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Sample records for posteriori parameter choice

  1. Marginal Maximum A Posteriori Item Parameter Estimation for the Generalized Graded Unfolding Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Thompson, Vanessa M.

    2011-01-01

    A marginal maximum a posteriori (MMAP) procedure was implemented to estimate item parameters in the generalized graded unfolding model (GGUM). Estimates from the MMAP method were compared with those derived from marginal maximum likelihood (MML) and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) procedures in a recovery simulation that varied sample size,…

  2. Maximum A Posteriori Bayesian Estimation of Chromatographic Parameters by Limited Number of Experiments.

    PubMed

    Wiczling, Paweł; Kubik, Łukasz; Kaliszan, Roman

    2015-07-21

    The aim of this work was to develop a nonlinear mixed-effect chromatographic model able to describe the retention times of weak acids and bases in all possible combinations of organic modifier content and mobile-phase pH. Further, we aimed to identify the influence of basic covariates, like lipophilicity (log P), dissociation constant (pK(a)), and polar surface area (PSA), on the intercompound variability of chromatographic parameters. Lastly, we aimed to propose the optimal limited experimental design to the estimation process of parameters through a maximum a posteriori (MAP) Bayesian method to facilitate the method development process. The data set comprised retention times for two series of organic modifier content collected at different pH for a large series of acids and bases. The obtained typical parameters and their distribution were subsequently used as priors to improve the estimation process from reduced design with a variable number of preliminary experiments. The MAP Bayesian estimator was validated using two external-validation data sets. The common literature model was used to relate analyte retention time with mobile-phase pH and organic modifier content. A set of QSRR-based covariate relationships was established. It turned out that four preliminary experiments and prior information that includes analyte pK(a), log P, acid/base type, and PSA are sufficient to accurately predict analyte retention in virtually all combined changes of pH and organic modifier content. The MAP Bayesian estimator of all important chromatographic parameters controlling retention in pH/organic modifier gradient was developed. It can be used to improve parameter estimation using limited experimental design.

  3. Efficient computation of the maximum a posteriori path and parameter estimation in integrate-and-fire and more general state-space models.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Paninski, Liam

    2010-08-01

    A number of important data analysis problems in neuroscience can be solved using state-space models. In this article, we describe fast methods for computing the exact maximum a posteriori (MAP) path of the hidden state variable in these models, given spike train observations. If the state transition density is log-concave and the observation model satisfies certain standard assumptions, then the optimization problem is strictly concave and can be solved rapidly with Newton-Raphson methods, because the Hessian of the loglikelihood is block tridiagonal. We can further exploit this block-tridiagonal structure to develop efficient parameter estimation methods for these models. We describe applications of this approach to neural decoding problems, with a focus on the classic integrate-and-fire model as a key example.

  4. Fast Harmonic Splines and Parameter Choice Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutting, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Solutions to boundary value problems in geoscience where the boundary is the Earth's surface are constructed in terms of harmonic splines. These are localizing trial functions that allow regional modeling or the improvement of a global model in a part of the Earth's surface. Some cases of the occurring kernels can be equipped with a fast matrix-vector multiplication using the fast multipole method (FMM). The main idea of the fast multipole algorithm consists of a hierarchical decomposition of the computational domain into cubes and a kernel approximation for the more distant points. The numerical effort of the matrix-vector multiplication becomes linear in reference to the number of points for a prescribed accuracy of the kernel approximation. This fast spline approximation which also allows the treatment of noisy data requires the choice of a smoothing parameter. We investigate several methods to (ideally automatically) choose this parameter with and without prior knowledge of the noise level. However, in order to keep a fast solution algorithm we do no longer have access to the whole matrix or e.g. its singular values whose computation requires a much larger numerical effort. This must be reflected by the parameter choice methods. Therefore, in some cases a further approximation is necessary. The performance of these methods is considered for different types of noise in a large simulation study with applications to gravitational field modeling as well as to boundary value problems.

  5. Robust heart sound detection in respiratory sound using LRT with maximum a posteriori based online parameter adaptation.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Hamed; Ozbek, I Yucel

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigates the utility of a likelihood ratio test (LRT) combined with an efficient adaptation procedure for the purpose of detecting the heart sound (HS) with lung sound and the lung sound only (non-HS) segments in a respiratory signal. The proposed detection method has four main stages: feature extraction, training of the models, detection, and adaptation of the model parameter. In the first stage, the logarithmic energy features are extracted for each frame of respiratory sound. In the second stage, the probabilistic models for HS and non-HS segments are constructed by training Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) with an expectation maximization algorithm in a subject-independent manner, and then the HS and non-HS segments are detected by the results of the LRT based on the GMMs. In the adaptation stage, the subject-independent trained model parameter is modified online using the observed test data to fit the model parameter of the target subject. Experiments were performed on the database from 24 healthy subjects. The experimental results indicate that the proposed heart sound detection algorithm outperforms two well-known heart sound detection methods in terms of the values of the normalized area under the detection error trade-off curve (NAUC), the false negative rate (FNR), and the false positive rate (FPR). Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An adaptive regularization parameter choice strategy for multispectral bioluminescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jinchao; Qin Chenghu; Jia Kebin; Han Dong; Liu Kai; Zhu Shouping; Yang Xin; Tian Jie

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) provides an effective tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities in vivo. However, the measured data in bioluminescence imaging are corrupted by noise. Therefore, regularization methods are commonly used to find a regularized solution. Nevertheless, for the quality of the reconstructed bioluminescent source obtained by regularization methods, the choice of the regularization parameters is crucial. To date, the selection of regularization parameters remains challenging. With regards to the above problems, the authors proposed a BLT reconstruction algorithm with an adaptive parameter choice rule. Methods: The proposed reconstruction algorithm uses a diffusion equation for modeling the bioluminescent photon transport. The diffusion equation is solved with a finite element method. Computed tomography (CT) images provide anatomical information regarding the geometry of the small animal and its internal organs. To reduce the ill-posedness of BLT, spectral information and the optimal permissible source region are employed. Then, the relationship between the unknown source distribution and multiview and multispectral boundary measurements is established based on the finite element method and the optimal permissible source region. Since the measured data are noisy, the BLT reconstruction is formulated as l{sub 2} data fidelity and a general regularization term. When choosing the regularization parameters for BLT, an efficient model function approach is proposed, which does not require knowledge of the noise level. This approach only requests the computation of the residual and regularized solution norm. With this knowledge, we construct the model function to approximate the objective function, and the regularization parameter is updated iteratively. Results: First, the micro-CT based mouse phantom was used for simulation verification. Simulation experiments were used to illustrate why multispectral data were used

  7. CHOICE OF PROTON DRIVER PARAMETERS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    KIRK, H.G.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; SIMOS, N.; WENG, W.

