revealed allelic differences between and within the lineages. This is the first report of genetic characterization of any T. gondii isolate from India.

  19. Genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from chickens from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Velmurugan, G V; Chockalingam, A; Pena, H F J; de Oliveira, L Nunes; Leifer, C A; Gennari, S M; Bahia Oliveira, L M G; Su, C

    2008-11-01

    Until recently, Toxoplasma gondii was considered clonal with very little genetic variability. Recent studies indicate that T. gondii isolates from Brazil are genetically and biologically different from T. gondii isolates from USA and Europe. In the present study, we retyped 151 free range chicken isolates from Brazil including 117 newly isolated samples from 11 geographically areas (Alagoas, Bahia, Ceará, Maranhão, Paraná, Pernambuco, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Norte, São Paulo, Sergipe, and Rondonia) and 34 previously reported isolates from the very north (Pará) and the very south (Rio Grande do Sul). Ten PCR-RFLP markers including SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico were used to genotype all isolates. Overall analysis of 151 T. gondii isolates revealed 58 genotypes. Half (29/58) of these genotypes had single isolate and the other half of the genotypes were characterized with two or more isolates. Only 1 of 151 isolates was clonal Type I strain and 5 were clonal Type III strains. Two isolates had mixed infections. Clonal Type II strain was absent. One strain was Type II at all loci, except BTUB. The results confirm high genetic diversity of T. gondii isolates from Brazil.

  20. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in wild birds in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ju-Chi; Tsai, Yu-Jen; Wu, Ying-Ling

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic protozoon which is well known for infecting humans and wild animals. In the present study, antibodies to T. gondii were evaluated in 394 wild birds, belonging to 37 species, from 15 different administrative regions in Taiwan. Using modified agglutination test (MAT), the overall seroprevalence of infection was 23.35% (CI 95% = 19.17%-27.53%). Antibodies were detected in birds of prey (25.73%, CI 95% = 19.76%-31.70%), birds living in freshwater or marine systems (34.29%, CI 95% = 18.56%-50.01%) and ground-feeding birds (18.12%, CI 95% = 11.94%-24.31%). Adult birds showed higher seroprevalence than that in juvenile birds, and the presence of clinical abnormalities was associated with T. gondii seropositivity. The results showed that this pathogen has spread widely in Taiwan. This suggests the zoonotic potential of the disease, with transmission from urban to rural regions, and from terrestrial to aquatic systems. The pathogenicity of T. gondii infection in wild birds in Taiwan needs further investigation. This is the first study of the seroprevalence of T. gondii in wild birds in Taiwan.

  1. Membrane Topology and Transient Acylation of Toxoplasma gondii Glycosylphosphatidylinositols

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Jürgen; Smith, Terry K.; Azzouz, Nahid; Gerold, Peter; Seeber, Frank; Lingelbach, Klaus; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Schwarz, Ralph T.

    2006-01-01

    Using hypotonically permeabilized Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, we investigated the topology of the free glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The morphology and permeability of parasites were checked by electron microscopy and release of a cytosolic protein. The membrane integrity of organelles (ER and rhoptries) was checked by protease protection assays. In initial experiments, GPI biosynthetic intermediates were labeled with UDP-[6-3H]GlcNAc in permeabilized parasites, and the transmembrane distribution of the radiolabeled lipids was probed with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). A new early intermediate with an acyl modification on the inositol was identified, indicating that inositol acylation also occurs in T. gondii. A significant portion of the early GPI intermediates (GlcN-PI and GlcNAc-PI) could be hydrolyzed following PI-PLC treatment, indicating that these glycolipids are predominantly present in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the ER. Permeabilized T. gondii parasites labeled with either GDP-[2-3H]mannose or UDP-[6-3H]glucose showed that the more mannosylated and side chain (Glc-GalNAc)-modified GPI intermediates are also preferentially localized in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the ER. PMID:16896225

  2. Genetic diversity among sea otter isolates of Toxoplasma gondii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundar, N.; Cole, R.A.; Thomas, N.J.; Majumdar, D.; Dubey, J.P.; Su, C.

    2008-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) have been reported to become infected with Toxoplasma gondii and at times succumb to clinical disease. Here, we determined genotypes of 39 T. gondii isolates from 37 sea otters in two geographically distant locations (25 from California and 12 from Washington). Six genotypes were identified using 10 PCR-RFLP genetic markers including SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico, and by DNA sequencing of loci SAG1 and GRA6 in 13 isolates. Of these 39 isolates, 13 (33%) were clonal Type II which can be further divided into two groups at the locus Apico. Two of the 39 isolates had Type II alleles at all loci except a Type I allele at locus L358. One isolate had Type II alleles at all loci except the Type I alleles at loci L358 and Apico. One isolate had Type III alleles at all loci except Type II alleles at SAG2 and Apico. Two sea otter isolates had a mixed infection. Twenty-one (54%) isolates had an unique allele at SAG1 locus. Further genotyping or DNA sequence analysis for 18 of these 21 isolates at loci SAG1 and GRA6 revealed that there were two different genotypes, including the previously identified Type X (four isolates) and a new genotype named Type A (14 isolates). The results from this study suggest that the sea otter isolates are genetically diverse.

  3. Cancer in the parasitic protozoans Trypanosoma brucei and Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lai, De-Hua; Wen, Yan-Zi; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Shen, Ji-Long; Yang, Ting-Bo; Zhou, Wen-Liang; Qu, Liang-Hu; Hide, Geoff; Ayala, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a general name for more than 100 malignant diseases. It is postulated that all cancers start from a single abnormal cell that grows out of control. Untreated cancers can cause serious consequences and deaths. Great progress has been made in cancer research that has significantly improved our knowledge and understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the disease, but the origins of cancer are far from being well understood due to the limitations of suitable model systems and to the complexities of the disease. In view of the fact that cancers are found in various species of vertebrates and other metazoa, here, we suggest that cancer also occurs in parasitic protozoans such as Trypanosoma brucei, a blood parasite, and Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular pathogen. Without treatment, these protozoan cancers may cause severe disease and death in mammals, including humans. The simpler genomes of these single-cell organisms, in combination with their complex life cycles and fascinating life cycle differentiation processes, may help us to better understand the origins of cancers and, in particular, leukemias. PMID:26195778

  4. p47 GTPases Regulate Toxoplasma gondii Survival in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Barbara A.; Greene, Robert I.; Henry, Stanley C.; Annecharico, Kimberly L.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Denkers, Eric Y.; Sher, Alan; Taylor, Gregory A.

    2005-01-01

    The cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is critical for resistance to Toxoplasma gondii. IFN-γ strongly activates macrophages and nonphagocytic host cells to limit intracellular growth of T. gondii; however, the cellular factors that are required for this effect are largely unknown. We have shown previously that IGTP and LRG-47, members of the IFN-γ-regulated family of p47 GTPases, are required for resistance to acute T. gondii infections in vivo. In contrast, IRG-47, another member of this family, is not required. In the present work, we addressed whether these GTPases are required for IFN-γ-induced suppression of T. gondii growth in macrophages in vitro. Bone marrow macrophages that lacked IGTP or LRG-47 displayed greatly attenuated IFN-γ-induced inhibition of T. gondii growth, while macrophages that lacked IRG-47 displayed normal inhibition. Thus, the ability of the p47 GTPases to limit acute infection in vivo correlated with their ability to suppress intracellular growth in macrophages in vitro. Using confocal microscopy and sucrose density fractionation, we demonstrated that IGTP largely colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum markers, while LRG-47 was mainly restricted to the Golgi. Although both IGTP and LRG-47 localized to vacuoles containing latex beads, neither protein localized to vacuoles containing live T. gondii. These results suggest that IGTP and LRG-47 are able to regulate host resistance to acute T. gondii infections through their ability to inhibit parasite growth within the macrophage. PMID:15908352

  5. Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in Dogs in Zhanjiang, Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai-Hai; Li, Ming-Wei; Xu, Min-Jun; Cong, Wei; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis, caused by Toxoplasma gondii, is a parasitic zoonosis with worldwide distribution. The present study investigated the prevalence of T. gondii in dogs in Zhanjiang city, southern China, using both serological and molecular detection. A total of 364 serum samples and 432 liver tissue samples were collected from the slaughter house between December 2012 and January 2013 and were examined for T. gondii IgG antibody by ELISA and T. gondii DNA by semi-nested PCR based on B1 gene, respectively. The overall seroprevalence of T. gondii IgG antibody was 51.9%, and T. gondii DNA was detected in 37 of 432 (8.6%) liver tissue samples. These positive DNA samples were analyzed by PCR-RFLP at 3'- and 5'-SAG2. Only 8 samples gave the PCR-RFLP data, and they were all classified as type I, which may suggest that the T. gondii isolates from dogs in Zhanjiang city may represent type I or type I variant. This study revealed the high prevalence of T. gondii infection in dogs in Zhanjiang city, southern China. Integrated measures should be taken to prevent and control toxoplasmosis in dogs in this area for public health concern. PMID:26323850

  6. Guanylate binding proteins directly attack Toxoplasma gondii via supramolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kravets, Elisabeth; Degrandi, Daniel; Ma, Qijun; Peulen, Thomas-Otavio; Klümpers, Verena; Felekyan, Suren; Kühnemuth, Ralf; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Seidel, Claus AM; Pfeffer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    GBPs are essential for immunity against intracellular pathogens, especially for Toxoplasma gondii control. Here, the molecular interactions of murine GBPs (mGBP1/2/3/5/6), homo- and hetero-multimerization properties of mGBP2 and its function in parasite killing were investigated by mutational, Multiparameter Fluorescence Image Spectroscopy, and live cell microscopy methodologies. Control of T. gondii replication by mGBP2 requires GTP hydrolysis and isoprenylation thus, enabling reversible oligomerization in vesicle-like structures. mGBP2 undergoes structural transitions between monomeric, dimeric and oligomeric states visualized by quantitative FRET analysis. mGBPs reside in at least two discrete subcellular reservoirs and attack the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) as orchestrated, supramolecular complexes forming large, densely packed multimers comprising up to several thousand monomers. This dramatic mGBP enrichment results in the loss of PVM integrity, followed by a direct assault of mGBP2 upon the plasma membrane of the parasite. These discoveries provide vital dynamic and molecular perceptions into cell-autonomous immunity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11479.001 PMID:26814575

  7. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in wild birds in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ju-Chi; Tsai, Yu-Jen; Wu, Ying-Ling

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic protozoon which is well known for infecting humans and wild animals. In the present study, antibodies to T. gondii were evaluated in 394 wild birds, belonging to 37 species, from 15 different administrative regions in Taiwan. Using modified agglutination test (MAT), the overall seroprevalence of infection was 23.35% (CI 95% = 19.17%-27.53%). Antibodies were detected in birds of prey (25.73%, CI 95% = 19.76%-31.70%), birds living in freshwater or marine systems (34.29%, CI 95% = 18.56%-50.01%) and ground-feeding birds (18.12%, CI 95% = 11.94%-24.31%). Adult birds showed higher seroprevalence than that in juvenile birds, and the presence of clinical abnormalities was associated with T. gondii seropositivity. The results showed that this pathogen has spread widely in Taiwan. This suggests the zoonotic potential of the disease, with transmission from urban to rural regions, and from terrestrial to aquatic systems. The pathogenicity of T. gondii infection in wild birds in Taiwan needs further investigation. This is the first study of the seroprevalence of T. gondii in wild birds in Taiwan. PMID:26412541

  8. Current Treatment of Toxoplasma Retinochoroiditis: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Carvounis, Petros E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To perform an evidence-based review of treatments for Toxoplasma retinochoroiditis (TRC). Methods. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database and the key phrase “ocular toxoplasmosis treatment” and the filter for “controlled clinical trial” and “randomized clinical trial” as well as OVID medline (1946 to May week 2 2014) using the keyword ‘‘ocular toxoplasmosis”. The included studies were used to evaluate the various treatment modalities of TRC. Results. The electronic search yielded a total of 974 publications of which 44 reported on the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis. There were 9 randomized controlled studies and an additional 3 comparative studies on the treatment of acute TRC with systemic or intravitreous antibiotics or on reducing the recurrences of TRC. Endpoints of studies included visual acuity improvement, inflammatory response, lesion size changes, recurrences of lesions, and adverse effects of medications. Conclusions. There was conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of systemic antibiotics for TRC. There is no evidence to support that one antibiotic regimen is superior to another so choice needs to be informed by the safety profile. Intravitreous clindamycin with dexamethasone seems to be as effective as systemic treatments. There is currently level I evidence that intermittent trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prevents recurrence of the disease. PMID:25197557

  9. Identifying Novel B Cell Epitopes within Toxoplasma gondii GRA6.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Cai, Jian Ping

    2016-08-01

    The study of antigenic epitopes from Toxoplasma gondii has not only enhanced our understanding of the structure and function of antigens, the reactions between antigens and antibodies, and many other aspects of immunology, but it also plays a significant role in the development of new diagnostic reagents and vaccines. In the present study, T. gondii GRA6 epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools and a synthetic peptide technique. The potential B cell epitopes of GRA6 predicted by bioinformatics tools concentrated upon 3 regions of GRA6, 1-20 aa, 44-103 aa, and 172-221 aa. Ten shorter peptides from the 3 regions were synthesized and assessed by ELISA using pig sera from different time points after infection. Three of the 10 peptides (amino acids 44-63, 172-191, and 192-211) tested were recognized by all sera and determined to be immunodominant B-cell epitopes of GRA6. The results indicated that we precisely and accurately located the T. gondii GRA6 epitopes using pig sera collected at different time points after infection. The identified epitopes may be very useful for further studies of epitope-based vaccines and diagnostic reagents. PMID:27658594

  10. Identification of Toxoplasma gondii infections by BI gene amplification.

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, E; Melchers, W; Galama, J; Camps, W; Meuwissen, J

    1991-01-01

    The diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in congenitally infected children or in immunocompromised patients can be difficult; serology is not reliable, and the diagnosis must be based on the combination of symptomatology and the direct demonstration of the parasite in clinical specimens by microscopy, antigen detection, or inoculation of samples into mice or tissue cultures. These techniques are either insensitive or time-consuming. To determine the value of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infections, we compared this technique with conventional detection techniques, such as microscopy, tissue culturing, and mouse inoculation. We were able to detect T. gondii by PCR in clinical specimens and tissue samples that were obtained postmortem from a bone marrow recipient with cerebral toxoplasmosis and from three congenitally infected children. The presence of T. gondii was demonstrated in brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, the heart, and skeletal muscle tested fresh or after fixation in Formalin. In only one sample was T. gondii isolated by mouse inoculation but not detected by PCR. Because it is a sensitive, relatively rapid, and specific method and because it can be applied to a variety of different clinical samples, PCR can be considered a valuable additional tool for the identification of T. gondii infections. Images PMID:1939564

  11. Impaired reproductive function of male rats infected with Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, A; Dalimi, A; Movahedin, M

    2012-05-01

    Toxoplasmosis is one of the classical conditions known to have an adverse effect on female reproductive functions, but a few investigations into male reproductive parameters have been performed. This work was carried out to study the effects of Toxoplasma gondii on reproductive function in male rats. Male rats were infected with the RH strain of T. gondii tachyzoites, and following every 10 days from 10 to 70 postinfection (PI), the percentage of body weight to testis weight ratio as well as epididymal sperm parameters (number, motility, viability, and morphology rates), serum testosterone (ST), intratesticular testosterone (ITT), serum lactate dehydrogenase (SLDH), intratesticular lactate dehydrogenase and fructose in seminal vesicles and coagulating glands were measured. The results of the study showed sperm motility, viability and concentration rates were significantly decreased temporary after infection up to 70 days. Sperm abnormality was also increased during these days. In addition, temporary alteration in ST, ITT, SLDH, intratesticular LDH and fructose in seminal vesicle and coagulating gland was observed PI. These findings suggest that toxoplasmosis can cause impermanent impairment on the reproductive parameters of male rats.

  12. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in wild kangaroos using an ELISA.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, N; O'Handley, R M; Grigg, M E; Fenwick, S G; Thompson, R C A

    2009-06-01

    Infection with Toxoplasma gondii is a significant problem in Australian marsupials, and can lead to devastating disease and predispose animals to predation. T. gondii infection in kangaroos is also of public health significance due to the kangaroo meat trade. A moderate seroprevalence of T. gondii was observed in a study of western grey kangaroos located in the Perth metropolitan area in Western Australia. Of 219 kangaroos tested, 15.5% (95%CI: 10.7-20.3) were positive for T. gondii antibodies using an ELISA developed to detect T. gondii IgG in macropod marsupials. When compared with the commercially available MAT (modified agglutination test), the ELISA developed was in absolute agreement and yielded a kappa coefficient of 1.00. Of 18 kangaroos tested for the presence of T. gondii DNA by PCR, the 9 ELISA positive kangaroos tested PCR positive and the 9 ELISA negative kangaroos tested PCR negative indicating the ELISA protocol was both highly specific and sensitive and correlated 100% with the more labour intensive PCR assay.

  13. Lipidomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii reveals unusual polar lipids†

    PubMed Central

    Welti, Ruth; Mui, Ernie; Sparks, Alexis; Wernimont, Sarah; Isaac, Giorgis; Kirisits, Michael; Roth, Mary; Roberts, Craig W.; Botté, Cyrille; Maréchal, Eric; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the polar lipids of Toxoplasma gondii by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provides a detailed picture of the lipid molecular species of this parasitic protozoan. Most notably, T. gondii contains a relatively high level, estimated to about 2% of the total polar lipid, of ceramide phosphoethanolamine. The ceramide phosphoethanolamine has a fatty amide profile with only 16- and 18-carbon species. Compared with the host fibroblasts in which it was grown, T. gondii also has higher levels of phosphatidylcholine, but lower levels of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylserine. Analysis at the molecular species level indicated that T. gondii has greater amounts of shorter-chain fatty acid in its polar lipid molecular species than the host fibroblasts. Shorter-chain fatty acids with a combined total of 30 or fewer acyl carbons make up 21% of Toxoplasma’s, but only 3% of the host’s, diacyl phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, diacyl phosphatidylcholine with two saturated acyl chains with 12, 14, or 16 carbons make up over 11% of parasite phosphatidylcholine, but less than 3% of the host phosphatidylcholine molecular species. The distinctive T. gondii tachyzoite lipid profile may be particularly suited to the function of parasitic membranes and the interaction of the parasite with the host cell and the host’s immune system. Combined with T. gondii genomic data, these lipidomic data will assist in elucidation of metabolic pathways for lipid biosynthesis in this important human pathogen. PMID:17988103

  14. Calcium uptake and proton transport by acidocalcisomes of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Rohloff, Peter; Miranda, Kildare; Rodrigues, Juliany C F; Fang, Jianmin; Galizzi, Melina; Plattner, Helmut; Hentschel, Joachim; Moreno, Silvia N J

    2011-04-25

    Acidocalcisomes are acidic calcium stores found in diverse organisms, being conserved from bacteria to humans. They possess an acidic matrix that contains several cations bound to phosphates, which are mainly present in the form of short and long polyphosphate chains. Their matrix is acidified through the action of proton pumps such as a vacuolar proton ATPase and a vacuolar proton pyrophosphatase. Calcium uptake occurs through a Ca(2+)/H(+) countertransporting ATPase located in the membrane of the organelle. Acidocalcisomes have been identified in a variety of microorganisms, including Apicomplexan parasites such as Plasmodium and Eimeria species, and in Toxoplasma gondii. We report the purification and characterization of an acidocalcisome fraction from T. gondii tachyzoites after subcellular fractionation and further discontinuous iodixanol gradient purification. Proton and calcium transport activities in the fraction were characterized by fluorescence microscopy and spectrophotometric methods using acridine orange and arsenazo III, respectively. This work will facilitate the understanding of the function of acidocalcisomes in Apicomplexan parasites, as we can now isolate highly purified fractions that could be used for proteomic analysis to find proteins that may clarify the biogenesis of these organelles.

  15. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation. [Toxoplasma gondii

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin.

  16. Inhibition and Structure of Toxoplasma gondii Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Teraya M.; Cassera, María B.; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zhan, Chenyang; Merino, Emilio F.; Evans, Gary B.; Tyler, Peter C.; Almo, Steven C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is a purine auxotroph that relies on purine salvage for proliferation. We have optimized T. gondii purine nucleoside phosphorylase (TgPNP) stability and crystallized TgPNP with phosphate and immucillin-H, a transition-state analogue that has high affinity for the enzyme. Immucillin-H bound to TgPNP with a dissociation constant of 370 pM, the highest affinity of 11 immucillins selected to probe the catalytic site. The specificity for transition-state analogues indicated an early dissociative transition state for TgPNP. Compared to Plasmodium falciparum PNP, large substituents surrounding the 5′-hydroxyl group of inhibitors demonstrate reduced capacity for TgPNP inhibition. Catalytic discrimination against large 5′ groups is consistent with the inability of TgPNP to catalyze the phosphorolysis of 5′-methylthioinosine to hypoxanthine. In contrast to mammalian PNP, the 2′-hydroxyl group is crucial for inhibitor binding in the catalytic site of TgPNP. This first crystal structure of TgPNP describes the basis for discrimination against 5′-methylthioinosine and similarly 5′-hydroxy-substituted immucillins; structural differences reflect the unique adaptations of purine salvage pathways of Apicomplexa. PMID:24585883

  17. Characterization of the chloroquine resistance transporter homologue in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Warring, Sally D; Dou, Zhicheng; Carruthers, Vern B; McFadden, Geoffrey I; van Dooren, Giel G

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) protein confer resistance to the antimalarial drug chloroquine. PfCRT localizes to the parasite digestive vacuole, the site of chloroquine action, where it mediates resistance by transporting chloroquine out of the digestive vacuole. PfCRT belongs to a family of transporter proteins called the chloroquine resistance transporter family. CRT family proteins are found throughout the Apicomplexa, in some protists, and in plants. Despite the importance of PfCRT in drug resistance, little is known about the evolution or native function of CRT proteins. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii contains one CRT family protein. We demonstrate that T. gondii CRT (TgCRT) colocalizes with markers for the vacuolar (VAC) compartment in these parasites. The TgCRT-containing VAC is a highly dynamic organelle, changing its morphology and protein composition between intracellular and extracellular forms of the parasite. Regulated knockdown of TgCRT expression resulted in modest reduction in parasite fitness and swelling of the VAC, indicating that TgCRT contributes to parasite growth and VAC physiology. Together, our findings provide new information on the role of CRT family proteins in apicomplexan parasites.

  18. High Toxoplasma gondii Seropositivity among Brain Tumor Patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bong-Kwang; Song, Hyemi; Kim, Min-Jae; Cho, Jaeeun; Shin, Eun-Hee; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular protozoan that can modulate the environment of the infected host. An unfavorable environment modulated by T. gondii in the brain includes tumor microenvironment. Literature has suggested that T. gondii infection is associated with development of brain tumors. However, in Korea, epidemiological data regarding this correlation have been scarce. In this study, in order to investigate the relationship between T. gondii infection and brain tumor development, we investigated the seroprevalence of T. gondii among 93 confirmed brain tumor patients (various histological types, including meningioma and astrocytoma) in Korea using ELISA. The results revealed that T. gondii seropositivity among brain tumor patients (18.3%) was significantly (P<0.05) higher compared with that of healthy controls (8.6%). The seropositivity of brain tumor patients showed a significant age-tendency, i.e., higher in younger age group, compared with age-matched healthy controls (P<0.05). In conclusion, this study supports the close relationship between T. gondii infection and incidence of brain tumors. PMID:27180580

  19. Dynamics of the Toxoplasma gondii inner membrane complex.

    PubMed

    Ouologuem, Dinkorma T; Roos, David S

    2014-08-01

    Unlike most cells, protozoa in the phylum Apicomplexa divide by a distinctive process in which multiple daughters are assembled within the mother (schizogony or endodyogeny), using scaffolding known as the inner membrane complex (IMC). The IMC underlies the plasma membrane during interphase, but new daughters develop in the cytoplasm, as cytoskeletal filaments associate with flattened membrane cisternae (alveolae), which elongate rapidly to encapsulate subcellular organelles. Newly assembled daughters acquire their plasma membrane as they emerge from the mother, leaving behind vestiges of the maternal cell. Although the maternal plasma membrane remains intact throughout this process, the maternal IMC disappears - is it degraded, or recycled to form the daughter IMC? Exploiting fluorescently tagged IMC markers, we have used live-cell imaging, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and mEos2 photoactivation to monitor the dynamics of IMC biogenesis and turnover during the replication of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. These studies reveal that the formation of the T. gondii IMC involves two distinct steps - de novo assembly during daughter IMC elongation within the mother cell, followed by recycling of maternal IMC membranes after the emergence of daughters from the mother cell.

  20. Deciphering the Draft Genome of Toxoplasma gondii RH Strain

    PubMed Central

    Gudimella, Ranganath; Zhang, GuiPing; Ching, Xiao-Teng; Razali, Rozaimi; Aziz, Farhanah; Anwar, Arif; Fong, Mun-Yik

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a widespread parasitic infection by Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite with at least three distinct clonal lineages. This article reports the whole genome sequencing and de novo assembly of T. gondii RH (type I representative strain), as well as genome-wide comparison across major T. gondii lineages. Genomic DNA was extracted from tachyzoites of T. gondii RH strain and its identity was verified by PCR and LAMP. Subsequently, whole genome sequencing was performed, followed by sequence filtering, genome assembly, gene annotation assignments, clustering of gene orthologs and phylogenetic tree construction. Genome comparison was done with the already archived genomes of T. gondii. From this study, the genome size of T. gondii RH strain was found to be 69.35Mb, with a mean GC content of 52%. The genome shares high similarity to the archived genomes of T. gondii GT1, ME49 and VEG strains. Nevertheless, 111 genes were found to be unique to T. gondii RH strain. Importantly, unique genes annotated to functions that are potentially critical for T. gondii virulence were found, which may explain the unique phenotypes of this particular strain. This report complements the genomic archive of T. gondii. Data obtained from this study contribute to better understanding of T. gondii and serve as a reference for future studies on this parasite. PMID:27355363

  1. Experimental Toxoplasma gondii infection in striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    PubMed

    Quirk, Travis; Dubey, J P

    2008-06-01

    Twenty-three striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) without demonstrable antibodies in 1:25 serum dilution in the modified agglutination test (MAT) were fed sporulated Toxoplasma gondii oocysts (9 skunks) or tissue cysts (10 skunks), and 4 skunks (controls) were not fed T. gondii. Skunks were bled before feeding T. gondii, 10 and 23- 25 days postinoculation (PI). All 9 seronegative skunks fed oocysts died of acute toxoplasmosis between 7 and 19 days PI; T. gondii tachyzoites were found in histological sections of many tissues. One of the 10 skunks fed tissue cysts and 1 of the 4 controls also died of acute toxoplasmosis days 19 and 20 PI; these animals probably became infected by ingestion of unexcysted oocysts passed in feces of skunks fed oocysts that were housed in the same room that skunks fed tissue cysts were housed. The remaining 9 skunks fed tissue cysts and the 3 controls developed only a mild illness and were killed in good health on days 23-25 PI. Antibodies to T. gondii were not found in 1:25 serum dilution of any of the 19 of 23 skunks that were alive on day 10 PI; 12 of 13 skunks had antibodies (MAT 1:80 or higher) on the day they were killed. Antibodies were not found in 1 skunk. Results indicate that skunks can develop IgG antibodies to T. gondii within 3 wk PI, and primary toxoplasmosis can be fatal in skunks.

  2. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in equids from Southern Spain.

    PubMed

    García-Bocanegra, I; Cabezón, O; Arenas-Montes, A; Carbonero, A; Dubey, J P; Perea, A; Almería, S

    2012-09-01

    Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were determined in serum samples from 616 equids (454 horses, 80 mules and 82 donkeys) in a cross-sectional study of 420 herds in Andalusia (Southern Spain), the region with the highest number of equids in Spain. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 10.8% horses, 15.0% mules and 25.6% donkeys by using the modified agglutination test (MAT) at a cut-off of 1:25. Herd seroprevalence for horses, mules and donkeys was 14.7% (48/327), 23.9% (11/46) and 34.0% (16/47), respectively, and 75 herds (17.8%) had at least one seropositive animal. Significant differences in T. gondii seroprevalence were observed among species, with donkeys having the highest seroprevalence and horses the lowest (P=0.04). Seroprevalence was significantly higher in herds with presence of domestic ruminants. This study is the first report of the presence of T. gondii antibodies in equine species in Spain and the first reporting T. gondii infection in donkeys in Europe. The presence of antibodies is indication of contact with the parasite and therefore, consumption of equine meat could be a potential source of human infection in Spain.

  3. Globalization and the population structure of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Tovi; Marcet, Paula L; Graham, Doug H; Dahl, Erica R; Dubey, J P

    2006-07-25

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that infects nearly all mammal and bird species worldwide. Usually asymptomatic, toxoplasmosis can be severe and even fatal to many hosts, including people. Elucidating the contribution of genetic variation among parasites to patterns of disease transmission and manifestations has been the goal of many studies. Focusing on the geographic component of this variation, we show that most genotypes are locale-specific, but some are found across continents and are closely related to each other, indicating a recent radiation of a pandemic genotype. Furthermore, we show that the geographic structure of T. gondii is extraordinary in having one population that is found in all continents except South America, whereas other populations are generally confined to South America, and yet another population is found worldwide. Our evidence suggests that South American and Eurasian populations have evolved separately until recently, when ships populated by rats, mice, and cats provided T. gondii with unprecedented migration opportunities, probably during the transatlantic slave trade. Our results explain several enigmatic features of the population structure of T. gondii and demonstrate how pervasive, prompt, and elusive the impact of human globalization is on nature.

  4. First record of Toxoplasma gondii in Chaetophractus villosus in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Kin, Marta S; Fort, Marcelo; Giménez, Hugo D; Casanave, Emma B

    2014-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite that causes abortion and reproductive disorder in domestic animals. T. gondii is a common worldwide disease in homeothermic animals, including birds and humans. The aim of the present study was to determine the presence of antibodies against T. gondii in the armadillo Chaetophractus villosus in the province of La Pampa, Argentina. Serum samples were collected from 150 individuals (70 males and 80 females). For serological detection of T. gondii, a latex agglutination test was first performed and then positive sera were confirmed with an indirect hemagglutination test, using 1:4 to 1:64 dilutions. Results showed that 27% (41) of the samples presented titers for antibodies against T. gondii. There were not significant differences between the presence of antibodies against T. gondii and age or sexes of the armadillos. Results show that presence of T. gondii antibodies in armadillos were associated with presence of pigs, and sheep, however there was not association with chickens and dairy cattle in capture site. T. gondii has an important presence in C. villosus population, suggesting a potential zoonotic risk for humans and wildlife animals when C. villosus meats are consumed raw or undercooked. This is the first record of the presence of antibodies against T. gondii in C. villosus.

