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Sample records for posterior-stabilized total knee

  1. Posterior cruciate ligament removal contributes to abnormal knee motion during posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cromie, Melinda J; Siston, Robert A; Giori, Nicholas J; Delp, Scott L

    2008-11-01

    Abnormal anterior translation of the femur on the tibia has been observed in mid flexion (20-60 degrees ) following posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty. The underlying biomechanical causes of this abnormal motion remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to isolate the effects of posterior cruciate ligament removal on knee motion after total knee arthroplasty. We posed two questions: Does removing the posterior cruciate ligament introduce abnormal anterior femoral translation? Does implanting a posterior stabilized prosthesis change the kinematics from the cruciate deficient case? Using a navigation system, we measured passive knee kinematics of ten male osteoarthritic patients during surgery after initial exposure, after removing the anterior cruciate ligament, after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and after implanting the prosthesis. Passively flexing and extending the knee, we calculated anterior femoral translation and the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Removing the posterior cruciate ligament doubled anterior translation (from 5.1 +/- 4.3 mm to 10.4 +/- 5.1 mm) and increased the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began (from 31.2 +/- 9.6 degrees to 49.3 +/- 7.3 degrees). Implanting the prosthesis increased the amount of anterior translation (to 16.1 +/- 4.4 mm), and did not change the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Abnormal anterior translation was observed in low and mid flexion (0-60 degrees) after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and normal motion was not restored by the posterior stabilized prosthesis.

  2. In vivo polyethylene bearing mobility is maintained in posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Komistek, Richard D; Dennis, Douglas A; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Walker, Scott; Outten, Joel

    2004-11-01

    In vivo knee kinematics, including polyethylene bearing mobility, were determined in a group of nine patients implanted with a posterior stabilized, mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty. Each patient, while under fluoroscopic surveillance, did a weightbearing deep knee bend and was analyzed using a 3-D computer model-fitting technique. Patients were evaluated at three and 15 months postoperatively. All nine patients had polyethylene bearing rotation relative to the tibial tray at both times, with the maximum amount of polyethylene bearing rotation at any flexion interval averaging 8.5 (range, 5.2-15.5) and 9.8 (range, 4.8-14.2) at 3 and 15 months, respectively. Minimal rotation of the polyethylene bearing relative to the femoral component was observed, averaging only 1.9 and 1.0 of rotation from full extension to maximum knee flexion at three and 15 months, respectively. This study determined that the polyethylene bearing is primarily rotating relative to the tibia rather than the femoral component. Therefore, as the femoral component axially rotates, the polyethylene bearing is rotating a similar magnitude in the same direction. This should result in reduced shear stresses on the superior aspect of the polyethylene bearing, lessening polyethylene wear.

  3. Patient function after a posterior stabilizing total knee arthroplasty: cam-post engagement and knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Jeremy F; Hanson, George R; Park, Sang Eun; Moynihan, Angela L; Li, Guoan

    2008-03-01

    Even though posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty has been widely used in surgery, how the cam-post mechanism (posterior substituting mechanism) affects knee joint kinematics and function in patients is not known. The objective of the present study was to investigate posterior femoral translation, internal tibial rotation, tibiofemoral contact, and cam-post engagement of total knee arthroplasty patients during in vivo weight-bearing flexion. Twenty-four knees with a PS TKA were investigated while performing a single leg weight-bearing lunge from full extension to maximum flexion as images were recorded using a dual fluoroscopic system. The in vivo knee position at each targeted flexion angle was reproduced using 3D TKA models and the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the knee was measured from the series of the total knee arthroplasty models. The cam-post engagement was determined when the surface model of the femoral cam overlapped with that of the tibial post. The mean maximum flexion angle for all the subjects was 112.5 +/- 13.1 degrees . The mean flexion angle where cam-post engagement was observed was 91.1 +/- 10.9 degrees . The femur moved anteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees and posteriorly through the rest of the flexion range. The internal tibial rotation increased approximately 6 degrees from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion and decreased slightly with further flexion. Both the medial and lateral contact point moved posteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees , remained relatively constant from 30 degrees to 90 degrees , and then moved further posterior from 90 degrees to maximum flexion. The in vivo cam-post engagement corresponded to increased posterior translation and reduced internal tibial rotation at high flexion of the posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty. The initial cam-post engagement was also mildly correlated with the maximum flexion angle of the knee (R = 0.51, p = 0.019). A later cam-post engagement might

  4. Effect of femoral component design on patellofemoral crepitance and patella clunk syndrome after posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frye, Benjamin M; Floyd, Mark W; Pham, Dahn C; Feldman, John J; Hamlin, Brian R

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if recent changes to the femoral component of a particular posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis would affect the incidence of postoperative patellofemoral crepitance and patella clunk syndrome. One hundred eight total knee arthroplasties were performed with the conventional design; 136 were performed after the femoral component was changed. Complications were compared between the groups with an average follow-up of 17.7 months and 12.4 months, respectively. Thirteen knees with the conventional design (12%) were found to have patellofemoral complications; no complications were noted with the new design (P < .0001). Femoral components with a deep trochlear groove and smooth transition of the intercondylar box appear to better accommodate any peripatellar fibrous nodule that may form after total knee arthroplasty.

  5. Does Cruciate-Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty Show Better Quadriceps Recovery than Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty? - Objective Measurement with a Dynamometer in 102 Knees

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kye-Youl; Song, Sang-Jun; Bae, Dae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Cruciate-retaining (CR) prostheses have been considered to produce more physiologic femoral rollback, provide better proprioception, and result in better quadriceps recovery than posterior-stabilized (PS) prostheses after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, there are very few studies demonstrating these benefits in an objective manner. We investigated whether CR-TKA could result in (1) better quadriceps recovery; (2) a greater proportion of patients with beyond the preoperative level of recovery; and (3) better clinical outcomes than PS-TKA. Methods This was a prospective non-randomized comparative study on the results of CR-TKA and PS-TKA. CR prostheses were used in 51 knees and PS prostheses in 51 knees. Quadriceps force was measured with a dynamometer preoperatively and at postoperative 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months consecutively. The Knee Society score (KSS) and range of motion (ROM) were also evaluated. Results There were no differences between two groups in terms of the objective quadriceps force during the follow-up period. The proportion of patients with beyond the preoperative level of recovery was similar between groups. Moreover, the KSS and ROM were not significantly different between two groups. Conclusions CR-TKA did not result in better quadriceps recovery than PS-TKA during the 6-month follow-up. In other words, PS-TKA could lead to comparable quadriceps recovery despite greater preoperative weaknesses such as more restricted ROM and more severe degenerative changes of the knee. PMID:27904719

  6. Highly Cross-Linked Versus Conventional Polyethylene in Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty at a Mean 5-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, R Michael; Lovro, Luke R; Smits, Shelly A; Ireland, Philip H

    2015-10-01

    Concerns of highly cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) exist regarding fatigue resistance and oxidation, particularly in posterior-stabilized (PS) designs. A prospective cohort study of 114 consecutive PS TKAs utilized conventional polyethylene in 50 knees and second-generation annealed XLPE in 64 TKAs. Clinical (Short-Form 36, Knee Society Scores, and LEAS) and radiographic outcomes were evaluated at a mean of 5 years in 103 TKAs. Mean KSS scores were 12 points higher (P=0.01) and SF-36 physical function subset 14 points higher (P=0.005) in the XLPE group. There was no radiographic osteolysis or mechanical failure related to the tibial polyethylene in either group. At 5-year follow-up, no deleterious effects related to highly cross-linked posterior stabilized tibial polyethylene inserts were observed.

  7. Incidence of patellar clunk syndrome in fixed versus high-flex mobile bearing posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Snir, Nimrod; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Diskin, Brian; Takemoto, Richelle; Hamula, Mathew; Meere, Patrick A

    2014-10-01

    The geometry of the intercondylar box plays a significant role in the development of patellar clunk syndrome. We reviewed the incidence of patella clunk at mid-to-long-term follow-up of a rotating high-flex versus fixed bearing posterior stabilized TKA design. 188-mobile and 223-fixed bearing TKAs were reviewed for complications, incidence of patellar clunk, treatment, recurrence rates, range of motion, and patient satisfaction. Patellar clunk developed in 22 knees in the mobile (11.7%) and in 4 (1.8%) in the fixed bearing group (P<0.001). 23 out of 26 cases resolved with a single arthroscopic treatment and 2 resolved with a second procedure. The mean postoperative range of motion was 122.4°. All but one patient reported overall satisfaction with the index procedure. In contrast with other recent studies we found a significant incidence of patellar clunk in high-flex mobile bearings. Despite the high rate of patellar clunk syndrome, overall patients did well and were satisfied with their outcomes.

  8. Clinical evaluation of 292 Genesis II posterior stabilized high-flexion total knee arthroplasty: range of motion and predictors.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Mathijs C H W; Janssen, Rob P A

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the range of motion and complications after Genesis II total knee arthroplasty with high-flexion tibia insert (TKA-HF). Furthermore, difference in knee flexion between high flexion and standard inserts was compared. The hypothesis was that knee flexion is better after high-flexion TKA. A total of 292 TKA-HF were retrospectively reviewed. Mean follow-up was 24.3 months. The range of motion was compared between TKA-HF (high-flexion group) and a comparable cohort of 86 Genesis II TKA with a standard tibia insert (control group). Surgeries were performed by one experienced knee orthopedic surgeon. Knee flexion in the high-flexion group increased from 114.8° preoperatively to 118.0° postoperatively (P < 0.01). Knee extension in the high-flexion group increased from -4.5° preoperatively to -0.4° after surgery (P < 0.01). Mean knee flexion was 5.52° (± 1.46°) better in the high-flexion group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Preoperative range of motion, body mass index, diabetes mellitus and patellofemoral pain significantly influenced range of motion. Few complications occurred after TKA-HF. The Genesis II TKA-HF showed good short-term results with limited complications. Knee flexion after Genesis II TKA-HF was better compared with a standard tibia insert.

  9. Tibiofemoral alignment in posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty: Static alignment does not predict dynamic tibial plateau loading.

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily J; Pagnano, Mark W; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2014-08-01

    For total knee arthroplasty (TKA), neutral mechanical alignment produces balanced static knee loading. Dynamically, knee loading is affected by more than limb static alignment. We compared static and dynamic knee loading following TKA. Fifteen TKA patients were evaluated pre-operatively and 2 months and 2 years post-operatively. Tibiofemoral angles and medial tibial plateau loading were calculated. Pre-operatively, static medial load was greater for varus than valgus knees. Post-operatively, no relationship existed between tibiofemoral angle and static medial plateau load. Pre-operatively and post-operatively, dynamic medial load was not dependent on tibiofemoral angle. While all patients achieved equal static plateau load distributions at 2 years, only 47% had dynamic medial load distributions of 50 ± 10%. Static tibiofemoral alignment alone does not predict dynamic tibial loading.

  10. Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty with a Cemented Posterior Stabilized, Condylar Constrained or Fully Constrained Prosthesis: A Minimum 2-year Follow-up Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sun-Chul; Kong, Jae-Yeon; Nam, Dae-Cheol; Kim, Dong-Hee; Park, Hyung-Bin; Jeong, Soon-Taek

    2010-01-01

    Background The clinical and radiological outcomes of revision total knee arthroplasty with a cemented posterior stabilized (PS), condylar constrained knee (CCK) or a fully constrained rotating hinge knee (RHK) prosthesis were evaluated. Methods This study reviewed the clinical and radiological results of 36 revision total knee arthroplasties with a cemented PS, CCK, and RHK prosthesis in 8, 25, and 13 cases, respectively, performed between 1998 and 2006. The mean follow-up period was 30 months (range, 24 to 100 months). The reason for the revision was aseptic loosening of one or both components in 15, an infected total knee in 18 and a periprosthetic fracture in 3 knees. The average age of the patients at the time of the revision was 65 years (range, 58 to 83 years). The original diagnosis for all primary total knee arthroplasties was osteoarthritis except for one case of a Charcot joint. All revision prostheses were fixed with cement. The bone deficiencies were grafted with a cancellous allograft in the contained defect and cortical allograft fixed with a plate and screws in the noncontained defect. A medial gastrocnemius flap was needed to cover the wound dehiscence in 6 of the 18 infected cases. Results The mean Knee Society knee score improved from 28 (range, 5 to 43) to 83 (range, 55 to 94), (p < 0.001) and the mean Knee Society function score improved from 42 (range, 10 to 66) to 82 (range, 60 to 95), (p < 0.001) at the final follow-up. Good or excellent outcomes were obtained in 82% of knees. There were 5 complications (an extensor mechanism rupture in 3 and recurrence of infection in 2 cases). Three cases of an extensor mechanism defect (two ruptures of ligamentum patellae and one patellectomy) were managed by the RHK prosthesis to provide locking stability in the heel strike and push off phases, and two cases of recurrent infection used an antibiotic impregnated cement spacer. The radiological tibiofemoral alignment improved from 1.7° varus to 3.0

  11. Evaluation of Postoperative Range of Motion and Functional Outcomes after Cruciate-Retaining and Posterior-Stabilized High-Flexion Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chang Wook; Yang, Ick Hwan; Lee, Woo Suk; Park, Kwan Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare postoperative range of motion and functional outcomes among patients who received high-flexion total knee arthroplasty using cruciate-retaining (CR-Flex) and posterior-stabilized (PS-Flex) type prostheses. Materials and Methods Among 127 patients (186 knees) who underwent high-flexion total knee arthroplasty between 2005 and 2007, 92 knees were placed in the CR-Flex group, and 94 knees were placed in the PS-Flex group. After two years of postoperative follow-up, clinical and radiographic data were reviewed. Postoperative non-weight-bearing range of knee motion, angle of flexion contracture and functional outcomes based on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) functional sub-scale were assessed and compared between the two groups. Results After the 2-year postoperative period, the mean range of motion was 131° in the CR-Flex group and 133° in the PS-Flex group. There were no significant differences in postoperative range of motion between the two groups. Only age at operation and preoperative range of motion were significantly associated with postoperative range of motion after high-flexion total knee arthroplasty. Postoperative functional outcomes based on the WOMAC functional sub-scale were slightly better in the CR-Flex group (9.2±9.1 points) than in the PS-Flex group (11.9±9.6 points); however, this difference was not statistically significant (p=non-significant). Conclusion The retention or substitution of the posterior cruciate ligament does not affect postoperative range of motion (ROM) or functional outcomes, according to 2 years of postoperative follow-up of high-flexion total knee arthroplasty. PMID:22665348

  12. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0–135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, “rollback” compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis. PMID:25591565

  13. Analysis of surface damage in retrieved carbon fiber-reinforced and plain polyethylene tibial components from posterior stabilized total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Wright, T M; Rimnac, C M; Faris, P M; Bansal, M

    1988-10-01

    The performance of carbon fiber-reinforced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene was compared with that of plain (non-reinforced) polyethylene on the basis of the damage that was observed on the articulating surfaces of retrieved tibial components of total knee prostheses. Established microscopy techniques for subjectively grading the presence and extent of surface damage and the histological structure of the surrounding tissues were used to evaluate twenty-six carbon fiber-reinforced and twenty plain polyethylene components that had been retrieved after an average of twenty-one months of implantation. All of the tibial components were from the same design of total knee replacement. The two groups of patients from whom the components were retrieved did not differ with regard to weight, the length of time that the component had been implanted, the radiographic position and angular alignment of the component, the original diagnosis, or the reason for removal of the component. The amounts and types of damage that were observed did not differ for the two materials. For both materials, the amount of damage was directly related to the length of time that the component had been implanted. The histological appearance of tissues from the area around the component did not differ for the two materials, except for the presence of fragments of carbon fiber in many of the samples from the areas around carbon fiber-reinforced components.

  14. Fracture of the polyethylene tibial post in a posterior stabilized knee prosthesis: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nishikant; Yadav, Chandrashekhar; Raj, Rishi; Yadav, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of fracture of tibial polyethylene post fracture from base in a 56 year old lady 10 years from posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty following trivial trauma. There have been signs of wear at the base especially anteriorly. After revision of tibial polyethylene component patient developed complete relief of symptom.

  15. What have we learned from 100% success of press fit condylar rotating platform posterior stabilized knees?: A 5-10 years followup by a nondesigner

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Shrinand V; Virani, Siddharth; Phunde, Rajendra; Mahajan, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Total joint arthroplasties of the hip and knee represent a remarkable feat of modern medicine in terms of reducing pain and restoring function to millions of patients afflicted with severe arthritis. Oftentimes, the performance and longevity of new implants and devices are based on limited data. This is the first study by a non-designer on the press fit condylar rotating platform posterior stabilized (PFC-RP-PS) design with 100’ success. This has a relevance, vis-á -vis bias that one may have in terms of reproducibility of technique and funding from the manufacturer. We associate our excellent mid-term results to intra operative technical aspects and stringent intra operative exclusion criteria. Materials and Methods: Our study includes a cohort of 121 selected knees operated between January 2003 and October 2010. We used cemented, posterior stabilized (PS), mobile bearing (MB), and RP prosthesis from the same manufacturer in all these 121 knees. The patients were evaluated bi-annually with the calculation of their Knee Society Scores (KSS) and a radiological assessment for loosening/osteolysis. Results: 120 knees were available for followup. The average Knee Society clinical and functional scores, respectively, were 27 points and 40 points preoperatively and 93 points and 95 points postoperatively. This indicates a mean increase of about 71’ in the clinical score and about 58’ in the functional score, which is statistically significant. The mean postoperative flexion was 124°, a mean increase of 23° from the preoperative flexion of 101°. There were no revisions (Kaplan-–Meier survivorship of 100’). Conclusions: We feel durable and reproducible results of PFC-RP-PS design knees are very technique sensitive. The way ahead with the PFC-RP-PS knees looks promising when the exclusion criteria for this design are strictly met. Coming from a non-designer, this study acquires a higher degree of relevance without any designer's or manufacturer

  16. 180° rotatory dislocation of the rotating platform of a posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing knee prosthesis; possible complication after closed reduction of a posterior dislocation--a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Min; Kim, Young Sung; Kim, Jong Pil

    2014-01-01

    Dislocation of the rotating platform is a significant early complication of mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty. The authors report an unusual case of acute 180° rotatory dislocation of the rotating platform after closed reduction of a posterior dislocation of a posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing total knee prosthesis. A 71-year-old male with knee osteoarthritis underwent TKRA using a posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing prosthesis. Posterior dislocation of the prosthesis occurred at 5 weeks postoperatively, and closed reduction of the posterior dislocation resulted in complete 180° rotatory dislocation of the rotating platform. The patient was treated by open exploration and polyethylene exchange for a larger component. This case illustrates that dislocation of a posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing total knee prosthesis can occur given valgus laxity and causes a 90° spin-out of the polyethylene insert, and that closed reduction attempts may contribute to complete 180° rotatory dislocation of the rotating platform. Special attention should be given to both AP and lateral views to ensure that the platform is truly reduced and not rotated by 180°. Plain digital radiography, which enhances the density of polyethylene, or arthrography is helpful for diagnosing this complication.

  17. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with a previous patellectomy.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Jed; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Immerman, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Post-patellectomy patients represent a specific subgroup of patients that may develop arthritis and persistent knee pain and potentially require treatment with total knee arthroplasty. This article reviews the treatment and functional outcomes following total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior patellectomy. A case report is presented as an example of the clinical management of a post-patellectomy patient with significant knee pain and disability treated with total knee arthroplasty. Emphasis will be placed in decision- making, specifically with the use of a posterior stabilized implant. In addition, postoperative strengthening of the quadriceps is essential to compensate for the lack of the patella and increase the success of total knee arthroplasty in this subgroup of patients.

  18. In vivo knee kinematics during stair and deep flexion activities in patients with bicruciate substituting total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Yuji; Mu, Shang; Hamai, Satoshi; Robb, William J; Banks, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and their patients continue to seek better functional outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. The bicruciate substituting (BCS) total knee arthroplasty design has been introduced to achieve more natural knee mechanics. The purpose of this study was to characterize kinematics in knees with BCS arthroplasty during deep flexion and stair activities using fluoroscopy and model-image registration. In 20 patients with 25 BCS knees, we observed average implant flexion of 128° during kneeling and consistent posterior condylar translations with knee flexion. Tibial rotations were qualitatively similar to those observed in the arthritic natural knee. Knee kinematics with BCS arthroplasty were qualitatively more similar to arthritic natural knees than knees with either posterior cruciate-retaining or posterior-stabilized arthroplasty.

  19. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  20. Total Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... stability. The long thigh muscles give the knee strength. All remaining surfaces of the knee are covered ... physical examination. This will assess knee motion, stability, strength, and overall leg alignment. • X-rays. These images ...

  1. Knee disarticulation after total-knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Lambregts, S A M; Hitters, W M G C

    2002-12-01

    An 89-year-old woman who had a total-knee replacement in the past, underwent a knee disarticulation of the same leg because of an ischaemic foot. Eight (8) months postoperatively the stump is fully weight-bearing and the patient is able to walk safely, using a prosthesis and a walking frame.

  2. Condylar-stabilizing tibial inserts do not restore anteroposterior stability after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sur, Yoo-Joon; Koh, In-Jun; Park, Se-Wook; Kim, Hyung-Jin; In, Yong

    2015-04-01

    The Triathlon condylar-stabilizing (CS) lipped insert is designed to provide anteroposterior (AP) stability of the posterior-stabilized (PS) insert, without a post. The purpose of this study was to compare the AP stability of the knee in patients with Triathlon CS and PS total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with midterm follow-up. Thirty-one patients received a Triathlon PS TKA in one knee and a Triathlon CS TKA in the contralateral knee, and 28 patients were followed up with a minimum duration of 5years. Although there was no difference in functional outcomes, the posterior displacement was significantly greater in the CS TKA group than in the PS TKA group (P<0.001). The Triathlon CS lipped insert could not restore posterior stability with PCL sacrifice.

  3. Design and cadaveric validation of a novel device to quantify knee stability during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Siston, Robert A; Maack, Thomas L; Hutter, Erin E; Beal, Matthew D; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2012-11-01

    The success of total knee arthroplasty depends, in part, on the ability of the surgeon to properly manage the soft tissues surrounding the joint, but an objective definition as to what constitutes acceptable postoperative joint stability does not exist. Such a definition may not exist due to lack of suitable instrumentation, as joint stability is currently assessed by visual inspection while the surgeon manipulates the joint. Having the ability to accurately and precisely measure knee stability at the time of surgery represents a key requirement in the process of objectively defining acceptable joint stability. Therefore, we created a novel sterilizable device to allow surgeons to measure varus-valgus, internal-external, or anterior-posterior stability of the knee during a total knee arthroplasty. The device can be quickly adjusted between 0 deg and 90 deg of knee flexion. The device interfaces with a custom surgical navigation system, which records the resultant rotations or translations of the knee while the surgeon applies known loads to a patient's limb with a handle instrumented with a load cell. We validated the performance of the device by having volunteers use it to apply loads to a mechanical linkage that simulated a knee joint; we then compared the joint moments calculated by our stability device against those recorded by a load cell in the simulated knee joint. Validation of the device showed low mean errors (less than 0.21 ± 1.38 Nm and 0.98 ± 3.93 N) and low RMS errors (less than 1.5 Nm and 5 N). Preliminary studies from total knee arthroplasties performed on ten cadaveric specimens also demonstrate the utility of our new device. Eventually, the use of this device may help determine how intra-operative knee stability relates to postoperative function and could lead to an objective definition of knee stability and more efficacious surgical techniques.

  4. Tibiofemoral force following total knee arthroplasty: comparison of four prosthesis designs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Rochelle L; Schirm, Andreas C; Jeffcote, Benjamin O; Kuster, Markus S

    2007-11-01

    Despite ongoing evolution in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) prosthesis design, restricted flexion continues to be common postoperatively. Compressive tibiofemoral force during flexion is generated through the interaction between soft tissues and prosthesis geometry. In this study, we compared the compressive tibiofemoral force in vitro of four commonly used prostheses: fixed-bearing PCL (posterior cruciate ligament)-retaining (PFC), mobile-bearing posterior-stabilized (PS), posterior-stabilized with a High Flex femoral component (HF), and mobile-bearing PCL-sacrificing (LCS). Fourteen fresh-frozen cadaver knee joints were tested in a passive motion rig, and tibiofemoral force measured using a modified tibial baseplate instrumented with six load cells. The implants without posterior stabilization displayed an exponential increase in force after 90 degrees of flexion, while PS implants maintained low force throughout the range of motion. The fixed-bearing PFC prosthesis displayed the highest peak force (214 +/- 68 N at 150 degrees flexion). Sacrifice of the PCL decreased the peak force to a level comparable with the LCS implant. The use of a PCL-substituting post and cam system reduced the peak force up to 78%, irrespective of whether it was a high-flex or a standard PS knee. However, other factors such as preoperative range of motion, knee joint kinematics, soft tissue impingement, and implantation technique play a role in postoperative knee function. The present study suggests that a posterior-stabilized TKA design might be advantageous in reducing soft tissue tension in deep flexion. Further research is necessary to fully understand all factors affecting knee flexion after TKA.

  5. Evolution of knee kinematics three months after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Alice, Bonnefoy-Mazure; Stéphane, Armand; Yoshisama, Sagawa Junior; Pierre, Hoffmeyer; Domizio, Suvà; Hermes, Miozzari; Katia, Turcot

    2015-02-01

    In patients with debilitating knee osteoarthritis, total knee replacement is the most common surgical procedure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that knee kinematics one year after total knee replacement are still altered compared to the healthy joint. However, little is known regarding impairments and functional limitations of patients several months after total knee replacement. The aim of this study was to describe the evolution of the knee gait kinematic in patients with knee osteoarthritis before and three months after a total knee replacement. Ninety patients who were to undergo total knee replacement were included in this study. Twenty-three subjects were recruited as the control group. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed before and three months after surgery. The spatio-temporal parameters and three-dimensional knee kinematics for the operated limb were evaluated during a comfortable gait and compared between groups (the before and after surgery groups and the control group). Three months after surgery, patients always walk with a slower gait velocity and lower knee flexion-extension movements compared to the control group. However, a degree of progress was observed in term of the stride and step length, gait velocity and knee alignment in the coronal plane. Our results suggest that the disability is still significant for most patients three months after total knee replacement. A better understand of the impairments and functional limitations following surgery would help clinicians design rehabilitation programs. Moreover, patients should be informed that rehabilitation after total knee replacement is a long process.

  6. Biomechanics of hyperflexion and kneeling before and after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thay Q

    2014-06-01

    The capacity to perform certain activities is frequently compromised after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) due to a functional decline resulting from decreased range of motion and a diminished ability to kneel. In this manuscript, the current biomechanical understanding of hyperflexion and kneeling before and after TKA will be discussed. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral joint contact area, contact pressure, and kinematics were evaluated in cadaveric studies using a Tekscan pressure measuring system and Microscribe. Testing was performed on intact knees and following cruciate retaining and posterior stabilized TKA at knee flexion angles of 90°, 105°, 120°, and 135°. Three loading conditions were used to simulate squatting, double stance kneeling, and single stance kneeling. Following TKA with double stance kneeling, patellofemoral contact areas did not increase significantly at high knee flexion angle (135°). Kneeling resulted in tibial posterior translation and external rotation at all flexion angles. Moving from double to single stance kneeling tended to increase pressures in the cruciate retaining group, but decreased pressures in the posterior stabilized group. The cruciate retaining group had significantly larger contact areas than the posterior stabilized group, although no significant differences in pressures were observed comparing the two TKA designs (p < 0.05). If greater than 120° of postoperative knee range of motion can be achieved following TKA, then kneeling may be performed with less risk in the patellofemoral joint than was previously believed to be the case. However, kneeling may increase the likelihood of damage to cartilage and menisci in intact knees and after TKA increases in tibiofemoral contact area and pressures may lead to polyethyelene wear if performed on a chronic, repetitive basis.

  7. Hinge total knee replacement revisited

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Hugh U.; Hu, Cungen; Vyamont, Didier

    1997-01-01

    Objective To determine if aseptic loosening is a major problem in hinge total knee replacement. Design A cohort study. Setting A university-affiliated institute, specializing in elective orthopedic surgery. Patients Fifty-eight patients, mainly those requiring revision, in whom the conditions were such that it was felt only a totally constrained implant was appropriate. In 7 patients the implant was press-fitted; in the remainder it was cemented. Five patients required fusion or revision, and 8 died less than 2 years after implantation, leaving 45 for review. Follow-up was 2 to 13 years. Intervention Total knee replacement with a Guepar II prosthesis. Main outcome measures Radiolucency determined by the Cameron system and clinical scoring using the Hospital for Special Surgery system. Results Of the cemented components, 91% of femoral stems were type IA (no lucency), 9% were type IB (partial lucency), with no type II or III lucency. Tibial lucency was 87% type IA and 13% type IB, with no type II or III lucency. Of the noncemented components, 58% of femoral components were type IA and 42% type IB. Tibial lucency was 71% type IA and 29% type IB. Lucency was mainly present in zones 1 and 2 adjacent to the knee. Clinical rating was 18% excellent, 20% good, 20% fair and 42% poor. Postoperative complications included infection (13%), aseptic loosening (7%), quadriceps lag (16%) and extensor mechanism problems (16%). Conclusions Aseptic loosening is an uncommon problem in hinge total knee replacement. The complication rate in cases of sufficient severity as to require a hinge replacement remains high. Current indications for a hinge prosthesis are anteroposterior instability with a very large flexion gap, complete absence of the collateral ligaments and complete absence of a functioning extensor mechanism. PMID:9267296

  8. Instability following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Background Knee prosthesis instability (KPI) is a frequent cause of failure of total knee arthroplasty. Moreover, the degree of constraint required to achieve immediate and long-term stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is frequently debated. Questions This review aims to define the problem, analyze risk factors, and review strategies for prevention and treatment of KPI. Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) search of the years 2000 to 2010 was performed using two key words: TKA and instability. One hundred and sixty-five initial articles were identified. The most important (17) articles as judged by the author were selected for this review. The main criteria for selection were that the articles addressed and provided solutions to the diagnosis and treatment of KPI. Results Patient-related risk factors predisposing to post-operative instability include deformity requiring a large surgical correction and aggressive ligament release, general or regional neuromuscular pathology, and hip or foot deformities. KPI can be prevented in most cases with appropriate selection of implants and good surgical technique. When ligament instability is anticipated post-operatively, the need for implants with a greater degree of constraint should be anticipated. In patients without significant varus or valgus malalignment and without significant flexion contracture, the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be retained. However, the PCL should be sacrificed when deformity exists particularly in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy, previous high tibial osteotomy or distal femoral osteotomy, and posttraumatic osteoarthritis with disruption of the PCL. In most cases, KPI requires revision surgery. Successful outcomes can only be obtained if the cause of KPI is identified and addressed. Conclusions Instability following TKA is a common cause of the need for revision. Typically, knees with deformity, rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy or high tibial osteotomy, and

  9. [What's new about total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Dao Trong, Mai Lang; Helmy, Näder

    2013-10-30

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is one of the most common problems in the orthopedic practice and its surgical technique is still challenging. This Mini-Review presents patient specific cutting blocks for the implantation of a total knee arthroplasty.

  10. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  11. Medial pivot knee in primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Francesco; Salama, Wael; Sabatini, Luigi; Mousa, Shazly; Khalefa, Abdelrahman

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a medial pivot design was developed in order to mimic normal knee kinematics; the highly congruent medial compartment implant should improve clinical results and decrease contact stresses. Clinical and radiographic mid-term outcomes are satisfactory, but we need other studies to evaluate long-term results and indications for unusual cases.

  12. The use of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lachiewicz, Paul F; Geyer, Mark R

    2011-03-01

    Polyethylene wear, with resultant particle-induced osteolysis, is a cause of late failure of total knee arthroplasty. The causes of both wear and osteolysis are multifactorial; still, improvements in the polyethylene liner have been investigated. Available highly cross-linked polyethylene tibial liners and patellar prostheses differ greatly in the amount and method of irradiation, thermal treatments, and sterilization techniques they undergo. Several varieties of highly cross-linked polyethylene reduce the gravimetric and volumetric wear of tibial liners in knee simulator studies. However, reduced fracture toughness and the generation of smaller and possibly more reactive particles also have been reported with some varieties of polyethylene. Clinical studies of the use of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty are limited. Two nonrandomized trials of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty have reported a nonsignificant decrease in radiolucent lines at 2 and 5 years, respectively. The risks of using highly cross-linked polyethylene include fracture of the liner or of a posterior-stabilized tibial post, liner dislodgement or locking mechanism disruption, and possibly more osteolysis. Highly cross-linked polyethylene tibial liners may be considered for younger, more active patients. However, until additional clinical results are available, a cautious approach is warranted to the widespread use of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty.

  13. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  14. Soft tissue balance changes depending on joint distraction force in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Kanto; Muratsu, Hirotsugu; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Miya, Hidetoshi; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2014-03-01

    The influence of joint distraction force on intraoperative soft tissue balance was evaluated using Offset Repo-Tensor® for 78 knees that underwent primary posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty. The joint center gap and varus ligament balance were measured between osteotomized surfaces using 20, 40 and 60 lbs of joint distraction force. These values were significantly increased at extension and flexion as the distraction force increased. Furthermore, lateral compartment stiffness was significantly lower than medial compartment stiffness. Thus, larger joint distraction forces led to larger varus ligament balance and joint center gap, because of the difference in soft tissue stiffness between lateral and medial compartments. These findings indicate the importance of the strength of joint distraction force in the assessment of soft tissue balance, especially when using gap-balancing technique.

  15. Gap balancing in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bottros, John; Gad, Bishoy; Krebs, Viktor; Barsoum, Wael K

    2006-06-01

    It is well known that the success of total knee arthroplasty is collectively dependent on the proper recreation of the joint line, appropriate soft tissue balancing, and respectful management of the extensor mechanism. One of the most decisive factors within the surgeon's control is the reestablishment of proper knee kinematics through both medial-lateral and flexion-extension ligamentous balancing. This can be accomplished only by a comprehensive intraoperative evaluation in full flexion, mid flexion, and full extension to minimize potential gap mismatches. Most of the discussion will focus on this aspect of soft tissue balancing, but this does not undermine the importance of the other aforementioned principles of successful knee arthroplasty.

  16. Tantalum Cones in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eric G; Patel, Nirav K; Chughtai, Morad; Elmallah, Randa D K; Delanois, Ronald E; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    The best strategy to address large bony defects in revision total knee arthroplasty has yet to be determined. The relatively recent development of porous tantalum cones and their use to address massive bone loss in knee arthroplasty has shown promising short- and intermediate-term results. The purpose of this review is to present the current literature on: (1) basic science of porous tantalum, (2) classification and treatment for bone loss, (3) clinical results, and (4) evolution of newer generation cones.

  17. Intraoperative passive knee kinematics during total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    Young, Kathryn L; Dunbar, Michael J; Richardson, Glen; Astephen Wilson, Janie L

    2015-11-01

    Surgical navigation systems for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery are capable of capturing passive three-dimensional (3D) angular joint movement patterns intraoperatively. Improved understanding of patient-specific knee kinematic changes between pre and post-implant states and their relationship with post-operative function may be important in optimizing TKA outcomes. However, a comprehensive characterization of the variability among patients has yet to be investigated. The objective of this study was to characterize the variability within frontal plane joint movement patterns intraoperatively during a passive knee flexion exercise. Three hundred and forty patients with severe knee osteoarthritis (OA) received a primary TKA using a navigation system. Passive kinematics were captured prior to (pre-implant), and after prosthesis insertion (post-implant). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to capture characteristic patterns of knee angle kinematics among patients, to identify potential patient subgroups based on these patterns, and to examine the subgroup-specific changes in these patterns between pre- and post-implant states. The first four extracted patterns explained 99.9% of the diversity within the frontal plane angle patterns among the patients. Post-implant, the magnitude of the frontal plane angle shifted toward a neutral mechanical axis in all phenotypes, yet subtle pattern (shape of curvature) features of the pre-implant state persisted.

  18. Anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Wolf; Rembitzki, Ingo Volker; Brüggemann, Gerd-Peter; Ellermann, Andree; Best, Raymond; Koppenburg, Andreas Gösele-; Liebau, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Anterior knee pain is one of the most common causes of persistent problems after implantation of a total knee replacement. It can occur in patients with or without patellar resurfacing. As a result of the surgical procedure itself many changes can occur which may affect the delicate interplay of the joint partners in the patello-femoral joint. Functional causes of anterior knee pain can be distinguished from mechanical causes. The functional causes concern disorders of inter- and intramuscular coordination, which can be attributed to preoperative osteoarthritis. Research about anterior knee pain has shown that not only the thigh muscles but also the hip and trunk stabilising muscles may be responsible for the development of a dynamic valgus malalignment. Dynamic valgus may be a causative factor for patellar maltracking. The mechanical causes of patello-femoral problems after knee replacement can be distinguished according to whether they increase instability in the joint, increase joint pressure or whether they affect the muscular lever arms. These causes include offset errors, oversizing, rotational errors of femoral or tibial component, instability, maltracking and chondrolysis, patella baja and aseptic loosening. In these cases, reoperation or revision is often necessary.

  19. [Rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty of hip and knee].

    PubMed

    Jansen, E; Brienza, S; Gierasimowicz-Fontana, A; Matos, C; Reynders-Frederix-Dobre, C; HateM, S M

    2015-09-01

    Numbers of total hip and knee arthroplasties are increasing on a regular basis. Clinical pathways tend to shorten the duration of hospitalization in acute care after surgery. Therefore, the preoperative preparation of the patient and his abilities for postoperative rehabilitation should be carefully addressed. Before the surgical intervention, it is recommended that the patient receives an educational program and a physical preparation. After the surgical intervention, the patient can benefit from a home-based rehabilitation program supervised by a physiotherapist, if there were no preoperative reasons for prolonging the hospital stay and if the surgery took place without complications. Some patients may benefit from postsurgical rehabilitation in a specialized locomotor rehabilitation long-stay care unit. The indications for inpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation are : two simultaneous arthroplasties, revision of a previous hip or knee arthroplasty, postsurgical complications, advanced age, comorbidities influencing the rehabilitation process, social difficulties, necessity for adaptation of the environment, insufficient or unadapted out-patient (para)medical care. The goals of the rehabilitation treatment depend on the patient's characteristics and environment, on the properties of the prosthesis and on the postsurgical complications. The functional prognosis of a total joint arthroplasty of the knee or hip is excellent, provided that there are no post-surgical complications and that the patient benefits from adequate rehabilitation therapy. The present paper describes the different phases of rehabilitation treatment and the general and specific complications of total hip and knee arthroplasties that may influence the rehabilitation outcome.

  20. Acute arterial occlusion after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Patricia C; Rogic, Roselyn; Eddington, Carolyn

    2006-11-01

    There are a number of complications associated with total knee-joint arthroplasty. These include deep venous thromboses, peroneal palsy, infection, anemia, and Ogilvie's syndrome. An uncommon but potentially limb-threatening complication is acute arterial occlusion. Approximately 35 cases have been reported in the orthopedic literature. Prompt recognition and treatment intervention are the keys to successful outcome. We describe the case of one patient who had mild peroneal palsy and developed acute arterial occlusion 9 days postoperatively while on the inpatient rehabilitation service. Prompt aggressive management restored arterial circulation to the lower limb. Careful management of patients after total knee arthroplasty requires an understanding that arterial occlusion is a rare limb-threatening complication of surgery, but that it is treatable with prompt, deliberate management. Physiatrists should be aware that this condition exists in postoperative knee-joint arthroplasty patients. They should pay careful attention to any patient with a history of peripheral vascular disease or postoperative peroneal palsy.

  1. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning. PMID:27648328

  2. PERIPROSTHETIC FRACTURES IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; De Bortoli, Giovani; Ventura Vieira, Inácio Facó; Uliana, Christiano Saliba

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of total knee arthroplasties, in combination with the population's longer life expectancy, has led to a greater number of long-term complications. These add to the poor bone quality of elderly patients and often culminate in periprosthetic fractures. This complex orthopedic problem has a great diversity of clinical presentation. It may affect any of the bones in the knee and, because of the difficulty in finding solutions, may lead to disastrous outcomes. Its treatment requires that orthopedists should have broad knowledge both of arthroplasty techniques and of osteosynthesis, as well as an elaborate therapeutic arsenal including, for example, access to a bone bank. PMID:27022546

  3. Total knee arthroplasty in vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Bhende, Harish; Laud, Nanadkishore; Deore, Sandeep; Shashidhar, V

    2015-01-01

    In Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome, vascular malformations are not only in skin and superficial soft tissues but also in deep tissues like muscles bones and joints. It is well documemted that these recurrent intraarticular bleeds can cause early arthritis and joint pain. Performing arthroplasty in such patients is difficult and fraught with complications. We describe such a case where navigated total knee arthroplasty was performed with success to avoid the problems of intra medullary alignment used in the presence of intra medullary vascular malformations. We also suggest certain measures when knee arthroplasty is considered in such patients. PMID:26538765

  4. The infected total knee: management options.

    PubMed

    Cuckler, John M

    2005-06-01

    The management of infection after total knee arthroplasty depends on the chronicity of the infection, host factors, and sensitivity of the infecting bacteria. Two-stage salvage consisting of removal of implants and cement, placement of an antibiotic spacer, and appropriate intravenous antibiotic therapy followed by reimplantation with an antibiotic-impregnated cement appears to be the predominant approach to managing this complication. The use of articulated spacers consisting of the sterilized femoral and polyethylene components with antibiotic cement allows maintenance of motion and bone stock. This report details the author's experience with 44 infected knee arthroplasties.

  5. Total hip and total knee replacement: preoperative nursing management.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Brian

    Total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgery are carried out for the relief of hip or knee pain, usually caused by osteoarthritis. This is the first of two articles on THR and TKR. It will outline the different types of replacement used in lower limb joint replacement surgery. Preparation of patients for surgery requires attention to physical, psychological and social factors and these are explored in detail. The organization of services along the patient pathway to ensure comprehensive preparation is considered and the nursing role highlighted. The second article, to be published in the next issue, will discuss recovery and rehabilitation from THR and TKR surgery.

  6. Measured flexion following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mai, Kenny T; Verioti, Christopher A; Hardwick, Mary E; Ezzet, Kace A; Copp, Steven N; Colwell, Clifford W

    2012-10-01

    Postoperative flexion is an important factor in the outcome of total knee arthroplasty. Although normal activities of daily living require a minimum of 105° to 110° of flexion, patients from non-Western cultures often engage in activities such as kneeling and squatting that require higher flexion. The desire to achieve greater flexion serves as the driving force for prosthetic modifications, including high-flexion designs. Techniques used to measure knee flexion and knee position during measurement are not often described or are different depending on the examiner. The purpose of this study was to compare active (self) and passive (assisted) flexion after successful total knee arthroplasty for 5 prostheses (2 standard and 3 high-flexion) using clinical (goniometer) and radiographic (true lateral radiograph) measurement techniques by different independent examiners.At a mean follow-up of 2.7 years (range, 1-5.6 years), a total of 108 patients (144 total knee arthroplasties) had completed the study. Mean postoperative active flexion was 111° clinically and 109° radiographically for the standard designs and 114° clinically and 117° radiographically for the high-flexion designs. Adding passive flexion increased flexion to 115° clinically and 117° radiographically for the standard designs and 119° clinically and 124° radiographically for the high-flexion designs. Flexion differences between the 2 measurement techniques (active vs passive and clinically vs radiographically) were statistically significant (P<.05). These findings demonstrate the importance of describing how flexion is measured in studies and understanding how the method of measurement can affect the findings.

  7. Failure of Polyethelene Insert Locking Mechanism after a Posterior Stabilised Total Knee Arthroplasty- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, AY Gurava; Rajan, D Soundar; Chiranjeevi, T; Karthik, C; Kiran, E Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Disengagement of polyethylene insert used in total knee arthroplasty is a rare but serious complication. Still rarer is disengagement because of failure of tibial insert locking mechanism. We report a previously unpublished complication of polyethylene insert locking mechanism failure in a 10-months-old posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty in a 70-year-old woman with osteoarthritis for whom Attune (Depuy) knee implant was used. Case Presentation: A 70-year-old female underwent (Attune, Depuy) primary bilateral posterior stabilised total knee arthroplasty in a private hospital. The patient did not have any complaints and had had been functioning well post her arthroplasty. After five months of surgery she had a fall and sustained injury over right hip which was treated with Cemented Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty. Ten months after index surgery, she sustained trivial fall and presented to the same hospital with knee pain and swelling, where the right knee prosthesis was found to be dislocated. An attempted closed reduction under anaesthesia failed, after which she was referred to our centre with an unstable, painful, swollen right knee in a long knee brace. The physical examination at the time of admission showed posterior sag of the tibia, fullness in the postero-lateral corner, quadriceps muscle atrophy without any neurovascular deficit oflower leg. Postero-lateral dislocation was confirmed with radiographs. Surgical error as a possible causative factor was excluded because patient had been functioning well after surgery. Her comorbidities included hypertension and hyponatremia. ESR and CRP were within normal limits. An open reduction surgery was planned. On exposure, polyethylene was found in the postero-lateral corner of the knee. We were not sure that revising the polyethylene alone would suffice as the poly and locking mechanism was of a relatively new design and hence it was decided to proceed with revision of the components. Revision was done

  8. Periprosthetic fractures around total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sarmah, SS; Patel, S; Reading, G; El-Husseiny, M; Douglas, S; Haddad, FS

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The number of total knee arthroplasties performed continues to rise annually and it would be expected that complications, which include periprosthetic fractures, will also therefore become more commonplace. This article reviews the current literature regarding this injury and identifies the treatment principles that enable patients to regain optimal function. METHODS A comprehensive search of the Pubmed and Embase™ databases was performed to identify relevant articles. Keywords and MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) terms included in the search strategy were ‘periprosthetic fracture(s)’, ‘femur’, ‘tibia’, ‘patella(r)’, ‘complication(s)’, ‘failure(s)’, ‘risk(s)’, ‘prevalence’, ‘incidence’, ‘epidemiology’ and ‘classification(s)’. The search was limited to all articles published in English and reference lists from the original articles were reviewed to identify pertinent articles to include in this review. A total number of 43 studies were identified. RESULTS Common treatment aims have been identified when managing patients with a periprosthetic fracture around total knee arthoplasty. The main criterion that determines which option to choose is the degree of remaining bone stock and the amount of fracture displacement. CONCLUSIONS Treatment of a periprosthetic fracture around total knee arthroplasty will either be non-operative, osteosynthesis or revision arthroplasty. It is imperative that a suitable option is chosen and based on the published literature, pathways are outlined to aid the surgeon. PMID:22943223

  9. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  10. Extensor tendon ruptures after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, M; Lustig, S; Huten, D

    2016-02-01

    Extensor tendon rupture is a rare but serious complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that impairs active knee extension, thereby severely affecting knee function. Surgery is usually required. Surgical options range from simple suturing to allograft reconstruction of the entire extensor mechanism and include intermediate methods such as reconstruction using neighbouring tendons or muscles, synthetic ligament implantation, and partial allograft repair. Simple suturing carries a high failure rate and should therefore be routinely combined with tissue augmentation using a neighbouring tendon or a synthetic ligament. After allograft reconstruction, outcomes are variable and long-term complications common. Salvage procedures for managing the most severe cases after allograft failure involve reconstruction using gastrocnemius or vastus flaps. Regardless of the technique used, suturing must be performed under tension, with the knee fully extended, and rehabilitation must be conducted with great caution. Weaknesses of available case-series studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity, and inadequate follow-up duration. All treatment options are associated with substantial failure rates. The patient should be informed of this fact and plans made for a salvage option. Here, the main techniques and their outcomes are discussed, and a therapeutic strategy is suggested.

  11. Bilateral fatigue fracture of the femoral components in a cruciate-retaining cementless total knee prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shu; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Ishii, Takao; Mori, Sei; Hosaka, Kunihiro; Ryu, Keinosuke; Suzuki, Gen

    2011-10-05

    This article reports a case of bilateral fatigue fracture of the femoral components in a cruciate-retaining uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A 75-year-old woman (height, 158 cm; weight, 72 kg; body mass index, 29.2) had undergone one-stage bilateral TKA for osteoarthritis 11 years previously at the author's institution. Surgery was performed using an uncemented Flexible Nichidai Knee. Equal tension of the collateral ligaments and normal mechanical axis were achieved during the primary procedure. The patient was an ardent lover of the game of badminton and had higher activity levels with daily playing. At 8 years postoperatively, she started complaining of mild pain in both knees. The pain gradually increased, and at 11 years postoperatively, she had difficulty walking. Anteroposterior radiographs showed narrowing of the medial joint space, indicating wear of the polyethylene insert. Lateral radiographs showed signs of broken implants in both knees. There were no signs of gross implant loosening or osteolysis. One-stage revision surgery was performed, and the knees were converted to cemented posterior-stabilized TKAs. At revision, the bilateral femoral components were found to be fractured at the junction between the trochlear flange and the medial condyle, anteriorly to the medial peg. The polyethylene insert showed mild wear at the medial middle portion. In the majority of case reports, stress fractures of the femoral component have predominantly affected the medial condyle, following uncemented implantation of fixed-bearing knees. In this case, failure of bone ingrowth in uncemented components, higher body mass index, and a higher athletic activity led to fatigue fracture of the femoral components.

  12. Intraoperative passive kinematics of osteoarthritic knees before and after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Siston, Robert A; Giori, Nicholas J; Goodman, Stuart B; Delp, Scott L

    2006-08-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure to treat pain and functional disability due to osteoarthritis. However, precisely how a total knee arthroplasty changes the kinematics of an osteoarthritic knee is unknown. We used a surgical navigation system to measure normal passive kinematics from 7 embalmed cadaver lower extremities and in vivo intraoperative passive kinematics on 17 patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty to address two questions: How do the kinematics of knees with advanced osteoarthritis differ from normal knees?; and, Does posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty restore kinematics towards normal? Osteoarthritic knees displayed a decreased screw-home motion and abnormal varus/valgus rotations between 10 degrees and 90 degrees of knee flexion when compared to normal knees. The anterior-posterior motion of the femur in osteoarthritic knees was not different than in normal knees. Following total knee arthroplasty, we found abnormal varus/valgus rotations in early flexion, a reduced screw-home motion when compared to the osteoarthritic knees, and an abnormal anterior translation of the femur during the first 60 degrees of flexion. Posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty does not appear to restore normal passive varus/valgus rotations or the screw motion and introduces an abnormal anterior translation of the femur during intraoperative evaluation.

  13. Tibia valga morphology in osteoarthritic knees: importance of preoperative full limb radiographs in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Ahmed; Rahmé, Michel; Lavigne, Martin; Massé, Vincent; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2014-08-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is associated with deformities of the lower limb. Tibia valga is a contributing factor to lower limb alignment in valgus knees. We evaluated 97 valgus knees and 100 varus knees. Long-leg films were taken in weight bearing with both knees in full extension. For valgus knees, 52 knees (53%) had a tibia valga deformity. Average tibia valgus deformation was 5.0°. For varus knees, there was only 1 case of tibia valga (1%), with a deformation of 2.5°. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of primary tibia valga in valgus and varus knees and understand how it affects our approach to total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We recommend having full-leg length films when planning for TKA in valgus knees.

  14. Fracture Blisters After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Halawi, Mohamad J

    2015-08-01

    Fracture blisters are tense vesicles that arise on markedly swollen skin overlying traumatized soft tissue. While this relatively uncommon complication has been well described in the trauma literature, this article reports for the first time a case of fracture blisters after primary total knee arthroplasty. The fracture blisters developed within 36 hours of surgery and were associated with profound swelling and erythema. There was no evidence of vascular injury, compartment syndrome, iatrogenic fracture, or deep venous thrombosis. The patient was treated with leg elevation, loosely applied nonadhesive dressings, and a short course of oral antibiotics after skin desquamation. Blood-filled blisters required longer time to reepithelialization than fluid-filled blisters. Knee stiffness developed because of pain and fear of participation with physical therapy, but the patient was able to resume intensive rehabilitation after resolution of the blisters. Patient factors, surgical factors, and review of the literature are discussed.

  15. In vivo kinematic evaluation and design considerations related to high flexion in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Argenson, Jean-Noël A; Scuderi, Giles R; Komistek, Richard D; Scott, W Norman; Kelly, Michael A; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel

    2005-02-01

    In designing a posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty (TKA) it is preferable that when the cam engages the tibial spine the contact point of the cam move down the tibial spine. This provides greater stability in flexion by creating a greater jump distance and reduces the stress on the tibial spine. In order to eliminate edge loading of the femoral component on the posterior tibial articular surface, the posterior femoral condyles need to be extended. This provides an ideal femoral contact with the tibial articular surface during high flexion angles. To reduce extensor mechanism impingement in deep flexion, the anterior margin of the tibial articular component should be recessed. This provides clearance for the patella and patella tendon. An in vivo kinematic analysis that determined three dimensional motions of the femorotibial joint was performed during a deep knee bend using fluoroscopy for 20 subjects having a TKA designed for deep flexion. The average weight-bearing range-of-motion was 125 degrees . On average, TKA subjects experienced 4.9 degrees of normal axial rotation and all subjects experienced at least -4.4 mm of posterior femoral rollback. It is assumed that femorotibial kinematics can play a major role in patellofemoral kinematics. In this study, subjects implanted with a high-flexion TKA design experienced kinematic patterns that were similar to the normal knee. It can be hypothesized that forces acting on the patella were not substantially increased for TKA subjects compared with the normal subjects.

  16. Metal Hypersensitivity and Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lachiewicz, Paul F; Watters, Tyler Steven; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2016-02-01

    Metal hypersensitivity in patients with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a controversial topic. The diagnosis is difficult, given the lack of robust clinical validation of the utility of cutaneous and in vitro testing. Metal hypersensitivity after TKA is quite rare and should be considered after eliminating other causes of pain and swelling, such as low-grade infection, instability, component loosening or malrotation, referred pain, and chronic regional pain syndrome. Anecdotal observations suggest that two clinical presentations of metal hypersensitivity may occur after TKA: dermatitis or a persistent painful synovitis of the knee. Patients may or may not have a history of intolerance to metal jewelry. Laboratory studies, including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein level, and knee joint aspiration, are usually negative. Cutaneous and in vitro testing have been reported to be positive, but the sensitivity and specificity of such testing has not been defined. Some reports suggest that, if metal hypersensitivity is suspected and nonsurgical measures have failed, then revision to components fabricated of titanium alloy or zirconium coating can be successful in relieving symptoms. Revision should be considered as a last resort, however, and patients should be informed that no evidence-based medicine is available to guide the management of these conditions, particularly for decisions regarding revision. Given the limitations of current testing methods, the widespread screening of patients for metal allergies before TKA is not warranted.

  17. Metal Hypersensitivity and Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lachiewicz, Paul F.; Watters, Tyler Steven; Jacobs, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Metal hypersensitivity in patients with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a controversial topic. The diagnosis is difficult, given the lack of robust clinical validation of the utility of cutaneous and in vitro testing. Metal hypersensitivity after TKA is quite rare and should be considered after eliminating other causes of pain and swelling, such as low-grade infection, instability, component loosening or malrotation, referred pain, and chronic regional pain syndrome. Anecdotal observations suggest that two clinical presentations of metal hypersensitivity may occur after TKA: dermatitis or a persistent painful synovitis of the knee. Patients may or may not have a history of intolerance to metal jewelry. Laboratory studies, including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein level, and knee joint aspiration, are usually negative. Cutaneous and in vitro testing have been reported to be positive, but the sensitivity and specificity of such testing has not been defined. Anecdotal reports suggest that, if metal hypersensitivity is suspected and nonsurgical measures have failed, then revision to components fabricated of titanium alloy or zirconium coating can be successful in relieving symptoms. Revision should be considered as a last resort, however, and patients should be informed that no evidence-based medicine is available to guide the management of these conditions, particularly for decisions regarding revision. Given the limitations of current testing methods, the widespread screening of patients for metal allergies before TKA is not warranted. PMID:26752739

  18. Perioperative pain management for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Jaime L; Gandhi, Kishor; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2014-01-01

    Pain management following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be challenging. Inadequate pain management following TKA may inhibit rehabilitation, increase morbidity and mortality, decrease patient satisfaction, and lead to chronic persistent postsurgical pain. Traditionally the mainstay of postoperative pain management was opioids; however, the current recommendations to pain management emphasize a multimodal approach and minimizing opioids whenever possible. With careful planning and a multimodal analgesic approach instituted perioperatively, appropriate pain management following TKA can be achieved. Utilizing an extensive review of the literature, this article discusses the analgesic techniques available for the perioperative management of TKA.

  19. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-12-29

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20 degrees to -12 degrees (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12 degrees to 0 degrees ).

  20. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior ipsilateral hip fusion.

    PubMed

    Romness, D W; Morrey, B F

    1992-03-01

    Sixteen total knee arthroplasties performed between 1977 and 1985 in 13 patients with prior ipsilateral hip arthrodesis or ankylosis were studied to determine the preferred sequence and long-term follow-up of procedures in this clinical setting. Twelve of 16 underwent fusion takedown and total hip arthroplasty prior to knee replacement. The average age at total knee arthroplasty was 52.7 years and the average time from hip fusion to total knee arthroplasty was 36.3 years. Mean follow-up after total knee arthroplasty was 5.5 years (range, 2.3 to 10 years). The Hospital for Special Surgery knee score increased from a mean of 31.8 preoperatively to 72.2 after surgery. In patients who had conversion of the hip fusion prior to knee replacement, knee scores were 28 before and 72.5 after both procedures. Patients who retained their hip fusion had mean scores of 43.5 and 72.1, respectively. None of the knees has been removed and 14 of 16 had no pain at last follow-up. One had mild pain and one had moderate pain attributed to pes anserine bursitis. Although the numbers are small, this experience reveals that takedown of the fusion with total hip arthroplasty is an effective technique before performing the knee replacement. Though successful in some instances, the experience is too small to show that if hip fusion is in good position, knee replacement without fusion takedown is acceptable.

  1. Posterior femoral condylar offset after total knee replacement in the risk of knee flexion contracture.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Tomohiro; Majima, Tokifumi; Nishiike, Osamu; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the risk of knee flexion contracture associated with a posterior femoral condylar offset after total knee replacement (TKR). Radiographs from 100 healthy Japanese volunteers were included in the study. We evaluated femoral component posterior offset in various implants and compared them with the normal Japanese knee. Posterior offset of the femoral condyle is up to a maximum of 4.7 times greater than that of the healthy Japanese knee in all knee implants. Excess posterior offset of the femoral condyle in TKR prostheses may cause knee joint flexion contracture due to the relative shortening of the posterior soft tissue.

  2. In vivo knee kinematics in patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasty of 2 designs.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Nobukazu; Breslauer, Leigh; Hedley, Anthony K; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Banks, Scott A

    2011-09-01

    Many younger and highly active patients desire to achieve high flexion after total knee arthroplasty. This study's purpose was to determine if a contemporary total knee arthroplasty design improved functional knee flexion compared with a traditional total knee arthroplasty in patients living a Western lifestyle. Ten patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasty of 2 types were studied during weight-bearing lunge, kneeling, and stair activities using fluoroscopic imaging. There were no differences in maximum knee flexion during lunging or kneeling. Statistically significant differences in tibial rotation and condylar translation were observed during the 3 activities. Although several joint kinematic differences were observed, no important functional differences were observed in clinically excellent, high performing subjects with bilateral total knee arthroplasty of 2 types.

  3. Constrained Implants in Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Touzopoulos, Panagiotis; Drosos, Georgios I; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-05-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is a successful procedure for pain relief and functional restoration in patients with advanced osteoarthritis. The number of TKRs is increasing, and this has led to an increase in revision surgeries. The key to long-term success in both primary and revision TKR is stability, as well as adequate and stable fixation between components and underlying bone. In the vast majority of primary TKRs and in some revision cases, a posterior cruciate retaining or a posterior cruciate substituting device can be used. In some primary cases with severe deformity or ligamentous instability and in most of the revision cases, a more constrained implant is required. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature concerning the use of condylar constrained knee (CCK) and rotating hinge (RH) implants in primary and revision cases focusing on the indications and results. According to this review, although excellent and very good results have been reported, there are limitations of the existing literature concerning the indications for the use of constrained implants, the absence of long-term results, and the limited comparative studies.

  4. Patellar options in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rorabeck, Cecil H; Mehin, Ramin; Barrack, Robert L

    2003-11-01

    There are numerous options that need to be considered by the surgeon at the time of revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). One needs to consider the reason for the revision, the type of patella in place, and the length of time the patella has been in place. The surgeon also needs to consider the status of the patellar bone stock, the stability of the patellar component (well-fixed or loose), and the component type (cemented or metal-backed). Assuming that the existing prosthesis is not metal-backed and has minimal PE wear, then it is preferable to retain a well-fixed all-PE cemented patellar button. However, if the button is metal-backed, then it probably is best to remove the button and replace it with an all-PE domed patellar component. Assuming more than 8 mm of patellar bone stock is remaining, it usually is best to cement an all-PE dome-shaped patella. However, if less than 8 mm is remaining, then that patient can be left with a patelloplasty, recognizing that this individual is going to continue with a high likelihood of anterior knee pain, subluxation, and poor functional results. In that situation, it may be preferable to consider a bone stock augmentation.

  5. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal. PMID:27595070

  6. Total knee arthroplasty closure with barbed sutures.

    PubMed

    Eickmann, Tom; Quane, Erika

    2010-09-01

    Bidirectional barbed sutures, which do not require the tying of knots, have the potential to reduce closure times of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) wounds without adverse effect to wound security, cosmesis, or infection risk. In this retrospective study, data were reviewed from TKAs performed between January 2007 and September 2008. For 88 of these procedures, conventional absorbable sutures were used for interrupted closure of the retinacular and subcutaneous layers and for running closure of the subcuticular layer. For 90 procedures, bidirectional barbed absorbable sutures were used for running closure of the retinacular and subcutaneous layers. Surgeries performed with barbed sutures were significantly faster than those performed with conventional sutures (mean times of 74.3 minutes and 85.8 minutes, respectively, p < 0.001) with no detrimental clinical effects.

  7. Trunk muscle action compensates for reduced quadriceps force during walking after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Li, Katherine; Ackland, David C; McClelland, Jodie A; Webster, Kate E; Feller, Julian A; de Steiger, Richard; Pandy, Marcus G

    2013-05-01

    Patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) frequently exhibit changes in gait biomechanics post-surgery, including decreased ranges of joint motion and changes in joint loading; however, the actions of the lower-limb muscles in generating joint moments and accelerating the center of mass (COM) during walking are yet to be described. The aim of the present study was to evaluate differences in lower-limb joint kinematics, muscle-generated joint moments, and muscle contributions to COM accelerations in TKA patients and healthy age-matched controls when both groups walk at the same speed. Each TKA patient was fitted with a posterior-stabilized total knee replacement and underwent patellar resurfacing. Three-dimensional gait analysis and subject-specific musculoskeletal modeling were used to determine lower-limb and trunk muscle forces and muscle contributions to COM accelerations during the stance phase of gait. The TKA patients exhibited a 'quadriceps avoidance' gait pattern, with the vasti contributing significantly less to the extension moment developed about the knee during early stance (p=0.036). There was a significant decrease in the contribution of the vasti to the vertical acceleration (support) (p=0.022) and forward deceleration of the COM (braking) (p=0.049) during early stance; however, the TKA patients compensated for this deficiency by leaning their trunks forward. This significantly increased the contribution of the contralateral back extensor muscle (erector spinae) to support (p=0.030), and that of the contralateral back rotators (internal and external obliques) to braking (p=0.004). These findings provide insight into the biomechanical causes of post-operative gait adaptations such as 'quadriceps avoidance' observed in TKA patients.

  8. Reverse Engineering Nature to Design Biomimetic Total Knee Implants.

    PubMed

    Varadarajan, Kartik Mangudi; Zumbrunn, Thomas; Rubash, Harry E; Malchau, Henrik; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Li, Guoan

    2015-10-01

    While contemporary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) provides tremendous clinical benefits, the normal feel and function of the knee is not fully restored. To address this, a novel design process was developed to reverse engineer "biomimetic" articular surfaces that are compatible with normal soft-tissue envelope and kinematics of the knee. The biomimetic articular surface is created by moving the TKA femoral component along in vivo kinematics of normal knees and carving out the tibial articular surface from a rectangular tibial block. Here, we describe the biomimetic design process. In addition, we utilize geometric comparisons and kinematic simulations to show that; (1) tibial articular surfaces of conventional implants are fundamentally incompatible with normal knee motion, and (2) the anatomic geometry of the biomimetic surface contributes directly to restoration of normal knee kinematics. Such biomimetic implants may enable us to achieve the long sought after goal of a "normal" knee post-TKA surgery.