    2006-06-23

    We discuss criteria for designing an optimal ''green field'' proton driver for a neutrino factory. The driver parameters are determined by considerations of space charge, power capabilities of the target, beam loading and available RF peak power.

  8. Time Required to Compute A Posteriori Probabilities,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The paper discusses the time required to compute a posteriori probabilities using Bayes ’ Theorem . In a two-hypothesis example it is shown that, to... Bayes ’ Theorem as the group operation. Winograd’s results concerning the lower bound on the time required to perform a group operation on a finite group using logical circuitry are therefore applicable. (Author)

  9. Choice of Proton Driver Parameters for a Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk,H.G.; Berg, J. S.; Fernow, R. C.; Gallardo, J. C.; Simos, N.; Weng, W.-T.; Brooks, S.

    2006-06-26

    We discuss criteria for designing an optimal 'green field' proton driver for a neutrino factory. The driver parameters are determined by considerations of space charge, power capabilities of the target, beam loading and available RF peak power. A neutrino factory may be the best experimental tool to unravel the physics involved in neutrino oscillation and CP violation phenomena [1]. To have sufficient neutrino flux for acceptable physics results within 5 years requires about 10{sup 22} protons on target per year, which corresponds to 1-4 MW of proton beam power from the proton driver depending on the beam energy. In the past, there were individual proposals from different laboratories of a particular design of proton driver capable of delivering beam power from 2 to 4 MW, without consistent attention paid to the needs or requirements from the downstream systems. In this study, we try to identify the requirements from those down stream systems first, then see whether it is possible to design a proton driver to meet those needs. Such a study will also assist site specific proposals to further improve on their designs to better serve the need of a proton driver for neutrino factory applications.

  10. Choice.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jay

    2008-09-01

    Understanding how and why analysands make the choices they do is central to both the clinical and the theoretical projects of psychoanalysis. And yet we know very little about the process of choice or about the relationship between choices and motives. A striking parallel is to be found between the ways choice is narrated in ancient Greek texts and the experience of analysts as they observe patients making choices in everyday clinical work. Pursuing this convergence of classical and contemporary sensibilities will illuminate crucial elements of the various meanings of choice, and of the way that these meanings change over the course of psychoanalytic treatment.

  11. Empirical estimation of consistency parameter in intertemporal choice based on Tsallis’ statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Taiki; Oono, Hidemi; Radford, Mark H. B.

    2007-07-01

    Impulsivity and inconsistency in intertemporal choice have been attracting attention in econophysics and neuroeconomics. Although loss of self-control by substance abusers is strongly related to their inconsistency in intertemporal choice, researchers in neuroeconomics and psychopharmacology have usually studied impulsivity in intertemporal choice using a discount rate (e.g. hyperbolic k), with little effort being expended on parameterizing subject's inconsistency in intertemporal choice. Recent studies using Tsallis’ statistics-based econophysics have found a discount function (i.e. q-exponential discount function), which may continuously parameterize a subject's consistency in intertemporal choice. In order to examine the usefulness of the consistency parameter (0⩽q⩽1) in the q-exponential discounting function in behavioral studies, we experimentally estimated the consistency parameter q in Tsallis’ statistics-based discounting function by assessing the points of subjective equality (indifference points) at seven delays (1 week-25 years) in humans (N=24). We observed that most (N=19) subjects’ intertemporal choice was completely inconsistent ( q=0, i.e. hyperbolic discounting), the mean consistency (0⩽q⩽1) was smaller than 0.5, and only one subject had a completely consistent intertemporal choice ( q=1, i.e. exponential discounting). There was no significant correlation between impulsivity and inconsistency parameters. Our results indicate that individual differences in consistency in intertemporal choice can be parameterized by introducing a q-exponential discount function and most people discount delayed rewards hyperbolically, rather than exponentially (i.e. mean q is smaller than 0.5). Further, impulsivity and inconsistency in intertemporal choice can be considered as separate behavioral tendencies. The usefulness of the consistency parameter q in psychopharmacological studies of addictive behavior was demonstrated in the present study.

  12. [ETHICAL PRINCIPALS AND A POSTERIORI JUSTIFICATIONS].

    PubMed

    Heintz, Monica

    2015-12-01

    It is difficult to conceive that the human being, while being the same everywhere, could be cared for in such different ways in other societies. Anthropologists acknowledge that the diversity of cultures implies a diversity of moral values, thus that in a multicultural society the individual could draw upon different moral frames to justify the peculiarities of her/his demand of care. But how could we determine what is the moral frame that catalyzes behaviour while all we can record are a posteriori justifications of actions? In most multicultural societies where several moralframes coexist, there is an implicit hierarchy between ethical systems derived from a hierarchy of power which falsifies these a posteriori justifications. Moreover anthropologists often fail to acknowledge that individual behaviour does not always reflect individual values, but is more often the result of negotiations between the moralframes available in society and her/his own desires and personal experience. This is certainly due to the difficulty to account for a dynamic and complex interplay of moral values that cannot be analysed as a system. The impact of individual experience on the way individuals give or receive care could also be only weakly linked to a moral system even when this reference comes up explicitly in the a posteriori justifications.