  5. Structure of Toxoplasma gondii fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Lauren E.; Bosch, Jürgen

    2014-08-29

    The structure of T. gondii fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, a glycolytic enzyme and structural component of the invasion machinery, was determined to a resolution of 2.0 Å. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii must invade host cells to continue its lifecycle. It invades different cell types using an actomyosin motor that is connected to extracellular adhesins via the bridging protein fructose-1,6-@@bisphosphate aldolase. During invasion, aldolase serves in the role of a structural bridging protein, as opposed to its normal enzymatic role in the glycolysis pathway. Crystal structures of the homologous Plasmodium falciparum fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been described previously. Here, T. gondii fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase has been crystallized in space group P22{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with the biologically relevant tetramer in the asymmetric unit, and the structure has been determined via molecular replacement to a resolution of 2.0 Å. An analysis of the quality of the model and of the differences between the four chains in the asymmetric unit and a comparison between the T. gondii and P. falciparum aldolase structures is presented.

  6. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  7. Atomic resolution insight into host cell recognition by Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Blumenschein, Tharin M A; Friedrich, Nikolas; Childs, Robert A; Saouros, Savvas; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Campanero-Rhodes, Maria A; Simpson, Peter; Chai, Wengang; Koutroukides, Theodoros; Blackman, Michael J; Feizi, Ten; Soldati-Favre, Dominique; Matthews, Stephen

    2007-06-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, a member of the phylum Apicomplexa that includes Plasmodium spp., is one of the most widespread parasites and the causative agent of toxoplasmosis. Micronemal proteins (MICs) are released onto the parasite surface just before invasion of host cells and play important roles in host cell recognition, attachment and penetration. Here, we report the atomic structure for a key MIC, TgMIC1, and reveal a novel cell-binding motif called the microneme adhesive repeat (MAR). Using glycoarray analyses, we identified a novel interaction with sialylated oligosaccharides that resolves several prevailing misconceptions concerning TgMIC1. Structural studies of various complexes between TgMIC1 and sialylated oligosaccharides provide high-resolution insights into the recognition of sialylated oligosaccharides by a parasite surface protein. We observe that MAR domains exist in tandem repeats, which provide a highly specialized structure for glycan discrimination. Our work uncovers new features of parasite-receptor interactions at the early stages of host cell invasion, which will assist the design of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:17491595

  8. Toxoplasma gondii transmembrane microneme proteins and their modular design

    PubMed Central

    Sheiner, Lilach; Santos, Joana M.; Klages, Natacha; Parussini, Fabiola; Jemmely, Noelle; Friedrich, Nikolas; Ward, Gary E.; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Summary Host cell invasion by the Apicomplexa critically relies on regulated secretion of transmembrane micronemal proteins (TM-MICs). Toxoplasma gondii possesses functionally non-redundant MICs complexes that participate in gliding motility, host cell attachment, moving junction formation, rhoptry secretion and invasion. The TM-MICs are released onto the parasite’s surface as complexes capable of interacting with host cell receptors. Additionally, TgMIC2 simultaneously connects to the actomyosin system via binding to aldolase. During invasion these adhesive complexes are shed from the surface notably via intramembrane cleavage of the TM-MICs by a rhomboid protease. Some TM-MICs act as escorters and assure trafficking of the complexes to the micronemes. We have investigated the properties of TgMIC6, TgMIC8, TgMIC8.2, TgAMA1 and the new micronemal protein TgMIC16 with respect to interaction with aldolase, susceptibility to rhomboid cleavage and presence of trafficking signals. We conclude that several TM-MICs lack targeting information within their C-terminal domains, indicating that trafficking depends on yet unidentified proteins interacting with their ectodomains. Most TM-MICs serve as substrates for a rhomboid protease and some of them are able to bind to aldolase. We also show that the residues responsible for binding to aldolase are essential for TgAMA1 but dispensable forTgMIC6 function during invasion. PMID:20545864

  9. Cactin is essential for G1 progression in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Szatanek, Tomasz; Anderson-White, Brooke R.; Faugno-Fusci, David M.; White, Michael; Saeij, Jeroen P.J.; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite whose rapid lytic replication cycles define its pathogenicity. We identified a temperature sensitive growth mutant, FV-P6, which irreversibly arrests before the middle of the G1 stage of the tachyzoite cell cycle. This arrest is caused by a point mutation in a gene conserved across eukaryotes, Cactin, whose product localizes to the nucleus. To elucidate the role of TgCactin we performed genome-wide expression profiling. Besides the expected G1 expression profile, many genes associated with the extracellular state as well as with the bradyzoite cyst stage were identified. Consistent with these profiles were the expression of AP2 transcription factors typically associated with extracellular and bradyzoite stage parasites. This suggests a role for TgCactin in control of gene expression. Since TgCactin does not contain any functionally defined domains we reasoned TgCactin exerts its function through interactions with other proteins. In support of this model we demonstrated that TgCactin is present in a protein complex and can oligomerize. Taken together, these results suggest that TgCactin acts as a pivotal protein potentially regulating gene expression at several transition points in parasite development. PMID:22486860

  10. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  11. Further evidence that naphthoquinone inhibits Toxoplasma gondii growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luciana Lemos Rangel; Portes, Juliana de Araujo; de Araújo, Marlon Heggdorne; Silva, Jéssica Lays Sant'ana; Rennó, Magdalena Nascimento; Netto, Chaquip Daher; da Silva, Alcides José Monteiro; Costa, Paulo Roberto Ribeiro; De Souza, Wanderley; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a widely disseminated disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular protozoan parasite. Standard treatment causes many side effects, such as depletion of bone marrow cells, skin rashes and gastrointestinal implications. Therefore, it is necessary to find chemotherapeutic alternatives for the treatment of this disease. It was shown that a naphthoquinone derivative compound is active against T. gondii, RH strain, with an IC50 around 2.5 μM. Here, three different naphthoquinone derivative compounds with activity against leukemia cells and breast carcinoma cell were tested against T. gondii (RH strain) infected LLC-MK2 cell line. All the compounds were able to inhibit parasite growth in vitro, but one of them showed an IC50 activity below 1 μM after 48 h of treatment. The compounds showed low toxicity to the host cell. In addition, these compounds were able to induce tachyzoite-bradyzoite conversion confirmed by morphological changes, Dolichus biflorus lectin cyst wall labeling and characterization of amylopectin granules in the parasites by electron microscopy analysis using the Thierry technique. Furthermore, the compounds induced alterations on the ultrastructure of the parasite. Taken together, our results point to the naphthoquinone derivative (LQB 151) as a potential compound for the development of new drugs for the treatment of toxoplasmosis. PMID:26335616

  12. Meat Juice Serology for Toxoplasma Gondii Infection in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Vismarra, Alice; Mangia, Carlo; Barilli, Elena; Brindani, Franco; Kramer, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important foodborne zoonosis. Free-range chickens are at particularly high risk of infection and are also excellent indicators of soil contamination by oocysts. In the present study, hearts of 77 free-range chickens were collected at slaughter. T. gondii meat juice enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed with a commercial kit, following validation with positive controls, from experimentally infected chickens, and negative ones. Out of 77 samples, only 66 gave sufficient meat juice for serology. Of these, 24 (36.4%) were positive for T. gondii considering the 5*standard deviation values (calculated on the optical density of negative controls), while all the samples were negative considering sample/positive% values. Parasite-specific polymerase chain reaction was carried out on all samples obtained from heart tissue and none were positive for the presence of T. gondii DNA. Results would suggest that further study on the use of meat juice with a validated serological test to detect T. gondii in chickens could lead to widespread epidemiological studies in this important intermediate host. However, sample collection and test specificity require further evaluation. PMID:27800433

  13. Diagnosis of toxoplasmosis and typing of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan; Wang, Ze-Dong; Huang, Si-Yang; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-05-28

    Toxoplasmosis, caused by the obligate intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, is an important zoonosis with medical and veterinary importance worldwide. The disease is mainly contracted by ingesting undercooked or raw meat containing viable tissue cysts, or by ingesting food or water contaminated with oocysts. The diagnosis and genetic characterization of T. gondii infection is crucial for the surveillance, prevention and control of toxoplasmosis. Traditional approaches for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis include etiological, immunological and imaging techniques. Diagnosis of toxoplasmosis has been improved by the emergence of molecular technologies to amplify parasite nucleic acids. Among these, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular techniques have been useful for the genetic characterization of T. gondii. Serotyping methods based on polymorphic polypeptides have the potential to become the choice for typing T. gondii in humans and animals. In this review, we summarize conventional non-DNA-based diagnostic methods, and the DNA-based molecular techniques for the diagnosis and genetic characterization of T. gondii. These techniques have provided foundations for further development of more effective and accurate detection of T. gondii infection. These advances will contribute to an improved understanding of the epidemiology, prevention and control of toxoplasmosis.

  14. Can the common brain parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, influence human culture?

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, Kevin D

    2006-01-01

    The latent prevalence of a long-lived and common brain parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, explains a statistically significant portion of the variance in aggregate neuroticism among populations, as well as in the ‘neurotic’ cultural dimensions of sex roles and uncertainty avoidance. Spurious or non-causal correlations between aggregate personality and aspects of climate and culture that influence T. gondii transmission could also drive these patterns. A link between culture and T. gondii hypothetically results from a behavioural manipulation that the parasite uses to increase its transmission to the next host in the life cycle: a cat. While latent toxoplasmosis is usually benign, the parasite's subtle effect on individual personality appears to alter the aggregate personality at the population level. Drivers of the geographical variation in the prevalence of this parasite include the effects of climate on the persistence of infectious stages in soil, the cultural practices of food preparation and cats as pets. Some variation in culture, therefore, may ultimately be related to how climate affects the distribution of T. gondii, though the results only explain a fraction of the variation in two of the four cultural dimensions, suggesting that if T. gondii does influence human culture, it is only one among many factors. PMID:17015323

  15. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in Antarctic pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Rengifo-Herrera, Claudia; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel; Alvarez-García, Gema; Gómez-Bautista, Mercedes; García-Párraga, Daniel; García-Peña, Francisco Javier; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana

    2012-11-23

    The presence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies was investigated in Antarctic marine mammals. Two hundred and eleven sera from different species of pinnipeds collected in years 2007, 2010 and 2011 from different locations in the South Shetland Islands and Antarctic Peninsula were analysed using a commercially available agglutination test kit. The presence of antibodies (titres ≥ 1:25) against T. gondii was detected in a total of 28 animals (13.3%). Amongst animal species, percentages of detection were higher in Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) (76.9%; 10/13) followed by Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) (41.9%; 13/31). Antibodies were also found in 4 of 165 (2.4%) Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) and 1 of 2 Crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga). Highest titres (1:100-1:800) were also observed in Southern elephant seals and Weddell seals. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the detection of antibodies against T. gondii in Antarctic marine mammals.

  16. Complications when augmenting the posterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, Paul; Melnick, Philip R; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary posterior edentulous region presents a challenge when planning for restoring missing teeth with a dental implant. The available bone in such cases is often not dense and not adequate for the placement of a properly sized implant because of maxillary sinus pneumatization and alveolar bone loss. Maxillary sinus lift is a predictable procedure to provide adequate bone height for the purpose of implant placement. However, complications are encountered during or after the execution of the sinus lift procedure. In this article, the prevention and management of maxillary sinus complications are discussed. PMID:25434561

  17. The posterior impingement sign: diagnosis of rotator cuff and posterior labral tears secondary to internal impingement in overhand athletes.

    PubMed

    Meister, Keith; Buckley, Bernadette; Batts, Joel

    2004-08-01

    We conducted this study to determine whether a test, the posterior impingement maneuver, could be used to prospectively identify articular side tears of the rotator cuff and/or posterior labrum. Sixty-nine athletes presented with posterior shoulder pain that developed during overhand athletics. Injured shoulders were placed into 90 degrees to 110 degrees of abduction, slight extension, and maximum external rotation, and an effort was made to elicit pain deep within the posterior aspect. Overall sensitivity of the test was 75.5%, and specificity was 85%. When only athletes with noncontact injuries (gradual onset of pain) were considered, sensitivity was 95% and specificity was 100%. A positive posterior impingement sign correlated highly with undersurface tearing of the rotator cuff and/or tearing of the posterior labrum in athletes with gradual onset of posterior shoulder pain during overhand athletics. PMID:15379239

  18. Posterior subcapsular cataract and inhaled corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Abuekteish, F.; Kirkpatrick, J. N.; Russell, G.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Although posterior subcapsular cataract complicates both systemic and topical corticosteroid therapy, the literature on the effects of inhaled corticosteroids is conflicting. METHODS--One hundred and forty children and young adults on inhaled corticosteroids were examined by slit lamp ophthalmoscopy after pupillary dilatation; 103 had received one or more short courses (< or = 7 days) of oral corticosteroids in the management of acute asthmatic attacks and four had also received one or more prolonged courses (> or = 4 weeks) of alternate day oral corticosteroid therapy. RESULTS--Bilateral posterior subcapsular cataract was identified in one girl who had received several prolonged courses of oral corticosteroids, but was not identified in any other patient. CONCLUSIONS--There is no evidence to support the contention that inhaled corticosteroid therapy on its own, or in association with short courses of oral corticosteroid therapy, might cause cataracts. Although children receiving long term systemic corticosteroid therapy should be screened for cataracts, this is unnecessary in children on inhaled corticosteroids alone. PMID:7638813

  19. Sampling Networks from Their Posterior Predictive Distribution.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravi; De Gruttola, Victor; Blitzstein, Joseph

    2014-04-01

    Recent research indicates that knowledge about social networks can be leveraged to increase efficiency of interventions (Valente, 2012). However, in many settings, there exists considerable uncertainty regarding the structure of the network. This can render the estimation of potential effects of network-based interventions difficult, as providing appropriate guidance to select interventions often requires a representation of the whole network. In order to make use of the network property estimates to simulate the effect of interventions, it may be beneficial to sample networks from an estimated posterior predictive distribution, which can be specified using a wide range of models. Sampling networks from a posterior predictive distribution of network properties ensures that the uncertainty about network property parameters is adequately captured. The tendency for relationships among network properties to exhibit sharp thresholds has important implications for understanding global network topology in the presence of uncertainty; therefore, it is essential to account for uncertainty. We provide detail needed to sample networks for the specific network properties of degree distribution, mixing frequency, and clustering. Our methods to generate networks are demonstrated using simulated data and data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.

  20. Bladder neck incompetence at posterior urethroplasty.

    PubMed

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M

    2015-03-01

    The finding of an incompetent bladder neck (BN) at the time of posterior urethroplasty will necessarily exacerbate the already difficult situation. In such cases the aim of the treatment is not only to restore urethral continuity by end-to-end urethral anastomosis, but also to restore the function of the BN to maintain urinary continence. Fortunately, the incidence of incompetence of the BN at posterior urethroplasty is uncommon, usually ≈4.5%. It seems that pelvic fracture-related BN injuries, in contrast to urethral injuries which result from a shearing force, are due to direct injury by the sharp edge of the fractured and displaced pubic bone. The risk of injuries to the BN is greater in children, in patients with a fracture involving both superior and inferior pubic rami on the same side, and in those managed initially by primary realignment. An incompetent BN is suspected by finding an open rectangular BN on cystography, and a fixedly open BN on suprapubic cystoscopy. An incompetent BN can be treated either subsequent to or concomitant with the urethral repair, according to whether a perineal or a perineo-abdominal urethroplasty is used, respectively. Several options have been reported to treat pelvic fracture-related BN incompetence, including reconstructing the BN, forming a new sphincter by tubularisation of a rectangular flap of the anterior bladder wall, and mechanical occlusion by an artificial sphincter or collagen injection. Reconstruction of the BN by the Young-Dees-Leadbetter∗∗ procedure probably provides the most successful results.

  1. Posterior surgical approaches to the rectum.

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, K C; Lang, N P; Broadwater, J R; Thompson, B W

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes experience with 19 posterior approaches to the rectum including nine trans-sacral (Kraske) and ten trans-sphincteric (Mason) procedures. This study included 12 men and 7 women, ranging in age from 18 to 89 years. Surgical indications included villous tumors in nine patients, various benign problems in four patients, primary carcinomas in three patients, and recurrent cancer in three patients. Eight complications developed in the 19 patients including: four fecal fistulae, two wound dehiscences, one rectal stricture, and one sacrococcygeal hernia. Spontaneous closure of the fecal fistulae occurred in two patients, and two patients required proximal colostomies. Fecal continence was achieved in 18 of the 19 patients. No patient died as a complication of the procedure. No recurrent tumors have developed. The conclusion is that a posterior approach to the rectum is a safe and effective procedure for various benign and for selected malignant conditions. It is particularly suitable for villous tumors that are too high for transanal resection and too low for transabdominal resection. It is an effective procedure for small, exophytic, mobile carcinomas of the lower 10 cm of the rectum in selected patients. PMID:7082059

  2. Mycophenolate-Induced Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Bhavik; Khajuria, Mansi; Agrawal, Yashwant

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman presented with diffuse anasarca and shortness of breath. Workup revealed a creatinine of 3.3 and a glomerular filtration rate of 17. The patient was also found to be pancytopenic with evidence of hemolytic anemia. A renal biopsy showed evidence of stage IV lupus nephritis with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Her lupus was further classified as ANA negative and anti-dsDNA positive. Mycophenolate and triweekly hemodialysis were started along with a steroid burst of methylprednisolone 1 g for 3 days followed by prednisone 60 mg daily. Four days after discharge, the patient represented with a witnessed 3-minute seizure involving bowel incontinence, altered mental status, and tongue biting. She was given 2 mg intravenous lorazepam and loaded with 1000 mg levetiracetam for seizure prophylaxis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head revealed bilateral posterior hemispheric subcortical edema, and the diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was made. Mycophenolate was immediately discontinued and replaced with cyclophosphamide. Strict blood pressure control below 140/90 mm Hg was maintained initially with intravenous nicardipine drip and then transitioned to oral nifedipine, clonidine, losartan, and minoxidil. A repeat head magnetic resonance imaging 8 days later showed resolved subcortical edema consistent with the patient's improved mental status. No permanent neurologic sequelae were recorded as a result of this hospital episode. PMID:25933141

  3. A SAS-6-like protein suggests that the Toxoplasma conoid complex evolved from flagellar components.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Jessica Cruz; Scheumann, Nicole; Beatty, Wandy; Beck, Josh R; Tran, Johnson Q; Yau, Candace; Bradley, Peter J; Gull, Keith; Wickstead, Bill; Morrissette, Naomi S

    2013-07-01

    SAS-6 is required for centriole biogenesis in diverse eukaryotes. Here, we describe a novel family of SAS-6-like (SAS6L) proteins that share an N-terminal domain with SAS-6 but lack coiled-coil tails. SAS6L proteins are found in a subset of eukaryotes that contain SAS-6, including diverse protozoa and green algae. In the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, SAS-6 localizes to the centriole but SAS6L is found above the conoid, an enigmatic tubulin-containing structure found at the apex of a subset of alveolate organisms. Loss of SAS6L causes reduced fitness in Toxoplasma. The Trypanosoma brucei homolog of SAS6L localizes to the basal-plate region, the site in the axoneme where the central-pair microtubules are nucleated. When endogenous SAS6L is overexpressed in Toxoplasma tachyzoites or Trypanosoma trypomastigotes, it forms prominent filaments that extend through the cell cytoplasm, indicating that it retains a capacity to form higher-order structures despite lacking a coiled-coil domain. We conclude that although SAS6L proteins share a conserved domain with SAS-6, they are a functionally distinct family that predates the last common ancestor of eukaryotes. Moreover, the distinct localization of the SAS6L protein in Trypanosoma and Toxoplasma adds weight to the hypothesis that the conoid complex evolved from flagellar components.

  4. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum in north-eastern Atlantic Harbor seal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum were determined in serum samples from 47 grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) and 56 harbor seals (Phoca vitulina vitulina) from the Atlantic coasts of United Kingdom and France. Antibodies to T. gondii assayed by the modified agglutination test (MAT) ...

  5. ISOLATION OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII FROM CAPYBARAS (HYDROCHAERIS HYDROCHAERIS) FROM SÃO PAULO STATE, BRAZIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris) is a large rodent used for human consumption in certain areas of South America. In the present study, viable Toxoplasma gondii was isolated for the first time from this host. Antibodies to T. gondii were assayed in the sera of 64 capybaras from 6 counties of São...

  6. Establishment of replacement International Standard 13/132 for human antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Rijpkema, Sjoerd; Hockley, Jason; Rigsby, Peter; Guy, Edward C

    2016-09-01

    Sixteen laboratories carried out a collaborative study to validate 13/132 as a replacement International Standard (IS) for TOXM (3rd IS for anti-Toxoplasma Serum, Human, 1000 IU). 13/132 is a freeze dried preparation of pooled human plasma from six donors who experienced a recent Toxoplasma gondii infection. The potency of 13/132 was compared to TOXM and 01/600 (1st IS for anti-Toxoplasma IgG, Human, 20 IU). Samples were tested for IgA, IgG, IgG avidity and IgM in agglutination assays; enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), enzyme linked fluorescent assays, immunoblots, immunofluorescence assays and the Sabin-Feldman dye test for Ig. 13/132 was strongly positive for Ig, IgA, IgG and IgM and the reproducibility was very good. 13/132 contains high levels of anti-Toxoplasma Ig, IgG and IgM and its potency falls between TOXM and 01/600. The avidity of IgG was found to be low, similar to the avidity of IgG from TOXM. 13/132 was established by the Expert Committee on Biological Standardization as the 4th IS for Antibodies, Human, to T. gondii with an assigned unitage of 160 IU per ampoule for Ig by dye test and 263 U per ampoule for IgG by ELISA. PMID:27378430

  7. Detection and survival of Toxoplasma gondii in milk and cheese from experimentally infected goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The consumption of unpasteurized goat cheese and milk has been suggested as a risk factor for toxoplasmosis in humans. In the present study, detection and survival of Toxoplasma gondii in milk and cheese was studied. Eight goats were inoculated orally with 300-10000 oocysts of T. gondii strain TgGoa...

  8. Functional conservation of Toxoplasma gondii virulence genes in its avirulent relative, Hammondia hammondi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite capable of infecting all warm blooded animals, including humans. Its closest extant relative, Hammondia hammondi, has never been found to infect humans and in contrast to T. gondii is highly attenuated in mice. To better understand the genetic b...

  9. Isolation and genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii from Ugandan chickens reveals frequent multiple infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic makeup of an infecting Toxoplasma gondii strain may be important for the outcome of infection and the risk of reactivation of chronic disease. In order to survey the distribution of different genotypes within an area, free-range chickens act as a good model species. In this study 85 chic...

  10. Toxoplasma gondii in horse meat intended for human consumption in Romania.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, an economically important zoonotic protozoan, was investigated in horses slaughtered for export and human consumption in the North of Romania. This study has aimed to assess the potential impact of Romanian horses’ toxoplasmosis on the public health. Pairs of sam...

  11. Uptake and transmission of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts by migratory filter-feeding fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous parasitic protozoan known to cause disease and death in warm-blooded animals. Bottlenose dolphins, walruses, sea otters, and other marine animals worldwide have died from toxoplasmosis, but the source of this parasite in the marine environment h...

  12. Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in bats from São Paulo city, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasmosis is a parasitic zoonosis caused by Toxoplasma gondii with a worldwide distribution. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of IgG anti-T. gondii antibodies in bats from São Paulo city, Brazil. A total of 616 serum samples were collected from 22 species of bats. Anti-T. gon...

  13. Neurons are the Primary Target Cell for the Brain-Tropic Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Hans K.; Nguyen, Elizabeth; MacDonald, Wes R.; Trivedi, Tapasya; Devineni, Asha; Koshy, Anita A.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, a common brain-tropic parasite, is capable of infecting most nucleated cells, including astrocytes and neurons, in vitro. Yet, in vivo, Toxoplasma is primarily found in neurons. In vitro data showing that interferon-γ-stimulated astrocytes, but not neurons, clear intracellular parasites suggest that neurons alone are persistently infected in vivo because they lack the ability to clear intracellular parasites. Here we test this theory by using a novel Toxoplasma-mouse model capable of marking and tracking host cells that directly interact with parasites, even if the interaction is transient. Remarkably, we find that Toxoplasma shows a strong predilection for interacting with neurons throughout CNS infection. This predilection remains in the setting of IFN-γ depletion; infection with parasites resistant to the major mechanism by which murine astrocytes clear parasites; or when directly injecting parasites into the brain. These findings, in combination with prior work, strongly suggest that neurons are not incidentally infected, but rather they are Toxoplasma’s primary in vivo target. PMID:26895155

  14. Obtaining Highly Purified Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts by a Discontinuous Cesium Chloride Gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan pathogen that commonly infects humans. To date, research on understanding the prevalence of T. gondii oocysts in the water and environment are limited due to the lack of tools to detect oocysts in the environment. This is primarily due to the...

  15. NextGen sequencing reveals short double crossovers contribute disproportionately to genetic diversity in Toxoplasma gondii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread protozoan parasite of animals that causes zoonotic disease in humans. Three clonal variants predominate in North America and Europe, while South American strains are genetically diverse, and undergo more frequent recombination. All three northern clonal variants s...

  16. Murine gamma interferon fails to inhibit Toxoplasma gondii growth in murine fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzman, J D; Gonias, S L; Pfefferkorn, E R

    1990-01-01

    Although treatment of human macrophages or fibroblasts with human gamma interferon results in the inhibition of intracellular Toxoplasma gondii, murine gamma interferon stimulated only murine macrophages, not murine fibroblasts, to inhibit T. gondii. This species difference may be important in understanding the control of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:2106497

  17. Serological Evidence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in five species of bats in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite which can infect almost all warm-blooded animals and humans with a worldwide distribution. Bats are reservoirs for an increasing number of emerging zoonotic viruses, such as henipaviruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) c...

  18. Transmission of Toxoplasma gondii - from land to sea: a personal perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been 100 years since the discovery of Toxoplasma gondii in 1908. Its full life cycle was not discovered until 1970 when it was found that it is a coccidian parasite of cats with all non-feline warm blooded animals (including humans) as intermediate hosts. The discovery of the environmentally ...

  19. Serology and genetics of Toxoplasma gondii in endangered Hawaiian (Nene) geese (Branta sandvicensis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is parasite transmitted by feral cats that has historically caused mortality in native Hawaiian birds. A recent study revealed that this parasite accounts for ca. 4% of causes of mortality in native Hawaiian geese (nene-Branta sandvicensis). To know how widespread exposure to the...

  20. Serotyping of Toxoplasma gondii in Cats (Felis domesticus) Reveals Predominance of Type II Infections in Germany

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cats are definitive hosts of Toxoplasma gondii and play an essential role in the epidemiology of this parasite. The study aims at clarifying whether cats are able to develop specific antibodies against different clonal types of T. gondii and to determine by serotyping the T. gondii clona...

  1. Toxoplasmosis in dogs: First report of Toxoplasma gondii infection in any animal species in Angola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the worldwide importance of zoonotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii nothing is known of toxoplasmosis in animals in Angola. The present study aimed at estimating the seroprevalence and also assessing correlates of T. gondii infection in pet dogs from Luanda, Angola. Dogs (n = 103) brought to a v...

  2. Detection of zoonotic protozoa Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis suihominis in wild boars from Spain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food safety regulations require the control of presence of protozoa in meats destined for human consumption. Wild boar (Sus scrofa) meat may constitute a source of zoonoses. A 23.8% (688/2881) seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies, and 72.2% (662/910) Sarcocystis sarcocysts prevalence ...

  3. [Incidence of Toxoplasma gondii infections among children in the Kielce province].

    PubMed

    Patrzałek, M; Sieczko, W; Rezner, A

    1990-01-01

    Toxoplasma antibodies were investigated among 639 children inhabiting the province of Kielce. The percentage of seropositive children appeared high in newborns (58.4), then dropped to 1.48 in one-year-old infants and increased to 17.4 among 6-7 year old children. The percentage was significantly higher among country children.

  4. Toxoplasma gondii in feral american minks at the Maullin river, Chile

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    American mink (Neovison vison) is a widely distributed invasive species in southern Chile. Thirty four feral minks were trapped at two distinct sites (rural and peri-urban), diet analyzed, and Toxoplasma gondii exposure compared using PCR and specific antibodies. Serum samples were evaluated using a...

  5. Geographical patterns of Toxoplasma gondii genetic diversity revealed by multilocus PCR-RFLP genotyping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, an extensive collection of Toxoplasma gondii samples have been typed by the multilocus PCR-RFLP method using a standardized set of 10 genetic markers. Here we summarize the data reported until the end of 2012. A total of 1457 samples were typed into 189 genotypes. Overall, only a fe...

  6. Factors affecting seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in the endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild felids are considered important in maintaining the sylvatic cycle of Toxoplasma gondii. Although, T. gondii antibodies have been reported in several species of wild felids, little is known of the epidemiology and risk factors associated with T. gondii infection in wild cats. In the present stud...

  7. Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and Neosport caninum antibodies in Spanish ibex (Capra pryenaica hispanica)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild felids are considered important in maintaining the sylvatic cycle of Toxoplasma gondii. Although, T. gondii antibodies have been reported in several species of wild felids, little is known of the epidemiology and risk factors associated with T. gondii infection in wild cats. The Iberian lynx (L...

  8. Determining Resistance of Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts to UV Disinfection Using Cell Culture and a Mouse Bioassay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of UV exposure on Toxoplasma gondii oocysts has not been completely defined for use in water disinfection. This study evaluated irradiated oocysts by three assays: a SCID mouse biassay, an in vitro T. gondii oocyst plaque assay (TOP-assay), and a quantitative reverse-transcriptase real-t...

  9. Seroepidemiology of toxoplasma gondii infection in human adults. From three rural communities in Derango State, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is scarce information concerning the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in people of rural Mexico. Anti-T. Gondii IgG and IgM antibodies were sought in 462 adult inhabitants from 3 rural communities of Durango State, Mexico, using enzyme-linked immunoassays. In total, 110 (23.8% of ...

  10. NEOSPORA CANINUM AND TOXOPLASMA GONDII ANTIBODIES IN DOGS FROM DURANGO CITY, MEXICO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum are structurally similar parasites with many common hosts.he prevalence of antibodies to T. gondii and N. caninum was determined in sera from dogs from Durango City, Mexico. Using a modified agglutination test, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 52 (51.5%) ...

  11. Development of the dose-response relationship for human toxoplasma gondii infection associated with meat consumption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that is responsible for approximately 24% of deaths attributed to foodborne pathogens in the United States.A substantial portion of human T. gondii infections may be acquired through the consumption of meats. The dose-response relationship for human exposure...

  12. Determining UV Inactivation of Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts by Using Cell Culture and a Mouse Bioassay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of UV exposure on Toxoplasma gondii oocysts has not been completely defined for use in water disinfection. This study evaluated UV irradiated oocysts by three assays: a SCID mouse bioassay, an in vitro T. gondii oocyst plaque assay (TOP-assay), and a quantitative reve...

  13. A systematic meta-analysis of Toxoplasma gondii prevalence in meat animals in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widely distributed protozoan parasite. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that T. gondii is one of three pathogens (along with Salmonella and Listeria), which together account for >70% of all deaths due to foodborne illness in the United States. Meat...