  9. Effect of implant design on knee flexion.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Douglas A; Heekin, R David; Clark, Charles R; Murphy, Jeffrey A; O'Dell, Tammy L; Dwyer, Kimberly A

    2013-03-01

    From March 2006 to August 2008, 93 subjects (186 knees) underwent simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty performed by eight surgeons at North American centers. This randomized study was conducted to determine whether non-weight-bearing passive flexion was superior for knees receiving a posterior stabilized high flexion device compared to a posterior stabilized standard device in the contra-lateral knee. Weight-bearing single leg active flexion was one secondary endpoint. Follow-up compliance was 92.5%. Results show small, but significant superiority in the motion metrics for the high flexion device compared to the standard device 12 months after surgery, especially for a subgroup of patients with pre-operative flexion less than 120° in both knees. Thus, the ideal candidate for the high flexion device may be one with lesser pre-operative flexion.

  10. Biceps tendinitis as a cause of acute painful knee after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pandher, Dilbans Singh; Boparai, Randhir Singh; Kapila, Rajesh

    2009-12-01

    The case report highlights an unusual case of posterolateral knee pain after total knee arthroplasty. Tendinitis of the patellar tendon or pes anserinus is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty; however, there is no report in the literature regarding the biceps femoris tendinitis causing acute pain in the early postoperative period. In this case, the biceps tendinitis was diagnosed and treated by ultrasound-guided injection into the tendon sheath.

  11. In vivo determination of total knee arthroplasty kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Bertin, Kim; Rosenberg, Aaron; Kennedy, William

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if consistent posterior femoral rollback of an asymmetrical posterior cruciate retaining (PCR) total knee arthroplasty was mostly influenced by the implant design, surgical technique, or presence of a well-functioning posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Three-dimensional femorotibial kinematics was determined for 80 subjects implanted by 3 surgeons, and each subject was evaluated under fluoroscopic surveillance during a deep knee bend. All subjects in this present study having an intact PCL had a well-functioning PCR knee and experienced normal kinematic patterns, although less in magnitude than the normal knee. In addition, a surprising finding was that, on average, subjects without a PCL still achieved posterior femoral rollback from full extension to maximum knee flexion. The findings in this study revealed that implant design did contribute to the normal kinematics demonstrated by subjects having this asymmetrical PCR total knee arthroplasty.

  12. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Severe Unstable Knee: Case-Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Amjad, Gholamreza Ghorbani; Kaseb, Mohammad Hassan; Bashti, Kaveh

    2017-01-01

    Multiplanar or global laxity in arthritic knee is rare, most of this patients have neuromuscular disorder (post poliomyelitis, spinal dystrophy) or history of knee trauma. Ligament insufficiency and severe bone loss is significant in this patient. The estimated prevalence for the concurrence of charcot marie-tooth (CMT) with myasthenia gravis (MG) suggests an extremely rare event. We have presented a 54-year-old female patient with CMT and MG complaining of progressive pain, swelling, and crepitation of the knee joints who had been undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with rotating hinge prosthesis. She had an acute myasthenia crisis soon after operation with prolonged intubation and intensive care unit admission. Radiographies and physical examination revealed bilateral severe unstable arthritic knee joints and left knee posterior dislocation. Short-term postoperative follow-up revealed improved knee function and resolution of all symptoms in the operated side. PMID:28271089

  13. Total Knee Arthroplasty for Severe Flexion Contracture in Rheumatoid Arthritis Knees

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Youn Soo; Moon, Kyu Pill; Kim, Kyung Taek; Kim, Jin Wan; Park, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Flexion contracture deformities, as well as severe varus and valgus deformities of the knee joint, accompany osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, severe flexion contracture deformity of the knee joint is often found in patients with RA, which renders them nonambulatory. This report describes a 26-year-old female patient diagnosed with RA 10 years ago. She had chronic joint pain, severe flexion contracture, valgus deformity in both knees, and limited range of motion in both knees and became nonambulatory. She underwent a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and serial casting and physical therapy to restore stable joint movement and correct knee joint deformity. Her pain was successfully relieved, and she was able to walk after surgery. Here, we report the excellent results of TKA in this RA patient with severe flexion contracture of both knees. PMID:27894181

  14. Effect of patellar thickness on knee flexion in total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemian, Mansour; Samiezadeh, Saeid; Sternheim, Amir; Bougherara, Habiba; Barnes, C Lowry; Backstein, David J

    2014-01-01

    A biomechanical computer-based model was developed to simulate the influence of patellar thickness on passive knee flexion after arthroplasty. Using the computer model of a single-radius, PCL-sacrificing knee prosthesis, a range of patella-implant composite thicknesses was simulated. The biomechanical model was then replicated using two cadaveric knees. A patellar-thickness range of 15 mm was applied to each of the knees. Knee flexion was found to decrease exponentially with increased patellar thickness in both the biomechanical and experimental studies. Importantly, this flexion loss followed an exponential pattern with higher patellar thicknesses in both studies. In order to avoid adverse biomechanical and functional consequences, it is recommended to restore patellar thickness to that of the native knee during total knee arthroplasty.

  15. Stress fracture of the proximal fibula after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaish, Abhishek; Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-04-22

    We report a rare case of proximal fibular fatigue fracture developing 14 years after total knee arthroplasty in a known case of rheumatoid arthritis. A valgus deformity of the knee can put abnormal stress on the upper fibula leading to its failure. We believe that, as the fibula acts as an important lateral strut, its disruption due to a fracture led to rapid progress of the valgus deformity of the knee in this patient.

  16. Astym® Therapy for the Management of Recalcitrant Knee Joint Stiffness after Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Corcoran, James; Cherian, Jeffery J; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Knee stiffness is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Despite studies published on the surgical management of reduced range of motion (ROM) after TKA, there is limited evidence on the nonoperative management of joint and soft tissue imbalances possibly contributing to reduced knee ROM. This report assesses changes in ROM, pain, function, and patellar tendon length after Astym® joint mobilization use. A 38-year-old male professional skier had a right TKA 3 months before presentation with 2 subsequent manipulations under anesthesia secondary to persistent knee stiffness. He had patellar baja on radiograph, a reduced arc of ROM, reduced patellar mobility and muscular extensibility, and pain to palpation along the patellar tendon. He had 12 visits of physical therapy with the use of Astym®, patellar mobilization, and tibio-femoral mobilizations with movement. The patient also used a customized knee device at home for prolonged knee extension stretching. The patient was treated for 12 visits, along with home use of customized bracing for knee extension. Significant improvements were seen in pain, function, and ROM. He returned to work full-time, ambulated prolonged distances, and negotiated stairs pain-free. He also demonstrated resolution of patellar baja radiographically. Conservative management of recalcitrant knee joint stiffness after primary TKA can be effective in restoring knee mobility and reducing pain and activity limitation. A multimodal approach using Astym® treatment, customized knee bracing, and targeted joint mobilization can be effective in resolving knee joint stiffness.

  17. Does vitamin E-stabilized ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene address concerns of cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Haider, Hani; Weisenburger, Joel N; Kurtz, Steven M; Rimnac, Clare M; Freedman, Jordan; Schroeder, David W; Garvin, Kevin L

    2012-03-01

    Concerns about reduced strength, fatigue resistance, and oxidative stability of highly cross-linked and remelted ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) have limited its clinical acceptance for total knee arthroplasty. We hypothesized that a highly cross-linked UHMWPE stabilized with vitamin E would have less oxidation and loss of mechanical properties. We compared the oxidation, in vitro strength, fatigue-crack propagation resistance, and wear of highly cross-linked UHMWPE doped with vitamin E to γ-inert-sterilized direct compression-molded UHMWPE (control). After accelerated aging, the control material showed elevated oxidation, loss of small-punch mechanical properties, and loss of fatigue-crack propagation resistance. In contrast, the vitamin E-stabilized material had minimal changes and exhibited 73% to 86% reduction in wear for both cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty designs. Highly cross-linked vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE performed well in vitro.

  18. Periprosthetic Bone Remodelling in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    GEORGEANU, Vlad; ATASIEI, Tudor; GRUIONU, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical studies have shown that the displacement of the prosthesis components, especially of the tibial one is higher during the first year, after which it reaches an equilibrum position compatible with a good long term functioning. This displacement takes place due to bone remodelling close to the implant secondary to different loading concentrations over different areas of bone. Material and Method: Our study implies a simulation on a computational model using the finite element analysis. The simulation started taking into account arbitrary points because of non-linear conditions of bone-prosthesis interface and it was iterative.. A hundred consecutive situations corresponding to intermediate bone remodelling phases have been calculated according to given loadings. Bone remodelling was appreciated as a function of time and bone density for each constitutive element of the computational model created by finite element method. For each constitutive element a medium value of stress during the walking cycle was applied. Results: Analyse of proximal epiphysis-prosthesis complex slices showed that bone density increase is maintained all over the stem in the immediately post-operative period. At 10 months, the moment considered to be the end of bone remodelling, areas with increased bone density are fewer and smaller. Meanwhile, their distribution with a concentration toward the internal compartment in the distal metaphysis is preserved. Conclusions: After the total knee arthroplasty the tibial bone suffered a process of remodelling adapted to the new stress conditions. This bone remodelling can influence, sometimes negatively, especially in the cases with tibial component varus malposition, the fixation, respectively the survival of the prosthesis. This process has been demonstrated both by clinical trials and by simulation, using the finite elements method of periprosthetic bone remodelling. PMID:25553127

  19. Improvements in knee biomechanics during walking are associated with increased physical activity after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Arnold, John B; Mackintosh, Shylie; Olds, Timothy S; Jones, Sara; Thewlis, Dominic

    2015-12-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in people with knee osteoarthritis increases knee-specific and general physical function, but it has not been established if there is a relationship between changes in these elements of functional ability. This study investigated changes and relationships between knee biomechanics during walking, physical activity, and use of time after TKA. Fifteen people awaiting TKA underwent 3D gait analysis before and six months after surgery. Physical activity and use of time were determined in free-living conditions from a high resolution 24-h activity recall. After surgery, participants displayed significant improvements in sagittal plane knee biomechanics and improved their physical activity profiles, standing for 105 more minutes (p=0.001) and performing 64 min more inside chores on average per day (p=0.008). Changes in sagittal plane knee range of motion (ROM) and peak knee flexion positively correlated with changes in total daily energy expenditure, time spent undertaking moderate to vigorous physical activity, inside chores and passive transport (r=0.52-0.66, p=0.005-0.047). Restoration of knee function occurs in parallel and is associated with improvements in physical activity and use of time after TKA. Increased functional knee ROM is required to support improvements in total and context specific physical activity.

  20. Human knee joint anatomy revisited: morphometry in the light of sex-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dargel, Jens; Michael, Joern W P; Feiser, Janna; Ivo, Roland; Koebke, Juergen

    2011-04-01

    This study investigates differences in the anatomy of male and female knee joints to contribute to the current debate on sex-specific total knee implants. Morphometric data were obtained from 60 human cadaver knees, and sex differences were calculated. All data were corrected for height, and male and female specimens presenting with an identical length of the femur were analyzed as matched pairs. Male linear knee joint dimensions were significantly larger when compared with females. When corrected for differences in height, medial-lateral dimensions of male knees were significantly larger than female; however, matched paired analysis did not prove these differences to be consistent. Although implant design should focus interindividual variations in knee joint anatomy, our data do not support the concept of a female-specific implant design.

  1. Knee range of motion after total knee arthroplasty: how important is this as an outcome measure?

    PubMed

    Miner, Andrew L; Lingard, Elizabeth A; Wright, Elizabeth A; Sledge, Clement B; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2003-04-01

    We investigated the relationship of knee range of motion (ROM) and function in a prospective, observational study of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Preoperative and 12-month data were collected on 684 patients, including knee ROM, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and function questionnaire scores, patient satisfaction, and perceived improvement in quality of life (QOL). Only modest correlations were found between knee ROM and WOMAC function (r<0.34). At 12 months we found significantly worse WOMAC function scores for patients with <95 degrees flexion compared with patients with > or =95 degrees (mean, 61.9 vs 75.0; P<.0001). In linear regression models, WOMAC pain and function scores at 12 months were both correlates of patient satisfaction and perceived improvement in QOL (standardized beta>3.5; P<.0001), but knee flexion was not. For assessment of these outcomes, WOMAC function appears to be more important than knee flexion.

  2. Biomechanical effects of total knee arthroplasty component malrotation: a computational simulation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Julie A; Hast, Michael W; Granger, Jeffrey F; Piazza, Stephen J; Siston, Robert A

    2011-07-01

    Modern total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an effective procedure to treat pain and disability due to osteoarthritis, but some patients experience quadriceps weakness after surgery and have difficulty performing important activities of daily living. The success of TKA depends on many factors, but malalignment of the prosthetic components is a major cause of postoperative complications. Significant variability is associated with femoral and tibial component rotational alignment, but how this variability translates into functional outcome remains unknown. We used a forward-dynamic computer model of a simulated squatting motion to perform a parametric study of the effects of variations in component rotational alignment in TKA. A cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized version of the same TKA implant were compared. We found that femoral rotation had a greater effect on quadriceps forces, collateral ligament forces, and varus/valgus kinematics, while tibial rotation had a greater effect on anteroposterior translations. Our findings support the tendency for orthopedic surgeons to bias the femoral component into external rotation and avoid malrotation of the tibial component.

  3. Oxidized Zirconium Bearing Surfaces in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Efe, Turgay; Heyse, Thomas J; Haas, Steven B

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene wear in total knee arthroplasty is a still unsolved problem resulting in osteolysis and long-term failure of knee joint replacement. To address the problem of polyethylene wear, research aimed for an optimal implant design and for an optimal combination of bearing surfaces. Oxidized zirconium was introduced to minimize surface wear and thus potentially increase long-term implant survival. This review comprises the current literature related to in vitro and in vivo studies evaluating performance of oxidized zirconium total knee arthroplasty and results from retrieval analyses.

  4. Development of a knee joint motion simulator to evaluate deep knee flexion of artificial knee joints.

    PubMed

    Takano, Y; Ueno, M; Kiguchi, K; Ito, J; Mawatari, M; Hotokebuchi, T

    2008-01-01

    A purpose of this study is to examine the effect that quadriceps femoris force gives to rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis during deep knee flexion such as a unique sitting style called 'seiza' in Japanese. For the evaluation, we developed the knee motion simulator which could bend to 180 degrees continually simulating the passive flexion performed by clinicians. A total knee prosthesis, which is a specially-devised posterior stabilized type and capable of flexion up to 180 degrees, was inserted into bone model. And this prosthesis pulled by three kinds of quadriceps femoris forces to perform parameter study. The results obtained in this study were showed the same tendency with those in the past cadaveric experiment. It is suggested that the rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis are affected by shape of prosthesis, a vector of quadriceps femoris force, and bony aliments during deep knee flexion.

  5. Accuracy of knee range of motion assessment after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lavernia, Carlos; D'Apuzzo, Michele; Rossi, Mark D; Lee, David

    2008-09-01

    Measurement of knee joint range of motion (ROM) is important to assess after total knee arthroplasty. Our objective was to determine level of agreement and accuracy between observers with different knowledge on total ROM after total knee arthroplasty. Forty-one patients underwent x-ray of active and passive knee ROM (gold standard). Five different raters evaluated observed and measured ROM: orthopedic surgeon, clinical fellow, physician assistant, research fellow, and a physical therapist. A 1-way analysis of variance was used to determine differences in ROM between raters over both conditions. Limit of agreement for each rater for both active and passive total ROM under both conditions was calculated. Analysis of variance indicated a difference between raters for all conditions (range, P = .004 to P < or =.0001). The trend for all raters was to overestimate ROM at higher ranges. Assessment of ROM through direct observation without a goniometer provides inaccurate findings.

  6. Detection of total knee prostheses at airport security checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Hooper, Hasan A; Sana, Said H; Mont, Michael A

    2012-06-01

    Airport security screening measures have changed substantially during the past decade, but few reports have examined how this affects patients who have undergone knee arthroplasties. The purpose of this study was to characterize the efficacy of airport metal detection of total knee prostheses, the delays faced, any inconvenience this may have caused, and the role of implant identification cards. Ninety-seven total knee arthroplasty recipients reported passing through an airport metal detector, with 70 triggering the alarm a mean of 3 times (range, 1-36). The presence of a single-knee prosthesis triggered airport security alarms more than 83% of the time and increased patient inconvenience. Patients should be informed about this chance and be prepared to present documentation of their prosthesis.

  7. Evaluation of total knee mechanics using a crouching simulator with a synthetic knee substitute.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Michael; Rosenbaum, Heather; Walker, Peter S

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical evaluation of total knees is frequently required for aspects such as wear, strength, kinematics, contact areas, and force transmission. In order to carry out such tests, we developed a crouching simulator, based on the Oxford-type machine, with novel features including a synthetic knee including ligaments. The instrumentation and data processing methods enabled the determination of contact area locations and interface forces and moments, for a full flexion-extension cycle. To demonstrate the use of the simulator, we carried out a comparison of two different total knee designs, cruciate retaining and substituting. The first part of the study describes the simulator design and the methodology for testing the knees without requiring cadaveric knee specimens. The degrees of freedom of the anatomic hip and ankle joints were reproduced. Flexion-extension was obtained by changing quadriceps length, while variable hamstring forces were applied using springs. The knee joint was represented by three-dimensional printed blocks on to which the total knee components were fixed. Pretensioned elastomeric bands of realistic stiffnesses passed through holes in the block at anatomical locations to represent ligaments. Motion capture of the knees during flexion, together with laser scanning and computer modeling, was used to reconstruct contact areas on the bearing surfaces. A method was also developed for measuring tibial component interface forces and moments as a comparative assessment of fixation. The method involved interposing Tekscan pads at locations on the interface. Overall, the crouching machine and the methodology could be used for many different mechanical measurements of total knee designs, adapted especially for comparative or parametric studies.

  8. Total Arthroplasty in Ankylosed Knees: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Camanho, Gilberto Luiz

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To present nine patients with ankylosis in their knees that were submitted to a total arthroplasty to lessen their pain and improve their functional limitation. For these patients, arthrodesis remained a possibility in the event of arthroplasty failure. INTRODUCTION Ankylosis of the knee is a severe functional limitation that becomes worse when pain is present. Arthrodesis of the knee is a classical indication for such patients, since it resolves the pain; however, the severe functional limitation remains. METHODS In the present study, we evaluated the clinical course of nine patients who underwent total arthroplasty of the knee, and were followed up for at least five years. RESULTS The results demonstrate that all of the patients experienced a significant reduction in pain and some improvement in the degree of knee flexion and extension. CONCLUSION Based on the latest follow-up, there has been no need to perform arthrodesis for any of our patients, showing that a total arthroplasty could be a option for treatment in knee ankylosis. PMID:19330242

  9. Arthroscopic knee debridement can delay total knee replacement in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Gomez-Cardero, Primitivo

    2016-09-01

    The role of arthroscopic debridement of the knee in haemophilia is controversial in the literature. The purpose of this study is to describe the results of arthroscopic knee debridement (AKD), with the aim of determining whether it is possible to delay total knee replacement (TKR) for painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients. In a 14-year period (1998-2011), AKD was performed for moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in 27 patients with haemophilia A. Their average age at operation was 28.6 years (range 26-39 years). Indications for surgery were as follows: more than 90° of knee flexion, flexion deformity less than 30°, good axial alignment of the knee, good patellar alignment, and pain above >60 points in a visual analogue scale [0 (no pain) to 100 points]. Secondary haematological prophylaxis and rehabilitation (physiotherapy) was given for at least 3 months after surgery. Follow-up was for an average of 7.5 years (range 2-14 years). We assessed the clinical outcome before surgery and at the time of latest follow-up using the Knee Society pain and function scores, the range of motion, and the radiological score of the World Federation of Haemophilia. Knee Society pain scores improved from 39 preoperatively to 66 postoperatively, and function scores improved from 36 to 52. Range of motion improved on an average from -15° of extension and 90° of flexion before surgery, to -5° of extension and 110° of flexion at the last follow-up. A radiological deterioration of 2.8 points on average was found. There were two (7.4%) postoperative complications (haemarthroses resolved by joint aspiration). One patient (3.7%) required a TKR 12.5 years later. AKD should be considered in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients to delay TKR.

  10. Position controlled Knee Rehabilitation Orthotic Device for Patients after Total Knee Replacement Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wannaphan, Patsiri; Chanthasopeephan, Teeranoot

    2016-11-01

    Knee rehabilitation after total knee replacement arthroplasty is essential for patients during their post-surgery recovery period. This study is about designing one degree of freedom knee rehabilitation equipment to assist patients for their post-surgery exercise. The equipment is designed to be used in sitting position with flexion/extension of knee in sagittal plane. The range of knee joint motion is starting from 0 to 90 degrees angle for knee rehabilitation motion. The feature includes adjustable link for different human proportions and the torque feedback control at knee joint during rehabilitation and the control of flexion/extension speed. The motion of the rehabilitation equipment was set to move at low speed (18 degrees/sec) for knee rehabilitation. The rehabilitation link without additional load took one second to move from vertical hanging up to 90° while the corresponding torque increased from 0 Nm to 2 Nm at 90°. When extra load is added, the link took 1.5 seconds to move to 90° The torque is then increased from 0 Nm to 4 Nm. After a period of time, the speed of the motion can be varied. User can adjust the motion to 40 degrees/sec during recovery activity of the knee and users can increase the level of exercise or motion up to 60 degrees/sec to strengthen the muscles during throughout their rehabilitation program depends on each patient. Torque control is included to prevent injury. Patients can use the equipment for home exercise to help reduce the number of hospital visit while the patients can receive an appropriate therapy for their knee recovery program.

  11. Intercondylar notch fibrous nodule after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Carro, L P; Suarez, G G

    1999-01-01

    Intra-articular fibrous bands and soft-tissue impingement under the patella after total knee replacement are a well known complications that can be diagnosed and treated arthroscopically. Arthroscopic treatment of soft-tissue impingement between femoral and tibial components in a total knee arthroplasty has been recently reported. The purpose of this article is to report one more case of this pathology of a more fibrotic type resembling a nodule in the intercondylar notch that prevents total extension and to discuss the possible origin and clinical significance. Finally, we propose a classification of the fibrotic reactions after total knee arthroplasty: (A)Multiples or complex bundles reactions; and (B)singles or isolates nodular forms: fibrous nodule in the femoropatelar area (clunk syndrome), and fibrous nodule in the intercondylar notch.

  12. Blastomycosis infection of the knee treated with staged total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Ian S; Day, Shandra R; Moore, Christopher C; Browne, James A

    2015-12-01

    Blastomycosis is a rare fungal disease that can cause intraarticular infection and joint destruction requiring surgical reconstruction. We describe a patient who presented with destruction of the knee joint of unknown etiology. The patient was initially treated with debridement and spacer placement followed by antifungal therapy after cultures grew blastomycosis. Following adequate treatment of the infection, the patient was taken back to the operating room for reconstruction with a total knee arthroplasty. The patient had a successful outcome with no evidence of infection at two years following surgery. To our knowledge, this case report represents the first documented case in which a blastomycotic infection of a native knee was successfully treated with a two-stage total knee arthroplasty.

  13. The difficult primary total knee arthroplasty: a review.

    PubMed

    Baldini, A; Castellani, L; Traverso, F; Balatri, A; Balato, G; Franceschini, V

    2015-10-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a reliable procedure with reproducible long-term results. Nevertheless, there are conditions related to the type of patient or local conditions of the knee that can make it a difficult procedure. The most common scenarios that make it difficult are discussed in this review. These include patients with many previous operations and incisions, and those with severe coronal deformities, genu recurvatum, a stiff knee, extra-articular deformities and those who have previously undergone osteotomy around the knee and those with chronic dislocation of the patella. Each condition is analysed according to the characteristics of the patient, the pre-operative planning and the reported outcomes. When approaching the difficult primary TKA surgeons should use a systematic approach, which begins with the review of the existing literature for each specific clinical situation.

  14. Should the patella be replaced in total knee replacement?

    PubMed

    Badhe, N; Dewnany, G; Livesley, P J

    2001-01-01

    In 170 total knee arthroplasties for osteoarthritis 71 did not receive a patellar replacement (group A), while 99 knees had a cemented polyethylene patella (group B). The mean follow-up time was 36 months (30-50 months). In group A 10 patients underwent second-stage patellar resurfacing and in group B 2 knees underwent revision of the patellar component. Radiologically the average patellar congruency was similar. In both groups there were 21 non-congruent knees. In group A 8 were symptomatic and had low scores compared to 2 in group B (P<0.05). The mean HSS score and patellar score were higher in group B than in group A (P<0.05).

  15. Current surgical strategies for total arthroplasty in valgus knee

    PubMed Central

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Michos, Ioannis; Safos, George; Safos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    The majority of orthopaedic surgeons even currently agree that primary total arthroplasty in valgus knees with a deformity of more than ten degrees may prove challenging. The unique sets of bone and soft tissue abnormalities that must be addressed at the time of the operation make accurate axis restoration, component orientation and joint stability attainment a difficult task. Understanding the specific pathologic anatomic changes associated with the valgus knee is a prerequisite so as to select the proper surgical method, to optimize component position and restore soft-tissue balance. The purpose of this article is to review the valgus knee anatomical variations, to assess the best pre-operative planning and to evaluate how to choose the grade of constraint of the implant. It will also be underlying the up-to-date main approaches and surgical techniques be proposed in the English literature both for bone cuts and soft tissue management of valgus knees. PMID:26191494

  16. Causes of Aseptic Persistent Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hong-An; Seon, Jong-Keun; Park, Kyung-Soon; Shin, Young-Joo; Yang, Hong-Yeol

    2017-01-01

    Background Persistent pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is dissatisfying to the patient and frustrating to the surgeon. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the aseptic causes and clinical course of intractable pain following TKA. Methods Of the total 2,534 cases of primary TKA reviewed, 178 cases were classified as having aseptic persistent pain that was not resolved within 1 year after surgery. Except for the cases with periprosthetic fracture (56 knees), 122 cases of aseptic painful TKA were divided into two groups: intra-articular group (83 knees) and extra-articular group (39 knees). Results In the intra-articular group, the main reasons for pain were aseptic loosening (n = 40), polyethylene wear (n = 16), instability (n = 10), recurrent hemarthrosis (n = 5), patellar maltracking (n = 4), tendon ruptures (n = 4), and stiffness (n = 2). In the extraarticular group, 10 knees (25.6%) were found to have nerve entrapment in the spine, 6 knees (15.4%) were found to have hip osteoarthritis or femoral head avascular necrosis. The reasons for persistent knee pain in the remaining 23 knees (59.0%) still remain elusive. Conclusions Persistent pain after TKA originated from pathology of extra-articular origin in a considerable number of cases in this study. Therefore, it is important to perform thorough preoperative evaluations to reduce pain resulting from extra-articular causes. Furthermore, meticulous surgical procedures and optimal alignment are required to reduce pain of intra-articular origin related to implant wear, instability, and patellar maltracking. PMID:28261427

  17. Kinematics and Mechanical Properties of Knees following Patellar Replacing and Patellar Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongying; Liu, Yanqiang; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Knee injury is a common medical issue. A full understanding of the kinematics and mechanical properties of knees following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) repair utilizing patellar replacement (only the base of the patella is replaced) versus patellar retaining surgical techniques is still lacking. In the current paper, we investigated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data from knees repaired by these two methods and evaluated total knee models created using imaging reconstruction technology that simulated gait conditions. Results revealed that patellar replacement had little influence on tibiofemoral kinematics, although the tibia-surface equivalent stress increased slightly. By contrast, patellar replacement had a significant influence on the patellofemoral joint; patellar internal rotation, external rotation, and medial-lateral translation were all increased. Moreover, the stress distribution on patellar prostheses was altered, resulting in an increased surface maximal equivalent stress on the corresponding area. Moreover, during the gait cycle, we found that the area with maximal equivalent stress shifted its position. Finally, the patellofemoral joint showed decreased motion stability. From the view of kinematics and mechanics, this paper suggests that patella should be retained during TKA if it is possible. The present study presented approaches and technologies for evaluating kinematics and mechanical properties of total knee joint after TKA under gait loads. PMID:27057134

  18. Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty for Simple Distal Femoral Fractures in Elderly Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nam-Yong; Sohn, Jong-Min; Cho, Sung-Gil; Kim, Seung-Chan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be an alternative method for treating distal femoral fractures in elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic results in patients with knee osteoarthritis who underwent TKA with the Medial Pivot prosthesis for distal femoral fractures. Materials and Methods Eight displaced distal femoral fractures in 8 patients were treated with TKA using the Medial Pivot prosthesis and internal fixation. The radiographic and clinical evaluations were performed using simple radiographs and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee scores during a mean follow-up period of 49 months. Results All fractures united and the mean time to radiographic union was 15 weeks. The mean range of motion of the knee joint was 114.3° and the mean HSS knee score was 85.1 at the final follow-up. Conclusions Based on the radiographic and clinical results, TKA with internal fixation can be considered as an option for the treatment of simple distal femoral fractures in elderly patients who have advanced osteoarthritis of the knee with appropriate bone stock. PMID:24032103

  19. One-stage long-stem total knee arthroplasty for arthritic knees with stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amber; Bhosale, Pradeep B; Suryawanshi, Ashish V; Purohit, Shaligram

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To evaluate the outcome of one-stage long-stem total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for patients with arthritic knees and tibiofemoral stress fractures. METHODS. Records of 11 men and 18 women aged 47 to 78 (mean, 66) years who underwent fixed-bearing posterior-stabilised TKA for osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis of the knee with tibial (n=31) and femoral (n=3) stress fractures were reviewed. All the tibial fractures involved the proximal half. There were 7 associated fibular stress fractures. Of the 31 knees with tibial stress fractures, 26 and 5 manifested varus and valgus deformity, respectively. RESULTS. The mean follow-up period was 51 (range, 24-96) months. The mean tibiofemoral angle improved from 23.2 to 1.9 degrees varus. The mean Knee Society knee score improved from 38.5 (range, 15- 63) to 89.6 (range, 80-95) [p<0.05]. The mean Knee Society functional score improved from 25.5 (range, 0-40) to 86.5 (range, 60-100) [p<0.05]. All fractures were united at the last follow-up. No complications were encountered. CONCLUSION. One-stage long-stem TKA restores limb alignment and facilitates fracture healing, with excellent outcome.

  20. Improved radiographic outcomes with patient-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ivie, Conrad B; Probst, Patrick J; Bal, Amrit K; Stannard, James T; Crist, Brett D; Sonny Bal, B

    2014-11-01

    Patient-specific guides can improve limb alignment and implant positioning in total knee arthroplasty, although not all studies have supported this benefit. We compared the radiographs of 100 consecutively-performed patient-specific total knees to a similar group that was implanted with conventional instruments instead. The patient-specific group showed more accurate reproduction of the theoretically ideal mechanical axis, with fewer outliers, but implant positioning was comparable between groups. Our odds ratio comparison showed that the patient-specific group was 1.8 times more likely to be within the desired +3° from the neutral mechanical axis when compared to the standard control group. Our data suggest that reliable reproduction of the limb mechanical axis may accrue from patient-specific guides in total knee arthroplasty when compared to standard, intramedullary instrumentation.

  1. Robotic Total Knee Arthroplasty: Surgical Assistant for a Customized Normal Kinematic Knee.

    PubMed

    Urish, Kenneth L; Conditt, Michael; Roche, Martin; Rubash, Harry E

    2016-09-01

    Although current total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is considered a highly successful surgical procedure, patients undergoing TKA can still experience substantial functional impairment and increased revision rates as compared with those undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Robotic-assisted surgery has been available clinically for almost 15 years and was developed, in part, to address these concerns. Robotic-assisted surgery aims to improve TKA by enhancing the surgeon's ability to optimize soft tissue balancing, reproduce alignment, and restore normal knee kinematics. Current systems include a robotic arm with a variety of different navigation systems with active, semi-active, or passive control. Semi-active systems have become the dominant strategy, providing a haptic window through which the surgeon consistently prepares a TKA based on preoperative planning. A review of previous designs and clinical studies demonstrates that these robotic systems decrease variability and increase precision, primarily with the mechanical axis and restoration of the joint line. Future design objectives include precise planning and consistent intraoperative execution. Preoperative planning, intraoperative sensors, augmenting surgical instrumentation, and biomimetic surfaces will be used to re-create the 4-bar linkage system in the knee. Implants will be placed so that the knee functions with a medial pivot, lateral rollback, screw home mechanism, and patellar femoral tracking. Soft tissue balancing will become more than equalizing the flexion and extension gaps and will match the kinematics to a normal knee. Together, coupled with advanced knee designs, they may be the key to a patient stating, "My knee feels like my natural knee." [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):e822-e827.].

  2. Total Limb Rotation after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: Side-to-Side Discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Jun; Yoon, Seok-Tae; Ko, Young-Bong

    2016-08-01

    Total limb rotation, an important anatomical feature of the lower limb, is defined as any rotation of the lower limb on its longitudinal axis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the discrepancies of rotational profiles of total limb between nonoperated and operated limb following unilateral total knee arthroplasty. We conducted an analysis of the computed tomography (CT) data from 32 patients undergoing primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty. Using these CT scan, rotational profiles of total limb, such as femoral neck anteversion angle expressed as femoral torsion angle (FTA), tibial torsion angle (TTA), knee joint rotation angle (KJRA), and total limb rotation (TLR) were measured. There were significant discrepancies of FTA and KJRA between operated and nonoperated limb following unilateral total knee arthroplasty. The mean difference of operated and nonoperated side for FTA and KJRA were -6.51 ± 11.88 degrees (p = 0.0041) and -6.83 ± 5.04 degrees (p < 0.001), respectively. However, there were no significant discrepancies of TLR, TTA. These results are due to the compensation effect of KJRA. However, excessive external rotation of the femoral component beyond the compensation effect of prosthetic knee joint can lead to a total limb rotational discrepancy in patient undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty.

  3. Knee arthrodesis as limb salvage for complex failures of total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuchinad, Raul; Fourman, Mitchell S; Fragomen, Austin T; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2014-11-01

    Patients with multiple failures of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are challenging limb salvage cases. Twenty one patients over the last 10 years were referred to our service for knee fusion by arthroplasty surgeons who felt they were not candidates for revision TKA. Active infection was present in 76.2% and total bone loss averaged 6.6 cm. Lengthening was performed in 7/22 patients. Total time in Ilizarov frames was 9 months, with 93.3% union. Patients treated with IM fusion nails had 100% union. Average LLD increased from 3.6 to 4.5 cm following intervention, while those with concurrent lengthening improved to 1.6 cm. Findings suggest that bone loss and the soft-tissue envelope dictate knee fusion method, and multiple techniques may be needed. A treatment algorithm is presented.

  4. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Cates, Harold E.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  5. [Recovery from total knee arthroplasty through continuous passive motion].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mayo, B; Rodríguez-Mansilla, J; González Sánchez, B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the effects of continuous passive mobilization in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all clinical trials, written in English and/or Spanish, published in the electronic search databases PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Dialnet, CSIC and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were: clinical trials published from January 2000 until November 2014 in English or Spanish. Out of 537 clinical trials that were potentially relevant, a total of 12 were included in this review. The evaluation of 1,153 patients shows that there is no significant difference in improving the range of the joint, pain, balance, motion, healing and hospital stay using continuous passive mobilization against the regular physiotherapy treatment for total knee arthroplasty. The application of continuous passive mobilization in the long-term does not provide any benefit in terms of the breadth of the range of the joint, pain and improvement of standing and motion in comparison with conventional postoperative physiotherapy treatment in total knee arthroplasty. In the short term an improvement is obtained in the range of joint motion in knee flexion.

  6. An unusual cause of locking after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, J; Doorgakant, A; Shand, J E G; Orr, M M

    2007-09-01

    Locking after total knee replacement is uncommon and is generally caused by the formation of fibrous tissue around the patella. We report an unusual cause of locking resulting from intermittent occlusion of the popliteal artery, which was tethered to cement at the posterior aspect of the tibial component.

  7. Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture after Ipsilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Shin, Sung Jin; Kang, Byoung Youl

    2016-01-01

    Insufficiency fracture of the calcaneus is a rare entity. In the absence of trauma, evaluating a painful ankle in an elderly patient can be difficult and also it might be overlook the insufficiency fracture. We experienced a case of insufficiency calcaneus fracture that occurred after ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty. Here, we report our case with a review of literatures. PMID:26981521

  8. Gait analysis of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aenon; Park, Junhyuck; Lee, Seungwon

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate ability and muscle activities of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and compare them with those of healthy ones. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen female patients with TKA due to advanced degenerative arthritis of the measured on knee joint and 19 healthy elderly females participated. Tibiofemoral angles of TKA patients were using a gait analysis system anterioposterior X-rays of the weight-bearing knee. The knee flexion angle and gait parameters were measured. Muscle activities and prolongation time were EMG system. The gait of the treated limb of each participant was evaluated in three consecutive trials at fast speed and comfortable speed. [Results] The knee flexion angle %stance phase, stride length, step length, speed, cadence, and gait cycle significantly decreased at both the fast speed and comfortable speeds, and the onset and duration time of rectus femoris activity was significantly increased at the comfortable speed in the TKA group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, elderly women who received TKA showed decreased gait ability and muscle activity compared to the healthy elderly women.

  9. Gait analysis of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aenon; Park, Junhyuck; Lee, Seungwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate ability and muscle activities of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and compare them with those of healthy ones. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen female patients with TKA due to advanced degenerative arthritis of the measured on knee joint and 19 healthy elderly females participated. Tibiofemoral angles of TKA patients were using a gait analysis system anterioposterior X-rays of the weight-bearing knee. The knee flexion angle and gait parameters were measured. Muscle activities and prolongation time were EMG system. The gait of the treated limb of each participant was evaluated in three consecutive trials at fast speed and comfortable speed. [Results] The knee flexion angle %stance phase, stride length, step length, speed, cadence, and gait cycle significantly decreased at both the fast speed and comfortable speeds, and the onset and duration time of rectus femoris activity was significantly increased at the comfortable speed in the TKA group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, elderly women who received TKA showed decreased gait ability and muscle activity compared to the healthy elderly women. PMID:25931687

  10. Full versus surface tibial baseplate cementation in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Galasso, Olimpio; Jenny, Jean-Yves; Saragaglia, Dominique; Miehlke, Rolf K

    2013-02-01

    The use of a keel in the tibial component during modern primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has become common, and its cementation may affect the future performance of the prosthesis. Although proponents of cementing the entire tibial component argue that this technique provides better initial fixation and may prevent aseptic loosening, reasons exist to apply cement only to the tibial baseplate. In this study, 232 patients who underwent TKA using full or surface cementation of the tibial baseplate were evaluated at an average 5.6-year follow-up to assess survivorship and clinical results. The cumulative survival rate at 8 years was 97.1%. With revision of either component for any reason considered the endpoint, no significant difference was noted between full and surface cemented groups. Knee Society Score, range of motion, and femoro-tibial mechanical angle significantly increased postoperatively. Multivariate analysis revealed that good preoperative range of motion and Knee Society Scores were related to good postoperative range of motion and Knee Society Scores. Follow-up length was a negative predictor of postoperative Knee Society Score. The use of full or surface cementation of the baseplate was unrelated to the postoperative clinical outcomes. Clinical outcomes did not differ according to the tibial component cementation technique. The results of this study suggest that cementing the keel of the tibial component during primary TKA has no advantage for patients. Longer-term follow-up and proper patient randomization are required to confirm these findings.

  11. Factors affecting postoperative range of motion after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gatha, Nehal M; Clarke, Henry D; Fuchs, Robin; Scuderi, Giles R; Insall, John N

    2004-10-01

    One hundred thirty five patients with osteoarthritis who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were evaluated to determine whether specific pre- and postoperative variables were correlated with the postoperative range of motion. Age, sex, pre- and postoperative range of motion, pre- and postoperative Knee Society scores, intraoperative patellar thickness before and after resurfacing, pre- and postoperative radiographic patellar height (as determined by the Insall-Salvati and Blackburn-Peel ratios), and preoperative radiographic alignment were recorded for each patient. Regression analysis was performed to identify whether any variables were correlated with the postoperative range of motion or Knee Society scores. The only variable that was significantly correlated with postoperative range of motion was the preoperative range of motion. This study suggests that among the variables evaluated, the preoperative range of motion was the only significant predictor of postoperative range of motion.

  12. [Management of Flexion Contracture in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Hube, R; Mayr, H O; Pfitzner, T; von Roth, P

    2015-06-01

    Flexion contracture is a common deformity of the arthritic knee. The present publication describes causes, clinical relevance and surgical technique in the presence of flexion contractures in total knee arthroplasty. Flexion contracture can be attributed to different causes. Basically it is a mismatch between flexion and extension gaps. Moderate and severe deformities have to be corrected by additional surgical interventions. In most cases soft tissue techniques with release of contracted structures, the removal of osteophytes and additional distal femoral bone resection are necessary. The goal of these interventions is to achieve full extension of the knee. During rehabilitation attention has to be paid to maintain it with intensive physical therapy. A remaining flexion contracture is associated with inferior functional outcome and persistent pain.

  13. [Effectiveness of continuous passive motion after total knee replacement].

    PubMed

    Trzeciak, Tomasz; Richter, Magdalena; Ruszkowski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Continuous passive motion (CPM) is frequently used method in the early post-operative rehabilitation in patients after knee surgery. Aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CPM after primary total knee arthroplasty. Efficacy was assesed in terms of clinical score and functional recovery. 93 patients (101 knee joints) undergoing total knee replacement were assigned into two groups. The experimental group received continuous passive motion and active exercises. A control group received conventional physical therapy only. CPM was initiated in the first day after surgery, for 120 minutes, starting with 0-40 degrees range of motion, increased as tolerated (mean 10 degrees per day) and maintained during the hospital stay. Outcome measures were those included in Knee Society Score (KSS). Functional recovery was evaluated using WOMAC. All subjects were evaluated once before the surgery and on 10th day postoperatively. Mean clinical score (KSS) at the day 10 was 70 +/- 15 points in the experimental group and 74 +/- 12 in a control group. There were no statistical difference between the two groups for any outcome measures. CPM group mean range of motion was 83 degrees +/- 14 degrees and a group without CPM 77 degrees +/- 21 degrees. KSS functional score was 66 +/- 9 points in the experimental group compared to 62 +/- 7 points in a control group. Subjective estimation of pain level, joint stiffness and function showed no statistical difference between the two groups regarding total and subscale scores. Mean total score was 24 +/- 19 points in the CPM group and 22 +/- 17 in a group without CPM. These findings show that CPM had no significant advantage in terms of improving clinical measurements. However, there was beneficial effect on subjective assessment of pain level, joint stiffness and functional ability.

  14. A multicenter analysis of axial femorotibial rotation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Douglas A; Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Walker, Scott A; Tucker, Abby

    2004-11-01

    A multicenter analysis was done to determine in vivo femorotibial axial rotation magnitudes and patterns in 1,027 knees (normal knees, nonimplanted ACL-deficient knees, and multiple designs of total knee arthroplasty). All knees were analyzed using fluoroscopy and a three-dimensional computer model-fitting technique during a deep knee bend and/or gait. Normal knees showed 16.5 degrees and 5.7 degrees of internal tibial rotation during a deep knee bend and gait, respectively. Rotation magnitudes and the percent having normal axial rotation patterns decreased in all total knee arthroplasty groups during a deep knee bend. During gait, all knee arthroplasty groups had similar rotational patterns (limited magnitudes). Average axial rotational magnitudes in gait and a deep knee bend were similar among major implant categories (ie, fixed-bearing versus mobile-bearing, etc). Average values in normal knees and ACL-retaining total knee arthroplasty patients (16.5 degrees and 8.1 degrees , respectively) were higher than in groups in which the ACL was absent (< 4.0 degrees ). All total knee arthroplasty groups had at least 19% of patients have a reverse axial rotational pattern during a deep knee bend and at least 31% during gait. Normal axial rotation patterns are essential for good patellar tracking, reduction of patellofemoral shear forces, and maximization of knee flexion.

  15. Knee kinematics during walking at different speeds in people who have undergone total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Jodie A; Webster, Kate E; Feller, Julian A; Menz, Hylton B

    2011-06-01

    People who have undergone total knee replacement (TKR) experience difficulties in some daily activities including walking. Walking at faster speeds requires more knee flexion and may therefore present a greater challenge following TKR. The aim of this study was to compare the knee kinematics of patients following TKR and unimpaired controls during comfortable and fast walking speeds. Forty patients (22 women, 18 men) 12 months following TKR and 40 control participants (matched for age and sex) were assessed during walking at self-selected comfortable and fast speeds using three dimensional motion analysis. The group averages of spatiotemporal and peak kinematic characteristics in the sagittal, coronal and transverse movement planes were compared using univariate analysis of variance with walking speed as a co-variate. The TKR group walked with significantly reduced cadence (p < 0.001 at both speeds) and reduced stride length (p < 0.001 at both speeds), less knee flexion during stance and swing phases (p < 0.001 for both speeds) and less knee extension during stance phase (p < 0.024 for comfortable speed; p < 0.042 for fast speed). The TKR group also walked with less peak knee external rotation than controls at both speeds (p < 0.001 for both speeds). Both groups increased their velocity, cadence and stride length by a similar proportion when walking at fast speed. When walking at a faster speed, spatiotemporal gait parameters and knee motion are altered in a similar manner for both TKR patients and controls. However, at both walking speeds, TKR patients exhibit residual deficits 12 months following surgery.

  16. The influence of pain on knee motion in patients with osteoarthritis undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Damien; Hanratty, Brian; Thompson, Neville; Beverland, David E

    2009-04-01

    Pain is the predominant symptom of degenerative knee arthritis and the main reason patients undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Variation in patient response to pain has proved difficult to quantify. The effect of removing pain by testing TKA patients' range of motion (ROM) before and after the administration of anesthesia has not previously been analyzed. This study objectively quantifies the effect of eliminating pain on knee joint ROM for a typical group of TKA patients with osteoarthritis. We prospectively recruited 141 patients with osteoarthritis admitted for TKA to assess the inhibitory effect of pain on ROM. Passive maximum flexion, extension, and ROM were measured preoperatively before and after administration of anesthesia (spinal anesthetic followed by femoral and sciatic regional nerve blocks). Following pain abolition, passive maximum flexion increased by an average of 13.4 degrees (SD=11.9 degrees), passive maximum extension improved by an average of 3.0 degrees (SD=4.2 degrees), and passive ROM increased by an average of 16.4 degrees (SD=13.1 degrees). The change in each parameter was statistically significant (P<.0001). Improvements in flexion (P=.01) and ROM (P=.005) were significantly greater in women. Measurements taken before anesthesia reflect knee ROM that the patient will tolerate before pain becomes the limiting factor, while measurements taken after anesthesia is achieved suggest the knee ROM possible once pain is eliminated. Abolition of pain led to significant increases in knee flexion, extension, and ROM, suggesting that pain has a significant inhibitory effect on knee motion.

  17. Preoperative laxity in osteoarthritis patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hideo; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Kiga, Hiroshi; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Toyabe, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    A preoperative quantitative evaluation of soft tissues is helpful for planning total knee arthroplasty, in addition to the conventional clinical examinations involved in moving the knee manually. We evaluated preoperative coronal laxity with osteoarthritis in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty by applying a force of 150 N with an arthrometer. We examined a consecutive series of 120 knees in 102 patients. The median laxity was 0° in abduction and 8° in adduction. The femorotibial angle on non-weight-bearing standard anteroposterior radiographs was 180° and correlated with both abduction (r = −0.244, p = 0.007) and adduction (r = 0.205, p = 0.025) laxity. The results of a regression analysis suggested that the femorotibial angle is helpful for estimating both laxities. Considering the many reports on how to obtain well-balanced soft tissues, stress radiographs might help to improve the preoperative planning for gaining the optimal laxity deemed appropriate by surgeons. PMID:17938923

  18. Chronic knee extensor mechanism lesions in total knee arthroplasty: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    COTTINO, UMBERTO; DELEDDA, DAVIDE; ROSSO, FEDERICA; BLONNA, DAVIDE; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Knee extensor mechanism rupture is a serious complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Its prevalence ranges from 1 to 10% and it is commonly observed as a chronic multifactorial pathology with the patellar tendon as the most common site of rupture. Knee extensor mechanism reconstruction can be performed using allogenic or synthetic grafts. In the literature it is still not clear whether one of these techniques is superior to the other and the choice is usually tailored to the patient case by case. Allografts allow better restoration of the anatomical landmarks, whereas the mesh technique is more reproducible and the graft does not elongate over time. Allografts carry an increased risk of infection compared with synthetic reconstructions, while the mesh technique is cheaper and more readily available. In this paper, we review the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of this pathology, drawing on the most recent literature. PMID:27900308

  19. Above knee amputation following total knee arthroplasty: when enough is enough.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Vickas; Tushinski, Daniel M; Soever, Leslie J; Vincent, Alex D; Backstein, David J

    2015-04-01

    In some cases, above knee amputation (AKA) for a chronically infected total knee arthroplasty is the only option. The purpose of this study was to assess patient satisfaction following AKA and to identify factors which may be indicative of successful outcome following AKA. A review was performed of 7 patients who underwent an AKA for a recurrent peri-prosthetic knee infection. Patient satisfaction was gauged through a modified questionnaire. All patients were satisfied with their AKA and 6 of 7 stated that they would have chosen an amputation earlier. Greater than 6 attempts at limb-salvage and failed gastrocnemius flap were identified by expert opinion as possible poor prognostic factors. Despite poor function, patients with chronically infected TKAs are satisfied following an AKA.

  20. Total Knee Arthroplasty After Knee Arthroscopy in Patients Older Than 50 Years.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Jason A; Gradisar, Ian M

    2016-11-01

    Several orthopedic registries have described the incidence of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients who have undergone knee arthroscopy. Patient risk factors may play a role in the conversion rate from knee arthroscopy to TKA. This study quantifies the incidence of conversion of knee arthroscopy to TKA from a US mixed-payer database and describes some common patient risk factors for conversion. The medical records of more than 50 million patients who were treated between 1998 and 2014 were mined with a commercially available software platform. During the study period, a total of 68,090 patients older than 50 years underwent knee arthroscopy for partial meniscectomy, chondroplasty, or debridement. Reported rates of TKA at 1, 2, and 3 years after arthroscopy were 10.1%, 13.7%, and 15.6%, respectively. Obesity, depressive disorder, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, and age 70 years and older were associated with increased relative risk of conversion to TKA at 2 years. When obesity was combined individually with the top 5 other risk factors, no combination produced a higher relative risk than that of obesity alone. Patients who were 50 to 54 years of age had the lowest incidence of conversion to TKA (8.3%, P<.001). Men had a lower incidence of conversion to TKA (11.3%) than women (15.8%, P<.001). This information can help surgeons to counsel patients on the incidence of TKA after knee arthroscopy and identify preoperative risk factors that increase risk. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1041-e1044.].

  1. Risk assessment tools used to predict outcomes of total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Konopka, Joseph F; Hansen, Viktor J; Rubash, Harry E; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews recently proposed clinical tools for predicting risks and outcomes in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty patients. Additionally, we share the Massachusetts General Hospital experience with using the Risk Assessment and Prediction Tool to predict the need for an extended care facility after total joint arthroplasty.

  2. Intraoperative Manipulation for Flexion Contracture During Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshio; Minoda, Yukihide; Fumiaki, Inori; Nakagawa, Sigeru; Okajima, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Akio

    2016-11-01

    Joint gap balancing during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is important for ensuring postoperative joint stability and range of motion. Although the joint gap should be balanced to ensure joint stability, it is not easy to achieve perfect balancing during TKA. In particular, relative extension gap shortening can induce flexion contracture. Intraoperative manipulation is often empirically performed. This study evaluated the tension required for this manipulation and investigated the influence of intraoperative manipulation on the joint gap in cadaveric knees. Total knee arthroplasty was performed in 6 cadaveric knees from whole body cadavers. Flexion contracture was induced using an insert that was 4 mm thicker than the extension gap, and intraoperative manipulation was performed. Study measurements included the changes in the joint gap after manipulation at 6 positions, with the knee bending from extension to 120° flexion, and the manipulation tension that was required to create a 4-mm increase in the gap. The manipulation tension needed to create a 4-mm increase in the extension gap was 303±17 N. The changes in the joint gap after manipulation were 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.2 mm, -0.2 mm, -0.4 mm, and -0.6 mm at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°, and 120° flexion, respectively. Therefore, the joint gap was not significantly changed by the manipulation. Intraoperative manipulation does not resolve flexion contracture. Therefore, if flexion contracture occurs during TKA, treatment with additional bone cutting and soft tissue release is likely more appropriate than manipulation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1070-e1074.].

  3. Does a standard outpatient physiotherapy regime improve the range of knee motion after primary total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Mockford, Brian James; Thompson, Neville W; Humphreys, Patricia; Beverland, David E

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a standard course of outpatient physiotherapy improves the range of knee motion after primary total knee arthroplasty. One hundred and fifty patients were randomly assigned into one of 2 groups. One group received outpatient physiotherapy for 6 weeks (group A). Another received no outpatient physiotherapy (group B). Range of knee motion was measured preoperatively and at 1-year review. Validated knee scores and an SF-12 health questionnaire were also recorded. Although patients in group A achieved a greater range of knee motion than those in group B, this was not statistically significant. No difference either was noted in any of the outcome measures used. In conclusion, outpatient physiotherapy does not improve the range of knee motion after primary total knee arthroplasty.

  4. Knee joint functional range of movement prior to and following total knee arthroplasty measured using flexible electrogoniometry.

    PubMed

    Myles, Christine M; Rowe, Philip J; Walker, Colin R C; Nutton, Richard W

    2002-08-01

    The functional ranges of movement of the knee were investigated in a group of patients with knee osteoarthritis (n = 42, mean age 70 years) before, 4 months and at 18-24 months after total knee arthroplasty and then compared with age matched normal subjects (n = 20, mean age 67 years). Flexible electrogoniometry was used to record the maximum flexion-extension angle, the minimum flexion-extension angle and flexion-extension excursions of both knees during eleven functional activities along with the active and passive knee joint range of motion measured using a manual goniometer. Over the eleven functional activities the patients pre-operatively exhibited 28% less knee joint excursion than normal age matched subjects. By 18-24 months following total knee arthroplasty only 2% of this deficit was recovered. Statistically this recovery was only significant in level walking, slope ascent and slope descent. A greater range of movement was measured in a non-weight bearing position than was used in weight bearing functional activity. It is concluded that total knee arthroplasty gives rise to little improvement in knee motion during functional activities and that functional range of movement of the knee remains limited when compared to normal knee function for a minimum of 18 months following operation.

  5. The effect of preoperative exercise on total knee replacement outcomes.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, D D; Colwell, C W; Morris, B A; Hardwick, M E; Kozin, F

    1996-05-01

    This study compared the effects of preoperative physical therapy of general cardiovascular conditioning exercises with the routine procedure of no preoperative physical therapy on patients undergoing primary total knee replacement. Thirty patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. Group 1 was the control group. Group 2 participated in a physical therapy program designed to strengthen the upper and lower limbs and improve knee range of motion. Group 3 participated in a cardiovascular conditioning program, consisting of arm ergometry, cycle ergometry, aquatic exercises, and aerobic activity. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively using the Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Rating, the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale, and the Quality of Well Being instrument. Both experimental groups tolerated their respective exercise protocols extremely well. All 3 groups showed significant improvement postoperatively as measured by the Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Rating, the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale and the Quality of Well Being measurement scales. However, neither type of preoperative exercise added to the degree of improvement after surgery at any of the postoperative evaluations.

  6. No clinical benefit of gender-specific total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chen; Wang, Jiaxing; Cheng, Mengqi; Peng, Xiaochun; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus regarding the clinical relevance of gender-specific prostheses in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We summarize the current best evidence in a comparison of clinical and radiographic outcomes between gender-specific prostheses and standard unisex prostheses in female patients. Methods We used the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Science Citation Index, and Scopus databases. We included randomized controlled trials published up to January 2013 that compared gender-specific prostheses with standard unisex prostheses in female patients who underwent primary TKAs. Results 6 trials involving 423 patients with 846 knee joints met the inclusion criteria. No statistically significant differences were observed between the 2 designs regarding pain, range of motion (ROM), knee scores, satisfaction, preference, complications, and radiographic results. The gender-specific design (Gender Solutions; Zimmer Inc, Warsaw, Indiana) reduced the prevalence of overhang. However, it had less overall coverage of the femoral condyles compared to the unisex group. In fact, the femoral prosthesis in the standard unisex group matched better than that in the gender-specific group. Interpretation Gender-specific prostheses do not appear to confer any benefit in terms of clinician- and patient-reported outcomes for the female knee. PMID:24954488

  7. Knee joint kinematics, fixation and function related to joint area design in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Uvehammer, J

    2001-02-01

    The aim was to study the influence of different designs of the joint area on tibial component fixation, kinematics and clinical outcome after a cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The HSS score and a special questionnaire were used at the clinical examination. Conventional radiography was done to record the positioning of the implants and development of radiolucencies. The migration and inducible displacement were evaluated using radiostereometry (RSA). The kinematics of the knee during active extension was studied using dynamic RSA. In randomised and prospective studies 87 knees in 83 patients (28 male, 55 female, age 69, range 50-83) received an AMK (DePuy, Johnson & Johnson) TKA. The patients were divided into two groups. In group 1 the patients had varus/valgus deformities of < or = 5 degrees and the PCL was retained. The PCL was resected in group 2 where the patients had deformities exceeding 5 degrees and/or fixed flexion deformities of more than 10 degrees. In group 1 a flat (F, n = 20) or a concave (C, n = 20) design was implanted (study 3). In group 2 (study 4) the patients received a concave (n = 25) or a posterior-stabilised (PS, n = 22) tibial plateau. The migration of the tibial component, positioning of the prosthesis, development of radiolucencies and the clinical outcome was evaluated after 1 and 2 years. Twenty-two patients (11 F, 11 C) in group 1 (study 1) and 22 knees in 20 patients in group 2 (study 2, 11 C, 11 PS) were examined 1 year post-operatively to evaluate the kinematics of the knee. Eleven normals served as controls. During active extension of the knee the inducible displacements of the tibial component were recorded in 16 knees (15 patients). Based on successful RSA examinations 5 knees (4 F, 1 C) from group 1 and 11 knees (5 C, 6 PS) from group 2 were selected (study 5). Abnormal kinematics and especially increased AP translations compared to normals (p < 0.0005) were recorded in all designs. The concave design showed the widest

  8. Sagittal plane balancing in the total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manson, Theodore T; Khanuja, Harpal S; Jacobs, Michael A; Hungerford, Marc W

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative stiffness or instability may result from a total knee arthroplasty imbalanced in the sagittal plane. Total knee arthroplasty instrumentation systems differ in the basic strategies used to assure this balance. In an anterior referencing system, changes in femoral size affect flexion gap tightness, and femoral size selection is paramount to assure sagittal plane balance. Conversely, in posterior referencing systems, femoral size changes do not affect the flexion gap but, rather, influence femoral component-patella articulation. Flexion/extension gap systems use calibrated spacer blocks to ensure gap balance but do not guarantee midrange stability; if used incorrectly, they may cause component malposition and joint line elevation. The authors reviewed the strengths and weaknesses of system types and provided system-specific troubleshooting guidelines for clinicians addressing intraoperative sagittal plane imbalance.

  9. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3–6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  10. Myofascial pain in patients waitlisted for total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Richard; Cahill, Catherine M; Wood, Gavin; Hroch, Jennifer; Wilson, Rosemary; Cupido, Tracy; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knee pain is one of the major sources of pain and disability in developed countries, particularly in aging populations, and is the primary indication for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). OBJECTIVES: To determine the presence of myofascial pain in OA patients waitlisted for TKA and to determine whether their knee pain may be alleviated by trigger point injections. METHODS: Following ethics approval, 25 participants were recruited from the wait list for elective unilateral primary TKA at the study centre. After providing informed consent, all participants were examined for the presence of active trigger points in the muscles surrounding the knee and received trigger point injections of bupivacaine. Assessments and trigger point injections were implemented on the first visit and at subsequent visits on weeks 1, 2, 4 and 8. Outcome measures included the Timed Up and Go test, Brief Pain Inventory, Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire. RESULTS: Myofascial trigger points were identified in all participants. Trigger point injections significantly reduced pain intensity and pain interference, and improved mobility. All participants had trigger points identified in medial muscles, most commonly in the head of the gastrocnemius muscle. An acute reduction in pain and improved functionality was observed immediately following intervention, and persisted over the eight-week course of the investigation. CONCLUSION: All patients had trigger points in the vastus and gastrocnemius muscles, and 92% of patients experienced significant pain relief with trigger point injections at the first visit, indicating that a significant proportion of the OA knee pain was myofascial in origin. Further investigation is warranted to determine the prevalence of myofascial pain and whether treatment delays or prevents TKA. PMID:23061082

  11. Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty: regarding a clinical case☆

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana Alexandra da Costa; Marques, Pedro Miguel Dantas Costa; Sá, Pedro Miguel Gomes; Oliveira, Carolina Fernandes; da Silva, Bruno Pombo Ferreira; de Sousa, Cristina Maria Varino

    2015-01-01

    Although compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty, it is one of the most devastating complications. It is defined as a situation of increased pressure within a closed osteofascial space that impairs the circulation and the functioning of the tissues inside this space, thereby leading to ischemia and tissue dysfunction. Here, a clinical case of a patient who was followed up in orthopedic outpatient consultations due to right gonarthrosis is presented. The patient had a history of arthroscopic meniscectomy and presented knee flexion of 10° before the operation, which consisted of total arthroplasty of the right knee. The operation seemed to be free from intercurrences, but the patient evolved with compartment syndrome of the ipsilateral leg after the operation. Since compartment syndrome is a true surgical emergency, early recognition and treatment of this condition through fasciotomy is crucial in order to avoid amputation, limb dysfunction, kidney failure and death. However, it may be difficult to make the diagnosis and cases may not be recognized if the cause of compartment syndrome is unusual or if the patient is under epidural analgesia and/or peripheral nerve block, which thus camouflages the main warning sign, i.e. disproportional pain. In addition, edema of the limb that underwent the intervention is common after total knee arthroplasty operations. This study presents a review of the literature and signals that the possible rarity of cases is probably due to failure to recognize this condition in a timely manner and to placing these patients in other diagnostic groups that are less likely, such as neuropraxia caused by using a tourniquet or peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26401507

  12. Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty: regarding a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana Alexandra da Costa; Marques, Pedro Miguel Dantas Costa; Sá, Pedro Miguel Gomes; Oliveira, Carolina Fernandes; da Silva, Bruno Pombo Ferreira; de Sousa, Cristina Maria Varino

    2015-01-01

    Although compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty, it is one of the most devastating complications. It is defined as a situation of increased pressure within a closed osteofascial space that impairs the circulation and the functioning of the tissues inside this space, thereby leading to ischemia and tissue dysfunction. Here, a clinical case of a patient who was followed up in orthopedic outpatient consultations due to right gonarthrosis is presented. The patient had a history of arthroscopic meniscectomy and presented knee flexion of 10° before the operation, which consisted of total arthroplasty of the right knee. The operation seemed to be free from intercurrences, but the patient evolved with compartment syndrome of the ipsilateral leg after the operation. Since compartment syndrome is a true surgical emergency, early recognition and treatment of this condition through fasciotomy is crucial in order to avoid amputation, limb dysfunction, kidney failure and death. However, it may be difficult to make the diagnosis and cases may not be recognized if the cause of compartment syndrome is unusual or if the patient is under epidural analgesia and/or peripheral nerve block, which thus camouflages the main warning sign, i.e. disproportional pain. In addition, edema of the limb that underwent the intervention is common after total knee arthroplasty operations. This study presents a review of the literature and signals that the possible rarity of cases is probably due to failure to recognize this condition in a timely manner and to placing these patients in other diagnostic groups that are less likely, such as neuropraxia caused by using a tourniquet or peripheral nerve injury.