  13. Influence of choice of null network on small-world parameters of structural correlation networks.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, S M Hadi; Kesler, Shelli R

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, coordinated variations in brain morphology (e.g., volume, thickness) have been employed as a measure of structural association between brain regions to infer large-scale structural correlation networks. Recent evidence suggests that brain networks constructed in this manner are inherently more clustered than random networks of the same size and degree. Thus, null networks constructed by randomizing topology are not a good choice for benchmarking small-world parameters of these networks. In the present report, we investigated the influence of choice of null networks on small-world parameters of gray matter correlation networks in healthy individuals and survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Three types of null networks were studied: 1) networks constructed by topology randomization (TOP), 2) networks matched to the distributional properties of the observed covariance matrix (HQS), and 3) networks generated from correlation of randomized input data (COR). The results revealed that the choice of null network not only influences the estimated small-world parameters, it also influences the results of between-group differences in small-world parameters. In addition, at higher network densities, the choice of null network influences the direction of group differences in network measures. Our data suggest that the choice of null network is quite crucial for interpretation of group differences in small-world parameters of structural correlation networks. We argue that none of the available null models is perfect for estimation of small-world parameters for correlation networks and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the selected model should be carefully considered with respect to obtained network measures.

  14. Influence of Choice of Null Network on Small-World Parameters of Structural Correlation Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, S. M. Hadi; Kesler, Shelli R.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, coordinated variations in brain morphology (e.g., volume, thickness) have been employed as a measure of structural association between brain regions to infer large-scale structural correlation networks. Recent evidence suggests that brain networks constructed in this manner are inherently more clustered than random networks of the same size and degree. Thus, null networks constructed by randomizing topology are not a good choice for benchmarking small-world parameters of these networks. In the present report, we investigated the influence of choice of null networks on small-world parameters of gray matter correlation networks in healthy individuals and survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Three types of null networks were studied: 1) networks constructed by topology randomization (TOP), 2) networks matched to the distributional properties of the observed covariance matrix (HQS), and 3) networks generated from correlation of randomized input data (COR). The results revealed that the choice of null network not only influences the estimated small-world parameters, it also influences the results of between-group differences in small-world parameters. In addition, at higher network densities, the choice of null network influences the direction of group differences in network measures. Our data suggest that the choice of null network is quite crucial for interpretation of group differences in small-world parameters of structural correlation networks. We argue that none of the available null models is perfect for estimation of small-world parameters for correlation networks and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the selected model should be carefully considered with respect to obtained network measures. PMID:23840672

  15. General or Technical High School: Parameters Related to Greek Students' Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopoulou, Anthoula; Kounenou, Kalliope

    2012-01-01

    This research attempts to examine the demographic characteristics of Greek adolescents who choose either general or technical high schools as well as the parameters related to students' specific educational decision. The sample of the survey includes 198 students from both schools. Results showed that students' choice was not directly related to…

  16. Maximum a posteriori decoder for digital communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altes, Richard A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A system and method for decoding by identification of the most likely phase coded signal corresponding to received data. The present invention has particular application to communication with signals that experience spurious random phase perturbations. The generalized estimator-correlator uses a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator to generate phase estimates for correlation with incoming data samples and for correlation with mean phases indicative of unique hypothesized signals. The result is a MAP likelihood statistic for each hypothesized transmission, wherein the highest value statistic identifies the transmitted signal.

  17. A posteriori error estimates for Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, Joachim

    2008-06-01

    Maxwell equations are posed as variational boundary value problems in the function space H(operatorname{curl}) and are discretized by Nedelec finite elements. In Beck et al., 2000, a residual type a posteriori error estimator was proposed and analyzed under certain conditions onto the domain. In the present paper, we prove the reliability of that error estimator on Lipschitz domains. The key is to establish new error estimates for the commuting quasi-interpolation operators recently introduced in J. Schoeberl, Commuting quasi-interpolation operators for mixed finite elements. Similar estimates are required for additive Schwarz preconditioning. To incorporate boundary conditions, we establish a new extension result.

  18. Parameter Choice Matters: Validating Probe Parameters for Use in Mixed-Solvent Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Probe mapping is a common approach for identifying potential binding sites in structure-based drug design; however, it typically relies on energy minimizations of probes in the gas phase and a static protein structure. The mixed-solvent molecular dynamics (MixMD) approach was recently developed to account for full protein flexibility and solvation effects in hot-spot mapping. Our first study used only acetonitrile as a probe, and here, we have augmented the set of functional group probes through careful testing and parameter validation. A diverse range of probes are needed in order to map complex binding interactions. A small variation in probe parameters can adversely effect mixed-solvent behavior, which we highlight with isopropanol. We tested 11 solvents to identify six with appropriate behavior in TIP3P water to use as organic probes in the MixMD method. In addition to acetonitrile and isopropanol, we have identified acetone, N-methylacetamide, imidazole, and pyrimidine. These probe solvents will enable MixMD studies to recover hydrogen-bonding sites, hydrophobic pockets, protein–protein interactions, and aromatic hotspots. Also, we show that ternary-solvent systems can be incorporated within a single simulation. Importantly, these binary and ternary solvents do not require artificial repulsion terms like other methods. Within merely 5 ns, layered solvent boxes become evenly mixed for soluble probes. We used radial distribution functions to evaluate solvent behavior, determine adequate mixing, and confirm the absence of phase separation. We recommend that radial distribution functions should be used to assess adequate sampling in all mixed-solvent techniques rather than the current practice of examining the solvent ratios at the edges of the solvent box. PMID:25058662

  19. On the choice of GARCH parameters for efficient modelling of real stock price dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhilchuk, K. A.; Savel'ev, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    We propose two different methods for optimal choice of GARCH(1,1) parameters for the efficient modelling of stock prices by using a particular return series. Using (as an example) stock return data for Intel Corporation, we vary parameters to fit the average volatility as well as fourth (linked to kurtosis of data) and eighth statistical moments and observe pure convergence of our simulated eighth moment to the stock data. Results indicate that fitting higher-order moments of a return series might not be an optimal approach for choosing GARCH parameters. In contrast, the simulated exponent of the Fourier spectrum decay is much less noisy and can easily fit the corresponding decay of the empirical Fourier spectrum of the used return series of Intel stock, allowing us to efficiently define all GARCH parameters. We compare the estimates of GARCH parameters obtained by fitting price data Fourier spectra with the ones obtained from standard software packages and conclude that the obtained estimates here are deeper in the stability region of parameters. Thus, the proposed method of using Fourier spectra of stock data to estimate GARCH parameters results in a more robust and stable stochastic process but with a shorter characteristic autocovariance time.