  14. TOXOPLASMA GONDII : UPTAKE AND SURVIVAL OF OOCYSTS IN FREE-LIVING AMOEBAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Waterborne transmission of the oocyst stage of Toxoplasma gondii can cause outbreaks of clinical toxoplasmosis in humans and infection of marine mammals. In water-related environments and soil, free-living amoebae are considered potential carriers of various pathogens, but knowledge on interactions ...

  15. Detection of antibodies against Sarcocystis neurona, neospora spp., and Toxoplasma gondii in horses from Costa Rica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serum samples from 315 horses from Costa Rica, Central America were examined for the presence of antibodies against Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., and Toxoplasma gondii using the SnSAG2 ELISA, the NhSAG1 ELISA, and the modified agglutination test, respectively. Anti-S. neurona antibodies were f...

  16. Isolation and genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from the gray wolf Canis lupus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife. In the present study feral gray wolf (Canis lupus) from Minnesota were examined for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 130 (52.4%) of 248 wolves tested by the modified agglutination test...

  17. Inactivation of Toxoplasma gondii on blueberries using low dose irradiation without affecting quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is the most common parasite that contaminates produce. However as more cases of T. gondii contamination are being linked to produce, current washing steps in produce processing may not be effective or suitable for some varieties of produce. The objective of this study was to eva...

  18. Prevalence of toxoplasma infection in Mexican newborns and children: a systematic review from 1954 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Galvan-Ramírez, Ma de la Luz; Troyo-Sanroman, Rogelio; Roman, Sonia; Bernal-Redondo, Rosamaría; Vázquez Castellanos, José Luís

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Recent studies in Mexico have shown that from 20/10,000 to 58/10,000 newborns with Toxoplasma infection could be undetected. The aim of this study was to determine the weighed prevalence of T. gondii infection and describe the epidemiological transition of infection in newborns. Methods. Research literature reporting Toxoplasma infection prevalence in Mexican newborns and children were searched in five international databases. Weighted prevalence was calculated by inverse variance-weighted method in asymptomatic and symptomatic study groups, and the epidemiological transition was estimated by a lineal regression analysis. Results. The weighed prevalence in 4833 asymptomatic newborns was 0.616%, CI95% (0.396%-0.835%) (P < 0.001), whereas, among 895 symptomatic newborns, the weighed prevalence was 3.02%, CI 95% (1.91%-4.1%) (P < 0.001). A downward trend of 0.25%/year represented an accumulated decrease of -13,75% in the prevalence in the symptomatic newborns throughout 55 years, whereas, in the asymptomatic children, the prevalence was similar over the course of the years. Conclusion. The high-weighted prevalence of congenital Toxoplasma infection in newborns justifies that Toxoplasma gondii testing be included in the screening programs for women during pregnancy and newborns in Mexico. A rapid diagnosis and treatment strategy could aid in limiting a potential damage to the newborns.

  19. Prevalence of Toxoplasma Infection in Mexican Newborns and Children: A Systematic Review from 1954 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Galvan-Ramírez, Ma. de la Luz; Troyo-Sanroman, Rogelio; Roman, Sonia; Bernal-Redondo, Rosamaría; Vázquez Castellanos, José Luís

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Recent studies in Mexico have shown that from 20/10,000 to 58/10,000 newborns with Toxoplasma infection could be undetected. The aim of this study was to determine the weighed prevalence of T. gondii infection and describe the epidemiological transition of infection in newborns. Methods. Research literature reporting Toxoplasma infection prevalence in Mexican newborns and children were searched in five international databases. Weighted prevalence was calculated by inverse variance-weighted method in asymptomatic and symptomatic study groups, and the epidemiological transition was estimated by a lineal regression analysis. Results. The weighed prevalence in 4833 asymptomatic newborns was 0.616%, CI95% (0.396%–0.835%) (P < 0.001), whereas, among 895 symptomatic newborns, the weighed prevalence was 3.02%, CI 95% (1.91%–4.1%) (P < 0.001). A downward trend of 0.25%/year represented an accumulated decrease of −13,75% in the prevalence in the symptomatic newborns throughout 55 years, whereas, in the asymptomatic children, the prevalence was similar over the course of the years. Conclusion. The high-weighted prevalence of congenital Toxoplasma infection in newborns justifies that Toxoplasma gondii testing be included in the screening programs for women during pregnancy and newborns in Mexico. A rapid diagnosis and treatment strategy could aid in limiting a potential damage to the newborns. PMID:23050161

  20. PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST TOXOPLASMA GONDII IN POLAR BEARS (URSUS MARITIMUS) FROM SVALBARD AND EAST GREENLAND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serum samples from 419 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Svalbard and the Barents Sea (collected 1990 - 2000) and 108 polar bears from East Greenland (collected 1999 - 2004) were assayed for antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Antibody prevalences were ...

  1. Toxoplasma gondii prevalence in farm animals in the U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasmosis, caused by Toxoplasma gondii, is one of the most common parasitic infections of humans and other warmblooded animals. It has been found worldwide, and nearly one third of humans have been exposed to the parasite. Congenital infection occurs when a woman becomes infected during pregna...

  2. Isolation of viable Toxoplasma gondii from guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) and rabbits from Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from a feral guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) and domestic rabbits from Brazil for the first time. Serum and brains from 10 guinea fowl and 21 rabbits from Brazil were examined for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 2 of 10 fowl and 2 of 21 rabbit...

  3. Seroprevalence of toxoplasma gondii infection in domestic rabbits in Durango State, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii infection in rabbits is of public health importance because rabbit meat is consumed by humans, and rabbits are preyed upon by cats that then shed environmentally resistant oocysts. Antibodies to T. gondii were determined in 429 domestic rabbits in Durango State, Mexico using the mo...

  4. Toxoplasma gondii coinfection with diseases and parasites in wild rabbits in Scotland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) on an estate in Perthshire, central Scotland, the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii was 18/548 (3.3 %). The wild rabbit could be a T. gondii reservoir and it has potential value as a sentinel of T. gondii in environmental substrates. T. gondii was associated...

  5. Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in women from the North of Portugal in their childbearing years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection and associated risk factors were investigated in 401 women of childbearing age from the North of Portugal. Among the 98 (24.4%) seropositive women, 92 (93.9%) were detected as positive only for imunoglobulin (Ig) G, two women (2.0%) were positive only fo...

  6. Prevalence of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in dogs from northeastern Portugal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prevalence of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii was investigated in 673 domestic dogs from northeastern Portugal, by using the modified agglutination test (MAT) with 1:20 as cut-off for seropositivity; antibodies were found in 256 dogs (38.0%). Differences between seroprevalence levels in males (36.7%...

  7. Prevalence of antibodies to Leishmania infantum and Toxoplasma gondii in horses from the north of Portugal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Leishmania infantum and Toxoplasma gondii are protozoa with zoonotic and economic importance. Prevalences of antibodies to these agents were assessed in 173 horses from the north of Portugal. Findings Antibodies to L. infantum were detected by the direct agglutination test (DAT); seven (...

  8. Genotyping Toxoplasma gondii from wildlife in Pennsylvania and identification of natural recombinants virulent to mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife. Available data indicate a predominance of one T. gondii genotype (haplogroup 12) in wildlife in the USA but it is uncertain if this is due to sampling bias, range of hosts, or geographical restriction. In the pres...

  9. Macrophages facilitate the excystation and differentiation of Toxoplasma gondii sporozoites into tachyzoites following oocyst internalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a common parasite of humans and domestic animals, which is transmitted via oocysts in cat faeces or tissue cysts in contaminated meat. The oocyst and sporocyst walls are multilayered polymeric structures that protect the infective sporozoites from deleterious physical and chemic...

  10. Host mitochondrial association evolved in the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii via neofunctionalization of a gene duplicate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite of humans and other warm-blooded animals, the ability to associate with host mitochondria (HMA) is driven by a locally expanded gene family that encodes multiple mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1) proteins. The importance of copy number in the e...

  11. A novel chemiluminescent immunoassay for detection of Toxoplasma gondii IgG in human sera.

    PubMed

    Holec-Gąsior, Lucyna; Ferra, Bartłomiej; Czechowska, Justyna; Serdiuk, Illia E; Krzymiński, Karol; Kur, Józef

    2016-08-01

    This study describes Toxoplasma gondii IgG chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) based on the use of a novel immunochemical reagents in the form of the conjugates of original acridinium ester (AE) labels attached to antibodies and SAG2-GRA1-ROP1L chimeric antigen and shows that this test is useful for diagnostic purposes.

  12. Coordinated loading of IRG resistance GTPases on to the Toxoplasma gondii parasitophorous vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Hunn, Julia P; Könen-Waisman, Stephanie; Zhao, Yang O; Preukschat, Daniela; Coers, Jörn; Boyle, Jon P; Ong, Yi-Ching; Boothroyd, John C; Reichmann, Gabriela; Howard, Jonathan C

    2010-01-01

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) constitute an interferon-induced intracellular resistance mechanism in mice against Toxoplasma gondii. IRG proteins accumulate on the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), leading to its disruption and to death of the parasite. How IRGs target the PVM is unknown. We show that accumulation of IRGs on the PVM begins minutes after parasite invasion and increases for about 1 h. Targeting occurs independently of several signalling pathways and the microtubule network, suggesting that IRG transport is diffusion-driven. The intensity of IRG accumulation on the PVM, however, is reduced in absence of the autophagy regulator, Atg5. In wild-type cells IRG proteins accumulate cooperatively on PVMs in a definite order reflecting a temporal hierarchy, with Irgb6 and Irgb10 apparently acting as pioneers. Loading of IRG proteins onto the vacuoles of virulent Toxoplasma strains is attenuated and the two pioneer IRGs are the most affected. The polymorphic rhoptry kinases, ROP16, ROP18 and the catalytically inactive proteins, ROP5A–D, are not individually responsible for this effect. Thus IRG proteins protect mice against avirulent strains of Toxoplasma but fail against virulent strains. The complex cooperative behaviour of IRG proteins in resisting Toxoplasma may hint at undiscovered complexity also in virulence mechanisms. PMID:20109161

  13. Use of filter papers to determine seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii among hunted ungulates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasmosis is a zoonosis caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, and it is found worldwide. To determine whether ungulates are reservoirs of T. gondii in an isolated and remote region of the northeastern Peruvian Amazon, antibodies to T. gondii were determined in 5 species of ungulates by the...

  14. Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in a mennonite community in Durango State, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a lack of information concerning the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in Mennonites (an ethnic group of Mexican citizens of German descent living in rural communities). The prevalence of anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies was examined in 152 Mennonites in Durango State, Mexic...

  15. Risk factors associated with Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive Sapajus spp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive capuchin monkeys at a facility in the northeastern Brazil. Serum samples from 116 bearded capuchin (Sapajus libidinosus), nine blonde capuchin (Sapajus flavius), five black-capped ...

  16. Multi-locus DNA sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from Brazilian pigs identifies genetically divergent strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five Toxoplasma gondii isolates (TgPgBr1-5) were isolated from hearts and brains of pigs freshly purchased at the market of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Four of the five isolates were highly pathogenic in mice. Four genotypes were identified. Multi-locus DNA sequenci...

  17. Targeting Toxoplasma Tubules: Tubulin, Microtubules, and Associated Proteins in a Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that causes serious opportunistic infections, birth defects, and blindness in humans. Microtubules are critically important components of diverse structures that are used throughout the Toxoplasma life cycle. As in other eukaryotes, spindle microtubules are required for chromosome segregation during replication. Additionally, a set of membrane-associated microtubules is essential for the elongated shape of invasive “zoites,” and motility follows a spiral trajectory that reflects the path of these microtubules. Toxoplasma zoites also construct an intricate, tubulin-based apical structure, termed the conoid, which is important for host cell invasion and associates with proteins typically found in the flagellar apparatus. Last, microgametes specifically construct a microtubule-containing flagellar axoneme in order to fertilize macrogametes, permitting genetic recombination. The specialized roles of these microtubule populations are mediated by distinct sets of associated proteins. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of tubulin, microtubule populations, and associated proteins in Toxoplasma; these components are used for both novel and broadly conserved processes that are essential for parasite survival. PMID:25380753

  18. Patterns of Hydrocephalus Caused by Congenital Toxoplasma gondii Infection Associate With Parasite Genetics.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Samuel L; Wheeler, Kelsey M; McLone, David; Frim, David; Penn, Richard; Swisher, Charles N; Heydemann, Peter T; Boyer, Kenneth M; Noble, A Gwendolyn; Rabiah, Peter; Withers, Shawn; Montoya, Jose G; Wroblewski, Kristen; Karrison, Theodore; Grigg, Michael E; McLeod, Rima

    2015-12-15

    Four anatomical patterns of hydrocephalus secondary to congenital Toxoplasma gondii infection were identified and characterized for infants enrolled in the National Collaborative Chicago-based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study. Analysis of parasite serotype revealed that different anatomical patterns associate with Type-II vs Not-Exclusively Type-II strains (NE-II) (P = .035).

  19. High prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in dogs in Veracruz, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known concerning the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in dogs in Mexico. Here, we investigated antibodies to T. gondii and associated risk factors in 101 dogs from an animal shelter in Veracruz State, Mexico. Canine sera were assayed for T. gondii IgG antibodies by using the modif...

  20. BEHAVIORAL AND MEMORY CHANGES IN Mus musculus COINFECTED BY Toxocara canis AND Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Flávia Motta; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo; Lescano, Susana A. Zevallos; dos Santos, Sergio Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Several researchers have stated that parasites can alter the behavior of their hosts, in order to increase the transmission rate, principally when prey-predator relationships are a reliable way of infection transmission. The aim of this study was to verify the occurrence of changes in anxiety and short-term memory patterns in experimentally infected Mus musculus by Toxocara canis and/or Toxoplasma gondii. Forty male Mus musculus (Balb/c) eight-week-old were divided into four groups of 10 mice each. One group was infected with 300 eggs of Toxocara canis; a second group was submitted to infection with 10 cysts of Toxoplasma gondii; a third group was concomitantly infected with both parasites with the same inoculums and the last group was maintained without infection. The anxiety levels were evaluated using an elevated plus maze and an actometer; the short-term memory was determined by a two-way active avoidance equipment. The determination of anxiety levels were conducted 40 and 70 days after infection and the short-term memory was evaluated 140 days after infection. Mice chronically infected by Toxoplasma gondii showed impaired learning and short-term memory, but no significant differences were found in mice infected by Toxocara canis or concomitantly infected by Toxocara canis and Toxoplasma gondii when compared to non infected mice. PMID:25076438

  1. Acid-fast lipids are important structural components of oocyst walls of Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, and Eimeria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coccidia are protozoan parasites that cause significant human disease and are of major agricultural importance. Cryptosporidium spp.cause diarrhea in humans and animals, while congenital Toxoplasma infections causes blindness and death. Eimeria kills chickens, so all poultry feed contain antibioti...

  2. SEROEPIDEMIOLOGY OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII IN ZOO ANIMALS IN SELECTED ZOOS IN MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii infections in zoo animals are of interest because many captive animals die of clinical toxoplasmosis and because of the potential risk of exposure of children and elderly to T. gondii oocysts excreted by cats in the zoos. Seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in wild zoo felids, h...

  3. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in captive wild mammals and birds in Brazil.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study serum samples of 203 animals from different locations from zoos and breeding facilities from the north and northeast region of Brazil were analyzed for the presence of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies by the modified agglutination test (MAT) with a cutoff of 1:25. Of the sampled anima...

  4. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were determined in 167 mammals in 3 zoos in Mexico City, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Overall, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 89 (53.3%) of the 167 animals tested. Antibodies were found in 35 of 43 wild Felidae: 2 of 2 bobcats (Lynx rufus...

  5. Effects of ozone and UV radiation treatments on the infectivity of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinical toxoplasmosis in humans has been epidemiologically-linked to the consumption of drinking water contaminated by Toxoplasma gondii oocysts. We evaluated killing of T. gondii oocysts after ultraviolet (UV) or ozone treatments by bioassay in mice and/or cell culture. A 4-log inactivation of the...

  6. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii from free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) from Addis Adaba, Ethiopa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) is a good indicator of the environmental contamination with oocysts because chickens become infected mainly by feeding from ground/feed/soil contaminated with oocysts. The seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in 125 free-r...

  7. Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans and animals in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews clinical and asymptomatic Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans and other animals in the USA. Seroprevalence of T. gondii in humans and pigs is declining. Modes of transmission, epidemiology, and environmental contamination with oocysts on land and sea are discussed. ...

  8. Isolation and genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in the mongoose (Herpestes auropunctatus) in Grenada, West Indies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known of the genetic diversity and epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in wildlife in Caribbean Islands. Here, we investigated prevalence and genetic diversity of T. gondii in mongooses (Herpestes auropunctatus). During 2011 and 2012, 91 mongooses were trapped in different parts of...

  9. PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES TO TOXOPLASMA GONDII IN WOLVERINES FROM NUNAVUT, CANADA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii was determined in blood and tissue exudates recovered from the spleens of 41 wolverines (Gulo gulo) collected in Nunavut, Canada using a modified agglutination test (MAT). Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 17 (41.5%) of the 41 wolverines with MAT...

  10. Isolation and genetic characterization of toxoplasma gondii from striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) from Costa Rica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii infection in marine mammals is of interest because of mortality and mode of transmission. It has been suggested that marine mammals become infected with T. gondii oocysts washed from land to the sea. We report the isolation and genetic characterization of viable T. gondii from a st...

  11. Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Romania are carriers of Toxoplasma gondii but not Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Şuteu, Ovidiu; Mihalca, Andrei Daniel; Paştiu, Anamaria Ioana; Györke, Adriana; Matei, Ioana Adriana; Ionică, Angela; Balea, Anamaria; Oltean, Miruna; D'Amico, Gianluca; Sikó, Sándor Barabási; Ionescu, Dan; Gherman, Călin Mircea; Cozma, Vasile

    2014-07-01

    Brain samples from 182 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Romania were examined using a standard PCR technique. Results provide evidence of Toxoplasma gondii (11 foxes=6.0%) and Neospora caninum (1 fox=0.5%) DNA in red foxes from Romania. No coinfections were found.

  12. Genetic characterization of viable Toxoplasma gondii isolates from stray dogs from Giza, Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stray dogs are considered as sentinels in the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii because they are carnivores and eat variety of foods, including garbage. In the present study, tissues and sera of 51 stray dogs (Canis familiaris) from Giza, Egypt were examined for T. gondii infection. Sera were examin...

  13. Molecular diagnosis of toxoplasmosis: value of the buffy coat for the detection of circulating Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Capderou, Elodie; Bertini, Rose-Laurence; Bailly, Sébastien; Fricker-Hidalgo, Hélène; Varlet-Marie, Emmanuelle; Murat, Jean-Benjamin; Sterkers, Yvon; Touafek, Fériel; Bastien, Patrick; Pelloux, Hervé

    2015-08-01

    Early detection of Toxoplasma tachyzoites circulating in blood using PCR is recommended for immunosuppressed patients at high risk for disseminated toxoplasmosis. Using a toxoplasmosis mouse model, we show that the sensitivity of detection is higher using buffy coat isolated from a large blood volume than using whole blood for this molecular monitoring.

  14. Toxoplasma gondii infection in domestic ducks, free-range and caged chickens in southern China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is widely distributed in human and other animals including domestic poultry throughout the world, but little is known of the prevalence of T. gondii in chickens and ducks in People’s Republic of China. In the present study, antibodies to T. gondii were determined in 349 domestic du...

  15. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii among turkeys on family farms in the state of Northeastern Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii in turkeys and chickens on family farms in the semi-arid region of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. In order to do so, 204 sera samples from turkeys were analyzed using the Modified Agglutination T...

  16. Seroprevalence and isolation of viable Toxoplasma gondii from raptors in the southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raptors are good indicators of the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in the environment because they prey on small mammals and birds. These prey species are a major source of infection in felids, which shed the environmentally resistant oocysts. We assessed T. gondii infection in 281 opportunistically...

  17. Prevalence and risk factors of Toxoplasma gondii infection in meat products destined for human consumption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that is responsible for approximately 24% of all estimated deaths attributed to foodborne pathogens in the U.S. Human infection results from accidental ingestion of oocysts, from the environment, in water or on insufficiently washed produce or through consum...

  18. Posterior femoral translation in medial pivot total knee arthroplasty of posterior cruciate ligament retaining type

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Su Hyun; Cho, Hyung Lae; Lee, Soo Ho; Jin, Hong Ki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report clinical results and demonstrate posterior femoral translation (PFT) in medial pivot total knee arthroplasty (TKA) of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) retaining type. Materials and methods A prospective study was performed upon thirty consecutive subjects who were operated on with medial pivot TKA of PCL retaining type between March 2009 and March 2010 and had been followed up for at least 2 years. Clinically, the knee society knee score and function score were used. In full extension and active flexion lateral radiograph, anteroposterior (AP) condylar position and magnitude of PFT was determined. Results At last follow-up, the mean knee society knee score and function score improved significantly compared to preoperative scores. The AP condylar positions were consistently posterior to midline throughout the entire range of flexion. The PFTs averaged 0.31 (±0.12) of half length of tibial base plate and were greater in higher flexion cases (r = 0.56, p = 0.0012). There were no cases having either component migration or radiolucent line wider than 2 mm except for one case showing instability related to trauma. Conclusions In medial pivot TKA of PCL retaining type, clinical outcomes were satisfactory and posterior femoral translations were consistently observed during progressive flexions of knees at two- to three-year follow-up. PMID:24403754

  19. GNSS integer ambiguity validation based on posterior probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zemin; Bian, Shaofeng

    2015-10-01

    GNSS integer ambiguity validation is considered to be a challenge task for decades. Several kinds of validation tests are developed and widely used in these years, but theoretical basis is their weakness. Ambiguity validation theoretically is an issue of hypothesis test. In the frame of Bayesian hypothesis testing, posterior probability is the canonical standard that statistical decision should be based on. In this contribution, (i) we derive the posterior probability of the fixed ambiguity based on the Bayesian principle and modify it for practice ambiguity validation. (ii) The optimal property of the posterior probability test is proved based on an extended Neyman-Pearson lemma. Since validation failure rate is the issue users most concerned about, (iii) we derive the failure rate upper bound of the posterior probability test, so the user can use the posterior probability test either in the fixed posterior probability or in the fixed failure rate way. Simulated as well as real observed data are used for experimental validations. The results show that (i) the posterior probability test is the most effective within the R-ratio test, difference test, ellipsoidal integer aperture test and posterior probability test, (ii) the posterior probability test is computational efficient and (iii) the failure rate estimation for posterior probability test is useful.

  20. A brief history and overview of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Innes, E A

    2010-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii was discovered by scientists working in North Africa and Brazil around 100 years ago. The parasite has since been found to be capable of infecting all warm-blooded animals including humans making it one of the most successful parasitic organisms worldwide. The pathogenic potential of T. gondii was recognized in the 1920s and 1930s, in congenitally infected children presenting with the classic triad of symptoms, namely hydrocephalus, retinochoroiditis and encephalitis. In addition, around the same time T. gondii parasites were found to be associated with severe intraocular inflammation. In the 1980s, T. gondii emerged as a major cause of death in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, illustrating the importance of the immune system in controlling T. gondii infection. T. gondii was reported as a major cause of abortion in sheep in New Zealand in the 1950s, which raised questions about potential new transmission routes for the parasite. The discovery of the cat as the definitive host in the 1960s was a very important finding as it helped to complete our understanding of the parasite's life cycle, and the oocyst stage of T. gondii shed in the faeces of infected cats was found to be an important source of infection for many intermediate hosts and helped to explain infection in herbivorous animals and people with a vegetarian diet. In addition, this stage of the parasite was very robust and could survive in the environment, depending on the climatic conditions, for up to 12-18 months. Knowledge of the parasite's life cycle, transmission routes, risk groups and host immune responses has helped in the development of strategies to control the disease, reduce transmission of the parasite and limit environmental contamination.

  1. The Toxoplasma gondii Rhoptry Kinome Is Essential for Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Rommereim, Leah M.; Guevara, Rebekah B.; Falla, Alejandra; Hortua Triana, Miryam Andrea; Sun, Yanbo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT    Ingestion of the obligate intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes an acute infection that leads to chronic infection of the host. To facilitate the acute phase of the infection, T. gondii manipulates the host response by secreting rhoptry organelle proteins (ROPs) into host cells during its invasion. A few key ROP proteins with signatures of kinases or pseudokinases (ROPKs) act as virulence factors that enhance parasite survival against host gamma interferon-stimulated innate immunity. However, the roles of these and other ROPK proteins in establishing chronic infection have not been tested. Here, we deleted 26 ROPK gene loci encoding 31 unique ROPK proteins of type II T. gondii and show that numerous ROPK proteins influence the development of chronic infection. Cyst burdens were increased in the Δrop16 knockout strain or moderately reduced in 11 ROPK knockout strains. In contrast, deletion of ROP5, ROP17, ROP18, ROP35, or ROP38/29/19 (ROP38, ROP29, and ROP19) severely reduced cyst burdens. Δrop5 and Δrop18 knockout strains were less resistant to host immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and exhibited >100-fold-reduced virulence. ROP18 kinase activity and association with the parasitophorous vacuole membrane were necessary for resistance to host IRGs. The Δrop17 strain exhibited a >12-fold defect in virulence; however, virulence was not affected in the Δrop35 or Δrop38/29/19 strain. Resistance to host IRGs was not affected in the Δrop17, Δrop35, or Δrop38/29/19 strain. Collectively, these findings provide the first definitive evidence that the type II T. gondii ROPK proteome functions as virulence factors and facilitates additional mechanisms of host manipulation that are essential for chronic infection and transmission of T. gondii. PMID:27165797

  2. Sporulation and survival of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsay, D.S.; Collins, M.V.; Mitchell, S.M.; Cole, R.A.; Flick, G.J.; Wetch, C.N.; Lindquist, A.; Dubey, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    We have been collaborating since 1992 in studies on southern sea otters (Enhdyra lutris nereis) as part of a program to define factors, which may be responsible for limiting the growth of the southern sea otter population. We previously demonstrated Toxoplasma gondii in sea otters. We postulated that cat feces containing oocysts could be entering the marine environment through storm run-off or through municipal sewage since cat feces are often disposed down toilets by cat owners. The present study examined the sporulation of T. gondii oocysts in seawater and the survival of sporulated oocysts in seawater. Unsporulated oocysts were placed in 15 ppt artificial seawater, 32 ppt artificial seawater or 2% sulfuric acid (positive control) at 24 C in an incubator. Samples were examined daily for 3 days and development monitored by counting 100 oocysts from each sample. From 75 to 80% of the oocysts were sporulated by 3 days post-inoculation under all treatment conditions. Groups of 2 mice were fed 10,000 oocysts each from each of the 3 treatment groups. All inoculated mice developed toxoplasmosis indicating that oocysts were capable of sporulating in seawater. Survival of sporulated oocysts was examined by placing sporulated T. gondii oocysts in 15 ppt seawater at room temperature 22a??24 C (RT) or in a refrigerator kept at 4 C. Mice fed oocysts that had been stored at 4C or RT for 6 months became infected. These results indicate that T. gondii oocysts can sporulate and remain viable in seawater for several months.

  3. Alteration of leukotriene release by macrophages ingesting Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Locksley, R M; Fankhauser, J; Henderson, W R

    1985-01-01

    Mouse resident peritoneal macrophages incubated with ionophore A23187 or opsonized zymosan released leukotrienes (LT) B4 and C4 (LTB4 and LTC4) and LTC4 and LTD4, respectively. In contrast, incubation with Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan, led to the formation of 11-, 12-, and 15-hydroxyicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), together with an unidentified compound, designated compound X. Each of these compounds incorporated [3H]arachidonic acid from the macrophage during phagocytosis of T. gondii. Compound X migrated immediately prior to 15-HETE by reverse-phase HPLC and was distinct from authentic monoHETE, monohydroperoxyicosatetraenoic acid (mono-HPETE), and dihydroxyicosatetraenoic acid (diHETE) standards. The generation of compound X by macrophages correlated with the extent of phagocytosis of T. gondii and with intracellular survival of the organisms. Prior antibody-coating of T. gondii or activation of macrophages, either of which inhibited survival and replication of ingested organisms, was associated with production of LTD4 but not compound X. Killed organisms also stimulated LTD4 release only. Although T. gondii concentrated arachidonic acid, they did not metabolize the compound to identifiable lipoxygenase products. Preincubation of macrophages with the relative lipoxygenase inhibitors nordihydroguaiaretic acid or 5,8,11,14-icosatetraynoic acid inhibited the formation of compound X. The absence of leukotriene production by macrophages ingesting T. gondii may explain the relative lack of a neutrophil inflammatory response in diseases due to obligate intracellular organisms. Alternatively, compound X may have functional activities that might mediate some of the host responses to cellular parasitism. PMID:2995993

  4. The Apoptotic Role of Metacaspase in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Li, Muzi; Wang, Hui; Liu, Jing; Hao, Pan; Ma, Lei; Liu, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a major opportunistic pathogen that spreads in a range of animal species and human beings. Quite a few characterizations of apoptosis have been identified in T. gondii treated with apoptosis inducers, but the molecular mechanisms of the pathway are not clearly understood. Metacaspases are caspase-like cysteine proteases that can be found in plants, fungi, and protozoa in which caspases are absent. Metacaspases are multifunctional proteases involved in apoptosis-like cell death, insoluble protein aggregate clearance, and cell proliferation. To investigate whether T. gondii metacaspase (TgMCA) is involved in the apoptosis of the parasites, we generated TgMCA mutant strains. Western blot analysis indicated that the autoproteolytic processing of TgMCA was the same as that for metacaspases of some other species. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) showed that TgMCA was dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and relocated to the nucleus when the parasites were exposed to the extracellular environment, which indicated the execution of its function in the nucleus. The number of apoptosis parasites was significantly diminished in the TgMCA knockout strain and increased in the TgMCA overexpression strain after treatment with extracellular buffer, as determined by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The lack of TgMCA did not affect the parasite propagation in vitro and virulence in vivo, suggesting that it is probably redundant in parasite propagation. But overexpression of TgMCA reduced the intracellular parasites growth in vitro. The TgMCA knockout strain showed more viability in extracellular buffer compared to the parental and overexpression lines. In this study, we demonstrated that TgMCA contributes to the apoptosis of T. gondii. PMID:26834715

  5. Toxoplasma gondii prevalence in Israeli crows and Griffon vultures.

    PubMed

    Salant, H; Hamburger, J; King, R; Baneth, G

    2013-01-16

    A cross-sectional Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence study was performed on free ranging crows (Corvus cornis, Corvus monedula, Corvus splendens) and Griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus) from Israel in order to assess exposure to this pathogen in scavenger birds that feed on animal carcasses and their possible role in the epidemiology of toxoplasmosis. Using the modified agglutination test (MAT) with a cutoff titer of 1:25, 52 of 122 crows (42.6%) and 40 of 101 Griffon vultures (39.6%) were found to be T. gondii seropositive. Crow T. gondii seroprevalence was significantly higher in northern areas of Israel (p=0.007) where annual precipitation is higher and annual summer maximum temperatures are lower than in the drier and warmer south. Seroprevalence in crows was positively associated with higher human population densities possibly related to the increased cat population in these areas. PCR analysis of brain extracts from crows resulted in the detection of T. gondii DNA in 1 seropositive crow from northern Israel. Genetic analysis of DNA from the positive crow brain confirmed infection with T. gondii type 2 using a multiplex multilocus nested PCR-RFLP (Mn-PCR-RFLP) of the SAG1, 5-3' SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, C22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico loci. The high T. gondii seroprevalence in these bird species suggests that infected carrion may be responsible for widespread infection of carcass scavenger birds which may further transmit infection to other carnivorous intermediate hosts or feline definitive hosts when consumed post-mortally.