  13. Anatomic Versus Mechanically Aligned Total Knee Arthroplasty for Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Toliopoulos, Panagiota; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Desmeules, Francois; Vendittoli, Pascal-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the intra-operative benefits and the clinical outcomes from kinematic or mechanical alignment for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients undergoing revision of failed unicompartmental kneel arthroplasty (UKA) to TKA. Methods: Ten revisions were performed with a kinematic alignment technique and 11 with a mechanical alignment. Measurements of the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA), the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA), and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) were performed using long-leg radiographs. The need for augments, stems, and constrained inserts was compared between groups. Clinical outcomes were compared using the WOMAC score along with maximum distance walked as well as knee range of motion obtained prior to discharge. All data was obtained by a retrospective review of patient files. Results: The kinematic group required less augments, stems, and constrained inserts than the mechanical group and thinner polyethylene bearings. There were significant differences in the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA) and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) between the two groups (p<0.05). The mean WOMAC score obtained at discharge was better in the kinematic group as was mean knee flexion. At last follow up of 34 months for the kinematic group and 58 months for the mechanical group, no orthopedic complications or reoperations were recorded. Conclusion: Although this study has a small patient cohort, our results suggest that kinematic alignment for TKA after UKA revision is an attractive method. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27563365

  14. Data Collection and Analysis Using Wearable Sensors for Monitoring Knee Range of Motion after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chih-Yen; Chen, Kun-Hui; Liu, Kai-Chun; Hsu, Steen Jun-Ping; Chan, Chia-Tai

    2017-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most common treatment for degenerative osteoarthritis of that articulation. However, either in rehabilitation clinics or in hospital wards, the knee range of motion (ROM) can currently only be assessed using a goniometer. In order to provide continuous and objective measurements of knee ROM, we propose the use of wearable inertial sensors to record the knee ROM during the recovery progress. Digitalized and objective data can assist the surgeons to control the recovery status and flexibly adjust rehabilitation programs during the early acute inpatient stage. The more knee flexion ROM regained during the early inpatient period, the better the long-term knee recovery will be and the sooner early discharge can be achieved. The results of this work show that the proposed wearable sensor approach can provide an alternative for continuous monitoring and objective assessment of knee ROM recovery progress for TKA patients compared to the traditional goniometer measurements. PMID:28241434

  15. Finite element analysis of constrained total Condylar Knee Prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-13

    Exactech, Inc., is a prosthetic joint manufacturer based in Gainesville, FL. The company set the goal of developing a highly effective prosthetic articulation, based on scientific principles, not trial and error. They developed an evolutionary design for a total knee arthroplasty system that promised improved performance. They performed static load tests in the laboratory with similar previous designs, but dynamic laboratory testing was both difficult to perform and prohibitively expensive for a small business to undertake. Laboratory testing also cannot measure stress levels in the interior of the prosthesis where failures are known to initiate. To fully optimize their designs for knee arthroplasty revisions, they needed range-of-motion stress/strain data at interior as well as exterior locations within the prosthesis. LLNL developed computer software (especially NIKE3D) specifically designed to perform stress/strain computations (finite element analysis) for complex geometries in large displacement/large deformation conditions. Additionally, LLNL had developed a high fidelity knee model for other analytical purposes. The analysis desired by Exactech could readily be performed using NIKE3D and a modified version of the high fidelity knee that contained the geometry of the condylar knee components. The LLNL high fidelity knee model was a finite element computer model which would not be transferred to Exactech during the course of this CRADA effort. The previously performed laboratory studies by Exactech were beneficial to LLNL in verifying the analytical capabilities of NIKE3D for human anatomical modeling. This, in turn, gave LLNL further entree to perform work-for-others in the prosthetics field. There were two purposes to the CRADA (1) To modify the LLNL High Fidelity Knee Model to accept the geometry of the Exactech Total Knee; and (2) To perform parametric studies of the possible design options in appropriate ranges of motion so that an optimum design could be

  16. [Pain following primary total knee replacement: causes, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    van Geene, Arnoud R; Saris, Daniël B F; Custers, Roel J H

    2015-01-01

    Total knee prosthesis (TKP) placement is a successful treatment for patients with disabling osteoarthritis of the knee. Despite good results, there is a large group of patients who are not satisfied following the procedure. Men, young patients and patients with chronic pain are more often satisfied after TKP placement, as are patients with a higher social status, better mental-health status and lower preoperative pain scores. The diagnostic workup for patients suffering pain after TKP placement is labour intensive, and should be carried out in a systematic manner. Treatment of pain varies per individual, ranging from medication and physiotherapy to revision surgery. There is limited data on how many patients do actually experience pain reduction following treatment.

  17. [Soft tissue balancing in total condylar knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Trepte, C T; Pfanzelt, K

    2003-01-01

    Soft tissue balancing and correct bone cuts are an entity in correcting malalignment in total knee arthroplasty, and cannot be considered isolated. Distinct bony deformations/deviations need enlarged soft tissue management. The extent of resection of the bone stock has to be planned exactly before the operation. Exact soft tissue balancing is necessary to stabilize the corrected knee. Soft tissue balancing has to be done primarily on the side of the contracture by lengthening of the shortened and contracted structures. After balancing the ligaments should have the same tension in extension and flexion together with the same height of the extension and flexion gap. Because of the classic resection of the tibial head, the femoral resection must follow the Insall-Line, that means 3 degrees to 5 degrees outer rotation in relation to the condyles. Only in this way a symmetric flexion gap can be achieved in combination with ligamentous stability in extension and flexion.

  18. Comparative responsiveness of outcome measures for total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Giesinger, K.; Hamilton, D.F.; Jost, B.; Holzner, B.; Giesinger, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective The aim of this study was to compare the responsiveness of various patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and clinician-reported outcomes following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) over a 2-year period. Methods Data were collected in a prospective cohort study of primary TKA. Patients who had completed Forgotten Joint Score-12 (FJS-12), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis (OA) index, EQ-5D, Knee Society Score and range of movement (ROM) assessment were included. Five time points were assessed: pre-operative, 2 months, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years post-operative. Results Data from 98 TKAs were available for analysis. Largest effect sizes (ES) for change from pre-operative to 2-month follow-up were observed for the Knee Society Score (KSS) Knee score (1.70) and WOMAC Total (−1.50). For the period from 6 months to 1 year the largest ES for change were shown by the FJS-12 (0.99) and the KSS Function Score (0.88). The EQ-5D showed the strongest ceiling effect at 1-year follow-up with 84.4% of patients scoring the maximum score. ES for the time from 1- to 2-year follow-up were largest for the FJS-12 (0.50). All other outcome measures showed ES equal or below 0.30. Conclusion Outcome measures differ considerably in responsiveness, especially beyond one year post-operatively. Joint-specific outcome measures are more responsive than clinician-reported or generic health outcome tools. The FJS-12 was the most responsive of the tools assessed; suggesting that joint awareness may be a more discerning measure of patient outcome than traditional PROMs. PMID:24262431

  19. Highly conforming polyethylene inlays reduce the in vivo variability of knee joint kinematics after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Daniilidis, Kiriakos; Skwara, Adrian; Vieth, Volker; Fuchs-Winkelmann, Susanne; Heindel, Walter; Stückmann, Volker; Tibesku, Carsten O

    2012-08-01

    The use of highly conforming polyethylene inlays in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) provides improved anteroposterior stability. The aim of this fluoroscopic study was to investigate the in vivo kinematics during unloaded and loaded active extension with a highly conforming inlay and a flat inlay after cruciate retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Thirty one patients (50 knees) received a fixed-bearing cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty (Genesis II, Smith & Nephew, Schenefeld, Germany) for primary knee osteoarthritis. Twenty two of them received a flat polyethylene inlay (PE), nine a deep dished PE and 19 were in the control group (physiological knees). The mean age at the time of surgery was 62 years. Dynamic examination with fluoroscopy was performed to assess the "patella tendon angle" in relation to the knee flexion angle (measure of anteroposterior translation) and the "kinematic index" (measure of reproducibility). Fluoroscopy was performed under active extension and flexion, during unloaded movement, and under full weight bearing, simulated by step climbing. No significant difference was observed between both types of polyethylene inlay designs and the physiological knee during unloaded movement. Anteroposterior (AP) instability was found during weight-bearing movement. The deep-dish inlay resulted in lower AP translation and a non-physiological rollback. Neither inlay types could restore physiological kinematics of the knee. Despite the fact that deep dished inlays reduce the AP translation, centralisation of contact pressure results in non-physiological rollback. The influence of kinematic pattern variability on clinical results warrants further investigation.

  20. Gelatin matrix use reduces postoperative bleeding after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Velyvis, John H

    2015-02-01

    Bleeding after total knee arthroplasty can result in significant morbidity and increases the need for blood transfusion. The proper use of intraoperative adjunctive topical hemostatic agents can enhance hemostasis perioperatively, potentially reducing blood transfusions. In this prospective study, 157 consecutive patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty received FLOSEAL (FLOSEAL Hemostatic Matrix; Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Hayward, California), a gelatin thrombin hemostatic matrix, 5 mL (74 patients) or 10 mL (83 patients). All patients received warfarin as thromboprophylaxis starting the day after surgery. Data were extracted via hospital chart review from 100 consecutive patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty and immediately preceded the FLOSEAL groups and did not receive FLOSEAL (control group). Postoperative drainage was significantly lower in the FLOSEAL 5 mL (236.9 mL) and 10 mL (120.5 mL) groups compared with the control group (430.8 mL; P<.0001 for both). The FLOSEAL 10 mL group had significantly less drainage than the FLOSEAL 5 mL group (P<.0001). The predicted probability of transfusion in the FLOSEAL 5 mL group was not significantly different compared with the control group (6.0% vs 7.6%, P=.650). The predicted probability of transfusion was lower in the FLOSEAL 10 mL group compared with the control group (0.5% vs 5.5%; P=.004). Within the FLOSEAL 10 mL group, application of FLOSEAL either before or after tourniquet release had a similarly significant effect on drainage volume and predicted probability of blood transfusion. No differences in outcomes were observed by type of anesthesia used. No adverse events occurred related to FLOSEAL use.

  1. Wear testing of materials and surfaces for total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Walker, P S; Blunn, G W; Lilley, P A

    1996-01-01

    A simple wear test was investigated for evaluating the wear and damage of material pairs when used in total knee replacement. The test consisted of an axially loaded metallic femoral indentor and a reciprocating ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) flat disk that represented the tibial component. A number of variables were studied including the effect of conformity by varying the radii of the femoral surface, distilled water or serum as a lubricant, different femoral materials, and different types of UHMWPE. In general, the different morphologies of the surface wear of the UHMWPE were similar to those seen on retrieved total knee replacements. Increased conformity with a cylindrical indentor gave a reduced wear rate initially, compared with that of the lower conformity spherical indentor. However, the wear rates were similar subsequent to this initial wearing in phase. Transfer films of UHMWPE were observed on the cobalt-chrome indentors for both serum and distilled water lubrication, although this film was more extensive for distilled water. The lowest wear rate was observed when oxidized zirconium was used on the femoral side, which was attributed to greater wettability, surface hardness, and immunity to oxidative wear. Tests using cobalt-chrome femoral cylinders and different grades of UHMWPE showed different wear rates. Of these PEs, GUR 415 showed less wear than both RCH 1000 and UHMWPE containing numerous fusion defects. For the latter, wear was attributed to a fatigue mechanism, although in most cases it was associated with surface phenomena rather than subsurface cracking. However, in some specimens of UHMWPE subsurface crack propagations occurred with defects. The test method is discussed in relation to its applicability to the evaluation and comparison of bearing materials and surfaces, with particular application to total knee replacements.

  2. Acute arterial thrombosis after bilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Christopher O; Bayne, Omar; Peterson, Michael; Cain, Eric

    2008-12-01

    Arterial thrombosis is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The overall incidence of arterial complications after TKA, including arterial occlusion, arteriovenous fistula, arterial aneurysm, and arterial severance, varies between 0.03% and 0.17% in reports published in the orthopedic literature (J Vasc Surg 1994;20:927-932). We report a case of acute popliteal artery thrombosis and its sequelae immediately following bilateral TKA performed sequentially under the same anesthesia. This is the first reported case of a post-TKA popliteal artery thrombosis in a patient younger than 60 years without the commonly accepted risk factors.

  3. PAIN FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY – A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Wilson Mello; Migon, Eduardo Zaniol; Zabeu, Jose Luis Amim

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is known to be a successful procedure. The aging of the population and the growing demand for quality of life have greatly increased the indications for the procedure. Nonetheless, TKA presents some complications that still lack definitive resolution. Pain after TKA is caused by a myriad of reasons that need to be systematically studied in order to reach the correct diagnosis and treatment. History, physical examination, laboratory tests and imaging examinations must all be included in the workup and repeated until a plausible reason has been identified, since if pain is the only indication for TKA revision, the results may be catastrophic. PMID:27022583

  4. Revision of medial Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement to a total knee replacement: similar to a primary?

    PubMed

    Wynn Jones, Henry; Chan, Warwick; Harrison, Timothy; Smith, Toby O; Masonda, Patrick; Walton, Neil P

    2012-08-01

    Unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) is an option for the treatment of isolated medial compartment osteoarthritis. A commonly perceived potential advantage is that revision of a UKR is straightforward. The purpose of this study was to determine the early outcomes and the level of complexity of revisions of Oxford UKRs performed at our hospital. A retrospective review of a prospective database of all phase III Oxford UKRs was undertaken. This identified 89 Oxford UKRs which were revised at our institution between 2002 and 2008. The median time from the primary procedure to revision was 19 months (interquartile range 2-73 months). Nine were revised to another UKR. Eighty were revised to a total knee replacement (TKR). Fifty-three were revised with primary TKR components. Twenty-seven were revised using stems and/or augments. The median overall tibial component thickness (including augments) was 15 mm. Forty-five knees had an overall tibial component thickness greater than 15 mm. A primary Oxford UKR bearing thickness of greater than 6mm was associated with an increased likelihood of requiring revision components. On the basis of this review, tibial bone defects were commonly encountered when revising UKRs. Reconstruction with either an augment and a stem, or thick polyethylene component was often required. We recommend that the potential complexity of revision for UKR failure should be borne in mind when considering a primary Oxford UKR.

  5. Sensitivity of knee soft-tissues to surgical technique in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Schirm, Andreas C; Jeffcote, Benjamin O; Nicholls, Rochelle L; Jakob, Hilaire; Kuster, Markus S

    2011-06-01

    Restricted range of motion and excessive laxity are both potential complications of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). During TKA surgery, the surgeon is frequently faced with the question of how tightly to implant the prosthesis. The most common method of altering implantation tightness is to vary the thickness of the polyethylene inlay after the bone cuts have been made and the trial components inserted. We have sought to quantify how altering the polyethylene thickness may affect post-operative soft tissue tension for a range of prosthetic designs. Four different prosthetic designs were implanted into fresh-frozen cadaveric knee joints. All four designs were implanted in the standard manner, with a 100 Newton distraction force used to set soft tissue balance. The tibiofemoral force was then recorded at 15° intervals throughout the passive flexion range. After the standard implantation of each prosthesis, the tibial component was raised or lowered to mimic increasing and decreasing the polyethylene thickness by 2mm and the force measurements repeated. Tibiofemoral force in extension correlated with implantation tightness for all prosthesis designs. Between 15° and 90° of knee flexion, all four designs were insensitive to changes in implantation tightness. Beyond 90° the effect was more notable in rotating platform mobile-bearing and cruciate-retaining prostheses than in posterior-stabilised mobile-bearing designs. The findings of this research may be useful in assisting surgical decision-making during the implantation of TKA prostheses.

  6. Physical functioning four years after total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vissers, M M; Bussmann, J B; de Groot, I B; Verhaar, J A N; Reijman, M

    2013-06-01

    Our previous study showed that 6 months after total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA), patients reported having less difficulty with daily activities, showed better functional capacity, and performed activities in their natural environment faster compared to preoperatively. However, their actual daily activity level was not significantly improved. Six months is a rather short follow-up period and the discrepancy in recovery among different aspects of functioning might be explained by this limited duration of follow-up. The objective of the present study was to examine the recovery of different aspects of physical functioning at a follow-up nearly 4 years after THA/TKA. Special attention was given to the actual daily activity level, and whether it had increased 4 years after THA/TKA compared to 6 months postoperatively. Seventy-seven (35 hip, 42 knee) patients who were measured preoperatively and postoperatively (6 months after surgery) in a previous study were invited to participate; 44 patients (23 hip, 21 knee) agreed to participate. The 4-year follow-up data were compared with the preoperative and 6-month postoperative data. The daily activity level after 4 years was found to be actually lower than at 6 months post-surgery (128 min vs. 138 min activity per 24h; p-value 0.48). However, the patients continued to improve in other aspects of physical functioning. In conclusion, 4-year post-surgery patients continued to improve on perceived physical functioning, capacity, and performance of activities in daily life. However, even in this relatively healthy study population, patients did not adopt a more active lifestyle 4 years after surgery.

  7. How useful is templating for total knee replacement component sizing?

    PubMed

    Peek, A C; Bloch, B; Auld, J

    2012-08-01

    This study aims to assess the accuracy of digital templating at our institution, by comparing the templated component sizes with those implanted, and to determine whether templating the preoperative films had any measurable difference on the radiographic outcome, and if, where there was a mismatch between the implanted and templated sizes, the templated size would have been preferable. While a number of studies have evaluated the accuracy of both acetate and digital templating, none has to our knowledge looked back at post-operative radiographs and reviewed these in light of the templated and implanted sizes. Data was collected from 90 PFC Sigma (DePuy, UK) total knee replacements done sequentially, 45 of whom were templated digitally using a calibrating ball and Agfa Orthopaedic Tools software. Postoperative radiographs were graded independently for correct sizing. All templates were within one size of the implanted prosthesis. The femoral component appeared to be more often oversized on the postoperative radiographs in the non-templated group. In addition, most tibial trays that were found be too small had been templated to a larger size. There was a trend towards tibial trays templated too large to have been templated to a smaller size. We conclude that digital templating with a calibrating device is a useful part of preoperative planning for total knee arthroplasty.

  8. The accuracy of femoral intramedullary guides in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Reed, S C; Gollish, J

    1997-09-01

    Of the technical factors important in achieving a successful total knee arthroplasty, limb alignment has been demonstrated to be most influential in determining implant survival. Intramedullary femoral guide systems rely on placement of the intramedullary rod along the anatomic axis of the femur. In this article, the accuracy of the femoral intramedullary guide is investigated using radiographs and a mathematical model. The femoral anatomic axis was drawn on 40 consecutive, preoperative, 3-ft standing radiographs. Using a mathematical model, the potential angular error in the distal femoral cut from aberrant placement of the intramedullary rod was estimated. Calculated values correlated with measured values from plain radiographs and an intramedullary guide template. The anatomic axis was found to exit the distal femur at an average of 6.6 mm medial to the center of the femoral notch. Substantial malalignment error resulted from minor malposition of the intramedullary rod. Most books and diagrams demonstrating the use of intramedullary guides indicate that the entry point is at the center of the femoral notch. These results show that the true entry point is medial to the center of the notch, and rod placement error results in excessive valgus alignment. Preoperative drawing of the anatomic axis on a 3-ft or 18-inch anteroposterior radiograph is recommended. The results both demonstrate the importance of correct use of the guide and heighten cognizance among surgeons performing total knee arthroplasty as to the limitations of the intramedullary guides.

  9. Anatomic dimensions of the patella measured during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, James L; House, C Ken

    2005-02-01

    The anatomic measurements of 92 patellae with normal underlying bony structure were studied during total knee arthroplasty before and after resection of the articular surface. The articular surface of the patella was found to have an oval shape with a width-to-height ratio (46 x 36 mm) of 1.30. The dome was 4.8 mm high and displaced medially 3.6 mm. The medial facet was slightly thicker than the lateral facet (18 vs 17 mm). The lateral facet is 25% wider than the medial facet. Coverage provided by oval patellar prostheses was significantly better than with round prostheses. The patellae in women were significantly smaller than in men. Size differences and deformity need to be taken into account when the patella is prepared for resurfacing. It is recommended that the bony resection should be no greater than one third of the maximum patellar thickness to avoid alteration of normal bony structure. Key words: patella, total knee arthroplasty, anatomy.

  10. Long-term clinical outcomes and survivorship after total knee arthroplasty using a rotating platform knee prosthesis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hopley, Colin D J; Crossett, Lawrence S; Chen, Antonia F

    2013-01-01

    A systematic search identified 29 papers reporting survivorship and clinical and function Knee Society Scores (KSS) of 6437 total knee replacements using the Low Contact Stress (LCS) Rotating Platform (RP) mobile bearing knee. Low Contact Stress RP survivorship and KSS outcomes were compared with non-LCS knees in the Swedish knee registry at comparable time periods and in 2 independent systematic reviews of knee arthroplasty outcomes. There is a substantial body of mainly observational evidence supporting the LCS RP knee. Knee Society Score outcomes were comparable for LCS RP and non-LCS RP knees at up to 15 years of follow-up, with mean clinical and function scores ranging from 72 to 96 and 58 to 90, respectively. Survivorship of LCS RP knees up to 14 years was higher than that for all knees in the Swedish Knee Registry.

  11. Immunohistochemical analysis of the neural structures of the posterior cruciate ligament in osteoarthritis patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty: an analysis of thirty-four cases

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Glaucus Cajaty; Camanho, Gilberto; Rodrigues, Mara Ibis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many authors recommend posterior cruciate ligament-retaining arthroplasty with the intention to maintain the proprioception properties of this ligament. Preservation of the neuroreceptors and nervous fibers may be essential for retaining the proprioception function of the posterior cruciate ligament. The present study was thus developed to evaluate the presence of neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament resected during posterior stabilized arthroplasty in osteoarthritis patients. In particular, clinical, radiographic and histological parameters were correlated with the presence or absence of neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament. METHODS: In total, 34 posterior cruciate ligament specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Gomori trichrome. An immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against the S100 protein and neurofilaments was also performed. The presence of neural structures was correlated with parameters such as tibiofemoral angulation, histological degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament, Ahlbäck radiological classification, age, gender and the histologic pattern of the synovial neurovascular bundle around the posterior cruciate ligament. RESULTS: In total, 67.5% of the cases presented neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament. In 65% of the cases, the neurovascular bundle was degenerated. Nervous structures were more commonly detected in varus knees than in valgus knees (77% versus 50%). Additionally, severe histologic degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament was related to neurovascular bundle degeneration. CONCLUSIONS: Severe posterior cruciate ligament degeneration was related to neurovascular bundle compromise. Neural structures were more commonly detected in varus knees. Intrinsic neural structures were detected in the majority of the posterior cruciate ligaments of patients submitted to knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. PMID:25789514

  12. Is latero-medial patellar mobility related to the range of motion of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Ota, Susumu; Nakashima, Takeshi; Morisaka, Ayako; Omachi, Takaaki; Ida, Kunio; Kawamura, Morio

    2010-12-01

    Diminished range of motion (ROM) of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is thought to be related to reduced patellar mobility. This has not been confirmed clinically due to a lack of quantitative methods adequate for measuring patellar mobility. We investigated the relationship between patellar mobility by a reported quantitative method and knee joint ROM after TKA. Forty-nine patients [osteoarthritis--OA: 29 knees; rheumatoid arthritis--RA: 20 knees] were examined after TKA. Respective medial and lateral patellar mobility was measured 1 and 6 months postoperatively using a patellofemoral arthrometer (PFA). Knee joint ROM was also measured in each of those 2 sessions. Although the flexion and extension of the knee joints improved significantly from 1 to 6 months after TKA, the medial and lateral patellar displacements (LPDs) failed to improve during that same period. Moreover, only the changes in knee flexion and medial patellar displacement (MPD) between the two sessions were positively correlated (r = 0.31, p < 0.05). However, our findings demonstrated that medial and lateral patellar mobility had no sufficient longitudinal relationship with knee ROM after TKA.

  13. Indoor and Outdoor Mobility following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Ava S.T.; Myrah, Ainslie M.; Bauck, Robyn A.; Brinkman, Danielle M.; Friess, Shawn N.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the relationship between indoor and outdoor mobility capacity in older adults with unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and, secondarily, to determine walking intensity in the same population and to compare all outcomes to a control group of older adults without knee pathology. Method: In this cross-sectional study, participants (TKA=16, mean 22.9 (SD 9.7) mo post TKA; control=22) completed indoor walking tests and a 580 m outdoor course that included varying terrain (e.g., curbs, grass, sidewalk) and frequent changes in direction. Walking capacity was assessed using stopwatches, global positioning system watches and accelerometers. Results: Outdoor walking time was moderately correlated (p<0.05) with the timed up-and-go (TUG) test (r=0.65), stair-climb test (SCT) (r=0.67 ascending, r=0.79 descending), 10 m walk test (10 mWT) (r=0.73), and 6-minute walk test (6 MWT) (r=−0.75). Based on activity counts, walking intensity levels for participants in both groups were moderate (outdoor walk and 6 MWT). There was no significant difference in walking capacity between groups (TUG, SCT, 10 mWT, 6 MWT, outdoor walk). Conclusions: Common clinical walking tests are moderately correlated with outdoor mobility. Mobility capacity of individuals post TKA was similar to controls in both indoor and outdoor environments, and participants in both groups achieved moderate physical activity levels with walking. PMID:24403699

  14. Conversion Total Knee Arthroplasty after Failed High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Lee, Chung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical results of high tibial osteotomy (HTO) deteriorate over time despite the initial satisfactory results. Several knees may require a conversion to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) because of failure such as the progression of degenerative osteoarthritis and the loss of the correction angle. It is important to know the long-term survival rate and common reason of failure in HTO to inform patients of postoperative expectations before surgery and to prevent surgical errors during surgery. In addition, it has been reported that clinical and radiological results, revision rate, and complication rate were poorer than those in patients without a previous HTO. There are few review articles that describe why conversion TKA after HTO is surgically difficult and the results are poor. Surgeons have to avoid the various complications and surgical errors in this specific situation. We would like to present the considering factors and technical difficulties during conversion TKA after HTO with a review of the literature. We could conclude through the review that the correction of deformity, lower amount of tibial bone resection, and sufficient polyethylene insert thickness, restoration of the joint line height, and adequate ligament balancing can be helpful in overcoming the technical challenges encountered during TKA following HTO. PMID:27274465

  15. Comparison of cementless and hybrid cemented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lass, Richard; Kubista, Bernd; Holinka, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Martin; Schuller, Spiro; Stenicka, Sandra; Windhager, Reinhard; Giurea, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Cementless total knee arthroplasty (TKA) implants were designed to provide long-term fixation without the risk of cement-associated complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of titanium-coated cementless implants compared with hybrid TKA implants with a cemented tibial and a cementless femoral component. The authors performed a case-control, single-center study of 120 TKAs performed between 2003 and 2007, including 60 cementless and 60 hybrid cemented TKAs. The authors prospectively analyzed the radiographic and clinical data and the survivorship of the implants at a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Ninety patients who underwent TKA completed the 5-year assessment. Knee Society Scores increased significantly in both groups (P<.001). In both groups, 2 patients underwent revision due to aseptic tibial component loosening, resulting in a 96% implant survival rate. Radiographs showed significantly less radiolucent lines around the tibial baseplate in the cementless group (n=12) than in the hybrid cemented group (n=26) (P=.009).At 6-year mean follow-up, no significant difference existed between the cementless and hybrid cemented tibial components in TKA in terms of clinical and functional results and postoperative complications. The significantly smaller number of radiolucent lines in the cementless group is an indicator of primary stability with the benefit of long-term fixation durability of TKA.

  16. Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Survey of Korean Knee Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ki; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kim, Jong Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to provide information on the actual status and prevailing trend of prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism (VTE) following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in South Korea. Materials and Methods The Korean Knee Society (KKS) developed a questionnaire with 6 clinical questions on VTE. The questionnaire was distributed to all members of KKS by both postal and online mail. Participants were asked to supply details on their specialty and to select methods of prophylaxis they employ. Of the total members of KKS, 27.9% participated in the survey. Results The percentage of surgeons who routinely performed prophylaxis for VTE was 60.4%; 19.4% performed prophylaxis depending on the patient's health condition; and the remaining 20.2% never implemented prophylaxis after surgery. The common prophylactic methods among the responders were compression stocking (72.9%), pneumatic leg compression (63.3%), perioral direct factor Xa inhibitor (46.9%), and low-molecular-weight heparin (39.5%). For the respondents who did not perform prophylaxis, the main reason (51.5%) was the low risk of postoperative VTE considering the low incidences in Asians. Conclusions The present study involving members of the KKS will help to comprehend the actual status of VTE prevention in South Korea. The results of this study may be useful to design VTE guidelines appropriate for Koreans in the future. PMID:27595074

  17. Intraoperative medial pivot affects deep knee flexion angle and patient-reported outcomes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Yusuke; Onodera, Tomohiro; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Daisuke; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Majima, Tokifumi

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between clinical results including patient-reported outcomes and intraoperative knee kinematic patterns after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A cross-sectional survey of forty consecutive medial osteoarthritis patients who had a primary TKA using a CT-based navigation system was conducted. Subjects were divided into two groups based on intraoperative kinematic patterns: a medial pivot group (n = 20) and a non-medial pivot group (n = 20). Subjective outcomes with the new Knee Society Score and clinical outcomes were evaluated. The functional activities, patient satisfaction and the knee flexion angle of the medial pivot group were significantly better than those of the non-medial pivot group. An intraoperative medial pivot pattern positively influences deep knee flexion and patient-reported outcomes.

  18. Short-interval two-stage approach to primary total knee arthroplasty for acutely septic osteoarthritic knees.

    PubMed

    Hochreiter, Bettina; Strahm, Carol; Behrend, Henrik

    2016-10-01

    Treatment strategies for advanced knee osteoarthritis with coexistent joint infection are not well established. While in periprosthetic joint infection the two-stage approach has been studied extensively, only few case reports on two-stage total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for knee osteoarthritis with coexistent joint infection have been published. The purpose of this paper was to report on our method of implementing a two-stage TKA with intervening antibiotic-loaded articulating cement spacers and a short interval between first- and second-stage procedures to treat two patients with Staphylococcus aureus-infected end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Consistent infection eradication was found at a 1-year follow-up with postoperative range of motion and knee scores comparing favourably with those of other case series. Level of evidence V.

  19. Knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular control during gait before and after total knee arthroplasty are sex-specific.

    PubMed

    Astephen Wilson, Janie L; Dunbar, Michael J; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L

    2015-01-01

    The future of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery will involve planning that incorporates more patient-specific characteristics. Despite known biological, morphological, and functional differences between men and women, there has been little investigation into knee joint biomechanical and neuromuscular differences between men and women with osteoarthritis, and none that have examined sex-specific biomechanical and neuromuscular responses to TKA surgery. The objective of this study was to examine sex-associated differences in knee kinematics, kinetics and neuromuscular patterns during gait before and after TKA. Fifty-two patients with end-stage knee OA (28 women, 24 men) underwent gait and neuromuscular analysis within the week prior to and one year after surgery. A number of sex-specific differences were identified which suggest a different manifestation of end-stage knee OA between the sexes.

  20. Is high flexion following total knee arthroplasty safe?: evaluation of knee joint loads in the patients during maximal flexion.

    PubMed

    Nagura, Takeo; Otani, Toshiro; Suda, Yasunori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to indicate the mechanical loads and the flexion angle at the knee during rise from maximal flexion following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty three knees were evaluated using skin marker-based motion analysis system during four different activities of daily living. The average maximum flexion was 90 degrees (34 degrees less than passive flexion) and all subjects required support for their weight to rise from maximal flexion. The external moments and the external forces at the knee during the maximal flexion were smaller than those during the stair descending activity. The results indicate that capable flexion angle for the patients following TKA is approximately 90 degrees which has smaller mechanical loads at the knee than the stair descending activity.

  1. Fatigue fracture of the femur after navigated total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Panasiuk, Michał; Bończak, Oktawiusz

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of fatigue fracture of the femur after navigated total knee arthroplasty with the Orthopilot system. A 60-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis (T-score = -3.1) reported increasing pain of the thigh 8 weeks after the surgery. A fatigue fracture of the right femur through the pinholes was diagnosed and stabilized with an intramedullary nail, achieving union and a good functional result. To our knowledge, this is the first described fracture through the pinholes after Orthopilot-assisted surgery with 4.5 mm threaded pins for tracker fixation. We believe that the number of such complications is underestimated because reports are not published. Patients with osteoporosis should be informed about the possibility of this complicating fracture if they are undergoing navigated surgery.

  2. Tantalum cones and bone defects in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boureau, F; Putman, S; Arnould, A; Dereudre, G; Migaud, H; Pasquier, G

    2015-04-01

    Management of bone loss is a major challenge in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The development of preformed porous tantalum cones offers new possibilities, because they seem to have biological and mechanical qualities that facilitate osseointegration. Compared to the original procedure, when metaphyseal bone defects are too severe, a single tantalum cone may not be enough and we have developed a technique that could extend the indications for this cone in these cases. We used 2 cones to fill femoral bone defects in 7 patients. There were no complications due to wear of the tantalum cones. Radiological follow-up did show any migration or loosening. The short-term results confirm the interest of porous tantalum cones and suggest that they can be an alternative to allografts or megaprostheses in case of massive bone defects.

  3. Mobile bearing and fixed bearing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dolfin, Marco; Saccia, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The mobile bearing (MB) concept in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was developed as an alternative to fixed bearing (FB) implants in order to reduce wear and improve range of motion (ROM), especially focused on younger patients. Unfortunately, its theoretical advantages are still controversial. In this paper we exhibit a review of the more recent literature available comparing FB and MB designs in biomechanical and clinical aspects, including observational studies, clinical trials, national and international registries analyses, randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses and Cochrane reviews. Except for some minor aspects, none of the studies published so far has reported a significant improvement related to MBs regarding patient satisfaction, clinical, functional and radiological outcome or medium and long-term survivorship. Thus the presumed superiority of MBs over FBs appears largely inconsistent. The routine use of MB is not currently supported by adequate evidences; implant choice should be therefore made on the basis of other factors, including cost and surgeon experience. PMID:27162777

  4. Embolization of Spontaneous Hemarthrosis Post Total Knee Replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Given, M. F. Smith, P.; Lyon, S. M.; Robertson, D.; Thomson, K. R.

    2008-09-15

    Spontaneous nonhemophiliac hemarthrosis is an unusual entity, which has been little described. We present three cases of spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis post total knee replacement (TKR) and successful management with embolization. Three male patients were referred to our service for angiography and treatment of recurrent hemarthrosis post TKR. In all three patients antegrade ipsilateral common femoral artery punctures and selective angiography of the geniculate branches were performed with a microcatheter. Abnormal vasculature was noted in all cases. Subsequent embolization was performed with Contour (Boston Scientific, Target Vascular, Cork, Ireland) embolization particles (150-250 and 250-355 {mu}m) in two patients and microcoils in the third (TornadoR; Cook Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA). Technical success was 100%. One patient had a recurrence of symptoms requiring a repeat procedure 6 months later. No complications were encountered. Selective angiography and particle embolization is an effective technique for management of this unusual but problematic postoperative sequelae.

  5. Total knee arthroplasty and fractures of the tibial plateau

    PubMed Central

    Softness, Kenneth A; Murray, Ryan S; Evans, Brian G

    2017-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures are common injuries that occur in a bimodal age distribution. While there are various treatment options for displaced tibial plateau fractures, the standard of care is open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). In physiologically young patients with higher demand and better bone quality, ORIF is the preferred method of treating these fractures. However, future total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a consideration in these patients as post-traumatic osteoarthritis is a common long-term complication of tibial plateau fractures. In older, lower demand patients, ORIF is potentially less favorable for a variety of reasons, namely fixation failure and the need for delayed weight bearing. In some of these patients, TKA can be considered as primary mode of treatment. This paper will review the literature surrounding TKA as both primary treatment and as a salvage measure in patients with fractures of the tibial plateau. The outcomes, complications, techniques and surgical challenges are also discussed. PMID:28251061

  6. Overview of Total Knee Arthroplasty and Modern Pain Control Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Lacey Giambelluca; Fox, M Patricia; Dasa, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    Perioperative pain management of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a challenge for physicians and anesthesiologists. Reducing postoperative pain is an essential component of patient satisfaction, functional outcomes, and hospital length of stay. Multimodal pain management regimens have been demonstrated to be superior to monotherapy in achieving adequate pain control, as well as an effective method of limiting side effects of analgesics. In the present investigation, we present literature published over the last year relating to new advancements in perioperative pain management for TKA. While it is widely accepted that methods including peripheral nerve blocks and local anesthetic injections are essential to pain protocols, there is still conflicting evidence over what modalities provide superior relief. The incorporation of cryoneurolysis preoperatively is a new modality which has been incorporated and has been shown to improve pain control in patients undergoing TKA.

  7. Acute Popliteal Artery Occlusion after Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Ryu; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Takayama, Koji; Kawakami, Yohei; Kamimura, Masato; Matsushita, Takehiko; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Acute arterial occlusions are a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, in revision TKA, the risk of such complications is higher and these complications can lead to amputation if not adequately treated. We describe a case of acute popliteal artery occlusion 4 hours after second revision TKA in a patient with a history of several surgical procedures because of periprosthetic infection at a previous hospital. Revascularization was achieved via bypass grafting and amputation was narrowly avoided despite time lag after symptom onset to revascularization. In this case, it was possible that the arterial disease that accompanied the vascular endothelium injury such as pseudoaneurysm had existed since the previous surgery at another hospital and was destroyed by the surgical procedure, which led to the formation of thrombosis and arterial occlusion. Preoperative evaluation of the arterial condition should be considered to avoid acute arterial occlusive disease, especially in patients who had several previous surgical procedures.

  8. [Osteoarthritis of the knee in the young patient--who should receive total knee arthroplasty and who should not?].

    PubMed

    Dornacher, D; Kappe, T; Reichel, H

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of total knee arthroplasty in young patients continues to rise in certain countries despite evidence of decreased patient satisfaction and increased likelihood for revision in patients 55 years of age or less. As long as sufficient pain relief and functional improvement can be obtained by alternative means, total knee arthroplasty should be avoided whenever possible. In young patients with unicompartmental osteoarthritis, and a partially conserved joint space, correctional osteotomy around the knee accompanied by cartilage surgery should be preferred in the presence of the respective deformity. In cases of advanced unicompartmental arthritis, unicompartmental arthroplasty should be considered even in younger patients. Only if advanced arthritic changes in more than one compartment or accompanying tibiofemoral instability are present in younger patients, is total knee arthroplasty indicated in selected cases. The strongest predictor of satisfaction even in younger patients is, however, a realistic expectation about the outcome of surgery.

  9. Bone cement product and failure in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Øystein; Espehaug, Birgitte; Havelin, Leif I; Furnes, Ove

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — The bone cement market for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in Norway has been dominated by a few products and distributors. Palacos with gentamicin had a market share exceeding 90% before 2005, but it was then withdrawn from the market and replaced by new slightly altered products. We have compared the survival of TKAs fixated with Palacos with gentamicin with the survival of TKAs fixated with the bone cements that took over the market. Patients and methods — Using data from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register for the period 1997–2013, we included 26,147 primary TKAs in the study. The inclusion criteria were TKAs fixated with the 5 most used bone cements and the 5 most common total knee prostheses for that time period. 6-year Kaplan-Meier survival probabilities were established for each cement product. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to assess the association between bone cement product and revision risk. Separate analyses were performed with revision for any reason and revision due to deep infection within 1 year postoperatively as endpoints. Adjustments were made for age, sex, diagnosis, and prosthesis brand. Results — Survival was similar for the prostheses in the follow-up period, between the 5 bone cements included: Palacos with gentamicin, Refobacin Palacos R, Refobacin Bone Cement R (Refobacin BCR), Optipac Refobacin Bone Cement R (Optipac Refobacin BCR), and Palacos R + G. Interpretation — According to our findings, the use of the new bone cements led to a survival rate that was as good as with the old bone cement (Palacos with gentamicin). PMID:27841713

  10. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients with Blount Disease or Blount-Like Deformity.

    PubMed

    Natoli, Roman M; Nypaver, Chrissy M; Schiff, Adam P; Hopkinson, William J; Rees, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    Blount disease is associated with complex deformity of the proximal tibia, and some patients will develop knee osteoarthritis. Five patients (eight knees) with Blount disease or Blount-like deformity underwent total knee arthroplasty. Mean proximal tibial metaphyseal-diaphyseal angle was 20.75°. Each patient had substantial posteromedial tibial bony defects and six knees required extensive medial releases. Two knees required increased constraint at index procedure. One patient has undergone bilateral revision surgery with rotating hinge prostheses. Mean WOMAC scores were 13.5 and Knee Society scores were 212.5 at average 75.2 month follow-up. Despite technical challenges, patients with these deformities can have successful outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. Surgeons should be prepared to address posteromedial tibial bony defects and consider constrained arthroplasty at the index procedure.

  11. Passive knee kinematics before and after total knee arthroplasty: are we correcting pathologic motion?

    PubMed

    Mihalko, William M; Ali, Mounawar; Phillips, Matthew J; Bayers-Thering, Mary; Krackow, Kenneth A

    2008-01-01

    The change in coronal plane deformity throughout a range of flexion before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has not been reported. Unlike most alignment assessments traditionally reporting coronal plane alignment in a standing position under static conditions, this study reports deformity throughout the flexion arc before and after deformity correction. One hundred fifty-two TKA patients using the anteroposterior axis for femoral component rotation and computer navigation techniques were included in the study. Deformity before TKA ranged from 17.5 degrees varus (deformity apex away from the midline) to 20.5 degrees valgus (deformity apex toward the midline) in full extension. Before TKA, deformity was not constant through an arc of motion and significantly decreased with flexion of 60 degrees and more (P < .01). The deformity after performing a TKA was not different (P = .478) throughout the flexion arc. The data determined that deformity is not constant throughout flexion in osteoarthritic knees preoperatively and that deformity throughout flexion can be corrected with the use of conventional alignment techniques during TKA.

  12. Bilateral custom-fit total knee arthroplasty in a patient with poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Nicolas; Chambat, Pierre; Murphy, Colin G; Fayard, Jean-Marie

    2014-09-01

    In limbs affected by poliomyelitis, total knee arthroplasty results in satisfactory pain relief. However, the risk of failure is high, especially if the preoperative quadriceps power is low. Therefore, treating osteoarthritis in the current patient represented a challenging procedure. A 66-year-old man presented with tricompartmental osteoarthritis of both knees, with valgus deformity of 14° on the left knee and 11° on the right knee. He walked with a bilateral knee recurvatum of 30° and a grade 1 quadriceps power. The authors treated both knees with cemented custom-fit hinged total knee arthroplasty with 30° of recurvatum in the tibial keel. Clinical scores showed good results 1 year postoperatively, especially on the subjective data of quality of life and function. At follow-up, radiographs showed good total knee arthroplasty positioning on the right side and a small mechanical loosening at the end of the tibial keel on the left side. Only 5 studies (Patterson and Insall; Moran; Giori and Lewallen; Jordan et al; and Tigani et al) have reported total knee arthroplasty results in patients with poliomyelitis. This study reports an original case of bilateral custom-fit hinged total knee arthroplasty in a patient with poliomyelitis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of this type of procedure in the literature. The key point is the degree of recurvatum that is needed to allow walking, avoiding excessive constraints on the implants that can lead to early mechanical failure.

  13. The Influence Of Component Alignment On The Life Of Total Knee Prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugariu, Delia; Bereteu, Liviu

    2012-12-01

    An arthritic knee affects the patient's life by causing pain and limiting movement. If the cartilage and the bone surfaces are severely affected, the natural joint is replaced with an artificial joint. The procedure is called total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Lately, the numbers of implanted total knee prostheses grow steadily. An important factor in TKA is the perfect alignment of the total knee prosthesis (TKP) components. Component misalignment can lead to the prosthesis loss by producing wear particles. The paper proposes a study on mechanical behaviors of a TKP based on numerical analysis, using ANSYS software. The numerical analysis is based on both the normal and the changed angle of the components alignment.

  14. Are static and dynamic kinematics comparable after total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Saevarsson, Stefan K; Romeo, Carolina I; Anglin, Carolyn

    2013-04-05

    Knee kinematics provide information about how the femoral, tibial and patellar bones or prosthetic components move relative to each other. Accurate knowledge of kinematics is valuable for implant design, comparisons between designs or surgical techniques, and to identify differences between patients with good and poor outcomes. Both static and dynamic imaging techniques have been used to evaluate kinematics. In general, static imaging is used to capture better quality images or to capture views that cannot be acquired by dynamic imaging, whereas dynamic imaging is used to capture real-life movements. How well static kinematics represent dynamic kinematics is subject to frequent debate and has not been adequately addressed, especially after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We compared the static and dynamic weightbearing kinematics of 10 female subjects after TKA. Using the same clinical scanner for both methods, static images were taken using our standard protocol, sequential-biplane radiographs at multiple flexion angles, as well as with dynamic video fluoroscopy during a step up activity. The static method can reliably measure all 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) after TKA, however only seven were compared due to the poorer out-of-plane reliability in the single-plane dynamic imaging. No differences were found between the static and dynamic kinematics for nine out of ten subjects. For one subject, however, a difference of 5-8° in internal/external tibial rotation was found. The research question, study purpose and the advantages and disadvantages of each method need to be considered when determining which imaging method to use.

  15. Evolution of trochlear compartment geometry in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Demey, Guillaume; Nover, Luca; Dejour, David

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to compare trochlear profiles in recent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) models and to determine whether they feature improvements compared to their predecessors. The hypothesis was that recent TKA models have more anatomic trochlear compartments and would display no signs of trochlear dysplasia. Methods The authors analyzed the geometry of the 6 following TKA models using engineering software: PFC and Attune (DePuy), NexGen and Persona (Zimmer), Noetos and KneeTec (Tornier). The mediolateral trochlear profiles were plotted at various flexion angles (0°, 15°, 30° and 45°) to deduce the sulcus angle. Results Analysis of sulcus angles reveals general convergence of recent designs towards anatomic values. At 0° of flexion, sulcus angles of recent implant models were between 156.0–157.4°, while those of previous generation models between 154.5–165.5°. At 30° of flexion, sulcus angles of recent models also lie within 145.7–148.6°, but those of previous models are between 149.5–152.0°. All three manufacturers deepened their trochlear profile at 30° of flexion in recent models compared to earlier designs. Sulcus angles converge towards anatomic values but still exceed radiologic signs of dysplasia by 2–5°. Conclusions Recent TKA designs have more anatomic trochlear geometries than earlier TKA models by the same manufacturers, but trochlear compartments still exceed radiologic signs of trochlear dysplasia by 2° to 5°. The hypothesis that recent TKA models display no signs of trochlear dysplasia is therefore refuted. Surgeons should be aware of design limitations to optimize choice of implant and extensor mechanisms alignment. Level of evidence: IV geometric implant analysis. PMID:26855943

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress activation during total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hocker, Austin D; Boileau, Ryan M; Lantz, Brick A; Jewett, Brian A; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Dreyer, Hans C

    2013-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most common remediation for knee pain from osteoarthritis (OA) and is performed 650,000 annually in the U.S. A tourniquet is commonly used during TKA which causes ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) to the lower limb but the effects of I/R on muscle are not fully understood. Previous reports suggest upregulation of cell stress and catabolism and downregulation of markers of cap-dependent translation during and after TKA. I/R has also been shown to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induce the unfolded protein response (UPR). We hypothesized that the UPR would be activated in response to ER stress during TKA. We obtained muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis at baseline, before TKA; at maximal ischemia, prior to tourniquet deflation; and during reperfusion in the operating room. Phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and AKT decreased during ischemia (−28%, P < 0.05; −20%, P < 0.05, respectively) along with an increase in eIF2α phosphorylation (64%, P < 0.05) suggesting decreased translation initiation. Cleaved ATF6 protein increased in ischemia (39%, P = 0.056) but returned to baseline during reperfusion. CASP3 activation increased during reperfusion compared to baseline (23%, P < 0.05). XBP1 splicing assays revealed an increase in spliced transcript during ischemia (31%, P < 0.05) which diminished during reperfusion. These results suggest that in response to I/R during TKA all three branches of the ER stress response are activated. PMID:24159375

  17. Lessons Learned from Selective Soft-Tissue Release for Gap Balancing in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: An Analysis of 1216 Consecutive Total Knee Arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Christopher L.; Jimenez, Chris; Erickson, Jill; Anderson, Mike B.; Pelt, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Soft-tissue releases are commonly necessary to achieve symmetrical flexion and extension gaps in primary total knee arthroplasty performed with a measured resection technique. We reviewed the frequency of required releases according to preoperative alignment and the clinical and radiographic results; associations with failure, reoperations, and complications are presented. Methods: We reviewed 1216 knees that underwent primary total knee arthroplasty from 2004 to 2009; 774 (64%) were in female patients and 442 (36%), in male patients. In the coronal plane, 855 knees had preoperative varus deformity, 123 were neutral, and 238 had valgus deformity. The mean age at the time of the index procedure was 62.7 years (range, twenty-three to ninety-four years), and the mean body mass index was 32.7 kg/m2 (range, 17.4 to 87.9 kg/m2). Clinical outcomes included the Knee Society Score (KSS), implant failure, reoperation, and complications. Radiographs were analyzed for component alignment. Results: The only difference in the total KSS was found at the time of final follow-up between valgus knees with zero releases (total KSS = 178) and those with one or two releases (KSS = 160, p = 0.026). Overall, 407 knees (33.5%) required zero releases, 686 (56.4%) required oneor two releases, and 123 (10.1%) required three or more releases. Among varus knees, 37% required zero releases, 55% required one or two releases, and 7.5% required three or more releases. Among neutral knees, 39% required zero releases, 55% required one or two releases, and 5.7% required three or more releases. Only 17% of valgus knees required zero releases whereas 61% required one or two releases and 21.8% required three or more releases. Valgus knees required more releases than neutral or varus knees did (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Selective soft-tissue release for gap balancing in primary total knee arthroplasty is an effective technique that produced excellent clinical and radiographic results

  18. Durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dion, Neil T; Bragdon, Charles; Muratoglu, Orhun; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the history of the development of highly cross-linked polyethylene and provides an in-depth review of the clinical results regarding the durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The use of polyethylene as a bearing surface has contributed to the success of THA and TKA; however, polyethylene wear and osteolysis can lead to failure. Ongoing clinical and retrieval studies are required to analyze outcomes at longer-term follow-up.

  19. HINGED CAST BRACE FOR PERSISTENT FLEXION CONTRACTURE FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Matthew D; Pugely, Andrew; Callaghan, John J; Shurr, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The reported incidence of persistent knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has varied from 1-15 percent Various treatment modalities have been described in attempts to manage this often difficult problem. This paper describes a novel method of treatment by using a hinged cast brace (previously reported for treatment of femur fractures and knee contractures secondary to hemophilia and cerebral palsy) for use in patients with symptomatic knee flexion contractures. Application of this cast brace with frequent adjustment (every three to four days, initially) toward full extension can often improve knee extension, after physical therapy and other modalities such as extension-assist braces have failed. Care must be taken in the application and use of this device which utilizes frequent manipulations to reduce and maintain the knee flexion angle. We report two clinical cases in which this protocol was effectively used in decreasing symptomatic knee flexion contractures. PMID:22096423

  20. Knee-Extension Training with a Single-Joint Hybrid Assistive Limb during the Early Postoperative Period after Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Patient with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Hisashi; Kubota, Shigeki; Onishi, Mio; Kanamori, Akihiro; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The knee range of motion is an important outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). According to previous studies, the knee range of motion temporarily decreases for approximately 1 month after TKA due to postoperative pain and quadriceps dysfunction following surgical invasion into the knee extensor mechanism. We describe our experience with a knee-extension training program based on a single-joint hybrid assistive limb (HAL-SJ, Cyberdyne Inc., Tsukuba, Japan) during the acute recovery phase after TKA. HAL-SJ is a wearable robot suit that facilitates the voluntary control of knee joint motion. A 76-year-old man underwent HAL-SJ-based knee-extension training, which enabled him to perform knee function training during the acute phase after TKA without causing increased pain. Thus, he regained the ability to fully extend his knee postoperatively. HAL-SJ-based knee-extension training can be used as a novel post-TKA rehabilitation modality. PMID:27774330

  1. Postoperative blood loss prevention in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Issa, Kimona; McElroy, Mark J; Khanuja, Harpal S; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    Blood loss is a serious concern during lower extremity total joint arthroplasty with the estimated reduction in hemoglobin concentration known to vary between 2 and 4 g/dL after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Allogeneic transfusions are commonly used to treat the acute blood loss and postoperative anemia to diminish the potential cardiovascular risks in up to 50% of such cases with a high volume of blood loss. However, these transfusions are associated with the risks of immunologic reactions, immunosuppression, and infection transmission. Multiple blood-saving strategies have been developed to minimize blood loss, to reduce transfusion rates, to decrease complications, and to improve outcomes in the postoperative period. Currently, there are no clear guidelines on the blood management strategies adopted to lessen the blood loss associated with TKA. The aim of this study was to review the literature and provide a broad summary of the efficacy and complications associated with several blood-saving measures that are currently used in the postoperative period. Evidence suggests that simple techniques such as limb elevation, cryotherapy, compression dressings, and drain clamping may reduce external drainage, however, whether these techniques lead to less allogeneic transfusions is currently debatable. Further research on using a combination of these strategies and their cost-effectiveness are needed.

  2. Apollo total knee replacements in University Malaya Medical Centre: a short-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Abbas, A A; Merican, A M; Kwan, M K; Mohamad, J A

    2006-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is the most preferred option for treatment of severe osteoarthritis of the knee. We report the short-term outcome of 48 total knee replacements in 31 patients utilizing the Apollo Total Knee System after an average follow-up of 48 months (range 15 to 70 months). Records of all patients who underwent TKA using Apollo Total Knee System were retrospectively reviewed. Functional outcome was evaluated using visual analogue scale for pain rating and the Oxford 12-item questionnaire. Postoperative radiographs of the replaced knees were assessed by using the Knee Society Total Knee Arthroplasty Roentgenographic Evaluation and Scoring System. Degenerative osteoarthritis was the commonest indication for TKA. The average patient's age was 63.7 years (range, 30-77 years). The mean visual analogue scale for pre- and post-operative pain was eight and zero respectively. The mean Oxford 12-item questionnaire score pre- and post-operatively was 44.8 and 16.5 respectively. Patient satisfaction was notable in 98% of the cases with an average improvement in arc of flexion of 111 degrees. There were four failures; deep infection (one) and aseptic loosening (three) giving rise to a 94% implant survivor. The short-term results of this series is comparable with or better than a number of outcome studies of the Apollo Knee System or other implants of similar design.

  3. Physiotherapy Rehabilitation After Total Knee or Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy analysis was to determine, where, how, and when physiotherapy services are best delivered to optimize functional outcomes for patients after they undergo primary (first-time) total hip replacement or total knee replacement, and to determine the Ontario-specific economic impact of the best delivery strategy. The objectives of the systematic review were as follows: To determine the effectiveness of inpatient physiotherapy after discharge from an acute care hospital compared with outpatient physiotherapy delivered in either a clinic-based or home-based setting for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of outpatient physiotherapy delivered by a physiotherapist in either a clinic-based or home-based setting in addition to a home exercise program compared with a home exercise program alone for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of preoperative exercise for people who are scheduled to receive primary total knee or hip replacement surgery Clinical Need Total hip replacements and total knee replacements are among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in Ontario. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after first-time total hip or knee replacement surgery is accepted as the standard and essential treatment. The aim is to maximize a person’s functionality and independence and minimize complications such as hip dislocation (for hip replacements), wound infection, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. The Therapy The physiotherapy rehabilitation routine has 4 components: therapeutic exercise, transfer training, gait training, and instruction in the activities of daily living. Physiotherapy rehabilitation for people who have had total joint replacement surgery varies in where, how, and when it is delivered. In Ontario, after discharge from an acute care hospital, people who have had a primary total knee or hip replacement may

  4. Thrombin-Based Hemostatic Agent in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xin; Tian, Peng; Xu, Gui-Jun; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Xin-Long

    2017-02-01

    The present meta-analysis pooled the results from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to identify and assess the efficacy and safety of thrombin-based hemostatic agent in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Potential academic articles were identified from the Cochrane Library, Medline (1966-2015.5), PubMed (1966-2015.5), Embase (1980-2015.5), and ScienceDirect (1966-2015.5). Relevant journals and the recommendations of expert panels were also searched by using Google search engine. RCTs assessing the efficacy and safety of thrombin-based hemostatic agent in primary TKA were included. Pooling of data was analyzed by RevMan 5.1 (The Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK). A total of four RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis revealed significant differences in postoperative hemoglobin decline (p < 0.00001), total blood loss (p < 0.00001), drainage volume (p = 0.01), and allogenic blood transfusion (p = 0.01) between the treatment group and the control group. No significant differences were found regarding incidence of infection (p = 0.45) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT; p = 0.80) between the groups. Meta-analysis indicated that the application of thrombin-based hemostatic agent before wound closure decreased postoperative hemoglobin decline, drainage volume, total blood loss, and transfusion rate and did not increase the risk of infection, DVT, or other complications. Therefore, the reviewers believe that thrombin-based hemostatic agent is effective and safe in primary TKA.

  5. Relationship between Tibial Baseplate Design and Rotational Alignment Landmarks in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Indelli, Pier Francesco; Graceffa, Angelo; Baldini, Andrea; Payne, Brielle; Pipino, Gennaro; Marcucci, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of modern tibial baseplate designs when using the anterior tibial cortex as a primary rotational landmark for the tibial baseplate in TKA. Eighty patients undergoing TKA were randomized in two groups. Group 1 included 25 females and 15 males receiving a posterior-stabilized (PS) symmetric tibial baseplate while Group 2 included 24 females and 16 males receiving a PS anatomical tibial component. Identical surgical technique, including the use of the surgical transepicondylar femoral axis (sTEA) and the anterior tibial cortex (“Curve-on-Curve”) as rotational alignment landmarks, was used. All patients underwent CT evaluation performed with the knee in full extension. Three observers independently measured the rotational alignment of the tibial component in relation to the sTEA. The rotational alignment of the symmetric baseplate showed an average external rotation of 1.3° (minimum 5°, maximum −1°): 91% of the knees showed 0 ± 3° with respect to the surgical sTEA, being internally rotated in 20%. The rotational alignment of the anatomical baseplate showed an average external rotation of 4.1° (minimum 0.4°, maximum 8.9°): only 47.5% of the knees showed 0 ± 3°, being externally rotated in 100%. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant. This study confirms the reliability of the “Curve-on-Curve” technique as an adequate rotational alignment anatomical landmark in TKA: the use of an asymmetric tibial baseplate might lead to external rotation of the tibial component when this technique is intraoperatively chosen. PMID:26491564

  6. Method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing.

    PubMed

    Yulou, Si; Yanqin, Xue; Yongjun, Xing

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing. Clinical data of 80 patients from October 2013 to December 2014 was selected with a retrospective method. All patients have undergone total knee arthroplasty. Then the X-rays plain film in weight loading was measured before and after operation and osteotomy was performed accurately according to the knee joint scores and the conditions of lower limb alignments. The average angle of tibial plateau osteotomy of postoperative patients was 4.3°, and the corrective angle of soft tissue balancing was 10.7°; the postoperative patients' indicies including range of joint motion, knee joint HSS score, angle between articular surfaces, tibial angle, femoral-tibial angle and flexion contracture were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05) and the differences were statistically significant; the postoperative patients' flexion contracture and range of joint motion were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05) and the differences were statistically significant. The effective release of the soft tissue of the posterior joint capsule under direct vision can avoid excess osteotomy and get satisfactory knee replacement space without influencing the patients' joint recovery.

  7. Method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing

    PubMed Central

    Yulou, Si; Yanqin, Xue; Yongjun, Xing

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing. Clinical data of 80 patients from October 2013 to December 2014 was selected with a retrospective method. All patients have undergone total knee arthroplasty. Then the X-rays plain film in weight loading was measured before and after operation and osteotomy was performed accurately according to the knee joint scores and the conditions of lower limb alignments. The average angle of tibial plateau osteotomy of postoperative patients was 4.3°, and the corrective angle of soft tissue balancing was 10.7°; the postoperative patients’ indicies including range of joint motion, knee joint HSS score, angle between articular surfaces, tibial angle, femoral-tibial angle and flexion contracture were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05) and the differences were statistically significant; the postoperative patients’ flexion contracture and range of joint motion were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05) and the differences were statistically significant. The effective release of the soft tissue of the posterior joint capsule under direct vision can avoid excess osteotomy and get satisfactory knee replacement space without influencing the patients’ joint recovery. PMID:28352736

  8. Intraoperative Hypothermia in Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Pepper, Andrew M; Rooney, Edward; Silverton, Craig

    2016-10-25

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are common and successful orthopedic procedures, and as their frequency continues to increase substantially, the focus on limiting perioperative complications heightens. Intraoperative normothermia is recommended to minimize additional complications, but limited evidence exists regarding the effect of hypothermia on orthopedic patients. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of perioperative hypothermia in the setting of TKA and THA, and to evaluate its impact on complications and outcomes. The clinical records of 2580 consecutive patients who underwent TKA or THA at a single institution between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013 were reviewed. After excluding patients with complex or revision procedures, a total of 2397 patients comprised the study population. Patient demographic data, surgery-specific data, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and 30-day readmission were recorded. Patients with a mean intraoperative temperature less than 36°C were identified as hypothermic. Statistical analysis evaluated associations with hypothermia and the effect on complications and outcomes. The incidence of mean intraoperative hypothermia was 37%, 43.9%, and 32.6% for arthroplasty, THA, and TKA, respectively. General anesthesia was significantly associated with hypothermia (P<.001). Women and THA patients were at higher risk for hypothermia. In the arthroplasty and THA cohorts, longer operating room time and re-warmer use were associated with hypothermia (P=.010). Overall, hypothermia was associated with increased estimated blood loss, but no increase in associated transfusion was demonstrated (P=.006). Hypothermia was not associated with postoperative complications. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  9. Cost savings of outpatient versus standard inpatient total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Adrian; Ryu, Jae-Jin; Dervin, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Background With diminishing reimbursement rates and strained public payer budgets, a high-volume inpatient procedure, such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA), is a common target for improving cost efficiencies. Methods This prospective case–control study compared the cost-minimization of same day discharge (SDD) versus inpatient TKA. We examined if and where cost savings can be realized and the magnitude of savings that can be achieved without compromising quality of care. Outcome variables, including detailed case costs, return to hospital rates and complications, were documented and compared between the first 20 SDD cases and 20 matched inpatient controls. Results In every case–control match, the SDD TKA was less costly than the inpatient procedure and yielded a median cost savings of approximately 30%. The savings came primarily from costs associated with the inpatient encounter, such as surgical ward, pharmacy and patient meal costs. At 1 year, there were no major complications and no return to hospital or readmission encounters for either group. Conclusion Our results are consistent with previously published data on the cost savings associated with short stay or outpatient TKA. We have gone further by documenting where those savings were in a matched cohort design. Furthermore, we determined where cost savings could be realized during the patient encounter and to what degree. In carefully selected patients, outpatient TKA is a feasible alternative to traditional inpatient TKA and is significantly less costly. Furthermore, it was deemed to be safe in the perioperative period. PMID:28234591

  10. Availability of Total Knee Arthroplasty Implants for Metal Hypersensitivity Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ajwani, Sanil Harji; Charalambous, Charalambos P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To provide information on the type of “hypersensitivity-friendly” components available for primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the current market. Materials and Methods Implant manufactures were identified using the 2013 National Joint Registries of the United Kingdom and Sweden and contacted to obtain information about the products they offer for patients with metal hypersensitivity. Results Information on 23 TKA systems was provided by 13 implant manufacturers. Of these, 15 systems had options suitable for metal hypersensitivity patients. Two types of “hypersensitivity-friendly” components were identified: 10 implants were cobalt chrome prostheses with a “hypersensitivity-friendly” outer coating and 5 implants were made entirely from non-cobalt chrome alloys. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that several hypersensitivity TKA options exist, some of which provide the same designs and surgical techniques as the conventional implants. The information in this study can guide TKA surgeons in making informed choices about implants and identifying implants that could be examined in future controlled studies comparing outcomes between “hypersensitivity-friendly” and conventional implants. PMID:27894179

  11. Factors affecting polyethylene wear in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Markus S; Stachowiak, Gwidon W

    2002-02-01

    A complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is fatigue-type wear, which can destroy a tibial inlay in <10 years. This deleterious wear mechanism occurs during cyclic loading if the yield stress of polyethylene is exceeded. Because increased stress on and within the polyethylene inlay is associated with increased wear, it is important to reduce the inlay stress by either activity restrictions or conformity changes of design. All stress parameters are more sensitive to conformity changes (eg, design changes) than to load changes (eg, activity restrictions). However, the reduction of stress on and within the polyethylene through increased conformity will increase the stress at the tibial fixation interfaces. An attempt was made to solve this problem with the introduction of mobile-bearing designs. Many mobile-bearing designs exist with good long-term results. One important difference among the various designs is the amount of flexion range with full conformity between the femoral component and the tibial inlay. Although a single radius design reduces polyethylene stress throughout the flexion range, it may be disadvantageous for a revision design to intraoperatively adapt to different degrees of constraint. Aseptic loosening and osteolysis due to small abrasive and adhesive wear particles have also been reported as a cause of failure. The design and material parameters affecting polyethylene wear in TKAs, as well as the potential detrimental effects of wear particle size, are the key issues in defining the life of a TKA.