  20. An Anisotropic A posteriori Error Estimator for CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feijóo, Raúl A.; Padra, Claudio; Quintana, Fernando

    In this article, a robust anisotropic adaptive algorithm is presented, to solve compressible-flow equations using a stabilized CFD solver and automatic mesh generators. The association includes a mesh generator, a flow solver, and an a posteriori error-estimator code. The estimator was selected among several choices available (Almeida et al. (2000). Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engng, 182, 379-400; Borges et al. (1998). "Computational mechanics: new trends and applications". Proceedings of the 4th World Congress on Computational Mechanics, Bs.As., Argentina) giving a powerful computational tool. The main aim is to capture solution discontinuities, in this case, shocks, using the least amount of computational resources, i.e. elements, compatible with a solution of good quality. This leads to high aspect-ratio elements (stretching). To achieve this, a directional error estimator was specifically selected. The numerical results show good behavior of the error estimator, resulting in strongly-adapted meshes in few steps, typically three or four iterations, enough to capture shocks using a moderate and well-distributed amount of elements.

  1. Electron transport in magnetrons by a posteriori Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, C.; Minea, T. M.; Popa, G.

    2014-02-01

    Electron transport across magnetic barriers is crucial in all magnetized plasmas. It governs not only the plasma parameters in the volume, but also the fluxes of charged particles towards the electrodes and walls. It is particularly important in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) reactors, influencing the quality of the deposited thin films, since this type of discharge is characterized by an increased ionization fraction of the sputtered material. Transport coefficients of electron clouds released both from the cathode and from several locations in the discharge volume are calculated for a HiPIMS discharge with pre-ionization operated in argon at 0.67 Pa and for very short pulses (few µs) using the a posteriori Monte Carlo simulation technique. For this type of discharge electron transport is characterized by strong temporal and spatial dependence. Both drift velocity and diffusion coefficient depend on the releasing position of the electron cloud. They exhibit minimum values at the centre of the race-track for the secondary electrons released from the cathode. The diffusion coefficient of the same electrons increases from 2 to 4 times when the cathode voltage is doubled, in the first 1.5 µs of the pulse. These parameters are discussed with respect to empirical Bohm diffusion.

  2. A model selection algorithm for a posteriori probability estimation with neural networks.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Juan Ignacio; Cid-Sueiro, Jesús

    2005-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel algorithm to jointly determine the structure and the parameters of a posteriori probability model based on neural networks (NNs). It makes use of well-known ideas of pruning, splitting, and merging neural components and takes advantage of the probabilistic interpretation of these components. The algorithm, so called a posteriori probability model selection (PPMS), is applied to an NN architecture called the generalized softmax perceptron (GSP) whose outputs can be understood as probabilities although results shown can be extended to more general network architectures. Learning rules are derived from the application of the expectation-maximization algorithm to the GSP-PPMS structure. Simulation results show the advantages of the proposed algorithm with respect to other schemes.

  3. Superconvergence and recovery type a posteriori error estimation for hybrid stress finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, YanHong; Wu, YongKe; Xie, XiaoPing

    2016-09-01

    Superconvergence and a posteriori error estimators of recovery type are analyzed for the 4-node hybrid stress quadrilateral finite element method proposed by Pian and Sumihara (Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engrg., 1984, 20: 1685-1695) for linear elasticity problems. Uniform superconvergence of order $O(h^{1+\\min\\{\\alpha,1\\}})$ with respect to the Lam\\'{e} constant $\\lambda$ is established for both the recovered gradients of the displacement vector and the stress tensor under a mesh assumption, where $\\alpha>0$ is a parameter characterizing the distortion of meshes from parallelograms to quadrilaterals. A posteriori error estimators based on the recovered quantities are shown to be asymptotically exact. Numerical experiments confirm the theoretical results.

  4. Robust contrast source inversion method with automatic choice rule of regularization parameters for ultrasound waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hongxiang; Azuma, Takashi; Qu, Xiaolei; Takagi, Shu

    2016-07-01

    We consider ultrasound waveform tomography using an ultrasound prototype equipped with the ring-array transducers. For this purpose, we use robust contrast source inversion (robust CSI), viz extended contrast source inversion, to reconstruct the sound-speed image from the wave-field data. The robust CSI method is implemented by the alternating minimization method. An automatic choice rule is employed into the alternating minimization method in order to heuristically determine a suitable regularization parameter while iterating. We prove the convergence of this algorithm. The numerical examples show that the robust CSI method with the automatic choice rule improves the spatial resolution of medical images and enhances the robustness, even when the wave-field data of a wavelength of 6.16 mm contaminated by 5% noise are used. The numerical results also show that the images reconstructed by the proposed method yield a spatial resolution of approximately half the wavelength that may be adequate for imaging a breast tumor at Stage I.

  5. Order of Search in Fuzzy ART and Fuzzy ARTMAP: Effect of the Choice Parameter.

    PubMed

    Heileman, Gregory L.; Bebis, George; Fernlund, Hans; Georgiopoulos, Michael

    1996-12-01

    This paper focuses on two ART architectures, the Fuzzy ART and the Fuzzy ARTMAP. Fuzzy ART is a pattern clustering machine, while Fuzzy ARTMAP is a pattern classification machine. Our study concentrates on the order according to which categories in Fuzzy ART, or the ART(a) model of Fuzzy ARTMAP are chosen. Our work provides a geometrical, and clearer understanding of why, and in what order, these categories are chosen for various ranges of the choice parameter of the Fuzzy ART module. This understanding serves as a powerful tool in developing properties of learning pertaining to these neural network architectures; to strengthen this argument, it is worth mentioning that the order according to which categories are chosen in ART 1 and ARTMAP provided a valuable tool in proving important properties about these architectures. Copyright 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  6. Parameters of rewards on choice behavior in Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Martin S; Jensen, Ashley L

    2009-09-01

    Five experiments were conducted with Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) to investigate how choices in a T-maze were affected by parameters of a social reward (aggression display to another male): presence or absence, amount, delay and distance traveled. Bettas showed a preference for the side associated with the presence of another male rather than the side associated with nothing (Exp 1), a greater length of time of the reward (Exp 2) and shorter delay (Exp 3). The animals were indifferent when one side offered a longer delay to a longer reward time compared with a shorter delay to a shorter reward time (Exp 4). What was most surprising, however, was that fish preferred to choose the side that was associated with swimming a greater distance to reach an opponent male (Exp 5). These experiments demonstrate that, while some parameters of a visual reward affect behavior in predictable ways (greater amount, shorter delay), the complex motivations underlying inter-male aggression can produce what appear to be paradoxical results.