  6. Spatial epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in goats in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Djokic, Vitomir; Klun, Ivana; Musella, Vincenzo; Rinaldi, Laura; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Sotiraki, Smaragda; Djurkovic-Djakovic, Olgica

    2014-05-01

    A major risk factor for Toxoplasma gondii infection is consumption of undercooked meat. Increasing demand for goat meat is likely to promote the role of this animal for human toxoplasmosis. As there are virtually no data on toxoplasmosis in goats in Serbia, we undertook a cross-sectional serological study, including prediction modelling using geographical information systems (GIS). Sera from 431 goats reared in 143 households/farms throughout Serbia, sampled between January 2010 and September 2011, were examined for T. gondii antibodies by a modified agglutination test. Seroprevalence was 73.3% at the individual level and 84.6% at the farm level. Risk factor analysis showed above two-fold higher risk of infection for goats used for all purposes compared to dairy goats (P = 0.012), almost seven-fold higher risk for goats kept as sole species versus those kept with other animals (P = 0.001) and a two-fold lower risk for goats introduced from outside the farm compared to those raised on the farm (P = 0.027). Moreover, households/farms located in centre-eastern Serbia were found to be less often infected than those in northern Serbia (P = 0.004). The risk factor analysis was fully supported by spatial analysis based on a GIS database containing data on origin, serology, land cover, elevation, meteorology and a spatial prediction map based on kriging analysis, which showed western Serbia as the area most likely for finding goats positive for T. gondii and centre-eastern Serbia as the least likely. In addition, rainfall favoured seropositivity, whereas temperature, humidity and elevation did not. PMID:24893025

  7. Epidemiological study of Toxoplasma gondii infection in ovine breeding.

    PubMed

    Zedda, M T; Rolesu, S; Pau, S; Rosati, I; Ledda, S; Satta, G; Patta, C; Masala, G

    2010-12-01

    An outbreak of toxoplasmosis occurring in a typical farm of 524 ovines was monitored for 1 year after the occurrence of 31 abortions. Abortion events involved 7.2% of 430 pregnant sheep. Presence of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in sheep sera was investigated by the indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT). A total of 422 ewes were bled four times during the year, and an epidemiological analysis was performed on all serology data collected in this subgroup. The prevalence of IgG positives ranged from 31.52% (133/422) at the first sampling to 62.56% (264/422) at the fourth sampling. Incidence of IgG antibodies was 38.75% at the second sampling, 14.92% at the third and 29.28% at the fourth sampling. At the beginning of the study, prevalence was 70.7% in primiparous sheep and 20.9% in sheep older than 5 years; at the third sampling, prevalence was stable at 70% in pluriparous sheep. The mean prevalence of IgM antibodies was 14.87%. A total of 147 out of all 524 ovines of the flock tested positive for IgM in more than one sampling. After an initial positivity, 60 sheep tested negative for IgG at the following serological controls (4 between the first and the second sampling, 30 between the second and the third and 28 between the third and the fourth sampling). One stray cat was positive for IgG, with a titre of 1 : 320. Moreover, one of the farmers was also positive, with a titre of 1 : 160 for IgG. A positive PCR result for T. gondii DNA was also observed in aliquots of grain and pellets taken from feed stocks amassed inside the sheds without protection, suggesting that an adequate management of the farm might be useful, if not essential, for controlling T. gondii outbreaks in ovine flocks.

  8. Shear Forces Enhance Toxoplasma gondii Tachyzoite Motility on Vascular Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Harker, Katherine S.; Jivan, Elizabeth; McWhorter, Frances Y.; Liu, Wendy F.; Lodoen, Melissa B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii is a highly successful parasite that infects approximately one-third of the human population and can cause fatal disease in immunocompromised individuals. Systemic parasite dissemination to organs such as the brain and eye is critical to pathogenesis. T. gondii can disseminate via the circulation, and both intracellular and extracellular modes of transport have been proposed. However, the processes by which extracellular tachyzoites adhere to and migrate across vascular endothelium under the conditions of rapidly flowing blood remain unknown. We used microfluidics and time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to examine the interactions between extracellular T. gondii and primary human endothelial cells under conditions of physiologic shear stress. Remarkably, tachyzoites adhered to and glided on human vascular endothelium under shear stress conditions. Compared to static conditions, shear stress enhanced T. gondii helical gliding, resulting in a significantly greater displacement, and increased the percentage of tachyzoites that invaded or migrated across the endothelium. The intensity of the shear forces (from 0.5 to 10 dynes/cm2) influenced both initial and sustained adhesion to endothelium. By examining tachyzoites deficient in the T. gondii adhesion protein MIC2, we found that MIC2 contributed to initial adhesion but was not required for adhesion strengthening. These data suggest that under fluidic conditions, T. gondii adhesion to endothelium may be mediated by a multistep cascade of interactions that is governed by unique combinations of adhesion molecules. This work provides novel information about tachyzoite interactions with vascular endothelium and contributes to our understanding of T. gondii dissemination in the infected host. PMID:24692639

  9. Experimental Toxoplasma gondii oocyst infections in turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Bangoura, B; Zöller, B; Koethe, M; Ludewig, M; Pott, S; Fehlhaber, K; Straubinger, R K; Daugschies, A

    2013-09-23

    Toxoplasma (T.) gondii is a protozoan parasite with a broad range of intermediate hosts. Humans are often infected by ingestion of tissue cysts in raw or undercooked meat or meat products. Turkeys as food-producing animals can also serve as intermediate hosts. The aim of the present study was to investigate occurrence and predilection sites of T. gondii infection in turkeys after oral infection with oocysts. Experimental infections with different doses of T. gondii oocysts were performed in 36 turkeys to mimic natural infection. Systemic distribution of parasitic stages was investigated by screening 14 different tissues including the edible tissues heart, liver, thigh, breast and drumstick muscle. Parasite detection was based on a conventional nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Animals were sacrificed 6-12 weeks after infection. Results demonstrated parasite spreading over the whole organism after oral infection by oocysts. Most frequently affected tissues were brain (47.2% of all brains were positive for T. gondii) and thigh muscle (25.0% positive samples). Other muscles were regularly T. gondii-positive, all other sampled tissues were positive at least once. Thus, edible tissues are one of the predilection sites of T. gondii in turkeys which renders raw or undercooked turkey meat a potential risk for parasite transmission to humans. Data were compared to results from previous parenteral turkey infections with tachyzoites. With the exception of brain, liver and breast muscle affection, no significant differences were observed between both infection routes. Both infection models could be used for research purposes with certain advantages and disadvantages.

  10. The Apoptotic Role of Metacaspase in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Li, Muzi; Wang, Hui; Liu, Jing; Hao, Pan; Ma, Lei; Liu, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a major opportunistic pathogen that spreads in a range of animal species and human beings. Quite a few characterizations of apoptosis have been identified in T. gondii treated with apoptosis inducers, but the molecular mechanisms of the pathway are not clearly understood. Metacaspases are caspase-like cysteine proteases that can be found in plants, fungi, and protozoa in which caspases are absent. Metacaspases are multifunctional proteases involved in apoptosis-like cell death, insoluble protein aggregate clearance, and cell proliferation. To investigate whether T. gondii metacaspase (TgMCA) is involved in the apoptosis of the parasites, we generated TgMCA mutant strains. Western blot analysis indicated that the autoproteolytic processing of TgMCA was the same as that for metacaspases of some other species. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) showed that TgMCA was dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and relocated to the nucleus when the parasites were exposed to the extracellular environment, which indicated the execution of its function in the nucleus. The number of apoptosis parasites was significantly diminished in the TgMCA knockout strain and increased in the TgMCA overexpression strain after treatment with extracellular buffer, as determined by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The lack of TgMCA did not affect the parasite propagation in vitro and virulence in vivo, suggesting that it is probably redundant in parasite propagation. But overexpression of TgMCA reduced the intracellular parasites growth in vitro. The TgMCA knockout strain showed more viability in extracellular buffer compared to the parental and overexpression lines. In this study, we demonstrated that TgMCA contributes to the apoptosis of T. gondii. PMID:26834715

  11. A brief history and overview of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Innes, E A

    2010-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii was discovered by scientists working in North Africa and Brazil around 100 years ago. The parasite has since been found to be capable of infecting all warm-blooded animals including humans making it one of the most successful parasitic organisms worldwide. The pathogenic potential of T. gondii was recognized in the 1920s and 1930s, in congenitally infected children presenting with the classic triad of symptoms, namely hydrocephalus, retinochoroiditis and encephalitis. In addition, around the same time T. gondii parasites were found to be associated with severe intraocular inflammation. In the 1980s, T. gondii emerged as a major cause of death in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, illustrating the importance of the immune system in controlling T. gondii infection. T. gondii was reported as a major cause of abortion in sheep in New Zealand in the 1950s, which raised questions about potential new transmission routes for the parasite. The discovery of the cat as the definitive host in the 1960s was a very important finding as it helped to complete our understanding of the parasite's life cycle, and the oocyst stage of T. gondii shed in the faeces of infected cats was found to be an important source of infection for many intermediate hosts and helped to explain infection in herbivorous animals and people with a vegetarian diet. In addition, this stage of the parasite was very robust and could survive in the environment, depending on the climatic conditions, for up to 12-18 months. Knowledge of the parasite's life cycle, transmission routes, risk groups and host immune responses has helped in the development of strategies to control the disease, reduce transmission of the parasite and limit environmental contamination. PMID:19744303

  12. Multisystemic toxoplasmosis associated with a type II-like Toxoplasma gondii strain in a New Zealand fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri) from New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Donahoe, Shannon L; Rose, Karrie; Slapeta, Jan

    2014-09-15

    We report the first confirmed case of toxoplasmosis in an Australian pinniped. Presence of Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected in the brain of a free-ranging subadult New Zealand fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri) with nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis, hypophysitis, posterior uveitis, retrobulbar cellulitis, and myocarditis associated with protozoan cysts and tachyzoites. The emaciated seal stranded moribund on a beach in northern Sydney in New South Wales. Histopathology coupled with specific immunohistochemistry and PCR assays confirmed the presence of T. gondii. The T. gondii sample (NZfs8825) identified in this study has an identical genotype as the type II (ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype #1) based on the direct sequencing and virtual RFLP of multilocus DNA markers including SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico. Direct sequencing of T. gondii B1 DNA marker from the T. gondii sample (NZfs8825) identified a type II-like strain, based on presence of non-archetypal B1 gene polymorphisms previously reported as unique to Australia. This study suggests that T. gondii oocysts originating from mainland Australia, which has a large population of feral cats, may act as a disease threat to native marine fauna. Therefore, emerging toxoplasmosis in the Arctic has a relevant parallel in the Southern Ocean within Australian waters with yet unknown relevance to Antarctica. PMID:25123611

  13. Multisystemic toxoplasmosis associated with a type II-like Toxoplasma gondii strain in a New Zealand fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri) from New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Donahoe, Shannon L; Rose, Karrie; Slapeta, Jan

    2014-09-15

    We report the first confirmed case of toxoplasmosis in an Australian pinniped. Presence of Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected in the brain of a free-ranging subadult New Zealand fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri) with nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis, hypophysitis, posterior uveitis, retrobulbar cellulitis, and myocarditis associated with protozoan cysts and tachyzoites. The emaciated seal stranded moribund on a beach in northern Sydney in New South Wales. Histopathology coupled with specific immunohistochemistry and PCR assays confirmed the presence of T. gondii. The T. gondii sample (NZfs8825) identified in this study has an identical genotype as the type II (ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype #1) based on the direct sequencing and virtual RFLP of multilocus DNA markers including SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico. Direct sequencing of T. gondii B1 DNA marker from the T. gondii sample (NZfs8825) identified a type II-like strain, based on presence of non-archetypal B1 gene polymorphisms previously reported as unique to Australia. This study suggests that T. gondii oocysts originating from mainland Australia, which has a large population of feral cats, may act as a disease threat to native marine fauna. Therefore, emerging toxoplasmosis in the Arctic has a relevant parallel in the Southern Ocean within Australian waters with yet unknown relevance to Antarctica.

  14. Toxoplasma gondii Infections Alter GABAergic Synapses and Signaling in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Justin M.; Carrillo, Gabriela L.; Su, Jianmin; Lindsay, David S.; Blader, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During infections with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is utilized as a carbon source for parasite metabolism and also to facilitate parasite dissemination by stimulating dendritic-cell motility. The best-recognized function for GABA, however, is its role in the nervous system as an inhibitory neurotransmitter that regulates the flow and timing of excitatory neurotransmission. When this pathway is altered, seizures develop. Human toxoplasmosis patients suffer from seizures, suggesting that Toxoplasma interferes with GABA signaling in the brain. Here, we show that while excitatory glutamatergic presynaptic proteins appeared normal, infection with type II ME49 Toxoplasma tissue cysts led to global changes in the distribution of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), a key enzyme that catalyzes GABA synthesis in the brain. Alterations in GAD67 staining were not due to decreased expression but rather to a change from GAD67 clustering at presynaptic termini to a more diffuse localization throughout the neuropil. Consistent with a loss of GAD67 from the synaptic terminals, Toxoplasma-infected mice develop spontaneous seizures and are more susceptible to drugs that induce seizures by antagonizing GABA receptors. Interestingly, GABAergic protein mislocalization and the response to seizure-inducing drugs were observed in mice infected with type II ME49 but not type III CEP strain parasites, indicating a role for a polymorphic parasite factor(s) in regulating GABAergic synapses. Taken together, these data support a model in which seizures and other neurological complications seen in Toxoplasma-infected individuals are due, at least in part, to changes in GABAergic signaling. PMID:26507232

  15. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii in water by an immunomagnetic separation method targeting the sporocysts.

    PubMed

    Dumètre, Aurélien; Dardé, Marie-Laure

    2007-09-01

    An immunomagnetic separation (IMS) method was developed to detect Toxoplasma gondii in fresh waters by using the monoclonal antibody 4B6 targeting the sporocyst wall of T. gondii, Hammondia hammondi, Hammondia heydorni, and Neospora caninum. Water concentrates obtained by filtering 10- to 20-l samples samples were spiked with Toxoplasma oocysts, sonicated to release the sporocysts, and analyzed by IMS-4B6. Mean sporocyst recoveries were 74.5 +/- 5.3% in drinking water, 30.6 +/- 2.4 and 37.1 +/- 3.2% in surface waters, and 81.6 +/- 2.1% in IMS buffer. Then, this IMS method was integrated in a multistep procedure (i.e., filtration, IMS, immunofluorescence and autofluorescence) to detect Toxoplasma in unspiked and spiked water samples (10-30 l) of various qualities. Sporocyst recoveries ranged from 14.4 to 44.7% in drinking water samples spiked with 1-10 oocysts/l, and from 17.8 to 32.5% in surface water samples spiked with 10 oocysts/l. Sporocysts were not detected in 25 unspiked water samples. A sporocyst-like structure was seen in one of these unspiked samples, but its coccidian nature could not be proved by three polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods targeting sequences of coccidian small and large subunit rRNA genes and Toxoplasma repetitive elements. In conclusion, IMS-4B6 is relevant for the detection of Toxoplasma in water generating small concentrates (<1 ml). Due to 4B6 cross-reactions, a PCR would be useful to further characterize coccidian sporocysts found microscopically.

  16. Suggestive evidence for Darwinian Selection against asparagine-linked glycans of Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Bushkin, G Guy; Ratner, Daniel M; Cui, Jike; Banerjee, Sulagna; Duraisingh, Manoj T; Jennings, Cameron V; Dvorin, Jeffrey D; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Robertson, Seth D; Steffen, Martin; O'Keefe, Barry R; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2010-02-01

    We are interested in asparagine-linked glycans (N-glycans) of Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii, because their N-glycan structures have been controversial and because we hypothesize that there might be selection against N-glycans in nucleus-encoded proteins that must pass through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) prior to threading into the apicoplast. In support of our hypothesis, we observed the following. First, in protists with apicoplasts, there is extensive secondary loss of Alg enzymes that make lipid-linked precursors to N-glycans. Theileria makes no N-glycans, and Plasmodium makes a severely truncated N-glycan precursor composed of one or two GlcNAc residues. Second, secreted proteins of Toxoplasma, which uses its own 10-sugar precursor (Glc(3)Man(5)GlcNAc(2)) and the host 14-sugar precursor (Glc(3)Man(9)GlcNAc(2)) to make N-glycans, have very few sites for N glycosylation, and there is additional selection against N-glycan sites in its apicoplast-targeted proteins. Third, while the GlcNAc-binding Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II labels ER, rhoptries, and surface of plasmodia, there is no apicoplast labeling. Similarly, the antiretroviral lectin cyanovirin-N, which binds to N-glycans of Toxoplasma, labels ER and rhoptries, but there is no apicoplast labeling. We conclude that possible selection against N-glycans in protists with apicoplasts occurs by eliminating N-glycans (Theileria), reducing their length (Plasmodium), or reducing the number of N-glycan sites (Toxoplasma). In addition, occupation of N-glycan sites is markedly reduced in apicoplast proteins versus some secretory proteins in both Plasmodium and Toxoplasma.

  17. Differential Effects of Three Canonical Toxoplasma Strains on Gene Expression in Human Neuroepithelial Cells ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianchun; Jones-Brando, Lorraine; Talbot, C. Conover; Yolken, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Strain type is one of the key factors suspected to play a role in determining the outcome of Toxoplasma infection. In this study, we examined the transcriptional profile of human neuroepithelioma cells in response to representative strains of Toxoplasma by using microarray analysis to characterize the strain-specific host cell response. The study of neural cells is of interest in light of the ability of Toxoplasma to infect the brain and to establish persistent infection within the central nervous system. We found that the extents of the expression changes varied considerably among the three strains. Neuroepithelial cells infected with Toxoplasma type I exhibited the highest level of differential gene expression, whereas type II-infected cells had a substantially smaller number of genes which were differentially expressed. Cells infected with type III exhibited intermediate effects on gene expression. The three strains also differed in the individual genes and gene pathways which were altered following cellular infection. For example, gene ontology (GO) analysis indicated that type I infection largely affects genes related to the central nervous system, while type III infection largely alters genes which affect nucleotide metabolism; type II infection does not alter the expression of a clearly defined set of genes. Moreover, Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) suggests that the three lineages differ in the ability to manipulate their host; e.g., they employ different strategies to avoid, deflect, or subvert host defense mechanisms. These observed differences may explain some of the variation in the neurobiological effects of different strains of Toxoplasma on infected individuals. PMID:21149591

  18. RNA Extraction Methods for Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time PCR and Microarray Analysis of Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of infectious oocyst forms of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium spp. to resist disinfection treatments and cause disease may have significant public health implications. Currently, little is known about oocyst-specific factors involved during host cell invasion p...

  19. RNA Extraction Methods for Real-Time PCR and Microarray Analyses of Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts - 2nd Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of infectious oocyst forms of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium spp. to resist disinfection treatments and cause disease may have significant public health implications. Currently, little is known about oocyst-specific factors involved during host cell invasion pr...

  20. Evaluation of Four RNA Extraction Methods for Gene Expression Analyses of Cryptosporidium parvum and Toxoplasma gondii Oocys

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii are important coccidian parasites that have caused waterborne and foodborne disease outbreaks worldwide. Techniques like subtractive hybridization, microarrays, and quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction (...

  1. Drinking water source and human Toxoplasma gondii infection in the United States: A cross-sectional analysis of NHANES data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxoplasma gondii imparts a considerable burden to public health. Human toxoplasmosis can be life-threatening in immunocompromised individuals, has been associated with psychiatric disorders, and can cause severe congenital pathologies, spontaneous abortion, or stillbirth. Enviro...

  2. Globally diverse Toxoplasma gondii isolates comprise six major clades originating from a small number of distinct ancestral lineages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marked phenotypic variation characterizes isolates of Toxoplasma gondii, a ubiquitous zoonotic parasite that serves as an important experimental model for studying Apicomplexans. Progress in identifying the heritable basis for clinically and epidemiologically significant differences require a stabl...

  3. Using Quantitative Reverse Transcriptase PCR and Cell Culture Plaque Assays to Determine Resistance of Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts to Chemical Sanitizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii oocysts are highly resistant to many chemical sanitizers. Current methods used to determine oocyst infectivity have relied exclusively on mouse, chicken, and feline bioassays. Although considered gold standards, they only provide a qualitative assessment of oocyst infectivity. I...

  4. Evaluation and management of posterior ankle pain in dancers.

    PubMed

    Luk, Pamela; Thordarson, David; Charlton, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Posterior ankle pain is a common complaint in dancers. There are multiple structures in the posterior ankle that have the potential to be the source of pain. The objective of this article is to review several of the most common causes of posterior ankle pain: peroneal tendon subluxation, posterior impingement syndrome secondary to a painful os trigonum, posterior talus osteochondritis dissecans, flexor hallucis longus tendinopathy, and posterior tibial tendinopathy. For dancers, we offer typical clinical presentations of these disorders to increase awareness and provide guidance regarding when to seek professional medical attention. For medical personnel who are responsible for optimizing dancers' health and training, we include a discussion of pertinent physical exam findings, diagnostic imaging options, non-operative and operative management, as well as surgical suggestions and postoperative rehabilitation guidelines.

  5. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy in a case of late-onset eclampsia].

    PubMed

    Castrillo-Sanz, Ana; Mendoza, Amelia; Gutiérrez-Ríos, Raúl; Zamora, M Isabel; Morollón, Noemí; Rodríguez-Sanz, M Fernanda; Duarte, Jacinto

    2013-08-01

    Introduccion. El sindrome de encefalopatia posterior reversible (SEPR) es un sindrome clinico-radiologico de presentacion aguda o subaguda que se caracteriza por la presencia de cefalea, vomitos, crisis epilepticas, trastornos visuales y alteracion del nivel de conciencia asociado a lesiones localizadas fundamentalmente en la sustancia blanca de regiones posteriores cerebrales. Caso clinico. Mujer de 32 años que desarrollo un SEPR en el periodo posparto secundario a eclampsia tardia. La paciente presento 10 dias despues del parto un cuadro clinico consistente en cefalea, crisis epilepticas, ceguera y deterioro del nivel de conciencia. El estudio de imagen con resonancia magnetica confirmo la afectacion de la sustancia blanca de predominio posterior. Conclusiones. Aunque la eclampsia es una entidad tipica del embarazo y puerperio inmediato, es necesario recordar que tambien puede producirse de forma tardia tras el parto y que puede ser la causa de otros sindromes, como el SEPR. Aunque en estos casos el pronostico suele ser favorable, el tratamiento debe ser precoz, efectuando un rapido control de la tension arterial y las convulsiones con el fin de evitar un daño cerebral permanente. Es necesario considerar siempre este sindrome en mujeres con crisis epilepticas u otros sintomas neurologicos durante el posparto.

  6. Iodine-125 radiation of posterior uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S.

    1987-12-01

    Twenty-eight cases of posterior choroidal melanoma were treated with iodine-125 in gold eye plaques. Eleven cases were located within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve (group A), nine were within 3.0 mm of the fovea (group B), and eight were within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve and fovea (group C). The mean follow-up of group A was 46.3 months; group B, 25.5 months; and group C, 42.7 months. Complications included macular edema, cataract and tumor growth. Visual acuity remained within two lines of that tested preoperatively for 4 of 11 patients in group A, 4 of 9 in group B, and 5 of 8 in group C. These results with iodine-125 suggest it as an appropriate treatment for patients with choroidal melanoma located near optic nerve and/or macula.

  7. Posterior Cruciate Ligament: Focus on Conflicting Issues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Seuk

    2013-01-01

    There is little consensus on how to optimally reconstruct the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the natural history of injured PCL is also unclear. The graft material (autograft vs. allograft), the type of tibial fixation (tibial inlay vs. transtibial tunnel), the femoral tunnel position within the femoral footprint (isometric, central, or eccentric), and the number of bundles in the reconstruction (1 bundle vs. 2 bundles) are among the many decisions that a surgeon must make in a PCL reconstruction. In addition, there is a paucity of information on rehabilitation after reconstruction of the PCL and posterolateral structures. This article focused on the conflicting issues regarding the PCL, and the scientific rationales behind some critical points are discussed. PMID:24340144

  8. Paediatric intrasubstance posterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Scott, Chloe E H; Murray, Alastair W

    2011-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 4-year-old boy who sustained an intrasubstance posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear whist trampolining. He was managed non-operatively with return to full function by 8 months. A high index of suspicion is required when assessing paediatric hyperflexion/extension injuries at the knee as ligamentous injury may occur without osteochondral fracture and may be missed on routine radiographs. Early MRI can identify such injuries in addition to osteochondral avulsions which are often amenable to acute internal fixation. In the case of paediatric intrasubstance PCL tears, it appears that non-operative management yields a good functional outcome in the short term in the skeletally immature.

  9. Posterior cruciate ligament: focus on conflicting issues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Jung, Young Bok

    2013-12-01

    There is little consensus on how to optimally reconstruct the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the natural history of injured PCL is also unclear. The graft material (autograft vs. allograft), the type of tibial fixation (tibial inlay vs. transtibial tunnel), the femoral tunnel position within the femoral footprint (isometric, central, or eccentric), and the number of bundles in the reconstruction (1 bundle vs. 2 bundles) are among the many decisions that a surgeon must make in a PCL reconstruction. In addition, there is a paucity of information on rehabilitation after reconstruction of the PCL and posterolateral structures. This article focused on the conflicting issues regarding the PCL, and the scientific rationales behind some critical points are discussed.

  10. Posterior restorations--a clinical view.

    PubMed

    Jedynakiewicz, N M; Martin, N

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the state-of-the-art in the direct restoration of posterior teeth. The existing paradigms for the management of caries are questioned and some existing methods of cavity preparation are reviewed. Dental restorations need to be durable but able to adapt to a changing environment brought about by wear of the adjacent tooth substance and by fatigue processes within the tooth itself. The wear of restorative materials needs to be matched to that of the tooth, otherwise differential loss of either the restorative material or the enamel may destabilize the occlusion. Esthetic instability due to natural darkening of the tooth with age, punctuated by clinical intervention with bleaching procedures, adds a further dimension to the concept of a permanent restoration. Clinical methods that minimize the disruptive effects of dental restorations upon the remaining tooth structure are a continuing challenge.

  11. Hemifacial spasm and posterior auricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Kiziltan, M; Sahin, R; Uzun, N; Kiziltan, G

    2006-09-01

    We aimed to investigate to which extent posterior auricular muscle (PAM) was affected and whether it contributed to the reflex activity in hemifacial spasm (HFS) patients. 19 HFS patients' spasm activities were recorded from facial muscles. Spasm activity of PAM was recorded synchronously on the symptomatic side in all patients. Lateral spread of blink reflex to orbicularis oris and PAMs were recorded in all but two patients. Botulinum toxin was applied to the PAM with the 14 patients presenting tinnitus, "clicking" or a "ticking" sound on the sane side and other positive auricular symptoms. After treatment, there was symptomatic improvement in 9 of 14 patients. The patients presenting with auricular symptoms and showing spasm activity in their PAMs can be thought as a candidate for botulinum toxin treatment scheme.

  12. Arthroscopic Reverse Remplissage for Posterior Instability.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Chad D; Hanzlik, Shane R; Pearson, Sara E; Caldwell, Paul E

    2016-02-01

    Posterior shoulder dislocation is an unusual injury often associated with electrical shock or seizure. As with anterior instability, patients frequently present with an impaction injury to the anterior aspect of the humeral head known as a "reverse Hill-Sachs lesion." The treatment of this bony defect is controversial, and multiple surgical procedures to fill the defect in an effort to decrease recurrence have been described. Most of the reports have focused on an open approach using variations of lesser tuberosity and subscapularis transfers, bone allograft, and even arthroplasty to assist with persistent instability. We advocate an arthroscopic technique that involves a suture anchor-based distal tenodesis of the subscapularis tendon or a reverse remplissage procedure. PMID:27073776

  13. Arthroscopic Reverse Remplissage for Posterior Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Chad D.; Hanzlik, Shane R.; Pearson, Sara E.; Caldwell, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior shoulder dislocation is an unusual injury often associated with electrical shock or seizure. As with anterior instability, patients frequently present with an impaction injury to the anterior aspect of the humeral head known as a “reverse Hill-Sachs lesion.” The treatment of this bony defect is controversial, and multiple surgical procedures to fill the defect in an effort to decrease recurrence have been described. Most of the reports have focused on an open approach using variations of lesser tuberosity and subscapularis transfers, bone allograft, and even arthroplasty to assist with persistent instability. We advocate an arthroscopic technique that involves a suture anchor–based distal tenodesis of the subscapularis tendon or a reverse remplissage procedure. PMID:27073776

  14. Bladder neck incompetence at posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2015-01-01

    The finding of an incompetent bladder neck (BN) at the time of posterior urethroplasty will necessarily exacerbate the already difficult situation. In such cases the aim of the treatment is not only to restore urethral continuity by end-to-end urethral anastomosis, but also to restore the function of the BN to maintain urinary continence. Fortunately, the incidence of incompetence of the BN at posterior urethroplasty is uncommon, usually ≈4.5%. It seems that pelvic fracture-related BN injuries, in contrast to urethral injuries which result from a shearing force, are due to direct injury by the sharp edge of the fractured and displaced pubic bone. The risk of injuries to the BN is greater in children, in patients with a fracture involving both superior and inferior pubic rami on the same side, and in those managed initially by primary realignment. An incompetent BN is suspected by finding an open rectangular BN on cystography, and a fixedly open BN on suprapubic cystoscopy. An incompetent BN can be treated either subsequent to or concomitant with the urethral repair, according to whether a perineal or a perineo-abdominal urethroplasty is used, respectively. Several options have been reported to treat pelvic fracture-related BN incompetence, including reconstructing the BN, forming a new sphincter by tubularisation of a rectangular flap of the anterior bladder wall, and mechanical occlusion by an artificial sphincter or collagen injection. Reconstruction of the BN by the Young-Dees-Leadbetter∗∗ procedure probably provides the most successful results. PMID:26019982

  15. Simultaneous correction of functional posterior cross bite and midline shift

    PubMed Central

    Arvinth, R.; Rana, Shailendra Singh; Duggal, Ritu; Kharbanda, Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent cause of functional posterior crossbite is the reduction in width of the maxillary dental arch. This posterior crossbite is associated with anterior crowding which is presented as an infrapositioned canine or a palatally positioned lateral incisor on one side; this leads to an upper midline shift toward the crowded side. The present case report shows the management of posterior crossbite with functional shift and upper midline shift simultaneously without adverse side effects. In this case, rapid maxillary expansion along with fixed appliance is used to correct posterior crossbite with the upper dental midline shift using reciprocal action of elastic transseptal fibers.