  12. Rehabilitative Guidelines after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Jaydev B; Elmallah, Randa D K; Bhave, Anil; Chughtai, Morad; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; McGinn, Tanner; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) continues to pose a challenge for both patients and providers. In addition, guidelines vary considerably between institutions, which often leave therapy regimens to the discretion of the provider. The lack of clear guidelines for rehabilitation may contribute to inadequate recovery of strength and range-of-motion, resulting in less optimal functional outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this review was to highlight and discuss a variety of post-TKA rehabilitative modalities currently available and to provide evidence regarding efficacy and practicality. Specifically, we assessed the role of and evidence for exercise therapy, aquatic therapy, balance training, continuous passive motion, cold therapy and compression, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and instrument-assisted soft-tissue therapy. Additionally, we proposed general recommendations for rehabilitation after TKA, and as we specifically described active and obese patients, we have included guidelines for these subsets as well. Our review examines the various rehabilitative modalities to offer suggestions for recovery of strength and range-of-motion after TKA, with a focus on the early incorporation of exercise therapy, balance training, aquatic therapy, cryopneumatic therapy, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Dedication and commitment to rehabilitation may help patients attain and exceed their preoperative activity levels.

  13. Rotation flaps for coverage after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Leonardo Rafael; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Guimarães, Tales Mollica; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results obtained using local myocutaneous rotation flaps in cases of wound dehiscence after total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: Patients undergoing these surgical procedures were selected in the 2000-2012 period. The nine selected cases during this period were subjected to flap coverage due to skin dehiscence associated with infection. In eight cases we used rotation flaps of the medial gastrocnemius, and in one case we used advancing skin. RESULTS: Eighty nine percent of the cases were successful in the coverage of the prosthesis and the viability of the flaps. In four cases it was possible to maintain or review the prosthesis. Four other cases progressed to amputation due to failure on treatment of infections, and one case remained without the prosthesis. The functional evaluation showed an unsatisfactory outcome in 89% of cases. CONCLUSION: Coverage flaps are a good option for the treatment of cases of dehiscence with exposure of the prosthesis and the functional failure was associated with the inability to control the infection and the damage it caused. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453672

  14. Patient-specific instruments for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lachiewicz, Paul F; Henderson, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    The use of patient-specific instruments for total knee arthroplasty shifts computer navigation for bone landmark registration and implant positioning from the intraoperative to the preoperative setting. Each system requires preoperative MRI or CT, with specifications determined by the instrument manufacturer. The marketed advantages of patient-specific instruments include greater accuracy in coronal alignment with fewer outliers, no need for instrumentation of the intramedullary canal, reduced surgical time, lower hospital costs, and improved clinical outcomes. The few published results of these instruments suggest minimal gains obtained in hospital logistics variables and minimal evidence of improvement in either alignment or patient outcomes. Disadvantages of patient-specific instruments include increased costs for imaging and instrument fabrication as well as increased preoperative time required for surgical planning and reviewing the instrument plans, and the learning curve for the surgeon to work with the engineers and use these instruments intraoperatively. It is also necessary to have a set of standard instruments available in case the patient-specific instruments do not work properly. Additional data are required before deciding whether these instruments should be recommended.

  15. Intraoperative evaluation of total knee replacement: kinematic assessment with a navigation system.

    PubMed

    Casino, Daniela; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Martelli, Sandra; Lopomo, Nicola; Bignozzi, Simone; Iacono, Francesco; Russo, Alessandro; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2009-04-01

    Interest in the kinematics of reconstructed knees has increased since it was shown that the alteration of knee motion could lead to abnormal wear and damage to soft tissues. We performed intraoperative kinematic measurements using a navigation system to study knee kinematics before and after posterior substituting rotating platform total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We verified intraoperatively (1) if varus/valgus (VV) laxity and anterior/posterior (AP) laxity were restored after TKA; (2) if TKA induced abnormal femoral rollback; and (3) how tibial axial rotation was influenced by TKA throughout the range of flexion. We found that TKA improved alignment in preoperative osteoarthritic varus knees which became neutral after surgery and maintained a neutral alignment in neutral knees. The VV stability at 0 degrees was restored while AP laxity at 90 degrees significantly increased after TKA. Following TKA, the femur had an abnormal anterior translation up to 60 degrees of flexion, followed by a small rollback of 12 +/- 5 mm. TKA influenced the tibia rotation pattern during flexion, but not the total amount of internal/external rotation throughout whole range of flexion, which was preserved after TKA (6 degrees +/- 5 degrees ). This study showed that the protocol proposed might be useful to adjust knee stability at time zero and that knee kinematic outcome during total knee replacement can be monitored by a navigation system.

  16. Research evidence for the use of preoperative exercise in patients preparing for total hip or total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Barbay, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Preoperative exercise/rehabilitation is currently being considered to improve outcomes for orthopaedic surgery. This article presents an evidence-based practice review of the current research literature from 1998 to 2008 to determine whether preoperative exercise alone will be beneficial to patients preparing for total knee or hip arthroplasty. Only 3 studies met the inclusion criteria of preoperative exercise as the sole intervention. Each of these studies indicated that preoperative exercise had some postoperative benefit to total knee or hip arthroplasty patients. In general, the results are inconclusive due to the lack of strong research evidence, and only a pragmatic recommendation for preoperative exercise prior to total hip or knee arthroplasty is supported. More research is needed in the area of preoperative exercise for persons preparing for total hip or knee arthroplasty.

  17. Use of tranexamic acid in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    MARRA, FRANCESCO; ROSSO, FEDERICA; BRUZZONE, MATTEO; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; DETTONI, FEDERICO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose different strategies have been developed to reduce blood loss in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The efficacy of both systemic and local tranexamic acid (TXA) administration is demonstrated in the literature. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of systemic, local and combined (systemic + local) administration of TXA in reducing blood loss after TKA. Methods we enrolled all patients submitted to a primary TKA in our department between November 2014 and August 2015. They were divided into three groups corresponding to the method of TXA administration used: intravenous (IV), intra-articular (IA), and a combination of the two. Demographic data, as well as preoperative hemoglobin and platelet levels, were collected. The primary outcome was the maximum hemoglobin loss, while the secondary outcomes were the amount of blood in the drain (cc/hour) and the rate of transfusions; postoperative pain was also assessed. Student’s t-test or a χ2 test was used to evaluate between-group differences, using p<0.05 as the cut-off for statistically significant differences. Results the sample comprised 34 patients: IV, 10 cases; IA, 15 cases, and combined (IV + IA), 9 cases. The average age of the patients was 71.1±6.4 years. No significant differences in the outcome measures were found between the groups, with the exception of a significantly lower maximum hemoglobin loss in the combined versus the IV group (p=0.02). There were no differences between the groups in the amount of blood in the drain or the rate of transfusions. Conclusions the data from this preliminary study, as well as data from the literature, confirm that TXA administration is safe and effective in reducing total blood loss in TKA, and no administration protocol seems to be superior to the others. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:28217656

  18. Influence of fear of movement on total knee arthroplasty outcome.

    PubMed

    Kocic, Mirjana; Stankovic, Anita; Lazovic, Milica; Dimitrijevic, Lidija; Stankovic, Ivona; Spalevic, Marija; Stojiljkovic, Predrag; Milenkovic, Marina; Stojanovic, Zorica; Nikolic, Dejan

    2015-01-01

    RiassuntoLo scopo dello studio è quello di verificare l’incidenza del timore postoperatorio ai movimenti nei pazienti sottoposti ad artroplastica totale del ginocchio (TKA) e di determinare l’associazione di questo timore con i provvedimenti da adottare. Lo studio prospettico riguarda 78 pazienti sottoposti ad TKA primaria per osteoartrite. L’incidenza di timore al movimento è stata detenninata con l’uso della Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK). I pazienti sono stati valutati in tre fasi temporali: 2 settimane. 4 settimane e 6 mesi dopo l’intervento chirurgico. In tutte e tre le fasi sono stati valutati il dolore e l’entità della flessione, mentre l’aspetto funzionale è stato preso in considerazione soltanto sei mesi dopo l’intervento, secondo la Oxford knee score 1. Il timore al movimento è stato registrato in 17 pazienti (21,8%). Quelli con maggiore entità di timore hanno dimostrato di conseguire risultati significativamente meno buoni in termini di dolore, grado di flessione e funzionalità rispetto a quelli con limitata paura. Miglioramento del dolore e della flessione sono stati progressivamente conseguiti nel tempo in entrambi i gruppi, ma i risultati migliori vengono raggiunti nel gruppo con minore paura al movimento. Lo studio ha dimostrato che la paura postoperatoria alla motilità si associa significativamente con il dolore, l’entità della flessione e la funzionalità del ginocchio. Altri Autori haImo rilevato che il timore preoperatorio alla motilità del ginocchio fa prevedere limitazioni funzionali postoperatorie. In conclusione il timore della motilità si rileva in una significativa proporzione dei pazienti dopo TKA e si associa con gonalgia, e minore flessione e funzionalità, e dunaue questa paura rappresenta un richio di scarsi risultati dopo artroplastica totale del ginocchio.

  19. Postoperative cognitive changes after total knee arthroplasty under regional anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young-Tae; Kim, Byung-Gun; Park, Young Ho; Sohn, Hye-Min; Kim, Jungeun; Kim, Seung Chan; An, Seong Soo; Kim, SangYun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The type of postoperative cognitive decline after surgery under spinal anesthesia is unknown. We investigated the type of postoperative cognitive decline after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Neuropsychological testing was conducted and the changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers after surgery were evaluated. Methods: Fifteen patients who required bilateral TKA at a 1-week interval under spinal anesthesia were included. Neuropsychological tests were performed twice, once the day before the first operation and just before the second operation (usually 1 week after the first test) to determine cognitive decline. Validated neuropsychological tests were used to examine 4 types of cognitive decline: memory, frontal-executive, language-semantic, and others. Concentrations of CSF amyloid peptide, tau protein, and S100B were measured twice during spinal anesthesia at a 1-week interval. The patients showed poor performance in frontal-executive function (forward digit span, semantic fluency, letter-phonemic fluency, and Stroop color reading) at the second compared to the first neuropsychological assessment. Results: S100B concentration decreased significantly 1 week after the operation compared to the basal value (638 ± 178 vs 509 ± 167 pg/mL) (P = 0.019). Amyloid protein β1–42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau concentrations tended to decrease but the changes were not significant. Conclusion: Our results suggest that frontal-executive function declined 1 week after TKA under spinal anesthesia. The CSF biomarker analysis indicated that TKA under regional anesthesia might not cause neuronal damage. PMID:28033253

  20. Patient perspective survey of total hip vs total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Justin; Petruccelli, Danielle; Adili, Anthony; Piccirillo, Liz; Wismer, David; Winemaker, Mitch

    2012-06-01

    A 42-item survey was developed and administered to determine patient perception of and satisfaction with total hip arthroplasty (THA) vs total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 153 patients who had both primary THA and TKA for osteoarthritis with 1-year follow-up were identified. Survey response rate was 72%. Patients were more satisfied with THA meeting expectations for improvement in function and quality of life (P < .05), whereas pain relief expectations were equivalent. Most patients (70.9%) reported that TKA required more physiotherapy. One-year Oxford score and improvement in Oxford score from preoperative to 1 year were superior for THAs (P = .000). Despite equivalent pain relief, THAs trend toward higher satisfaction compared with TKAs. THA is more likely to "feel normal" with greater improvement in Oxford score. Recovery from TKA requires more physiotherapy and a longer time to achieve a satisfactory recovery status. Patients should be counseled accordingly.

  1. In vivo six-degree-of-freedom knee-joint kinematics in overground and treadmill walking following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shanyuanye; Gray, Hans A; Schache, Anthony G; Feller, Julian; de Steiger, Richard; Pandy, Marcus G

    2016-10-22

    No data are available to describe six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) knee-joint kinematics for one complete cycle of overground walking following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aims of this study were firstly, to measure 6-DOF knee-joint kinematics and condylar motion for overground walking following TKA; and secondly, to determine whether such data differed between overground and treadmill gait when participants walked at the same speed during both tasks. A unique mobile biplane X-ray imaging system enabled accurate measurement of 6-DOF TKA knee kinematics during overground walking by simultaneously tracking and imaging the joint. The largest rotations occurred for flexion-extension and internal-external rotation whereas the largest translations were associated with joint distraction and anterior-posterior drawer. Strong associations were found between flexion-extension and adduction-abduction (R(2)  = 0.92), joint distraction (R(2)  = 1.00), and anterior-posterior translation (R(2)  = 0.77), providing evidence of kinematic coupling in the TKA knee. Although the measured kinematic profiles for overground walking were grossly similar to those for treadmill walking, several statistically significant differences were observed between the two conditions with respect to temporo-spatial parameters, 6-DOF knee-joint kinematics, and condylar contact locations and sliding. Thus, caution is advised when making recommendations regarding knee implant performance based on treadmill-measured knee-joint kinematic data. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  2. Total knee arthroplasty in a pseudoachondroplastic dwarfism patient with bilateral patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Jun; Yoon, Jung-Ro; Yang, Jae-Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Late presentation of congenital patellar dislocation with advanced osteoarthritis is rare. This article presents a case of a 59-year-old man with underlying pseudoachondroplastic dwarfism. Advanced osteoarthritis due to bilateral neglected congenital patellar dislocation was treated with total knee arthroplasty without patella relocation surgery. Two years later, the patient had an improvement in Knee Society scores, painless function, and stability.

  3. Relationship between Improvements in Physical Measures and Patient Satisfaction in Rehabilitation after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazzal, Mahmoud I.; Bashaireh, Khaldoon H.; Alomari, Mahmoud A.; Nazzal, Mohammad S.; Maayah, Mikhled F.; Mesmar, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patient satisfaction with rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fifty-six patients, aged 45-77 years, were enrolled in a post-TKA comprehensive therapy program focusing on knee strengthening and functional activities. The program lasted 3 months and was conducted for 1 h, twice a day, 5 days per…

  4. Lower Limbs Function and Pain Relationships after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tali, Maie; Maaroos, Jaak

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate gait characteristics, lower limbs joint function, and pain relationships associated with knee osteoarthritis of female patients before and 3 months after total knee arthroplasty at an outpatient clinic rehabilitation department. Gait parameters were registered, the active range of lower extremity joints was…

  5. OSTEOLYSIS AROUND TOTAL KNEE ARTHOPLASTY: A REVIEW OF PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Jiri; Goodman, Stuart B.; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Wimmer, Markus A.; Holinka, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic loosening and other wear-related complications are one of the most frequent late reasons for revision of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Periprosthetic osteolysis (PPOL) predates aseptic loosening in many cases indicating the clinical significance of this pathogenic mechanism. A variety of implant-, surgery-, and host-related factors have been delineated to explain the development of PPOL. These factors influence the development of PPOL due to changes in mechanical stresses within the vicinity of the prosthetic device, excessive wear of the polyethylene liner, and joint fluid pressure and flow acting on the peri-implant bone. The process of aseptic loosening is initially governed by factors such as implant/limb alignment, device fixation quality, and muscle coordination/strength. Later large numbers of wear particles detached from TKAs trigger and perpetuate particle disease, as highlighted by progressive growth of inflammatory/granulomatous tissue around the joint cavity. An increased accumulation of osteoclasts at the bone-implant interface, an impairment of osteoblast function, mechanical stresses, and an increased production of joint fluid contribute to bone resorption and subsequent loosening of the implant. In addition, hypersensitivity and adverse reactions to metal debris may contribute to aseptic TKA failure but should be determined more precisely. Patient activity level appears to be the most important factor when the long-term development of PPOL is considered. Surgical technique, implant design, and material factors are the most important preventative factors because they influence both the generation of wear debris and excessive mechanical stresses. New generations of bearing surfaces and designs for TKA should carefully address these important issues in extensive preclinical studies. Currently, there is little evidence that PPOL can be prevented with pharmacological interventions. PMID:23669623

  6. Postoperative pain treatment after total knee arthroplasty: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wetterslev, Mik; Hansen, Signe Elisa; Hansen, Morten Sejer; Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Jørgen B.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this systematic review was to document efficacy, safety and quality of evidence of analgesic interventions after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods This PRISMA-compliant and PROSPERO-registered review includes all-language randomized controlled trials of medication-based analgesic interventions after TKA. Bias was evaluated according to Cochrane methodology. Outcomes were opioid consumption (primary), pain scores at rest and during mobilization, adverse events, and length of stay. Interventions investigated in three or more trials were meta-analysed. Outcomes were evaluated using forest plots, Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE), L’Abbe Plots and trial sequential analysis. Results The included 113 trials, investigating 37 different analgesic interventions, were characterized by unclear/high risk of bias, low assay sensitivity and considerable differences in pain assessment tools, basic analgesic regimens, and reporting of adverse events. In meta-analyses single and continuous femoral nerve block (FNB), intrathecal morphine, local infiltration analgesia, intraarticular injection of local anaesthetics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and gabapentinoids demonstrated significant analgesic effects. The 24-hour morphine-sparing effects ranged from 4.2 mg (CI: 1.3, 7.2; intraarticular local anaesthetics), to 16.6 mg (CI: 11.2, 22; single FNB). Pain relieving effects at rest at 6 hours ranged from 4 mm (CI: -10, 2; gabapentinoids), to 19 mm (CI: 8, 31; single FNB), and at 24 hours from 3 mm (CI: -2, 8; gabapentinoids), to 16 mm (CI: 8, 23; continuous FNB). GRADE-rated quality of evidence was generally low. Conclusion A low quality of evidence, small sample sizes and heterogeneity of trial designs prohibit designation of an optimal procedure-specific analgesic regimen after TKA. PMID:28273133

  7. Change in preoperative expectations in patients undergoing staged bilateral primary total knee or total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Poultsides, Lazaros A; Ghomrawi, Hassan M K; Lyman, Stephen; Aharonoff, Gina B; Mancuso, Carol A; Sculco, Thomas P

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare preoperative expectation scores between stages in patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). For patients with TKA (57), ICC was 0.449, indicating fair agreement between stages; expectations did not change for 31% of patients, whereas 40% had higher and 29% had lower expectations. For patients with THA (55), ICC was 0.663, indicating moderate agreement; expectations did not change for 42% of patients, whereas 38% had higher and 20% had lower expectations. In multivariable analyses controlling for first expectation score, second expectation score was associated with better Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index stiffness score for TKA and with worse Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index function score for patients with THA. For most patients, expectations changed between staged bilateral TKA and THA, but the direction of change was not uniform.

  8. Measuring movement symmetry using tibial-mounted accelerometers for people recovering from total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Cory L.; Bade, Michael J.; Paxton, Roger J.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation was to examine movement symmetry changes over the first 26 weeks following unilateral total knee arthroplasty in community environments using skin-mounted tibial accelerometers. Comparisons to healthy participants of similar age were also made. Methods Patients (N = 24) with unilateral knee osteoarthritis (mean (SD), 65.2 (9.2) years) scheduled to undergo total knee arthroplasty and a control group (N = 19 healthy people; mean (SD), 61.3 (9.2) years) were recruited. The total knee arthroplasty group participated in a standardized course of physical rehabilitation. Tibial acceleration data were recorded during a Stair Climb Test and 6-Minute Walk Test. Tibial acceleration data were reduced to initial peak acceleration for each step. An inter-limb absolute symmetry index of tibial initial peak acceleration values was calculated. Findings The total knee arthroplasty group had greater between limb asymmetry for tibial initial peak acceleration and initial peak acceleration absolute symmetry index values five weeks after total knee arthroplasty, during the Stair Climb Test and the 6-Minute Walk Test. Interpretation Tibial accelerometry is a potential tool for measuring movement symmetry following unilateral total knee arthroplasty in clinical and community environments. Accelerometer-based symmetry outcomes follow patterns similar to published measures of limb loading recorded in laboratory settings. PMID:25979222

  9. Malassezia species infection of the synovium after total knee arthroplasty surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leylabadlo, Hamed Ebrahimzadeh; Zeinalzadeh, Elham; Akbari, Najibeh Asl Rahnemaii; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-01-01

    Infection is a serious complication after implantation of total knee-prostheses. However, fungal infection is rarely found in periprosthetic joints, and in most reports, the infecting organism is a Candida species. This is a case report of infection after left knee total arthroplasty caused by Malassezia species. The patient is still undergoing antifungal therapy with voriconazole and is still being followed-up. To the authors’ knowledge, the present case is the first report of Malassezia species in a patient after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27730027

  10. Revision total knee arthroplasty using a custom tantalum implant in a patient following multiple failed revisions.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Colin A; Gösthe, Raúl G; Patel, Preetesh D; Sanders, Kristopher C; Huaman, Gustavo; Suarez, Juan C

    2017-03-01

    The number of revision total knee arthroplasty procedures performed annually is increasing and, subsequently, so is the number of patients presenting following a failed revision. Rerevising a total knee arthroplasty after one or more failed revision procedures presents many challenges, including diminished bone stock for prosthetic fixation. "Off the shelf" implants may not offer the best alternative for reconstruction. We present the case of a 55-year-old patient who required a rerevision total knee arthroplasty following multiple failed revisions with severe femoral and tibia bone loss. We describe a novel technique we employed to improve component fixation within the compromised bone stock.

  11. Comparison between closed suction drainage and nondrainage in total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-dong; Guo, Wan-shou; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Zhao-hui; Cheng, Li-ming; Li, Zi-rong

    2011-12-01

    From individual randomized studies, it is not clear whether a closed suction drainage should be used after total knee arthroplasty. Our meta-analysis compares the clinical outcomes of closed suction drainage with nondrainage after total knee arthroplasty in randomized controlled trials reported between January 1966 and May 2010. Fifteen eligible trials involving 1361 knee incisions (686 knees with closed suction drainage and 675 knees without drainage) satisfied the inclusion criteria for our meta-analysis. The result of the meta-analysis indicates that closed suction drainage reduces the incidence of soft tissue ecchymosis and requirement for dressing reinforcement, but increases the rate of homologous blood transfusion. No significant difference between drainage and nondrainage was observed in the incidence of infection, deep venous thrombosis, or postoperative range of motion.

  12. Monoblock versus modular polyethylene insert in uncemented total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Mikkel Rathsach; Winther, Nikolaj; Lind, Thomas; SchrøDer, Henrik; Flivik, Gunnar; Petersen, Michael Mørk

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Backside wear of the polyethylene insert in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can produce clinically significant levels of polyethylene debris, which can lead to loosening of the tibial component. Loosening due to polyethylene debris could theoretically be reduced in tibial components of monoblock polyethylene design, as there is no backside wear. We investigated the effect of 2 different tibial component designs, monoblock and modular polyethylene, on migration of the tibial component in uncemented TKA. Patients and methods — In this randomized study, 53 patients (mean age 61 years), 32 in the monoblock group and 33 in the modular group, were followed for 2 years. Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) was done postoperatively after weight bearing and after 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. The primary endpoint of the study was comparison of the tibial component migration (expressed as maximum total point motion (MTPM)) of the 2 different implant designs. Results — We did not find any statistically significant difference in MTPM between the groups at 3 months (p = 0.2) or at 6 months (p = 0.1), but at 12 and 24 months of follow-up there was a significant difference in MTPM of 0.36 mm (p = 0.02) and 0.42 mm (p = 0.02) between groups, with the highest amount of migration (1.0 mm) in the modular group. The difference in continuous migration (MTPM from 12 and 24 months) between the groups was 0.096 mm (p = 0.5), and when comparing MTPM from 3–24 months, the difference between the groups was 0.23 mm (p = 0.07). Interpretation — In both study groups, we found the early migration pattern expected, with a relatively high initial amount of migration from operation to 3 months of follow-up, followed by stabilization of the implant with little migration thereafter. However, the modular implants had a statistically significantly higher degree of migration compared to the monoblock. We believe that the greater stiffness of the modular implants was the

  13. Monoblock versus modular polyethylene insert in uncemented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mikkel Rathsach; Winther, Nikolaj; Lind, Thomas; SchrøDer, Henrik; Flivik, Gunnar; Petersen, Michael Mørk

    2016-12-01

    Background and purpose - Backside wear of the polyethylene insert in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can produce clinically significant levels of polyethylene debris, which can lead to loosening of the tibial component. Loosening due to polyethylene debris could theoretically be reduced in tibial components of monoblock polyethylene design, as there is no backside wear. We investigated the effect of 2 different tibial component designs, monoblock and modular polyethylene, on migration of the tibial component in uncemented TKA. Patients and methods - In this randomized study, 53 patients (mean age 61 years), 32 in the monoblock group and 33 in the modular group, were followed for 2 years. Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) was done postoperatively after weight bearing and after 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. The primary endpoint of the study was comparison of the tibial component migration (expressed as maximum total point motion (MTPM)) of the 2 different implant designs. Results - We did not find any statistically significant difference in MTPM between the groups at 3 months (p = 0.2) or at 6 months (p = 0.1), but at 12 and 24 months of follow-up there was a significant difference in MTPM of 0.36 mm (p = 0.02) and 0.42 mm (p = 0.02) between groups, with the highest amount of migration (1.0 mm) in the modular group. The difference in continuous migration (MTPM from 12 and 24 months) between the groups was 0.096 mm (p = 0.5), and when comparing MTPM from 3-24 months, the difference between the groups was 0.23 mm (p = 0.07). Interpretation - In both study groups, we found the early migration pattern expected, with a relatively high initial amount of migration from operation to 3 months of follow-up, followed by stabilization of the implant with little migration thereafter. However, the modular implants had a statistically significantly higher degree of migration compared to the monoblock. We believe that the greater stiffness of the modular implants was the main

  14. Biomechanical comparison of extensile exposures in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wall, Simon J; Rose, David M; Khanuja, Harpal S; Sutter, Edward G; Knight, Trevor A; Belkoff, Stephen M; Mears, Simon C

    2010-06-09

    The "banana peel" exposure is a novel technique for knee joint exposure that consists of partially peeling the patellar tendon off the tibia, leaving the extensor mechanism intact distally and laterally. Although good clinical results have been reported with this technique with no disruption of the extensor mechanism, concerns exist that it could cause extensor lag, quadriceps weakness, or patellar tendon rupture. We compared the banana peel exposure repair to tibial tubercle osteotomy repair, which we chose as our benchmark procedure because much is known about its associated healing and rehabilitation protocols. In our study of 16 paired, fresh-frozen human knee specimens, the 2 techniques were used alternately for the right and left knees. To measure acute strength, 10 pairs were tested. The patella was clamped and pulled superiorly at 25 mm/min until failure. For cyclical testing (6 pairs), the knee was extended from 90 degrees of flexion to 0 degrees for 2000 cycles at 0.25 Hz while we monitored the distance between the inferior pole of the patella and the tibial diaphysis using a passive optical kinematic measuring system. Mean failure strengths of the banana peel and osteotomy groups were 2642+/-1104 N and 2123+/-562 N, respectively, suggesting that the banana peel repair is not weaker than the osteotomy repair. Neither group had a significant increase (via paired Student t test, P>.05) in the distance between the inferior pole of the patella and the tibial diaphysis, suggesting that neither exposure would result in extensor lag.

  15. Early outcomes of twin-peg mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty compared with primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Z. C.; Lombardi, A. V.; Hurst, J. M.; Morris, M. J.; Adams, J. B.; Berend, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Since redesign of the Oxford phase III mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) femoral component to a twin-peg design, there has not been a direct comparison to total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Thus, we explored differences between the two cohorts. Patients and Methods A total of 168 patients (201 knees) underwent medial UKA with the Oxford Partial Knee Twin-Peg. These patients were compared with a randomly selected group of 177 patients (189 knees) with primary Vanguard TKA. Patient demographics, Knee Society (KS) scores and range of movement (ROM) were compared between the two cohorts. Additionally, revision, re-operation and manipulation under anaesthesia rates were analysed. Results The mean follow-up for UKA and TKA groups was 5.4 and 5.5 years, respectively. Six TKA (3.2%) versus three UKAs (1.5%) were revised which was not significant (p = 0.269). Manipulation was more frequent after TKA (16; 8.5%) versus none in the UKA group (p < 0.001). UKA patients had higher post-operative KS function scores versus TKA patients (78 versus 66, p < 0.001) with a trend toward greater improvement, but there was no difference in ROM and KS clinical improvement (p = 0.382 and 0.420, respectively). Conclusion We found fewer manipulations, and higher functional outcomes for patients treated with medial mobile-bearing UKA compared with TKA. TKA had twice the revision rate as UKA although this did not reach statistical significance with the numbers available. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):28–33. PMID:27694513

  16. Totally Endovascular Management of Popliteal Artery Occlusion and Pseudoaneurysm Formation after Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Anthony; Sandstrom, Anna; Jha, Pankaj K

    2017-01-01

    Injuries to the popliteal artery during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are rare. We present a case of a 72-year-old man with popliteal artery thrombosis and a pseudoaneurysm presenting immediately after TKA. First-line management of acute limb ischemia is currently transitioning from open surgery to endovascular strategies such as catheter-directed thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy. Due to the rarity of acute limb ischemia and pseudoaneurysms after TKA, endovascular management is only reported in a few case studies. This case is distinctive by having both popliteal artery thrombosis and a pseudoaneurysm which were successfully managed entirely endovascular using AngioJet thrombolysis and a flexible covered stent. This case contributes to the evidence supporting endovascular management of this rare complication of TKA.

  17. Essential amino acid supplementation in patients following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Hans C.; Strycker, Lisa A.; Senesac, Hilary A.; Hocker, Austin D.; Smolkowski, Keith; Shah, Steven N.; Jewett, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. By the year 2030, 3.48 million older U.S. adults are projected to undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Following this surgery, considerable muscle atrophy occurs, resulting in decreased strength and impaired functional mobility. Essential amino acids (EAAs) have been shown to attenuate muscle loss during periods of reduced activity and may be beneficial for TKA patients. Methods. We used a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial with 28 older adults undergoing TKA. Patients were randomized to ingest either 20 g of EAAs (n = 16) or placebo (n = 12) twice daily between meals for 1 week before and 2 weeks after TKA. At baseline, 2 weeks, and 6 weeks after TKA, an MRI was performed to determine mid-thigh muscle and adipose tissue volume. Muscle strength and functional mobility were also measured at these times. Results. TKA patients receiving placebo exhibited greater quadriceps muscle atrophy, with a –14.3 ± 3.6% change from baseline to 2 weeks after surgery compared with –3.4 ± 3.1% for the EAA group (F = 5.16, P = 0.036) and a –18.4 ± 2.3% change from baseline to 6 weeks after surgery for placebo versus –6.2 ± 2.2% for the EAA group (F = 14.14, P = 0.001). EAAs also attenuated atrophy in the nonoperated quadriceps and in the hamstring and adductor muscles of both extremities. The EAA group performed better at 2 and 6 weeks after surgery on functional mobility tests (all P < 0.05). Change in quadriceps muscle atrophy was significantly associated with change in functional mobility (F = 5.78, P = 0.021). Conclusion. EAA treatment attenuated muscle atrophy and accelerated the return of functional mobility in older adults following TKA. Trial registration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00760383. Funding. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Office of the Director (OD), and the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS), NIH grant K01HD057332, and the Medical

  18. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt; Kehlet, Henrik; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2014-01-01

    Background Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. Objective To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark, receiving a TKA, between November 2012 and April 2013. Participants Seventeen patients, no more than 3 weeks after their TKA. Main outcome measures: In a randomized order, the patients performed 1 set of 4 standardized knee extensions, using relative loads of 8, 14, and 20 repetition maximum (RM), and ended with 1 single set to contraction failure (14 RM load). The individual loadings (kilograms) were determined during a familiarization session >72 hours prior. The patients rated their knee pain during each repetition, using a numerical rating scale (0–10). Results Two patients were lost to follow up. Knee pain increased with increasing load (20 RM: 3.1±2.0 points, 14 RM: 3.5±1.8 points, 8 RM: 4.3±2.5 points, P = 0.006), and repetitions to contraction failure (10% failure: 3.2±1.9 points, 100% failure: 5.4±1.6 points, P<0.001). Resting knee pain 60 seconds after the final repetition (2.7±2.4 points) was not different from that recorded before strength training (2.7±1.8 points, P = 0.88). Conclusion Both loading and repetitions performed to contraction failure during knee- extension strength-training, increased post-operative knee pain during strength training implemented shortly following TKA. However, only the increase in pain during repetitions to contraction failure exceeded that defined as clinically relevant, and was very short-lived. Trial Registration

  19. Arthroscopic treatment of patients with moderate arthrofibrosis after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg; Aldawoudy, Akram M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the effect of arthroscopic management in patients with knee stiffness after total knee replacement. We present a case series study, in which 32 patients have been treated for moderate arthrofibrosis of the knee after total knee replacement, with the same regimen. We have excluded all cases of stiffness, because of infection, mechanical mal-alignment, loosening of the implants and other obvious reasons of stiffness of the knee, rather than pure arthrofibrosis. All patients first underwent a trial of conservative treatment before going for arthroscopic management. A pain catheter for femoral nerve block was inserted just before anesthesia for post-operative pain management. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the intra-articular pathology was performed in a standardized technique with release of all fibrous bands in the suprapatellar pouch, reestablishing the medial and lateral gutter, release of the patella, resection of the remaining meniscal tissue or an anterior cyclops, if needed. Intensive physiotherapy and continuous passive motion were to start immediately post-operatively. All the patients were available for the follow up and they were evaluated using the knee society rating system. A total of 25 of the 32 procedures resulted in an improvement of the patients knee score. All the knees operated upon had intra-articular fibrous bands, hypertrophic synovitis and peri-patellar adhesions. A total of eight patients suffered from an anterior cyclops lesion and six patients showed pseudomenicus. In 19 cases a medial and lateral relapse of the patella was performed; only 5 patients got an isolated lateral release. The mean knee flexion was 119 degrees (100-130) at the end of arthroscopy and was 97 degrees (75-115) at the last follow up. The eight patients with extension lags decreased from 27 degrees (10 degrees-35 degrees) pre-operatively to 4 degrees (0-10) at time of follow up. The average knee society ratings increased from 70

  20. Severe Bilateral Fixed Flexion Deformity-Simultaneous or Staged Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Lee, Wu Chean; Kwan, Yu Heng; Yeo, Seng Jin

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes of 29 simultaneous (SimBTKA) and 38 staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty (StaBTKA) subjects with severe (≥16°) bilateral fixed flexion deformity (FFD) were retrospectively investigated. SimBTKA patients were significantly younger (63 ± 8 vs 68 ± 7, P > .01). At 2 years, SimBTKA subjects had significantly better residual FFD (2.5° ± 5.1° vs 5.4° ± 6.6°, P = .02) and Knee Society function score (75.7 ± 25.7 vs 69.3 ± 24.1, P = .02). However, Knee Society knee scores, Oxford Knee Scores, and Short Form-36 scores were similar. These suggest no large clinical advantage of SimBTKA over StaBTKA. We feel that severe bilateral FFD is not an absolute indication for SimBTKA.

  1. Total knee arthroplasty after lower extremity amputation: a review of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Amanatullah, Derek F; Trousdale, Robert T; Sierra, Rafael J

    2014-08-01

    Below knee amputation protects the ipsilateral knee from osteoarthritis and overloads the contralateral knee predisposing it to symptomatic osteoarthritis. We retrospectively reviewed 13 primary total knee arthroplasty (TKAs) in 12 patients with a prior lower extremity amputation. Twelve TKAs were performed on the contralateral side of the amputated limb while only one TKA was performed on the ipsilateral side. The average clinical follow-up was 6.8 ± 4.8 years. Knee Society Scores improved from 30.4 ± 11.8 to 88.5 ± 4.2 after TKA with a prior contralateral amputation. Three (23.1%) patients with TKA after contralateral amputation had aseptic loosening of the tibial component. Patients experience clinically significant improvement with TKA after lower extremity amputation. Augmentation of tibial fixation with a stem may be advisable during TKA after contralateral amputation.

  2. Comparison of pain perception between open and minimally invasive surgery in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Biagio; Vitale, Elsa; Esposito, Antonio; Colella, Antonio; Cassano, Maria; Notarnicola, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was a well-established procedure that had shown excellent long-term results in terms of reduced pain and increased mobility. Pain was one of the most important outcome measures that contributed to patient dissatisfaction after TKA. After a computerized search of the Medline and Embase databases, we considered articles from January 1st, 1997 to October 31st, 2009 that underlined the impact on patient pain perception of either standard open total knee arthroplasty or minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty. We included articles that used the visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Knee Score, Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS) as postoperative pain indicators, and we included studies with a minimum follow-up period of two months. We excluded studies that monitored only functional postoperative knee activities. It was shown that TKA with the open technique was a better treatment for knees with a positive effect on pain and function than the minimally invasive technique. PMID:21042568

  3. The use of focal knee joint cryotherapy to improve functional outcomes after total knee arthroplasty: review article.

    PubMed

    Ewell, Melvin; Griffin, Christopher; Hull, Jason

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to review and synthesize available evidence on the effect of focal knee joint cryotherapy on quadriceps arthrogenic muscle inhibition and to discuss the implications of the findings regarding the use of this modality for patients after a total knee arthroplasty. An electronic literature search that targeted peer reviewed journals was completed by using the PubMed, CINAHL, ScienceDirect, and OvidSP databases. An article was included when it was determined that the article was relevant to the topic of focal knee joint cryotherapy and its effect on quadriceps muscle function. There were 6 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Of the reviewed studies, effect sizes for quadriceps activation ranged from very small to large. Five of the 6 studies observed medium to large effects. Effect sizes for quadriceps torque and force production ranged from no effect to a large effect. Two of the 5 studies with outcome measurements related to quadriceps torque or force production observed medium and large effects. Analysis of this evidence suggests that focal joint cooling of the knee shows the potential to improve quadriceps activation as well as quadriceps torque and force production in patients with arthrogenic muscle inhibition. Arthrogenic muscle inhibition of the quadriceps is an impairment commonly observed in patients after a total knee arthroplasty. Analysis of the evidence uncovered in this review suggests that this patient population may be positively impacted by the use of this modality to improve quadriceps activation as well as quadriceps torque and force production.

  4. Total knee arthroplasty following tibial plateau fracture: a matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Scott, C E H; Davidson, E; MacDonald, D J; White, T O; Keating, J F

    2015-04-01

    Radiological evidence of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) after fracture of the tibial plateau is common but end-stage arthritis which requires total knee arthroplasty is much rarer. The aim of this study was to examine the indications for, and outcomes of, total knee arthroplasty after fracture of the tibial plateau and to compare this with an age and gender-matched cohort of TKAs carried out for primary osteoarthritis. Between 1997 and 2011, 31 consecutive patients (23 women, eight men) with a mean age of 65 years (40 to 89) underwent TKA at a mean of 24 months (2 to 124) after a fracture of the tibial plateau. Of these, 24 had undergone ORIF and seven had been treated non-operatively. Patients were assessed pre-operatively and at 6, 12 and > 60 months using the Short Form-12, Oxford Knee Score and a patient satisfaction score. Patients with instability or nonunion needed total knee arthroplasty earlier (14 and 13.3 months post-injury) than those with intra-articular malunion (50 months, p < 0.001). Primary cruciate-retaining implants were used in 27 (87%) patients. Complication rates were higher in the PTOA cohort and included wound complications (13% vs 1% p = 0.014) and persistent stiffness (10% vs 0%, p = 0.014). Two (6%) PTOA patients required revision total knee arthroplasty at 57 and 114 months. The mean Oxford knee score was worse pre-operatively in the cohort with primary osteoarthritis (18 vs 30, p < 0.001) but there were no significant differences in post-operative Oxford knee score or patient satisfaction (primary osteoarthritis 86%, PTOA 78%, p = 0.437). Total knee arthroplasty undertaken after fracture of the tibial plateau has a higher rate of complications than that undertaken for primary osteoarthritis, but patient-reported outcomes and satisfaction are comparable. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:532-8.

  5. Role of Patellofemoral Offset in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Louis S; Odum, Susan M; Springer, Bryan D; Fehring, Thomas K

    2017-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty occasionally does not meet expectations. This randomized clinical trial assessed the effect of restoration of the native patellofemoral height on clinical outcomes. Group I underwent standard patellar bone resection; group II underwent modified patellar bone resection that adjusted the amount of anterior condylar bone removed and the anterior flange thickness. There were no differences in anterior knee pain, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index scores, or Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score scores. Patellofemoral compartment height restoration versus patellar height alone does not appear to significantly reduce pain or improve function.

  6. MEDIUM-TERM ASSESSMENT OF TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY WITH IMPLANT MADE IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Barretto, João Maurício; Malta, Márcio; e Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; de Assis, Daniel Pinho; Campos, André Siqueira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed 47 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with implants manufactured in Brazil, with a mean follow-up of five years. Methods: This was a retrospective study at Santa Casa de Misericordia Hospital in Rio de Janeiro, from January 1993 to December 2002. The sample comprised 47 patients (44 females and three males) who underwent TKA, totaling 58 knees. The patients’ ages ranged from 46 to 83 years. A diagnosis of osteoarthritis or rheumatic disease was confirmed in all the patients. Results: In this investigation, all the patients underwent cemented TKA with preservation of the posterior cruciate ligament. The length of follow-up ranged from 5 to 17 years. The functional assessment criterion used was the one of the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), and this yielded an average of 87 points after the operation. The radiographic criterion used was the Knee Society Total Knee Arthroplasty Roentgenographic Evaluation and Scoring System. We had three cases with a radiolucent line without implant loosening, which were asymptomatic from a clinical standpoint. Conclusion: The total knee arthroplasty procedures using an implant made in Brazil were performed by a trained and experienced team. To date, over the clinical follow-up on these patients with knee osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, the results have been seen to be satisfactory. PMID:27027051

  7. Repeat Manipulation Under Anesthesia For Persistent Stiffness After Total Knee Arthroplasty Achieves Functional Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Ferrel, Jason R; Davis, Richard L; Agha, Obiajulu A J C; Politi, Joel R

    2015-05-01

    Poor range of motion may decrease a patient's ability to participate in activities of daily living after total knee arthroplasty. Manipulation under anesthesia has been shown to improve range of motion; however, some patients have persistent stiffness even after manipulation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and complications of patients who underwent a second manipulation under anesthesia for persistent stiffness after total knee arthroplasty. The review of surgical records of two joint arthroplasty surgeons identified 226 knees in 210 patients who underwent a manipulation under anesthesia for poor range of motion after total knee arthroplasty. Of these patients, 16 patients underwent a second manipulation under anesthesia. For patients undergoing two manipulations under anesthesia procedures, at latest follow up (mean 539 days), mean extension improved from 10.50° to 2.50° (p=0.001) and mean flexion improved from 87.50° to 112.69° (p=0.001) respectively. SF-12 scores were available for 12 of 16 knees with a mean score of 34.42. Two of 16 patients (12.5%) experienced a complication. Three of 16 (18.8%) patients who underwent a second manipulation required a revision arthroplasty procedure. In conclusion, a second manipulation under anesthesia can achieve functional range of motion that is sustained after total knee arthroplasty.

  8. Assessment of reactive synovitis in rotating-platform posterior-stabilized design: a 10-year prospective matched-pair MRI study.

    PubMed

    Meftah, Morteza; Potter, Hollis G; Gold, Stephanie; Ranawat, Anil S; Ranawat, Amar S; Ranawat, Chitranjan S

    2013-10-01

    This is the first long-term (mean 11.6 years), prospective, matched-pair study (based on age, gender, BMI and UCLA scores) using MAVRIC (multi-acquisition variable-resonance image combination) magnetic resonance imaging to analyze reactive synovitis and osteolysis between rotating-platform posterior-stabilized (RP-PS), fixed-bearing metal-back (FB-MB), and all-polyethylene tibial (APT) in active patients (24 total, 8 in each group, mean age of 64 years, mean UCLA of 8.5) with identical femoral component and polyethylene. Reactive synovitis was observed in 6 RP-PS (75%), all 8 FB-MB (100%), and 6 APT (75%). There was a significant difference between the RP-PS and FB-MB knees in volumetric synovitis (P=0.023). Osteolysis with bone loss more than 4mm was seen in 3 FB-MB, 2 APT and none for RP-PS. These were not statistically significant.

  9. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): physical activity, knee function, pain, exertion, and well-being.

    PubMed

    Würth, S; Finkenzeller, T; Pötzelsberger, B; Müller, E; Amesberger, G

    2015-08-01

    This study focused on the psychological and quality of life aspects of resuming alpine skiing practice after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in elderly skilled skiers. Two data pools were used in order to analyze psychological states: (a) at the beginning, at the end, and 8 weeks after a 12-week skiing intervention; and (b) concerning diurnal variations of states (i.e., skiing days compared with everyday life during intervention and retention phase). In particular, effects of skiing on amount of physical activity and perceived exertion, perceived pain and knee function, and subjective well-being were analyzed using a control group design. Results reveal that the skiing intervention substantially increases the amount of physical activity by the intervention group (122.30 ± 32.38 min/day), compared with the control group (75.14 ± 21.27 min/day) [F (2, 32) = 8.22, P < 0.01, η(2)  = 0.34)]. Additionally, the analyses of psychological states demonstrated that skiing goes along with enhanced well-being and no significant impact on perceived pain, exertion or knee function. In sum, alpine skiing can be recommended for older persons with TKA with respect to well-being, perceived pain and knee function, and perceived exertion.

  10. Auricular Acupressure for Managing Postoperative Pain and Knee Motion in Patients with Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Sham Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling-hua; Hsu, Chung-Hua; Jong, Gwo-Ping; Ho, Shungtai; Tsay, Shiow-luan; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Background. Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the adjuvant effects of auricular acupressure on relieving postoperative pain and improving the passive range of motion in patients with total knee replacement (TKR). Method. Sixty-two patients who had undergone a TKR were randomly assigned to the acupressure group and the sham control group. The intervention was delivered three times a day for 3 days. A visual analog scale (VAS) and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were used to assess pain intensity. Pain medication consumption was recorded, and the knee motion was measured using a goniometer. Results. The patients experienced a moderately severe level of pain postoperatively (VAS 58.66 ± 20.35) while being on the routine PCA. No differences were found in pain scores between the groups at all points. However, analgesic drug usage in the acupressure group patients was significantly lower than in the sham control group (P < 0.05), controlling for BMI, age, and pain score. On the 3rd day after surgery, the passive knee motion in the acupressure group patients was significantly better than in the sham control group patients (P < 0.05), controlling for BMI. Conclusion. The application of auricular acupressure at specific therapeutic points significantly reduces the opioid analgesia requirement and improves the knee motion in patients with TKR. PMID:22844334

  11. The management of extensor mechanism complications in total knee arthroplasty. AAOS exhibit selection.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Abdel, Matthew P; Cross, Michael B; LaMont, Lauren E; Reinhardt, Keith R; McArthur, Benjamin A; Mayman, David J; Hanssen, Arlen D; Sculco, Thomas P

    2014-03-19

    Complications involving the knee extensor mechanism and patellofemoral joint occur in 1% to 12% of patients following total knee arthroplasty and have major negative effects on patient outcomes and satisfaction. The surgeon must be aware of intraoperative, postoperative, and patient-related factors that can increase the rate of these problems. This review focuses on six of the most commonly encountered problems: patellar tendon disruption, quadriceps tendon rupture, patellar crepitus and soft-tissue impingement, periprosthetic patellar fracture, patellofemoral instability, and osteonecrosis of the patella. The goals of this report are to (1) review the relevant anatomy of the knee extensor mechanism, (2) present risk factors that may lead to extensor mechanism complications, (3) provide a diagnostic and treatment algorithm for each of the aforementioned problems, and (4) review the specific surgical techniques of Achilles tendon allograft reconstruction and synthetic mesh augmentation. Extensor mechanism disorders following total knee arthroplasty remain difficult to manage effectively. Although various surgical techniques have been used, the results in patients with a prior total knee arthroplasty are inferior to the results in the young adult without such a prior procedure. Surgical attempts at restoration of the knee extensor mechanism are usually warranted; however, the outcomes of treatment of these complications are often poor, and management of patient expectations is important.

  12. Wear of moderately cross-linked polyethylene in fixed-bearing total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire L; Jennings, Louise M; Hardaker, Catherine; Fisher, John

    2012-07-01

    Cross-linked polyethylene has been introduced into total joint replacement to improve wear resistance. Although the performance of highly cross-linked polyethylene is well documented clinically and experimentally for total hip replacements, the reduction in mechanical properties with increasing irradiation is of concern for application to total knee replacement. The aim of this study was to investigate the wear performance of a moderately cross-linked polyethylene material in a fixed-bearing total knee replacement. The study was conducted using two femoral geometries, a conventional cruciate-retaining femoral and a high-flexion femoral geometry. The femoral geometry appeared to have no effect on the wear of the knee replacement under standard gait conditions. A significant reduction in wear volume was measured with the moderately cross-linked polyethylene compared with the conventional polyethylene over a six-million-cycle wear study. This study indicates the use of a moderately cross-linked polyethylene in a fixed-bearing total knee replacement may provide a low wearing option for total knee replacement.

  13. Clinical and Biomechanical Evaluations of Staged Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients with Two Different Implant Designs

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Alexandre; Fuentes, Alexandre; Hagemeister, Nicola; Lavigne, Martin; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various implants of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are used in clinical practice and each presents specific design characteristics. No implant managed this day to reproduce perfectly the biomechanics of the natural knee during gait. Objectives: We therefore asked whether (1) differences in tridimensional (3D) kinematic data during gait could be observed in two different designs of TKA on the same patients, (2) if those gait kinematic data are comparable with those of asymptomatic knees and (3) if difference in clinical subjective scores can be observed between the two TKA designs on the same patient. Methods: We performed knee kinematic analysis on 15 patients (30 TKAs) with two different TKA implant designs (Nexgen, Zimmer and Triathlon, Stryker) on each knee and on 25 asymptomatic subjects (35 knees). Clinical evaluation included range of motion, weight bearing radiographs, questionnaire of joint perception, KOOS, WOMAC and SF-12. Results: Comparison between TKAs and asymptomatic knees revealed that asymptomatic knees had significantly less knee flexion at initial contact (p < 0.04) and more flexion for most of the swing phase (p between 0.004 and 0.04). Asymptomatic knees also had less varus at loading response, during stance phase and during most of the swing phase (p between 0.001 - 0.05). Transverse plane analysis showed a tendency for asymptomatic knees to be more in internal rotation during stance phase (p 0.02 - 0.04). Comparing both TKA designs, NexgenTM implant had significantly more flexion at the end of swing phase (p = 0.04) compared to knees with the TriathlonTM implant. In frontal plane, from initial contact to maximum mid stance angle and between the mean mid stance angle and initial contact NexgenTM TKA had significantly more adduction (varus, p =0.02 – 0.03). Clinical scores of both TKAs did not have significant difference. Conclusions: TKA with the tested implants did not reproduce natural knee kinematics during gait. In our cohort

  14. Long-term outcome of low contact stress total knee arthroplasty with different mobile bearing designs

    PubMed Central

    SOLARINO, GIUSEPPE; SPINARELLI, ANTONIO; CARROZZO, MASSIMILIANO; PIAZZOLLA, ANDREA; VICENTI, GIOVANNI; MORETTI, BIAGIO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose to evaluate the differences in clinical outcome and survivorship of three different mobile bearings for total knee arthroplasty. Methods a retrospective study was conducted in 60 patients (53 females, 7 males, mean age: 68 years and 5 months) each submitted to total knee replacement using one of the three different mobile bearings of the LCS system (Depuy Johnson & Johnson, Warsaw, IN). The diagnosis was knee osteoarthritis in 57 cases and rheumatoid arthritis in three cases. Three different groups of 20 cases each were identified: total knee arthroplasties with mobile menisci (group 1); total knee arthroplasties with the rotating platform (group 2); and total knee arthroplasties with the anteroposterior glide platform (group 3). As regards the component fixation, 33 implants were cementless, three were cemented, and in 24 only the tibial component was cemented. The patella was not replaced. Results although the duration of follow-up differed between the three groups, the clinical and radiological results at final follow-up showed no revision of femoral and/or tibial components for mechanical or septic reasons, and no signs of impending failure. One meniscal bearing, showing polyethylene wear after 17 years, was successfully replaced. Conclusions the present retrospective study confirmed the long-term effectiveness of knee implants with mobile bearings, in which the congruity of the surfaces makes it possible to overcome the problem of high contact stresses that may result in polyethylene wear and osteolysis; at the same time, these implants eliminate constraint forces thereby reducing the risk of mechanical loosening. Level of evidence Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:25606553

  15. Towards an understanding of the painful total knee: what is the role of patient biology?

    PubMed

    Preston, Stephen; Petrera, Massimo; Kim, Christopher; Zywiel, Michael G; Gandhi, Rajiv

    2016-12-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains the treatment of choice for end-stage osteoarthritis of the knee. With an aging population, the demand for TKA continues to increase, placing a significant burden on a health care system that must function with limited resources. Although generally accepted as a successful procedure, 15-30 % of patients report persistent pain following TKA. Classically, pain generators have been divided into intra-articular and extra-articular causes. However, there remains a significant subset of patients for whom pain remains unexplained. Recent studies have questioned the role of biology (inflammation) in the persistence of pain following TKA. This article aims to serve as a review of previously identified causes of knee pain following TKA, as well as to explore the potential role of biology as a predictor of pain following knee replacement surgery.

  16. TIBIAL COMPONENT IN REVISION OF TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: COMPARISON BETWEEN CEMENTED AND HYBRID FIXATION

    PubMed Central

    Cintra, Francisco Fontes; Yepéz, Anthony Kerbes; Rasga, Marcos Gilbert Sucena; Abagge, Marcelo; Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical, radiographic and medium-term follow-up results from two fixation methods for the tibial component in revision procedures on total knee prostheses: cemented (tray and stem) and hybrid (cemented tray and uncemented, nonporous canal-filling stem). Methods: Between August 1999 and November 2005, 30 revision procedures on total knee arthroplasties were performed on 26 patients, who were divided between group I (cemented fixation; 21 knees) and group II (hybrid fixation; nine knees). The mean follow-up was 52 months and no patients were lost from the follow up. Results: No differences in the scores from the WOMAC and Knee Society questionnaires were observed between the two groups. One patient in group I presented radiographic signs of loosening. Two patients (one in each group) complained of pain in the diaphyseal region, compatible with the location of the stem tip. The pedestal radiographic sign was observed in 89% of the knees with uncemented stems and in none of the cemented group. Conclusion: The comparative analysis between the two methods did not show any differences regarding clinical and radiographic parameters, or arthroplasty survival. PMID:27027058

  17. Ochronosis of the knee with secondary osteoarthritis requiring total knee replacement in a patient with cryptogenic organising pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Jorrit; Metsaars, Wieneke; Jansen, Joris

    2016-05-20

    Ochronosis is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by homogentisic acid oxidase enzyme deficiency. High homogentisic acid levels will eventually result in black deposits in skin, sclerae, connective tissues and urine (alkaptonuria). It can lead to early degeneration of connective tissues and cartilage. Ochronosis can damage normal cartilage, leading to secondary osteoarthritis. The diagnosis is often delayed because of its low prevalence and non-specific early symptoms. In our patient, the secondary osteoarthritis due to ochronosis deposits in the cartilage was treated by total knee arthroplasty, with good clinical outcome. This article reports the first case of ochronosis with secondary osteoarthritis of the knee in a patient previously diagnosed with cryptogenic organising pneumonia (COP).

  18. Impact of total knee replacement practice: cost effectiveness analysis of data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ferket, Bart S; Feldman, Zachary; Zhou, Jing; Oei, Edwin H; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Mazumdar, Madhu

    2017-03-28

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of total knee replacement on quality of life in people with knee osteoarthritis and to estimate associated differences in lifetime costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) according to use by level of symptoms.Design Marginal structural modeling and cost effectiveness analysis based on lifetime predictions for total knee replacement and death from population based cohort data.Setting Data from two studies-Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) and the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST)-within the US health system.Participants 4498 participants with or at high risk for knee osteoarthritis aged 45-79 from the OAI with no previous knee replacement (confirmed by baseline radiography) followed up for nine years. Validation cohort comprised 2907 patients from MOST with two year follow-up.Intervention Scenarios ranging from current practice, defined as total knee replacement practice as performed in the OAI (with procedural rates estimated by a prediction model), to practice limited to patients with severe symptoms to no surgery.Main outcome measures Generic (SF-12) and osteoarthritis specific quality of life measured over 96 months, model based QALYs, costs, and incremental cost effectiveness ratios over a lifetime horizon.Results In the OAI, total knee replacement showed improvements in quality of life with small absolute changes when averaged across levels of confounding variables: 1.70 (95% uncertainty interval 0.26 to 3.57) for SF-12 physical component summary (PCS); -10.69 (-13.39 to -8.01) for Western Ontario and McMaster Universities arthritis index (WOMAC); and 9.16 (6.35 to 12.49) for knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) quality of life subscale. These improvements became larger with decreasing functional status at baseline. Provision of total knee replacement to patients with SF-12 PCS scores <35 was the optimal scenario given a cost effectiveness threshold of $200 000/QALY, with cost savings of $6974

  19. Negative emotions affect postoperative scores for evaluating functional knee recovery and quality of life after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Qi, A; Lin, C; Zhou, A; Du, J; Jia, X; Sun, L; Zhang, G; Zhang, L; Liu, M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether psychological factors affect health-related quality of life (HRQL) and recovery of knee function in total knee replacement (TKR) patients. A total of 119 TKR patients (male: 38; female: 81) completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-revised (EPQR-S), Knee Society Score (KSS), and HRQL (SF-36). At 1 and 6 months after surgery, anxiety, depression, and KSS scores in TKR patients were significantly better compared with those preoperatively (P<0.05). SF-36 scores at the sixth month after surgery were significantly improved compared with preoperative scores (P<0.001). Preoperative Physical Component Summary Scale (PCS) and Mental Component Summary Scale (MCS) scores were negatively associated with extraversion (E score) (B=-0.986 and -0.967, respectively, both P<0.05). Postoperative PCS and State Anxiety Inventory (SAI) scores were negatively associated with neuroticism (N score; B=-0.137 and -0.991, respectively, both P<0.05). Postoperative MCS, SAI, Trait Anxiety Inventory (TAI), and BAI scores were also negatively associated with the N score (B=-0.367, -0.107, -0.281, and -0.851, respectively, all P<0.05). The KSS function score at the sixth month after surgery was negatively associated with TAI and N scores (B=-0.315 and -0.532, respectively, both P<0.05), but positively associated with the E score (B=0.215, P<0.05). The postoperative KSS joint score was positively associated with postoperative PCS (B=0.356, P<0.05). In conclusion, for TKR patients, the scores used for evaluating recovery of knee function and HRQL after 6 months are inversely associated with the presence of negative emotions.

  20. Negative emotions affect postoperative scores for evaluating functional knee recovery and quality of life after total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Qi, A.; Lin, C.; Zhou, A.; Du, J.; Jia, X.; Sun, L.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, L.; Liu, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether psychological factors affect health-related quality of life (HRQL) and recovery of knee function in total knee replacement (TKR) patients. A total of 119 TKR patients (male: 38; female: 81) completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-revised (EPQR-S), Knee Society Score (KSS), and HRQL (SF-36). At 1 and 6 months after surgery, anxiety, depression, and KSS scores in TKR patients were significantly better compared with those preoperatively (P<0.05). SF-36 scores at the sixth month after surgery were significantly improved compared with preoperative scores (P<0.001). Preoperative Physical Component Summary Scale (PCS) and Mental Component Summary Scale (MCS) scores were negatively associated with extraversion (E score) (B=-0.986 and -0.967, respectively, both P<0.05). Postoperative PCS and State Anxiety Inventory (SAI) scores were negatively associated with neuroticism (N score; B=-0.137 and -0.991, respectively, both P<0.05). Postoperative MCS, SAI, Trait Anxiety Inventory (TAI), and BAI scores were also negatively associated with the N score (B=-0.367, -0.107, -0.281, and -0.851, respectively, all P<0.05). The KSS function score at the sixth month after surgery was negatively associated with TAI and N scores (B=-0.315 and -0.532, respectively, both P<0.05), but positively associated with the E score (B=0.215, P<0.05). The postoperative KSS joint score was positively associated with postoperative PCS (B=0.356, P<0.05). In conclusion, for TKR patients, the scores used for evaluating recovery of knee function and HRQL after 6 months are inversely associated with the presence of negative emotions. PMID:26577843

  1. Measuring the effect of femoral malrotation on knee joint biomechanics for total knee arthroplasty using computational simulation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, K-T.; Koh, Y-G.; Son, J.; Kwon, O-R.; Baek, C.; Jung, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Malrotation of the femoral component can result in post-operative complications in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), including patellar maltracking. Therefore, we used computational simulation to investigate the influence of femoral malrotation on contact stresses on the polyethylene (PE) insert and on the patellar button as well as on the forces on the collateral ligaments. Materials and Methods Validated finite element (FE) models, for internal and external malrotations from 0° to 10° with regard to the neutral position, were developed to evaluate the effect of malrotation on the femoral component in TKA. Femoral malrotation in TKA on the knee joint was simulated in walking stance-phase gait and squat loading conditions. Results Contact stress on the medial side of the PE insert increased with internal femoral malrotation and decreased with external femoral malrotation in both stance-phase gait and squat loading conditions. There was an opposite trend in the lateral side of the PE insert case. Contact stress on the patellar button increased with internal femoral malrotation and decreased with external femoral malrotation in both stance-phase gait and squat loading conditions. In particular, contact stress on the patellar button increased by 98% with internal malrotation of 10° in the squat loading condition. The force on the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) increased with internal and external femoral malrotations, respectively. Conclusions These findings provide support for orthopaedic surgeons to determine a more accurate femoral component alignment in order to reduce post-operative PE problems. Cite this article: K-T. Kang, Y-G. Koh, J. Son, O-R. Kwon, C. Baek, S. H. Jung, K. K. Park. Measuring the effect of femoral malrotation on knee joint biomechanics for total knee arthroplasty using computational simulation. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:552–559. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.511.BJR-2016-0107.R1. PMID:28094763

  2. Simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty as a single surgical procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Simultaneous osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint complicates primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In such cases, rehabilitation of TKA is limited by debilitating ankle pain, but varus or valgus ankle arthritis may even compromise placement of knee prosthetic components. Case presentation We present a patient with simultaneous bilateral valgus and patellofemoral OA of the knees and bilateral varus OA of the ankle joints that equally contributed to overall disability. This 63 years old, motivated and otherwise healthy patient was treated by simultaneous bilateral total knee and ankle arthroplasty (quadruple total joint arthroplasty, TJA) during the same anesthesia. Two years outcome showed excellent alignment and function of all four replaced joints. Postoperative time for rehabilitation, back to work (6th week) and hospital stay (12 days) of this special patient was markedly reduced compared to the usual course of separate TJA. Conclusions Simultaneous quadruple TJA in equally disabling OA of bilateral deformed knees and ankles resulted in a better functional outcome and faster recovery compared to the average reported results after TKA and TAA in literature. However, careful preoperative planning, extensive patient education, and two complete surgical teams were considered essential for successful performance. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report in literature about quadruple major total joint arthroplasty implanted during the same anesthesia in the same patient. PMID:21995682

  3. Femoral quadriceps neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Helena Bruna Bettoni; Szego, Paulo; Lenza, Mario; Milan, Silvia Lefone; Talerman, Claudia; Ferretti, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty. This was a systematic review with no language or publication status restriction. Our search was made in Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS. Randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials evaluating neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty were included. Four studies with moderate risk of bias and low statistical power were included, totalizing 376 participants. There was no statistically significant difference in knee function, pain and range of motion during 12 month follow-up. This review concluded that neuromuscular electrical stimulation was less effective than traditional rehabilitation in function, muscular strength and range of motion. However, this technique was useful for quadriceps activation during the first days after surgery. PMID:26537511

  4. How does total knee replacement technique influence polyethylene wear?

    PubMed

    Massin, P

    2017-02-01

    In knee prostheses, wear is inherent to the tribology of the imperfectly congruent surfaces, one in chromium-cobalt alloy, the other in polyethylene. It is a multifactorial phenomenon, involving the properties of the respective materials and implant design, but also implant functioning, as determined by the implantation technique. There are still dark corners in the implantation charge book, especially concerning minimal insert thickness, the adjustment of tibiofemoral alignment and ligament balance. A review of the literature revealed consensus regarding minimal insert thickness (8mm), tibiofemoral alignment (to be kept within 5° on either side of the neutral axis) and ligament balance (identical collateral ligament tension in both extension and flexion spaces). Finer adjustment seems desirable. Tibiofemoral alignment is probably customizable according to individual patient morphology and weight. The rotational alignment of the components should allow harmonious patellar engagement. Classic ligament balance rules underestimate sagittal laxity, which needs checking to prevent paradoxical movement accelerating polymer delamination. Navigation techniques or specific ancillaries can help optimize implant component alignment. Control of sagittal laxity may require specific adaptation, notably in the flexion space. Improved implantation technique could postpone wear onset until beyond the 10th or even 20th postoperative year, barring material failure for other reasons.