  7. Analysis of the geophysical data using a posteriori algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskoboynikova, Gyulnara; Khairetdinov, Marat

    2016-04-01

    The problems of monitoring, prediction and prevention of extraordinary natural and technogenic events are priority of modern problems. These events include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, the lunar-solar tides, landslides, falling celestial bodies, explosions utilized stockpiles of ammunition, numerous quarry explosion in open coal mines, provoking technogenic earthquakes. Monitoring is based on a number of successive stages, which include remote registration of the events responses, measurement of the main parameters as arrival times of seismic waves or the original waveforms. At the final stage the inverse problems associated with determining the geographic location and time of the registration event are solving. Therefore, improving the accuracy of the parameters estimation of the original records in the high noise is an important problem. As is known, the main measurement errors arise due to the influence of external noise, the difference between the real and model structures of the medium, imprecision of the time definition in the events epicenter, the instrumental errors. Therefore, posteriori algorithms more accurate in comparison with known algorithms are proposed and investigated. They are based on a combination of discrete optimization method and fractal approach for joint detection and estimation of the arrival times in the quasi-periodic waveforms sequence in problems of geophysical monitoring with improved accuracy. Existing today, alternative approaches to solving these problems does not provide the given accuracy. The proposed algorithms are considered for the tasks of vibration sounding of the Earth in times of lunar and solar tides, and for the problem of monitoring of the borehole seismic source location in trade drilling.

  8. A Posteriori Analysis for Hydrodynamic Simulations Using Adjoint Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, C S; Estep, D; Sandelin, J; Wang, H

    2009-02-26

    This report contains results of analysis done during an FY08 feasibility study investigating the use of adjoint methodologies for a posteriori error estimation for hydrodynamics simulations. We developed an approach to adjoint analysis for these systems through use of modified equations and viscosity solutions. Targeting first the 1D Burgers equation, we include a verification of the adjoint operator for the modified equation for the Lax-Friedrichs scheme, then derivations of an a posteriori error analysis for a finite difference scheme and a discontinuous Galerkin scheme applied to this problem. We include some numerical results showing the use of the error estimate. Lastly, we develop a computable a posteriori error estimate for the MAC scheme applied to stationary Navier-Stokes.

  9. A Two-Stage Algorithm for Origin-Destination Matrices Estimation Considering Dynamic Dispersion Parameter for Route Choice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Ma, Xiaolei; Liu, Yong; Gong, Ke; Henrickson, Kristian C; Henricakson, Kristian C; Xu, Maozeng; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-stage algorithm to simultaneously estimate origin-destination (OD) matrix, link choice proportion, and dispersion parameter using partial traffic counts in a congested network. A non-linear optimization model is developed which incorporates a dynamic dispersion parameter, followed by a two-stage algorithm in which Generalized Least Squares (GLS) estimation and a Stochastic User Equilibrium (SUE) assignment model are iteratively applied until the convergence is reached. To evaluate the performance of the algorithm, the proposed approach is implemented in a hypothetical network using input data with high error, and tested under a range of variation coefficients. The root mean squared error (RMSE) of the estimated OD demand and link flows are used to evaluate the model estimation results. The results indicate that the estimated dispersion parameter theta is insensitive to the choice of variation coefficients. The proposed approach is shown to outperform two established OD estimation methods and produce parameter estimates that are close to the ground truth. In addition, the proposed approach is applied to an empirical network in Seattle, WA to validate the robustness and practicality of this methodology. In summary, this study proposes and evaluates an innovative computational approach to accurately estimate OD matrices using link-level traffic flow data, and provides useful insight for optimal parameter selection in modeling travelers' route choice behavior.

  10. A Two-Stage Algorithm for Origin-Destination Matrices Estimation Considering Dynamic Dispersion Parameter for Route Choice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Ma, Xiaolei; Liu, Yong; Gong, Ke; Henricakson, Kristian C.; Xu, Maozeng; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-stage algorithm to simultaneously estimate origin-destination (OD) matrix, link choice proportion, and dispersion parameter using partial traffic counts in a congested network. A non-linear optimization model is developed which incorporates a dynamic dispersion parameter, followed by a two-stage algorithm in which Generalized Least Squares (GLS) estimation and a Stochastic User Equilibrium (SUE) assignment model are iteratively applied until the convergence is reached. To evaluate the performance of the algorithm, the proposed approach is implemented in a hypothetical network using input data with high error, and tested under a range of variation coefficients. The root mean squared error (RMSE) of the estimated OD demand and link flows are used to evaluate the model estimation results. The results indicate that the estimated dispersion parameter theta is insensitive to the choice of variation coefficients. The proposed approach is shown to outperform two established OD estimation methods and produce parameter estimates that are close to the ground truth. In addition, the proposed approach is applied to an empirical network in Seattle, WA to validate the robustness and practicality of this methodology. In summary, this study proposes and evaluates an innovative computational approach to accurately estimate OD matrices using link-level traffic flow data, and provides useful insight for optimal parameter selection in modeling travelers’ route choice behavior. PMID:26761209

  11. Maximum a posteriori CMB lensing reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carron, Julien; Lewis, Antony

    2017-09-01

    Gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a valuable cosmological signal that correlates to tracers of large-scale structure and acts as a important source of confusion for primordial B -mode polarization. State-of-the-art lensing reconstruction analyses use quadratic estimators, which are easily applicable to data. However, these estimators are known to be suboptimal, in particular for polarization, and large improvements are expected to be possible for high signal-to-noise polarization experiments. We develop a method and numerical code, lensit, that is able to find efficiently the most probable lensing map, introducing no significant approximations to the lensed CMB likelihood, and applicable to beamed and masked data with inhomogeneous noise. It works by iteratively reconstructing the primordial unlensed CMB using a deflection estimate and its inverse, and removing residual lensing from these maps with quadratic estimator techniques. Roughly linear computational cost is maintained due to fast convergence of iterative searches, combined with the local nature of lensing. The method achieves the maximal improvement in signal to noise expected from analytical considerations on the unmasked parts of the sky. Delensing with this optimal map leads to forecast tensor-to-scalar ratio parameter errors improved by a factor ≃2 compared to the quadratic estimator in a CMB stage IV configuration.