  16. Simultaneous correction of functional posterior cross bite and midline shift

    PubMed Central

    Arvinth, R.; Rana, Shailendra Singh; Duggal, Ritu; Kharbanda, Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent cause of functional posterior crossbite is the reduction in width of the maxillary dental arch. This posterior crossbite is associated with anterior crowding which is presented as an infrapositioned canine or a palatally positioned lateral incisor on one side; this leads to an upper midline shift toward the crowded side. The present case report shows the management of posterior crossbite with functional shift and upper midline shift simultaneously without adverse side effects. In this case, rapid maxillary expansion along with fixed appliance is used to correct posterior crossbite with the upper dental midline shift using reciprocal action of elastic transseptal fibers. PMID:27630513

  17. Diagnostics for insufficiencies of posterior calculations in Bayesian signal inference.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Sebastian; Oppermann, Niels; Ensslin, Torsten A

    2013-11-01

    We present an error-diagnostic validation method for posterior distributions in Bayesian signal inference, an advancement of a previous work. It transfers deviations from the correct posterior into characteristic deviations from a uniform distribution of a quantity constructed for this purpose. We show that this method is able to reveal and discriminate several kinds of numerical and approximation errors, as well as their impact on the posterior distribution. For this we present four typical analytical examples of posteriors with incorrect variance, skewness, position of the maximum, or normalization. We show further how this test can be applied to multidimensional signals.

  18. Simultaneous correction of functional posterior cross bite and midline shift.

    PubMed

    Arvinth, R; Rana, Shailendra Singh; Duggal, Ritu; Kharbanda, Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent cause of functional posterior crossbite is the reduction in width of the maxillary dental arch. This posterior crossbite is associated with anterior crowding which is presented as an infrapositioned canine or a palatally positioned lateral incisor on one side; this leads to an upper midline shift toward the crowded side. The present case report shows the management of posterior crossbite with functional shift and upper midline shift simultaneously without adverse side effects. In this case, rapid maxillary expansion along with fixed appliance is used to correct posterior crossbite with the upper dental midline shift using reciprocal action of elastic transseptal fibers. PMID:27630513

  19. Toxoplasmosis and Alzheimer: can Toxoplasma gondii really be introduced as a risk factor in etiology of Alzheimer?

    PubMed

    Mahami-Oskouei, Mahmoud; Hamidi, Faezeh; Talebi, Mahnaz; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Taheraghdam, Ali Akbar; Kazemi, Tohid; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Fallah, Esmaeil

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer is a progressive neurological disease that results in irreversible loss of neurons and includes about two thirds of all cases of dementia. Toxoplasma gondii may be an important infectious agent involved in neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between Toxoplasma as an etiologic agent in the progress of Alzheimer's disease. This case control study was conducted on 75 Alzheimer's patients and 75 healthy volunteers. Blood samples were obtained and anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM tests were done by using ELISA technique. DNA was extracted from buffy coat and then GRA6 gene and SAG2 loci were amplified by PCR and nested PCR, respectively. Chi-square, Fisher's test, and binary logistic regression were used for data analysis. A percentage of 61.3 % of Alzheimer's patients and 62.6 % of healthy volunteers were positive for anti-Toxoplasma IgG but all participants were negative for anti-Toxoplasma IgM. There were no significant differences between Alzheimer's patients with their controls in terms of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody (P = 0.5). Due to lack of positive IgM sample, results of the molecular methods were negative by GRA6 and SAG2 fragments amplification. This result shows that, infection with T. gondii cannot be considered as a risk factor for etiology and developing Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27106237

  20. Introduction of Caveolae Structural Proteins into the Protozoan Toxoplasma Results in the Formation of Heterologous Caveolae but Not Caveolar Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Lige, Bao; Sonda, Sabrina; Joiner, Keith A.; Coppens, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Present on the plasma membrane of most metazoans, caveolae are specialized microdomains implicated in several endocytic and trafficking mechanisms. Caveolins and the more recently discovered cavins are the major protein components of caveolae. Previous studies reported that caveolar invaginations can be induced de novo on the surface of caveolae-negative mammalian cells upon heterologous expression of caveolin-1. However, it remains undocumented whether other components in the transfected cells participate in caveolae formation. To address this issue, we have exploited the protozoan Toxoplasma as a heterologous expression system to provide insights into the minimal requirements for caveogenesis and caveolar endocytosis. Upon expression of caveolin-1, Toxoplasma accumulates prototypical exocytic caveolae ‘precursors’ in the cytoplasm. Toxoplasma expressing caveolin-1 alone, or in conjunction with cavin-1, neither develops surface-located caveolae nor internalizes caveolar ligands. These data suggest that the formation of functional caveolae at the plasma membrane in Toxoplasma and, by inference in all non-mammalian cells, requires effectors other than caveolin-1 and cavin-1. Interestingly, Toxoplasma co-expressing caveolin-1 and cavin-1 displays an impressive spiraled network of membranes containing the two proteins, in the cytoplasm. This suggests a synergistic activity of caveolin-1 and cavin-1 in the morphogenesis and remodeling of membranes, as illustrated for Toxoplasma. PMID:23272165

  1. The "Sublabral Window" in Arthroscopic Posterior Shoulder Instability Surgery: Description of a Technique for Safe Posterior Glenoid Preparation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kushal V; Bravman, Jonathan T; McCarty, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Arthroscopic posterior labral repairs for posterior shoulder instability can be challenging. Preparation of the capsulolabral tissue and glenoid bony surface is critical. Iatrogenic injury to the articular cartilage and unwarranted truncation of the capsulolabral tissue are concerns during preparation. As a result, several techniques have been described to potentially avoid these complications. We describe an additional technique for improving access and preparing the capsulolabral tissue and glenoid surface through a "sublabral window." This technique approaches the posterior labrum and glenoid through an already established posterior portal and mitigates iatrogenic injury to the labrum and articular cartilage. The technique is rather simple and easily adaptable. PMID:27656358

  2. Triazine Inhibits Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mui, Ernest J; Jacobus, David; Milhous, Wilbur K; Schiehser, Guy; Hsu, Honghue; Roberts, Craig W; Kirisits, Michael J; McLeod, Rima

    2005-08-01

    The triazine WR99210 [4,6-diamino-1,2-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-1-(2,4,5-trichlorophenoxypropyloxy)-1,3,5 triazine] inhibits Toxoplasma gondii in vitro at nanomolar levels (P < 0.05). The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) was approximately 50 nM. It is a potent inhibitor in vitro and is also effective in vivo. Administration of WR99210 parenterally (i.e., intraperitoneally) reduced the mean number of RH strain tachyzoites present in peritoneal fluid substantially 4 days after intraperitoneal infection of mice. There was a mean of approximately 35 million parasites in control mice as contrasted with approximately 2 million parasites in mice treated with 1.25 mg WR99210/kg of body weight in a representative experiment (P < 0.05). In addition the prodrug PS-15 N'-[3-(2,4, 5-trichlorophenoxy)propyloxy]-N9-(1-methylethyl) imidocarbonimidicdiamide is converted to 4,6-diamino-1,2-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-1-(2,4,5-trichlorophenoxypropyloxy)-1,3,5 triazine in vivo when the prodrug is administered orally. PS-15 administered by gavage also reduced intraperitoneal RH strain T. gondii tachyzoite numbers. WR99210 has high efficacy and relatively low toxicity because of its substantial effect on T. gondii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) but not the mammalian host DHFR. Amino acid sequences of T. gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, and Homo sapiens DHFRs were compared. It is of interest that of the DHFR amino acids considered to be interacting with WR99210 in P. falciparum within interatomic distances within 3 to 5 A, four of eight were shared with T. gondii DHFR. H. sapiens also shared four amino acids thought to be interacting with WR99210. Efficacy of intraperitoneal administration of WR99210 and peroral administration of PS-15 demonstrate the potential usefulness of this class of compounds in treatment of toxoplasmosis administered either parenterally or perorally. The recent development program for this class of antimicrobials as antimalarials makes our proof of principle of improved

  3. Triazine Inhibits Toxoplasma gondii Tachyzoites In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mui, Ernest J.; Jacobus, David; Milhous, Wilbur K.; Schiehser, Guy; Hsu, Honghue; Roberts, Craig W.; Kirisits, Michael J.; McLeod, Rima

    2005-01-01

    The triazine WR99210 [4,6-diamino-1,2-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-1-(2,4,5-trichlorophenoxypropyloxy)-1,3,5 triazine] inhibits Toxoplasma gondii in vitro at nanomolar levels (P < 0.05). The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was approximately 50 nM. It is a potent inhibitor in vitro and is also effective in vivo. Administration of WR99210 parenterally (i.e., intraperitoneally) reduced the mean number of RH strain tachyzoites present in peritoneal fluid substantially 4 days after intraperitoneal infection of mice. There was a mean of approximately 35 million parasites in control mice as contrasted with approximately 2 million parasites in mice treated with 1.25 mg WR99210/kg of body weight in a representative experiment (P < 0.05). In addition the prodrug PS-15 N′-[3-(2,4, 5-trichlorophenoxy)propyloxy]-N9-(1-methylethyl) imidocarbonimidicdiamide is converted to 4,6-diamino-1,2-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-1-(2,4,5-trichlorophenoxypropyloxy)-1,3,5 triazine in vivo when the prodrug is administered orally. PS-15 administered by gavage also reduced intraperitoneal RH strain T. gondii tachyzoite numbers. WR99210 has high efficacy and relatively low toxicity because of its substantial effect on T. gondii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) but not the mammalian host DHFR. Amino acid sequences of T. gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, and Homo sapiens DHFRs were compared. It is of interest that of the DHFR amino acids considered to be interacting with WR99210 in P. falciparum within interatomic distances within 3 to 5 Å, four of eight were shared with T. gondii DHFR. H. sapiens also shared four amino acids thought to be interacting with WR99210. Efficacy of intraperitoneal administration of WR99210 and peroral administration of PS-15 demonstrate the potential usefulness of this class of compounds in treatment of toxoplasmosis administered either parenterally or perorally. The recent development program for this class of antimicrobials as antimalarials makes our proof of principle of improved

  4. The Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in Chinese Population With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, CaiXiao; Li, ZhanZhan; Chen, Peng; Chen, LiZhang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Toxoplasmosis is fatal in the immunocompromised individuals such as cancer patients with chemotherapy. Clinical toxoplasmosis in cancer patients is a great public health concern in China. We performed this meta-analysis to assess the seroprevalence and odds ratios (ORs) of Toxoplasma gondii in Chinese population with cancer compared with those without. A methodical literature search was conducted with the help of the PubMed, Web of Knowledge, Embase, Chinese Web of Knowledge, Wanfang, and Chongqing VIP database. Case-control studies published from their inception until April 2015, reporting the seroprevalence of T. gondii in Chinese population with cancer, were covered as well. The nonweighted prevalence, pooled random-effects estimates of ORs, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were all calculated. Nineteen studies including 4493 cases and 6797 controls were incorporated in the meta-analysis. The overall seroprevalence of T. gondii was higher in population with cancer compared with those without ((20.59% vs 6.31%, P < 0.001; OR 3.90, 95% CI 3.00–5.07). The OR of T. gondii in cancer patients is further subgrouped according to publication year, sample size, and diagnostic methods. The pooled OR estimates were 4.80 (95% CI 2.57–8.99) from 1991 to 1999, 4.96 (95% CI 3.03–8.12) during 2000 to 2005, and 2.94 (95% CI 2.46–3.50) during 2006 to 2015. The pooled OR estimates were 6.16 (95% CI 3.87–9.78) when the sample size was below 400, 5.37 (95% CI 3.84–7.53) when the sample size was between 400 and 500, and 2.58 (95% CI 2.17–3.07) when the sample size was above 500. The pooled OR estimates were 5.50 (95% CI 3.98–7.62) by using indirect hemagglutination assay method, and 3.15 (95% CI 2.67–3.72) by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The meta-analysis study found Chinese population with cancer had higher seroprevalence rates of T. gondii compared with those without. PMID:26683951

  5. The Rhoptry Pseudokinase ROP54 Modulates Toxoplasma gondii Virulence and Host GBP2 Loading.

    PubMed

    Kim, Elliot W; Nadipuram, Santhosh M; Tetlow, Ashley L; Barshop, William D; Liu, Philip T; Wohlschlegel, James A; Bradley, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii uses unique secretory organelles called rhoptries to inject an array of effector proteins into the host cytoplasm that hijack host cell functions. We have discovered a novel rhoptry pseudokinase effector, ROP54, which is injected into the host cell upon invasion and traffics to the cytoplasmic face of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM). Disruption of ROP54 in a type II strain of T. gondii does not affect growth in vitro but results in a 100-fold decrease in virulence in vivo, suggesting that ROP54 modulates some aspect of the host immune response. We show that parasites lacking ROP54 are more susceptible to macrophage-dependent clearance, further suggesting that ROP54 is involved in evasion of innate immunity. To determine how ROP54 modulates parasite virulence, we examined the loading of two known innate immune effectors, immunity-related GTPase b6 (IRGb6) and guanylate binding protein 2 (GBP2), in wild-type and ∆rop54II mutant parasites. While no difference in IRGb6 loading was seen, we observed a substantial increase in GBP2 loading on the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) of ROP54-disrupted parasites. These results demonstrate that ROP54 is a novel rhoptry effector protein that promotes Toxoplasma infections by modulating GBP2 loading onto parasite-containing vacuoles. IMPORTANCE The interactions between intracellular microbes and their host cells can lead to the discovery of novel drug targets. During Toxoplasma infections, host cells express an array of immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) that load onto the parasite-containing vacuole to clear the parasite. To counter this mechanism, the parasite secretes effector proteins that traffic to the vacuole to disarm the immunity-related loading proteins and evade the immune response. While the interplay between host IRGs and Toxoplasma effector proteins is well understood, little is known about how Toxoplasma neutralizes the GBP response. We describe here a T

  6. Drug Repurposing Screening Identifies Novel Compounds That Effectively Inhibit Toxoplasma gondii Growth

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, Ashley J.; Drozda, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The urgent need to develop new antimicrobial therapies has spawned the development of repurposing screens in which well-studied drugs and other types of compounds are tested for potential off-label uses. As a proof-of-principle screen to identify compounds effective against Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a collection of 1,120 compounds for the ability to significantly reduce Toxoplasma replication. A total of 94 compounds blocked parasite replication with 50% inhibitory concentrations of <5 µM. A significant number of these compounds are established inhibitors of dopamine or estrogen signaling. Follow-up experiments with the dopamine receptor inhibitor pimozide revealed that the drug impacted both parasite invasion and replication but did so independently of inhibition of dopamine or other neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Tamoxifen, which is an established inhibitor of the estrogen receptor, also reduced parasite invasion and replication. Even though Toxoplasma can activate the estrogen receptor, tamoxifen inhibits parasite growth independently of this transcription factor. Tamoxifen is also a potent inducer of autophagy, and we find that the drug stimulates recruitment of the autophagy marker light chain 3-green fluorescent protein onto the membrane of the vacuolar compartment in which the parasite resides and replicates. In contrast to other antiparasitic drugs, including pimozide, tamoxifen treatment of infected cells leads to a time-dependent elimination of intracellular parasites. Taken together, these data suggest that tamoxifen restricts Toxoplasma growth by inducing xenophagy or autophagic destruction of this obligate intracellular parasite. IMPORTANCE There is an urgent need to develop new therapies to treat microbial infections, and the repurposing of well-characterized compounds is emerging as one approach to achieving this goal. Using the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a library of 1,120 compounds and identified several

  7. Drug Repurposing Screening Identifies Novel Compounds That Effectively Inhibit Toxoplasma gondii Growth.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Ashley J; Drozda, Allison A; Blader, Ira J

    2016-01-01

    The urgent need to develop new antimicrobial therapies has spawned the development of repurposing screens in which well-studied drugs and other types of compounds are tested for potential off-label uses. As a proof-of-principle screen to identify compounds effective against Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a collection of 1,120 compounds for the ability to significantly reduce Toxoplasma replication. A total of 94 compounds blocked parasite replication with 50% inhibitory concentrations of <5 µM. A significant number of these compounds are established inhibitors of dopamine or estrogen signaling. Follow-up experiments with the dopamine receptor inhibitor pimozide revealed that the drug impacted both parasite invasion and replication but did so independently of inhibition of dopamine or other neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Tamoxifen, which is an established inhibitor of the estrogen receptor, also reduced parasite invasion and replication. Even though Toxoplasma can activate the estrogen receptor, tamoxifen inhibits parasite growth independently of this transcription factor. Tamoxifen is also a potent inducer of autophagy, and we find that the drug stimulates recruitment of the autophagy marker light chain 3-green fluorescent protein onto the membrane of the vacuolar compartment in which the parasite resides and replicates. In contrast to other antiparasitic drugs, including pimozide, tamoxifen treatment of infected cells leads to a time-dependent elimination of intracellular parasites. Taken together, these data suggest that tamoxifen restricts Toxoplasma growth by inducing xenophagy or autophagic destruction of this obligate intracellular parasite. IMPORTANCE There is an urgent need to develop new therapies to treat microbial infections, and the repurposing of well-characterized compounds is emerging as one approach to achieving this goal. Using the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a library of 1,120 compounds and identified several

  8. The Rhoptry Pseudokinase ROP54 Modulates Toxoplasma gondii Virulence and Host GBP2 Loading

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Elliot W.; Nadipuram, Santhosh M.; Tetlow, Ashley L.; Barshop, William D.; Liu, Philip T.; Wohlschlegel, James A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii uses unique secretory organelles called rhoptries to inject an array of effector proteins into the host cytoplasm that hijack host cell functions. We have discovered a novel rhoptry pseudokinase effector, ROP54, which is injected into the host cell upon invasion and traffics to the cytoplasmic face of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM). Disruption of ROP54 in a type II strain of T. gondii does not affect growth in vitro but results in a 100-fold decrease in virulence in vivo, suggesting that ROP54 modulates some aspect of the host immune response. We show that parasites lacking ROP54 are more susceptible to macrophage-dependent clearance, further suggesting that ROP54 is involved in evasion of innate immunity. To determine how ROP54 modulates parasite virulence, we examined the loading of two known innate immune effectors, immunity-related GTPase b6 (IRGb6) and guanylate binding protein 2 (GBP2), in wild-type and ∆rop54II mutant parasites. While no difference in IRGb6 loading was seen, we observed a substantial increase in GBP2 loading on the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) of ROP54-disrupted parasites. These results demonstrate that ROP54 is a novel rhoptry effector protein that promotes Toxoplasma infections by modulating GBP2 loading onto parasite-containing vacuoles. IMPORTANCE The interactions between intracellular microbes and their host cells can lead to the discovery of novel drug targets. During Toxoplasma infections, host cells express an array of immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) that load onto the parasite-containing vacuole to clear the parasite. To counter this mechanism, the parasite secretes effector proteins that traffic to the vacuole to disarm the immunity-related loading proteins and evade the immune response. While the interplay between host IRGs and Toxoplasma effector proteins is well understood, little is known about how Toxoplasma neutralizes the GBP response. We describe

  9. Portable exhausters POR-004 SKID B, POR-005 SKID C, POR-006 SKID D storage plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, O.D.

    1997-09-04

    This document provides a storage plan for portable exhausters POR-004 SKID B, POR-005 SKID C, AND POR-006 SKID D. The exhausters will be stored until they are needed by the TWRS (Tank Waste Remediation Systems) Saltwell Pumping Program. The storage plan provides criteria for portable exhauster storage, periodic inspections during storage, and retrieval from storage.

  10. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  11. Posterior regeneration in Isodiametra pulchra (Acoela, Acoelomorpha)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Regeneration is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom, but the capacity to restore damaged or missing tissue varies greatly between different phyla and even within the same phylum. However, the distantly related Acoelomorpha and Platyhelminthes share a strikingly similar stem-cell system and regenerative capacity. Therefore, comparing the underlying mechanisms in these two phyla paves the way for an increased understanding of the evolution of this developmental process. To date, Isodiametra pulchra is the most promising candidate as a model for the Acoelomorpha, as it reproduces steadily under laboratory conditions and is amenable to various techniques, including the silencing of gene expression by RNAi. In order to provide an essential framework for future studies, we report the succession of regeneration events via the use of cytochemical, histological and microscopy techniques, and specify the total number of cells in adult individuals. Results Isodiametra pulchra is not capable of regenerating a new head, but completely restores all posterior structures within 10 days. Following amputation, the wound closes via the contraction of local muscle fibres and an extension of the dorsal epidermis. Subsequently, stem cells and differentiating cells invade the wound area and form a loosely delimited blastema. After two days, the posterior end is re-patterned with the male (and occasionally the female) genital primordium being apparent. Successively, these primordia differentiate into complete copulatory organs. The size of the body and also of the male and female copulatory organs, as well as the distance between the copulatory organs, progressively increase and by nine days copulation is possible. Adult individuals with an average length of 670 μm consist of approximately 8100 cells. Conclusion Isodiametra pulchra regenerates through a combination of morphallactic and epimorphic processes. Existing structures are “re-modelled” and provide a

  12. Posterior Tibialis Tendon Dysfunction: Overview of Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kaihan; Yang, Timothy Xianyi; Yew, Wei Ping

    2015-06-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Recognize posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction and begin to include it in differential diagnoses. 2. Recall the basic anatomy and pathology of the posterior tibialis tendon. 3. Assess a patient for posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction with the appropriate investigations and stratify the severity of the condition. 4. Develop and formulate a treatment plan for a patient with posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction. The posterior tibialis is a muscle in the deep posterior compartment of the calf that plays several key roles in the ankle and foot. Posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction is a complex but common and debilitating condition. Degenerative, inflammatory, functional, and traumatic etiologies have all been proposed. Despite being the leading cause of acquired flatfoot, it is often not recognized early enough. Knowledge of the anatomical considerations and etiology of posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction, as well as key concepts in its evaluation and management, will allow health care professionals to develop appropriate intervention strategies to prevent further development of flatfoot deformities. PMID:26091214

  13. Role of posterior hypothalamus in hypobaric hypoxia induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Choudhary, R C; Reddy, M K; Ray, A; Ravi, K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of posterior hypothalamus and central neurotransmitters in the pulmonary edema due to hypobaric hypoxia, rats were placed in a high altitude simulation chamber (barometric pressure-294.4 mmHg) for 24 h. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increases in mean arterial blood pressure, renal sympathetic nerve activity, right ventricular systolic pressure, lung wet to dry weight ratio and Evans blue dye leakage. There was a significant attenuation in these responses to hypobaric hypoxia (a) after lesioning posterior hypothalamus and (b) after chronic infusion of GABAA receptor agonist muscimol into posterior hypothalamus. No such attenuation was evident with the chronic infusion of the nitric oxide donor SNAP into the posterior hypothalamus. It is concluded that in hypobaric hypoxia, there is over-activity of posterior hypothalamic neurons probably due to a local decrease in GABA-ergic inhibition which increases the sympathetic drive causing pulmonary hypertension and edema. PMID:25448396

  14. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Complicating Traumatic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sigurtà, Anna; Terzi, Valeria; Regna-Gladin, Caroline; Fumagalli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We are reporting a case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) developed in an unusual clinical scenario without the presence of the most described symptoms. PRES is a neurological and radiological syndrome described in many different clinical conditions. In children it has been mostly reported in association with hematological and renal disorders. Our patient was a 15 years old boy, admitted to our intensive care unit for pancreatitis after blunt abdominal trauma. During the stay in the intensive care unit, he underwent multiple abdominal surgical interventions for pancreatitis complications. He had a difficult management of analgesia and sedation, being often agitated with high arterial pressure, and he developed a bacterial peritonitis. After 29 days his neurological conditions abruptly worsened with neuroimaging findings consistent with PRES. His clinical conditions progressively improved after sedation and arterial pressure control. He was discharged at home with complete resolution of the neurological and imaging signs 2 months later. The pathophysiology of PRES is controversial and involves disordered autoregulation ascribable to hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. In this case both hypertension and endothelial activation, triggered by sepsis and pancreatitis, could represent the culprits of PRES onset. Even if there is no specific treatment for this condition, a diagnosis is mandatory to start antihypertensive and supportive treatment. We are therefore suggesting to consider PRES in the differential diagnosis of a neurological deterioration preceded by hypertension and/or septic state, even without other “typical” clinical features. PMID:27258506

  15. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Leff, Alexander P.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Methods: Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Results: Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%–270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. PMID:26138948

  16. New infectious etiologies for posterior uveitis.

    PubMed

    Khairallah, Moncef; Kahloun, Rim; Ben Yahia, Salim; Jelliti, Bechir; Messaoud, Riadh

    2013-01-01

    Emergent and resurgent arthropod vector-borne diseases are major causes of systemic morbidity and death and expanding worldwide. Among them, viral and bacterial agents including West Nile virus, Dengue fever, Chikungunya, Rift Valley fever, and rickettsioses have been recently associated with an array of ocular manifestations. These include anterior uveitis, retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis and optic nerve involvement. Proper clinical diagnosis of any of these infectious diseases is based on epidemiological data, history, systemic symptoms and signs, and the pattern of ocular involvement. The diagnosis is usually confirmed by the detection of a specific antibody in serum. Ocular involvement associated with emergent infections usually has a self-limited course, but it can result in persistent visual impairment. There is currently no proven specific treatment for arboviral diseases, and therapy is mostly supportive. Vaccination for humans against these viruses is still in the research phase. Doxycycline is the treatment of choice for rickettsial diseases. Prevention, including public measures to reduce the number of mosquitoes and personal protection, remains the mainstay for arthropod vector disease control. Influenza A (H1N1) virus was responsible for a pandemic human influenza in 2009, and was recently associated with various posterior segment changes.

  17. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondhi antibodies in captive wild mammals and birds in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Minervino, Antonio Humberto Hamad; Soares, Herbert Sousa; Barrêto-Júnior, Raimundo Alves; Neves, Kedson Alessandri Lobo; Pena, Hilda Fátima de Jesus; Ortolani, Enrico Lippi; Dubey, Jitender Prakash; Gennari, Solange Maria

    2010-09-01

    In this study, serum samples of 203 animals from different locations, from zoos and breeding facilities from the north and northeast regions of Brazil, were analyzed for the presence of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies by the modified agglutination test (MAT) with a cutoff of 1:25. Of the sampled animals, 184 were adult mammals of both sexes and 19 were birds. Antibodies were found in 61 of 184 mammals, and no association between sex and age of the animals and the presence of T. gondii antibodies was observed (P < 0.05). Anti-T gondii antibodies were not found in birds. Toxoplasma gondii was detected in Brazilian tapir (Tapirus terrestris) for the first time. PMID:20945665

  18. Evidence of Toxoplasma gondii exposure in Boer goat herds in Missouri, USA.

    PubMed

    Yaglom, H D; Rottinghaus, A A; Pithua, P

    2014-09-01

    Limited data currently exist on the prevalence of Toxoplasma infections in goats in the USA. The objective of this pilot investigation was to determine the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in Boer goats raised in Missouri. Sera collected from 367 Boer goats in 24 herds were tested using a commercial latex agglutination assay. Evidence of T. gondii antibodies was present in 25 of the 367 goats, with titres of 1 : 32 in 4, 1 : 64 in 11, 1 : 128 in 5, 1 : 256 in 3 and 1 : 1024 in 2. Estimates for the apparent animal-level and between-herd prevalence were 6.8% (95% CI = 4.7-9.9%) and 41.7% (95% CI = 24.5-61.2%). These results confirm that Boer goats in Missouri are exposed to T. gondii and may constitute a public health risks.

  19. Isolation and genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii from free-ranging chickens from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Venturini, M C; Venturini, L; Piscopo, M; Graham, D H; Dahl, E; Sreekumar, C; Vianna, M C; Lehmann, T

    2003-10-01

    The prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in free-ranging chickens can be considered a good indicator of the prevalence of T. gondii oocysts in the environment because chickens feed from the ground. In the present study, prevalence of T. gondii in 29 free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) from Argentina was investigated. Blood, heart, and brain from each chicken were examined for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii, assayed with the modified agglutination test (MAT), were found in 19 of 29 (65.5%) chickens. Hearts and brains of seropositive (MAT > or = 1:5) chickens were bioassayed in mice. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from 9 of 19 seropositive chickens. Genotyping of chicken isolates of T. gondii using the SAG2 locus indicated that 1 was type I, 1 was type II, and 7 were type III. This is the first report of isolation of T. gondii from chickens from Argentina.

  20. [Advances in researches on mechanism of anti-Toxoplasma Chinese herbal medicine].

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhao-Yun; Zhang, Bao-de; Ning, Jun-ya; Wang, Yuan-yuan; Yuan, Wen-ying

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunity cellular parasite, related to the infection of various animals and human beings and severely impairing agriculture and human health. Because of the complexity of T. gondii life cycle, its different biological characteristics, and multifarious pathogenesis, there are no specific treatment and preventive medicines at present. Chinese herbal medicine can balance "yin-yang" and regulate the immunity and its side-effect is slight. Now, it has been a hot topic of the research on effective and secure medicines in anti-toxoplasmosis. This paper summarizes and analyzes the curative effect and mechanism of anti-Toxoplasma Chinese herbal medicine, such as Scutellaria baicalensis, Inontus obliquus polysaccharide, Radix glycyrrhizae, pumpkin seeds, and Semen arecae. PMID:26930953

  1. Toxoplasmosis and anti-Toxoplasma effects of medicinal plant extracts-A mini-review.

    PubMed

    Al Nasr, Ibrahim; Ahmed, Faiyaz; Pullishery, Fawaz; El-Ashram, Saeed; Ramaiah, Vardharajula Venkata

    2016-08-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a globally distributed parasitic protozoan disease, caused by Toxoplasma gondii. The infection can result in more severe symptoms with potentially life-threatening in case of immunocompromised individuals. Sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine are the two drugs used as a part of standard therapy for toxoplasmosis. Researchers have demonstrated the therapeutic effects of medicinal plants for toxoplasmosis, which can be used as an alternative to standard drug therapy with reduced side effects. Traditional herbal plants are used by people to cure a large number of parasitic disorders. This review provides new insights into various medicinal plants that are used traditionally for the treatment of toxoplasmosis and other parasitic infections, which can be useful as an alternative treatment option for Toxoplasma gondii infections. PMID:27569880

  2. Interferon-γ : The Major Mediator of Resistance against Toxoplasma gondii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Orellana, Manuel A.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Remington, Jack S.