  5. Embedded piezoelectrics for sensing and energy harvesting in total knee replacement units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brooke E.; Meneghini, Michael; Anton, Steven R.

    2015-04-01

    The knee replacement is the second most common orthopedic surgical intervention in the United States, but currently only 1 in 5 knee replacement patients are satisfied with their level of pain reduction one year after surgery. It is imperative to make the process of knee replacement surgery more objective by developing a data driven approach to ligamentous balance, which increases implant life. In this work, piezoelectric materials are considered for both sensing and energy harvesting applications in total knee replacement implants. This work aims to embed piezoelectric material in the polyethylene bearing of a knee replacement unit to act as self-powered sensors that will aid in the alignment and balance of the knee replacement by providing intraoperative feedback to the surgeon. Postoperatively, the piezoelectric sensors can monitor the structural health of the implant in order to perceive potential problems before they become bothersome to the patient. Specifically, this work will present on the use of finite element modeling coupled with uniaxial compression testing to prove that piezoelectric stacks can be utilized to harvest sufficient energy to power sensors needed for this application.

  6. Total knee arthroplasty in patient with paraplegia after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zietek, P; Dobiecki, K

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of paraplegic patients is more complex than in able-bodied subjects. Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects younger, active people more often than the elderly during high-energy fall or traffic accidents. In order to return to work after suffering an SCI, patients need to regain their functional independence, especially their ability to drive. The literature lacks strong evidence addressing the surgical solutions in severe knee arthrosis in paralyzed patients after SCI. We present a favourable outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) of a stiff knee in extension in a man with T12 grade C paraplegia after SCI. We describe an effective rehabilitation protocol after knee arthroplasty in patient with damage to the spinal cord. Several factors should be taken into account before performing surgery: 1. ability of regaining some of spinal cord locomotor function through intensive gait rehabilitation in SCI patients, 2. presence of muscle imbalance and knee contractures combined with a risk of bone fracture resulting from intensive postoperative rehabilitation, 3. the impaired microvasculature of the skin and subcutaneous tissues and increased risk of occlusion occurrence of the capillaries and small vessels of the leg, 4. higher prevalence of secondary infections via urinary entry sites in patients after SCI, 5. patient's strong determination and willingness to undergo the arthroplasty procedure. TKA might be considered in selected paralyzed patients after SCI, especially in those with severe arthrosis as well as significant knee contractures. Our study reveals the advantage of performing TKA in improving functional state in patients with cord injury.

  7. Metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty: revision surgery using a ceramic femoral component - a case report.

    PubMed

    Bergschmidt, Philipp; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2012-03-01

    We present a case involving the revision of a total knee arthroplasty with a metal femoral component using a ceramic implant due to metal hypersensitivity. A 58-year-old female patient underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a standard metal bicondylar knee system. She suffered from persistent pain and strong limitations in her range of motion (ROM) associated with flexion during the early postoperative period. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the knee joint and intensive active and passive physical treatment, in combination with a cortisone regime, temporarily increased the ROM and reduced pain. No signs of low grade infection or other causes of implant failure were evident. Histology of synovial tissue revealed lymphoplasmacellular fibrinous tissue, consistent with a type IV allergic reaction. Allergometry (skin reaction) revealed type IV hypersensitivity against nickel-II-sulfate and palladium chloride. Revision surgery of the metal components was performed with a cemented ceramic femoral component (same bicondylar design) and a cemented titanium alloy tibial component. Postoperative evaluations were performed 10days, and 3 and 12months after the revision surgery. There was an increased ROM in flexion to 90° at the 12month follow-up. No swelling or effusion was observed at all clinical examinations after the revision surgery. No pain at rest and moderate walking pain were evident. The presented case demonstrates that ceramic implants are a promising solution for patients suffering from hypersensitivity to metal ions in total knee arthroplasty.

  8. Subcutaneous thigh fat necrosis as a result of tourniquet control during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tamvakopoulos, George S; Toms, Andoni P; Glasgow, Malcolm

    2005-09-01

    The use of a pneumatic tourniquet in total knee arthroplasty has been linked to complications caused by local tissue hypoxia. Fat necrosis is a rare condition that presents as an ill-defined subcutaneous lesion. The clinical features resemble that of a lipoma but histological appearance is characteristic. Ultrasound imaging is helpful in establishing the diagnosis both by sonographic appearance as well as in directing a biopsy if necessary. We present a case of encapsulated fat necrosis caused by the use of a pneumatic tourniquet during total knee arthroplasty.

  9. [Recurrent effusion and granulomatous synovitis following total knee arthroplasty in association with latex allergy].

    PubMed

    Schuh, A; Thomas, P; Hönle, W; Schmickal, T

    2008-02-01

    An increasing number of articles report about allergic reactions in association with total knee arthroplasty. While most studies focus on allergic reactions to metallic components, few reports exist about reactions to bone cement or its ingredients. Allergy to natural rubber latex is a major occupational problem in the health care sector and a problem even in other occupations in which protective gloves are used. The allergic reaction to latex ranges from a minor skin rash to anaphylactic shock. Preventing exposure to latex is the key to managing and preventing this allergy. We report about a patient who developed recurrent effusion and granulomatous synovitis following total knee arthroplasty in association with latex allergy.

  10. Sensori-motor adaptation to knee osteoarthritis during stepping-down before and after total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Mouchnino, L; Gueguen, N; Blanchard, C; Boulay, C; Gimet, G; Viton, J-M; Franceschi, J-P; Delarque, A

    2005-01-01

    Background Stepping-down is preceded by a shift of the center of mass towards the supporting side and forward. The ability to control both balance and lower limb movement was investigated in knee osteoarthritis patients before and after surgery. It was hypothesized that pain rather than knee joint mobility affects the coordination between balance and movement control. Methods The experiment was performed with 25 adult individuals. Eleven were osteoarthritic patients with damage restricted to one lower limb (8 right leg and 3 left leg). Subjects were recruited within two weeks before total knee replacement by the same orthopedic surgeon using the same prosthesis and technics of surgery. Osteoarthritic patients were tested before total knee replacement (pre-surgery session) and then, 9 of the 11 patients were tested one year after the surgery when re-educative training was completed (post-surgery session). 14 adult individuals (men: n = 7 and women: n = 7) were tested as the control group. Results The way in which the center of mass shift forward and toward the supporting side is initiated (timing and amplitude) did not vary within patients before and after surgery. In addition knee joint range of motion of the leading leg remained close to normal before and after surgery. However, the relative timing between both postural and movement phases was modified for the osteoarthritis supporting leg (unusual strategy for stepping-down) before surgery. The "coordinated" control of balance and movement turned to be a "sequential" mode of control; once the body weight transfer has been completed, the movement onset is triggered. This strategy could be aimed at shortening the duration-time supporting on the painful limb. However no such compensatory response was observed. Conclusion The change in the strategy used when supporting on the arthritis and painful limb could result from the action of nociceptors that lead to increased proprioceptor thresholds, thus gating the

  11. Effect of postoperative use of nasal oxygen catheter supplementation in wound healing following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Junqueira, Jader Joel Machado; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; Angelini, Fábio Janson; Rezende, Marcia Uchoa; Tírico, Luis Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Healing is an event that is fundamental to the success of total knee arthroplasty. The aims of the present study were to compare the rates of complications related to wound healing between two groups of volunteers submitted to total knee arthroplasty and to evaluate the effects of postoperative oxygen supplementation by means of a nasal catheter. METHOD: A total of 109 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty were randomized into two groups, namely, groups that did and did not receive postoperative oxygen supplementation via a nasal catheter. The surgical wound was monitored every day during the hospital stay and on the 7th, 14th, 21st, 30th and 42nd postoperative days. Characteristics related to healing were observed, including hyperemia, dehiscence, necrosis, phlyctenules and deep and superficial infection. RESULTS: There were no cases of deep infection. Hyperemia was statistically correlated with the total number of complications in the groups, with oxygen demonstrated to be a protective factor against hyperemia. Approximately 30% of the patients who exhibited hyperemia had other complications, independent of oxygen supplementation. CONCLUSION: Oxygen supplementation following total knee arthroplasty was shown to be effective in diminishing hyperemia around the operative wound. The development of hyperemia was a precursor to other complications, irrespective of whether oxygen supplementation was used. PMID:25518030

  12. The effects of conformity and load in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Kuster, M S; Horz, S; Spalinger, E; Stachowiak, G W; Gächter, A

    2000-06-01

    The effects of different conformity ratios and loads on the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene stress levels acting on knee implants were examined using a nonlinear, finite element analysis. The contact condition between a rigid cylinder with a radius of 30 mm and a polyethylene plate was modeled. Nonlinear behavior of polyethylene was assumed. The polyethylene plate was constructed with varying radii, with a minimal thickness of 6 mm and with a width of 40 mm. The ratio of the cylinder radius to the radius of the polyethylene plate was defined as the conformity ratio; a conformity ratio of 0 represented a flat tibial inlay, whereas the highest ratio modeled of 0.99 was nearly conforming. The conformity ratios modeled were 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 0.95, and 0.99. The loads applied were 1000 N, 2000 N, 3000 N, 4000 N, 5000 N, and 6000 N. The effects of different conformity ratios and loads on the contact area (mm2), the compressive surface stress (MPa), the shear stress (MPa), and the von Mises stress (MPa) were investigated. It was found that all of these parameters were affected by changes to the conformity ratio and to a lesser extent by load changes. That is, increasing the load from 3000 N to 6000 N resulted in a surface and shear stress increase lower than the increase in stress caused by the small change of the conformity ratio from 0.99 to 0.95. The effect of an increasing conformity ratio on the reduction in stress was more pronounced for conformity ratios above 0.8. In addition, the effect of a load increase for a flat tibial inlay was two times greater than for one with near full conformity.

  13. RAPID KNEE-EXTENSIONS TO INCREASE QUADRICEPS MUSCLE ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: A RANDOMIZED CROSS-OVER STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Wilquin, Lousia; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Bandholm, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Inhibition of the quadriceps muscle and reduced knee-extension strength is common shortly following total knee arthroplasty (weeks to months), due to reduced voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle. In healthy subjects, strength training with heavy loads is known to increase agonist muscle activity, especially if the exercise is conducted using rapid muscle contractions. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine if patients with total knee arthroplasty could perform rapid knee-extensions using a 10 RM load four to eight weeks after surgery, and the degree to which rapid knee-extensions were associated with greater voluntary quadriceps muscle activity during an experimental strength training session, compared to that elicited using slow knee-extensions. Study Design A randomized cross-over study. Methods Twenty-four patients (age 66.5) 4-8 weeks post total knee arthroplasty randomly performed one set of five rapid, and one set of five slow knee-extensions with the operated leg, using a load of their 10 repetition maximum, while surface electromyography recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis of the quadriceps muscle. Results Data from 23 of the 24 included patients were analyzed. Muscle activity was significantly higher during rapid knee-extensions (120.2% [10th-90th percentile: 98.3-149.1]) compared to slow knee-extensions (106.0% [88.8-140.8]) for the vastus lateralis (p<0.01), but not for the vastus medialis (120.8% [90.4-134.0]) and (121.8% [93.0-133.0]) (p = 0.17), respectively. Slow and rapid knee-extensions were performed at a median angular velocity of 19.7 degrees/sec (13.7-24.4) and 51.4 degrees/sec (28.9-63.1), respectively Conclusion Four to eight weeks after their total knee arthroplasty, the patients in the present study were able to conduct rapid knee-extensions according to the experimental protocol with an approximately doubled angular velocity compared to slow knee-extensions. This was associated with

  14. Predicting Functional Performance and Range of Motion Outcomes After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Michael J.; Kittelson, John M.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of functional performance and range of motion measures on outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. Design This is a secondary analysis of two pooled prospective randomized controlled trials. Sixty-four subjects (32 men and 32 women) with end-stage knee osteoarthritis scheduled to undergo primary total knee arthroplasty were enrolled. Active knee flexion and extension range of motion, Timed Up and Go (TUG) test time, and 6-min walk test distance were assessed. Results Preoperative measures of knee flexion and extension were predictive of long-term flexion (β = 0.44, P < 0.001) and extension (β = 0.46, P < 0.001). Acute measures of knee flexion and extension were not predictive of long-term flexion (β= 0.09, P = 0.26) or extension (β = 0.04, P = 0.76). Preoperative TUG performance was predictive of long-term 6-min walk performance (β = −21, P < 0.001). Acute TUG performance was predictive of long-term functional performance on the 6-min walk test, after adjusting for the effects of sex and age (P = 0.02); however, once adjusted for preoperative TUG performance, acute TUG was no longer related to long-term 6-min walk performance (P = 0.65). Conclusions Acute postoperative measures of knee range of motion are of limited prognostic value, although preoperative measures have some prognostic value. However, acute measures of functional performance are of useful prognostic value, especially when preoperative functional performance data are unavailable. PMID:24508937

  15. Preclinical computational models: predictors of tibial insert damage patterns in total knee arthroplasty: AAOS exhibit selection.

    PubMed

    Morra, Edward A; Heim, Christine S; Greenwald, A Seth

    2012-09-19

    Computational models that predict clinical surface damage of the tibial insert during activities of daily living are emerging as powerful tools to assess the safety and efficacy of contemporary total knee arthroplasty designs. These models have the advantage of quickly determining the performance of new designs at low cost, and they allow direct comparison with the performance of classic, clinically successful designs. This study validated finite element and kinematic modeling predictions through comparison with preclinical physical testing results, damage patterns on retrieved tibial inserts, and clinically measured knee motion. There is a mounting body of evidence to support the role of computational modeling as a preclinical tool that enables the optimization of total knee arthroplasty designs and the auditing of component quality control before large-scale manufacturing is undertaken.

  16. Patellofemoral overstuff and its relationship to flexion after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mihalko, William; Fishkin, Zair; Krackow, Kenneth; Krakow, Kenneth

    2006-08-01

    Flexion is an important outcome variable after total knee arthroplasty. Traditionally, matched implant-bone resections of the distal and posterior aspects of the femur are used to prevent loss of knee flexion or extension. However, given limited implant sizes, resection of these portions of the femur may affect the shape of the knee. Variations in the anterior aspects of the femur along with implant size constraints may increase trochlear groove height in the anterior compartment, increase the arc that the extensor mechanism must travel, and thereby decrease passive flexion. We determined the trochlear groove height change in 55 patients after primary total knee arthroplasties. The thickness of the replaced lateral and medial anterior flanges increased by 1.1 +/- 2.6 mm and 0.5 +/- 2.2 mm, respectively, whereas the change in trochlear groove thickness was 0 +/- 1.1 mm. We examined varying amounts of patellofemoral buildup in a cadaver model to observe the effect on passive range of motion of the knee. A 2-mm and 4-mm buildup of the anterior cortex resulted in flexion loss of 1.8 degrees and 4.4 degrees, respectively. The change in the shape of the anterior aspect of the femur may have small effects on flexion but they may not be clinically important.

  17. Limited rotation of the mobile-bearing in a rotating platform total knee prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Garling, E H; Kaptein, B L; Nelissen, R G H H; Valstar, E R

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that the polyethylene bearing in a rotating platform total knee prosthesis shows axial rotation during a step-up motion, thereby facilitating the theoretical advantages of mobile-bearing knee prostheses. We examined 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who had a rotating platform total knee arthroplasty (NexGen LPS mobile, Zimmer Inc. Warsaw, USA). Fluoroscopic data was collected during a step-up motion six months postoperatively. A 3D-2D model fitting technique was used to reconstruct the in vivo 3D kinematics. The femoral component showed more axial rotation than the polyethylene mobile-bearing insert compared to the tibia during extension. In eight knees, the femoral component rotated internally with respect to the tibia during extension. In the other two knees the femoral component rotated externally with respect to the tibia. In all 10 patients, the femur showed more axial rotation than the mobile-bearing insert indicating the femoral component was sliding on the polyethylene of the rotating platform during the step-up motion. Possible explanations are a too limited conformity between femoral component and insert, the anterior located pivot location of the investigated rotating platform design, polyethylene on metal impingement and fibrous tissue formation between the mobile-bearing insert and the tibial plateau.

  18. Analysis of in vitro and in vivo function of total knee replacements using dynamic contact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dong

    Despite the high incidence of osteoarthritis in human knee joint, its causes remain unknown. Total knee replacement (TKR) has been shown clinically to be effective in restoring the knee function. However, wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene has limited the longevity of TKRs. To address these important issues, it is necessary to investigate the in vitro and in vivo function of total knee replacements using dynamic contact models. A multibody dynamic model of an AMTI knee simulator was developed. Incorporating a wear prediction model into the contact model based on elastic foundation theory enables the contact surface to take into account creep and wear during the dynamic simulation. Comparisons of the predicted damage depth, area, and volume lost with worn retrievals from a physical machine were made to validate the model. In vivo tibial force distributions during dynamic and high flexion activities were investigated using the dynamic contact model. In vivo medial and lateral contact forces experienced by a well-aligned instrumented knee implant, as well as upper and lower bounds on contact pressures for a variety of activities were studied. For all activities, the predicted medial and lateral contact forces were insensitive to the selected material model. For this patient, the load split during the mid-stance phase of gait and during stair is more equal than anticipated. The external knee adduction torque has been proposed as a surrogate measure for medial compartment load during gait. However, a direct link between these two quantities has not been demonstrated using in vivo measurement of medial compartment load. In vivo data collected from a subject with an instrumented knee implant were analyzed to evaluate this link. The subject performed five different overground gait motions (normal, fast, slow, wide, and toe out) while instrumented implant, video motion, and ground reaction data were simultaneously collected. The high correlation coefficient

  19. Posterior cruciate ligament balancing in total knee arthroplasty: a numerical study with a dynamic force controlled knee model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adequate soft tissue balancing is a key factor for a successful result after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the primary restraint to posterior translation of the tibia after cruciate retaining TKA and is also responsible for the amount of joint compression. However, it is complex to quantify the amount of ligament release with its effects on load bearing and kinematics in TKA and limited both in vivo and in vitro. The goal of this study was to create a dynamic and deformable finite element model of a full leg and analyze a stepwise release of the PCL regarding knee kinematics, pressure distribution and ligament stresses. Methods A dynamic finite element model was developed in Ansys V14.0 based on boundary conditions of an existing knee rig. A cruciate retraining knee prosthesis was virtually implanted. Ligament and muscle structures were simulated with modified spring elements. Linear elastic materials were defined for femoral component, inlay and patella cartilage. A restart algorithm was developed and implemented into the finite element simulation to hold the ground reaction force constant by adapting quadriceps force. After simulating the unreleased PCL model, two models were developed and calculated with the same boundary conditions with a 50% and 75% release of the PCL stiffness. Results From the beginning of the simulation to approximately 35° of flexion, tibia moves posterior related to the femur and with higher flexion anteriorly. Anterior translation of the tibia ranged from 5.8 mm for unreleased PCL to 3.7 mm for 75% PCL release (4.9 mm 50% release). A decrease of maximum von Mises equivalent stress on the inlay was given with PCL release, especially in higher flexion angles from 11.1 MPa for unreleased PCL to 8.9 MPa for 50% release of the PCL and 7.8 MPa for 75% release. Conclusions Our study showed that dynamic FEM is an effective method for simulation of PCL balancing in knee arthroplasty. A tight

  20. Outcome of total hip arthroplasty, but not of total knee arthroplasty, is related to the preoperative radiographic severity of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, Claire; Holtslag, Maarten J; Tordoir, Rutger L; Leichtenberg, Claudia S; Verdegaal, Suzan H M; Kroon, Herman M; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus on the impact of radiographic severity of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) on the clinical outcome of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether preoperative radiographic severity of OA is related to improvements in functioning, pain, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 1 year after THA or TKA. Patients and methods This prospective cohort study included 302 THA patients and 271 TKA patients with hip or knee OA. In the THA patients, preoperatively 26% had mild OA and 74% had severe OA; in the TKA patients, preoperatively 27% had mild OA and 73% had severe OA. Radiographic severity was determined according to the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) classification. Clinical assessments preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively included: sociodemographic characteristics and patient-reported outcomes (PROMs): Oxford hip/knee score, hip/knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS/KOOS), SF36, and EQ5D. Change scores of PROMs were compared with mild OA (KL 0–2) and severe OA (KL 3–4) using a multivariate linear regression model. Results Adjusted for sex, age, preoperative scores, BMI, and Charnley score, radiographic severity of OA in THA was associated with improvement in HOOS “Activities of daily living”, “Pain”, and “Symptoms”, and SF36 physical component summary (“PCS”) scale. In TKA, we found no such associations. Interpretation The decrease in pain and improvement in function in THA patients, but not in TKA patients, was positively associated with the preoperative radiographic severity of OA. PMID:26484651

  1. A randomised controlled trial comparing skin closure in total knee arthroplasty in the same knee: nylon sutures versus skin staples

    PubMed Central

    Iamthanaporn, K.; Hongnaparak, T.; Tangtrakulwanich, B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Nylon sutures and skin staples are used commonly in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgical wound closure. However, there is no study that compares the wound healing efficacy and patient satisfaction scores of both techniques in the same knee. Methods We randomised 70 patients who underwent primary TKA into two groups. In one group of 34 patients, the skin at the upper half of the wound was closed with skin staples and the lower half of the wound was closed with simple interrupted nylon sutures. In the other group of 36 patients, the skin at the upper half of the wound was closed with nylon stitches and the lower half of the wound was closed with skin staples. We recorded the wound closure time, pain score at the time of stitch removal, wound complication rate, patient satisfaction score, and the Hollander wound evaluation score at the post-operative periods of five days, 14 days, six weeks, three months, and six months. Each half wound was analysed separately. Results The mean patient body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2 (standard deviation 6.3). A total of 70 nylon stitched wounds and 70 skin stapled wounds were analysed. There were no significant differences in wound complication rates, patient satisfaction score, and the Hollander wound evaluation score between both types of wounds (p > 0.05). The wound closure time for skin stapled wounds was significantly lower than the nylon stitched wounds (p < 0.001). However, the skin stapled wounds had a significantly higher pain score at the time of stitch removal (p < 0.001). Conclusion Skin staples and nylon stitches had comparable results with respect to wound healing and patient satisfaction in TKA wound closure in non-obese patients. The benefit of skin staples over nylon stitches was a decrease in operative time, but was more painful upon removal. Cite this article: V. Yuenyongviwat. A randomised controlled trial comparing skin closure in total knee arthroplasty in the same knee: nylon sutures versus skin

  2. Prolonged Epidural Infusion Improves Functional Outcomes Following Knee Arthroscopy in Patients with Arthrofibrosis after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Retrospective Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Dave, Ankur; Young, Adam; Ahuja, Mukesh; Amin, Sandeep D; Bush-Joseph, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    A total of 20 consecutive patients with knee stiffness post total knee arthroplasty (TKA) underwent arthroscopic lysis of adhesions and manipulation plus indwelling epidural were evaluated retrospectively. Epidural catheters were placed preoperatively for an intended 6 weeks of postoperative analgesia to facilitate intensive physical therapy. The mean loss of knee extension immediately before incision was 13.5 ± 9.1 degrees (range, 0-35 degrees) and flexion was 77.65 ± 19.2 degrees (range, 45-125 degrees). At the 6-week and final (mean, 0.47 years) follow-up, the loss of extension was 1.5 ± 5.1 degrees (range, -10 to +7 degrees) and 5.4 ± 4.7 degrees (range, 0-15 degrees), respectively, and flexion was 99.7 ± 12.3 degrees (range, 75-120 degrees) and 98.5 ± 16.1 degrees (range, 75-130 degrees), respectively. Of the 20 patients, 2 missed their 6-week clinic visit. Improvements in motion immediately preoperative to 6-week and final follow-up were each significant (p < 0.01). At examination 6 weeks postoperatively, 94.4% of patients met the definition for clinical motion success and 70% maintained success at final follow-up. Visual analog scale improved significantly from 5.4 to 2.0 (p < 0.01) at 6 weeks postoperative in the 12 patients with this data recorded. On the basis of this data, use of tunneled epidurals with arthroscopic lysis of adhesions for arthrofibrosis after TKA is correlated with a high likelihood of functional success postoperatively as measured by range of motion improvement.

  3. The Influence of Component Alignment and Ligament Properties on Tibiofemoral Contact Forces in Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Colin R.; Vignos, Michael F.; Lenhart, Rachel L.; Kaiser, Jarred; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2016-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate the influence of coronal plane alignment and ligament properties on total knee replacement (TKR) contact loads during walking. We created a subject-specific knee model of an 83-year-old male who had an instrumented TKR. The knee model was incorporated into a lower extremity musculoskeletal model and included deformable contact, ligamentous structures, and six degrees-of-freedom (DOF) tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. A novel numerical optimization technique was used to simultaneously predict muscle forces, secondary knee kinematics, ligament forces, and joint contact pressures from standard gait analysis data collected on the subject. The nominal knee model predictions of medial, lateral, and total contact forces during gait agreed well with TKR measures, with root-mean-square (rms) errors of 0.23, 0.22, and 0.33 body weight (BW), respectively. Coronal plane component alignment did not affect total knee contact loads, but did alter the medial–lateral load distribution, with 4 deg varus and 4 deg valgus rotations in component alignment inducing +17% and −23% changes in the first peak medial tibiofemoral contact forces, respectively. A Monte Carlo analysis showed that uncertainties in ligament stiffness and reference strains induce ±0.2 BW uncertainty in tibiofemoral force estimates over the gait cycle. Ligament properties had substantial influence on the TKR load distributions, with the medial collateral ligament and iliotibial band (ITB) properties having the largest effects on medial and lateral compartment loading, respectively. The computational framework provides a viable approach for virtually designing TKR components, considering parametric uncertainty and predicting the effects of joint alignment and soft tissue balancing procedures on TKR function during movement. PMID:26769446

  4. Fabella Syndrome as an Uncommon Cause of Posterolateral Knee Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Eriko; Yanai, Takaji; Kohyama, Sho; Kanamori, Akihiro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Tanaka, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The fabella is a sesamoid bone that is located in the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle and has been identified on magnetic resonance imaging in 31% of Japanese people. In the present case, a 65-year-old woman experienced posterolateral knee pain, accompanied by a clicking “sound” during active knee flexion, after undergoing total knee arthroplasty for knee osteoarthritis. Eight months of conservative therapy failed to produce an improvement, with progressive osteoarthritic change of the fabella identified on plain radiography. Based on this evidence, a diagnosis of fabella syndrome was made and the patient underwent a fabellectomy. Fabellectomy provided immediate resolution of posterolateral knee pain and the clicking sound with knee flexion, with the patient remaining symptom-free 18 months after fabellectomy and with no limitations in knee function. Fabellectomy eliminated symptoms in all of five case reports that have been previously published and is regarded as an effective first choice for treating fabella syndrome after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27418991

  5. Three-Dimensional Biomechanical Gait Characteristics at Baseline Are Associated With Progression to Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, Gillian L; Stanish, William D; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if baseline 3-dimensional (3-D) biomechanical gait patterns differed between those patients with moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA) who progressed to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and those that did not, and whether these differences had predictive value. Methods Fifty-four patients with knee OA had ground reaction forces and segment motions collected during gait. 3-D hip, knee, and ankle angles and moments were calculated over the gait cycle. Amplitude and temporal waveform characteristics were determined using principal component analysis. At followup 5–8 years later, 26 patients reported undergoing TKA. Unpaired t-tests were performed on baseline demographic and waveform characteristics between TKA and no-TKA groups. Receiver operating curve analysis, stepwise discriminate analysis, and logistic regression analysis determined the combination of features that best classified TKA and no-TKA groups and their predictive ability. Results Baseline demographic, symptomatic, and radiographic variables were similar, but 7 gait variables differed (P < 0.05) between groups. A multivariate model including overall knee adduction moment magnitude, knee flexion/extension moment difference, and stance–dorsiflexion moment had a 74% correct classification rate, with no overtraining based on cross-validation. A 1-unit increase in model score increased by 6-fold the odds of progression to TKA. Conclusion In addition to the link between higher overall knee adduction magnitude and future TKA, an outcome of clear clinical importance, novel findings include altered sagittal plane moment patterns indicative of reduced ability to unload the joint during midstance. This combination of dynamic biomechanical factors had a 6-fold increased odds of future TKA; adding baseline demographic and clinical factors did not improve the model. PMID:25708360

  6. Loosening of Total Knee Arthroplasty after Brucellosis Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Bahramian, Fateme; Mirzaee, Fateme; Zafarani, Zohreh; Aslani, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    In this report we describe a 78-year-old man whose total knee arthroplasty showed the symptoms of infection with brucella with radiographic signs of loosening 5 years after the index surgery. The patient was treated successfully after a 2-stage revision arthroplasty surgery along with using rifampicin and doxycycline for 8 weeks. PMID:28271092

  7. Bilateral extensor mechanism disruption after total knee arthroplasty in two morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Zachary H; Yi, Paul H; Haughom, Bryan D; Hellman, Michael D; Levine, Brett R

    2015-05-01

    Disruption of the extensor mechanism as a result of patellar tendon or quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon but devastating complication after total knee arthroplasty. Treating a disrupted extensor mechanism can be challenging, particularly in patients who are morbidly obese, due to an increased risk of postoperative complications. Therefore, despite the debilitating nature of extensor mechanism disruption, many community surgeons do not feel comfortable pursuing more complex cases like revision total knee arthroplasty with extensor mechanism allograft on morbidly obese patients, and consequently many of these patients are referred to tertiary-care centers for reconstruction secondary to the complexity of this patient cohort. The authors report 2 cases of bilateral extensor mechanism disruption after total knee arthroplasty in patients who are morbidly obese. One patient experienced trauma leading to her initial rupture; however, her contralateral atraumatic disruption was subsequently diagnosed at a later date. The second patient did not experience trauma leading to either of her extensor mechanism disruptions. Despite substantial medical comorbidities and morbid obesity, revision total knee arthroplasties with extensor mechanism allografts were recommended in both cases in a staged bilateral fashion. The surgical technique is described and the unique challenges afforded by the marked obesity are detailed. The current literature on this subject is reviewed. Despite early complications related to recumbency, this report serves as an example of successful repairs of extensor mechanism disruptions in patients who are morbidly obese, suggesting that extensor mechanism allograft is viable even in patients with high risk of complications.

  8. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee arthroplasty: a survey of Canadian orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Michael; Anderson, David R.; Nagpal, Seema; O’Brien, Bernie

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacologic and physical modalities used by orthopedic surgeons in Canada to prevent venous thromboembolism (deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Design Mail survey sent to all members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association. Setting A nation-wide study. Methods A total of 828 questionnaires, designed to identify the type and frequency of prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism that were used after hip and knee arthroplasty were mailed to orthopedic surgeons. Outcome measures Demographic data and the frequency and type of thromboprophylaxis. Results Of the 828 surveys mailed 445 (54%) were returned, and 397 were included in this analysis. Of the respondents, 97% used prophylaxis routinely for patients who undergo total hip or knee arthroplasty. Three of the 397 (0.8%) did not use any method of prophylaxis. Warfarin was the most common agent used (46%), followed by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (36%). Combination therapy with both mechanical and pharmacologic methods were used in 39% of patients. Objective screening tests were not frequently performed before discharge. Extended prophylaxis beyond the duration of hospitalization was used by 36% of physicians. Conclusion Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism with warfarin or LMWH has become standard care after total hip or knee arthroplasty in Canada. PMID:10593248

  9. Manipulation for stiffness following total knee arthroplasty: when and how often to do it?

    PubMed

    Desai, Aravind S; Karmegam, Anand; Dramis, Asterios; Board, Tim N; Raut, Videsh

    2014-10-01

    Stiffness following total knee arthroplasty is a disabling complication. One of the management options of stiffness includes manipulation under anaesthesia, but no real consensus exist on appropriate timing of intervention, and the timing and results of the manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) are under debate in the literature. Our aim was to determine the efficacy of single and multiple manipulations under anaesthesia following total knee arthroplasty and to determine the most appropriate timing for manipulation. We retrospectively reviewed 86 patients who underwent manipulation for stiffness following primary total knee replacement with at least 1-year follow-up. Range of motion before surgery, at the time of the MUA, immediately after MUA and at 6 weeks and 1 year post-MUA were recorded. At the end of 1 year post-manipulation, manipulations performed at less than 20 weeks, following primary total knee arthroplasty, showed 31° of flexion gain as compared to only 1.5° of flexion gain when manipulation was undertaken after 20 weeks. Of the 86 patients, 21 had multiple manipulations with no significant difference in flexion gain after the second manipulation. Patients on warfarin (26%) had an increased incidence of stiffness and poor flexion gain. This study showed that better results were achieved when manipulation was performed at less than 20 weeks (particularly between 12 and 14 weeks) from primary surgery with no added benefit from re-manipulations.

  10. Influence of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Gait Mechanics of the Replaced and Non-Replaced Limb During Stair Negotiation.

    PubMed

    Standifird, Tyler W; Saxton, Arnold M; Coe, Dawn P; Cates, Harold E; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    This study compared biomechanics during stair ascent in replaced and non-replaced limbs of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients with control limbs of healthy participants. Thirteen TKA patients and fifteen controls performed stair ascent. Replaced and non-replaced knees of TKA patients were less flexed at contact compared to controls. The loading response peak knee extension moment was greater in control and non-replaced knees compared with replaced. The push-off peak knee abduction moment was elevated in replaced limbs compared to controls. Loading and push-off peak hip abduction moments were greater in replaced limbs compared to controls. The push-off peak hip abduction moment was greater in non-replaced limbs compared to controls. Future rehabilitation protocols should consider the replaced knee and also the non-replaced knee and surrounding joints.

  11. Radiological Stability after Revision of Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty Using Modular Metal Augments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Son, Eun-Seok; Jung, Jae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the radiological stability according to the number of modular augments after revision of infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Materials and Methods Between February 2006 and September 2013, 37 patients (39 knees) followed ≥2 years after revision of infected TKA using modular metal augments for bone defects were reviewed retrospectively. We divided the patients into 3 groups according to the number of augments into group A (≤2 augments, 14 knees), group B (3–4 augments, 18 knees), and group C (5≥ augments, 7 knees) and evaluated the width of radiolucent zones around the implant at the last follow-up. Results There were 3 Anderson Orthopedic Research Institute type I, 33 type II, and 3 type III bone defects. The mean number of radiolucent zones of group A was 3 and the sum of width averaged 4.4 mm. In group B, the values were 4.8 and 6.2 mm, respectively. In group C, the values were 8.1 and 12.9 mm, respectively. The differences between the three groups were statistically significant. Conclusions In revision TKA with modular metal augmentation caused by infected TKA, increased modularity can result in radiological instability. PMID:26955613

  12. The conflicting requirements of laxity and conformity in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, S; Walker, P S

    1999-03-01

    Bearing surfaces of total condylar knees which are designed with a high degree of conformity to produce low stresses in the polyethylene tibial insert may be overconstrained. This study determines femoral and tibial bearing surface geometries which will induce the least destructive fatigue mechanisms in the polyethylene whilst conserving the laxity of the natural knee. Sixteen knee designs were generated by varying four parameters systematically to cover the range of contemporary knee designs. The parameters were the femoral frontal radius (30 or 70 mm), the difference between the femoral and tibial frontal radii (2 or 10 mm), the tibial sagittal radius (56 or 80 mm) and the posterior-distal transition angle (-8 or -20 degrees), which is the angle at which the small posterior arc of the sagittal profile transfers to the larger distal arc. Rigid body analyses determined the anterior-posterior and rotational motions as well as the contact points during the stance phase of gait for the different designs. In addition, a damage function which accumulated the fluctuating maximum shear stresses was used to predict the susceptibility to delamination wear of the polyethylene (damage score). This study predicted that of the 16 designs, the knee with a frontal radius of 70 mm, a difference in femoral and tibial frontal radii of 2 mm, a tibial sagittal radius of 80 mm and a posterior distal transition angle of -20 degrees would satisfy the conflicting needs of both resistance to delamination wear and natural kinematics.

  13. An ABJS Best Paper: Dynamic intraoperative ligament balancing for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W

    2007-10-01

    Complications after total knee arthroplasty, such as malalignment, instability, and excessive wear, have been attributed to poor soft tissue balance. Traditional instruments that assist in intraoperative soft tissue balancing rely on static measurements. We used a custom tibial trial, instrumented with force transducers, for dynamic measurement of soft tissue balance. Six cadaver knees and two patients were implanted with the trial tray along with a standard femoral component and a tibial insert. We recorded tibial forces during passive knee flexion, after the initial bone cuts were made, after soft tissue balancing, and after replacing the selected optimal insert with one that was 2 mm thicker. In all knees, substantial imbalance in tibial forces initially was recorded. Soft tissue balancing substantially reduced the imbalance. Although reasonable balance was achieved at 0-degree and 90-degree flexion, there was some measurable imbalance at flexion angles other than 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Increasing the thickness of the insert by 2 mm substantially increased net tibial forces. Inconsistent soft tissue balance may explain some of the wide variation in knee kinematics. Surgical navigation systems have reduced the variability in component alignment. An instrumented tibial trial can be a valuable adjunct to directly measure soft tissue balance.

  14. Osseointegrated total knee replacement connected to a lower limb prosthesis: 4 cases

    PubMed Central

    Khemka, Aditya; Frossard, Laurent; Lord, Sarah J; Bosley, Belinda; Al Muderis, Munjed

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — Osseointegrated implants are an alternative for prosthetic attachment in individuals with amputation who are unable to wear a socket. However, the load transmitted through the osseointegrated fixation to the residual tibia and knee joint can be unbearable for those with transtibial amputation and knee arthritis. We report on the feasibility of combining total knee replacement (TKR) with an osseointegrated implant for prosthetic attachment. Patients and methods — We retrospectively reviewed all 4 cases (aged 38–77 years) of transtibial amputations managed with osseointegration and TKR in 2012–2014. The below-the-knee prosthesis was connected to the tibial base plate of a TKR, enabling the tibial residuum and knee joint to act as weight-sharing structures. A 2-stage procedure involved connecting a standard hinged TKR to custom-made implants and creation of a skin-implant interface. Clinical outcomes were assessed at baseline and after 1–3 years of follow-up using standard measures of health-related quality of life, ambulation, and activity level including the questionnaire for transfemoral amputees (Q-TFA) and the 6-minute walk test. Results — There were no major complications, and there was 1 case of superficial infection. All patients showed improved clinical outcomes, with a Q-TFA improvement range of 29–52 and a 6-minute walk test improvement range of 37–84 meters. Interpretation — It is possible to combine TKR with osseointegrated implants. PMID:26145721

  15. Does Computer Assisted Navigation Improve Functional Outcomes and Implant Survivability after Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy D; Clatworthy, Mark G; Frampton, Chris M; Young, Simon W

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether computer assisted navigation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) improves functional outcomes and implant survivability using data from a large national database. We analysed 9054 primary TKA procedures performed between 2006 and 2012 from the New Zealand National Joint Registry. Functional outcomes were assessed using Oxford Knee Questionnaires at six months and five years. On multivariate analysis, there was no significant difference in mean Oxford Knee Scores between the navigated and non-navigated groups at six months (39.0 vs 38.1, P=0.54) or five years (42.2 vs 42.0, P=0.76). At current follow-up, there was no difference in revision rates between navigated and non-navigated TKA (0.46 vs 0.43 revisions 100 component years, P=0.8).

  16. [Minimally invasive approaches to hip and knee joints for total joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Rittmeister, M; König, D P; Eysel, P; Kerschbaumer, F

    2004-11-01

    The manuscript features the different minimally invasive approaches to the hip for joint replacement. These include medial, anterior, anterolateral, and posterior approaches. The concept of minimally invasive hip arthroplasty makes sense if it is an integral part of a larger concept to lower postoperative morbidity. Besides minimal soft tissue trauma, this concept involves preoperative patient education, preemptive analgesia, and postoperative physiotherapy. It is our belief that minimal incision techniques for the hip are not suited for all patients and all surgeons. The different minimally invasive approaches to the knee joint for implantation of a knee arthroplasty are described and discussed. There have been no studies published yet that fulfill EBM criteria. The data so far show that minimally invasive approaches and implantation techniques for total knee replacements lead to quicker rehabilitation of patients.

  17. The effects of kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasty on stress at the medial tibia

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Kuriyama, S.; Ito, H.; Furu, M.; Matsuda, S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Little biomechanical information is available about kinematically aligned (KA) total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to simulate the kinematics and kinetics after KA TKA and mechanically aligned (MA) TKA with four different limb alignments. Materials and Methods Bone models were constructed from one volunteer (normal) and three patients with three different knee deformities (slight, moderate and severe varus). A dynamic musculoskeletal modelling system was used to analyse the kinematics and the tibiofemoral contact force. The contact stress on the tibial insert, and the stress to the resection surface and medial tibial cortex were examined by using finite element analysis. Results In all bone models, posterior translation on the lateral side and external rotation in the KA TKA models were greater than in the MA TKA models. The tibiofemoral force at the medial side was increased in the moderate and severe varus models with KA TKA. In the severe varus model with KA TKA, the contact stress on the tibial insert and the stress to the resection surface and to the medial tibial cortex were increased by 41.5%, 32.2% and 53.7%, respectively, compared with MA TKA, and the bone strain at the medial side was highest among all models. Conclusion Near normal kinematics was observed in KA TKA. However, KA TKA increased the contact force, stress and bone strain at the medial side for moderate and severe varus knee models. The application of KA TKA for severe varus knees may be inadequate. Cite this article: S. Nakamura, Y. Tian, Y. Tanaka, S. Kuriyama, H. Ito, M. Furu, S. Matsuda. The effects of kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasty on stress at the medial tibia: A case study for varus knee. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:43–51. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.61.BJR-2016-0090.R1. PMID:28077396

  18. Distal femoral cut in total knee arthroplasty in a Brazilian population☆

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marcos Areias Vieira; Mozella, Alan de Paula; Cobra, Hugo Alexandre de Araujo Barros

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the ideal angle for making the distal femoral cut in total knee arthroplasty in a Brazilian population. Methods Panoramic radiographs of the lower limbs bearing weight from 79 patients (57 women and 22 men) were studied, totaling 107 knees with an indication for total knee arthroplasty. The femoral anatomical axis, femoral mechanical axis and cervical-diaphyseal angle were traced out. The angle of the femoral cut was determined from the meeting point between the femoral anatomical and mechanical axes. The ideal degree of femoral valgus was compared between men and women and between knees presenting varus and valgus alignment of the lower limb. The ideal distal femoral cut was also correlated with the cervical-diaphyseal angle. Results The ideal femoral valgus angle ranged from 4.2 to 8.6 degrees, with a mean of 6.3 degrees. There was no statistically significant difference in the distal femoral cut between patients with coronal varus and valgus alignment (p = 0.180). Comparing men and women, there was no statistically significant difference regarding the ideal femoral valgus between the groups (p = 0.057). The cervical-diaphyseal angle presented an inverse relationship with the distal femoral cut. Conclusions The mean angle between the femoral mechanical and anatomical axes was 6.3 degree. Neither preoperative coronal alignment nor sex had any influence on the distal femoral cut. The cervical-diaphyseal angle presented an inverse relationship with the distal femoral cut. PMID:26229933

  19. Patellofemoral contact patterns before and after total knee arthroplasty: an in vitro measurement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral complications are one of the main problems after Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA). Retropatellar pressure distribution after TKA can contribute to these symptoms. Therefore we evaluated retropatellar pressure distribution subdivided on the ridge, medial and lateral surface on non-resurfaced patella before and after TKA. Additionally, we analyzed axial femorotibial rotation and quadriceps load before and after TKA. Methods Seven fresh frozen cadaver knees were tested in a force controlled knee rig before and after TKA (Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany, Columbus CR) while isokinetic flexing the knee from 20° to 120° under weight bearing. Ridge, medial and lateral retropatellar surface were defined and pressure distribution was dynamically measured while quadriceps muscles and hamstring forces were applied. Aside axial femorotibial rotation and quadriceps load was recorded. Results There was a significant change of patella pressure distribution before and after TKA (p = 0.004). In physiological knees pressure distribution on medial and lateral retropatellar surface was similar. After TKA the ridge of the patella was especially in higher flexion grades strongly loaded (6.09 +/−1.31 MPa) compared to the natural knee (2.92 +/−1.15 MPa, p < 0.0001). Axial femorotibial rotation showed typical internal rotation with increasing flexion both before and after TKA, but postoperatively it was significantly lower. The average amount of axial rotation was 3.5° before and after TKA 1.3° (p = 0.001). Mean quadriceps loading after implantation of knee prosthesis did not change significantly (575 N ±60 N in natural knee and after TKA 607 N ±96 N; p = 0.28). Conclusions The increased retropatellar pressure especially on the ridge may be one important reason for anterior knee pain after TKA. The trochlea of the femoral component might highly influence the pressure distribution of the non-resurfaced retropatellar surface. Additionally

  20. [Total knee and hip prosthesis: variables associated with costs].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Espiñeira, Carmen; Escobar, Antonio; Navarro-Espigares, José Luis; Castillo, Juan de Dios Lunadel; García-Pérez, Lidia; Godoy-Montijano, Amparo

    2013-01-01

    antecedentes: la alta prevalencia de artrosis en los países occidentales, el elevado costo de las intervenciones de artroplastia de cadera y rodilla y las amplias variaciones en la práctica médica generan gran interés por comparar los costos asociados antes y después de la cirugía. Objetivo: conocer el costo de las intervenciones de reemplazo total de cadera y rodilla durante la estancia hospitalaria y al año de seguimiento posterior al alta. material y métodos: estudio multicéntrico y prospectivo efectuado en 15 hospitales de tres comunidades autónomas. La relación entre las variables independientes con el costo de la estancia y costo post-alta, se analizó con modelos multinivel y para agrupar los casos se utilizó la variable "hospital." Las variables independientes fueron: edad, sexo, índice de masa corporal, calidad de vida prequirúrgica (cuestionarios ED-5D, SF-12 y Womac), intervención (cadera-rodilla), índice Charlson, complicaciones, número de camas y dependencia económico-institucional del hospital, comunidad autó-noma y presencia de cuidador. Resultados: el costo promedio por paciente, sin incluir el costo de la prótesis, fue de 4,734 Euros ± 2,136 y el costo del seguimiento post alta de 554 Euros ± 509. Si se incluye el costo de la prótesis, al final del año el costo total asciende a 7,645 Euros ± 2,248. Conclusiones: existe un margen considerable en la reducción de los costos de estancia; más de 44% de la variabilidad observada no está determinada por las condiciones clínicas de los pacientes sino por el comportamiento de los centros hospitalarios.

  1. In vitro method for assessing the biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Coles, L G; Gheduzzi, S; Miles, A W

    2014-12-01

    The patellofemoral joint is a common site of pain and failure following total knee arthroplasty. A contributory factor may be adverse patellofemoral biomechanics. Cadaveric investigations are commonly used to assess the biomechanics of the joint, but are associated with high inter-specimen variability and often cannot be carried out at physiological levels of loading. This study aimed to evaluate the suitability of a novel knee simulator for investigating patellofemoral joint biomechanics. This simulator specifically facilitated the extended assessment of patellofemoral joint biomechanics under physiological levels of loading. The simulator allowed the knee to move in 6 degrees of freedom under quadriceps actuation and included a simulation of the action of the hamstrings. Prostheses were implanted on synthetic bones and key soft tissues were modelled with a synthetic analogue. In order to evaluate the physiological relevance and repeatability of the simulator, measurements were made of the quadriceps force and the force, contact area and pressure within the patellofemoral joint using load cells, pressure-sensitive film, and a flexible pressure sensor. The results were in agreement with those previously reported in the literature, confirming that the simulator is able to provide a realistic physiological loading situation. Under physiological loading, average standard deviations of force and area measurements were substantially lower and comparable to those reported in previous cadaveric studies, respectively. The simulator replicates the physiological environment and has been demonstrated to allow the initial investigation of factors affecting patellofemoral biomechanics following total knee arthroplasty.

  2. Development and validation of a weight-bearing finite element model for total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Woiczinski, M; Steinbrück, A; Weber, P; Müller, P E; Jansson, V; Schröder, Ch

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful procedure for osteoarthritis. However, some patients (19%) do have pain after surgery. A finite element model was developed based on boundary conditions of a knee rig. A 3D-model of an anatomical full leg was generated from magnetic resonance image data and a total knee prosthesis was implanted without patella resurfacing. In the finite element model, a restarting procedure was programmed in order to hold the ground reaction force constant with an adapted quadriceps muscle force during a squat from 20° to 105° of flexion. Knee rig experimental data were used to validate the numerical model in the patellofemoral and femorotibial joint. Furthermore, sensitivity analyses of Young's modulus of the patella cartilage, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) stiffness, and patella tendon origin were performed. Pearson's correlations for retropatellar contact area, pressure, patella flexion, and femorotibial ap-movement were near to 1. Lowest root mean square error for retropatellar pressure, patella flexion, and femorotibial ap-movement were found for the baseline model setup with Young's modulus of 5 MPa for patella cartilage, a downscaled PCL stiffness of 25% compared to the literature given value and an anatomical origin of the patella tendon. The results of the conducted finite element model are comparable with the experimental results. Therefore, the finite element model developed in this study can be used for further clinical investigations and will help to better understand the clinical aspects after TKA with an unresurfaced patella.

  3. Indoor and Outdoor Mobility following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Storey, Ava S T; Myrah, Ainslie M; Bauck, Robyn A; Brinkman, Danielle M; Friess, Shawn N; Webber, Sandra C

    2013-01-01

    Objectifs : En premier lieu, établir la relation entre la capacité de mobilité à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur chez les aînés qui ont subi une arthroplastie unilatérale totale du genou (TKA); en second lieu, évaluer l'intensité de la marche chez les mêmes individus et comparer tous les résultats à l'aide d'un groupe de contrôle composé d'aînés n'ayant aucune pathologie du genou. Méthodologie : Dans le cadre d'une étude transversale, les participants (TKA=16, moyenne de 22,9 [écart-type 9,7] mois après TKA; groupe de contrôle=22) ont effectué des tests de marche à l'intérieur et ont marché sur un parcours extérieur de 580 m sur divers types de surfaces (p. ex. bordure de chaussée, gazon, trottoir), avec changements de direction fréquents. La capacité de marche a été évaluée à l'aide de montres chronomètres, de GPS et d'accéléromètres. Résultats : Le temps de marche à l'extérieur était modérément corrélé (p<0,05) avec un test TUG (timed up-and-go); (r=0,65), un test de l'escalier (stair-climb test, SCT) (r=0,67 en montée, r=0,79 en descente), un test de marche de 10 mètres (10 mWT); (r=0,73), et un test de marche de 6 minutes (6 MWT); (r=−0,75). En fonction du décompte des activités, les niveaux d'intensité pendant la marche pour les participants des deux groupes étaient modérés (marche à l'extérieur et 6 MWT). Il n'y a pas eu de différence significative dans la capacité de marche entre les deux groupes (pour le TUG, le SCT, le 10 mWT, le 6 MWT, et la marche à l'extérieur). Conclusions : Les tests de marche cliniques habituellement utilisés sont corrélés de façon modérée avec la mobilité à l'extérieur. La capacité de mobilité chez les personnes post-TKA était similaire aux participants du groupe de contrôle à l'intérieur comme à l'extérieur, et les participants des deux groupes sont parvenus à un niveau d'activité physique modérée grâce à la marche.

  4. The effect of insert conformity and material on total knee replacement wear

    PubMed Central

    Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Brockett, Claire L; Liu, Feng; Jennings, Louise M; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2013-01-01

    The mean average life is increasing; therefore, there is a need to increase the lifetime of the prostheses. To fulfil this requirement, new prosthetic designs and materials are being introduced. Two of the design parameters that may affect wear of total knee replacements, and hence the expected lifetime, are the insert conformity and material. Computational models have been used extensively for wear prediction and optimisation of artificial knee designs. The objective of the present study was to use a previously validated non-dimensional wear coefficient-based computational wear model to investigate the effect of insert conformity and material on the predicted wear in total knee replacements. Four different inserts (curved, lipped, partial flat and custom flat), with different conformity levels, were tested against the same femoral and under two different kinematic inputs (intermediate and high), with different levels of cross-shear. The insert bearing materials were either conventional or moderately cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear predictions were validated against the experimental data from Leeds knee simulation tests. The predicted wear rates for the curved insert (most conformed) were more than three times those for the flat insert (least conformed). In addition, the computationally predicted average volumetric wear rates for moderately cross-linked UHMWPE bearings were less than half of their corresponding conventional UHMWPE bearings. Moreover, the wear of the moderately cross-linked UHMWPE was shown to be less dependent on the degree of cross-shear, compared to conventional UHMWPE. These results along with supporting experimental studies provide insight into the design variables, which may reduce wear in knee replacements. PMID:24297773

  5. The effect of insert conformity and material on total knee replacement wear.

    PubMed

    Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Brockett, Claire L; Liu, Feng; Jennings, Louise M; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    The mean average life is increasing; therefore, there is a need to increase the lifetime of the prostheses. To fulfil this requirement, new prosthetic designs and materials are being introduced. Two of the design parameters that may affect wear of total knee replacements, and hence the expected lifetime, are the insert conformity and material. Computational models have been used extensively for wear prediction and optimisation of artificial knee designs. The objective of the present study was to use a previously validated non-dimensional wear coefficient-based computational wear model to investigate the effect of insert conformity and material on the predicted wear in total knee replacements. Four different inserts (curved, lipped, partial flat and custom flat), with different conformity levels, were tested against the same femoral and under two different kinematic inputs (intermediate and high), with different levels of cross-shear. The insert bearing materials were either conventional or moderately cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear predictions were validated against the experimental data from Leeds knee simulation tests. The predicted wear rates for the curved insert (most conformed) were more than three times those for the flat insert (least conformed). In addition, the computationally predicted average volumetric wear rates for moderately cross-linked UHMWPE bearings were less than half of their corresponding conventional UHMWPE bearings. Moreover, the wear of the moderately cross-linked UHMWPE was shown to be less dependent on the degree of cross-shear, compared to conventional UHMWPE. These results along with supporting experimental studies provide insight into the design variables, which may reduce wear in knee replacements.

  6. Radiological method for measuring patellofemoral tracking and tibiofemoral kinematics before and after total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, G. B.; Saevarsson, S. K.; Amiri, S.; Montgomery, S.; Ramm, H.; Lichti, D. D.; Lieck, R.; Zachow, S.; Anglin, C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Numerous complications following total knee replacement (TKR) relate to the patellofemoral (PF) joint, including pain and patellar maltracking, yet the options for in vivo imaging of the PF joint are limited, especially after TKR. We propose a novel sequential biplane radiological method that permits accurate tracking of the PF and tibiofemoral (TF) joints throughout the range of movement under weightbearing, and test it in knees pre- and post-arthroplasty. Methods A total of three knees with end-stage osteoarthritis and three knees that had undergone TKR at more than one year’s follow-up were investigated. In each knee, sequential biplane radiological images were acquired from the sagittal direction (i.e. horizontal X-ray source and 10° below horizontal) for a sequence of eight flexion angles. Three-dimensional implant or bone models were matched to the biplane images to compute the six degrees of freedom of PF tracking and TF kinematics, and other clinical measures. Results The mean and standard deviation for the six degrees of freedom of PF tracking and TF kinematics were computed. TF and PF kinematics were highly accurate (< 0.9 mm, < 0.6°) and repeatable. Conclusions The developed method permitted measuring of in vivo PF tracking and TF kinematics before and after TKR throughout the range of movement. This method could be a useful tool for investigating differences between cohorts of patients (e.g., with and without pain) impacting clinical decision-making regarding surgical technique, revision surgery or implant design. PMID:23610657

  7. Use of closed suction drain after primary total knee arthroplasty – an overrated practice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav M.; Palekar, Gauresh; Tanna, Dilip D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The age-old practice of closed suction drain following orthopedic procedures has been challenged since past few decades. Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of closed suction drain after total knee arthroplasty. Materials and methods: One hundred twenty patients (135 knees) with primary Total Knee Arthroplasty were divided into a study group (no drain) and a control group (drain used). Inclusion criteria were grade 3 and grade 4 osteoarthritis of the knee. Revision cases and rheumatoid arthritis were excluded. Parameters assessed were pain, pre and post-op Hb, dressing change, early infection, ecchymosis and duration of stay. Results were calculated using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and Oxford Knee scoring systems at two weeks, six months and one year. Results: Mean age was 72.03 ± 6.68 in study group and 71.38 ± 7.02 in control group. Pre and post op Hb was 12.1678 ± 1.3220 (study group), 12.1803 ± 1.2717 (control group) and 9.8373 ± 1.5703 (study group), 9.7918 ± 1.4163 (control group). There was one case of early infection in both groups which was controlled by oral antibiotics. Change of dressing and ecchymosis were more in the study group. Duration of hospital stay was more in the control group p < 0.0006 (statistically significant). Conclusion: There is no added advantage of closed suction drain over no drain usage and this practice can safely be brought to a halt. PMID:27855775

  8. Blood Sparing Efficacy of Oral Tranexamic Acid in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Qunn Jid; Ching, Wai Yee; Wong, Yiu Chung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Tranexamic acid (TXA) is effective in reducing blood loss in primary total knee replacement. Almost all studies used an intravenous form or a topical form. The aim of this study was to assess the blood sparing efficacy and the safety of oral TXA. Materials and Methods All patients with primary total knee replacement performed in our institute from January 2015 to October 2015 were eligible. Oral TXA group was given 1 g oral TXA 2 hours before induction of anesthesia and 6 hours and 12 hours postoperatively. The control group was not given TXA. Results There were 94 cases in the oral TXA group and 95 cases in the control group. There was no difference in the baseline characteristics. The oral TXA group had a significantly lower hemoglobin drop (1.7 g/dL vs. 2.5 g/dL), lower drain output (154 mL vs. 203 mL), lower hidden blood loss (244 mL vs. 423 mL) and lower total blood loss (398 mL vs. 626 mL). There was no difference in transfusion rate (1.1% vs. 3.2%) and thromboembolic complication. There was no infection or mortality in both groups. Conclusions Oral TXA is effective in reducing blood loss in primary total knee replacement. It is a safe alternative to the intravenous or topical form. PMID:28231650

  9. Computer model to predict subsurface damage in tibial inserts of total knees.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, S; Walker, P S

    1998-09-01

    Two designs of total knee replacements were analysed to determine how the geometry of their bearing surface would affect the susceptibility of their ultra high molecular weight polyethylene tibial inserts to delamination. Orientations of the femoral components on the tibial surfaces were calculated with use of rigid body analysis for discrete intervals during the stance phase of gait. For each successive orientation, finite element analysis was used to compress the components together to determine the stresses in the tibial inserts. A damage function analogous to strain energy density was defined to account for the accumulated amplitudes and frequencies of the maximum shear stress cycles and hence to predict fatigue failure. The damage function was applied to each polyethylene element in the tibial insert, and the highest value calculated for each design was its damage score. One knee had a damage score more than three times less than that of the other because of lower stresses and because the contact points moved in the medial-lateral as well as anterior-posterior directions during internal-external rotation. The femoral and tibial components of this knee had large outer frontal radii and close conformity in the frontal plane. We propose that this method, which accounts for the motions and stresses endured during walking, makes different predictions regarding the likelihood of delamination compared with the predictions made by conventional static compression tests performed when the knee is in a neutral position.

  10. A clinical study of the rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liangjia; Liu, Xiaomin; Liu, Changlu; Liu, Yingli

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The reasons for femorotibial rotational malalignment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were analyzed to provide evidence for clinical knee joint surgery and to reduce complications. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety knees of 60 patients were selected and randomly divided into two groups (n=30). For one group, rotational alignment of the femoral component was determined by the transepicondylar axis and TKA was performed. For the other group, rotational alignment of the femoral component was conducted through 3° external rotation of the posterior femoral condyles. Knee joint specimens were operated with TKA and various biomechanical indices were measured. [Results] The femoral epicondylar axis was a constant, reliable reference for femoral component rotational alignment. When the femoral component was rotated by 0° versus the epicondylar axis, the peak contact pressure on the patellofemoral joint was optimal. When the femoral component was arranged in parallel with Whiteside’s line, the peak contact pressure on the patellofemoral joint varied largely. The patellofemoral contact areas of the two groups were similar. [Conclusion] Axial rotational alignment of the femoral component influenced the contact pressure of patellofemoral joints in TKA more significantly than external rotation of the femoral condyles. It is more reliable to use the femoral epicondylar axis as the reference for the rotational alignment of the femoral component. PMID:26311929

  11. Time-dependent elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of total knee replacement under walking conditions.

    PubMed

    Su, Yonglin; Yang, Peiran; Fu, Zengliang; Jin, Zhongmin; Wang, Chengtao

    2011-06-01

    This work is concerned with the lubrication analysis of artificial knee joints, which plays an increasing significant role in clinical performance and longevity of components. Time-dependent elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis for normal total knee replacement is carried out under the cyclic variation in both load and speed representative of normal walking. An equivalent ellipsoid-on-plane model is adopted to represent an actual artificial knee. A full numerical method is developed to simultaneously solve the Reynolds and elasticity equations using the multigrid technique. The elastic deformation is based on the constrained column model. Results show that, under the combined effect of entraining and squeeze-film actions throughout the walking cycle, the predicted central film thickness tends to decrease in the stance phase but keeps a relatively larger value at the swing phase. Furthermore, the geometry of knee joint implant is verified to play an important role under its lubrication condition, and the length of time period is a key point to influence the lubrication performance of joint components.

  12. No positive effect of autologous platelet gel after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Activated platelets release a cocktail of growth factors, some of which are thought to stimulate repair. We investigated whether the use of autologous platelet gel (PG) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) would improve wound healing and knee function, and reduce blood loss and the use of analgesics. Patients and methods 102 patients undergoing TKA were randomly assigned to a PG group (n = 50) or to a control (C) group (n = 52). The primary analysis was based on 73 participants (PG: 32; C: 41) with comparison of postoperative wound scores, VAS, WOMAC, knee function, use of analgesics, and the pre- and postoperative hemoglobin values after a follow-up of 3 months. 29 participants were excluded due to insufficient data. Results The characteristics of the protocol-compliant patients were similar to those of the patients who were excluded. Analysis was per protocol and focused on the remaining 73 patients. At baseline and after 3 months of follow-up, there were no statistically significant differences between both groups regarding age, height, weight, sex, side of operation, platelet count, hemoglobin values, severity of complaints (WOMAC), and level of pain. Interpretation In our patients undergoing TKA, application of PG to the wound site did not promote wound healing. Also, we found that PG had no effect on pain, knee function, or hemoglobin values. PMID:19916689

  13. Bilateral Patella Dislocation after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Report of Two Cases and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Panthi, Sagar; Vijay, Vipul; Vaish, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Patellar instability is a known but catastrophic complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The occurrence of bilateral dislocation of the patella after TKA is exceedingly rare. It may present as anterior knee pain, and diagnosis can easily be made clinically or by plain radiographs. Early diagnosis with surgical realignment and repair of the extensor mechanism can provide good outcomes after this complication.