  12. Cognitive Models of Risky Choice: Parameter Stability and Predictive Accuracy of Prospect Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glockner, Andreas; Pachur, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    In the behavioral sciences, a popular approach to describe and predict behavior is cognitive modeling with adjustable parameters (i.e., which can be fitted to data). Modeling with adjustable parameters allows, among other things, measuring differences between people. At the same time, parameter estimation also bears the risk of overfitting. Are…

  13. Maximum a posteriori probability estimation for localizing damage using ultrasonic guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Eric B.; Todd, Michael D.; Wilcox, Paul D.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Croxford, Anthony J.

    2011-04-01

    Presented is an approach to damage localization for guided wave structural health monitoring (GWSHM) in plate-like structures. In this mode of SHM, transducers excite and sense guided waves in order to detect and characterize the presence of damage. The premise of the presented localization approach is simple: use as the estimated damage location the point on the structure with the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) of being the location of damage (i.e., the most probable location given a set of sensor measurements). This is accomplished by constructing a minimally-informed statistical model of the GWSHM process. Parameters of the model which are unknown, such as scattered wave amplitude, are assigned non-informative Bayesian prior distributions and averaged out of the a posteriori probability calculation. Using an ensemble of measurements from an instrumented plate with stiffening stringers, the performance of the MAP estimate is compared to that of what were found to be the two most effective previously reported algorithms. The MAP estimate proved superior in nearly all test cases and was particularly effective in localizing damage using very sparse arrays of as few as three transducers.

  14. Explaining purportedly irrational behavior by modeling skepticism in task parameters: an example examining confidence in forced-choice tasks.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Craig R M; Wixted, John T; Noelle, David C

    2004-09-01

    Many purported demonstrations of irrational behavior rely on the assumption that participants believe key task parameters that are merely asserted by experimenters. For example, previous researchers have found that participants who first reported confidence in items presented in a yes-no format did not change confidence to the degree prescribed by the normative model when those same items were later presented in a forced-choice format. A crucial assumption, however, was that participants fully believed the assertion that the forced-choice items were mutually exclusive and exhaustive. In this article, the authors derive and test a new normative model in which it is not assumed that participants fully believe the assertion. Two visual identification experiments show that the new normative model provides a compelling account of participants' confidence reports. ((c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

  15. Suitable parameter choice on quantitative morphology of A549 cell in epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhou-Xin; Yu, Hai-Bin; Li, Jian-Sheng; Shen, Jun-Ling; Du, Wen-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of morphological changes in cells is an integral part of study on epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), however, only a few papers reported the changes in quantitative parameters and no article compared different parameters for demanding better parameters. In the study, the purpose was to investigate suitable parameters for quantitative evaluation of EMT morphological changes. A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line was selected for the study. Some cells were stimulated by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) for EMT, and other cells were as control without TGF-β1 stimulation. Subsequently, cells were placed in phase contrast microscope and three arbitrary fields were captured and saved with a personal computer. Using the tools of Photoshop software, some cells in an image were selected, segmented out and exchanged into unique hue, and other part in the image was shifted into another unique hue. The cells were calculated with 29 morphological parameters by Image Pro Plus software. A parameter between cells with or without TGF-β1 stimulation was compared statistically and nine parameters were significantly different between them. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC curve) of a parameter was described with SPSS software and F-test was used to compare two areas under the curves (AUCs) in Excel. Among them, roundness and radius ratio were the most AUCs and were significant higher than the other parameters. The results provided a new method with quantitative assessment of cell morphology during EMT, and found out two parameters, roundness and radius ratio, as suitable for quantification. PMID:26182364

  16. Limitations of the rheological mucoadhesion method: the effect of the choice of conditions and the rheological synergism parameter.

    PubMed

    Hägerström, Helene; Edsman, Katarina

    2003-04-01

    This work demonstrates several limitations of the simple rheological method that is widely used to investigate mucoadhesion of polymer gels. We establish the importance of the choice of conditions and the synergism parameter for the results obtained in comparative studies. Dynamic rheological measurements were performed on gels based on four slightly different poly(acrylic acid) (Carbopol) polymers and their corresponding mixtures with porcine stomach mucin and bovine submaxillary gland mucin. The rationale for the comparison of the polymers had a large influence on the results obtained. The method does not give the same ranking order when two different comparison strategies are used. Moreover, we show that the results obtained are also sensitive to where in the 'rheological range' the comparison is made, e.g., at which value of G'. Positive values of the synergism parameters are, for example, only seen with weak gels. The choice of synergism parameter also has a bearing on the results obtained, and here we suggest a new refined relative parameter, the log ratio (log(G'(mix)/G'(p))). We also investigated the adhesion of the gel preparations to porcine nasal mucosa, using tensile strength measurements. Increased gel strength resulted in stronger adhesion, which is in contrast to the results from the rheological method, where the positive values of the synergism parameters were seen only with weak gels. On the basis of the limitations demonstrated and discussed, we recommend that the rheological method should not be used as a stand-alone method for the studying of mucoadhesive properties of polymer gels.

  17. Extracting volatility signal using maximum a posteriori estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, David

    2016-11-01

    This paper outlines a methodology to estimate a denoised volatility signal for foreign exchange rates using a hidden Markov model (HMM). For this purpose a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation is performed. A double exponential prior is used for the state variable (the log-volatility) in order to allow sharp jumps in realizations and then log-returns marginal distributions with heavy tails. We consider two routes to choose the regularization and we compare our MAP estimate to realized volatility measure for three exchange rates.