    1988-04-01

    Mice were injected with a monoclonal antibody to interferon-γ to examine the importance of endogenous production of this lymphokine in resistance against infection with the sporozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Mice with intraperitoneal infections of T. gondii that received no antibody survived and developed chronic T. gondii infection, whereas the infected mice that received the monoclonal antibody died of toxoplasmosis. The activation of macrophages, which kill T. gondii in vivo, was inhibited by administration of the monoclonal antibody, but the production of antibodies to T. gondii was not suppressed. The fact that an antibody to interferon-γ can eliminate resistance to acute Toxoplasma infection in mice suggests that this lymphokine is an important mediator of host resistance to this parasite.

  3. Sexual recombination punctuated by outbreaks and clonal expansions predicts Toxoplasma gondii population genetics.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Michael E; Sundar, Natarajan

    2009-07-01

    The cosmopolitan parasitic pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is capable of infecting essentially any warm-blooded vertebrate worldwide, including most birds and mammals, and establishes chronic infections in one-third of the globe's human population. The success of this highly prevalent zoonosis is largely the result of its ability to propagate both sexually and clonally. Frequent genetic exchanges via sexual recombination among extant parasite lineages that mix in the definitive felid host produces new lines that emerge to expand the parasite's host range and cause outbreaks. Highly successful lines spread clonally via carnivorism and in some cases sweep to pandemic levels. The extent to which sexual reproduction versus clonal expansion shapes Toxoplasma's current, global population genetic structure is the central question this review will attempt to answer. PMID:19217909

  4. Toxoplasma gondii recombinant antigens as tools for serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis: current status of studies.

    PubMed

    Holec-Gasior, Lucyna

    2013-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a parasitic protozoan which is the cause of toxoplasmosis. Although human toxoplasmosis in healthy adults is usually asymptomatic, serious disease can occur in the case of congenital infections and immunocompromised individuals. Furthermore, despite the exact recognition of its etiology, it still presents a diagnostic problem. Diagnosis of toxoplasmosis is mainly based on the results of serological tests detecting anti-T. gondii-specific antibodies in the patient's serum sample. The specificities and sensitivities of serology tests depend mostly on the diagnostic antigen(s) used. Most of the commercial serological kits currently available are based on Toxoplasma lysate antigens (TLAs). In recent years, many studies showed that recombinant antigenic proteins of T. gondii may be an alternative source of antigens which are very useful for the serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis. This article presents a review of current studies on the application and usefulness of different T. gondii recombinant antigens in serological tests for the diagnosis of human toxoplasmosis.

  5. Comparison of Eight Cell-Free Media for Maintenance of Toxoplasma gondii Tachyzoites

    PubMed Central

    KALANI, Hamed; DARYANI, Ahmad; SHARIF, Mehdi; AHMADPOUR, Ehsan; ALIZADEH, Ahad; NASROLAHEI, Mohtaram; SARVI, Shahabeddin; KALANI, Farzad; FARIDNIA, Roghiyeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Toxoplasmosis is considered as one of the most common infectious diseases caused by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Tachyzoite is the main form of Toxoplasma and continuously is maintained in cell culture or injected into the mice peritoneal cavity. This study was designed to evaluate the survival rate of RH strain of T. gondii tachyzoites in different cell free, nutrient and biological media at different temperatures. Methods: This experimental study was performed at the Toxoplasmosis Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran, in 2010. One ml of each solution including hypotonic saline (0.3%), normal saline (0.85%), RPMI-1640 (RPMI), RPMI with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), RPMI with 20% FBS, ovine hydatid cyst fluid, pasteurized milk of cow, and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) along with 4×104 T. gondii tachyzoites were added to plate wells and incubated in 4 °C, 22 °C, 37 °C, and 37 °C under 5% CO2. The survival rate and viability assessment of parasites were performed daily and the results were analyzed using Univariate tests. Result: Tachyzoites survival rate in PBS (4 °C) and normal saline (4 °C) were considerably high, compared to other solutions in different conditions (P<0.001). The best temperature for Toxoplasma maintenance was 4 °C (P<0.001). Conclusion: This study introduces two available and economical solutions, PBS (4 °C) and normal saline (4 °C) media, for maintenance of Toxoplasma tachyzoites as appropriate choice media for a noticeable period of time (11 days) in vitro. PMID:27095976

  6. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii Infection among HIV/AIDS Patients in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guoqiang; Wang, Xiaoming; Sun, Hui; Gao, Yaying

    2016-02-01

    Toxoplasmosis, a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, occurs throughout the world. Human T. gondii infection is asymptomatic in 80% of the population; however, the infection is life-threatening and causes substantial neurologic damage in immunocompromised patients such as HIV-infected persons. The major purpose of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in subjects infected with HIV/AIDS in eastern China. Our findings showed 9.7% prevalence of anti-T. gondii IgG antibody in HIV/AIDS patients, which was higher than in intravenous drug users (2.2%) and healthy controls (4.7%), while no significant difference was observed in the seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgM antibody among all participants (P>0.05). Among all HIV/AIDS patients, 15 men (7.7%) and 10 women (15.9%) were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG antibody; however, no significant difference was detected in the seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody between males and females. The frequency of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody was 8.0%, 13.2%, 5.5%, and 0% in patients with normal immune function (CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count ≥500 cells/ml), immunocompromised patients (cell count ≥200 and <500 cells/ml), severely immunocompromised patients (cell count ≥50 and <200 cells/ml), and advanced AIDS patients, respectively (cell count <50 cells/ml), while only 3 immunocompromised patients were positive for anti-T. gondii IgM antibody. The results indicate a high seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in HIV/AIDS patients in eastern China, and a preventive therapy for toxoplasmosis may be given to HIV/AIDS patients based on CD4(+) T lymphocyte count.

  7. Disruption of microtubules uncouples budding and nuclear division in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Morrissette, Naomi S; Sibley, L David

    2002-03-01

    The tachyzoite stage of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii has two populations of microtubules: spindle microtubules and subpellicular microtubules. To determine how these two microtubule populations are regulated, we investigated microtubule behavior during the cell cycle following treatment with microtubule-disrupting drugs. Previous work had established that the microtubule populations are individually nucleated by two distinct microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs): the apical polar ring for the subpellicular microtubules and spindle pole plaques/centrioles for the spindle microtubules. When replicating tachyzoites were treated with 0.5 microM oryzalin or 1.0 mM colchicine they retained the capacity to form a spindle and undergo nuclear division. Although these parasites could complete budding, they lost the bulk of their subpellicular microtubules and the ability to reinvade host cells. Both nascent spindle and subpellicular microtubules were disrupted in 2.5 microM oryzalin or 5.0 mM colchicine. Under these conditions, parasites grew in size and replicated their genome but were incapable of nuclear division. After removal from 0.5 microM oryzalin, Toxoplasma tachyzoites were able to restore normal subpellicular microtubules and a fully invasive phenotype. When oryzalin was removed from Toxoplasma tachyzoites treated with 2.5 microM drug, the parasites attempted to bud as crescent-shaped tachyzoites. Because the polyploid nuclear mass could not be correctly segregated, many daughter parasites lacked nuclei altogether although budding and scission from the maternal mass was able to be completed. Multiple MTOCs permit Toxoplasma tachyzoites to control nuclear division independently from cell polarity and cytokinesis. This unusual situation grants greater cell cycle flexibility to these parasites but abolishes the checks for coregulation of nuclear division and cytokinesis found in other eukaryotes. PMID:11870220

  8. Innate resistance against Toxoplasma gondii: An evolutionary tale of mice, cats and men

    PubMed Central

    Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Mendonça-Neto, Rondon; Lilue, Jingtao; Howard, Jonathan; Sher, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Recent studies have revealed remarkable species specificity of the Toll-Like Receptors (TLR) 11 and TLR12, and the Immunity Related GTPase (IRG) proteins that are essential elements for detection and immune control of Toxoplasma gondii in mice, but not in humans. The biological and evolutionary implications of these findings for the T. gondii host-pathogen relationship and for human disease are discussed. PMID:24528860

  9. [Frequency of latent connatal Toxoplasma gondii infection in children and their development].

    PubMed

    Hengst, P

    1979-11-01

    The incidence and clinical symptoms of Toxoplasma gondii-primoinfection during pregnancy are ascertained basing on a prospective survey comprising 1,697 gravid women. The rate of the first infection during pregnancy was 7.6%, the connatal infection rate 5.6%, the premature birth rate in connatal infection 44%. In cases of connatal infection which were proved serologically with SFT and CFT, the development of the children was followed up to the age of 9 and 10 years.

  10. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma Gondii antibodies in cats from Durango City, Mexico.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii was determined in sera from 105 domestic cats from Durango City, Mexico. Using a modified agglutination test, antibodies to this parasite were found in (21%) of the 105 cats with titers of 1:25 in 3, 1:50 in 4, 1:200 in 5, 1:400 in 2, 1:800 in 2, 1...

  11. Structure-activity studies of some berberine analogs as inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Krivogorsky, Bogdana; Pernat, Jennifer A; Douglas, Kelsi A; Czerniecki, Nikolas J; Grundt, Peter

    2012-04-15

    The shortfalls of the current treatment options against infections with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) necessitates the development of non-toxic and well-tolerated alternatives. To address this problem a structurally diverse panel of berberine alkaloids was synthesized and evaluated for in vitro inhibition of T. gondii tachyzoites. Inhibitory doses (ID(50)) of less than 50 nM and therapeutic indices (TI) up to 4000 were observed.

  12. Toxoplasma Effector MAF1 Mediates Recruitment of Host Mitochondria and Impacts the Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Pernas, Lena; Adomako-Ankomah, Yaw; Shastri, Anjali J.; Ewald, Sarah E.; Treeck, Moritz; Boyle, Jon P.; Boothroyd, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent information has revealed the functional diversity and importance of mitochondria in many cellular processes including orchestrating the innate immune response. Intriguingly, several infectious agents, such as Toxoplasma, Legionella, and Chlamydia, have been reported to grow within vacuoles surrounded by host mitochondria. Although many hypotheses have been proposed for the existence of host mitochondrial association (HMA), the causes and biological consequences of HMA have remained unanswered. Here we show that HMA is present in type I and III strains of Toxoplasma but missing in type II strains, both in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of F1 progeny from a type II×III cross revealed that HMA is a Mendelian trait that we could map. We use bioinformatics to select potential candidates and experimentally identify the polymorphic parasite protein involved, mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1). We show that introducing the type I (HMA+) MAF1 allele into type II (HMA−) parasites results in conversion to HMA+ and deletion of MAF1 in type I parasites results in a loss of HMA. We observe that the loss and gain of HMA are associated with alterations in the transcription of host cell immune genes and the in vivo cytokine response during murine infection. Lastly, we use exogenous expression of MAF1 to show that it binds host mitochondria and thus MAF1 is the parasite protein directly responsible for HMA. Our findings suggest that association with host mitochondria may represent a novel means by which Toxoplasma tachyzoites manipulate the host. The existence of naturally occurring HMA+ and HMA− strains of Toxoplasma, Legionella, and Chlamydia indicates the existence of evolutionary niches where HMA is either advantageous or disadvantageous, likely reflecting tradeoffs in metabolism, immune regulation, and other functions of mitochondria. PMID:24781109

  13. The Unfolded Protein Response in the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii Features Translational and Transcriptional Control

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Bradley R.; Tampaki, Zoi; Kim, Kami

    2013-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an important regulatory network that responds to perturbations in protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In mammalian cells, the UPR features translational and transcriptional mechanisms of gene expression aimed at restoring proteostatic control. A central feature of the UPR is phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2) by PERK (EIF2AK3/PEK), which reduces the influx of nascent proteins into the ER by lowering global protein synthesis, coincident with preferential translation of key transcription activators of genes that function to expand the processing capacity of this secretory organelle. Upon ER stress, the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is known to induce phosphorylation of Toxoplasma eIF2α and lower translation initiation. To characterize the nature of the ensuing UPR in this parasite, we carried out microarray analyses to measure the changes in the transcriptome and in translational control during ER stress. We determined that a collection of transcripts linked with the secretory process are induced in response to ER stress, supporting the idea that a transcriptional induction phase of the UPR occurs in Toxoplasma. Furthermore, we determined that about 500 gene transcripts showed enhanced association with translating ribosomes during ER stress. Many of these target genes are suggested to be involved in gene expression, including JmjC5, which continues to be actively translated during ER stress. This study indicates that Toxoplasma triggers a UPR during ER stress that features both translational and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, which is likely to be important for parasite invasion and development. PMID:23666622

  14. Investigation and management of Toxoplasma gondii infection in pregnancy and infancy: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    di Carlo, Paola; Romano, Amelia; Casuccio, Alessandra; Cillino, Salvatore; Schimmenti, Maria Gabriella; Mancuso, Giorgio; la Chiusa, Stella; Novara, Vincenzo; Ingrassia, Daniela; li Vecchi, Valentina; Trizzino, Marcello; Titone, Lucina

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Toxoplasma gondii infection during pregnancy poses a serious risk to the fetus, therefore timely and accurate diagnosis is essential. The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of congenital infection via evaluating mother's immunological status and the possibility to improving the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Methods: Eighty five mothers with Toxoplasma seroconversion and their offspring were enrolled (among them, 2 spontaneous abortions were documented in the first trimester). Prenatal PCR diagnosis was carried out on 50 patients (60%), with 7 positive cases (14%). Morphological ultrasound scanning revealed anomalies in one fetus. Long-term follow-up included general physical examinations, serological status tested using Western blot, neuro-radiological, ophthalmologic and neurologic examinations, psychological and developmental tests, visual evoked potential tests and audiology tests, as well as anti-Toxoplasma treatment regimes. Results: Fourteen (17%) of the infants were infected at one-year serological follow-up. Chi-square for linear trend of vertical transmission from the first to the third trimester was significant (P=0.009). Western blot analysis showed IgM and IgA in half of the infected infants. In 69 uninfected infants, anti-Toxoplasma IgG immunoblot analysis excluded infection within the 3 months in 18 infants (26%) and in the others within 6 months of life. The most relevant instrumental findings are described. Conclusion: Western blot analysis may help to evaluate infection within the 6 months of life. The accuracy of ultrasound imaging to determine the brain damage in the fetus and newborns is doubtful, and should be combined with MR imaging. Multistep approaches can improve the timing of postnatal follow-up. PMID:21743484

  15. Knowledge and practice on Toxoplasma infection in pregnant women from Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Andiappan, Hemah; Nissapatorn, Veeranoot; Sawangjaroen, Nongyao; Khaing, Si-Lay; Salibay, Cristina C.; Cheung, Mary Mae M.; Dungca, Julieta Z.; Chemoh, Waenurama; Xiao Teng, Ching; Lau, Yee-Ling; Mat Adenan, Noor A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, is one of the infectious agents of congenital TORCH infections, causes severe clinical outcomes in fetus and newborns. Nevertheless this life-threatening parasitic disease is preventable by simple preventive measures related to lifestyle during pregnancy. We aim to study on the knowledge about toxoplasmosis and practices that prevents this infection among the pregnant women. Total of 2598 pregnant women from Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand were randomly surveyed to determine the knowledge and their practices on Toxoplasma infection. The questionnaire covered respondents' general information and knowledge on plausible risks factors, symptoms, timing of infection, prevention knowledge, and preventive behavior regarding Toxoplasma infection. Majority of these pregnant women were in their age group of 20–29 years (50.9%), completed secondary level of education (51.7%), in their second trimester of pregnancies (38.1%), non-parous (36.6%), and had no history of abortion (90.4%). Based on this survey, only 11% of these pregnant women had read, heard, or seen information regarding toxoplasmosis and 3.5% of them were aware of being tested for the infection. A small percentage of these pregnant women knew that T. gondii were shed in the feces of infected cats (19.4%) and sometimes found in the raw or undercooked meat (11.0%). There was 16.1% of responding women knew that toxoplasmosis is caused by an infection. Demographic profiles such as age group, level of education, pregnancy term, and number of children of the pregnant women showed significant association with their responses toward prevention knowledge and preventive behavior related questions (P < 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that health education on toxoplasmosis and primary behavioral practices should be consistently offered to reproductive age women in general and pregnant women in particular. This information could help to reduce vertical transmission of Toxoplasma infection during

  16. Isolation and Biological and Molecular Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from Canine Cutaneous Toxoplasmosis in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Moroz, Ludmila R.; Sozigan, Rita K. B.; Ajzenberg, Daniel; Carvalho, Fernando R.; Mota, Caroline M.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.; Marcili, Arlei

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous toxoplasmosis is a rare manifestation. This study represents a case report of an immunosuppressed dog that developed nodular dermal lesions caused by Toxoplasma gondii. The isolate (TgDgBr20) was characterized as mouse virulent and was genotyped as type BrI (ToxoDB genotype 6) using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and as Africa 1 through microsatellite analysis. PMID:25253796

  17. The Calcium Signaling Toolkit of the Apicomplexan Parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium spp

    PubMed Central

    Lourido, Sebastian; Moreno, Silvia N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites have complex life cycles, frequently split between different hosts and reliant on rapid responses as the parasites react to changing environmental conditions. Calcium ion (Ca2+) signaling is consequently essential for the cellular and developmental changes that support apicomplexan parasitism. Apicomplexan genomes reveal a rich repertoire of genes involved in calcium signaling, although many of the genes responsible for observed physiological changes remain unknown. There is evidence, for example, for the presence of a nifedipine-sensitive calcium entry mechanism in Toxoplasma, but the molecular components involved in Ca2+ entry in both Toxoplasma and Plasmodium, have not been identified. The major calcium stores are the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the acidocalcisomes, and the plant-like vacuole in Toxoplasma, or the food vacuole in Plasmodium spp. Pharmacological evidence suggests that Ca2+ release from intracellular stores may be mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) or cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) although there is no molecular evidence for the presence of receptors for these second messengers in the parasites. Several Ca2+-ATPases are present in apicomplexans and a putative mitochondrial Ca2+/H+ exchanger has been identified. Apicomplexan genomes contain numerous genes encoding Ca2+-binding proteins, with the notable expansion of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), whose study has revealed novel roles in gliding motility, microneme secretion, host cell invasion and egress, and parasite differentiation. Microneme secretion has also been shown to depend on the C2 domain containing protein DOC2 in both Plasmodium spp. and Toxoplasma, providing further evidence for the complex transduction of Ca2+ signals in these organisms. The characterization of these pathways could lead to the discovery of novel drug targets and to a better understanding of the role of Ca2+ in these parasites. PMID:25605521

  18. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Retention versus Posterior Stabilization for Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Bian, Yanyan; Feng, Bin; Weng, Xisheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although being debated for many years, the superiority of posterior cruciate-retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and posterior-stabilized (PS) TKA remains controversial. We compare the knee scores, post-operative knee range of motion (ROM), radiological outcomes about knee kinematic and complications between CR TKA and PS TKA. Methods Literature published up to August 2015 was searched in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases, and meta-analysis was performed using the software, Review Manager version 5.3. Results Totally 14 random control trials (RCTs) on this topic were included for the analysis, which showed that PS and CR TKA had no significant difference in Knee Society knee Score (KSS), pain score (KSPS), Hospital for Special Surgery score (HSS), kinematic characteristics including postoperative component alignment, tibial posterior slope and joint line, and complication rate. However, PS TKA is superior to CR TKA regarding post-operative knee range of motion (ROM) [Random Effect model (RE), Mean Difference (MD) = -7.07, 95% Confidential Interval (CI) -10.50 to -3.65, p<0.0001], improvement of ROM (Fixed Effect model (FE), MD = -5.66, 95% CI -10.79 to -0.53, p = 0.03) and femoral-tibial angle [FE, MD = 0.85, 95% CI 0.46 to 1.25, p<0.0001]. Conclusions There are no clinically relevant differences between CR and PS TKA in terms of clinical, functional, radiological outcome, and complications, while PS TKA is superior to CR TKA in respects of ROM, while whether this superiority matters or not in clinical practice still needs further investigation and longer follow-up. PMID:26824368

  19. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in different water resources by Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP).

    PubMed

    Gallas-Lindemann, Carmen; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Mahmoodi, Mohammad Reza; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2013-02-01

    Human toxoplasmosis is potentially contracted due to consumption of contaminated drinking water and represents an increasing public health risk worldwide. Toxoplasma gondii oocysts can be resistant to standard disinfection processes, including UV radiation. Increased awareness of the risk of waterborne toxoplasmosis outbreaks has led to an increase in research interest in the detection of oocysts in environmental water systems. Ninety-five environmental water samples from the Lower Rhine area in Germany have been included in the study and examined for the presence of Toxoplasma. Water samples were filtered or flocculated by aluminum sulfate and purified by sucrose density gradient. DNA was then extracted, and the DNA samples were then examined by LAMP analysis. T. gondii DNA was detected in eight out of 83 (9.6%) influent and effluent samples obtained from wastewater treatment plants. All samples (n=12) from the surface, ground, raw and tap waters tested negative. The purpose of this work was to investigate the occurrence and distribution of Toxoplasma oocysts on the Lower Rhine in Germany. Our study provides evidence that the assay is a sensitive, specific, rapid and cost effective method for the detection of T. gondii and is useful for both the investigations of cases of waterborne outbreaks and for identifying the source of contamination.

  20. Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma Parasites Are Inhibited by a Benzoxaborole Targeting Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ru-Juan; Lukarska, Maria; Gut, Jiri; Bougdour, Alexandre; Touquet, Bastien; Wang, En-Duo; Li, Xianfeng; Alley, M. R. K.; Freund, Yvonne R.; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2016-01-01

    The apicomplexan parasites Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma are serious threats to human health. Cryptosporidiosis is a severe diarrheal disease in malnourished children and immunocompromised individuals, with the only FDA-approved drug treatment currently being nitazoxanide. The existing therapies for toxoplasmosis, an important pathology in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women, also have serious limitations. With the aim of developing alternative therapeutic options to address these health problems, we tested a number of benzoxaboroles, boron-containing compounds shown to be active against various infectious agents, for inhibition of the growth of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammalian cells. A 3-aminomethyl benzoxaborole, AN6426, with activity in the micromolar range and with activity comparable to that of nitazoxanide, was identified and further characterized using biophysical measurements of affinity and crystal structures of complexes with the editing domain of Cryptosporidium leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS). The same compound was shown to be active against Toxoplasma parasites, with the activity being enhanced in the presence of norvaline, an amino acid that can be mischarged by LeuRS. Our observations are consistent with AN6426 inhibiting protein synthesis in both Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma by forming a covalent adduct with tRNALeu in the LeuRS editing active site and suggest that further exploitation of the benzoxaborole scaffold is a valid strategy to develop novel, much needed antiparasitic agents. PMID:27431220

  1. Effect of Estuarine Wetland Degradation on Transport of Toxoplasma gondii Surrogates from Land to Sea▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Karen; Conrad, Patricia A.; Mazet, Jonna A. K.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Miller, Woutrina A.; Largier, John L.

    2010-01-01

    The flux of terrestrially derived pathogens to coastal waters presents a significant health risk to marine wildlife, as well as to humans who utilize the nearshore for recreation and seafood harvest. Anthropogenic changes in natural habitats may result in increased transmission of zoonotic pathogens to coastal waters. The objective of our work was to evaluate how human-caused alterations of coastal landscapes in California affect the transport of Toxoplasma gondii to estuarine waters. Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that is excreted in the feces of infected felids and is thought to reach coastal waters in contaminated runoff. This zoonotic pathogen causes waterborne toxoplasmosis in humans and is a significant cause of death in threatened California sea otters. Surrogate particles that mimic the behavior of T. gondii oocysts in water were released in transport studies to evaluate if the loss of estuarine wetlands is contributing to an increased flux of oocysts into coastal waters. Compared to vegetated sites, more surrogates were recovered from unvegetated mudflat habitats, which represent degraded wetlands. Specifically, in Elkhorn Slough, where a large proportion of otters are infected with T. gondii, erosion of 36% of vegetated wetlands to mudflats may increase the flux of oocysts by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Total degradation of wetlands may result in increased Toxoplasma transport of 6 orders of magnitude or more. Destruction of wetland habitats along central coastal California may thus facilitate pathogen pollution in coastal waters with detrimental health impacts to wildlife and humans. PMID:20802072

  2. Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma Parasites Are Inhibited by a Benzoxaborole Targeting Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Andrés; Liu, Ru-Juan; Lukarska, Maria; Gut, Jiri; Bougdour, Alexandre; Touquet, Bastien; Wang, En-Duo; Li, Xianfeng; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; Rosenthal, Philip J; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    The apicomplexan parasites Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma are serious threats to human health. Cryptosporidiosis is a severe diarrheal disease in malnourished children and immunocompromised individuals, with the only FDA-approved drug treatment currently being nitazoxanide. The existing therapies for toxoplasmosis, an important pathology in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women, also have serious limitations. With the aim of developing alternative therapeutic options to address these health problems, we tested a number of benzoxaboroles, boron-containing compounds shown to be active against various infectious agents, for inhibition of the growth of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammalian cells. A 3-aminomethyl benzoxaborole, AN6426, with activity in the micromolar range and with activity comparable to that of nitazoxanide, was identified and further characterized using biophysical measurements of affinity and crystal structures of complexes with the editing domain of Cryptosporidium leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS). The same compound was shown to be active against Toxoplasma parasites, with the activity being enhanced in the presence of norvaline, an amino acid that can be mischarged by LeuRS. Our observations are consistent with AN6426 inhibiting protein synthesis in both Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma by forming a covalent adduct with tRNA(Leu) in the LeuRS editing active site and suggest that further exploitation of the benzoxaborole scaffold is a valid strategy to develop novel, much needed antiparasitic agents.

  3. An aspartyl protease defines a novel pathway for export of Toxoplasma proteins into the host cell

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Michael J; Sleebs, Brad E; Uboldi, Alessandro D; Garnham, Alexandra; Franco, Magdalena; Marino, Nicole D; Panas, Michael W; Ferguson, David JP; Enciso, Marta; O'Neill, Matthew T; Lopaticki, Sash; Stewart, Rebecca J; Dewson, Grant; Smyth, Gordon K; Smith, Brian J; Masters, Seth L; Boothroyd, John C; Boddey, Justin A; Tonkin, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Infection by Toxoplasma gondii leads to massive changes to the host cell. Here, we identify a novel host cell effector export pathway that requires the Golgi-resident aspartyl protease 5 (ASP5). We demonstrate that ASP5 cleaves a highly constrained amino acid motif that has similarity to the PEXEL-motif of Plasmodium parasites. We show that ASP5 matures substrates at both the N- and C-terminal ends of proteins and also controls trafficking of effectors without this motif. Furthermore, ASP5 controls establishment of the nanotubular network and is required for the efficient recruitment of host mitochondria to the vacuole. Assessment of host gene expression reveals that the ASP5-dependent pathway influences thousands of the transcriptional changes that Toxoplasma imparts on its host cell. All these changes result in attenuation of virulence of Δasp5 tachyzoites in vivo. This work characterizes the first identified machinery required for export of Toxoplasma effectors into the infected host cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10809.001 PMID:26576949

  4. Ovine and caprine toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma gondii) in aborted animals in Jordanian goat and sheep flocks.

    PubMed

    Abu-Dalbouh, Mohamad Abed-alhaleem; Ababneh, Mustafa M; Giadinis, Nektarios D; Lafi, Shawkat Q

    2012-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty-five biological samples (106 aborted foetal tissue samples and 149 blood samples from aborted sheep and goats) were collected from 188 animals during the lambing season from September 2009 to April 2010 from the Mafraq region of Jordan. The sampled animals belonged to 93 goat and sheep flocks that had cases of abortion. A total of 169 (66.3%) biological samples were collected from sheep and 86 (33.7%) from goats. Seventy-six (29.8%) biological samples (45 blood and 31 tissue samples) were positive for Toxoplasma gondii by PCR assay. The positive samples were obtained from 43 sheep and 23 goats. The overall toxoplasma-specific prevalence rate was 35.1% (66/188). Forty flocks (43%) had at least one T. gondii PCR-positive animal. The risk factors related to flock health status and farm management that are hypothesized to be associated with T. gondii PCR positivity were also assessed using multiple logistic regressions. The presence of cats (OR = 4.74), a large flock size (OR = 2.76) and the method of disposing the aborted foetuses (OR = 3.77) were all statistically significant (P<0.05) risk factors that were positively associated with toxoplasma positivity in goat and sheep flocks. PMID:21643666

  5. Repurposing the Open Access Malaria Box To Discover Potent Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii and Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Fokou, Patrick V. T.; Tchokouaha, Lauve R. Y.; Spangenberg, Thomas; Mfopa, Alvine N.; Kouipou, Ruffin M. T.; Mbouna, Cedric J.; Donfack, Valerie F. Donkeng; Zollo, Paul H. A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis and amebiasis are important public health concerns worldwide. The drugs currently available to control these diseases have proven limitations. Therefore, innovative approaches should be adopted to identify and develop new leads from novel scaffolds exhibiting novel modes of action. In this paper, we describe results from the screening of compounds in the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) open access Malaria Box in a search for new anti-Toxoplasma and anti-Entamoeba agents. Standard in vitro phenotypic screening procedures were adopted to assess their biological activities. Seven anti-Toxoplasma compounds with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of <5 μM and selectivity indexes (SI) of >6 were identified. The most interesting compound was MMV007791, a piperazine acetamide, which has an IC50 of 0.19 μM and a selectivity index of >157. Also, we identified two compounds, MMV666600 and MMV006861, with modest activities against Entamoeba histolytica, with IC50s of 10.66 μM and 15.58 μM, respectively. The anti-Toxoplasma compounds identified in this study belong to scaffold types different from those of currently used drugs, underscoring their novelty and potential as starting points for the development of new antitoxoplasmosis drugs with novel modes of action. PMID:25049259

  6. Do differences in Toxoplasma prevalence influence global variation in secondary sex ratio? Preliminary ecological regression study.

    PubMed

    Dama, Madhukar S; Martinec Nováková, Lenka; Flegr, Jaroslav

    2016-08-01

    Sex of the fetus is genetically determined such that an equal number of sons and daughters are born in large populations. However, the ratio of female to male births across human populations varies significantly. Many factors have been implicated in this. The theory that natural selection should favour female offspring under suboptimal environmental conditions implies that pathogens may affect secondary sex ratio (ratio of male to female births). Using regression models containing 13 potential confounding factors, we have found that variation of the secondary sex ratio can be predicted by seroprevalence of Toxoplasma across 94 populations distributed across African, American, Asian and European continents. Toxoplasma seroprevalence was the third strongest predictor of secondary sex ratio, β = -0·097, P < 0·01, after son preference, β = 0·261, P < 0·05, and fertility, β = -0·145, P < 0·001. Our preliminary results suggest that Toxoplasma gondii infection could be one of the most important environmental factors influencing the global variation of offspring sex ratio in humans. The effect of latent toxoplasmosis on public health could be much more serious than it is usually supposed to be. PMID:27350331

  7. Toxoplasma encephalitis in Haitian adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinical-pathologic-CT correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Post, M.J.D.; Chan, J.C.; Hensley, G.T.; Hoffman, T.A.; Moskowitz, L.B.; Lippmann, S.