  14. Non-Sagittal Knee Joint Kinematics and Kinetics during Gait on Level and Sloped Grounds with Unicompartmental and Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients.

    PubMed

    Komnik, Igor; Peters, Markus; Funken, Johannes; David, Sina; Weiss, Stefan; Potthast, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    After knee arthroplasty (KA) surgery, patients experience abnormal kinematics and kinetics during numerous activities of daily living. Biomechanical investigations have focused primarily on level walking, whereas walking on sloped surfaces, which is stated to affect knee kinematics and kinetics considerably, has been neglected to this day. This study aimed to analyze over-ground walking on level and sloped surfaces with a special focus on transverse and frontal plane knee kinematics and kinetics in patients with KA. A three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis was performed by means of optoelectronic stereophogrammetry 1.8 ± 0.4 years following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and unicompartmental arthroplasty surgery (UKA). AnyBody™ Modeling System was used to conduct inverse dynamics. The TKA group negotiated the decline walking task with reduced peak knee internal rotation angles compared with a healthy control group (CG). First-peak knee adduction moments were diminished by 27% (TKA group) and 22% (UKA group) compared with the CG during decline walking. No significant differences were detected between the TKA and UKA groups, regardless of the locomotion task. Decline walking exposed apparently more abnormal knee frontal and transverse plane adjustments in KA patients than level walking compared with the CG. Hence, walking on sloped surfaces should be included in further motion analysis studies investigating KA patients in order to detect potential deficits that might be not obvious during level walking.

  15. Non-Sagittal Knee Joint Kinematics and Kinetics during Gait on Level and Sloped Grounds with Unicompartmental and Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients

    PubMed Central

    Komnik, Igor; David, Sina; Weiss, Stefan; Potthast, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    After knee arthroplasty (KA) surgery, patients experience abnormal kinematics and kinetics during numerous activities of daily living. Biomechanical investigations have focused primarily on level walking, whereas walking on sloped surfaces, which is stated to affect knee kinematics and kinetics considerably, has been neglected to this day. This study aimed to analyze over-ground walking on level and sloped surfaces with a special focus on transverse and frontal plane knee kinematics and kinetics in patients with KA. A three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis was performed by means of optoelectronic stereophogrammetry 1.8 ± 0.4 years following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and unicompartmental arthroplasty surgery (UKA). AnyBody™ Modeling System was used to conduct inverse dynamics. The TKA group negotiated the decline walking task with reduced peak knee internal rotation angles compared with a healthy control group (CG). First-peak knee adduction moments were diminished by 27% (TKA group) and 22% (UKA group) compared with the CG during decline walking. No significant differences were detected between the TKA and UKA groups, regardless of the locomotion task. Decline walking exposed apparently more abnormal knee frontal and transverse plane adjustments in KA patients than level walking compared with the CG. Hence, walking on sloped surfaces should be included in further motion analysis studies investigating KA patients in order to detect potential deficits that might be not obvious during level walking. PMID:28002437

  16. The impact of blood management on length of stay after primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Monsef, Jad B; Della Valle, Alejandro G; Mayman, David J; Marx, Robert G; Ranawat, Amar S; Boettner, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigates the impact of patient factors, surgical factors, and blood management on postoperative length of stay (LOS) in 516 patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty. Age, gender, type of anticoagulation, but not body mass index (BMI) were found to be highly significant predictors of an increased LOS. Allogeneic transfusion and the number of allogeneic units significantly increased LOS, whereas donation and/or transfusion of autologous blood did not. Hemoglobin levels preoperatively until 48 hours postoperatively were negatively correlated with LOS. After adjusting for confounding factors through Poisson regression, age (p = 0.001) and allogeneic blood transfusion (p = 0.002) were the most significant determinants of LOS. Avoiding allogeneic blood plays an essential role in reducing the overall length of stay after primary total knee arthroplasty.

  17. Enhanced recovery protocol and hidden blood loss in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Rohit; Rajgor, Harshadkumar; Yarlagadda, Rathan; John, John; Graham, Niall M

    2017-01-01

    Background: Perioperative blood loss and postoperative pain following total knee arthroplasty prevent early mobilisation of patients. The Enhanced Recovery Protocol (ERP) followed for patients in our institute aims at reducing post operative pain, blood loss and length of stay. Materials and Methods: 50 consecutive patients that underwent ERP following total knee arthroplasty with another group of 70 patients that underwent the same surgery without ERP were compared in terms of hidden blood loss and length of hospital stay. Hidden blood loss was calculated according to previously described method. Results: Reduction in blood loss was found in both males (305 ml) and females (150 ml) following ERP. Length of stay reduced by 1.5 days in both genders. Regression analysis showed a significant correlation between body weight and blood loss in females. Conclusion: Enhanced recovery protocol could be a useful tool to reduce patient morbidity and reduce length of inpatient stay.

  18. The effect of obesity on mechanical failure after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fessy, Michel-Henri

    2015-01-01

    “Increased aseptic tibial failures in patients with a BMI ≥35 and well-aligned total knee arthroplasties” published in The Journal of Arthroplasty on July 2, 2015 draws the conclusion that the risk of revision total knee arthroplasties (TKA) due to aseptic tibial component loosening is two times greater in patients with a BMI ≥35 kg/m2, independent of age or limb alignment. This result confirms that obese patients are at a higher risk of mechanical complications after performing TKA, independently from the risk of infection. This study suggests that the management of obese patients for TKA must be meticulous, careful, and should inspire from great bone deformations in valgus of varus when choosing implants. PMID:26697470

  19. The patient's perspective of in-home telerehabilitation physiotherapy services following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kairy, Dahlia; Tousignant, Michel; Leclerc, Nancy; Côté, Anne-Marie; Levasseur, Mélanie; Researchers, The Telage

    2013-08-30

    This study aimed at exploring patients' perceptions regarding telerehabilitation services received post total knee replacement. In this qualitative embedded single case study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with five patients who had previously received in-home telerehabilitation post total knee arthroplasty. Participants were asked to reflect on their 8-week rehabilitation process and on their experience with the home telerehabilitation program. Interviews were transcribed and a qualitative thematic analysis was conducted. Six overarching themes emerged from the patients' perceptions: (1) improving access to services with reduced need for transportation; (2) developing a strong therapeutic relationship with therapist while maintaining a sense of personal space; (3) complementing telerehabilitation with in-person visits; (4) providing standardized yet tailored and challenging exercise programs using telerehabilitation; (5) perceived ease-of-use of telerehabilitation equipment; and (6) feeling an ongoing sense of support. Gaining a better understating of the patient's experience in telerehabilitation will be essential as programs continue to be developed and implemented.

  20. Accuracy and efficacy of osteotomy in total knee arthroplasty with patient-specific navigational template

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Yudong; Ding, Jing; Xu, Yongqing; Hou, Chunlin

    2015-01-01

    This study develops and validates a novel patient-specific navigational template for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 70 patients who underwent TKA were randomized and divided into conventional method group and navigational template group. In the navigational template group, the patient-specific navigational templates were designed and used intraoperatively to assist 35 patients with knee arthroplasty. Information on operation time and blood loss was recorded. After surgery, the positions of the prosthesis were evaluated using CT scan and X-rays. Analysis showed significant differences in errors between the two techniques. In addition, mean operation time and mean blood loss were statistically and significantly lower in the navigational template group than in the conventional group. Overall, the navigational template method showed a high degree of accuracy and efficacy. PMID:26550129

  1. In Vivo Wear Performance of Cobalt-Chromium Versus Oxidized Zirconium Femoral Total Knee Replacements.

    PubMed

    Gascoyne, Trevor C; Teeter, Matthew G; Guenther, Leah E; Burnell, Colin D; Bohm, Eric R; Naudie, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the damage and wear on the polyethylene (PE) inserts from 52 retrieved Genesis II total knee replacements to identify differences in tribological performance between matched pairs of cobalt-chromium (CoCr) and oxidized zirconium (OxZr) femoral components. Observer damage scoring and microcomputed tomography were used to quantify PE damage and wear, respectively. No significant differences were found between CoCr and OxZr groups in terms of PE insert damage, surface penetration, or wear. No severe damage such as cracking or delamination was noted on any of the 52 PE inserts. Observer damage scoring did not correlate with penetrative or volumetric PE wear. The more costly OxZr femoral component does not demonstrate clear tribological benefit over the standard CoCr component in the short term with this total knee replacement design.

  2. Long-Term Clinical Outcomes and Survivorship of Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty with Use of a Constrained Condylar Knee Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoo; Park, Jang-Won; Kim, Jun-Shik; Oh, Hyun-Keun

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine long-term clinical and radiographic results. One hundred and ninety-four patients (228 knees) underwent revision TKA with use of a constrained condylar knee prosthesis. The mean duration of follow-up was 14.6 years (range, 11 to 16 years). The mean pre-revision Knee Society knee scores (43.5 points) and function scores (47.0 points), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index scores (88 points) were improved significantly (P=0.002) to 85.6, 68.5, and 25 points, respectively, at 14.6 years follow-up. Eighteen knees (8%) had re-revision. Four knees were re-revised for infection. Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis revealed that the 16-year rate of survival of the components was 94.7% as the end point of loosening and 92% as the end point of revision.

  3. The role of surgeon volume on patient outcome in total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A number of factors have been identified as influencing total knee arthroplasty outcomes, including patient factors such as gender and medical comorbidity, technical factors such as alignment of the prosthesis, and provider factors such as hospital and surgeon procedure volumes. Recently, strategies aimed at optimizing provider factors have been proposed, including regionalization of total joint arthroplasty to higher volume centers, and adoption of volume standards. To contribute to the discussions concerning the optimization of provider factors and proposals to regionalize total knee arthroplasty practices, we undertook a systematic review to investigate the association between surgeon volume and primary total knee arthroplasty outcomes. Methods We performed a systematic review examining the association between surgeon volume and primary knee arthroplasty outcomes. To be included in the review, the study population had to include patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty. Studies had to report on the association between surgeon volume and primary total knee arthroplasty outcomes, including perioperative mortality and morbidity, patient-reported outcomes, or total knee arthroplasty implant survivorship. There were no restrictions placed on study design or language. Results Studies were variable in defining surgeon volume (‘low’: <3 to <52 total knee arthroplasty per year; ‘high’: >5 to >70 total knee arthroplasty per year). Mortality rate, survivorship and thromboembolic events were not found to be associated with surgeon volume. We found a significant association between low surgeon volume and higher rate of infection (0.26% - 2.8% higher), procedure time (165 min versus 135 min), longer length of stay (0.4 - 2.13 days longer), transfusion rate (13% versus 4%), and worse patient reported outcomes. Conclusions Findings suggest a trend towards better outcomes for higher volume surgeons, but results must be interpreted with caution. PMID

  4. Physical Function and Physical Activity in Obese Adults After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Smith, Webb A; Zucker-Levin, Audrey; Mihalko, William M; Williams, Michael; Loftin, Mark; Gurney, James G

    2017-04-01

    Obese patients are more likely to have osteoarthritis and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This investigation sought to evaluate physical function, activity level, and quality of life (QOL). Obese participants near 1-year postsurgical follow-up appointment were recruited. Evaluation included QOL and activity questionnaire, medical histories, anthropometrics, strength, and aerobic capacity. Sixty participants completed assessments. Obese TKA patients have physical performance limitations and low physical activity levels 1 year after surgery and completion of postoperative rehabilitation.

  5. Acute Cholecystitis Following Total Knee Replacement: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghalimah, Bayan; Hamdi, Amre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Infection poses a substantial challenge after joint replacement. Case Presentation: We report a 53-year-old female with multiple co-morbidities, who underwent unilateral total knee arthroplasty. Her postoperative course was complicated by acute cholecystitis necessitating cholecystectomy. Conclusion: In patients who require joint replacement surgery, careful and detailed preoperative assessment is important to identify those at risk for this complication in order to provide timely treatment. PMID:27703950

  6. Radiophosphate visualization of the foreign body reaction to wear debris from total knee prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthall, L.

    1987-05-01

    Three patients with total knee arthroplasties, in which the tibial and patellar articulating surfaces consisted of a polyethylene-carbon fiber composite, demonstrated technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP) deposition in the intraarticular space, whereas, the gallium-67 citrate images were normal. This was shown to be due to a synovial giant cell foreign body reaction to particulate carbon fiber debris in one patient who required surgical revision of the prosthesis.

  7. Compartment syndrome following total knee replacement: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Shaath, Mohammed; Sukeik, Mohamed; Mortada, Saadallah; Masterson, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee replacement (TKR) surgery that needs prompt diagnosis and treatment as it may be associated with high morbidity and mortality. We have found very few reports in the literature describing compartment syndrome after TKRs and therefore, present a relevant case which occurred in the immediate postoperative phase and was treated with fasciotomy and subsequent operations to close the soft tissue defects. PMID:27672575

  8. Fabella Fractures after Total Knee Arthroplasty with Correction of Valgus Malalignment

    PubMed Central

    Heggelman, Ben; Gaasbeek, Robert; Nix, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of fabella fractures is considered to be extremely low. This report presents two patients with femorotibial osteoarthritis and considerable preoperative valgus malalignment, who developed a fracture of the fabella (as demonstrated by radiography) after total knee arthroplasty with intraoperative correction of the valgus malalignment. Special attention should be paid to the fabella for not missing a fabella fracture in these patients. PMID:27340579

  9. Is routine splintage following primary total knee replacement necessary? A prospective randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Horton, T C; Jackson, R; Mohan, N; Hambidge, J E

    2002-09-01

    It was hypothesised that routine splintage following primary total knee replacement has no affect on flexion deformity and offers no benefit over simple wool and crepe. Fifty-five patients undergoing primary total knee replacement were entered into a prospective study. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: The first group was rehabilitated without a splint and the second received an adjustable semi-rigid extension splint (Richards splint) for the first 48 h after surgery. Range of motion measurements were recorded pre-operatively and at 2 days, 1 week and 3 months post-operation by a research nurse blinded to the allocation. No statistically significant difference in flexion deformity was found at any stage (P>0.5). No difference was found in general or wound complications, or requirement for blood transfusion, and the post-operative stay was equal in the two groups. We conclude that routine use of a semi-rigid splint following primary total knee replacement has no advantage over simple wound dressings.

  10. Assessment of isometricity before and after total knee arthroplasty: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Markus S; Jeffcote, Benjamin O; Schirm, Andreas C; Jacob, Hilaire; Nicholls, Rochelle L

    2009-10-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) relies on soft tissue to regulate joint stability after surgery. In practice, the exact balance of the gaps can be difficult to measure, and various methods including intra-operative spreaders or distraction devices have been proposed. While individual ligament strain patterns have been measured, no data exist on the isometricity of the soft tissue envelope as a whole. In this study, a novel device was developed and validated to compare isometricity in the entire soft tissue envelope for both the intact and TKA knee. A spring-loaded rod was inserted in six cadaver knee joints between the tibial shaft and the tibial plateau or tibial tray after removing a 7 mm slice of bone. The displacement of the rod during passive flexion represented variation in tissue tension around the joint. The rod position in the intact knee remained within 1 mm of its initial position between 15 degrees and 135 degrees of flexion, and within 2 mm (+/-1.2 mm) throughout the entire range of motion (0-150 degrees). After insertion of a mobile-bearing TKA, the rod was displaced a mean of 6 mm at 150 degrees (p<0.001). The results were validated using a force transducer implanted in the tibial baseplate of the TKA, which showed increased tibiofemoral force in the parts of the flexion range where the rod was most displaced. The force measurements were highly correlated with the displacement pattern of the spring-loaded rod (r=-0.338; p=0.006). A simple device has been validated to measure isometricity in the soft tissue envelope around the knee joint. Isometricity measurements may be used in the future to improve implantation techniques during TKA surgery.

  11. Patellar tracking during total knee arthroplasty: an in vitro feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Belvedere, C; Catani, F; Ensini, A; Moctezuma de la Barrera, J L; Leardini, A

    2007-08-01

    Abnormal patellar tracking results in patello-femoral (PF) joint disorders and frequently in failure of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is fundamental to assess this tracking intra-operatively, i.e. since the implantation of the femoral and tibial components. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of three-dimensional anatomical-based patellar tracking intra-operatively in standard TKA. A surgical navigation system was utilized to test the new technique in-vitro. An original tracking device and a reference frame were designed and an articular convention for the description of PF joint kinematics was adopted. Six fresh-frozen amputated legs were analyzed with the new technique. Landmark digitations were used to define anatomical reference frames for the femur, tibia, and patella. Five trials of passive flexion were performed with 100 N force on the quadriceps, before and after standard knee arthroplasty. Patellar flexion, tilt, rotation and shift were calculated in addition to standard tibio-femoral (TF) joint kinematics. An intra-specimen repeatable path of motion over repetitions and a coupled path of motion throughout the flexion-extension cycle were observed in all intact knees, both at the TF and PF joints. Replication of the original PF motion in the intact knee was not fully accomplished in the replaced knee. These results revealed the feasibility and the necessity of patellar tracking during TKA. By monitoring intra-operatively also the PF kinematics, the surgeon has a more complete prediction of the performance of the final implant and therefore a valuable support for the most critical surgical decisions.

  12. Total knee arthroplasty for posttraumatic osteoarthritis in military personnel under age 50.

    PubMed

    Murtha, Andrew S; Johnson, Anthony E; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Rivera, Jessica C

    2016-05-13

    United States military personnel frequently suffer knee injuries. The resulting progressive post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) causes significant disability in these young high-demand patients for which total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the only effective treatment of their pain and impairment. Yet the use of this option for treatment of PTOA has not been studied. This retrospective review identified 74 knees in 64 U.S. military personnel who underwent TKA at ≤ 50 years-of-age during an eight year period at a tertiary-care, academic, military medical center. Fifty-five knees (74.3%) experienced one or more prior ligamentous, meniscal, or chondral injuries prior to arthroplasty. Only one subject had a history of osteochondral intra-articular fracture. The average at injury was 29.2 years (95% CI of ± 2.50) with an average age at arthroplasty of 44.3 years (± 1.11). The most common injury was anterior cruciate ligament rupture (n = 19) with a mean time to TKA of 23.1 years (± 10.54) and 18.8 years (± 7.01) when concomitant meniscal pathology was noted. Nineteen patients were noted to have radiographic and symptomatic end-stage osteoarthritis without a specified etiology at 41.4 years (± 1.47) and underwent subsequent TKA. This is the first study to evaluate treatment of end-stage PT OA in young people treated with TKA, finding that the incidence of PTOA as an indication for arthroplasty is significantly higher than among civilians. In this otherwise healthy, high-demand patient population, the rate of OA progression following knee injury is accelerated and the long term implications can be career and life-altering. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Why Patients Do Not Participate in Sports Activities After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Moon Jong; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Chung, Byung June; Chang, Chong Bum; Kim, Tae Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Background It is important to identify the reasons or factors preventing patients from participating in sports activities after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to improve patient satisfaction and general health that can be gained from regular sports activities. Purpose To determine the reasons for lack of participation in regular sports activities after TKA as perceived by patients and to identify specific factors involved. Study Design Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A total of 369 patients with a follow-up longer than 1 year after TKA were included in this retrospective study. A postal survey regarding sports activities was conducted using a questionnaire gathering information such as sociodemographic data, activity levels, and sports activities after TKA. The reasons perceived by patients for not participating in sports activities were determined. Patients unable to participate in sports activities were compared with patients able to do so in terms of sociodemographic data and pre- and postoperative outcomes. Results Of the 369 patients, 88 (24%) replied that they could not participate in a sports activity. Among the perceived reasons, reasons not related to the replaced knee were more frequent than those related to the replaced knee (76% vs 24%). Symptoms related to the spine or other joints composed 25% of the total perceived reasons. The presence of medical comorbidities accounted for 16%, while symptoms in the nonreplaced knee represented 8% of the reasons. In terms of patient factors, multivariate logistic regression revealed that male sex, a floor-based (ie, non-Western) lifestyle with greater demands on knee flexion, and worse postoperative University of California at Los Angeles activity scale were associated with nonregular sports activity levels. Conclusion The perceived reasons and patient factors hindering regular sports activities after TKA were not restricted to problems with the replaced knee. Nonetheless, orthopaedic surgeons may have a

  14. Comparison between intravenous and intra-articular regimens of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Soni, Ashwani; Saini, Raghav; Gulati, Anmol; Paul, Rajesh; Bhatty, Shiraj; Rajoli, Sreekanth Reddy

    2014-08-01

    Tranexamic acid is an antifibrinolytic drug used widely to prevent bleeding. Its use in reducing bleeding during total knee arthroplasty surgery is well proven but there is no final consensus regarding the regimen. The purpose of our study was to compare the effectiveness of intravenous and intra-articular regimen of tranexamic acid during the total knee arthroplasty surgery. A total of 40 patients were received three doses of intravenous tranexamic acid during total knee arthroplasty surgery. Intra-articular tranexamic acid was used in 40 patients during the surgery. We concluded that intra-articular tranexamic acid is equally effective as three dose intravenous regimen in reducing blood loss during total knee arthroplasty surgery.

  15. The Influence of Obesity on the Complication Rate and Outcome of Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Servien, Elvire; Dunn, Warren; Dahm, Diane; Bramer, Jos A.M.; Haverkamp, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background: The increase in the number of individuals with an unhealthily high body weight is particularly relevant in the United States. Obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) is a well-documented risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis. Furthermore, an increased prevalence of total knee arthroplasty in obese individuals has been observed in the last decades. The primary aim of this systematic literature review was to determine whether obesity has a negative influence on outcome after primary total knee arthroplasty. Methods: A search of the literature was performed, and studies comparing the outcome of total knee arthroplasty in different weight groups were included. The methodology of the included studies was scored according to the Cochrane guidelines. Data extraction and pooling were performed. The weighted mean difference for continuous data and the weighted odds ratio for dichotomous variables were calculated. Heterogeneity was calculated with use of the I2 statistic. Results: After consensus was reached, twenty studies were included in the data analysis. The presence of any infection was reported in fourteen studies including 15,276 patients (I2, 26%). Overall, infection occurred more often in obese patients, with an odds ratio of 1.90 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46 to 2.47). Deep infection requiring surgical debridement was reported in nine studies including 5061 patients (I2, 0%). Deep infection occurred more often in obese patients, with an odds ratio of 2.38 (95% CI, 1.28 to 4.55). Revision of the total knee arthroplasty, defined as exchange or removal of the components for any reason, was documented in eleven studies including 12,101 patients (I2, 25%). Revision for any reason occurred more often in obese patients, with an odds ratio of 1.30 (95% CI, 1.02 to 1.67). Conclusions: Obesity had a negative influence on outcome after total knee arthroplasty. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete

  16. Salvage revision total knee replacement using the Endo-Model rotating hinge prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, N R; Bale, L; Kay, P; Porter, M L

    2004-12-01

    Inability to balance a knee in complex revision total knee replacement has led to the use of rotating hinged knee devices in these cases as a salvage procedure. We conducted a retrospective study of 50 patients receiving 51 Endo-Model rotating hinge prosthesis with an average follow-up of 4 years (range 2-6 years). Clinical and radiological results were reviewed at latest follow-up. Five patients died from unrelated causes. Reasons for revision were infection (23), aseptic loosening (23), implant failure (3), stiffness (1) and peri-prosthetic fracture (1). The average number of previous surgery from and including the primary arthroplasty was three (ranges 1-14). Seven patients required plastic surgery for soft tissue cover. There was notable improvement in the pain, stability, range of motion and mobility of the patients with an improvement in the Hospital for Special Surgery Score (35.9 to 72.17). Postoperatively, 11 (22%) had an excellent HSS grade, 22 (44%) good grade, 10 (19%) fair grade and 8 (15%) poor grade. A significant number of our patients had an extremely low preoperative HSS score, and for these patients, an improvement to a fair grade HSS score was a satisfactory and realistic outcome. Forty-four (86%) patients were satisfied with the outcome of the revision surgery, 3 (6%) noncommittal and 4 (8%) disappointed. Comparing revision for infection vs. aseptic loosening, 22 (95%) patients out of 23 were satisfied in the aseptic loosening group vs. 17 (74%) out of 23 were satisfied in the infected group. In selected complex cases, salvage revision surgery shows encouraging results in the short to medium term using the Endo-Model rotating hinge prosthesis. A knee score such as the Hospital for Special Surgery score (objective outcome) should be used in conjunction with a patient satisfaction questionnaire (subjective outcome) in assessing the clinical outcome of complex, salvage revision knee surgery. Revision for infected total knee replacement is less

  17. Temperature-Controlled Continuous Cold Flow Device after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial Study.

    PubMed

    Ruffilli, Alberto; Castagnini, Francesco; Traina, Francesco; Corneti, Isabella; Fenga, Domenico; Giannini, Sandro; Faldini, Cesare

    2016-11-30

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a widely accepted and successful procedure for end-stage arthritis. Nevertheless, fast-track may be compromised by many factors, such as pain, edema, and blood loss. Cryotherapy has been advocated as a safe and effective strategy to improve the postoperative results, acting on pain, edema, and blood loss. This study is a prospective randomized controlled study, involving 50 patients after primary TKA. A power analysis was performed preoperatively. Twenty-four patients were addressed to a postoperative treatment with a continuous cold flow device (Hilotherm, Hilotherm GmbH, Germany). Twenty-six patients represented the control group, treated with crushed ice packs. All the patients shared the same analgesic strategy and the same rehabilitation protocol. Pain, analgesic consumption, active knee range of motion, drain output, transfusion requirement, and total blood loss were evaluated at different follow-ups (postoperative first, third, and seventh days). The two groups were homogenous for preoperative and intraoperative features. The groups showed no statistically significant differences in all the evaluated parameters. A modest reduction of knee volume was evident after 7 days from surgery (trend). No differences in blood loss were noticed. Continuous cold flow device in the acute postoperative setting after TKA did not show superiority in reducing edema, pain, and blood loss, compared with traditional icing regimen. Thus, due to the costs, it should be reserved to selected cases.

  18. Is Total Knee Arthroplasty a Viable Treatment Option in Octogenarians with Advanced Osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jai-Gon; Moon, Young-Wan; Cho, Byung-Chul; Kim, Su Cheol; Ko, Young Hoo; Jang, Seung Pil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study directly compared clinical assessment scores and short-term systemic complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between a group of patients aged 80 or older (141 patients) and another group of patients aged between 65 and 70 years (616 patients) with advanced osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods We retrospectively investigated 757 osteoarthritic patients who underwent primary TKA from January 2007 to January 2011 with a follow-up of 1 year. The surgery was performed using an extramedullary alignment guide instrument without invasion of the intramedullary canal to decrease embolic load and blood loss. Results At 1 year after surgery, the mean Knee Society knee score was improved in both groups (from 63.6 to 83.2 in octogenarians and from 68.3 to 89.0 in the younger group) and the level of satisfaction was excellent in both groups (8 in octogenarians and 8.3 in the younger group), even though there was no notable change in function score in the octogenarians (from 61.0 to 61.9 in the octogenarians and from 62.3 to 73.6 in the younger group). The total incidence of systemic complications (3.4% vs. 1.2%, p=0.400) and surgical complications (2.1% vs. 0.5%, p=0.229) showed no significant difference between groups. Conclusions TKA yielded favorable clinical outcomes with a comparatively low postoperative complication rate in octogenarians despite the negligible functional improvement. PMID:26675818

  19. Association between Hyaluronic Acid Injections and Time-to-Total Knee Replacement Surgery.

    PubMed

    Altman, Roy; Fredericson, Michael; Bhattacharyya, Samir K; Bisson, Brad; Abbott, Thomas; Yadalam, Sashidhar; Kim, Myoung

    2016-10-01

    This study assessed the association between hyaluronic acid (HA) injections and time-to-total knee replacement (TKR) surgery for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Patients 18 to 64 years of age who had TKR surgery between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2011 were identified from the MarketScan Commercial claims database. All patients had 6 years or more of continuous enrollment prior to TKR surgery. There were two cohorts (1) patients with HA injections prior to TKR surgery and (2) patients who did not have HA injections prior to TKR surgery. Time-to-TKR was defined as the total days from the date of diagnosis of knee OA on the patient's first visit to an orthopedic surgeon to the date of TKR surgery. Results included 22,555 patients who had TKR surgery: 14,132 in the non-HA and 8,423 in the HA cohort. In this retrospective analysis of patients undergoing TKR, the median Time-to-TKR surgery was 326 days for the non-HA and 908 days for the HA cohort, a difference of 582 days. Those receiving HA injections had a median 1.6-year longer Time-to-TKR surgery versus those who did not receive HA injections. These results have both clinical and economic implications.

  20. Total knee arthroplasty kinematics may be assessed using computer modeling: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mihalko, William M; Williams, John L

    2012-10-01

    The next generational leap in computer navigation will hopefully aid surgeons in personalizing surgical techniques to patients' individual anatomical variables to optimize outcomes. To effectively use the information obtained in the operating room, a multitude of kinematic variables must be conveyed to the orthopedic surgeon in a usable and coherent manner. This study used an intraoperative navigation system to record passive knee kinematics after a total knee arthroplastyperformed. The clinical measures were taken via research software with the ability to record kinematic data in 10-second intervals. The data from 10 consecutive clinical cases were averaged, and the translation (anterior/posterior) and rotation (internal/external) were recorded and compared from 0° to 100° of flexion to allow for comparison with the previously recorded computer model. Model and clinical curves compared favorably, with less than 1° rotational and 1.5-mm differences, on average. The comparison of information and analyses were reviewed to indicate how they might be interpreted in the operating room for future use during surgery to allow a more personalized approach to improving functional outcomes after total knee arthroplasty.

  1. Transdermal nitroglycerin as an adjuvant to patient-controlled morphine analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Orbach-Zinger, Sharon; Lenchinsky, Artium; Paul-Kesslin, Lesley; Velks, Steven; Salai, Moses; Eidelman, Leonid A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitroglycerin (NTG) has been shown to be a useful adjunct for pain treatment without increasing adverse side effects. The effects of NTG on postoperative morphine consumption after knee replacement were evaluated. METHODS: After undergoing total knee replacement, patients receiving patient-controlled morphine analgesia were randomly assigned to receive either an NTG or a placebo patch. The blinded investigator assessed each patient using a visual analogue scale at rest and while moving, as well as the patient’s morphine requirements, sedation score, sleep quality, nausea and vomiting, vital signs and postoperative bleeding. RESULTS: Two of the patients in the NTG group suffered postoperative myocardial infarctions after removal of the patch. Because of these two serious adverse effects, the study was stopped prematurely. In the subset of patients studied, NTG conferred no advantage over placebo in pain control (visual analogue scale at rest or during movement) and in satisfaction scores. CONCLUSIONS: The use of NTG patches conferred no advantage over the use of placebo in patients receiving patient-controlled morphine analgesia after total knee replacement. Two myocardial infarcts occurred in this group. Therefore, the safety of postoperative NTG patch use for pain control must be questioned. PMID:19532851

  2. EFFECT OF TRANEXAMIC ACID ON BLEEDING CONTROL IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    SADIGURSKY, DAVID; ANDION, DANIEL; BOUREAU, PÉRICLES; FERREIRA, MARIA CORDULINA; CARNEIRO, ROGÉRIO JAMIL FERNANDES; COLAVOLPE, PAULO OLIVEIRA

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To analyze the effectiveness of intravenous (IV) tranexamic acid (TA) in reducing blood loss in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Method: The population sample was composed of patients with a diagnosis of primary knee osteoarthritis. The patients undergoing TKA were divided in two groups. Group A: comprised patients who used IV TA and B group, formed by patients who did not use TA in the intra or post-operative period. For descriptive analysis, quantitative variables were represented by mean and standard deviations when their distribution was normal and interquartile ranges and medians for non-normal variables. Results: The mean age of patients was 68 years old, most of them were female and with involvement of the left knee. Postoperatively patients who had used IV TA showed less bleeding rate and less hemoglobin rate reduction. Conclusion: The use of IV TA in TKA reduces blood loss in peri- and postoperative periods. Regarding total blood loss reduction, hemoglobin rate and need for blood transfusions, IV TA should be used routinely during TKA since it has been shown to be safe with no increase in side effects as thromboembolic events. Level of Evidence III. Retrospective Comparative Study. PMID:27217813

  3. Total knee arthroplasty with subvastus approach in patient with chronic post-traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Jader Joel Machado; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, Jose Ricardo; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lateral dislocation of the patella is a rare condition and acquired causes are usually secondary to knee trauma. The neglected chronic dislocation leads to progressive genu valgum and external tibial torsion deformities with subsequent gonarthrosis, which becomes painful and debilitating. There is no consensus regarding treatment of these patients, but total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a useful therapy in cases of painful symptomatic gonarthrosis. Few reports have shown that subvastus approach and lateral release may be a valid option for TKA, since it allows the correction of valgus deformity and patellar tracking without interrupting vascular blood supply of patella. This article reports a case of TKA and extensor mechanism realignment without patellar resurfacing in a patient with genu valgum and chronic post-traumatic patellar dislocation with satisfactory results after two years of follow-up.

  4. One-Stage Computer-Assisted Total Knee Arthroplasty and Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Denjean, S; Chatain, F; Tayot, O

    2017-03-02

    Same-stage tibial osteotomy may deserve consideration in candidates to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) who have severe bone deformities, particularly at extra-articular sites. This strategy obviates the need for either a major and technically difficult ligament release procedure, which may compromise ligament balancing, or the use of a semi-constrained prosthesis. This technical note describes a one-stage, computer-assisted technique consisting in TKA followed by corrective tibial osteotomy to obtain an overall mechanical axis close to 180° without extensive ligament balancing. This technique provided satisfactory outcomes in 8 patients followed-up for at least 3 years, with no specific complications or ligament instability and with a hip-knee-ankle angle close to 180°. After planning, intra-operative computer assistance ensures accurate determination of both implant position and the degree of correction achieved by the osteotomy.

  5. Pasteurella multocida infection of a total knee arthroplasty after a "dog lick".

    PubMed

    Heym, B; Jouve, F; Lemoal, M; Veil-Picard, A; Lortat-Jacob, A; Nicolas-Chanoine, M H

    2006-10-01

    The patient we report here underwent a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) which got infected with P. multocida after her dog had licked a small wound at the third toe of the same foot. Despite a correct treatment comprising synovectomy and cleansing, and an active antibiotic treatment for 3 months, the patient was readmitted for persistent infection of the same knee 2 weeks after the end of the antibiotic treatment. Sampling during surgery allowed for the growth of a P. multocida isolate proven by a molecular method to be identical to the previously isolated strain. This recurrent P. multocida infection was treated by a two-step change of the TKA comprising a 2-month period of antibiotic treatment between the two surgical interventions.

  6. Pigmented villonodular synovitis diagnosed during revision total knee arthroplasty for flexion instability and patellar fracture.

    PubMed

    Camp, Christopher L; Yuan, Brandon J; Wood, Adam J; Lewallen, David G

    2016-03-01

    Occurring in either a localized or diffuse form, pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a disease of unknown etiology that typically presents with insidious onset of pain, swelling, stiffness, or mechanical symptoms as a result of synovial tissue proliferation. PVNS preferentially affects large joints, most commonly the knee. Currently there is no known association with PVNS and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and to date, there are only a few cases reported in the orthopedic literature in which PVNS was diagnosed after primary TKA. To our knowledge, this is the first case of diffuse PVNS that was discovered at the time of revision TKA for flexion instability and patellar fracture. In this patient, with no known history of PVNS, the diagnosis of diffuse PVNS was made at the time of surgery. She underwent revision TKA, partial patellectomy, and extensive synovectomy. Level of evidence: V, Case Report.

  7. MRI is more accurate than CT for patient-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frye, Benjamin M; Najim, Amjad A; Adams, Joanne B; Berend, Keith R; Lombardi, Adolph V

    2015-12-01

    Previous reports have stated that MRI is less accurate than CT for patient specific guide creation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty-three TKAs were performed with CT-based guides and 27 with MRI-based guides. A mechanical axis through the central third of the knee was achieved in 88.9% of MRI-guided TKA versus 69.6% of CT-guided TKA (p=0.07). There were nine component outliers in the CT group (39.1%) and two in the MRI group (7.4%, p=0.00768). The relative risk of having an outlier using a CT-based guide was 5.28 times that of an MRI-based guide. Superior overall alignment and fewer outliers were achieved with the use of MRI compared with CT. MRI is the best imaging modality for surgeons wishing to utilize patient specific guides for TKA.

  8. Extensor Mechanism Disruption after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Series and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-02-04

    Extensor mechanism disruption following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a rare but devastating complication. These patients may require revision of the implants, but even then, it may not be possible to restore the normal function of the knee after the disruption. The patterns of extensor mechanism disruption can broadly be classified into three types: suprapatellar (quadriceps tendon rupture), transpatellar (patellar fracture), or infrapatellar (patellar tendon rupture). Infrapatellar tendon ruptures are the worst injuries, as they carry maximum morbidity and are challenging to manage. The disruption of the extensor mechanism may occur either intra-operatively or in the immediate postoperative period due to an injury. The treatment of extensor mechanism complications after TKA may include either nonsurgical management or surgical intervention in the form of primary repair or reconstruction with autogenous, allogeneic, or synthetic substitutes. We have provided an algorithm for the management of extensor mechanism disruption after TKA.

  9. Is Total Knee Replacement Justified in the Morbidly Obese? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Wamae, David; Agarwal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) comprises a significant, growing aspect in the management of patients with advanced arthritis of the knee for which conservative medical therapy has failed. Obesity, a rising epidemic, is considered an important independent risk factor in the development of osteoarthritis (OA). An aging population and increasing incidence of obesity contribute to a higher prevalence of OA and a subsequent greater need for TKR. The numbers of morbidly obese (MO) people undergoing TKR has consistently been rising. However, there have been concerns among patients and surgeons about the outcomes and complications of TKR in MO patients, especially given the morbidities associated with obesity. The goal of this systematic review was to assess relevant, up-to-date data on the safety, outcomes, and complications associated with TKR in MO patients. PMID:27790392

  10. Differences between actual and expected leisure activities after total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dina L; Bhanegaonkar, Abhijeet J; Billings, Anthony A; Kriska, Andrea M; Irrgang, James J; Crossett, Lawrence S; Kwoh, C Kent

    2012-08-01

    This prospective cohort study determined the type, frequency, intensity, and duration of actual vs expected leisure activity among a cohort undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Data on actual and expected participation in 36 leisure activities were collected preoperatively and at 12 months in 90 patients with knee osteoarthritis. Despite high expectations, there were statistically and clinically significant differences between actual and expected activity at 12 months suggesting that expectations may not have been fulfilled. The differences were equivalent to walking 14 less miles per week than expected, which is more than the amount of activity recommended in national physical activity guidelines. Perhaps an educational intervention could be implemented to help patients establish appropriate and realistic leisure activity expectations before surgery.

  11. Economic impact of tranexamic acid in healthy patients undergoing primary total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gillette, Blake P; Maradit Kremers, Hilal; Duncan, Christopher M; Smith, Hugh M; Trousdale, Robert T; Pagnano, Mark W; Sierra, Rafael J

    2013-09-01

    Tranexamic acid (TA) has been shown to reduce perioperative blood loss and blood transfusion. While concern remains about the cost of antifibrinolytic medication, we hypothesized that routine use of tranexamic acid would result in lower direct hospital total cost by decreasing costs associated with blood transfusion, laboratory testing, and room & board. Patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class II or less undergoing primary total hip or knee arthroplasty at a single institution during 2007-2008 were retrospectively reviewed. The estimated mean direct hospital total cost, operating room, blood/lab, room & board, and pharmacy costs were compared between patients who did and did not receive TA. The study population included 1018 patients, and 580 patients received TA. The mean direct total cost of hospitalization with and without TA was $15,099 and $15,978 (P<.0002) respectively, a difference of $879. The only increased cost associated with TA was the pharmacy cost which was $921 versus $781 (P<.0001). The routine use of tranexamic acid TA was associated with lower mean direct hospital total costs after primary total hip and knee arthroplasty as the increase in pharmacy costs was more than offset by cost savings in other categories.

  12. Femoral versus Multiple Nerve Blocks for Analgesia after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Sevi, Roger; Stav, Michael Yohay; Powell, Devorah; Dor, Yanai; Dudkiewicz, Mickey; Bayadse, Fuaz; Sternberg, Ahud; Soudry, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background The PROSPECT (Procedure-Specific Postoperative Pain Management) Group recommended a single injection femoral nerve block in 2008 as a guideline for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty. Other authors have recommended the addition of sciatic and obturator nerve blocks. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve is also involved in pain syndrome following total knee arthroplasty. We hypothesized that preoperative blocking of all four nerves would offer superior analgesia to femoral nerve block alone. Methods This is a prospective, randomized, controlled, and observer-blinded clinical study. A total of 107 patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a femoral nerve block group, a multiple nerve block group, and a control group. All patients were treated postoperatively using patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with morphine. Pain intensity at rest, during flexion and extension, and morphine consumption were compared between groups over three days. Results A total of 90 patients completed the study protocol. Patients who received multiple nerve blocks experienced superior analgesia and had reduced morphine consumption during the postoperative period compared to the other two groups. Pain intensity during flexion was significantly lower in the “blocks” groups versus the control group. Morphine consumption was significantly higher in the control group. Conclusions Pain relief after total knee arthroplasty immediately after surgery and on the first postoperative day was significantly superior in patients who received multiple blocks preoperatively, with morphine consumption significantly lower during this period. A preoperative femoral nerve block alone produced partial and insufficient analgesia immediately after surgery and on the first postoperative day. (Clinical trial registration number (NIH): NCT01303120) PMID:28178436

  13. How effective is multiple needle puncturing for medial soft tissue balancing during total knee arthroplasty? A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Koh, In Jun; Kwak, Dai-Soon; Kim, Tae Kyun; Park, In Joo; In, Yong

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the quantitative effect and risk factors for over-release during multiple needle puncturing (MNP) for medial gap balancing in varus total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Of the ten pairs of cadaveric knees, one knee from each pair was randomly assigned to undergo MNP in extension (E group), while the other knee underwent MNP in flexion (F group). The increased extension and 90° flexion gaps after every five needle punctures were measured until over-release occurred. The extension gap (< 4mm) and the 90° flexion gap (< 6mm) gradually increased in both groups. The 90° flexion gaps increased more selectively than did the extension gaps. MNP in the flexed knee, a narrow MCL, and severe osteoarthritis were associated with a smaller number of MNPs required to over-release.

  14. Determinants of return to work 12 months after total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Leichtenberg, C S; Tilbury, C; Kuijer, Ppfm; Verdegaal, Shm; Wolterbeek, R; Nelissen, Rghh; Frings-Dresen, Mhw; Vliet Vlieland, Tpm

    2016-07-01

    Introduction A substantial number of patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA) do not or only partially return to work. This study aimed to identify differences in determinants of return to work in THA and TKA. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of working patients aged <65 years undergoing THA or TKA for osteoarthritis. The primary outcome was full versus partial or no return to work 12 months postoperatively. Factors analysed included preoperative sociodemographic and work characteristics, alongside the Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS)/Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Oxford Hip and Knee Scores. Results Of 67 THA and 56 TKA patients, 9 (13%) and 10 (19%), respectively, returned partially and 5 (7%) and 6 (11%), respectively, did not return to work 1 year postoperatively. Preoperative factors associated with partial or no return to work in THA patients were self-employment, absence from work and a better HOOS Activities of Daily Living (ADL) subscale score, whereas only work absence was relevant in TKA patients. Type of surgery modified the impact of ADL scores on return to work. Conclusions In both THA and TKA, absence from work affected return to work, whereas self-employment and better preoperative ADL subscale scores were also associated in THA patients. The impact of ADL scores on return to work was modified by type of surgery. These results suggest that strategies aiming to influence modifiable factors should consider THA and TKA separately.

  15. Determinants of return to work 12 months after total hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, C; Kuijer, PPFM; Verdegaal, SHM; Wolterbeek, R; Nelissen, RGHH; Frings-Dresen, MHW; Vliet Vlieland, TPM

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A substantial number of patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA) do not or only partially return to work. This study aimed to identify differences in determinants of return to work in THA and TKA. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of working patients aged <65 years undergoing THA or TKA for osteoarthritis. The primary outcome was full versus partial or no return to work 12 months postoperatively. Factors analysed included preoperative sociodemographic and work characteristics, alongside the Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS)/Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Oxford Hip and Knee Scores. Results Of 67 THA and 56 TKA patients, 9 (13%) and 10 (19%), respectively, returned partially and 5 (7%) and 6 (11%), respectively, did not return to work 1 year postoperatively. Preoperative factors associated with partial or no return to work in THA patients were self-employment, absence from work and a better HOOS Activities of Daily Living (ADL) subscale score, whereas only work absence was relevant in TKA patients. Type of surgery modified the impact of ADL scores on return to work. Conclusions In both THA and TKA, absence from work affected return to work, whereas self-employment and better preoperative ADL subscale scores were also associated in THA patients. The impact of ADL scores on return to work was modified by type of surgery. These results suggest that strategies aiming to influence modifiable factors should consider THA and TKA separately. PMID:27138849

  16. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): clinical and radiographic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hofstaedter, T; Fink, C; Dorn, U; Pötzelsberger, B; Hepperger, C; Gordon, K; Müller, E

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of a recreational alpine skiing intervention on implant-related factors, such as loosening and wear, in patients with total knee arthoplasty (TKA). A group of 16 TKA patients were examined 2.3 ± 0.1 years after skiing about 80 days over three seasons inclusive of a ski intervention of 2-3 times per week (25.5 days) over a 12-week period. Mean follow-up period was 5.1 ± 1 years after surgery. All patients had excellent clinical and radiological outcomes. The average flexion was 120-130°, the average Oxford Knee Score increased from 15 points pre-operatively to 47.4 points post-operatively. An average Tegner activity level of 5.5 was assessed, indicating a very high post-operative activity level. No radiolucencies or osteolyses were observed in any of the radiographs. One patient sustained a meniscal tear in the contralateral knee. Recreational alpine skiing on intermediate terrain at moderate speed can be recommended after TKA. Analysis of mid-term follow-up has not shown any negative effect on the implant loosening or additional polyethylene wear.

  17. Basic kinematics and biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint part 2: the patella in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Oliver S

    2012-02-01

    Patellar and femoral component in total knee arthroplasty are inextricably linked as a functional unit. The configuration of this unit has been a matter of ongoing debate, and the myriad of different patellar and femoral components currently available reflect the lack of consensus with respect to the ideal design. One of the major challenges is to overcome the biomechanical disadvantages of a small contact area through which high contact pressures are transferred, making this mechanical construct the weakest part of the prosthetic knee. Contact areas are highly dependent on the congruency of the patellofemoral joint articulation, and are significantly smaller for dome shaped patellar components compared to those of more anatomic designs. However, when exposed to 3-dimensional movements, the contact areas of the dome shaped patella are significantly greater, indicating enhanced forgiveness regarding patellar malpositioning. Although contact stresses, a function of implant design and surface conformity, can reach levels far beyond the yield strength of UHMWPE, catastrophic failure of resurfaced patellar components, commonly seen in metal backed patellae, fashionable in the 1980s, has rarely been observed since. Although plastic deformation and wear of UHMWPE continue to represent a problem, in the absence of suitable alternatives polyethylene remains the bearing surface of choice. The appreciation of the consequences of the mechanical environment on the behaviour of the patellofemoral joint is of particular importance in the endeavour to develop knee replacement systems which provide satisfactory function together with clinical long-term success.

  18. Quality-of-life assessment among patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty in Manaus☆

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Leão, Marcos George; Santos Santoro, Erika; Lima Avelino, Rafael; Inoue Coutinho, Lucas; Campos Granjeiro, Ronan; Orlando Junior, Nilton

    2014-01-01

    Objective this study had the aim of assessing the quality of life among patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). For this, the SF-36 and WOMAC questionnaires respectively were used to make comparisons with preoperative values. Methods a prospective observational cohort study was conducted, with blinded analysis on the results from 107 TKAs in 99 patients, between June 2010 and October 2011. The present study included 55 knees/patients, among whom 73% were female and 27% were male. The patients’ mean age was 68 years. The SF-36 and WOMAC questionnaires (which have been validated for the Portuguese language) were applied immediately before and six months after the surgical procedure. Results the statistical and graphical analyses indicated that the variables presented normal distribution. From the data, it was seen that all the indices underwent positive changes after the surgery. Conclusions despite the initial morbidity, TKA is a very successful form of treatment for severe osteoarthritis of the knee (i.e. more than two joint compartments affected and/or Ahlback classification greater than 3), from a functional point of view, with improvement of the patients’ quality of life, as confirmed in the present study. This study presented evidence level IV (description of case series), with analysis on the results, without a comparative study. PMID:26229799

  19. Stress fracture of the first metatarsal after total knee arthroplasty: two case reports using gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Harato, Kengo; Ozaki, Masahiro; Sakurai, Aiko; Kudo, Yutaka; Otani, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    Stress fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) occur mainly in patients with considerable deformity of the knee. In addition, the majority of these fractures after TKA involve the hip joint. We present two cases of stress fractures of the first metatarsal after TKA in patients with severe varus deformity. Correction of leg alignment and pain reduction obtained by TKA lead to stress fracture of the bone. Gait analysis was carried out for both cases in order to clarify the gait characteristics of the stress fracture. As a result, side-to-side differences of the distance between first metatarsal and foot center of pressure in the coronal plane were observed using gait analysis in these patients. Fortunately, conservative treatment was successful for these patients. Stress fractures should be considered when a patient who had a considerable severe deformity of the knee preoperatively complains of foot pain on the affected side. Contrary to stress fractures at the hip joint, patients with the fracture of the first metatarsal can be treated without surgery.

  20. Similar patient-reported outcomes and performance after total knee arthroplasty with or without patellar resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdulemir; Lindstrand, Anders; Nilsdotter, Anna; Sundberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Knee pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is not uncommon. Patellar retention in TKA is one cause of postoperative knee pain, and may lead to secondary addition of a patellar component. Patellar resurfacing in TKA is controversial. Its use ranges from 2% to 90% worldwide. In this randomized study, we compared the outcome after patellar resurfacing and after no resurfacing. Patients and methods We performed a prospective, randomized study of 74 patients with primary osteoarthritis who underwent a Triathlon CR TKA. The patients were randomized to either patellar resurfacing or no resurfacing. They filled out the VAS pain score and KOOS questionnaires preoperatively, and VAS pain, KOOS, and patient satisfaction 3, 12, and 72 months postoperatively. Physical performance tests were performed preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Results We found similar scores for VAS pain, patient satisfaction, and KOOS 5 subscales at 3, 12, and 72 months postoperatively in the 2 groups. Physical performance tests 3 months postoperatively were also similar in the 2 groups. No secondary resurfacing was performed in the group with no resurfacing during the first 72 months Interpretation Patellar resurfacing in primary Triathlon CR TKA is of no advantage regarding pain, physical performance, KOOS 5 subscales, or patient satisfaction compared to no resurfacing. None of the patients were reoperated with secondary addition of a patellar component within 6 years. According to these results, routine patellar resurfacing in primary Triathlon TKA appears to be unnecessary. PMID:27212102

  1. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): muscular adaptations.

    PubMed

    Rieder, F; Kösters, A; Wiesinger, H-P; Dorn, U; Hofstaedter, T; Fink, C; Seynnes, O R; Müller, E

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of recreational skiing as an intervention to improve quadriceps muscle architecture, strength, and antagonistic co-activation in patients with unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Hence, patients with TKA were assigned to either an intervention group (IG) or control group (CG). The IG completed a 12-week guided skiing program whereas the CG was instructed not to change their daily routines for the same period and was not allowed to ski. Before, after the intervention/after an 8-week retention period m. rectus femoris (RF) cross-sectional area (CSA), m. vastus lateralis muscle thickness, fascicle length, and pennation angle were measured with ultrasonography, while isometric (90° knee angle) knee extension, flexion torque and m. biceps femoris co-activation were assessed on an isokinetic dynamometer in 26 patients. There were significant and stable increases in RF CSA for the operated (10%; P < 0.05) and non-operated leg (12%; P < 0.01) after the training period in the IG whereas no changes were observed for the CG (all P > 0.05). There were no significant effects for other parameters (all P > 0.05). Overall, the skiing intervention was successful in increasing muscle mass in TKA older patients.

  2. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    López-Liria, Remedios; Padilla-Góngora, David; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Rocamora-Pérez, Patricia; Pérez-de la Cruz, Sagrario; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients' functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left) or clinical characteristics (P > 0.05). After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P < 0.001) from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale), the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices), balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective. PMID:25961017

  3. Functional ability perceived by individuals following total knee arthroplasty compared to age-matched individuals without knee disability.

    PubMed

    Finch, E; Walsh, M; Thomas, S G; Woodhouse, L J

    1998-04-01

    A comparison of function of individuals 1 year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with healthy control subjects (controls) meaningfully describes outcome in these patients. Perception of function measured by two questionnaires, the Lower Extremity Activity Profile (LEAP) and the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and walking and stair performance was compared between 29 patients, 1 year after TKA, and 40 controls. There was significantly greater perceived difficulty with function in patients with TKA than in controls. In TKA men, LEAP and WOMAC scores correlated respectively with self-paced walk speed (r = -.71 and -.55) and stair performance time (r = 0.70 and 0.68). In TKA women, LEAP difficulty score correlated with self-paced walk speed (r = -.41) and stair performance time (r = -0.71). By 1 year, TKA subjects regained 80% of the function of controls. Perception of function after TKA can be measured by either questionnaire in men; however, the LEAP is the preferable questionnaire with women.

  4. Preoperative physiotherapy and short-term functional outcomes of primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Mohd Shukry Mat Eil @; Sharifudin, Mohd Ariff; Shokri, Amran Ahmed; Rahman, Shaifuzain Ab

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Physiotherapy is an important part of rehabilitation following arthroplasty, but the impact of preoperative physiotherapy on functional outcomes is still being studied. This randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of preoperative physiotherapy on the short-term functional outcomes of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS 50 patients with primary knee osteoarthritis who underwent unilateral primary TKA were randomised into two groups: the physiotherapy group (n = 24), whose patients performed physical exercises for six weeks immediately prior to surgery, and the nonphysiotherapy group (n = 26). All patients went through a similar physiotherapy regime in the postoperative rehabilitation period. Functional outcome assessment using the algofunctional Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) scale and range of motion (ROM) evaluation was performed preoperatively, and postoperatively at six weeks and three months. RESULTS Both groups showed a significant difference in all algofunctional KOOS subscales (p < 0.001). The mean score difference at six weeks and three months was not significant in the sports and recreational activities subscale for both groups (p > 0.05). Significant differences were observed in the time-versus-treatment analysis between groups for the symptoms (p = 0.003) and activities of daily living (p = 0.025) subscales. No significant difference in ROM was found when comparing preoperative measurements and those at three months following surgery, as well as in time-versus-treatment analysis (p = 0.928). CONCLUSION Six-week preoperative physiotherapy showed no significant impact on short-term functional outcomes (KOOS subscales) and ROM of the knee following primary TKA. PMID:26996450

  5. A comprehensive joint replacement program for total knee arthroplasty: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jon R; Warren, Meghan; Ganley, Kathleen J; Prefontaine, Paul; Wylie, Jack W

    2008-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a commonly performed surgical procedure in the US. It is important to have a comprehensive inpatient TKA program which maximizes outcomes while minimizing adverse events. The purpose of this study was to describe a TKA program – the Joint Replacement Program (JRP) – and report post-surgical outcomes. Methods 74 candidates for a primary TKA were enrolled in the JRP. The JRP was designed to minimize complications and optimize patient-centered outcomes using a team approach including the patient, patient's family, and a multidisciplinary team of health professionals. The JRP consisted of a pre-operative class, standard pathways for medical care, comprehensive peri-operative pain management, aggressive physical therapy (PT), and proactive discharge planning. Measures included functional tests, knee range of motion (ROM), and medical record abstraction of patient demographics, length of stay, discharge disposition, and complications over a 6-month follow-up period. Results All patients achieved medical criteria for hospital discharge. The patients achieved the knee flexion ROM goal of 90° (91.7 ± 5.4°), but did not achieve the knee extension ROM goal of 0° (2.4 ± 2.6°). The length of hospital stay was two days for 53% of the patients, with 39% and 7% discharged in three and four days, respectively. All but three patients were discharged home with functional independence. 68% of these received outpatient physical therapy compared with 32% who received home physical therapy immediately after discharge. Two patients (< 3%) had medical complications during the inpatient hospital stay, and 9 patients (12%) had complications during the 6-month follow-up period. Conclusion The comprehensive JRP for TKA was associated with satisfactory clinical outcomes, short lengths of stay, a high percentage of patients discharged home with outpatient PT, and minimal complications. This JRP may represent an efficient, effective and safe

  6. Parecoxib prevents early postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yang-Zi; Yao, Rui; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Hui; Wang, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Trial design neuroinflammation and postoperative pain after surgery are increasingly reported in association with postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Parecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, is used for postoperative analgesia for its potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. This study aimed to evaluate parecoxib's effects on POCD in elderly patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Methods: Around 134 elderly patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty were randomly divided into parecoxib (group P) and control (group C) groups, and treated with parecoxib sodium and saline, respectively, shortly after induction of general anesthesia and 12-h postsurgery, respectively. Perioperative plasma IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and C-reactive protein (CRP) 1evels were measured. Postoperative pain was assessed following surgery. Neuropsychological tests were performed before surgery, and 1 week and 3 months postoperation. Results: POCD incidence in group P was significantly lower compared with that of group C at 1 week after surgery (16.7% vs 33.9%; P < 0.05); no significant difference was found between groups C and P at 3-month follow-up (9.7% vs 6.7%). Compared with group C values, visual analog pain scale (VAS) scores at 3, 6, and 12 hours after surgery were significantly lower in group P(P < 0.05). Plasma IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α levels were lower in group P than in group C after the operation (P < 0.05). No significant difference in the plasma CRP level was found between groups P and C. Conclusions: Parecoxib sodium decreases POCD incidence after total knee arthroplasty in elderly patients and may explain how this drug suppresses inflammation and acute postoperative pain caused by surgical trauma. PMID:27428192

  7. Two-dimensional surrogate contact modeling for computationally efficient dynamic simulation of total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chung; Haftka, Raphael T; Queipo, Nestor V; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2009-04-01

    Computational speed is a major limiting factor for performing design sensitivity and optimization studies of total knee replacements. Much of this limitation arises from extensive geometry calculations required by contact analyses. This study presents a novel surrogate contact modeling approach to address this limitation. The approach involves fitting contact forces from a computationally expensive contact model (e.g., a finite element model) as a function of the relative pose between the contacting bodies. Because contact forces are much more sensitive to displacements in some directions than others, standard surrogate sampling and modeling techniques do not work well, necessitating the development of special techniques for contact problems. We present a computational evaluation and practical application of the approach using dynamic wear simulation of a total knee replacement constrained to planar motion in a Stanmore machine. The sample points needed for surrogate model fitting were generated by an elastic foundation (EF) contact model. For the computational evaluation, we performed nine different dynamic wear simulations with both the surrogate contact model and the EF contact model. In all cases, the surrogate contact model accurately reproduced the contact force, motion, and wear volume results from the EF model, with computation time being reduced from 13 min to 13 s. For the practical application, we performed a series of Monte Carlo analyses to determine the sensitivity of predicted wear volume to Stanmore machine setup issues. Wear volume was highly sensitive to small variations in motion and load inputs, especially femoral flexion angle, but not to small variations in component placements. Computational speed was reduced from an estimated 230 h to 4 h per analysis. Surrogate contact modeling can significantly improve the computational speed of dynamic contact and wear simulations of total knee replacements and is appropriate for use in design sensitivity

  8. Stacked Modalities' Thromboprophylactic Therapy for Patients Undergoing Total Knee Replacement Surgery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Limin; Zhang, Shudong; Zhao, Yuchi

    2017-03-01

    Thromboprophylaxis is a controversial and challenging topic in joint replacement surgery. Mechanical prophylaxis in combination with the use of anticoagulants have been shown to have greater efficacy than single modalities. But the early use of anticoagulants has the potential to increases the risk of postoperative bleeding. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thromboprophylactic effects of sequential combined method using early-mechanical compression with delayed rivaroxaban in total knee arthroplasty. A retrospective cohort study, including 369 patients receiving simultaneous combined mechanical and pharmacological thromboprophylactic modality and 385 patients receiving sequential combined modality with early-mechanical compression treatment followed by rivaroxaban 2 days later after primary total knee arthroplasty surgery was conducted. The incidence rates of proximal and distal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) on the 2nd day and the 5th week and the volume of wound drainage were compared postoperatively. On the 2nd postoperative day, the incidence rates of proximal and distal DVT in the sequential group (1.56, 4.16%) had no significant difference compared with those (1.08, 3.25%) in the simultaneous group (p = 0.569, 0.507, respectively). No difference was found in the incidence rate of proximal and distal DVT on the 5th week between groups. No pulmonary embolism occurred. The mean volume of wound drainage in the sequential group was 343 mL which was 98 mL lesser than in the simultaneous group (p < 0.001). The sequential combined method as called "stacked modalities" thromboprophylactic therapy following total knee arthroplasty was safe and effective. The use of the mechanical compression method alone during the early-postoperative 48 hours, then followed by rivaroxaban then until the 5th week had the same antithrombotic effects and reduced the postoperative wound drainage volume as compared with simultaneous combined modalities.

  9. Radiolucent lines in low-contact-stress mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty: a blinded and matched case control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low-contact-stress (LCS) mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ; previously: DePuy, Warsawa, USA) provides excellent functional results and wear rates in long-term follow-up analyses. Radiological analysis shows radiolucent lines (RLL) appearing immediately or two years after primary implantation, indicative of poor seat. Investigations proved RLL to be more frequent in uncemented TKA, resulting in a consensus to cement the tibial plateau, but their association with clinical findings and patients discomfort and knee pain is still unknown. Methods 553 patients with 566 low-contact-stress (LCS) total knee prostheses were screened for continuous moderate knee pain. We compared tibial stress shielding classified by Ewald in patients suffering from pain with a matched, pain-free control group on blinded X-rays. We hypothesized a positive correlation between pain and radiolucency and higher frequency of such radiolucent lines in the most medial and most lateral zones of the tibial plateau. Results Twenty-eight patients suffered from knee pain in total. Radiolucencies were detected in 27 of these cases and in six out of 28 matched controls without knee pain. We could demonstrate a significant correlation of knee pain and radiolucencies, which appeared significantly more frequently in the outermost zones of the tibial plateau. Conclusion Our findings suggest that radiolucent lines, representing poor implant seat, about the tibial plateau are associated with knee pain in LCS patients. Radiolucencies are observed more often in noncemented LCS, and cementing the tibial plateau might improve implant seat and reduce both radiolucent lines and associated knee pain. PMID:21714916

  10. A pilot study of post-total knee replacement gait rehabilitation using lower limbs robot-assisted training system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Wu, Tao; Xu, Zhisheng; Gu, Xudong

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the application value of the lower limbs robot-assisted training system for post-total knee replacement (TKR) gait rehabilitation. A total of 60 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee were equally randomized into the traditional and robot-assisted rehabilitation training groups within 1 week after TKR. All patients received 2-week training. Scores of hospital for special surgery (HSS), knee kinesthesia grades, knee proprioception grades, functional ambulation (FAC) scores, Berg balance scores, 10-m sitting-standing time, and 6-min walking distances were compared between the groups. The HSS score, Berg score, 10-m sitting-standing time, and 6-min walking distance of the robot-assisted training group were significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.05). Its knee kinesthesia grade, knee proprioception grade, and FAC score were better than the control group but not significantly (P > 0.05). Lower limbs robot-assisted rehabilitation training improves post-TKR patients' knee proprioception and stability more effectively compared with the traditional method. It improves patients' gait and symptoms, increases their walking speed, and prolongs their walking distances, which benefit their return to family and society.