  18. The Impact of Escape Alternative Position Change in Multiple-Choice Test on the Psychometric Properties of a Test and Its Items Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamadneh, Iyad Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the impact changing of escape alternative position in multiple-choice test on the psychometric properties of a test and it's items parameters (difficulty, discrimination & guessing), and estimation of examinee ability. To achieve the study objectives, a 4-alternative multiple choice type achievement test…

  19. Sensitivity of Human Choice to Manipulations of Parameters of Positive and Negative Sound Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether altering parameters of positive and negative reinforcement in identical ways could influence behavior maintained by each in different ways. Three undergraduate students participated in a series of assessments designed to identify preferred and aversive sounds with similar reinforcing values.…

  20. Effects of using a posteriori methods for the conservation of integral invariants. [for weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takacs, Lawrence L.

    1988-01-01

    The nature and effect of using a posteriori adjustments to nonconservative finite-difference schemes to enforce integral invariants of the corresponding analytic system are examined. The method of a posteriori integral constraint restoration is analyzed for the case of linear advection, and the harmonic response associated with the a posteriori adjustments is examined in detail. The conservative properties of the shallow water system are reviewed, and the constraint restoration algorithm applied to the shallow water equations are described. A comparison is made between forecasts obtained using implicit and a posteriori methods for the conservation of mass, energy, and potential enstrophy in the complete nonlinear shallow-water system.

  1. Effects of using a posteriori methods for the conservation of integral invariants. [for weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takacs, Lawrence L.

    1988-01-01

    The nature and effect of using a posteriori adjustments to nonconservative finite-difference schemes to enforce integral invariants of the corresponding analytic system are examined. The method of a posteriori integral constraint restoration is analyzed for the case of linear advection, and the harmonic response associated with the a posteriori adjustments is examined in detail. The conservative properties of the shallow water system are reviewed, and the constraint restoration algorithm applied to the shallow water equations are described. A comparison is made between forecasts obtained using implicit and a posteriori methods for the conservation of mass, energy, and potential enstrophy in the complete nonlinear shallow-water system.

  2. Haloperidol, dynamics of choice, and the parameters of the matching law.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Carlos F

    2007-06-01

    The idea that dopamine mediates the reinforcing effects of stimuli persists in the field of neurosciences. The present study shows that haloperidol, a dopamine antagonist, does not eliminate the reinforcing value of food reinforcers. The ratio of reinforcers changed seven times across two levers within sessions, modeling a dynamic environment. The magnitude of the reinforcer was manipulated independently of the reinforcer ratio. Four doses of intraperitoneal haloperidol were assessed over periods of 12 daily sessions. Haloperidol did not impair the discrimination that the rats established between rich and lean levers; the response distributions favored the lever associated with the higher probability of reinforcement and the larger pellets. The parameters of the generalized matching law (bias and sensitivity) were used to estimate effects of haloperidol upon the motor system and upon the rats' motivation for food reinforcers.

  3. Parameter choices for a muon recirculating linear accelerator from 5 to 63 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. S.

    2014-06-19

    A recirculating linear accelerator (RLA) has been proposed to accelerate muons from 5 to 63 GeV for a muon collider. It should be usable both for a Higgs factory and as a stage for a higher energy collider. First, the constraints due to the beam loading are computed. Next, an expression for the longitudinal emittance growth to lowest order in the longitudinal emittance is worked out. After finding the longitudinal expression, a simplified model that describes the arcs and their approximate expression for the time of flight dependence on energy in those arcs is found. Finally, these results are used to estimate the parameters required for the RLA arcs and the linac phase.

  4. High speed e-beam writing for large area photonic nanostructures — a choice of parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kezheng; Li, Juntao; Reardon, Christopher; Schuster, Christian S.; Wang, Yue; Triggs, Graham J.; Damnik, Niklas; Müenchenberger, Jana; Wang, Xuehua; Martins, Emiliano R.; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2016-09-01

    Photonic nanostructures are used for many optical systems and applications. However, some high-end applications require the use of electron-beam lithography (EBL) to generate such nanostructures. An important technological bottleneck is the exposure time of the EBL systems, which can exceed 24 hours per 1 cm2. Here, we have developed a method based on a target function to systematically increase the writing speed of EBL. As an example, we use as the target function the fidelity of the Fourier Transform spectra of nanostructures that are designed for thin film light trapping applications, and optimize the full parameter space of the lithography process. Finally, we are able to reduce the exposure time by a factor of 5.5 without loss of photonic performance. We show that the performances of the fastest written structures are identical to the original ones within experimental error. As the target function can be varied according to different purposes, the method is also applicable to guided mode resonant grating and many other areas. These findings contribute to the advancement of EBL and point towards making the technology more attractive for commercial applications.

  5. High speed e-beam writing for large area photonic nanostructures — a choice of parameters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kezheng; Li, Juntao; Reardon, Christopher; Schuster, Christian S.; Wang, Yue; Triggs, Graham J.; Damnik, Niklas; Müenchenberger, Jana; Wang, Xuehua; Martins, Emiliano R.; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Photonic nanostructures are used for many optical systems and applications. However, some high-end applications require the use of electron-beam lithography (EBL) to generate such nanostructures. An important technological bottleneck is the exposure time of the EBL systems, which can exceed 24 hours per 1 cm2. Here, we have developed a method based on a target function to systematically increase the writing speed of EBL. As an example, we use as the target function the fidelity of the Fourier Transform spectra of nanostructures that are designed for thin film light trapping applications, and optimize the full parameter space of the lithography process. Finally, we are able to reduce the exposure time by a factor of 5.5 without loss of photonic performance. We show that the performances of the fastest written structures are identical to the original ones within experimental error. As the target function can be varied according to different purposes, the method is also applicable to guided mode resonant grating and many other areas. These findings contribute to the advancement of EBL and point towards making the technology more attractive for commercial applications. PMID:27633902

  6. Cost functions to estimate a posteriori probabilities in multiclass problems.

    PubMed

    Cid-Sueiro, J; Arribas, J I; Urbán-Muñoz, S; Figueiras-Vidal, A R

    1999-01-01

    The problem of designing cost functions to estimate a posteriori probabilities in multiclass problems is addressed in this paper. We establish necessary and sufficient conditions that these costs must satisfy in one-class one-output networks whose outputs are consistent with probability laws. We focus our attention on a particular subset of the corresponding cost functions; those which verify two usually interesting properties: symmetry and separability (well-known cost functions, such as the quadratic cost or the cross entropy are particular cases in this subset). Finally, we present a universal stochastic gradient learning rule for single-layer networks, in the sense of minimizing a general version of these cost functions for a wide family of nonlinear activation functions.