    1983-05-01

    The clinical data, histologic findings, and computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in eight adult Haitians with toxoplasma encephalitis were analyzed retrospectively. Diagnosis was established by identification of Toxoplasma gondii on autopsy in five and brain biopsy in three specimens and subsequently confirmed by the immunoperoxidase method. All these patiens, six of whom had been in the United States for 24 months or less, had severe idiopathic immunodeficiency syndrome. All were lymphopenic and six were on treatment for tuberculosis when the toxoplasma encephalitis developed. All patients were studied with CT when they developed an altered mental status and fever associated with seizures and/or focal neurologic deficits. Scans before treatment showed multiple intraparenchymal lesions in seven and a single lesion in the thalamus in one. Ring and/or nodular enhancement of the lesions was found in six and hypodense areas in two. Progressions of abnormalities occurred on serial studies. These CT findings that were best shown on axial and coronal thin-section double-dose contrast studies were useful but not diagnostically pathognomonic. In patients with similar clinical presentation CT is recommended to identify focal areas of involvement and to guide brain biopsy or excision so that prompt medical thereapy of this often lethal infection can be instituted.

  8. Systematic identification of the lysine succinylation in the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Hu, Xin; Wan, Yujing; Xie, Guizhen; Li, Xiangzhi; Chen, Di; Cheng, Zhongyi; Yi, Xingling; Liang, Shaohui; Tan, Feng

    2014-12-01

    Lysine succinylation is a new posttranslational modification identified in histone proteins of Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa. However, very little is known about their scope and cellular distribution. Here, using LC-MS/MS to identify parasite peptides enriched by immunopurification with succinyl lysine antibody, we produced the first lysine succinylome in this parasite. Overall, a total of 425 lysine succinylation sites that occurred on 147 succinylated proteins were identified in extracellular Toxoplasma tachyzoites, which is a proliferative stage that results in acute toxoplasmosis. With the bioinformatics analysis, it is shown that these succinylated proteins are evolutionarily conserved and involved in a wide variety of cellular functions such as metabolism and epigenetic gene regulation and exhibit diverse subcellular localizations. Moreover, we defined five types of definitively conserved succinylation site motifs, and the results imply that lysine residue of a polypeptide with lysine on the +3 position and without lysine at the -1 to +2 position is a preferred substrate of lysine succinyltransferase. In conclusion, our findings suggest that lysine succinylation in Toxoplasma involves a diverse array of cellular functions, although the succinylation occurs at a low level.

  9. Primary structure of the dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase gene from Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Roos, D S

    1993-03-25

    We have determined the primary genomic and cDNA sequences encoding the bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) enzyme of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (dihydrofolate reductase, EC 1.5.1.3; thymidylate synthase EC 2.1.1.45). The DHFR-TS gene of T. gondii (strain RH) spans more than 6 kilobases of genomic DNA. Unlike the DHFR-TS genes of other protists, sequences encoding the Toxoplasma protein are interrupted by numerous intervening sequences. Analysis of processed T. gondii DHFR-TS cDNAs reveals a single open reading frame of 1830 nucleotides, predicting a 610-amino acid protein of molecular mass of 69 kilodaltons. Because its nucleotide composition and codon usage are roughly comparable to those observed in "higher" eukaryotes, the Toxoplasma DHFR-TS sequence is particularly useful for assessing evolutionary relationships between eukaryotic species. The predicted amino acid sequence for the DHFR-TS protein shows conservation of the major structural features identified in other DHFR and TS enzymes, while revealing certain differences which may be exploited for the design of novel antifolates for treatment of toxoplasmosis associated with AIDS.

  10. Role of ATG3 in the parasite Toxoplasma gondii: autophagy in an early branching eukaryote.

    PubMed

    Besteiro, Sébastien

    2012-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii belongs to the phylum Apicomplexa, a diverse group of early branching unicellular eukaryotes related to dinoflagellates and ciliates. Like several other Apicomplexa such as Plasmodium (the causative agent of malaria), T. gondii is a human pathogen responsible for a potentially lethal disease called toxoplasmosis. Most Apicomplexa have complex life cycles, involving intermediate hosts and vectors, which include obligatory intracellular developmental stages. In the case of malaria and toxoplasmosis, it is that replicative process, leading to the ultimate lysis of the host cell, which is causing the symptoms of the disease. For Toxoplasma, the invasive and fast-replicating form of the parasite is called the tachyzoite. While autophagy has been a fast-growing field of research in recent years, not much was known about the relevance of this catabolic process in medically important apicomplexan parasites. Vesicles resembling autophagosomes had been described in drug-treated Plasmodium parasites in the early 1970s and a potential role for autophagy in organelle recycling during differentiation between Plasmodium life stages has also been recently described. Interestingly, recent database searches have identified putative orthologs of the core machinery responsible for the formation of autophagosomes in several protists, including Toxoplasma. In spite of an apparently reduced machinery (only about one-third of the yeast ATG genes appear to be conserved), T. gondii seemed thus able to perform macroautophagy, but the cellular functions of the pathway for this parasite remained to be demonstrated.

  11. Epigenomic Modifications Predict Active Promoters and Gene Structure in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Gissot, Mathieu; Kelly, Krystyna A; Ajioka, James W; Greally, John M; Kim, Kami

    2007-01-01

    Mechanisms of gene regulation are poorly understood in Apicomplexa, a phylum that encompasses deadly human pathogens like Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Initial studies suggest that epigenetic phenomena, including histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, have a profound effect upon gene expression and expression of virulence traits. Using the model organism Toxoplasma gondii, we characterized the epigenetic organization and transcription patterns of a contiguous 1% of the T. gondii genome using custom oligonucleotide microarrays. We show that methylation and acetylation of histones H3 and H4 are landmarks of active promoters in T. gondii that allow us to deduce the position and directionality of gene promoters with >95% accuracy. These histone methylation and acetylation “activation” marks are strongly associated with gene expression. We also demonstrate that the pattern of histone H3 arginine methylation distinguishes certain promoters, illustrating the complexity of the histone modification machinery in Toxoplasma. By integrating epigenetic data, gene prediction analysis, and gene expression data from the tachyzoite stage, we illustrate feasibility of creating an epigenomic map of T. gondii tachyzoite gene expression. Further, we illustrate the utility of the epigenomic map to empirically and biologically annotate the genome and show that this approach enables identification of previously unknown genes. Thus, our epigenomics approach provides novel insights into regulation of gene expression in the Apicomplexa. In addition, with its compact genome, genetic tractability, and discrete life cycle stages, T. gondii provides an important new model to study the evolutionarily conserved components of the histone code. PMID:17559302

  12. Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma Parasites Are Inhibited by a Benzoxaborole Targeting Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Andrés; Liu, Ru-Juan; Lukarska, Maria; Gut, Jiri; Bougdour, Alexandre; Touquet, Bastien; Wang, En-Duo; Li, Xianfeng; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; Rosenthal, Philip J; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    The apicomplexan parasites Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma are serious threats to human health. Cryptosporidiosis is a severe diarrheal disease in malnourished children and immunocompromised individuals, with the only FDA-approved drug treatment currently being nitazoxanide. The existing therapies for toxoplasmosis, an important pathology in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women, also have serious limitations. With the aim of developing alternative therapeutic options to address these health problems, we tested a number of benzoxaboroles, boron-containing compounds shown to be active against various infectious agents, for inhibition of the growth of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammalian cells. A 3-aminomethyl benzoxaborole, AN6426, with activity in the micromolar range and with activity comparable to that of nitazoxanide, was identified and further characterized using biophysical measurements of affinity and crystal structures of complexes with the editing domain of Cryptosporidium leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS). The same compound was shown to be active against Toxoplasma parasites, with the activity being enhanced in the presence of norvaline, an amino acid that can be mischarged by LeuRS. Our observations are consistent with AN6426 inhibiting protein synthesis in both Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma by forming a covalent adduct with tRNA(Leu) in the LeuRS editing active site and suggest that further exploitation of the benzoxaborole scaffold is a valid strategy to develop novel, much needed antiparasitic agents. PMID:27431220

  13. Arthroscopic Repair of Posterior Meniscal Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Lauren; Moulton, Samuel G.; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare subjective clinical outcomes in patients requiring arthroscopic transtibial pullout repair for posterior meniscus root tears of the medial and lateral menisci. We hypothesized that improvement in function and activity level would be similar among patients undergoing lateral and medial meniscal root repairs. Methods: This study was IRB approved. All patients who underwent posterior meniscal root repair by a single orthopaedic surgeon were included in this study. Detailed operative data were documented at surgery. Patients completed a subjective questionnaire, including Lysholm score, Tegner activity scale, WOMAC, SF-12 and patient satisfaction with outcome, which were collected preoperatively and at a minimum of two years postoperatively. Failure was defined as any patient who underwent revision meniscal root repair or partial meniscectomy following the index surgery. Results: There were 50 patients (16 females, 34 males) with a mean age of 37.8 years (range, 16.6-65.7) and a mean BMI of 27.3 (range, 20.5-49.2) included in this study. Fifteen patients underwent lateral meniscus root repair and 35 patients underwent medial meniscus root repair. Three patients who underwent lateral meniscus root repair required revision meniscus root repair surgery, while no patients who underwent medial meniscus root repair required revision surgery (p=0.26). There was a significant difference in preoperative and postoperative Lysholm score (53 vs. 78) (p<0.001), Tegner activity scale (2.0 vs. 4.0) (p=0.03), SF-12 physical component subscale (38 vs. 50) (p=0.001) and WOMAC (36 vs. 8) (p<0.001) for the total population. Median patient satisfaction with outcome was 9 (range, 1-10). There was no significant difference in mean age between lateral and medial root repair groups (32 vs. 40) (p=0.12) or gender (p=0.19). There was no significant difference in gender between lateral and medial root repair groups (p=0.95). There was a

  14. Posterior spinal fusion using pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Athanasakopoulos, Michael; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Triantafyllopoulos, George; Koufos, Spiros; Pneumaticos, Spiros G

    2013-07-01

    Few clinical studies have reported polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rod pedicle screw spinal instrumentation systems (CD-Horizon Legacy PEEK rods; Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota). This article describes a clinical series of 52 patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion using the PEEK Rod System between 2007 and 2010. Of the 52 patients, 25 had degenerative disk disease, 10 had lateral recess stenosis, 6 had degenerative spondylolisthesis, 6 had lumbar spine vertebral fracture, 4 had combined lateral recess stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis, and 1 had an L5 giant cell tumor. Ten patients had 1-segment fusion, 29 had 2-segment fusion, and 13 had 3-segment fusion. Mean follow-up was 3 years (range, 1.5-4 years); no patient was lost to follow-up. Clinical evaluation was performed using the Oswestry Disability Index and a low back and leg visual analog pain scale. Imaging evaluation of fusion was performed with standard and dynamic radiographs. Complications were recorded. Mean Oswestry Disability Index scores improved from 76% preoperatively (range, 52%-90%) to 48% at 6 weeks postoperatively, and to 34%, 28%, and 30% at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, respectively. Mean low back and leg pain improved from 8 and 9 points preoperatively, respectively, to 6 and 5 points immediately postoperatively, respectively, and to 2 points each thereafter. Imaging union of the arthrodesis was observed in 50 (96%) patients by 1-year follow-up. Two patients sustained screw breakage: 1 had painful loss of sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine and underwent revision spinal surgery with pedicle screws and titanium rods and the other had superficial wound infection and was treated with wound dressing changes and antibiotics for 6 weeks. No adjacent segment degeneration was observed in any patient until the time of this writing. PMID:23823055

  15. Posterior fossa syndrome after cerebellar stroke.

    PubMed

    Mariën, Peter; Verslegers, Lieven; Moens, Maarten; Dua, Guido; Herregods, Piet; Verhoeven, Jo

    2013-10-01

    Posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) due to vascular etiology is rare in children and adults. To the best of our knowledge, PFS due to cerebellar stroke has only been reported in patients who also underwent surgical treatment of the underlying vascular cause. We report longitudinal clinical, neurocognitive and neuroradiological findings in a 71-year-old right-handed patient who developed PFS following a right cerebellar haemorrhage that was not surgically evacuated. During follow-up, functional neuroimaging was conducted by means of quantified Tc-99m-ECD SPECT studies. After a 10-day period of akinetic mutism, the clinical picture developed into cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS) with reversion to a previously learnt accent, consistent with neurogenic foreign accent syndrome (FAS). No psychometric evidence for dementia was found. Quantified Tc-99m-ECD SPECT studies consistently disclosed perfusional deficits in the anatomoclinically suspected but structurally intact bilateral prefrontal brain regions. Since no surgical treatment of the cerebellar haematoma was performed, this case report is presumably the first description of pure, "non-surgical vascular PFS". In addition, reversion to a previously learnt accent which represents a subtype of FAS has never been reported after cerebellar damage. The combination of this unique constellation of poststroke neurobehavioural changes reflected on SPECT shows that the cerebellum is crucially implicated in the modulation of neurocognitive and affective processes. A decrease of excitatory impulses from the lesioned cerebellum to the structurally intact supratentorial network subserving cognitive, behavioural and affective processes constitutes the likely pathophysiological mechanism underlying PFS and CCAS in this patient. PMID:23575947

  16. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome: A systematic four-stage approach

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Youichi; Hannon, Charles P; Hurley, Eoghan; Kennedy, John G

    2016-01-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS) is a common injury in athletes engaging in repetitive plantarflexion, particularly ballet dancers and soccer players. Despite the increase in popularity of the posterior two-portal hindfoot approach, concerns with the technique remain, including; the technical difficulty, relatively steep learning curve, and difficulty performing simultaneous anterior ankle arthroscopy. The purpose of the current literature review is to provide comprehensive knowledge about PAIS, and to describe a systematic four-stage approach of the posterior two-portal arthroscopy. The etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic strategies are first introduced followed by options in conservative and surgical management. A detailed systematic approach to posterior hindfoot arthroscopy is then described. This technique allows for systematic review of the anatomic structures and treatment of the bony and/or soft tissue lesions in four regions of interest in the hindfoot (superolateral, superomedial, inferomedial, and inferolateral). The review then discusses biological adjuncts and postoperative rehabilitation and ends with a discussion on the most recent clinical outcomes after posterior hindfoot arthroscopy for PAIS. Although clinical evidence suggests high success rates following posterior hindfoot arthroscopy in the short- and mid-term it may be limited in the pathology that can be addressed due to the technical skills required, but the systematic four-stage approach of the posterior two-portal arthroscopy may improve upon this problem. PMID:27795947

  17. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Chang, Ji-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity has been considered a risk factor causing late failure of reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, although it is unknown whether that is the case for reconstructed posterior cruciate ligaments. We hypothesized patients with generalized joint laxity, compared with those without laxity, would have similar postoperative knee stability, range of motion, and functional scores after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Beighton and Horan criteria were used to determine generalized joint laxity. We enrolled 24 patients with generalized joint laxity (Group L) and 29 patients without any positive findings of joint laxity (Group N) matched by gender and age. The average side-by-side differences of posterior tibial translation were 4.72 mm in Group L and 3.63 mm in Group N. We observed no differences in posterior tibial translation with differing graft materials or combined procedures. In Group L the International Knee Documentation Committee score was normal in 12.5% and nearly normal in 45.8% whereas in Group N, 24.1% were normal and 55.2% nearly normal. Patients with generalized joint laxity showed more posterior laxity than patients without joint laxity. Generalized joint laxity therefore appears to be a risk factor associated with posterior laxity after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Level of Evidence: Level III, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18843524

  18. Posterior mediastinal mass diagnosed as schwanomma with concomittant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Surya Kant; Mishra, Ashwini Kumar; Verma, Ajay Kumar; Prakash, Ved

    2014-01-01

    A 21-year-old non-smoker, non-hypertensive male without diabetes was referred to our pulmonary medicine department with suspected malignant intrathoracic mass. The clinicoradiological evaluation revealed that it could be a posterior mediastinal mass. The same diagnosis was confirmed on performing CT and MRI. Benign posterior mediastinal schwanomma was suspected as it is the most common posterior mediastinal mass. It was completely resected. Histopathological examination confirmed the same. The mass was also sent for culture for mycobacterium which came out to be positive. The patient recovered from the surgery and postoperative X-ray showed complete clearance. He was treated with antitubercular treatment and responded very well. PMID:25246469

  19. Incidence and surgical importance of the posterior gastric artery.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, K; Prates, J C; DiDio, L J

    1978-01-01

    In a series of 61 adult cadavers, the posterior gastric artery was found in 38 (62.3%), originating from the superior aspect of the mid-third of the splenic artery. The posterior gastric artery, running behind the parietal peritoneum of the omental bursa, produced a peritoneal fold before reaching the posterior wall of the superior portion of the gastric body, near the cardiac region, and the fundus. Its high incidence, hidden origin, deep course, and distribution make this artery very important for surgical procedures relating to the stomach, pancreas, spleen, and celiac region. It may be crucial, especially if partial gastric resection of splenectomy have obliterated other gastric vessels. PMID:629615

  20. Asystole during posterior fossa surgery: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Keshav; Philip, Frenny Ann; Rath, Girija Prasad; Mahajan, Charu; Sujatha, M.; Bharti, Sachidanand Jee; Gupta, Nidhi

    2012-01-01

    Asystole during posterior fossa neurosurgical procedures is not uncommon. Various causes have been implicated, especially when surgical manipulation is carried out in the vicinity of the brain stem. The trigemino-cardiac reflex has been attributed as one of the causes. Here, we report two cases who suffered asystole during the resection of posterior fossa tumors. The vago-glossopharyngeal reflex and the direct stimulation of the brainstem were hypothesized as the causes of asytole. These episodes resolved spontaneously following withdrawal of the surgical stimulus emphasizing the importance of anticipation and vigilance during critical moments of tumor dissection during posterior fossa surgery. PMID:22870159

  1. The Simultaneous Modeling Technique: closing gaps in posteriors.

    PubMed

    Scolavino, Salvatore; Paolone, Gaetano; Orsini, Giovanna; Devoto, Walter; Putignano, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Direct posterior restorations represent a widespread procedure in daily practice. Occlusal layering is often considered a complex task, generally not predictable and often requiring several occlusal adjustments. Moreover, direct posterior restorations are time consuming, as many small increments must be applied and cured individually to control shrinkage stress. Several authors have proposed different material layering techniques for posteriors. The authors of this article propose a simplified approach, which primarily aims to help the clinician perform quick, simple, predictable, and natural-looking occlusal modeling, reducing the need for occlusal adjustments.

  2. Posterior cortical atrophy: an atypical variant of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Suárez-González, Aida; Henley, Susie M; Walton, Jill; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-06-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by striking progressive visual impairment and a pattern of atrophy mainly involving posterior cortices. PCA is the most frequent atypical presentation of Alzheimer disease. The purpose of this article is to provide a summary of PCA's neuropsychiatric manifestations. Emotional and psychotic symptoms are discussed in the context of signal characteristic features of the PCA syndrome (the early onset, focal loss of visual perception, focal posterior brain atrophy) and the underlying cause of the disease. The authors' experience with psychotherapeutic intervention and PCA support groups is shared in detail.

  3. Anatomic Double-Bundle Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Nitri, Marco; Civitarese, David; Dean, Chase S; Moulton, Samuel G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is known to be the main posterior stabilizer of the knee. Anatomic single-bundle PCL reconstruction, focusing on reconstruction of the larger anterolateral bundle, is the most commonly performed procedure. Because of the residual posterior and rotational tibial instability after the single-bundle procedure and the inability to restore the normal knee kinematics, an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction has been proposed in an effort to re-create the native PCL footprint more closely and to restore normal knee kinematics. We detail our technique for an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction using Achilles and anterior tibialis tendon allografts. PMID:27284530

  4. Posterior Wall Blowout in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Justin J.; Dean, Chase S.; Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J.; Cram, Tyler R.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Violation of the posterior femoral cortex, commonly referred to as posterior wall blowout, can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and lead to loss of graft fixation or early graft failure. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and adherence to proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and alternative fixation techniques is imperative to ensure optimal patient outcomes. This article highlights anatomic considerations for femoral tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction and techniques for avoidance and salvage of a posterior wall blowout. PMID:27335885

  5. The Simultaneous Modeling Technique: closing gaps in posteriors.

    PubMed

    Scolavino, Salvatore; Paolone, Gaetano; Orsini, Giovanna; Devoto, Walter; Putignano, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Direct posterior restorations represent a widespread procedure in daily practice. Occlusal layering is often considered a complex task, generally not predictable and often requiring several occlusal adjustments. Moreover, direct posterior restorations are time consuming, as many small increments must be applied and cured individually to control shrinkage stress. Several authors have proposed different material layering techniques for posteriors. The authors of this article propose a simplified approach, which primarily aims to help the clinician perform quick, simple, predictable, and natural-looking occlusal modeling, reducing the need for occlusal adjustments. PMID:26835524

  6. TgATAT-Mediated α-Tubulin Acetylation Is Required for Division of the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Varberg, Joseph M; Padgett, Leah R; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo; Sullivan, William J

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread protozoan parasite that causes potentially life-threatening opportunistic disease. New inhibitors of parasite replication are urgently needed, as the current antifolate treatment is also toxic to patients. Microtubules are essential cytoskeletal components that have been selectively targeted in microbial pathogens; further study of tubulin in Toxoplasma may reveal novel therapeutic opportunities. It has been noted that α-tubulin acetylation at lysine 40 (K40) is enriched during daughter parasite formation, but the impact of this modification on Toxoplasma division and the enzyme mediating its delivery have not been identified. We performed mutational analyses to provide evidence that K40 acetylation stabilizes Toxoplasma microtubules and is required for parasite replication. We also show that an unusual Toxoplasma homologue of α-tubulin acetyltransferase (TgATAT) is expressed in a cell cycle-regulated manner and that its expression peaks during division. Disruption of TgATAT with CRISPR/Cas9 ablates K40 acetylation and induces replication defects; parasites appear to initiate mitosis yet exhibit incomplete or improper nuclear division. Together, these findings establish the importance of tubulin acetylation, exposing a new vulnerability in Toxoplasma that could be pharmacologically targeted. IMPORTANCE Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic parasite that infects at least one-third of the world population. New treatments for the disease (toxoplasmosis) are needed since current drugs are toxic to patients. Microtubules are essential cellular structures built from tubulin that show promise as antimicrobial drug targets. Microtubules can be regulated by chemical modification, such as acetylation on lysine 40 (K40). To determine the role of K40 acetylation in Toxoplasma and whether it is a liability to the parasite, we performed mutational analyses of the α-tubulin gene. Our results indicate that parasites cannot survive without K40

  7. TgATAT-Mediated α-Tubulin Acetylation Is Required for Division of the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Varberg, Joseph M.; Padgett, Leah R.; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread protozoan parasite that causes potentially life-threatening opportunistic disease. New inhibitors of parasite replication are urgently needed, as the current antifolate treatment is also toxic to patients. Microtubules are essential cytoskeletal components that have been selectively targeted in microbial pathogens; further study of tubulin in Toxoplasma may reveal novel therapeutic opportunities. It has been noted that α-tubulin acetylation at lysine 40 (K40) is enriched during daughter parasite formation, but the impact of this modification on Toxoplasma division and the enzyme mediating its delivery have not been identified. We performed mutational analyses to provide evidence that K40 acetylation stabilizes Toxoplasma microtubules and is required for parasite replication. We also show that an unusual Toxoplasma homologue of α-tubulin acetyltransferase (TgATAT) is expressed in a cell cycle-regulated manner and that its expression peaks during division. Disruption of TgATAT with CRISPR/Cas9 ablates K40 acetylation and induces replication defects; parasites appear to initiate mitosis yet exhibit incomplete or improper nuclear division. Together, these findings establish the importance of tubulin acetylation, exposing a new vulnerability in Toxoplasma that could be pharmacologically targeted. IMPORTANCE Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic parasite that infects at least one-third of the world population. New treatments for the disease (toxoplasmosis) are needed since current drugs are toxic to patients. Microtubules are essential cellular structures built from tubulin that show promise as antimicrobial drug targets. Microtubules can be regulated by chemical modification, such as acetylation on lysine 40 (K40). To determine the role of K40 acetylation in Toxoplasma and whether it is a liability to the parasite, we performed mutational analyses of the α-tubulin gene. Our results indicate that parasites cannot survive

  8. [Toxoplasma gondii infections and oocyst shedding in domestic cats and the significance of this for the epidemiology and epizootiology of toxoplasmosis].

    PubMed

    Knaus, B U; Fehler, K

    1989-05-01

    Because of the dissemination of oocysts the cat and other felines have a central position within Toxoplasma gondii epidemiology and epizootiology. From 1984 to 1986, 267 cats between 2 months and 15 years old were serologically examined (SFT) for Toxoplasma antibodies. The rate of infection was 59.9 per cent. The infection rate of stray cats (72.5%) was significantly higher than that of domestic cats (40%). The high infection rate of herbivores results from behaviour of stray cats. In faeces of 264 animals Toxoplasma oocysts could not be proved by flotation technique. But in 39 samples of faeces Toxocara mystax eggs were found, in one sample Toxascaris leonina eggs. Coproscopical examinations did not reflect the real degree of parasitization of cats. The rate of disseminators of oocysts is drainable by Toxoplasma gondii infection found serologically. About 40% of the animals at the age of up to one year were found to excrete Toxoplasma oocysts.

  9. Evaluation of the antigenic value of recombinant Toxoplasma gondii HSP20 to detect specific immunoglobulin G antibodies in Toxoplasma infected humans.

    PubMed

    Cóceres, Veronica M; Becher, Melina Laguia; De Napoli, Maximiliano G; Corvi, María M; Clemente, Marina; Angel, Sergio O

    2010-10-01

    Recombinant Toxoplasma gondii small heat shock protein HSP20, surface antigen SAG1 and dense granule GRA7 were analyzed by IgG-ELISA with serum samples of Toxoplasma infected humans grouped as I (IgG+, IgM+), II (IgG+, IgM-) and III (IgG-, IgM-). rHSP20 reacted against 80% and 62.5% of serum samples from groups I and II, respectively. rSAG1 was recognized by 85% of the samples from group I and 70.8% from group II, whereas rGRA7 was recognized by 85% and 66.6% of the serum samples from groups I and II, respectively. When a combination of two or three recombinant antigens was used, the sensitivity values improved to 85-95% for group I and 87.5-91.7% for group II. All combinations tested produced similar reactivity profiles. None of the recombinant proteins reacted against group III serum samples. In conclusion, we demonstrated that T. gondii HSP20 elicits an important B-cell response during human infection, and could be suitable for the development of serodiagnosis tools.

  10. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection and associated risk factors in Huicholes in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Very little is known about the seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in ethnic groups in Mexico. Huicholes are an indigenous ethnic group living in a remote mountainous region in Mexico. We sought to determine the prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies in Huicholes; and to determine the association of Toxoplasma seropositivity with socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics of Huicholes. Methods We performed a cross sectional survey in Huicholes from September 2013 to January 2014. A convenience sampling method was used. We investigated the prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies in 214 Huicholes using enzyme-linked immunoassays. A standardized questionnaire was used to obtain the characteristics of the Huicholes. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of Toxoplasma exposure and Huicholes’ characteristics. Results Of the 214 Huicholes studied (mean age: 37.98 ± 15.80 years), 71 (33.2%) were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies and 47 (66.2%) of them were also positive for anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies. Seroprevalence of T. gondii infection did not vary with age, sex, or occupation. However, seroprevalence of anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies was significantly higher in female than in male Huicholes. Multivariate analysis of socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics showed that T. gondii exposure was associated with consumption of turkey meat (OR = 2.28; 95% CI: 1.16-4.46; P = 0.01). In addition, seroprevalence of T. gondii infection was significantly higher in Huicholes suffering from dizziness and memory impairment than those without such clinical characteristics. Conclusions Our results demonstrate serological evidence of T. gondii exposure among Huicholes which may be impacting their health. Results of this first study of T. gondii infection in Huicholes may be useful for the design of optimal preventive measures against infection with T

  11. Current management of posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Moed, Berton R; Kregor, Philip J; Reilly, Mark C; Stover, Michael D; Vrahas, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The general goals for treating an acetabular fracture are to restore congruity and stability of the hip joint. These goals are no different from those for the subset of fractures of the posterior wall. Nevertheless, posterior wall fractures present unique problems compared with other types of acetabular fractures. Successful treatment of these fractures depends on a multitude of factors. The physician must understand their distinctive radiologic features, in conjunction with patient factors, to determine the appropriate treatment. By knowing the important points of posterior surgical approaches to the hip, particularly the posterior wall, specific techniques can be used for fracture reduction and fixation in these often challenging fractures. In addition, it is important to develop a complete grasp of potential complications and their treatment. The evaluation and treatment protocols initially developed by Letournel and Judet continue to be important; however, the surgeon also should be aware of new information published and presented in the past decade.

  12. A rare case of traumatic posterior phacocele with retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Sindal, Manavi D; Mourya, Deepesh

    2016-01-01

    Dislocation of crystalline lens into the anterior subconjunctival or subtenon's space is a rare but known complication of blunt trauma. Dislocation into the posterior subtenon's space is even rarer and can be associated with a complication such as occult scleral tear and retinal detachment. We report a case of traumatic posterior subtenon's dislocation of crystalline lens after blunt trauma and its successful surgical management. PMID:26953031

  13. Posterior partially edentulous jaws, planning a rehabilitation with dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Douglas R; Silva, Emily V F; Pellizzer, Eduardo P; Filho, Osvaldo Magro; Goiato, Marcelo C

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To discuss important characteristics of the use of dental implants in posterior quadrants and the rehabilitation planning. METHODS: An electronic search of English articles was conducted on MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1990 up to the period of March 2014. The key terms were dental implants and posterior jaws, dental implants/treatment planning and posterior maxilla, and dental implants/treatment planning and posterior mandible. No exclusion criteria were used for the initial search. Clinical trials, randomized and non randomized studies, classical and comparative studies, multicenter studies, in vitro and in vivo studies, case reports, longitudinal studies and reviews of the literature were included in this review. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-two articles met the inclusion criteria of treatment planning of dental implants in posterior jaw and were read in their entirety. The selected articles were categorized with respect to their context on space for restoration, anatomic considerations (bone quantity and density), radiographic techniques, implant selection (number, position, diameter and surface), tilted and pterygoid implants, short implants, occlusal considerations, and success rates of implants placed in the posterior region. The results derived from the review process were described under several different topic headings to give readers a clear overview of the literature. In general, it was observed that the use of dental implants in posterior region requires a careful treatment plan. It is important that the practitioner has knowledge about the theme to evaluate the treatment parameters. CONCLUSION: The use of implants to restore the posterior arch presents many challenges and requires a detailed treatment planning. PMID:25610852

  14. Double bundle posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: surgical technique and results.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Gregory C; Beck, John D; Edson, Craig J

    2010-12-01

    The keys to successful posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are to identify and treat all pathology, use strong graft material, accurately place tunnels in anatomic insertion sites, minimize graft bending, use a mechanical graft tensioning device, use primary and back-up graft fixation, and use the appropriate postoperative rehabilitation program. Adherence to these technical principles results in successful single and double-bundle arthroscopic transtibial tunnel posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction based upon stress radiography, arthrometer, knee ligament rating scales, and patient satisfaction measurements.