  11. The effect of femoral component rotation and asymmetry in total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Worland, Richard L; Jessup, Douglas E; Vazquez-Vela Johnson, Gonzalo; Alemparte, Jose Antonio; Tanaka, Sakae; Rex, Francisco Soza; Keenan, Jonathan

    2002-10-01

    Between April 1999 and February 2000, femoral component rotation and asymmetry (universal versus anatomic) were studied in a prospective randomized control trial in 101 consecutive patients undergoing total knee replacement. Patients were randomly assigned to four groups. The same surgical technique was used in all patients except for femoral component symmetry and rotational alignment. Universal femoral components provide a cheaper and equally reliable solution compared to anatomic compo nents. External rotation of the femoral component or using an anatomic femoral component did not statistically reduce the need for lateral release or improve patellar tracking.

  12. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection of a total knee arthroplasty an occupational hazard.

    PubMed

    Traer, Emily A; Williams, Mark R; Keenan, Jon N

    2008-06-01

    A 76-year-old man with a medical history of rheumatoid arthritis, lupus intersititial nephritis, and steroid therapy was found at first-stage revision total knee arthroplasty to have Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (a zoonotic pathogen normally associated with pigs and fish) infection of the arthroplasty. He had a history of potential occupational exposure to the organism. On literature review, we found only 3 other case reports of E rhusiopathiae linked to septic arthritis in humans. This unique case of an infected joint arthroplasty further illustrates the pathogenicity of E rhusiopathiae in humans.

  13. Expect the Unexpected: Mycobacterial Infection in Post Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mohan M; Wade, Roshan N; Bava, Surendar S

    2017-01-01

    Orthopaedic Surgeons rarely encounter mycobacterial infections in Post Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) patients. We present series of two cases to create awareness among clinicians to expect the unexpected. Tuberculosis typical/ atypical is a hidden culprit in catch clinical situations when chronic infection is Suspected, but the lab investigations are negative in persistently symptomatic patients. In such situations clinicians should suspect atypical or complex mycobacterial infections and evaluate the patients accordingly. Clinical suspicion, evaluation, isolation and treatment of atypical or complex mycobacterial infections with sensitive chemotherapy, leads to complete resolution of infection and full functional rehabilitation.

  14. Autologous platelet concentrate and vacuum-assisted closure device use in a nonhealing total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Klayman, Myra H; Trowbridge, Cody C; Stammers, Alfred H; Wolfgang, Gary L; Zijerdi, David A; Bitterly, Thomas J

    2006-03-01

    Following a total knee replacement surgery, a 51-year-old insulin-dependent patient presented with complications of impaired healing and postoperative trauma to the wound site. The inability of this leg wound to heal placed this patient at risk of amputation. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy was initiated at postoperative day 53; after 100 days of protracted wound history a series of treatments with topical platelet concentrates were added to the vacuum assisted closure therapy and conventional wound care therapy. The previous nonhealing wound presented with good granulation and margination that enabled a skin graft with good take on postoperative day 150.

  15. "Possible TRALI" developed during bilateral total knee arthroplasty replacement -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn Jin; Heo, Seok

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is one of the leading causes of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. However, it is frequently not diagnosed and under-reported, which could result in inappropriate treatment. Diagnostic definition for TRALI consists of hypoxia and bilateral pulmonary edema occurring during or within 6 hours of a transfusion in the absence of cardiac failure or intravascular volume overload. Here, we report a fatal case, which resulted from under-recognition and misdiagnosis of TRALI occurring during transfusion with packed red blood cells during a bilateral total knee replacement.

  16. Bone loss in revision total knee arthroplasty: graft options and adjuncts.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, S David

    2003-04-01

    The treatment of small bone defects in revision total knee arthroplasty should make immediate full weight bearing and full therapy possible, provide long-term stability for the implants, and restore bone stock. These objectives are achieved with bone grafts if the defects are cavitary or small (involving less than one fourth of the cortical rim) segmental defects. These objectives are achieved with porous metal augments if the defects are segmental and involve more than one fourth of the cortical rim. The treatment of bone loss on the femur must allow the re-establishment of the distal and posterior joint lines as well as provide a firm fixation base for the implants.

  17. Can a total knee arthroplasty be both rotationally unconstrained and anteroposteriorly stabilised?

    PubMed Central

    Imam, M. A.; Eifert, A.; Freeman, M. A. R.; Pinskerova, V.; Field, R. E.; Skinner, J.; Banks, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Throughout the 20th Century, it has been postulated that the knee moves on the basis of a four-bar link mechanism composed of the cruciate ligaments, the femur and the tibia. As a consequence, the femur has been thought to roll back with flexion, and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) prostheses have been designed on this basis. Recent work, however, has proposed that at a position of between 0° and 120° the medial femoral condyle does not move anteroposteriorly whereas the lateral femoral condyle tends, but is not obliged, to roll back – a combination of movements which equates to tibial internal/ femoral external rotation with flexion. The aim of this paper was to assess if the articular geometry of the GMK Sphere TKA could recreate the natural knee movements in situ/in vivo. Methods The pattern of knee movement was studied in 15 patients (six male: nine female; one male with bilateral TKAs) with 16 GMK Sphere implants, at a mean age of 66 years (53 to 76) with a mean BMI of 30 kg/m2 (20 to 35). The motions of all 16 knees were observed using pulsed fluoroscopy during a number of weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing static and dynamic activities. Results During maximally flexed kneeling and lunging activities, the mean tibial internal rotation was 8° (standard deviation (sd) 6). At a mean 112° flexion (sd 16) during lunging, the medial and lateral condyles were a mean of 2 mm (sd 3) and 8 mm (sd 4) posterior to a transverse line passing through the centre of the medial tibial concavity. With a mean flexion of 117° (sd 14) during kneeling, the medial and lateral condyles were a mean of 1 mm (sd 4) anterior and 6 mm (sd 4) posterior to the same line. During dynamic stair and pivoting activities, there was a mean anteroposterior translation of 0 mm to 2 mm of the medial femoral condyle. Backward lateral condylar translation occurred and was linearly related to tibial rotation. Conclusion The GMK Sphere TKA in our study group shows movements similar in

  18. Bibliometric Analysis of Orthopedic Literature on Total Knee Arthroplasty in Asian Countries: A 10-year Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Sang Hwa; Bamne, Ankur B.; Chowdhry, Madhav; Chae, Ihn Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to determine the quantity and quality of research output of selected Asian countries in the field of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the last 10 years. Materials and Methods Top 15 Asian countries were selected according to their gross domestic product. The Science Citation Index Expanded database was used to search for the literature published between 2004 and 2013 using "Total Knee Arthroplasty". The numbers of articles, journals and citations and the contribution of each country were analyzed. The articles were classified according to the type of study and the relative proportion of each type was analyzed. Results Asian surgeons have increasingly contributed to orthopedic literature on TKA for the past 10 years, but the dominant contribution came from only a few countries. The total number of articles published by Asian countries increased by 261%, with Japan producing most of the studies and China showing the maximum growth rate. The majority of studies were published in low impact factor journals. Korea published the highest proportion of articles in high impact factor journals. Clinical papers were most frequent. Conclusions Our identification of research productivity pertaining to TKA among Asian countries gives a unique insight into the level of academic research in the field of TKA in these countries. There is a need to improve the quality of research to enhance the publishing power in high impact journals as well as the need for more basic research and epidemiological studies considering the unique differences among Asian patients undergoing TKA. PMID:26389067

  19. Preoperative Acute Inflammatory Markers as Predictors for Postoperative Complications in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Gustavo; Sumarriva, Gonzalo; Ochsner, J. Lockwood; Chimento, George; Schmucker, Dana; Dasa, Vinod; Meyer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) has been suggested as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular pathology in the nonsurgical setting. While postoperative CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) have an established role in aiding the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infections, some authors suggest a link between preoperative CRP and postoperative complications in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 351 patients who underwent unilateral primary total knee arthroplasty by a single surgeon during a 28-month period (January 2013 through April 2015). Patient medical records were reviewed for the following complications occurring within 90 days postoperatively: myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, pulmonary embolism, wound infection, acute renal failure, and reoperation. Results: We found no statistically significant link between postoperative complications and preoperative CRP levels (P=0.5005) or ESR levels (P=0.1610). Conclusion: The results of this study do not support the routine inclusion of CRP and ESR analysis as part of the preoperative evaluation for elective total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27999506

  20. Mobility and contact mechanics of a rotating platform total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Otto, J K; Callaghan, J J; Brown, T D

    2001-11-01

    Despite their increasing clinical use, mobile-bearing total knee replacements have not been well characterized biomechanically. An experimental and finite element analysis was done to assess the mobility and contact mechanics of a widely used rotating platform total knee replacement. Parameters that varied were axial load, condylar load allocation, flexion angle, and static versus dynamic loading. Similar results from the physical model and finite element model lend credence to the validity of the findings. The torque required to initiate rotation (static torque) was greater than that to sustain rotation (dynamic torque). At four times body weight axial load, peak resisting torque measured was 9.47+/-0.61 and 5.51+/-0.38 N-m, for static and dynamic torque, respectively. A 60-40 condylar load allocation produced slightly less resisting torque than the 50-50 load. For all practical purposes, the polyethylene insert rotated simultaneously with the femoral component, leading to maintenance of high contact area, desirable behavior clinically. Walking cycle simulations produced a total axial rotation range of motion of 6 degrees. The high frictional torques observed at the mobile interface may explain why a percentage of these mobile-bearings fail to rotate under routine functional load.

  1. [Association between allergy to benzoyl peroxide, vitiligo and implantation of a cemented total knee joint prosthesis: Is there a connection?].

    PubMed

    Gothner, M; Ozokyay, L; Godau, P; Kälicke, T; Muhr, G; Schildhauer, T A; Dudda, M

    2011-09-01

    Allergies against bone cement or bone cement components have been well-described. We report on a 63-year-old patient who presented with progressive vitiligo all over the body after implantation of a cemented total knee replacement. A dermatological examination was performed and an allergy to benzoyl peroxide was found. A low-grade infection was diagnosed 5 months after implantation of the total knee replacement and the prosthesis was replaced with a cement spacer. After treating the infection of the knee replacement non-cemented arthrodesis of the knee was performed. In cases of new, unknown skin efflorescence, urticaria and periprosthetic loosening of cemented joint replacement, the differential diagnosis should include not only infections but also possible allergies against bone-cement and components such as benzoyl peroxide or metal components.

  2. Comparison of the Clinical Outcomes after Total Knee Arthroplasty with the LCS Rotating Platform Mobile Bearing Knee System and the PFC Sigma RP-F Mobile Bearing Knee System

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Ju-Yeong; Jeong, Jae-Heon; Lee, Sang-Hak; Jung, Ho-Joong

    2012-01-01

    Background We compared clinical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty with the Low Contact Stress (LCS) rotating platform mobile bearing knee system and the Press Fit Condylar Sigma rotating platform high flexion (PFC Sigma RP-F) mobile bearing knee system. Methods Fifty cases of total knee arthroplasty were performed with the PFC Sigma RP-F mobile bearing knee system and sixty-one cases were performed with the LCS mobile bearing total knee arthroplasty. The average duration of follow-up was 2.9 years. Results The mean Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee score was 62.1 (range, 52 to 75) in the LCS group and 61.9 (range, 50 to 74) in the Sigma RP-F group preoperatively, and 90.1 (range, 84 to 100) in the LCS group and 89.8 (range, 83 to 100) in the Sigma RP-F group at the final follow-up. The mean preoperative flexion contracture was 6.7° (range, 0° to 10°) in the LCS group and 9.3° (range, 0° to 15°) in the Sigma RP-F group preoperatively. The mean range of motion was 124.6° (range, 105° to 150°) in the LCS group and 126.1° (range, 104° to 145°) in the Sigma RP-F group at the final follow-up. Conclusions After a minimum duration of follow-up of two years, we found no significant differences between the two groups with regard to the range of knee motion or the clinical or radiographic results. PMID:23205234

  3. Does malalignment affect revision rate in total knee replacements: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Mohammed; Barlow, Tim; Ahmed, Imran; Dunbar, Mark; McCulloch, Peter; Griffin, Damian

    2015-01-01

    To ensure implant durability following Modern total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, one long held principle in condylar total knee arthroplasty is positioning the components in alignment with the mechanical axis and restoring the overall limb alignment to 180° ± 3°. However, this view has been challenged recently. Given the high number of TKR performed, clarity on this integral aspect of the procedure is necessary. To investigate the association between malalignment following primary TKR and revision rates. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using a computerised literature search of Medline, CINHAL, and EMBASE to identify English-language studies published from 2000 through to 2014. Studies with adequate information on the correlation between malalignment and revision rate with a minimum follow-up of 6 months were considered for inclusion. A study protocol, including the detailed search strategy was published on the PROSPERO database for systematic reviews. From an initial 2107 citations, eight studies, with variable methodological qualities, were eligible for inclusion. Collectively, nine parameters of alignment were studied, and 20 assessments were made between an alignment parameter and revision rate. Four out of eight studies demonstrated an association between a malalignment parameter and increased revision rates. In the coronal plane, only three studies assessed the mechanical axis. None of these studies found an association with revision rates, whereas four of the five studies investigating the anatomical axis found an association between malalignment and increased revision rate. This study demonstrates the effect of malalignment on revision rates is likely to be modest. Interestingly, studies that used mechanical alignment in the coronal plane demonstrated no association with revision rates. This questions the premise of patient specific instrumentation devices based on the mechanically aligned knee when considering revision as the

  4. Similar migration in computer-assisted and conventional total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Petursson, Gunnar; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Gøthesen, Øystein; Haugan, Kristin; Dyrhovden, Gro Sævik; Hallan, Geir; Röhrl, Stephan M; Aamodt, Arild; Nilsson, Kjell G; Furnes, Ove

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been used in recent years in the hope of improving the alignment and positioning of the implant, thereby achieving a better functional outcome and durability. However, the role of computer navigation in TKA is still under debate. We used radiostereometric analysis (RSA) in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to determine whether there are any differences in migration of the tibial component between CAS- and conventionally (CONV-) operated TKA. Patients and methods 54 patients (CAS, n = 26; CONV, n = 28) with a mean age of 67 (56–78) years and with osteoarthritis or arthritic disease of the knee were recruited from 4 hospitals during the period 2009–2011. To estimate the mechanical stability of the tibial component, the patients were examined with RSA up to 24 months after operation. The following parameters representing tibial component micromotion were measured: 3-D vector of the prosthetic marker that moved the most, representing the magnitude of migration (maximum total point motion, MTPM); the largest negative value for y-translation (subsidence); the largest positive y-translation (lift-off); and prosthetic rotations. The precision of the RSA measurements was evaluated and migration in the 2 groups was compared. Results Both groups had most migration within the first 3 months, but there was no statistically significant difference in the magnitude of the migration between the CAS group and the CONV group. From 3 to 24 months, the MTPM (in mm) was 0.058 and 0.103 (p = 0.1) for the CAS and CON groups, respectively, and the subsidence (in mm) was 0.005 and 0.011 (p = 0.3). Interpretation Mean MTPM, subsidence, lift-off, and rotational movement of tibial trays were similar in CAS- and CONV-operated knees. PMID:27996349

  5. One Year After Navigated Total Knee Replacement, No Clinically Relevant Difference Found Between Fixed Bearing and Mobile Bearing Knee Replacement in a Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Frank; Sufi-Siavach, Anusch; Bohlen, Karina E; Hille, Ekkehard; Dries, Sebastian P.M

    2011-01-01

    Background: The mobile bearing designs have not yet been shown to improve clinical outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In this prospective randomized study, we compared the short-term clinical results of a mobile bearing implant with those of the fixed bearing version of the same implant. Methods: We randomized 100 knees into two double-blind groups who received either the fixed (FB, 52 knees) or the mobile bearing (MB, 48 knees) version of the same implant. We used navigation to standardize the surgical technique. For up to one year, we recorded the Knee Society (KSS) and Oxford (OXF) scores. We performed an exploratory analysis of variance (ANOVA) to determine the influence of baseline scores as covariate and the extent of improvement in clinical outcome over time. Results: After one year, we did not detect any statistically significant difference between the two groups. The KSS scores differed by 2 points, the OXF scores by 1.1 points. Conclusion: Even with identical geometry of implant surfaces and a navigated surgical technique, first-year results do not support a preference for either a fixed or a mobile design. PMID:21687563

  6. Activation of fibrinolysis by reinfusion of unwashed salvaged blood after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Keiji; Nozawa, Masahiko; Katsube, Sadanobu; Maezawa, Katsuhiko; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2010-02-01

    In 19 patients with RA and 20 with OA who underwent autotransfusion with unwashed salvaged blood (USB) after total knee arthroplasty, we performed serial measurement of D-dimer, FgDP, t-PA, and PIC in the plasma and salvaged blood. The PIC level at the completion of salvaged blood transfusion was closely correlated with the volume of USB reinfused in the RA group (p<0.001). The t-PA level of salvaged blood showed a significant positive correlation with the total volume of postoperative drainage in both the RA and OA groups (p<0.05). The increase of total postoperative drainage associated with reinfusion of USB is largely caused by an increase of t-PA in the salvaged blood.

  7. Loosening of the total knee arthroplasty: detection by radionuclide bone scanning. [/sup 99m/Tc-methylene diphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.C.; Hattner, R.S.; Murray, W.R.; Genant, H.K.

    1980-07-01

    Pain after total knee arthroplasty is a common clinical problem in orthopedics, and prosthetic loosening, often requiring surgical revision, is usually the etiology. Since standard clinical and radiographic diagnostic measures have not proven totally satisfactory, a study of the utility of bone scintigraphy to assess stability of the knee prosthesis was done. Thirty-five patients with 39 prostheses were studied. Seventeen patients with 21 total knee arthroplasties served as controls and were asymptomatic, were stable at surgery, or improved with conservative management. Eighteen knees in 18 symptomatic patients composed the experimental group. Of these, 11 knees were loose at surgery and seven have had surgery recommended. Scintigrams of the knees were obtained using /sup 99m/Tc-MDP, and ranked 0-3 corresponding to increasingly abnormal localization by three observers. Highly significant differences were observed between the abnormal and control groups (p<0.001). Reciprocal changes in sensitivity and specificity with increasingly stringent criteria were shown. While it is apparent that the bone scan cannot be used as the sole diagnostic method for evaluation of prosthetic stability, it does seem to be a useful adjunct along with clinical criteria and radiographic studies.

  8. The Patient’s Perspective of in-Home Telerehabilitation Physiotherapy Services Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kairy, Dahlia; Tousignant, Michel; Leclerc, Nancy; Côté, Anne-Marie; Levasseur, Mélanie

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at exploring patients’ perceptions regarding telerehabilitation services received post total knee replacement. In this qualitative embedded single case study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with five patients who had previously received in-home telerehabilitation post total knee arthroplasty. Participants were asked to reflect on their 8-week rehabilitation process and on their experience with the home telerehabilitation program. Interviews were transcribed and a qualitative thematic analysis was conducted. Six overarching themes emerged from the patients’ perceptions: (1) improving access to services with reduced need for transportation; (2) developing a strong therapeutic relationship with therapist while maintaining a sense of personal space; (3) complementing telerehabilitation with in-person visits; (4) providing standardized yet tailored and challenging exercise programs using telerehabilitation; (5) perceived ease-of-use of telerehabilitation equipment; and (6) feeling an ongoing sense of support. Gaining a better understating of the patient’s experience in telerehabilitation will be essential as programs continue to be developed and implemented. PMID:23999548

  9. Gastrocnemius flap reconstruction of soft-tissue defects following infected total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Corten, K; Struelens, B; Evans, B; Graham, E; Bourne, R B; MacDonald, S J

    2013-09-01

    A soft-tissue defect over an infected total knee replacement (TKR) presents a difficult technical problem that can be treated with a gastrocnemius flap, which is rotated over the defect during the first-stage of a revision procedure. This facilitates wound healing and the safe introduction of a prosthesis at the second stage. We describe the outcome at a mean follow-up of 4.5 years (1 to 10) in 24 patients with an infected TKR who underwent this procedure. A total of 22 (92%) eventually obtained a satisfactory result. The mean Knee Society score improved from 53 pre-operatively to 103 at the latest follow-up (p < 0.001). The mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index and Short-Form 12 score also improved significantly (p < 0.001). This form of treatment can be used reliably and safely to treat many of these complex cases where control of infection, retention of the components and acceptable functional recovery are the primary goals.

  10. Application of a vibrating device for the prevention of flexion contracture after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manó, Sándor; Pálinkás, Judit; Szabó, János; Nagy, Judit T; Bakó, Katalin; Csernátony, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Our research team developed a new, heel support-based static and vibrating complementary treatment method for the prevention of flexion contractures often arising after total knee arthroplasty. We examined the efficiency of the method performing a randomized clinical trial with 144 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Seventy-nine patients were treated for 1 week with a generally used continuous passive motion (CPM) device complemented with our new method, which was based on the application of a static and an alternating heel support. The 65 patients in the control group were treated with only a CPM device as in usual clinical practice. The femoro-tibial angle was measured immediately following surgery, and after 1 week of treatment. At the end of the 1 week treatment, the target extension angle (0° ± 5°) was achieved by significantly more patients with the new combined method. This way the elevated heel rest and the vibrating device proved to be a good adjunct treatment along with the CPM used in routine clinical practice in the first place for the prevention of flexion contractures.

  11. Fungal periprosthetic joint infection in total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Oliver; Schoof, Benjamin; Klatte, Till Orla; Schmidl, Stefan; Fensky, Florian; Guenther, Daniel; Frommelt, Lars; Gehrke, Thorsten; Gebauer, Matthias

    2015-03-03

    Fungal periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a rare but devastating complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A standardized procedure regarding an accurate treatment of this serious complication of knee arthroplasty is lacking. In this systematic review, we collected data from 36 studies with a total of 45 reported cases of a TKA complicated by a fungal PJI. Subsequently, an analysis focusing on diagnostic, medicaments and surgical procedures in the pre-, intra- and postoperative period was performed. Candida spp. accounts for about 80% (36 out of 45 cases) of fungal PJIs and is therefore the most frequently reported pathogen. A systemic antifungal therapy was administered in all but one patient whereas a local antifungal therapy, e.g. the use of an impregnated spacer, is of inferior relevance. Resection arthroplasty with delayed re-implantation (two-stage revision) was the surgical treatment of choice. However, in 50% of all reported cases the surgical therapy was heterogeneous. The outcome under a combined therapy was moderate with recurrent fungal PJI in 11 patients and subsequent bacterial PJI as a main complication in 5 patients. In summary, this systematic review integrates data from up to date 45 reported cases of a fungal PJI of a TKA. On the basis of the current literature strategies for the treatment of this devastating complication after TKA are discussed.

  12. Low-power SoC design for ligament balance measuring system in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Chun; Jiang, Hanjun; Wang, Zhihua

    2011-01-01

    A design of a low-power wireless System-on-Chip (SoC) for the Ligament Balance Measuring System (LBMS) in Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is presented in this paper. It includes a signal conditioning circuit that can support up to 15 force sensors, a 433 MHz RF front-end for data transmission, an 8-bit low-power microprocessor, and a FIFO with a digital filter. Idle and wake-up modes are well designed to reduce the power consumption since the device should be used for the whole surgical procedure. Test results show that the signal conditioning circuit with 16-bit single line output can operate under a wide voltage range, which is from 1.2V to 3.6V. The minimal power consumption is 139μ.W@1.2V with a 200 KHz clock. Experimental results demonstrated in static and body tests are given in the paper also. The chip will be used in an aided monitoring system for Total Knee Arthroplasty in the future work.

  13. Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes of Partial Lateral Patellar Facetectomy in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Lee, Chang-Rack; Seo, Seung-Suk; Gwak, Heui-Chul; Kim, Jung-Han; Park, Joon-Ho

    2017-02-01

    Recently, some authors have performed partial lateral patellar facetectomy in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and reported good results. However, research on partial lateral patellar facetectomy in TKA is still lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiologic results of partial lateral patellar facetectomies in patellar non-resurfacing and resurfacing TKAs. Total 251 TKAs (patellar non-resurfacing: 131; resurfacing: 120) that were followed up for at least 24 months to evaluate the clinical and radiologic results of partial lateral patellar facetectomies in patellar non-resurfacing and resurfacing TKAs were retrospectively reviewed. The radiologic evaluations involved assessments of the patellar tilt angle and the lateral patellar displacement, and the clinical evaluations involved assessments of the Knee Society knee score, Knee Society function score, Feller patellar score, and Kujala score. In patellar non-resurfacing TKA, the average postoperative patellar tilt angle and lateral patellar displacement of the group that did not undergo facetectomy were 7.0 ± 4.8 degrees and 2.4 ± 3.6 mm, respectively, and the average postoperative patellar tilt angle and lateral patellar displacement of the group that did undergo facetectomy were 4.0 ± 3.8 degrees and 0.7 ± 2.5 mm, respectively. Significant differences were observed in the postoperative patellar tilt angle and lateral patellar displacement (p < 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively). In patellar resurfacing TKA, while the patellar tilt angle showed a significant difference between the group that underwent facetectomy (6.7 ± 3.1 degrees) and the group that did not (8.3 ± 4.4 degrees) (p = 0.023), it exhibited no difference in the lateral patellar displacement between the two groups. In both patellar non-resurfacing TKA and resurfacing TKA, the postoperative clinical results did not show any difference between no-facetectomy group and facetectomy

  14. Thirty-day complications in rheumatoid patients following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Julio J; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Dixit, Anant; Naziri, Qais; Hip-Flores, David J; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    Although total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is highly successful for patients with end-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the risks and complications associated with surgery in this cohort are less defined. The objectives of our study were to analyze the demographic and perioperative factors of RA patients that may affect post-TKA outcomes, as well as to assess the 30-day complication rates compared to osteoarthritis patients. We retrospectively evaluated the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database from 2006 to 2012 to assess all patients who underwent a primary TKA and had a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (n = 141) or primary knee osteoarthritis (n = 7125). We evaluated and compared the demographic factors, social factors, preoperative factors, operative factors, and postoperative complications. The RA cohort had a lower mean age and body mass index than patients in the OA group. There was also a significantly higher incidence of women and Hispanics in the RA cohort. There was a lower incidence of diabetes and hypertension requiring medication in the rheumatoid cohort, but also a higher incidence of bleeding disorders. The RA cohort had an increased proportion of patients requiring blood transfusions and had a longer mean length of stay. The incidence of pneumonia and postoperative bleeding that required transfusion was also higher in RA patients. Rheumatoid patients had higher rates of wound infections, pulmonary embolisms, and deep vein thrombosis; however, these findings were not significant. Although RA patients with end-stage knee arthritis may benefit from TKA, these patients should be preoperatively optimized to minimize complication risks.

  15. Does patella resurfacing really matter? Pain and function in 972 patients after primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Espehaug, Birgitte; Havelin, Leif Ivar; Vollset, Stein Emil; Furnes, Ove

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Resurfacing of the patella during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often recommended based on higher revision rates in non-resurfaced knees. As many of these revisions are insertions of a patella component due to pain, and since only patients with a non-resurfaced patella have the option of secondary resurfacing, we do not really know whether these patients have more pain and poorer function. The main purpose of the present paper was therefore to assess pain and function at least 2 years after surgery for unrevised primary non-resurfaced and resurfaced TKA, and secondary among prosthesis brands. Methods Information needed to calculate subscales from the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) was collected in a questionnaire given to 972 osteoarthritis patients with intact primary TKAs that had been reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Pain and satisfaction on visual analog scales and improvement in EQ-5D index score ΔEQ-5D) were also used as outcomes. Outcomes were measured on a scale from 0 to 100 units (worst to best). To estimate differences in mean scores, we used multiple linear regression with adjustment for possible confounders. Results We did not observe any differences between resurfacing and non-resurfacing in any outcome, with estimated differences of ≤ 1.4 units and p-values of > 0.4. There was, however, a tendency of better results for the NexGen implant as compared to the reference brand AGC for symptoms (difference = 4.9, p = 0.05), pain (VAS) (difference = 8.3, p = 0.004), and satisfaction (VAS) (difference = 7.9, p = 0.02). However, none of these differences reached the stated level of minimal perceptible clinical difference. Interpretation Resurfacing of the patella has no clinical effect on pain and function after TKA. Differences between the brands investigated were small and they were assumed to be of minor importance. PMID:20158405

  16. Midterm Results of the Vanguard SSK Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty System.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Wesley G; Ritter, Merrill A; Berend, Michael E; Malinzak, Robert A; Faris, Philip M; Meding, John B

    2016-09-01

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is becoming increasingly common as the population ages and the number of existing primary TKAs continues to increase. Revision TKA systems use a greater range of component modularity than primary TKA systems, including stems, augments, and varying levels of constraint. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review the authors' institution's use of one specific revision knee implant system and its midterm results. The Vanguard SSK Revision Knee System (Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana) was implanted 297 times in 272 patients between 2005 and 2013. Average patient age was 67.2 years, average body mass index was 33 kg/m(2), and average follow-up was 4.8 years. The most common diagnoses leading to use of this system were failed previous TKA (45.5%) and periprosthetic infection (23.2%). The SSK system was used in 78 (26.3%) complex primary TKAs at the discretion of the operating surgeon. There were 22 failures: 12 septic and 10 aseptic. Of the 12 infections, 6 occurred after 2-staged treatment of periprosthetic joint infection, with all 6 of these reinfections having a different causative organism. Aseptic failures included aseptic loosening (n=3), periprosthetic fracture (n=2), patellar maltracking (n=2), instability (n=1), arthrofibrosis (n=1), and extensor mechanism disruption (n=1). Aseptic implant survivorship was 97.2%, 95.6%, 93.1%, and 93.1% at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years postoperatively, respectively. The Vanguard SSK demonstrates excellent performance at medium-range follow-up with respect to complications, clinical scores, and prosthesis survivorship. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e833-e837.].

  17. Antibiotic-Loaded Spacer for Two-Stage Revision of Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vecchini, Eugenio; Micheloni, Gian Mario; Perusi, Francesco; Scaglia, Marco; Maluta, Tommaso; Lavini, Franco; Bondi, Manuel; Dall'Oca, Carlo; Magnan, Bruno

    2017-03-01

    Infection of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a challenge in orthopedic surgery. In literature TKA infection is classified according to the time after surgery: acute postoperative; late chronic; acute hematogenous; positive intraoperative microbiological growth. The purpose of this study is to present the results of the use of a preformed antibiotic-loaded spacer in TKA infections, treated by a two-stage revision procedure. A series of 19 consecutive patients (20 knees) with a diagnosis of infected TKA were treated from January 2003 to February 2012. Two-stage reimplantation protocols were completed only in 16 patients and these data were included in the study. We lost three patients at follow-up. An antibiotic-loaded preformed articulating polymethylmethacrylate spacer was applied. Patients were observed 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively and then yearly for clinical and radiographic examination. The mean American Knee Society Score improved from 68.4 preoperatively (range, from 34 to 108) to 112.7 at final follow-up (range, from 49 to 180). The pain was evaluated as part of clinical score. It improved from an average of 19.3 preoperatively (range, from 10 to 30) to 34.3 at final follow-up (range, from 10 to 50). The average range of motion improved from 40.1 degrees (range, from 6 to 90 degrees) to 79.3 degrees (range, from 45 to 125 degrees). The use of the spacer allows obtaining a reduction of pain, an improvement of quality of life in the period of time between the two surgical stages and an easier reimplantation of TKA.

  18. Persistent post-surgical pain and neuropathic pain after total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Georgios I; Triantafilidou, Triantafilia; Ververidis, Athanasios; Agelopoulou, Cristina; Vogiatzaki, Theodosia; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the prevalence of persistent post-surgical pain (PPSP) and neuropathic pain (NP) after total knee replacement (TKR). METHODS: MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched for articles published until December 2014 in English language. Published articles were included if they referred to pain that lasts at least 3 mo after primary TKR for knee osteoarthritis, and measured pain with pain specific instruments. Studies that referred to pain caused by septic reasons and implant malalignment were excluded. Both prospective and retrospective studies were included and only 14 studies that match the inclusion criteria were selected for this review. RESULTS: The included studies were characterized by the heterogeneity on the scales used to measure pain and pre-operative factors related to PPSP and NP. The reported prevalence of PPSP and NP seems to be relatively high, but it varies among different studies. There is also evidence that the prevalence of post-surgical pain is related to the scale used for pain measurement. The prevalence of PPSP is ranging at 6 mo from 16% to 39% and at 12 mo from 13.1% to 23% and even 38% of the patients. The prevalence of NP at 6 mo post-operatively is ranging from 5.2% to 13%. Pre-operative factors related to the development of PPSP also differ, including emotional functioning, such as depression and pain catastrophizing, number of comorbidities, pain problems elsewhere and operations in knees with early grade of osteoarthritis. CONCLUSION: No firm conclusions can be reached regarding the prevalence of PPSP and NP and the related factors due to the heterogeneity of the studies. PMID:26301182

  19. Total knee arthroplasty for treatment of post-traumatic arthritis: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Hesham; Yu, Stephen; Vigdorchik, Jonathan; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-01-01

    AIM To review and report functional outcomes, complications, and survivorship associated with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the treatment of post-traumatic arthritis (PTA). METHODS We conducted a systematic review according to the PRISMA guidelines. We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, and SCOPUS in December 2015 for English-language clinical research studies, both prospective and retrospective, examining the use of TKA for the treatment of PTA. All relevant articles were accessed in full. The manual search included references of retrieved articles. We extracted data on patients’ demographics and clinical outcomes, including preoperative diagnosis and pre- and post-operative functional scores. We summarized the data and reported the results in tables and text. RESULTS Sixteen studies, four prospective and ten retrospective, examined patients who underwent TKA for PTA due to fractures of the proximal tibia, patella, and/or distal femur. Eleven studies utilized the Knee Society Scores criteria to assess functional outcomes. All studies utilizing these criteria reported an improvement in functional and knee scores of patients following TKA. Further, studies reported an increased range of motion (ROM) and reduction of pain following surgery. The most commonly reported complications with TKA included infection, stiffness, wound complications, intraoperative rupture of tendons, and osteolysis/polyethylene wear. The overwhelming majority of these complications occurred within the first two years following surgery. Six studies examined the survivorship of TKA with subsequent revision for any reason as an endpoint. Compared to patients with osteoarthritis, patients with PTA required more revisions, the majority for polyethylene wear. CONCLUSION Although associated with higher complication rates, TKA is an effective treatment for PTA, as it improves ROM, pain and functional outcomes. PMID:27672572

  20. Manipulation under anaesthesia post total knee replacement: long term follow up.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, David; Nicolaou, Nick; Goddard, Richard; Willmott, Henry; Miles, Kim; East, Debra; Hinves, Barry; Shepperd, John; Butler-Manuel, Adrian

    2012-08-01

    A reduced range of motion post total knee replacement (TKR) is a recognised problem. Manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) is commonly performed in the stiff post-operative TKR. Long-term results are variable in the literature. We retrospectively reviewed, prospectively collected data on 48 patients followed up since 1996 from one centre, over an average of 7.5 years, (range 1 to 10 years) and report on the long-term results. During the study period 2.3% of TKRs underwent MUA. The mean time to MUA post TKR was 12.3 weeks (range 3 to 48). Pre MUA, the mean flexion was 53°. The mean immediate passive flexion post MUA was 97°, an improvement of 44° (Range 10° to 90°, p<0.05). By 1year, the mean flexion was 87°, an improvement of 34°, (range -15° to 70°, p<0.05). At 10 years the mean flexion was 86°, (range 55° to 100°, p<0.05). We found no difference in the gain in range of motion (ROM) between knees manipulated before or after 12 weeks. Additionally, the gain was no different in stiff knees with a pre TKR ROM <90°, compared to a pre TKR ROM >90°. There were no complications as a result of MUA. However, one patient was eventually revised at 2 years secondary to low grade infection. Our findings show that MUA is a safe and effective method at improving the ROM in a stiff post-operative TKR. The improvement is maintained in the long term irrespective of time to MUA and range of motion pre TKR.

  1. The efficacy of continuous passive motion after total knee arthroplasty: a comparison of three protocols.

    PubMed

    Boese, C Kent; Weis, Marcia; Phillips, Tamra; Lawton-Peters, Sheila; Gallo, Theresa; Centeno, Leslie

    2014-06-01

    We conducted a randomized, controlled trial to determine the efficacy of CPM following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Postoperative outcomes of interest were: swelling, drop in hemoglobin, self-reported pain scores, range of motion, and hospital length of stay. A total of 160 subjects were randomized into one of three treatment groups: CPM device on and moving from the immediate post-operative period, CPM device on and stationary at 90 degree flexion for the first night and then moving throughout the rest of their stay, and no CPM (N = 55, 51, and 54, respectfully). Subjects were followed during the first and second postoperative day until their first follow-up appointment approximately 3-4 weeks post-operatively. Cost of CPM was further evaluated. CPM provided no benefit to patients recovering from TKA.

  2. Racial disparities in receiving total hip/knee replacement surgery: the effect of hospital admission sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Rizzo, John A; Parasuraman, Shreekant; Gunnarsson, Candace

    2013-02-01

    Using a nationally-representative inpatient care dataset (the HCUP National Inpatient Sample from 2002 to 2007) we examined racial disparities in receiving total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgeries. Multivariable logistic regression models revealed that racial minorities were significantly less likely to receive THR or TKR than Whites, controlling for patients' hospital admission source and hospital characteristics. Employing Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition techniques, we found that observed difference in population characteristics explained 55%-67% and 78% of the racial disparities in THR and TKR, respectively. Differences in patients' hospital admission source emerged as the major individual factor associated with these disparities, explaining 57%-77% of racial disparities in THR and 26%-50% of racial disparities in TKR. This study suggests that substantive racial and ethnic disparities exist in utilization of THR and TKR surgery. Observed population characteristics accounted for most of these differences, with hospital admission source being the key factor.

  3. A prospective double-blind placebo controlled trial of topical tranexamic acid in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Andrew G; Muh, Stephanie J; Silverton, Craig D; Weir, Robb M; Laker, Michael W

    2013-09-01

    Tranexamic acid (TNA) reduces postoperative blood loss in general and obstetrical surgery but there is limited orthopaedic literature regarding its use in the topical setting. To study the effect of topical TNA after primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA), 101 patients were randomized to topical administration of 2.0g TNA in 75mL of normal saline (50 patients) or placebo (51 patients). Operative technique, drug administration, and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis were standardized. All patients underwent screening ultrasound of the operative extremity. Total blood loss was lower in the TNA group (940.2±327.1mL) than the placebo group (1293.1±532.7mL)(P<0.001), and four patients in the placebo group and none in the TNA group received postoperative transfusion (P=0.118). We recommend administration of topical TNA in primary TKA in healthy patients to decrease perioperative blood loss.

  4. Predictors and complications of blood transfusion in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Wessell, Nolan M; Charters, Michael A; Yu, Stephen; Jeffries, James J; Silverton, Craig D

    2014-09-01

    Perioperative patient optimization can minimize the need for blood transfusions in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine predictors and complications of transfusions. This retrospective review analyzed 1795 patients who underwent primary THA and TKA at our institution between January 2011 and December 2012. Of the 1573 patients ultimately included the rates of transfusion were 9.27% in TKA and 26.6% in THA. Significant predictors for transfusion include: preoperative hemoglobin, age, female gender, body mass index, creatinine, TKA, operating room time, operative blood loss, and intra-operative fluids. The DVT rate was comparable, but deep surgical site infection rate among transfused patients was 2.4% compared to 0.5% in non-transfused patients (P = 0.0065).

  5. Relationship between joint gap difference and range of motion in total knee arthroplasty: a prospective randomised study between different platforms.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Hatayama, Kazuhisa; Shimizu, Masaki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Takagishi, Kenji

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the range of motion (ROM) of the knee before and four years after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a mobile or fixed type of platform and to prospectively evaluate whether there was a difference in ligament balance between the platform types. The subjects were 68 patients involving 76 joints. The mobile type was used in 31 joints and fixed type in 45 joints by employing a prospective randomised method. The passive maximum ROM was measured using a goniometer before and four years after surgery. Also, the intraoperative knee ligament balance was measured. The postoperative extension ROM was significantly improved after TKA using a mobile bearing type compared with that employing a fixed bearing type. In TKA using the former, the intraoperative gap difference was not related to the postoperative flexion angle of the knee. However, they were related in TKA using a fixed bearing type, with a positive correlation regarding the flexion gap.

  6. Knee Joint Distraction Compared to Total Knee Arthroplasty for Treatment of End Stage Osteoarthritis: Simulating Long-Term Outcomes and Cost-Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, J. A. D.; Nair, S. C.; Custers, R. J. H.; van Laar, J. M.; Kuchuck, N. O.; Lafeber, F. P. J. G.; Welsing, P. M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In end-stage knee osteoarthritis the treatment of choice is total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An alternative treatment is knee joint distraction (KJD), suggested to postpone TKA. Several studies reported significant and prolonged clinical improvement of KJD. To make an appropriate decision regarding the position of this treatment, a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis from healthcare perspective for different age and gender categories was performed. Methods A treatment strategy starting with TKA and a strategy starting with KJD for patients of different age and gender was simulated. To extrapolate outcomes to long-term health and economic outcomes a Markov (Health state) model was used. The number of surgeries, QALYs, and treatment costs per strategy were calculated. Costs-effectiveness is expressed using the cost-effectiveness plane and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Results Starting with KJD the number of knee replacing procedures could be reduced, most clearly in the younger age categories; especially revision surgery. This resulted in the KJD strategy being dominant (more effective with cost-savings) in about 80% of simulations (with only inferiority in about 1%) in these age categories when compared to TKA. At a willingness to pay of 20.000 Euro per QALY gained, the probability of starting with KJD to be cost-effective compared to starting with a TKA was already found to be over 75% for all age categories and over 90–95% for the younger age categories. Conclusion A treatment strategy starting with knee joint distraction for knee osteoarthritis has a large potential for being a cost-effective intervention, especially for the relatively young patient. PMID:27171268

  7. Comprehensive Operative Note Templates for Primary and Revision Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Electricwala, Ali J.; Amanatullah, Derek F.; Narkbunnam, Rapeepat I.; Huddleston, James I.; Maloney, William J.; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adequate preoperative planning is the first and most crucial step in the successful completion of a revision total joint arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the availability, adequacy and accuracy of operative notes of primary surgeries in patients requiring subsequent revision and to construct comprehensive templates of minimum necessary information required in the operative notes to further simplify re-operations, if they should become necessary. Methods: The operative notes of 144 patients (80 revision THA’s and 64 revision TKA’s) who underwent revision total joint arthroplasty at Stanford Hospital and Clinics in the year 2013 were reviewed. We assessed the availability of operative notes and implant stickers prior to revision total joint arthroplasty. The availability of implant details within the operative notes was assessed against the available surgical stickers for adequacy and accuracy. Statistical comparisons were made using the Fischer-exact test and a P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The primary operative note was available in 68 of 144 revisions (47%), 39 of 80 revision THAs (49%) and 29 of 66 revision TKAs (44%, p = 0.619). Primary implant stickers were available in 46 of 144 revisions (32%), 26 of 80 revision THAs (32%) and 20 of 66 revision TKAs (30%, p = 0.859). Utilizing the operative notes and implant stickers combined identified accurate primary implant details in only 40 of the 80 revision THAs (50%) and 34 of all 66 revision TKAs (52%, p = 0.870). Conclusion: Operative notes are often unavailable or fail to provide the necessary information required which makes planning and execution of revision hip and knee athroplasty difficult. This emphasizes the need for enhancing the quality of operative notes and records of patient information. Based on this information, we provide comprehensive operative note templates for primary and revision total hip and knee

  8. Influence of Different Patellofemoral Design Variations Based on Genesis II Total Knee Endoprosthesis on Patellofemoral Pressure and Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Barbara; Herzog, Yvonne; Schnauffer, Peter; Leichtle, Carmen I.; Wülker, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), patellofemoral groove design varies greatly and likely has a distinct influence on patellofemoral biomechanics. To analyse the selective influence, five patellofemoral design variations were developed based on Genesis II total knee endoprosthesis (original design, being completely flat, being laterally elevated, being medially elevated, and both sides elevated) and made from polyamide using rapid prototyping. Muscle-loaded knee flexion was simulated on 10 human knee specimens using a custom-made knee simulator, measuring the patellofemoral pressure distribution and tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematics. The measurements were carried out in the native knee as well as after TKA with the 5 design prototypes. The overall influence of the different designs on the patellofemoral kinematics was small, but we found detectable effects for mediolateral tilt (p < 0.05 for 35°–80° flexion) and translation of the patella (p < 0.045 for 20°–65° and 75°–90°), especially for the completely flat design. Considering patellofemoral pressures, major interindividual differences were seen between the designs, which, on average, largely cancelled each other out. These results suggest that the elevation of the lateral margin of the patellofemoral groove is essential for providing mediolateral guidance, but smooth contouring as with original Genesis II design seems to be sufficient. The pronounced interindividual differences identify a need for more patellofemoral design options in TKA. PMID:28255225

  9. Influence of Different Patellofemoral Design Variations Based on Genesis II Total Knee Endoprosthesis on Patellofemoral Pressure and Kinematics.

    PubMed

    Leichtle, Ulf G; Lange, Barbara; Herzog, Yvonne; Schnauffer, Peter; Leichtle, Carmen I; Wülker, Nikolaus; Lorenz, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), patellofemoral groove design varies greatly and likely has a distinct influence on patellofemoral biomechanics. To analyse the selective influence, five patellofemoral design variations were developed based on Genesis II total knee endoprosthesis (original design, being completely flat, being laterally elevated, being medially elevated, and both sides elevated) and made from polyamide using rapid prototyping. Muscle-loaded knee flexion was simulated on 10 human knee specimens using a custom-made knee simulator, measuring the patellofemoral pressure distribution and tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematics. The measurements were carried out in the native knee as well as after TKA with the 5 design prototypes. The overall influence of the different designs on the patellofemoral kinematics was small, but we found detectable effects for mediolateral tilt (p < 0.05 for 35°-80° flexion) and translation of the patella (p < 0.045 for 20°-65° and 75°-90°), especially for the completely flat design. Considering patellofemoral pressures, major interindividual differences were seen between the designs, which, on average, largely cancelled each other out. These results suggest that the elevation of the lateral margin of the patellofemoral groove is essential for providing mediolateral guidance, but smooth contouring as with original Genesis II design seems to be sufficient. The pronounced interindividual differences identify a need for more patellofemoral design options in TKA.

  10. I-ONE therapy in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty: a prospective, randomized and controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often associated with a severe local inflammatory reaction which, unless controlled, leads to persistent pain up to one year after surgery. Standard and accelerated rehabilitation protocols are currently being implemented after TKA, but no consensus exists regarding the long-term effects. Biophysical stimulation with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) has been demonstrated to exert an anti-inflammatory effect, to promote early functional recovery and to maintain a positive long-term effect in patients undergoing joint arthroscopy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether PEMFs can be used to limit the pain and enhance patient recovery after TKA. Methods A prospective, randomized, controlled study in 30 patients undergoing TKA was conducted. Patients were randomized into experimental PEMFs or a control group. Patients in the experimental group were instructed to use I-ONE stimulator 4hours/day for 60days. Postoperatively, all patients received the same rehabilitation program. Treatment outcome was assessed using the Knee Society Score, SF-36 Health-Survey and VAS. Patients were evaluated pre-operatively and one, two, six and 12 months after TKA. Joint swelling and Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drug (NSAID) consumption were recorded. Comparisons between the two groups were carried out using a two-tail heteroschedastic Student’s t-test. Analysis of variance for each individual subject during the study was performed using ANOVA for multiple comparisons, applied on each group, and a Dunnet post hoc test. A p value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Pre-operatively, no differences were observed between groups in terms of age, sex, weight, height, Knee-Score, VAS, SF-36 and joint swelling, with the exception of the Functional Score. The Knee-Score, SF-36 and VAS demonstrated significantly positive outcomes in the I-ONE stimulated group compared with the controls at follow-ups. In the I

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Valgus Deformity Undergoing Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty Through the Medial Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hamahashi, Kosuke; Mitani, Genya; Takagaki, Tomonori; Serigano, Kenji; Mochida, Joji; Sato, Masato; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes between patients with a valgus or varus deformity undergoing minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty through the medial approach. Methods: The patients were classified into 2 groups according to the preoperative femorotibial angle measured on an anteroposterior long leg roentgenogram. The valgus group comprised of 26 knees in 21 patients with a femorotibial angle <170° (163.5 ± 5.7), and the varus group comprised of 24 knees in 21 patients with a femorotibial angle >190° (195.9 ± 5.5). The following background variables were compared between the groups: age at the time of the operation, sex, causative disease, preoperative femoral mechanical–anatomical angle, and postoperative knee range of motion, Knee Society score, femorotibial angle, and implant position. Results: There were significant differences between the valgus and varus groups in the age (68.0 ± 6.9 vs 75.8 ± 6.2 years), percentage of males (23.8% vs 0%), percentage with rheumatoid arthritis (61.9% vs 4.8%), and preoperative femoral mechanical–anatomical angle (6.2 ± 1.0° vs 7.4 ± 2.1°). Clinical outcome variables of postoperative femorotibial angle (173.1 ± 3.9° vs 175.2 ± 1.6°) and α angle (96.6 ± 3.1° vs 95.0 ± 1.9°) also differed. Conclusion: It was assumed that over-valgus resection of the femur is a contributory factor to residual valgus alignment. However, knee range of motion and Knee Society score did not differ between the groups. We suggest that minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty through the medial approach is one of the treatment options for patients with valgus deformity. PMID:28144381

  12. Pain management in total knee arthroplasty: efficacy of a multimodal opiate-free protocol

    PubMed Central

    CANATA, GIAN LUIGI; CASALE, VALENTINA; CHIEY, ALFREDO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose this study was conducted to identify the most effective method of postoperative pain management, comparing the intravenous opiate infusion protocol with the use of a single periarticular local anesthetic infiltration (LAI) in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery. Methods 50 patients submitted to TKA surgery between 2013 and 2015 were divided into two groups. Buprenorphine was administered intravenously to the patients in Group A, while the Group B patients received a single periarticular LAI (ropivacaine and ketorolac) during surgery. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were measured in the early postoperative period and at 40 days post-surgery. Range of motion and inflammatory markers were also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test. Results student’s t-test showed no significant difference between the groups in functional outcomes or blood values, but a difference in VAS score on the day of surgery was found (p < 0.0001), in favor of Group B. Conclusions LAI considerably reduces postoperative pain, allowing rapid mobilization and accelerating functional recovery. Level of evidence Level I, prospective single-blind randomized trial. PMID:28217658

  13. Are Korean Patients Different from Other Ethnic Groups in Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Kyoon; Seo, Min-Chul; Song, Sang-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Most of the implants used for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in Asian patients have been produced based on anthropometry of Western people. Since anatomic features and life styles are different between Western and Eastern people, there would be ethnic differences in terms of conformity of implants to the patient's anatomy or clinical results after TKA. Therefore, surgeons in Asia are particularly interested in related surgical techniques and implant designs used in TKA for improved clinical results and patient satisfaction. In this review, we investigated the anthropometric differences of Koreans from Westerners. Koreans are of shorter stature, less weight, and smaller skeletal structure and have a higher incidence of constitutional varus alignment of the lower extremity. Moreover, compared to Westerner TKA populations, the proportion of female patients was large and primary osteoarthritis was prevalent in preoperative diagnosis in Korean TKA patients. Culturally, Koreans have life styles that demand high flexion positions of the knee such as squatting, kneeling, and cross-legged sitting. Although there were no notable differences in the complication and revision rates following TKA between Westerners and Koreans, the incidence of postoperative deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism was lower in Koreans than Westerners. We hope that further research on implant designs and more interest in TKA will improve outcomes in Korean patients. PMID:26675374

  14. The Impact of Personality Traits on the Outcome of Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Giurea, A; Fraberger, G; Kolbitsch, P; Lass, R; Schneider, E; Kubista, B; Windhager, R

    2016-01-01

    Ten to twenty percent of patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are dissatisfied with their clinical outcome. Aim of this study was to investigate the impact of personality traits on the subjective outcome of TKA. We investigated 80 patients with 86 computer navigated TKAs. We asked for patients satisfaction and divided patients into two groups (satisfied or dissatisfied). 12 personality traits were tested by the Freiburg Personality Inventory (FPI-R). Postoperative examination included Knee Society Score (KSS), Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Radiologic investigation was done in all patients. 84% of our patients were satisfied, while 16% were not satisfied. The FPI-R showed statistical significant influence of four personality traits on patient satisfaction: life satisfaction (p = 0.006), performance orientation (p = 0.015), somatic distress (p = 0.001), and emotional stability (p = 0.002). All clinical scores (VAS, WOMAC, and KSS) showed significantly better results in the satisfied patient. Radiological examination showed optimal alignment of all TKAs. There were no complications requiring revision surgery. The results of our study show that personality traits may influence patients satisfaction and clinical outcome after TKA. Therefore patients personality traits may be a useful predictive factor for postoperative satisfaction after TKA.

  15. Ertapenem Articulating Spacer for the Treatment of Polymicrobial Total Knee Arthroplasty Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marinkovic, Jugoslav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are the primary cause of early failure of the total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Polymicrobial TKA infections are often associated with a higher risk of treatment failure. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of ertapenem loaded spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial PJI. Methods. There were 18 patients enrolled; nine patients with polymicrobial PJI treated with ertapenem loaded articulating spacers were compared to the group of 9 patients treated with vancomycin or ceftazidime loaded spacers. Results. Successful reimplantation with revision implants was possible in 66.67%. Ertapenem spacers were used in 6 cases in primary two-stage procedure and in 3 cases in secondary spacer exchange. Successful infection eradication was achieved in all cases; final reimplantation with revision knee arthroplasty implants was possible in 6 cases. Conclusion. Ertapenem can be successfully used as antimicrobial addition to the cement spacers in two-stage revision treatment of polymicrobial PJIs. However, this type of spacer may also be useful in the treatment of infections caused by monomicrobial extended spectrum beta-lactamases producing gram-negative bacilli. Further clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ertapenem spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial and monomicrobial PJIs. PMID:27366173

  16. Increased conformity offers diminishing returns for reducing total knee replacement wear.

    PubMed

    Fregly, Benjamin J; Marquez-Barrientos, Carlos; Banks, Scott A; DesJardins, John D

    2010-02-01

    Wear remains a significant problem limiting the lifespan of total knee replacements (TKRs). Though increased conformity between TKR components has the potential to decrease wear, the optimal amount and planes of conformity have not been investigated. Furthermore, differing conformities in the medial and lateral compartments may provide designers the opportunity to address both wear and kinematic design goals simultaneously. This study used a computational model of a Stanmore knee simulator machine and a previously validated wear model to investigate this issue for simulated gait. TKR geometries with different amounts and planes of conformity on the medial and lateral sides were created and tested in two phases. The first phase utilized a wide range of sagittal and coronal conformity combinations to blanket a physically realistic design space. The second phase performed a focused investigation of the conformity conditions from the first phase to which predicted wear volume was sensitive. For the first phase, sagittal but not coronal conformity was found to have a significant effect on predicted wear volume. For the second phase, increased sagittal conformity was found to decrease predicted wear volume in a nonlinear fashion, with reductions gradually diminishing as conformity increased. These results suggest that TKR geometric design efforts aimed at minimizing wear should focus on sagittal rather than coronal conformity and that at least moderate sagittal conformity is desirable in both compartments.

  17. The Effect of Air Tourniquet on Interleukin-6 Levels in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Kenji; Sonohata, Motoki; Kugisaki, Hajime; Someya, Shinsuke; Honke, Hidefumi; Komine, Mitsunori; Izumi, Masataka; Ide, Shuya; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    Background: Air tourniquet-induced skeletal muscle injury increases the concentrations of some cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) in plasma. However, the effect of an air tourniquet on the IL-6 concentrations after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is unclear. We therefore investigated the impact of tourniquet-induced ischemia and reperfusion injury in TKA using the IL-6 level as an index. Methods: Ten patients with primary knee osteoarthrosis who underwent unilateral TKA without an air tourniquet were recruited (Non-tourniquet group). We also selected 10 age- and sex-matched control patients who underwent unilateral TKA with an air tourniquet (Tourniquet group). Venous blood samples were obtained at 3 points; before surgery, 24 h after surgery, and 7 days after surgery. The following factors were compared between the two groups; IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), the mean white blood cell (WBC) counts, and the maximum daily body temperatures. Results: The IL-6 level at 24 h after surgery was significantly higher than that at any other point (p<0.01). No significant differences were observed in the WBC count, the body temperature, or the CRP, CPK, or IL-6 levels of the two groups at any of the time points. Conclusion: The effect of ischemia and reperfusion due to the use of an air tourniquet on increasing the IL-6 level was much smaller than that induced by surgical stress in TKA. PMID:28217217

  18. Detection of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chong-Jun; Lv, Jin-Han; Niu, Dong-Sheng; Ma, Tao; Sun, Shou-Xuan; Li, Li-Xin; Zhao, Xin; Wu, Long; Jin, Qun-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic inflammatory joint disorder and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP Ab) is regarded as a serological marker for diagnosing early and late RA. In the present study, we aimed to determine the levels of anti-CCP Ab in serum, synovial tissue (ST) and synovial fluid (SF) in RA patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). 23 patients were included. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-CCP Ab in serum were detected prior to surgery and then at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after TKA. Synovial samples were obtained by knee arthroscopy and used for anti-CCP detection. One month after TKA, anti-CCP levels were significantly reduced (P < 0.01) in RA patients. However, their levels were not significantly different between pre-surgery and 1 year post-surgery (P > 0.05). Furthermore, anti-CCP levels in ST were much higher than in serum. These findings suggest that RA patients should continue antirheumatic therapy after TKA. ST is the preferred place for the synthesis of anti-CCP Ab.

  19. Smart instrumentation for determination of ligament stiffness and ligament balance in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hasenkamp, W; Villard, J; Delaloye, J R; Arami, A; Bertsch, A; Jolles, B M; Aminian, K; Renaud, P

    2014-06-01

    Ligament balance is an important and subjective task performed during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedure. For this reason, it is desirable to develop instruments to quantitatively assess the soft-tissue balance since excessive imbalance can accelerate prosthesis wear and lead to early surgical revision. The instrumented distractor proposed in this study can assist surgeons on performing ligament balance by measuring the distraction gap and applied load. Also the device allows the determination of the ligament stiffness which can contribute a better understanding of the intrinsic mechanical behavior of the knee joint. Instrumentation of the device involved the use of hall-sensors for measuring the distractor displacement and strain gauges to transduce the force. The sensors were calibrated and tested to demonstrate their suitability for surgical use. Results show the distraction gap can be measured reliably with 0.1mm accuracy and the distractive loads could be assessed with an accuracy in the range of 4N. These characteristics are consistent with those have been proposed, in this work, for a device that could assist on performing ligament balance while permitting surgeons evaluation based on his experience. Preliminary results from in vitro tests were in accordance with expected stiffness values for medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL).

  20. Qualitative research: a review of methods with use of examples from the total knee replacement literature.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Dorcas E; Clark, Jocalyn P

    2009-05-01

    Qualitative research is a useful approach to explore perplexing or complicated clinical situations. Since 1996, at least fifteen qualitative studies in the area of total knee replacement alone were found. Qualitative studies overcome the limits of quantitative work because they can explicate deeper meaning and complexity associated with questions such as why patients decline joint replacement surgery, why they do not adhere to pain medication and exercise regimens, how they manage in the postoperative period, and why providers do not always provide evidence-based care. In this paper, we review the role of qualitative methods in orthopaedic research, using knee osteoarthritis as an illustrative example. Qualitative research questions tend to be inductive, and the stance of the investigator is relevant and explicitly acknowledged. Qualitative methodologies include grounded theory, phenomenology, and ethnography and involve gathering opinions and text from individuals or focus groups. The methods are rigorous and take training and time to apply. Analysis of the textual data typically proceeds with the identification, coding, and categorization of patterns in the data for the purpose of generating concepts from within the data. With use of analytic techniques, researchers strive to explain the findings; questions are asked to tease out different levels of meaning, identify new concepts and themes, and permit a deeper interpretation and understanding. Orthopaedic practitioners should consider the use of qualitative research as a tool for exploring the meaning and complexities behind some of the perplexing phenomena that they observe in research findings and clinical practice.

  1. Demographic and psychosocial predictors of acute perioperative pain for total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Maya L; Tripp, Dean A; Harrison, Mark H; Sullivan, Michael; Carson, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the North American population ages, the prevalence of knee osteoarthritis and the surgical interventions (ie, total knee arthroplasty [TKA]) aimed at correcting pain and disability will also rise proportionally. Therefore, efforts to better understand the factors associated with surgical outcomes are warranted. To date, no studies have examined the impact of psychosocial factors on acute postoperative TKA pain. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective was to examine the associations among catastrophizing, negative mood, demographics and acute postoperative pain following TKA. Ancillary analyses examined the association of preoperative psychological variables with postoperative pain. METHODS: Patients completed questionnaire packages 2 h before their surgery and on three consecutive postoperative days while in the hospital. The questionnaire packages included the Short Form –McGill Pain Questionnaire, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and the Shortened Version of Profile of Mood States. The Mini-Mental State Examination was also administered. Demographic data were extracted from patients’ medical charts. RESULTS: Associations among catastrophizing, negative mood and pain were established. Regressions showed that younger age predicted greater preoperative and postoperative day 1 pain; catastrophizing predicted preoperative and postoperative day 2 pain; and negative mood predicted postoperative day 3 pain. Catastrophizing and negative mood were highly correlated at several assessment points. Preoperative variables did not predict postoperative pain. CONCLUSION: These results have postoperative pain management implications. Heightened attention to psychosocial variables, such as postoperative catastrophizing and negative mood, may be useful in identifying patients at risk for greater postoperative pain. PMID:17717610

  2. The Impact of Personality Traits on the Outcome of Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Giurea, A.; Fraberger, G.; Kolbitsch, P.; Lass, R.; Schneider, E.; Kubista, B.; Windhager, R.

    2016-01-01

    Ten to twenty percent of patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are dissatisfied with their clinical outcome. Aim of this study was to investigate the impact of personality traits on the subjective outcome of TKA. We investigated 80 patients with 86 computer navigated TKAs. We asked for patients satisfaction and divided patients into two groups (satisfied or dissatisfied). 12 personality traits were tested by the Freiburg Personality Inventory (FPI-R). Postoperative examination included Knee Society Score (KSS), Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Radiologic investigation was done in all patients. 84% of our patients were satisfied, while 16% were not satisfied. The FPI-R showed statistical significant influence of four personality traits on patient satisfaction: life satisfaction (p = 0.006), performance orientation (p = 0.015), somatic distress (p = 0.001), and emotional stability (p = 0.002). All clinical scores (VAS, WOMAC, and KSS) showed significantly better results in the satisfied patient. Radiological examination showed optimal alignment of all TKAs. There were no complications requiring revision surgery. The results of our study show that personality traits may influence patients satisfaction and clinical outcome after TKA. Therefore patients personality traits may be a useful predictive factor for postoperative satisfaction after TKA. PMID:26989686

  3. Is Intraoperative Use of QuikClot Combat Gauze Effective for Hemostasis after Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Woo; Nam, Young Joon; Choi, Ki Yong

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the hemostatic effect of QuikClot Combat Gauze (QCG) compared to that of standard gauze during cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods Sixty knees underwent TKA using a pneumatic tourniquet in this prospective randomized study. After implantation of the femoral and tibial components and hardening of the bone cement, the tourniquet was deflated and QCG (group 1) or standard gauze (group 2) was packed into the joint cavity for 5 minutes for hemostasis. Perioperative bleeding volume and blood transfusion volume were compared between two groups. Results The mean intraoperative bleeding volume was 64.7 ± 12.7 mL in group 1 and 63.9 ± 9.2 mL in group 2 (p = 0.808). The mean postoperative blood drainage was 349.0 ± 170.6 mL in group 1 and 270.1 ± 136.3 mL in group 2 (p = 0.057). The average postoperative blood transfusion volume was 323.7 ± 325.9 mL in group 1 and 403.6 ± 274.8 mL in group 2 (p = 0.314). Conclusions QCG was not significantly effective for reducing perioperative bleeding volume or the blood transfusion rate compared with standard gauze during TKA. PMID:28261426

  4. Diagnosis and Management of Extra-articular Causes of Pain After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manning, Blaine T; Lewis, Natasha; Tzeng, Tony H; Saleh, Jamal K; Potty, Anish G R; Dennis, Douglas A; Mihalko, William M; Goodman, Stuart B; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain, which has been attributed to poor outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), remains problematic for many patients. Although the source of TKA pain can often be delineated, establishing a precise diagnosis can be challenging. It is often classified as intra-articular or extra-articular pain, depending on etiology. After intra-articular causes, such as instability, aseptic loosening, infection, or osteolysis, have been ruled out, extra-articular sources of pain should be considered. Physical examination of the other joints may reveal sources of localized knee pain, including diseases of the spine, hip, foot, and ankle. Additional extra-articular pathologies that have potential to instigate pain after TKA include vascular pathologies, tendinitis, bursitis, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Patients with medical comorbidities, such as metabolic bone disease and psychological illness, may also experience prolonged postoperative pain. By better understanding the diagnosis and treatment options for extra-articular causes of pain after TKA, orthopaedic surgeons may better treat patients with this potentially debilitating complication.