  15. Cementoblastoma of posterior maxilla involving the maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Dadhich, Anuj S.; Nilesh, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cementoblastoma is a rare neoplasm, representing <1% of all odontogenic tumors. It usually occurs in the posterior mandible and is associated with roots of a mandibular first molar or second premolar. This paper presents a rare case of cementoblastoma in the maxillary posterior region involving the maxillary sinus, in a young female patient. The clinical, radiological, and histopathological features of the lesion are discussed along with a review of previously reported cases in the literature. PMID:26389052

  16. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Fabio; Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior "watershed" areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis.

  17. Erupted complex odontoma of the posterior maxilla: A rarity

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonika; Arul, A. Sri Kennath J.; Arul, A. Sri Sennath J.; Chitra, S.

    2015-01-01

    Complex odontomas, hamartomas of aborted tooth development, mainly occur in posterior part of the mandible and rarely erupt into the oral cavity. The spontaneous eruption may be associated with pain, inflammation of adjacent soft tissues or recurrent infection. The present case of complex odontoma is of particular interest due to its apparent eruption in the maxillary posterior segment, its association with agenesis of the second molar and impacted third molar; with the lesion being completely asymptomatic. PMID:26604611

  18. Erupted complex odontoma of the posterior maxilla: A rarity.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sonika; Arul, A Sri Kennath J; Arul, A Sri Sennath J; Chitra, S

    2015-08-01

    Complex odontomas, hamartomas of aborted tooth development, mainly occur in posterior part of the mandible and rarely erupt into the oral cavity. The spontaneous eruption may be associated with pain, inflammation of adjacent soft tissues or recurrent infection. The present case of complex odontoma is of particular interest due to its apparent eruption in the maxillary posterior segment, its association with agenesis of the second molar and impacted third molar; with the lesion being completely asymptomatic.

  19. Jerky dystonic shoulder following infarction of the posterior thalamus.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ruth H

    2015-01-01

    The syndrome of the jerky dystonic hand is recognized as a consequence of infarction of the posterior thalamus. A patient with multiple risk factors for stroke developed jerky dystonia of more proximal involvement, affecting the shoulder and speech, several months after a stroke affecting the posterior thalamic region. The cause for the proximal, rather than distal, upper limb involvement, is unclear, and is not apparent from the distribution of the lesion on neuroimaging. Injections of botulinum toxin significantly improved the symptoms.

  20. Parascapular mass revealing primary tuberculosis of the posterior arch

    PubMed Central

    Arbault, Anais; Ornetti, Paul; Chevallier, Olivier; Avril, Julien; Pottecher, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a parascapular abscess revealing primary tuberculosis of the posterior arch in a 31-year-old man. Sectional imaging is essential in order to detect the different lesions of this atypical spinal tuberculosis as osteolysis of the posterior arch extendible to vertebral body, osteocondensation, epidural extension which is common in this location, and high specificity of a zygapophysial, costo-vertebral or transverse arthritis.

  1. Mature posterior fossa teratoma mimicking infratentorial meningioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, O; El Kacemi, I; Fatemi, N; Gana, R; Saïdi, A; Maaqili, R; Jiddane, M; Bellakhdar, F

    2012-02-01

    Intracranial teratomas are congenital neoplasms mostly diagnosed in the pediatric hood and usually involve supratentorial midline structures. These teratomas, especially those involving the posterior fossa are an uncommon and representing less than 0.5% of all intracranial tumors. We report a case of mature posterior fossa teratoma in an adult patient diagnosed in the 4th decade of life. This lesion was taken for a huge infratentorial meningioma.

  2. Optimizing tooth form with direct posterior composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Raghu, Ramya; Srinivasan, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Advances in material sciences and technology have provided today's clinicians the strategies to transform the mechanistic approach of operative dentistry into a biologic philosophy. In the last three decades, composite resins have gone from being just an esthetically pleasing way of restoring Class III and Class IV cavities to become the universal material for both anterior and posterior situations as they closely mimic the natural esthetics while restoring the form of the human dentition. In order to enhance their success, clinicians have to rethink their protocol instead of applying the same restorative concepts and principles practiced with metallic restorations. Paralleling the evolution of posterior composite resin materials, cavity designs, restorative techniques and armamentarium have also developed rapidly to successfully employ composite resins in Class II situations. Most of the earlier problems with posterior composites such as poor wear resistance, polymerization shrinkage, postoperative sensitivity, predictable bonding to dentin, etc., have been overcome to a major extent. However, the clinically relevant aspect of achieving tight contacts in Class II situations has challenged clinicians the most. This paper reviews the evolution of techniques and recent developments in achieving predictable contacts with posterior composites. A Medline search was performed for articles on “direct posterior composite contacts.” The keywords used were “contacts and contours of posterior composites.” The reference list of each article was manually checked for additional articles of relevance. PMID:22144797

  3. Optimizing tooth form with direct posterior composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ramya; Srinivasan, Raghu

    2011-10-01

    Advances in material sciences and technology have provided today's clinicians the strategies to transform the mechanistic approach of operative dentistry into a biologic philosophy. In the last three decades, composite resins have gone from being just an esthetically pleasing way of restoring Class III and Class IV cavities to become the universal material for both anterior and posterior situations as they closely mimic the natural esthetics while restoring the form of the human dentition. In order to enhance their success, clinicians have to rethink their protocol instead of applying the same restorative concepts and principles practiced with metallic restorations. Paralleling the evolution of posterior composite resin materials, cavity designs, restorative techniques and armamentarium have also developed rapidly to successfully employ composite resins in Class II situations. Most of the earlier problems with posterior composites such as poor wear resistance, polymerization shrinkage, postoperative sensitivity, predictable bonding to dentin, etc., have been overcome to a major extent. However, the clinically relevant aspect of achieving tight contacts in Class II situations has challenged clinicians the most. This paper reviews the evolution of techniques and recent developments in achieving predictable contacts with posterior composites. A Medline search was performed for articles on "direct posterior composite contacts." The keywords used were "contacts and contours of posterior composites." The reference list of each article was manually checked for additional articles of relevance.

  4. [Detection of toxoplasma-specific IgM antibodies--comparison with the ISAGA (immunosorbent agglutination assay) and immunofluorescence results].

    PubMed

    Saathoff, M; Seitz, H M

    1985-01-01

    Serum samples from 702 persons were examined for Toxoplasma-specific IgM-antibodies using the immunosorbent agglutination assay (ISAGA) and the immunofluorescence-test (IIFT). 250 samples showed a positive reaction in the Sabin-Feldman-test (SFT) with titers greater than or equal to 1: 1 024, 58% were positive in ISAGA and 36% in the IIFT. Samples of persons with acute Toxoplasma-infection, showed high titers in the ISAGA and SFT as well, even in cases where the IgM-IIFT was negative. SFT-negative sera and others with weakly-positive reactions and also rheuma-positive samples were negative in the ISAGA. It is discussed how far it is possible to determine the duration of the Toxoplasma infection by applying the ISAGA in combination with other antibody tests.

  5. Role of the 52 KDa thioredoxin protein disulfide isomerase of Toxoplasma gondii during infection to human cells.

    PubMed

    Moncada, Diego; Arenas, Aylan; Acosta, Alejandro; Molina, Diego; Hernández, Alejandro; Cardona, Néstor; Gomez-Yepes, Mónica; Gomez-Marin, Jorge E

    2016-05-01

    Toxoplasma protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a 52 KDa thioredoxin of interest because have a great immunogenicity for humans. We cloned and produced a recombinant protein (recTgPDI) used to test its effect during infection to different human cell lines (epithelial and retinal). We also determine if there were differences in gen expression during in vitro infection. Expression of the gen was lower after entry into the host cells. PDI's inhibitors bacitracin and nitroblue tetrazolium reduced the percent of infected cells and small amounts of recTgPDI proteins interfered with the invasion step. All these results support a role of Toxoplasma PDI during the first steps of infection (adhesion and invasion). Toxoplasma PDI is a protein linked to early steps of invasion, it would be of importance to identify the host proteins substrates during invasion steps. PMID:26896642

  6. One step arthroscopically assisted Latarjet and posterior bone-block, for recurrent posterior instability and anterior traumatic dislocation.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Perfetti, Carlo; Garavaglia, Guido; Taverna, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    This case presents the challenges of the surgical management for a patient with a history of recurrent posterior shoulder instability and subsequently traumatic anterior dislocation. The patient was already on the waiting list for an arthroscopic posterior stabilization with anchors, when a car accident caused an additional anterior shoulder dislocation. This traumatic anterior dislocation created a bone loss with a glenoid fracture and aggravated the preexisting posterior instability. In order to address both problems, we decided to perform an arthroscopically assisted Latarjet procedure for anterior instability and to stabilize with a bone graft for posterior instability. To our best knowledge, this type of surgical procedure has so far never been reported in the literature. The purpose of this report is to present the surgical technique and to outline the decision making process.

  7. One step arthroscopically assisted Latarjet and posterior bone-block, for recurrent posterior instability and anterior traumatic dislocation

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambrosi, Riccardo; Perfetti, Carlo; Garavaglia, Guido; Taverna, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    This case presents the challenges of the surgical management for a patient with a history of recurrent posterior shoulder instability and subsequently traumatic anterior dislocation. The patient was already on the waiting list for an arthroscopic posterior stabilization with anchors, when a car accident caused an additional anterior shoulder dislocation. This traumatic anterior dislocation created a bone loss with a glenoid fracture and aggravated the preexisting posterior instability. In order to address both problems, we decided to perform an arthroscopically assisted Latarjet procedure for anterior instability and to stabilize with a bone graft for posterior instability. To our best knowledge, this type of surgical procedure has so far never been reported in the literature. The purpose of this report is to present the surgical technique and to outline the decision making process. PMID:26288539

  8. [Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy. A rare cause of ischaemic stroke].

    PubMed

    del Saz-Saucedo, Pablo; Alfaya-Muñoz, Laura Blanca; Recio-Bermejo, Marta; Lara-Medina, Francisco Javier; García-Chiclano, Amalia; Ortega-León, Teresa; Rueda-Medina, Ignacio; Domínguez-Fernández, María José; Madrid-Muñiz, Carmen; Franco-Huerta, María

    2013-06-01

    Introduccion. La epiteliopatia pigmentaria placoide multifocal posterior aguda (EPPMPA) es una enfermedad inflamatoria rara, generalmente de etiologia indeterminada, de la coriocapilar, el epitelio pigmentario y la retina externa. Afecta predominantemente a pacientes jovenes y en algunos casos puede involucrar al sistema nervioso central en forma de ictus o de meningoencefalitis. Presentamos el caso clinico de una mujer joven con EPPMPA complicada con ictus e hipertension intracraneal. Caso clinico. Mujer de 16 anos que comienza con cefalea intensa sugestiva de hipertension intracraneal, asi como con un deficit agudo hemisferico izquierdo. La resonancia magnetica craneal ponia de manifiesto lesiones embolicas o vasculiticas en diferentes territorios. No se evidenciaron datos de meningoencefalitis en el estudio del liquido cefalorraquideo, pero si de hipertension intracraneal asociada. La presencia de lesiones muy especificas en el polo ocular posterior permitio el diagnostico de EPPMPA complicada con ictus isquemico, probablemente por mecanismo vasculitico. Un amplio estudio etiologico fue negativo para identificar un factor desencadenante claro del proceso. Se inicio tratamiento corticoideo con buena evolucion clinica y radiologica. Conclusiones. La EPPMPA es una entidad rara que generalmente entrana buen pronostico; sin embargo, en algunos casos puede complicarse con afectacion del sistema nervioso central, y el ictus isquemico secundario a vasculitis es la complicacion mas grave. Ante un paciente joven con ictus que presente sintomatologia visual y lesiones coriorretinianas, debe considerarse la EPPMPA en su diagnostico etiologico.

  9. Persistent Low Toxoplasma IgG Avidity Is Common in Pregnancy: Experience from Antenatal Testing in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Findal, Gry; Stray-Pedersen, Babill; Holter, Ellen K.; Berge, Tone; Jenum, Pål A.

    2015-01-01

    The parasite Toxoplasma gondii might harm the fetus if a woman is infected during pregnancy. IgG seroconversion and significant increase in IgG antibody amount in pregnancy indicates maternal infection. Presence of toxoplasma immunoglobulin M (IgM), immunoglobulin G (IgG) and low IgG avidity in a single serum sample indicates possible maternal infection, but positive toxoplasma IgM and low IgG avidity may persist for months and even years. We aimed to evaluate avidity development during pregnancy in a retrospective study. Serial blood samples from 176 pregnant women admitted to Oslo University Hospital 1993–2013 for amniocentesis because of suspected toxoplasma infection were included. Data were obtained from journals and laboratory records. The avidity method used was based on Platelia Toxo IgG assay. Mean maternal age at first serology was 29.9 years (SD 5.2, range 18–42). In 37 (21%) women only the avidity increased from low to high in < 3 months. In 139 (79%) the IgG avidity remained below the high threshold ≥ 3 months and within this group 74 (42%) women had stable low IgG avidity during the observation period. Median gestational age at first test was 10.6 weeks (range 4.6–28.7). Fetal infection was detected in four children, but none among children whose mother had stable low IgG avidity. The first antenatal toxoplasma serology should ideally be collected in early pregnancy and if stable values of toxoplasma IgM and low IgG-avidity are detected in a second sample after three to four weeks, the need for amniocentesis can be questioned. PMID:26714282

  10. Persistent Low Toxoplasma IgG Avidity Is Common in Pregnancy: Experience from Antenatal Testing in Norway.

    PubMed

    Findal, Gry; Stray-Pedersen, Babill; Holter, Ellen K; Berge, Tone; Jenum, Pål A

    2015-01-01

    The parasite Toxoplasma gondii might harm the fetus if a woman is infected during pregnancy. IgG seroconversion and significant increase in IgG antibody amount in pregnancy indicates maternal infection. Presence of toxoplasma immunoglobulin M (IgM), immunoglobulin G (IgG) and low IgG avidity in a single serum sample indicates possible maternal infection, but positive toxoplasma IgM and low IgG avidity may persist for months and even years. We aimed to evaluate avidity development during pregnancy in a retrospective study. Serial blood samples from 176 pregnant women admitted to Oslo University Hospital 1993-2013 for amniocentesis because of suspected toxoplasma infection were included. Data were obtained from journals and laboratory records. The avidity method used was based on Platelia Toxo IgG assay. Mean maternal age at first serology was 29.9 years (SD 5.2, range 18-42). In 37 (21%) women only the avidity increased from low to high in < 3 months. In 139 (79%) the IgG avidity remained below the high threshold ≥ 3 months and within this group 74 (42%) women had stable low IgG avidity during the observation period. Median gestational age at first test was 10.6 weeks (range 4.6-28.7). Fetal infection was detected in four children, but none among children whose mother had stable low IgG avidity. The first antenatal toxoplasma serology should ideally be collected in early pregnancy and if stable values of toxoplasma IgM and low IgG-avidity are detected in a second sample after three to four weeks, the need for amniocentesis can be questioned. PMID:26714282

  11. Interaction between Parasitophorous Vacuolar Membrane-associated GRA3 and Calcium Modulating Ligand of Host Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum in the Parasitism of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Ryu, Kyung Ju

    2008-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody against Toxoplasma gondii of Tg556 clone (Tg556) blotted a 29 kDa protein, which was localized in the dense granules of tachyzoites and secreted into the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) after infection to host cells. A cDNA fragment encoding the protein was obtained by screening a T. gondii cDNA expression library with Tg556, and the full-length was completed by 5'-RACE of 2,086 bp containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 669 bp. The ORF encoded a polypeptide of 222 amino acids homologous to the revised GRA3 but not to the first reported one. The polypeptide has 3 hydrophobic moieties of an N-terminal stop transfer sequence and 2 transmembrane domains (TMD) in posterior half of the sequence, a cytoplasmic localization motif after the second TMD and an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retrival motif in the C-terminal end, which suggests GRA3 as a type III transmembrane protein. With the ORF of GRA3, yeast two-hybrid assay was performed in HeLa cDNA expression library, which resulted in the interaction of GRA3 with calcium modulating ligand (CAMLG), a type II transmembrane protein of ER. The specific binding of GRA3 and CAMLG was confirmed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. The localities of fluorescence transfectionally expressed from GRA3 and CAMLG plasmids were overlapped completely in HeLa cell cytoplasm. In immunofluorescence assay, GRA3 and CAMLG were shown to be co-localized in the PVM of host cells. Structural binding of PVM-inserted GRA3 to CAMLG of ER suggested the receptor-ligand of ER recruitment to PVM during the parasitism of T. gondii. PMID:19127325

  12. Posterior Surgery Alone in the Treatment of Post-traumatic Kyphosis by Posterior Column Osteotomy, Spondylodesis, Instrumentation, and Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohamed Hosein; Kachooei, Amir Reza; Heidari, Hosein

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To determine if posterior surgery alone can satisfactorily treat post-traumatic kyphosis (PTK). Overview of Literature One of the worst complications of vertebral fractures is PTK. The type of surgery and approach to treat a symptomatic and refractory PTK is a challenging issue in spinal surgery, and yet, there is no specific treatment algorithm. Methods From August 2003 to September 2010, we collected 26 cases (male to female ratio, 2.25; mean age, 31.9±9.7 years and follow-up period of 42.4±8.1 months) with PTK treated by posterior column osteotomy, spondylodesis, instrumentation and cement vertebroplasty in one stage posterior surgery. PTK angle, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjective satisfaction from surgery were used to determine the results. We used a student t test for analyzing the data before and after surgery. Results In our patients, T11 and L1 had the highest incidence of vertebral fractures. The results indicated that in PTK, ODI, and VAS were significantly improved this surgery. Solid fusion occurred in 96.2% of patients with 3.2°±2.1° loss of correction. A total of 84.6% of patients have satisfaction level of excellent and good. Conclusions Posterior surgery alone with posterior column osteotomy, vertebroplasty, posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation can effectively treat symptomatic PTK. PMID:24353841

  13. One-stage posterior approach and combined interbody and posterior fusion for thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis with kyphosis in children.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Qi; Wang, Yu-Xiang; Guo, Chao-Feng; Liu, Jin-Yang; Wu, Jian-Huang; Chen, Jing; Guo, Dai; Tang, Ming-Xing

    2010-11-02

    The goal of this study was to determine the efficacy and feasibility of surgical management of advanced thoracolumbar spine tuberculosis with kyphosis in children in poor general condition with 1-stage posterior decompression, interbody grafts, and posterior instrumentation and fusion. Between 2006 and 2008, 7 children with advanced thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis accompanied by kyphosis and in poor general condition were treated with 1-stage posterior decompression, interbody grafts, and posterior instrumentation and fusion followed by chemotherapy. Mean follow-up was 34 months (range, 27-42 months). Patients were evaluated pre- and postoperatively for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), neurological status, pain, spinal canal compromise, and kyphotic angle. Spinal tuberculosis was completely cured and the grafted bones fused in all 7 patients. There was no recurrence of the disease in any patient at final follow-up. In all patients, ESR was normal within 3 months, Frankel neurological classification improved, and pain relief was obtained. Average canal compromise was 52.57% (range, 35%-75%) preoperatively and 9.86% (range, 0%-19%) postoperatively. Average preoperative kyphosis was 37.9°, which decreased to 5.4° postoperatively. There was no significant loss of correction at last follow-up. Our results show that 1-stage posterior decompression, interbody grafts, and posterior instrumentation and fusion followed by chemotherapy is an alternative treatment for children with advanced thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis and in poor general condition.

  14. A novel co-infection model with Toxoplasma and Chlamydia trachomatis highlights the importance of host cell manipulation for nutrient scavenging.

    PubMed

    Romano, Julia D; de Beaumont, Catherine; Carrasco, Jose A; Ehrenman, Karen; Bavoil, Patrik M; Coppens, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    Toxoplasma and Chlamydia trachomatis are obligate intracellular pathogens that have evolved analogous strategies to replicate within mammalian cells. Both pathogens are known to extensively remodel the cytoskeleton, and to recruit endocytic and exocytic organelles to their respective vacuoles. However, how important these activities are for infectivity by either pathogen remains elusive. Here, we have developed a novel co-infection system to gain insights into the developmental cycles of Toxoplasma and C. trachomatis by infecting human cells with both pathogens, and examining their respective ability to replicate and scavenge nutrients. We hypothesize that the common strategies used by Toxoplasma and Chlamydia to achieve development results in direct competition of the two pathogens for the same pool of nutrients. We show that a single human cell can harbour Chlamydia and Toxoplasma. In co-infected cells, Toxoplasma is able to divert the content of host organelles, such as cholesterol. Consequently, the infectious cycle of Toxoplasma progresses unimpeded. In contrast, Chlamydia's ability to scavenge selected nutrients is diminished, and the bacterium shifts to a stress-induced persistent growth. Parasite killing engenders an ordered return to normal chlamydial development. We demonstrate that C. trachomatis enters a stress-induced persistence phenotype as a direct result from being barred from its normal nutrient supplies as addition of excess nutrients, e.g. amino acids, leads to substantial recovery of Chlamydia growth and infectivity. Co-infection of C. trachomatis with slow growing strains of Toxoplasma or a mutant impaired in nutrient acquisition does not restrict chlamydial development. Conversely, Toxoplasma growth is halted in cells infected with the highly virulent Chlamydia psittaci. This study illustrates the key role that cellular remodelling plays in the exploitation of host intracellular resources by Toxoplasma and Chlamydia. It further highlights the

  15. Toxoplasmosis and genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii in Macropus rufus and Macropus giganteus in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Moré, G; Pardini, L; Basso, W; Machuca, M; Bacigalupe, D; Villanueva, M C; Schares, G; Venturini, M C; Venturini, L

    2010-04-19

    Toxoplasma gondii infection is frequently asymptomatic; however, it can be severe or even fatal to some hosts. In this study, diagnosis of disseminated toxoplasmosis in one red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and one great grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) from the La Plata Zoo, Argentina and the isolation and molecular characterization of T. gondii are reported. Both male kangaroos showed depression and sudden death. Toxoplasma gondii infection was diagnosed by fresh examination, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, PCR and bioassay in mice. During fresh examination many protozoan cysts were observed in diaphragm, heart and hind limb muscles of M. rufus. Cysts were also observed in samples from M. giganteus, although in lower number. Cysts from both kangaroos stained strongly with T. gondii anti-serum by immunohistochemistry. The M. rufus showed more considerable histopathological lesions like non-suppurative meningoencephalitis, myositis and myocarditis. All mice inoculated with tissues from both kangaroos developed IFAT titers to T. gondii (titer >or=800) and brain cysts at necropsy. Both T. gondii isolates were maintained by mice passages and the M. rufus isolate was also maintained in cell culture. Toxoplasma gondii DNA from tissue samples was analyzed by PCR-RFLP analysis using the markers 5'SAG2, 3'SAG2, BTUB, GRA6, SAG3, c22-8, L358, PK1, c29-2 and Apico. Genotyping revealed that the T. gondii isolate from M. rufus was clonal type III and the isolate from M. giganteus was clonal type II. This is the first report of disseminated toxoplasmosis in M. rufus and M. giganteus in Argentina caused by genotypes of T. gondii considered non-virulent in a mouse model.

  16. Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii isolates in free-range chickens from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Marcet, Paula L; Lehmann, T

    2005-12-01

    The prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in free-ranging chickens is a good indicator of the prevalence of T. gondii oocysts in the soil because chickens feed from the ground. The prevalence of T. gondii in 61 free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) from provinces of Santiago del Estero and Entre Rios, Argentina was determined. Antibodies to T. gondii were assayed by the modified agglutination test (MAT) and were found in 25 chickens; titers were 1:5 in 6 chickens, 1:10 in 1 chicken, 1:20 in 2 chickens, 1:40 in 1 chicken, 1:80 in 2 chickens, 1:60 in 4 chickens, 1:120 in 2 chickens, 1:640 in 3 chickens, and 1: 1,280 or higher in 4 chickens. Hearts, pectoral muscles, and brains of 22 seropositive (MAT 1:10 or higher) chickens were bioassayed individually in mice. Tissue from 39 chickens with titers of 1:5 or less were pooled and fed to 3 T. gondii-free cats. Feces of cats were examined for oocysts, but none was found. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from 17 of 22 chickens with MAT titers of 1:10 or higher. Genotyping of these 17 isolates using polymorphisms at the SAG2 locus indicated that 4 were Type I, 3 were Type II, and 10 were Type III. Toxoplasma gondii isolates (2 Type I and I Type III) from 3 chickens were virulent for mice and 1 Type I was not mouse virulent. Prevalence of T. gondii antibodies in chickens varied among regions, being 3 times greater in the humid Pampeana region (61.2%) than in the semiarid plain of Santiago del Estero (20%).

  17. Toxoplasma gondii infections in chickens from Venezuela: isolation, tissue distribution, and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Lenhart, A; Castillo, C E; Alvarez, L; Marcet, P; Sreekumar, C; Lehmann, T

    2005-12-01

    The prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, in free-ranging chickens is a good indicator of the prevalence of T. gondii oocysts in the soil because chickens feed from the ground. The prevalence of T. gondii in 46 free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) from Venezuela was determined. Antibodies to T. gondii were assayed by the modified agglutination test (MAT). Antibodies were found in 16 (32%) chickens with titers of 1:5 in 1, 1:10 in 2, 1:40 in 2, 1:80 in 2, 1:160 in 2, 1:320 in 3, 1: 640 in 2, and 1:1,280 or higher in 2. Hearts, pectoral muscles, and brains of 13 chickens with MAT titers of 1:40 or more were bioassayed individually in mice. Tissues of each of 3 chickens with titers of 1:5 or 1:10 were pooled and bioassayed in mice. Tissues from the remaining 30 seronegative chickens were pooled and fed to 1 T. gondii-free cat. Feces of the cat were examined for oocysts; it did not shed oocysts. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from 12 of 13 chickens with MAT titers of 1:40 or more. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from pooled tissues of 1 of 2 chickens with titers of 1:10. Eight of these 13 isolates were virulent for mice. Genotyping of 13 of these isolates using the SAG2 locus indicated that 10 were type III, and 3 were type II. Phenotypically and genetically these isolates were different from T. gondii isolates from North America and Brazil. This is the first report of isolation of T. gondii from chickens from Venezuela.

  18. Negative pretransplant serostatus for Toxoplasma gondii is associated with impaired survival after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doesch, Andreas O; Ammon, Kerstin; Konstandin, Mathias; Celik, Sultan; Kristen, Arnt; Frankenstein, Lutz; Müller, Susanne; Sack, Falk-Udo; Katus, Hugo A; Dengler, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    Chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection is known to trigger potentially adverse immunoregulatory changes, but limited data exist on long-term implications for heart transplant (HTX) recipients. We evaluated the risk of all cause mortality regarding T. gondii serostatus prior to HTX. Pre-HTX T. gondii serostatus was obtained in 344 recipients and 294 donors. Mean age was 52.1 +/- 10.2 years and mean follow-up time after HTX was 5.7 (+/-5.5, median 3.5) years. All seronegative patients received prophylaxis with pyrimethamine/sulfomethoxazole or cotrimoxazol for 6 months after transplantation. Multivariate survival analysis adjusted for diabetes mellitus, pre-HTX renal function, recipient age, type of primary immunosuppression (i.e. HTX before 2001), cytomegalovirus (CMV) high-risk status, ischemic time, and number of treated rejection episodes was performed. Overall, 190 recipients (55.2% of total) were seronegative and 154 (44.8% of total) were seropositive for T. gondii prior to HTX. One hundred and fifty-two recipients died during follow-up (44.2% of total). Negative recipient Toxoplasma serostatus was associated with a significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality (P = 0.0213). Recipient T. gondii serostatus did not influence the number of cellular or humoral rejection episodes. Analyses of specific causes of death showed a trend toward a higher number of infection-related deaths in the seronegative subgroup (P = 0.13). No statistically significant effects of T. gondii donor/recipient seropairing, or seroconversion were observed. Negative preoperative serostatus for T. gondii in HTX recipients appears to be an independent risk factor associated with increased all-cause mortality. The cause of impaired survival in Toxoplasma seronegative recipients is currently unclear; possible explanations include an alteration of immune-reactivity/-regulation or adverse effects of prophylactic medication. PMID:19912587

  19. Posterior Corneal Characteristics of Cataract Patients with High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Qinghe; Tang, Yating; Qian, Dongjin; Lu, Yi; Jiang, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the characteristics of the posterior corneal surface in patients with high myopia before cataract surgery. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study at the Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Corneal astigmatism and axial length were measured with a rotating Scheimpflug camera (Pentacam) and partial coherence interferometry (IOLMaster) in a high-myopia study group of 167 eyes (axial length ≥ 26 mm) and a control group of 150 eyes (axial length > 20 mm and < 25 mm). Results Total corneal astigmatism and anterior corneal astigmatism values were higher in the high-myopia group than in the control group. There was no significant difference in posterior corneal astigmatism between the high-myopia study group and the control group. In the study group, the mean posterior corneal astigmatism (range 0 – −0.9 diopters) was –0.29 diopters (D) ± 0.17 standard deviations (SD). The steep corneal meridian was aligned vertically (60°–120°) in 87.43% of eyes for the posterior corneal surface, and did not change with increasing age. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.235, p = 0.002) between posterior corneal astigmatism and anterior corneal astigmatism, especially when the anterior corneal surface showed with-the-rule (WTR) astigmatism (r = 0.452, p = 0.000). There was a weak negative correlation between posterior corneal astigmatism and age (r = –0.15, p = 0.053) in the high-myopia group. Compared with total corneal astigmatism values, the anterior corneal measurements alone overestimated WTR astigmatism by a mean of 0.27 ± 0.18 D in 68.75% of eyes, underestimated against-the-rule (ATR) astigmatism by a mean of 0.41 ± 0.28 D in 88.89% of eyes, and underestimated oblique astigmatism by a mean of 0.24 ± 0.13 D in 63.64% of eyes. Conclusions Posterior corneal astigmatism decreased with age and remained as ATR astigmatism in most cases of high myopia. There was a significant correlation between posterior corneal

  20. The enigmatic diagnosis of posterior tibialis tendon rupture.

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, R. E.; Pfister, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Posterior tibialis tendon rupture is a diagnosis that is often missed. This is thought to be secondary to nonspecific clinical findings and the lack of any laboratory or radiographic test to reliably confirm the diagnosis. We report sixteen cases of surgically confirmed posterior tibialis tendon rupture. Based on our review of these patients, the diagnosis of posterior tibialis tendon rupture should be strongly suspected in the adult patient presenting with a history of a twisting ankle injury and generalized medial ankle pain and swelling. A flexible, asymmetric pes planus and forefoot pronation deformity with absence of posterior tibialis tendon function on manual testing is seen on examination. This is associated with loss of ipsilateral heel inversion on bilateral heel rise. The patient is usually unable to perform ipsilateral single leg heel rise and has less severe pes planus of the contralateral foot. This study reviews the presentation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of posterior tibialis tendon rupture. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7820739