  5. Stance time variability during stair stepping before and after total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica W.; Marcus, Robin L.; Tracy, Brian L.; Foreman, K. Bo; Christensen, Jesse C.; LaStayo, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The main objectives of this pilot study were to: 1) investigate stance time variability (STV) during stair stepping in older adults with osteoarthritis (OA) before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and compare to an age- and sex-matched group of healthy controls with native knees and 2) evaluate the relationship between quadriceps strength and STV during stair stepping before and after TKA. A prospective, observational, pilot study was carried out on 13 individuals (15% male, mean age 62.71 ± 6.84 years) before and after TKA using an instrumented stairway, patient-reported outcomes, timed stair stepping test, and quadriceps strength measures. At 6-months post-operatively, STV during stair descent was significantly greater in the TKA-GROUP compared to the CONTROL-GROUP, but was not significantly different at 12-months compared to controls. There were no significant differences in STV for stair ascent between the pre- and post-operative visits, or compared to controls. There was a trend toward significance for the relationship between quadriceps strength and STV during stair ascent (P=0.059) and descent (P=0.073). Variability during stair stepping may provide an important, short-term rehabilitation target for individuals following TKA and may represent another parameter to predict declines in functional mobility. PMID:26590484

  6. Timing of manipulation under anaesthesia for stiffness after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mamarelis, Georgios; Sunil-Kumar, Karadi Hari; Khanduja, Vikas

    2015-11-01

    Stiffness following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a debilitating condition for the patient with limitation of functional outcome. There are various causes of stiffness, which can be classified as pre-operative, per-operative and post-operative. Arthrofibrosis is one of the causes, which can be managed in different ways, and manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) is routinely performed as the first line of management. The timing of MUA is often debated. We review the paper by Issa et al., which looks at the effect of timing of manipulation on a stiff TKA. They conclude that early manipulation within 12 weeks of performing the TKA had a higher mean flexion gain (36.5°), higher final range of motion (ROM) (119°) and higher knee society score (89 points) compared to those performed after 12 weeks which were 17°, 95° and 84 points respectively. Other studies have also reinforced the idea that early manipulation within 12 weeks has a better outcome than those performed after 12 weeks. There may still be a benefit of manipulation until 26 weeks after which open arthrolysis may be needed to improve ROM.

  7. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BIOMECHANICAL ASYMMETRIES DURING A STEP UP AND OVER TASK AND STAIR CLIMBING AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Federico; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Zeni, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients six months after total knee arthroplasty demonstrate movement asymmetries and functional deficits, which may be related to poor functional performance. The aims of this study were to 1) compare biomechanical variables between subjects 6 months after total knee arthroplasty and an agematched healthy control group during a step up and over task and 2) determine the relationship between quadriceps strength, movement patterns and stair climbing performance. Methods Twenty patients 6 months following unilateral total knee arthroplasty and twenty healthy controls were enrolled. Participants completed questionnaires, isometric quadriceps strength testing and performance based tests to quantify functional performance. Motion analysis was performed during a step up and over task. Functional and biomechanical variables were analyzed using a 2×2 ANOVA. The symmetry ratios (operated/non-operated limb *100) for biomechanical variables were analyzed using independent t-tests. Pearson correlations were performed to determine the relationships between biomechanical variables, strength and stair climbing performance. Findings In the TKA group, subjects had lower peak moments, power and sagittal plane excursion in the operated knee compared to the contralateral knee (p < .05), while the hip on the operated side had greater power generation (p = .014). Compared to the control group, all symmetry ratios were significantly lower in the surgical group (p < .05). Stair climbing time was correlated with quadriceps strength of the operated limb (R=−0.762, p<0.001). Interpretation Individuals 6 months after total knee arthroplasty had worse performance with respect to biomechanics, quadriceps strength, and performance-based tests. Biomechanical asymmetries after TKA reduce the demand on the operated knee and increase reliance on the contralateral limb and ipsilateral hip. PMID:25467765

  8. New options for anticoagulation following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty: new oral agents on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2012-08-01

    Patients undergoing surgery for total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are at particularly high risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). Despite the existence of effective therapies for VTE prevention, THA/TKA patients remain at risk for developing thrombi. Furthermore, the incidence of VTE is predicted to increase as an aging and increasingly obese population experiences joint damage necessitating THA and TKA. Current guidelines recommend the use of a wide range of antithrombotic agents in patients undergoing THA and TKA. These agents include vitamin K antagonists, low-molecular-weight heparins, fondaparinux, and the new oral anticoagulants. However, adherence to guidelines in clinical practice is disappointingly low. The limitations of traditional anticoagulants present management challenges following orthopedic surgery. Vitamin K antagonists present a number of drawbacks, including a narrow therapeutic window and unpredictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The subcutaneous route of administration of fondaparinux and low-molecular-weight heparins may make them unacceptable to patients in the outpatient setting. The introduction of a new generation of anticoagulants promises to address many of the drawbacks associated with the traditional agents. Clinical studies have shown the new oral anticoagulants to be as effective as traditional thromboprophylaxis, with good tolerability profiles. Clinical knowledge of these new agents will be essential to ensure that patients receive appropriate care following orthopedic surgery. This article will discuss the prevention of VTE after THA and TKA based on current evidence-based practice guidelines, the limitations of conventional anticoagulants, and the promise of new therapeutics.

  9. Outcome of total knee replacement following explantation and cemented spacer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Zajonz, Dirk; Bollmann, Juliane; Geissler, Vanessa; Prietzel, Torsten; Moche, Michael; Roth, Andreas; Heyde, Christoph-E.; Josten, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infection after total knee replacement (TKR) is one of the serious complications which must be pursued with a very effective therapeutic concept. In most cases this means revision arthroplasty, in which one-setting and two-setting procedures are distinguished. Healing of infection is the conditio sine qua non for re-implantation. This retrospective work presents an assessment of the success rate after a two-setting revision arthroplasty of the knee following periprosthetic infection. It further considers drawing conclusions concerning the optimal timing of re-implantation. Patients and methods: A total of 34 patients have been enclosed in this study from September 2005 to December 2013. 35 re-implantations were carried out following explantation of total knee and implantation of cemented spacer. The patient’s group comprised of 53% (18) males and 47% (16) females. The average age at re-implantation time was 72.2 years (ranging from 54 to 85 years). We particularly evaluated the microbial spectrum, the interval between explantation and re-implantation, the number of surgeries that were necessary prior to re-implantation as well as the postoperative course. Results: We reported 31.4% (11) reinfections following re-implantation surgeries. The number of the reinfections declined with increasing time interval between explantation and re-implantation. Patients who developed reinfections were operated on (re-implantation) after an average of 4.47 months. Those patients with uncomplicated course were operated on (re-implantation) after an average of 6.79 months. Nevertheless, we noticed no essential differences in outcome with regard to the number of surgeries carried out prior to re-implantation. Mobile spacers proved better outcome than temporary arthrodesis with intramedullary fixation. Conclusion: No uniform strategy of treatment exists after peri-prosthetic infections. In particular, no optimal timing can be stated concerning re-implantation. Our data

  10. Computerized tomography based “patient specific blocks” improve postoperative mechanical alignment in primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Birla, Vikas P; Agarwal, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the postoperative mechanical alignment achieved after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using computer tomography (CT) based patient specific blocks (PSB) to conventional instruments (CI). METHODS: Total 80 knees were included in the study, with 40 knees in both the groups operated using PSB and CI. All the knees were performed by a single surgeon using the same cruciate sacrificing implants. In our study we used CT based PSB to compare with CI. Postoperative mechanical femoro-tibial angle (MFT angle) was measured on long leg x-rays using picture archiving and communication system (PACS). We compared mechanical alignment achieved using PSB and CI in TKA using statistical analysis. RESULTS: The PSB group (group 1) included 17 females and seven males while in CI group (group 2) there were 15 females and eight males. The mean age of patients in group 1 was 60.5 years and in group 2 it was 60.2 years. The mean postoperative MFT angle measured on long-leg radiographs in group 1 was 178.23° (SD = 2.67°, range: 171.9° to 182.5°) while in group 2, the mean MFT angle was 175.73° (SD = 3.62°, range: 166.0° to 179.8°). There was significant improvement in postoperative mechanical alignment (P value = 0.001), in PSB group compared to CI. Number of outliers were also found to be less in group operated with PSB (7 Knee) compared to those operated with CI (17 Knee). CONCLUSION: PSB improve mechanical alignment after total knee arthroplasty, compared to CI. This may lead to lower rates of revision in the PSB based TKA as compared to the conventional instrumentation. PMID:27458553

  11. Modified gap-balancing technique in total knee arthroplasty: evaluation of the post-operative coronal laxity.

    PubMed

    Moro-oka, Taka-aki; Shiraishi, Hirokazu; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Banks, Scott A

    2010-03-01

    It is unknown how intra-operative soft-tissue balance affects post-operative knee kinematics during different functional tasks. In order to clarify this relationship, the intra-operative varus-valgus balance and post-operative knee kinematics were compared for 17 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty using a modified gap technique. The intra-operative balance was recorded with a tensor device, and in vivo knee kinematics of lunging, kneeling and non-weight-bearing knee extension were analyzed with 3D-to-2D model registration techniques. Femoral condylar separation from the tibial articular surface also was investigated. The post-operative varus-valgus angle in 90 degrees kneeling had a strong relationship with the intra-operative varus-valgus angle, while there was a weak relationship for the non-weight-bearing motion at 0 degrees and 90 degrees flexion. Articular surface separation was an uncommon observation, seen in 2.2% of images during non-weight-bearing motion and in none of the lunging or kneeling images. The modified gap technique appears effective providing stable knee arthroplasty kinematics during in vivo activities with minimal articular separation in non-weight-bearing motion.

  12. Five-year results of a randomised controlled trial comparing mobile and fixed bearings in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Breeman, S; Campbell, M K; Dakin, H; Fiddian, N; Fitzpatrick, R; Grant, A; Gray, A; Johnston, L; MacLennan, G S; Morris, R W; Murray, D W

    2013-04-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the merits of mobile bearings in total knee replacement, partly because most randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have not been adequately powered. We report the results of a multicentre RCT of mobile versus fixed bearings. This was part of the knee arthroplasty trial (KAT), where 539 patients were randomly allocated to mobile or fixed bearings and analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) plus secondary measures including Short Form-12, EuroQol EQ-5D, costs, cost-effectiveness and need for further surgery. There was no significant difference between the groups pre-operatively: mean OKS was 17.18 (sd 7.60) in the mobile-bearing group and 16.49 (sd 7.40) in the fixed-bearing group. At five years mean OKS was 33.19 (sd 16.68) and 33.65 (sd 9.68), respectively. There was no significant difference between trial groups in OKS at five years (-1.12 (95% confidence interval -2.77 to 0.52) or any of the other outcome measures. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with knee-related re-operations or in total costs. In this appropriately powered RCT, over the first five years after total knee replacement functional outcomes, re-operation rates and healthcare costs appear to be the same irrespective of whether a mobile or fixed bearing is used.

  13. Mobile compression devices and aspirin for VTE prophylaxis following simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Nunley, Ryan M; Johnson, Staci R; Keeney, James A; Barrack, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    Recently, Levy et al questioned the effectiveness of mobile compression devices (MCDs) as the sole method of thromboprophylaxis following simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This study's purpose was to assess if the addition of aspirin to MCDs improves venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention following simultaneous bilateral TKA. Ninety-six patients (192 TKAs) were retrospectively reviewed: 47 patients received MCDs for 10 days and aspirin for 6 weeks postoperatively based on a risk stratification protocol, while 49 patients received warfarin for 4 weeks postoperatively. One symptomatic VTE was noted in the warfarin cohort, while one patient in the MCD/aspirin cohort and three patients in the warfarin cohort were readmitted within 3 months of surgery. In appropriately selected patients, MCDs with aspirin shows promise in VTE prevention following simultaneous bilateral TKA.

  14. Acceptability of a Guided Imagery Intervention for Persons Undergoing a Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Draucker, Claire Burke; Jacobson, Ann F.; Umberger, Wendy A.; Myerscough, Rodney P.; Sanata, Jessica D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Guided imagery (GI) has been recommended as a mind-body therapy for pain relief following orthopaedic surgery, but little is known about the acceptability of the intervention. Purpose Describe the perceptions of patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery (TKR) regarding the acceptability of a customized GI intervention to promote TKR outcomes. Methods Narrative and survey data collected during a randomized controlled trial of the GI intervention were analyzed to assess the acceptability of the intervention. Results Most participants were satisfied with and actively engaged in the intervention, and they perceived it to be helpful. For the smaller group who did not find the intervention to be acceptable, reasons for dissatisfaction and barriers to engagement were identified. Conclusions GI is an acceptable intervention for many persons undergoing TKR surgery. The results of this study can provide information to further develop a targeted and customized GI intervention for this population. PMID:26575508

  15. Review article: Perioperative care in enhanced recovery for total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Marinus D J; Lemanu, Daniel P; Coleman, Brendan; Hill, Andrew G; Munro, Jacob T

    2014-12-01

    Enhanced recovery pathways for total hip and knee arthroplasty can reduce length of hospital stay and perioperative morbidity. 22 studies were reviewed for identification of perioperative care interventions, including preoperative (n=4), intra-operative (n=8), and postoperative (n=4) care interventions. Factors that improve outcomes included use of pre-emptive and multimodal analgesia regimens to reduce opioid consumption, identification of patients with poor nutritional status and provision of supplements preoperatively to improve wound healing and reduce length of hospital stay, use of warming systems and tranexamic acid, avoidance of drains to reduce operative blood loss and subsequent transfusion, and early ambulation with pharmacological and mechanical prophylaxis to reduce venous thromboembolism and to speed recovery.

  16. How to interpret postoperative X-rays after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nishikant; Yadav, Chandrashekhar; Raj, Rishi; Anand, Sumit

    2014-08-01

    Today, total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one the most commonly performed surgeries worldwide. The purpose of this article is to review the appearance of normal post-TKA roentgenographs and describe the correct sequence for their interpretation. It is unwise to depend solely on patients' symptoms when diagnosing TKA complications because serial radiographs can foresee failures well before they manifest clinically. Ideal post-TKA radiographs comprise whole lower extremity anteroposterior and lateral views taken under weight bearing conditions along with a skyline view of the patellofemoral joint. Among other things, weight bearing exposes the true alignment, ligamentous laxity and polyethylene wear. On the basis of follow-up of our TKA cases, we have drawn up a protocol for assessing postoperative X-ray films after TKAs. Following the proposed sequence, surgeon can easily decide how to proceed with follow-up and foresee complications. Careful interpretation of postoperative radiographs after TKA is essential to careful monitoring of patients and implant survival.

  17. Mortality Risk Assessment of Total Knee Arthroplasty and Related Surgery After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Von Keudell, Arvind G.; Thornhill, Thomas S.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Losina, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background: The optimal antiplatelet therapy (APT) treatment strategy after Coronary Artery Stenting (CAS) in non-cardiac surgery, such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or urgent TKA-related surgery remains unknown. Methods: We built a decision tree model to examine the mortality outcomes of two alternative strategies for APT after CAS use in the perioperative period namely, continuous use and discontinuation. Results: If surgery was performed in the first month after CAS placement, discontinuing APT led to an estimated 30-day post TKA mortality of 10.5%, compared to 1.0% in a strategy with continuous APT use. Mortality with both strategies decreased with longer intervals. Conclusion: Our model demonstrated that APT discontinuation in patients undergoing TKA or urgent TKA related surgery after CAS placement might lead to greater 30-day mortality up to one year. PMID:28144380

  18. Sports activity following total knee arthroplasty in patients older than 60 years.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Hermann O; Reinhold, Maik; Bernstein, Anke; Suedkamp, Norbert P; Stoehr, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    In a retrospective study with a population over 65 years, sports activity was conducted 6 years after cruciate retaining (CR) total condylar knee arthroplasty (TKA) with rotating platform (RP). Eighty-one Patients (71.8±5.4years) were examined at follow-up 6.4±0.9 years postoperative. Sport was practiced 5.3 hours every week in mean. Patients were active in sports 3.5times per week. Twenty-five percent performed high impact sports, 47% medium impact sports and 52% low impact sports at follow-up. In KOOS sports 60±28 was reached, in WOMAC 12.1±15.1. It can be concluded that in this population 50% of patients were active in medium and low impact sport 6 years after surgery. However, a quarter of patients were also active in high impact sports.

  19. The Classic: Modular Total Knee-Replacement Arthroplasty. A Review of Eighty-nine Patients

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-eight osteoarthritic and thirty-one rheumatoid patients underwent modular total knee-replacement arthroplasty. The major indication for the operation was relief of pain. Contraindications to this resurfacing arthroplasty included varus-valgus instability of over 20 degrees, combined varus-valgus instability with flexion contracture of over 40 degrees, marked recurvatum, and predominant patellofemoral symptoms. In 59 per cent of the osteoarthritic and 58 per cent of the rheumatoid patients, complete relief of pain was evident when they were evaluated twenty-four months after surgery, while another 35 per cent of each group had only mild pain related to inclement weather. Their ability to walk long distances without support or limp was increased. Range of motion and ability to climb stairs were not significantly improved. PMID:18795387

  20. Predicting acute recovery of physical function following total knee joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Shawn M; Rastogi, Ravi; McLaughlin, Terry-Lyne

    2014-02-01

    The objective was to explore predictors of physical function during acute in-patient rehabilitation within a few days after TKA. Physical function status of participants (n = 72) three days after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was measured using the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) and the function subscale of the Western Ontario McMaster Universities Index of Osteoarthritis (WOMAC-function). Potential predictors of physical function were measured day one post-TKA. Their relationship with physical function was examined using backward elimination, multiple regression analyses. Older age and increased comorbidity were associated (R(2) = 0.20) with worse TUG times. Increased pain severity was associated (R(2) = 0.08) with worse WOMAC-function scores. Age, comorbidity, and pain severity should be considered when predicting which patients will struggle with acute recovery post-TKA.

  1. Spontaneous Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia and Venous Thromboembolism following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A 72-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted for an elective left total knee arthroplasty. Her surgery was uncomplicated and she was discharged to a rehabilitation facility. Twelve days later, she developed acute shortness of breath followed by a syncopal episode. She was hypoxic and cyanotic, requiring hospitalization and intubation, and was subsequently diagnosed with bilateral submassive pulmonary emboli and bilateral lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. She was started on unfractionated heparin infusion. Within 24 hours of exposure, she had an acute decrease in platelet count to 48,000. Heparin was discontinued and argatroban was initiated due to concern for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Both quantitative enzyme immunoassay and functional assay confirmed the diagnosis of HIT. The patient had no prior lifetime heparin exposure. Given the absence of preceding heparin therapy, this case is consistent with the diagnosis of spontaneous HIT. PMID:28261509

  2. Reinfusion of unwashed salvaged blood after total knee arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Keiji; Nozawa, Masahiko; Katsube, Sadanobu; Maezawa, Katsuhiko; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2009-12-01

    Autotransfusion with unwashed salvaged blood (USB) is effective for avoiding allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We performed a retrospective study to determine the percentage of patients receiving ABT and the volume of postoperative blood drainage after introduction of autotransfusion with USB for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) undergoing TKA. In 100 patients without autotransfusion (group 1) and 100 patients receiving autotransfusion of USB (group 2), we compared the number of patients who required ABT, as well as the postoperative drainage volume, ABT volume, and autotransfusion volume. In group 1, 83% of the patients received ABT, while only 47% received ABT in group 2, and there was a significant decrease (p < 0.001). However, the postoperative drainage volume was significantly increased in group 2 (p < 0.001).

  3. Bone scans after total knee arthroplasty in asymptomatic patients. Cemented versus cementless

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, A.A.; Wyatt, R.W.; Daniels, A.U.; Armstrong, L.; Alazraki, N.; Taylor, A. Jr. )

    1990-02-01

    The natural history of bone scans after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was studied in 26 patients with 28 cemented TKAs and 29 patients with 31 cementless TKAs. The bone scans were examined at specified postoperative intervals. Radionuclide activity of the femoral, tibial, and patellar regions was measured. Six patients who developed pain postoperatively were excluded. Bone scans immediately postoperative and at three months demonstrated increased uptake, which gradually decreased to baseline levels at ten to 12 months. Radioisotope uptake was comparable in the cemented and cementless groups, but was highly variable in individual patients and in each of the follow-up periods. A single postoperative bone scan cannot differentiate component loosening from early bone remodeling. Sequential bone scans, as a supplement to the clinical examination and conventional radiography, may prove useful in the diagnosis of TKA failure.

  4. Tibial component alignment after total knee arthroplasty with intramedullary instrumentation: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Talmo, Carl T; Cooper, Andrew J; Wuerz, Tom; Lang, Jason E; Bono, James V

    2010-12-01

    The best operative technique for achieving appropriate postoperative alignment following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains controversial, with proponents of extramedullary, intramedullary and computer-assisted techniques. One hundred ninety-two consecutive patients undergoing TKA were prospectively evaluated with full-length lower extremity radiographs. Patients underwent cemented TKA using femoral and tibial intramedullary instrumentation. Digital radiographs were analyzed using PACS (AGFA Healthcare, Ridgefield Park, NJ) software. Tibial component alignment was measured in the coronal and sagittal planes. Tibial component slope averaged 3.89° + 1.96 for the cruciate-retaining components and averaged 1.7° + 1.92 for PS components. The average coronal tibial component alignment was 90.00°, and 99% were within 3° of neutral mechanical alignment with only 2 (1%) outliers. Intramedullary instrumentation resulted in excellent postoperative tibial component and lower extremity alignment.

  5. Physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM) care pathways: "patients after total knee arthroplasty".

    PubMed

    Ribinik, P; Le Moine, F; de Korvin, G; Coudeyre, E; Genty, M; Rannou, F; Yelnik, A; Calmels, P

    2012-11-01

    This document is part of a series of documents designed by the French Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Society (SOFMER) and the French Federation of PRM (FEDMER). These documents describe the needs for or a specific type of patients; PRM care objectives, human and material resources to be implemented, chronology as well as expected outcomes. "Care pathways in PRM" is a short document designed to enable the reader (physicians, decision-maker, administrator, lawyer or finance manager) to quickly apprehend the needs of these patients and the available therapeutic care structures for proper organization and pricing of these activities. Patients after total knee arthroplasty are classified into three care sequences and two clinical categories, each one being treated with the same six parameters according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (WHO), while taking into account personal and environmental factors that could influence the needs of these patients.

  6. Popliteal artery thrombosis following total knee arthroplasty managed successfully with percutaneous intervention

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Anoop; Abraham, Biju Jacob; Fischer, Louie; Punnoose, Eapen

    2014-01-01

    Acute popliteal artery thrombosis is a rare complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), with sequelae including critical limb ischaemia and amputation. We report the case of a 54-year-old woman who developed acute popliteal artery thrombosis following TKA, presenting 2 weeks after the initial symptoms. While such cases have been traditionally managed with surgical thrombectomy or bypass grafting, percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy is an emerging alternative management strategy in the early postoperative period. However, in patients in whom intervention is delayed, the efficacy of percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy is not known. Our patient had complete resolution of thrombus following percutaneous thrombus aspiration, angioplasty and tirofiban administration. Prompt diagnosis and early percutaneous intervention may avert critical limb ischaemia in patients presenting with popliteal artery thrombosis following TKA. PMID:25414222

  7. Primary versus secondary distal femoral arthroplasty for treatment of total knee arthroplasty periprosthetic femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Antonia F; Choi, Lisa E; Colman, Matthew W; Goodman, Mark A; Crossett, Lawrence S; Tarkin, Ivan S; McGough, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Current methods of fixing periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are variable, and include open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) via plating, retrograde nailing, or revision using standard revision TKA components or a distal femoral arthroplasty (DFA). The purpose of this study is to compare patients who failed plating techniques requiring subsequent revision to DFA to patients who underwent primary DFA. Of the 13 patients (9.2%) who failed primary ORIF, causes included nonunion (53.8%), infection (30.8%), loosening (7.7%), and refracture (7.7%). There were significantly more surgical procedures for ORIF revision to DFA compared to primary DFA. Complications for patients who underwent primary reconstruction with DFAs included extensor mechanism disruption (8.3%), infection (5.6%), and dislocation (2.8%). Primary reconstruction via ORIF is beneficial for preserving bone stock, but primary DFA may be preferred in osteopenic patients, or those at high risk for nonunion.

  8. Liposomal bupivacaine versus traditional periarticular injection for pain control after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bagsby, Deren T; Ireland, Phillip H; Meneghini, R Michael

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a novel liposomal bupivacaine to traditional peri-articular injection (PAI) in a multi-modal pain protocol for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A retrospective cohort study compared 85 consecutive patients undergoing TKA with a traditional PAI of ropivacaine, epinephrine and morphine to 65 patients with a liposomal bupivacaine PAI. After the initial 24h, inpatient self-reported pain scores were higher in the liposomal bupivacaine group compared to the traditional PAI group (P = 0.04) and a smaller percentage (16.9%) of patients in the liposomal bupivacaine group rated their pain as "mild" compared to the traditional group (47.6%). Liposomal bupivacaine PAI provided inferior pain control compared to the less expensive traditional PAI in a multi-modal pain control program in patients undergoing TKA.

  9. [Acute total knee replacement infection after a cat bite and scratch: a clinical case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Miranda, I; Angulo, M; Amaya, J V

    2013-01-01

    In the last 15 years only few cases of Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) total knee arthroplasty infection have been published, mostly related to cat or dog bites or scratches. We report a case of P. multocida total knee arthroplasty infection in a 64-year- old patient, 10 days after being scratched and bitten by his cat. The patient was successfully treated with debridement and tibial interspacer exchange and antibiotic treatment for 6 weeks. Antimicrobial prophylaxis should be considered in cat or dog bites or scratches victims with prosthetic joints.

  10. Perioperative complications following preoperative cessation of antithrombotic agents for total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin-Young; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Chong-Soo; Chang, Jee-Eun; Min, Seong-Won

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The number of elderly patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has steadily increased. Elderly patients undergoing TKA usually have underlying diseases, and some of them take antithrombotic agents for the prevention or treatment of these co-morbidities, including cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, or thromboembolic diseases. When these patients are scheduled to undergo TKA, preoperative cessation of antithrombotic agents is considered on the basis of its risks and benefits. This study was aimed to evaluate the impact of discontinuing antithrombotic agents for primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on perioperative complications. Patients who underwent primary TKA between 2008 and 2012 were identified, and classified into two groups: group A, in whom antithrombotic agents were ceased preoperatively, and group B, in which patients did not receive antithrombotic therapy. Patient characteristics, history of antithrombotic therapy, intraoperative blood loss, perioperative blood transfusion, postoperative 30-day complications, and postoperative hospital stay were recorded. Of 885 patients undergoing primary TKA, 218 (24.6%) patients were included in group A, and 667 (75.4%) in group B. Group A received transfusion more frequently than group B (P < 0.001). However, there was no difference between the two groups in terms of intraoperative blood loss, postoperative 30-day complications, and postoperative hospital stay. Patients who discontinued antithrombotic drugs before primary TKA do not have a higher incidence of postoperative 30-day complications, including cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, or thromboembolic events. Moreover, the estimated intraoperative blood loss was not different compared with patients not receiving antithrombotic agents preoperatively. Larger prospective studies of this issue are required. PMID:27902607

  11. Association between body mass index and risk of total knee replacement, the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ying-Ying; Allen, John Carson; Noviani, Maria; Ang, Li-Wei; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Data on the association between body mass index (BMI) and risk of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) are sparse for Asian populations who are leaner than Western populations. We evaluated the association between BMI and risk of total knee replacement (TKR) due to severe KOA among Chinese in Singapore. Methods We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population based prospective cohort of 63,257 Chinese men and women, aged 45–74 years at enrollment from 1993 to 1998. Information on height, weight, diet and lifestyle factors were obtained via in-person interviews. TKR cases for severe KOA were identified via linkage with the nationwide hospital discharge database through 2011. Cox regression and weighted least squares regression were used in the analysis. Results The mean BMI among cohort participants was 23.1 kg/m2, and more than two-thirds had BMI below 25 kg/m2. A total of 1,649 had TKR attributable to severe KOA. Risk of TKR increased in a strong dose-dependent manner with increasing BMI throughout the 15–32 kg/m2 range and became less clear at BMI > 32 kg/m2. In the BMI range 16–27 kg/m2, there was a 27% increase in TKR risk for each unit increase in BMI (p for trend < 0.001). Compared to BMI 19–20 kg/m2, the risk estimates of TKR were all statistically significant with increasing unit of BMI ≥ 21 kg/m2. Results were similar for men and women. Conclusion Our results provided evidence for a constant mechanical mechanism underlying BMI and KOA initiation and/or progression. PMID:25450848

  12. Efficiency and Cost Analysis of Cell Saver Auto Transfusion System in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bilgili, Mustafa Gökhan; Erçin, Ersin; Peker, Gökhan; Kural, Cemal; Başaran, Serdar Hakan; Duramaz, Altuğ; Avkan, Cevdet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood loss and replacement is still a controversial issue in major orthopaedic surgery. Allogenic blood transfusion may cause legal problems and concerns regarding the transmission of transfusion-related diseases. Cellsaver Systems (CSS) were developed as an alternative to allogenic transfusion but CSS transfusion may cause coagulation, infection and haemodynamic instability. Aims: Our aim was to analyse the efficiency and cost analysis of a cell saver auto-transfusion system in the total knee arthroplasty procedure. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study. Methods: Those patients who were operated on by unilateral, cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were retrospectively evaluated. Group 1 included 37 patients who were treated using the cell saver system, and Group 2 involved 39 patients who were treated by allogenic blood transfusion. The groups were compared in terms of preoperative haemoglobin and haematocrit levels, blood loss and transfusion amount, whether allogenic transfusion was made, degree of deformity, body mass index and cost. Results: No significant results could be obtained in the statistical comparisons made in terms of the demographic properties, deformity properties, preoperative laboratory values, transfusion amount and length of hospital stay of the groups. Average blood loss was calculated to be less in Group 1 (p<0.05) and cost was higher in Group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusion: Cell saver systems do not decrease the amount of allogenic blood transfusion and costs more. Therefore, the routine usage of the auto-transfusion systems is a controversial issue. Cell saver system usage does not affect allogenic blood transfusion incidence or allogenic blood transfusion volume. It was found that preoperative haemoglobin and body mass index rates may affect allogenic blood transfusion. Therefore, it is foreseen that auto-transfusion systems could be useful in patients with low haemoglobin level and body mass index. PMID:25207187

  13. Sick leave in Sweden before and after total joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Stigmar, Kjerstin; Dahlberg, Leif E; Zhou, Caddie; Jacobson Lidgren, Helena; Petersson, Ingemar F; Englund, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Little is know about patterns of sick leave in connection with total hip and knee joint replacement (THR and TKR) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Patients and methods Using registers from southern Sweden, we identified hip and knee OA patients aged 40–59 years who had a THR or TKR in the period 2004–2012. Patients who died or started on disability pension were excluded. We included 1,307 patients with THR (46% women) and 996 patients with TKR (56% women). For the period 1 year before until 2 years after the surgery, we linked individual-level data on sick leave from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency. We created a matched reference cohort from the general population by age, birth year, and area of residence (THR: n = 4,604; TKR: n = 3,425). The mean number of days on sick leave and the proportion (%) on sick leave 12 and 24 months before and after surgery were calculated. Results The month after surgery, about 90% of patients in both cohorts were on sick leave. At the two-year follow-up, sick leave was lower for both cohorts than 1 year before surgery, except for men with THR, but about 9% of the THR patients and 12–17% of the TKR patients were still sick-listed. In the matched reference cohorts, sick leave was constant at around 4–7% during the entire study period. Interpretation A long period of sick leave is common after total joint replacement, especially after TKR. There is a need for better knowledge on how workplace adjustments and rehabilitation can facilitate the return to work and can postpone surgery. PMID:27996342

  14. Effects of Cold Irrigation on Early Results after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhirui; Liu, Daohong; Dong, Jiyuan; Gong, Long; Wang, Yong; Tang, Peifu; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have indicated that pain peaks at 24 to 48 hours after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery. TKA has been associated with disruption in normal sleep patterns, swelling knee, and significant blood loss. However, a satisfactory regime to resolve these mentioned problems has yet to be found. In this study, a total of 420 patients were randomly allocated into two groups and treated with continuous irrigation of either 4000 mL cold saline with 0.5% epinephrine or normal temperature solution. Clinical outcomes including pain scores at rest during postoperative three days, drainage output, analgesic consumption, decreased hemoglobin, sleep quality, and satisfaction rate were analyzed. Mean scores and postoperative change in scores were calculated. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores in the treatment group were significantly reduced from 4 hours (P = 0.0016) to 24 hours (P = 0.0004) after TKA. Additional benefits including reduced analgesic consumption, improved satisfaction rate, and sleep quality were observed. In addition, a significant reduction in blood loss reflected by decreased Hb and drainage was found. In this study, irrigation with a cold 0.5% epinephrine solution was a beneficial and cost-effective treatment that decreased acute postoperative VAS pain scores immediately after and 1 day after surgery. Patients reported postoperative improvement in sleep quality and overall satisfaction rate with a decrease in morphine usage. In addition, a reduction of intraoperative blood loss might decrease the blood transfusion rate and related costs. Collectively, irrigation with cold 0.5% epinephrine offers a safe, simple, and effective treatment that might improve recovery and enhance quality of life of patients undergoing TKA. PMID:27310945

  15. Mobile Application Use in Monitoring Patient Adherence to Perioperative Total Knee Arthroplasty Protocols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kelvin; Pham, Diep; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-04-01

    The potential for using mobile applications (apps) as an effective tool to monitor patients in an outpatient setting is promising. Past studies have investigated the use of applications in preoperative and postoperative settings as well as in monitoring and treating chronic illnesses such as diabetes, congestive heart failure (CHF), and multiple sclerosis. However, there is limited data on its specific use in the context of total knee arthroplasty. Given the complicated nature and crucial role of patient adherence to protocols during the preparatory and recovery phases of the procedure, the use of an app can serve as a helpful tool in aiding patients throughout this process. We present a pilot study to assess the efficacy of using such an app in order to monitor patient adherence to total knee arthroplasty-specific preoperative and postoperative protocols. Preoperative protocols used in this study included a 5-item medication protocol and multiple activity instructions. Postoperative patient protocols included following instructions on topics such as recording responses to quality-of-life questions, when and how to contact the clinical team if patients had non-emergent concerns or questions, and carrying out daily physical therapy (PT) exercises. Patients received and recorded responses to these preoperative and postoperative instructions using the iGetBetter program application installed on an iPad Mini, provided to the participants. Patient adherence was based on the data gathered from the patient responses inputted on this app. Adherence rates were comparable to those reported in various past studies that also investigated rates of adherence to health management-related instructions communicated through mobile apps.

  16. Effect of training level on accuracy of digital templating in primary total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Andrew R; Kim, Jeffrey D; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Levine, Brett R

    2012-02-17

    The use of digital radiography and templating software continues to become more prevalent in orthopedics as the number of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures increases every year. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of training level on the accuracy of digital templating for primary THA and TKA. Digital radiographs of 97 patients undergoing primary THA (49 cases) and TKA (48 cases) were retrospectively templated using OrthoView digital planning software (OrthoView LLC, Jacksonville, Florida). Anteroposterior hip and lateral knee radiographs were digitally templated and compared with the actual size of the implants used intraoperatively. An implant sales representative, physician assistant, medical student (J.D.K.), resident (A.R.H.), and fellowship-trained arthroplasty surgeon (B.R.L.) templated all cases independently after a standardized orientation and were blinded to the actual component sizes used for surgery. The medical student, resident, and arthroplasty surgeon retemplated the same 97 cases 1 month later to determine intraobserver reliability. Digital templating was accurate in predicting the correct implant size in 33% of THAs and 54% of TKAs. In 73% of THAs and 92% of TKAs, digital templating was within 1 size of the actual implant used, and in 88% of THAs and 99% of TKAs, templating was within 2 sizes of the final components. In no cases did the templated implant size vary by >3 sizes from the final components. Interobserver reliability for templating THAs and TKAs showed good reliability as measured by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (ICC(THA)=.70; ICC(TKA)=.86). Intraobserver reliability for templating THAs had excellent reliability for the resident and arthroplasty surgeon, with a kappa coefficient (κ) of 0.92, and good reliability for the medical student (κ=0.78). Intraobserver reliability for templating TKAs showed excellent reliability among all examiners (κ=0.90).

  17. Multimodal periarticular injection vs continuous femoral nerve block after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective, crossover, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ng, Fu-Yuen; Ng, Jacobus Kwok-Fu; Chiu, Kwong-Yuen; Yan, Chun-Hoi; Chan, Chi-Wing

    2012-06-01

    This study compares the efficacy of pain control using continuous femoral nerve block (FNB) and multimodal periarticular soft tissue injection. This is a randomized, crossover, clinical trial. Sixteen patients having bilateral osteoarthritis of the knee scheduled for staged total knee arthroplasty were randomized to receive either FNB (0.2% ropivacaine), via indwelling catheter for 72 hours, or multimodal periarticular soft tissue injection in the first stage. In the second stage, they received the opposite treatment. The primary outcome measure was morphine consumption by patient-controlled analgesia in the first 72 hours postoperatively. Cumulative morphine consumption as well as rest pain and motion pain in the first 72 hours was comparable between the 2 groups. The functional outcomes did not differ significantly. We conclude that multimodal periarticular soft tissue injection provides comparable analgesia to continuous FNB after total knee arthroplasty.

  18. Wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in total knee prostheses: a review of key influences.

    PubMed

    McGloughlin, T M; Kavanagh, A G

    2000-01-01

    The formation and development of wear is now widely accepted as one of the major concerns in the long-term survivorship of contemporary knee prostheses in vivo. This review examines the role of surface topography, third-body debris, load, contact mechanics and material quality in the wear process. Some of the kinematic and physiological issues that need to be modelled in the development of wear testing regimes for evaluation of material combinations and geometrical combinations in total knee implant designs are considered. Wear testing procedures and some of the results from wear tests are discussed and the need to consider the impact of rolling and sliding in the study of wear in total knee components is highlighted. The dominant wear mechanisms that occur in vivo are identified and the role of these mechanisms is currently being examined experimentally at the University of Limerick wear testing machine.

  19. Revision of Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty: Two-Stage Reimplantation Using an Antibiotic-Impregnated Static Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fernando; Renovell, Pablo; Morante, Elena; López, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Background A two-stage revision remains as the "gold standard" treatment for chronically infected total knee arthroplasties. Methods Forty-five septic knee prostheses were revised with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Static antibiotic-impregnated cement spacers were used in all cases. Intravenous antibiotics according to sensitivity test of the culture were applied during patients' hospital stay. Oral antibiotics were given for another 5 weeks. Second-stage surgery was undertaken after control of infection with normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein values. Extensile techniques were used if needed and metallic augments were employed for bone loss in 32 femoral and 29 tibial revisions. Results The average interval between the first-stage resection and reimplantation was 4.4 months. Significant improvement was obtained with respect to visual analog scale pain and clinical and functional scores, and infection was eradicated in 95.6% of cases following a two-stage revision total knee arthroplasty. Radiographic evaluation showed suitable alignment without signs of mechanical loosening. Conclusions This technique is a reasonable procedure to eradicate chronic infection in knee arthroplasty and provides proper functional and clinical results. However, it sometimes requires extensile surgical approaches that could imply arduous surgeries. Metallic augments with cementless stems available in most of the knee revision systems are a suitable alternative to handle bone deficiencies, avoiding the use of bone allografts with its complications. PMID:24009903

  20. Evaluation of health outcomes in osteoarthritis patients after total knee replacement: a two-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the improvement in health outcomes in patients after total knee replacement (TKR). Methods This was a two-year non-randomized prospective observational study in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients undergone TKR. Patients were interviewed one week before, six months after, and two years after surgery using a standardized questionnaire including the SF-36, the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), and the Knee Society Clinical Rating Scale (KSS). A generalized estimating equation (GEE) model was used to estimate the magnitudes of the changes with and without the adjustment of age, ethnicity, BMI, and years with OA. Results A total of 298 (at baseline), 176 (at six-months), and 111 (at two-years) eligible patients were included in the analyses. All the scores changed significantly over time, with the exception of SF-36 social functioning, vitality, and mental health. With the adjustment of covariates, the magnitude of changes in these scores was similar to those without the adjustment. Conclusions Both general and knee-specific physical functioning had been significantly improved after TKR, while other health domains have not been substantially improved after the surgery. PMID:20723239

  1. Gait comparison of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasties with healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Jones, G. G.; Kotti, M.; Wiik, A. V.; Collins, R.; Brevadt, M. J.; Strachan, R. K.; Cobb, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To compare the gait of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients with healthy controls, using a machine-learning approach. Patients and Methods 145 participants (121 healthy controls, 12 patients with cruciate-retaining TKA, and 12 with mobile-bearing medial UKA) were recruited. The TKA and UKA patients were a minimum of 12 months post-operative, and matched for pattern and severity of arthrosis, age, and body mass index. Participants walked on an instrumented treadmill until their maximum walking speed was reached. Temporospatial gait parameters, and vertical ground reaction force data, were captured at each speed. Oxford knee scores (OKS) were also collected. An ensemble of trees algorithm was used to analyse the data: 27 gait variables were used to train classification trees for each speed, with a binary output prediction of whether these variables were derived from a UKA or TKA patient. Healthy control gait data was then tested by the decision trees at each speed and a final classification (UKA or TKA) reached for each subject in a majority voting manner over all gait cycles and speeds. Top walking speed was also recorded. Results 92% of the healthy controls were classified by the decision tree as a UKA, 5% as a TKA, and 3% were unclassified. There was no significant difference in OKS between the UKA and TKA patients (p = 0.077). Top walking speed in TKA patients (1.6 m/s; 1.3 to 2.1) was significantly lower than that of both the UKA group (2.2 m/s; 1.8 to 2.7) and healthy controls (2.2 m/s; 1.5 to 2.7; p < 0.001). Conclusion UKA results in a more physiological gait compared with TKA, and a higher top walking speed. This difference in function was not detected by the OKS. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):16–21. PMID:27694511

  2. A Population-Based Study of Trends in the Use of Total Hip and Total Knee Arthroplasty, 1969-2008

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Vessely, Michael B.; Harmsen, W. Scott; Schleck, Cathy D.; Melton, L. Joseph; Kurland, Robert L.; Berry, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the rates of use of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) during the past 4 decades. METHODS: The Rochester Epidemiology Project was used to identify all Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents who underwent THA or TKA from January 1, 1969, through December 31, 2008. We used a population-based approach because few data are available on long-term trends in the use of THA and TKA in the United States. Rates of use were determined by age- and sex-specific person-years at risk. Poisson regression was used to assess temporal trends by sex and age group. RESULTS: The age- and sex-adjusted use of THA increased from 50.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 40.5-59.8) per 100,000 person-years in 1969-1972 to 145.5 (95% CI, 134.2-156.9) in 2005-2008, whereas TKA increased markedly from 31.2 (95% CI, 25.3-37.1) per 100,000 person-years in 1971-1976 to 220.9 (95% CI, 206.7-235.0) in 2005-2008. For both procedures, use was greater among females, and the rate generally increased with age. CONCLUSION: In this community, TKA and THA use rates have increased steadily since the introduction of the procedures and continue to increase for all age groups. On the basis of these population-based data, the probable need for TKA and THA exceeds current federal agency projections. PMID:20823375

  3. Effect of Tranexamic Acid on Blood Loss and Blood Transfusion Reduction after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Young-Jun; Seon, Jong-Keun; Lee, Seung-Hun; Jin, Cheng; Prakash, Jatin; Park, Yong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) accompanies the risk of bleeding and need for transfusion. There are several methods to reduce postoperative blood loss and blood transfusion. One such method is using tranexamic acid during TKA. The purpose of this study was to confirm whether tranexamic acid reduces postoperative blood loss and blood transfusion after TKA. Materials and Methods A total of 100 TKA patients were included in the study. The tranexamic acid group consisted of 50 patients who received an intravenous injection of tranexamic acid. The control included 50 patients who received a placebo injection. The amounts of drainage, postoperative hemoglobin, and transfusion were compared between the groups. Results The mean amount of drainage was lower in the tranexamic acid group (580.6±355.0 mL) than the control group (886.0±375.5 mL). There was a reduction in the transfusion rate in the tranexamic acid group (48%) compared with the control group (64%). The hemoglobin level was higher in the tranexamic acid group than in the control group at 24 hours postoperatively. The mean units of transfusion were smaller in the tranexamic acid group (0.76 units) than in the control group (1.28 units). Conclusions Our data suggest that intravenous injection of tranexamic acid decreases the total blood loss and transfusion after TKA. PMID:27595071

  4. Impact of remote ischaemic preconditioning on cerebral oxygenation during total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chung-Sik; Kim, Seong-Hyop; Lee, Jaemoon; Rhee, Ka Young

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ischaemic reperfusion injury (IRI) after tourniquet release during total knee arthroplasty (TKR) is related to postoperative cerebral complications. Remote ischaemic preconditioning (RIPC) is known to minimise IRI in previous studies. Thus, we evaluated the effect of RIPC on regional cerebral oxygenation after tourniquet release during TKR. Methods: Patients undergoing TKR were randomly allocated to not receive RIPC (control group) and to receive RIPC (RIPC group). Regional cerebral oxygenation and pulmonary oxygenation were assessed up to 24 h postoperatively. The changes in serum cytokine and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were assessed and arterial blood gas analysis was performed. Total transfusion amounts and postoperative bleeding were also examined. Results: In total, 72 patients were included in the final analysis. Regional cerebral oxygenation (P < 0.001 in the left side, P = 0.003 in the right side) with pulmonary oxygenation (P = 0.001) was significantly higher in the RIPC group. The serum LDH was significantly lower in the RIPC group at 1 h and 24 h postoperatively (P < 0.001). The 24 h postoperative transfusion (P = 0.002) and bleeding amount (P < 0.001) were significantly lower in the RIPC group. Conclusions: RIPC increased cerebral oxygenation after tourniquet release during TKR by improving pulmonary oxygenation. Additionally, RIPC decreased the transfusion and bleeding amount with the serum LDH level. PMID:28260986

  5. The Efficacy and Safety of Autologous Transfusion in Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Moon-Jib; Ryu, Jee-Won; Kim, Jeong-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although allogeneic blood transfusion is the most common method of transfusion in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), there are reports showing significant decrease in the amount of allogeneic transfusion and incidence of side effects after combined use of autologous transfusion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of using an autologous transfusion device in TKA. Materials and Methods Patients who underwent TKA at our institution from January 2003 to January 2014 were divided into two groups: group A (n=127) who received allogeneic transfusion only in TKA and group B (n=118) who received autologous transfusion via an autologous transfusion device and allogeneic transfusion. In both groups, the patients were transfused when the hemoglobin level was below 9 g/dL. In group B, blood collected by the autologous transfusion device was transfused only once after surgery. The total blood loss volume, total transfusion volume, and the presence of side effects were assessed based on medical records. Results Group A received 294.6 mL more allogeneic transfusion than group B (p<0.001). There were no significant differences with regard to the development of side effects between groups. Conclusions Application of an autologous transfusion device during TKA can be effective in reducing the allogeneic transfusion volume. Moreover, allogeneic transfusion was not necessary after autologous transfusion in some patients. PMID:26389070

  6. Developing simulations to reproduce in vivo fluoroscopy kinematics in total knee replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Komistek, Richard D; Rullkoetter, Paul J

    2014-07-18

    For clinically predictive testing and design-phase evaluation of prospective total knee replacement (TKR) implants, devices should ideally be evaluated under physiological loading conditions which incorporate population-level variability. A challenge exists for experimental and computational researchers in determining appropriate loading conditions for wear and kinematic knee simulators which reflect in vivo joint loading conditions. There is a great deal of kinematic data available from fluoroscopy studies. The purpose of this work was to develop computational methods to derive anterior-posterior (A-P) and internal-external (I-E) tibiofemoral (TF) joint loading conditions from in vivo kinematic data. Two computational models were developed, a simple TF model, and a more complex lower limb model. These models were driven through external loads applied to the tibia and femur in the TF model, and applied to the hip, ankle and muscles in the lower limb model. A custom feedback controller was integrated with the finite element environment and used to determine the external loads required to reproduce target kinematics at the TF joint. The computational platform was evaluated using in vivo kinematic data from four fluoroscopy patients, and reproduced in vivo A-P and I-E motions and compressive force with a root-mean-square (RMS) accuracy of less than 1mm, 0.1°, and 40 N in the TF model and in vivo A-P and I-E motions, TF flexion, and compressive loads with a RMS accuracy of less than 1mm, 0.1°, 1.4°, and 48 N in the lower limb model. The external loading conditions derived from these models can ultimately be used to establish population variability in loading conditions, for eventual use in computational as well as experimental activity simulations.

  7. Posterior Cortical Axis: A New Landmark to Control Femoral Component Rotation in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Matziolis, Doerte; Meiser, Marius; Sieber, Norbert; Teichgräber, Ulf; Matziolis, Georg

    2017-01-20

    Rotation errors of the femoral component are held responsible for occurrences such as instability in flexion and midflexion, patellar maltracking, and arthrofibrosis following total knee arthroplasty. However, in many cases, the epicondylar axis cannot be reliably identified due to bone defects or metal artifacts on computed tomography, so alternative landmarks are necessary to evaluate the femoral component rotation. The current study sought to determine the relationship of the posterior cortical bone and the anterior cortical bone in relation to the epicondylar axis. In this retrospective study, 398 consecutive patients who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging of the knee joint were included. The average angle between the posterior cortical bone and the epicondylar axis was 7.3°±3.3°. When the posterior cortical bone was used as the reference, the average absolute error was 2.6°±2.1°. In comparison, the average angle between the anterior cortical bone and epicondylar axis was 10.4°±4.5°. When this reference was used, the average absolute error was 3.6°±2.8°. The posterior cortical bone is a more consistent landmark than the anterior cortical bone is for intra- or postoperative approximation of the epicondylar axis. This appears to be due to the flat geometry of the posterior cortical bone compared with the elliptical form of the anterior cortical bone of the distal femur. In practice, an external rotation of the femoral component of 7° in relation to the posterior cortical bone is to be recommended. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  8. Prediction of medial and lateral contact force of the knee joint during normal and turning gait after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Purevsuren, Tserenchimed; Dorj, Ariunzaya; Kim, Kyungsoo; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2016-04-01

    The computational modeling approach has commonly been used to predict knee joint contact forces, muscle forces, and ligament loads during activities of daily living. Knowledge of these forces has several potential applications, for example, within design of equipment to protect the knee joint from injury and to plan adequate rehabilitation protocols, although clinical applications of computational models are still evolving and one of the limiting factors is model validation. The objective of this study was to extend previous modeling technique and to improve the validity of the model prediction using publicly available data set of the fifth "Grand Challenge Competition to Predict In Vivo Knee Loads." A two-stage modeling approach, which combines conventional inverse dynamic analysis (the first stage) with a multi-body subject-specific lower limb model (the second stage), was used to calculate medial and lateral compartment contact forces. The validation was performed by direct comparison of model predictions and experimental measurement of medial and lateral compartment contact forces during normal and turning gait. The model predictions of both medial and lateral contact forces showed strong correlations with experimental measurements in normal gait (r = 0.75 and 0.71) and in turning gait trials (r = 0.86 and 0.72), even though the current technique over-estimated medial compartment contact forces in swing phase. The correlation coefficient, Sprague and Geers metrics, and root mean squared error indicated that the lateral contact forces were predicted better than medial contact forces in comparison with the experimental measurements during both normal and turning gait trials.

  9. Patients’ Expectations Impact Their Satisfaction following Total Hip or Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Neuprez, Audrey; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Bruyère, Olivier; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to assess the number and magnitude of preoperative expectations and to correlate them with the degree of satisfaction expressed one year after Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) or Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA), in patients with severe and painful osteoarthritis (OA). Materials and Methods Preoperative expectations (within 20 days prior to surgery) and postoperative satisfaction (one year after the intervention) were measured using the previously validated French version of the Hospital for Special Surgery Hip or Knee Replacement Expectations Survey. Postoperative satisfaction was measured using a specific scale, following the same methodology as that used for the assessment of expectations. Prediction of the satisfaction of the patients was performed using multivariate linear regression modelling. Results A total of 138 patients (80 THA and 58 TKA) completed the two parts of the study. The expectations score (mean ± SD) (range 0–100) was 72.58 ± 12.63 before THA and 69.10 ± 13.72 before TKA (p = 0.13). The number of expectations expressed was 14.34 ± 1.32 (out of a potential maximum of 18) before THA and 14.70 ± 2.29 (out of a potential maximum of 19) before TKA. After 1 year, THA generated a significantly higher degree of satisfaction compared to TKA (69.70 ± 14.46 v 60.44 ± 17.54, p<0.001) (range 0–100). The pre-operative expectations score was the single best positive predictor of the post-surgery satisfaction assessment both for TKA and THA. Conclusion Patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty for end-stage OA have a high level of expectations, before both THA and TKA. While both types of interventions significantly improve essential and non-essential activities, the rate of satisfaction is significantly greater post THA. Preoperative expectations are a major contributor to the final degree of satisfaction, one year after surgery. These results re-emphasize the need for an optimal preoperative interaction

  10. An Examination of the Effects of Pre-Surgical Education on Patient Expectations in Total Knee Arthroplasties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montez-Ray, Natasha Dawn

    2011-01-01

    As patients prepare for total-knee arthroplasty surgery, they have numerous expectations related to their long-term recovery and function. This research discerned whether the use of a pre-surgical patient education class with an additional long-term expectation module addressing recovery during the first 12 months after surgery was more effective…

  11. Clinical, roentgenographic, and scintigraphic results after interruption of the superior lateral genicular artery during total knee arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, M.A.; Keating, E.M.; Faris, P.M. )

    1989-11-01

    Forty-eight patients treated by primary bilateral simultaneous total knee arthroplasty, in which one knee had a lateral release and the other did not, were evaluated clinically and roentgenographically from one to 12 years postoperatively. Thirty of these patients also had a technetium-99 bone scan. Mean clinical scores at the last follow-up examination were 90 for both groups. Roentgenographically, there were no subluxations, dislocations, or fractures in either group. There were two metal-backed patellae (one in each group) with signs of polyethylene wear and developed debris. Bone scans showed no difference between the two groups and no signs of osteonecrosis of the patella.

  12. Ipsilateral total hip arthroplasty in patient with an above-knee amputee for femoral neck fracture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunhui; Lv, Qi; Yi, Chengqing; Ma, Jinzhong; Zhu, Libo

    2015-01-01

    There is limited literature about the outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) as a surgical option for above-knee amputees. Here, we described one case of femoral neck fracture with above-knee amputation. Two-year follow-up revealed an excellent clinical and radiological outcome. The main challenge of THA posed by the amputation was control of the lower extremity. We recommend inserting a pin at the greater trochanter of the femur to improve control of traction or rotation. PMID:25932163

  13. Conversion of bilateral hip and knee ankylosis to total joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Karva, A R; Board, T N; Porter, M L

    2008-05-01

    We present a 25-year-old patient with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosis of both hips and both knees treated by staged bilateral hip and knee arthroplasty. She was followed up for 18 months. We discuss the pre-operative planning, surgical details and post-operative rehabilitation.

  14. Optimal Timing for Hemoglobin Concentration Determination after Total Knee Arthroplasty: Day 1 versus Day 2

    PubMed Central

    Khalfaoui, Mahdi Yacine; Godavitarne, Charles; Wilkinson, Michael C P

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Postoperative hemoglobin (Hb) determination remains an essential parameter for quantifying blood loss following total knee replacement (TKR) surgery and guiding transfusion practice. In this study we aimed to ascertain the optimal timing for Hb determination postoperatively and assess its relationship to serum hematocrit (Hct). Materials and Methods This was a retrospective cohort analysis of 61 consecutive patients undergoing preoperative, day 1 and day 2 Hb and Hct concentration determination following TKR surgery. This was a single centre study in the United Kingdom. Results The mean fall in Hb concentration at day 1 was 2.9 g/dL in comparison to 3.3 g/dL at day 2. This indicated a significant difference of 0.39 g/dL (p=0.023). A total of 5 patients required blood transfusions following day 2 Hb determination. Postoperative Hct values varied in close relation with the Hb concentration with no significant differences demonstrated. Our study reveals a significant change between day 1 and day 2 Hb concentrations following TKR surgery, with no significant differing information provided through Hct determination. Conclusions Our results support the use of delayed routine testing at day 2 following surgery as it is likely to more accurately reflect ongoing hidden blood loss into the joint cavity and within soft tissue planes. PMID:28231649

  15. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): study design and intervention.

    PubMed

    Kösters, A; Pötzelsberger, B; Dela, F; Dorn, U; Hofstaedter, T; Fink, C; Müller, E

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the long-term effects of skiing on health-related parameters and implant related factors like loosening and wear in patients with total knee arthroplasty. This paper describes the overall study design, general demographics, and physiological demand of the intervention phase. A control group design consisting of an intervention group (n = 14; age: 70.4 ± 4.5 years) and a control group (n = 17; age: 71.5 ± 5.1 years) was utilized in this study. Parameters of interest were measured during pre-, post-, and retention test sessions. During the 12 weeks of intervention, an average of 25.5 days of guided skiing was conducted by each patient. Daily heart rate (HR) profiles and global positioning system data throughout the ski day were recorded. The intervention group completed an average of 3393 vertical meters of downhill skiing, with a total skiing distance of 33.6 km/day. Average skiing speed was 8.2 m/s. In the skiing phase, the average physiological load was 75.9 ± 6.6% of HRmax . Further effects of the 12-week skiing intervention on the tested parameters will be reported in the following papers of this supplementum.

  16. Intra-articular infusion: a direct approach to treatment of infected total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Roy, M E; Nayfeh, T A

    2016-01-01

    Bactericidal levels of antibiotics are difficult to achieve in infected total joint arthroplasty when intravenous antibiotics or antibiotic-loaded cement spacers are used, but intra-articular (IA) delivery of antibiotics has been effective in several studies. This paper describes a protocol for IA delivery of antibiotics in infected knee arthroplasty, and summarises the results of a pharmacokinetic study and two clinical follow-up studies of especially difficult groups: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and failed two-stage revision. In the pharmacokinetic study, the mean synovial vancomycin peak level was 9242 (3956 to 32 150; sd 7608 μg/mL) among the 11 patients studied. Serum trough level ranged from 4.2 to 25.2 μg/mL (mean, 12.3 μg/mL; average of 9.6% of the joint trough value), which exceeded minimal inhibitory concentration. The success rate exceeded 95% in the two clinical groups. IA delivery of antibiotics is shown to be safe and effective, and is now the first option for treatment of infected total joint arthroplasty in our institution.

  17. The identification and quantification of instability in a primary total knee replacement prior to revision.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D F; Burnett, R; Patton, J T; Howie, C R; Simpson, A H R W

    2014-10-01

    Instability is the reason for revision of a primary total knee replacement (TKR) in 20% of patients. To date, the diagnosis of instability has been based on the patient's symptoms and a subjective clinical assessment. We assessed whether a measured standardised forced leg extension could be used to quantify instability. A total of 25 patients (11 male/14 female, mean age 70 years; 49 to 85) who were to undergo a revision TKR for instability of a primary implant were assessed with a Nottingham rig pre-operatively and then at six and 26 weeks post-operatively. Output was quantified (in revolutions per minute (rpm)) by accelerating a stationary flywheel. A control group of 183 patients (71 male/112 female, mean age 69 years) who had undergone primary TKR were evaluated for comparison. Pre-operatively, all 25 patients with instability exhibited a distinctive pattern of reduction in 'mid-push' speed. The mean reduction was 55 rpm (sd 33.2). Post-operatively, no patient exhibited this pattern and the reduction in 'mid-push' speed was 0 rpm. The change between pre- and post-operative assessment was significant (p < 0.001). No patients in the control group exhibited this pattern at any of the intervals assessed. The between-groups difference was also significant (p < 0.001). This suggests that a quantitative diagnostic test to assess the unstable primary TKR could be developed.

  18. Safety of desirudin in thrombosis prevention after total knee arthroplasty: the DESIR-ABLE study.

    PubMed

    Jove, Maurice; Maslanka, Marc; Minkowitz, Harold S; Jaffer, Amir K

    2014-01-01

    Desirudin, administered 30 minutes before total hip arthroplasty is superior to enoxaparin in preventing proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) with similar bleeding. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety of desirudin in patients undergoing elective total knee arthroplasty (TKA) when the first dose of desirudin was administered the evening after surgery. This is a case series of patients undergoing TKA who received desirudin 15 mg every 12 hours subcutaneously for an average of 5 days with the first dose administered postoperatively. The primary endpoint was major bleeding; secondary endpoints included wound outcomes (oozing and infection) and new symptomatic DVT or PE. Desirudin has a favorable safety profile when administered postoperatively in patients undergoing TKA with no reports of major bleeding, wound ooze, or infection. No patients experienced symptomatic DVT, but 2 patients had PE detected by computed tomography after experiencing atypical symptoms. The safety profile of desirudin is improved when administered postoperatively. Bleeding and wound outcomes seem to occur less frequently than historical desirudin and enoxaparin controls.

  19. Use of patient-specific cutting blocks reduces blood loss after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    León, Vicente J; Lengua, María A; Calvo, Víctor; Lisón, Alonso J

    2017-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with substantial blood loss. Sources of bleeding are the femoral and tibial intramedullary canals, which are violated during implantation using standard instrumentation. Patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) and computer-assisted surgery (CAS) do not require violation of the intramedullary canals. Therefore, we sought to assess the impact of these methods on blood loss and transfusion requirement. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in a series of 107 consecutive primary TKAs. The first group (n = 32) was operated with standard instrumentation, the second group (n = 35) with CAS and the third group (n = 40) with PSI. A tourniquet was used in all cases. Mean (standard deviation) calculated total blood loss was 442 (160), 750 (271) and 700 (401) ml for the PSI, CAS and standard instrumentation groups, respectively (p < 0.001), with no significant differences between CAS and standard instrumentation (p = 0.799). Significant differences were found in terms of transfusion requirements, with 12.5, 42.9 and 21.8% of the patients requiring transfusion (p = 0.010). Post hoc analysis revealed that only the difference between PSI and CAS were statistically significant (p = 0.003). In conclusion, PSI reduces blood loss when compared to both CAS and standard instrumentation TKA performed with the use of a tourniquet.

  20. Persistent pain after total knee or hip arthroplasty: differential study of prevalence, nature, and impact

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Patrícia R; McIntyre, Teresa; Ferrero, Ramón; Araújo-Soares, Vera; Almeida, Armando

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the incidence, nature, and impact of persistent post-surgical pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) and investigates differences between these procedures, with the focus on potential presurgical and post-surgical issues that could be related to the distinct persistent post-surgical pain outcomes between these two groups. A consecutive sample of 92 patients was assessed prospectively 24 hours before, 48 hours, and 4–6 months after surgery. The data show that TKA patients had a higher likelihood of developing persistent post-surgical pain, of reporting higher pain levels, and of using more neuropathic descriptors when classifying their pain. In addition, TKA patients more often reported interference from pain on functional domains, including general activity, walking ability, and normal work. Demographic factors, like gender and age, along with presurgical clinical factors like disease onset, existence of medical comorbidities, and other pain problems, may have contributed to these differences, whereas baseline psychologic factors and functionality levels did not seem to exert an influence. Heightened acute post-surgical pain experience among TKA patients could also be related to distinct outcomes for persistent post-surgical pain. Future prospective studies should therefore collect TKA and THA samples wherein patients are homogeneous for demographic and presurgical clinical issues. Overall, these findings contribute to a small but growing body of literature documenting persistent post-surgical pain after major arthroplasty, conducted in different countries and across different health care settings. PMID:24072977