  7. Implicit a posteriori error estimates for the Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izsak, Ferenc; Harutyunyan, Davit; van der Vegt, Jaap J. W.

    2008-09-01

    An implicit a posteriori error estimation technique is presented and analyzed for the numerical solution of the time-harmonic Maxwell equations using Nedelec edge elements. For this purpose we define a weak formulation for the error on each element and provide an efficient and accurate numerical solution technique to solve the error equations locally. We investigate the well-posedness of the error equations and also consider the related eigenvalue problem for cubic elements. Numerical results for both smooth and non-smooth problems, including a problem with reentrant corners, show that an accurate prediction is obtained for the local error, and in particular the error distribution, which provides essential information to control an adaptation process. The error estimation technique is also compared with existing methods and provides significantly sharper estimates for a number of reported test cases.

  8. A posteriori pointwise error estimates for the boundary element method

    SciTech Connect

    Paulino, G.H.; Gray, L.J.; Zarikian, V.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents a new approach for a posteriori pointwise error estimation in the boundary element method. The estimator relies upon the evaluation of hypersingular integral equations, and is therefore intrinsic to the boundary integral equation approach. This property allows some theoretical justification by mathematically correlating the exact and estimated errors. A methodology is developed for approximating the error on the boundary as well as in the interior of the domain. In the interior, error estimates for both the function and its derivatives (e.g. potential and interior gradients for potential problems, displacements and stresses for elasticity problems) are presented. Extensive computational experiments have been performed for the two dimensional Laplace equation on interior domains, employing Dirichlet and mixed boundary conditions. The results indicate that the error estimates successfully track the form of the exact error curve. Moreover, a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of the actual error is also obtained.

  9. A posteriori operation detection in evolving software models

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Philip; Wimmer, Manuel; Brosch, Petra; Herrmannsdörfer, Markus; Seidl, Martina; Wieland, Konrad; Kappel, Gerti

    2013-01-01

    As every software artifact, also software models are subject to continuous evolution. The operations applied between two successive versions of a model are crucial for understanding its evolution. Generic approaches for detecting operations a posteriori identify atomic operations, but neglect composite operations, such as refactorings, which leads to cluttered difference reports. To tackle this limitation, we present an orthogonal extension of existing atomic operation detection approaches for detecting also composite operations. Our approach searches for occurrences of composite operations within a set of detected atomic operations in a post-processing manner. One major benefit is the reuse of specifications available for executing composite operations also for detecting applications of them. We evaluate the accuracy of the approach in a real-world case study and investigate the scalability of our implementation in an experiment. PMID:23471366

  10. An Investigation of the Standard Errors of Expected A Posteriori Ability Estimates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Ayala, R. J.; And Others

    Expected a posteriori has a number of advantages over maximum likelihood estimation or maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation methods. These include ability estimates (thetas) for all response patterns, less regression towards the mean than MAP ability estimates, and a lower average squared error. R. D. Bock and R. J. Mislevy (1982) state that the…

  11. 4D maximum a posteriori reconstruction in dynamic SPECT using a compartmental model-based prior.

    PubMed

    Kadrmas, D J; Gullberg, G T

    2001-05-01

    A 4D ordered-subsets maximum a posteriori (OSMAP) algorithm for dynamic SPECT is described which uses a temporal prior that constrains each voxel's behaviour in time to conform to a compartmental model. No a priori limitations on kinetic parameters are applied; rather, the parameter estimates evolve as the algorithm iterates to a solution. The estimated parameters and time-activity curves are used within the reconstruction algorithm to model changes in the activity distribution as the camera rotates, avoiding artefacts due to inconsistencies of data between projection views. This potentially allows for fewer, longer-duration scans to be used and may have implications for noise reduction. The algorithm was evaluated qualitatively using dynamic 99mTc-teboroxime SPECT scans in two patients, and quantitatively using a series of simulated phantom experiments. The OSMAP algorithm resulted in images with better myocardial uniformity and definition, gave time-activity curves with reduced noise variations, and provided wash-in parameter estimates with better accuracy and lower statistical uncertainty than those obtained from conventional ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) processing followed by compartmental modelling. The new algorithm effectively removed the bias in k21 estimates due to inconsistent projections for sampling schedules as slow as 60 s per timeframe, but no improvement in wash-out parameter estimates was observed in this work. The proposed dynamic OSMAP algorithm provides a flexible framework which may benefit a variety of dynamic tomographic imaging applications.

  12. Enabling Predictive Simulation and UQ of Complex Multiphysics PDE Systems by the Development of Goal-Oriented Variational Sensitivity Analysis and A Posteriori Error Estimation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ginting, Victor

    2014-03-15

    it was demonstrated that a posteriori analyses in general and in particular one that uses adjoint methods can accurately and efficiently compute numerical error estimates and sensitivity for critical Quantities of Interest (QoIs) that depend on a large number of parameters. Activities include: analysis and implementation of several time integration techniques for solving system of ODEs as typically obtained from spatial discretization of PDE systems; multirate integration methods for ordinary differential equations; formulation and analysis of an iterative multi-discretization Galerkin finite element method for multi-scale reaction-diffusion equations; investigation of an inexpensive postprocessing technique to estimate the error of finite element solution of the second-order quasi-linear elliptic problems measured in some global metrics; investigation of an application of the residual-based a posteriori error estimates to symmetric interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin method for solving a class of second order quasi-linear elliptic problems; a posteriori analysis of explicit time integrations for system of linear ordinary differential equations; derivation of accurate a posteriori goal oriented error estimates for a user-defined quantity of interest for two classes of first and second order IMEX schemes for advection-diffusion-reaction problems; Postprocessing finite element solution; and A Bayesian Framework for Uncertain Quantification of Porous Media Flows.

  13. Testing the role of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter and the choice of connection in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achour, Jibril Ben; Geiller, Marc; Noui, Karim; Yu, Chao

    2015-05-01

    We study the role of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter γ and the choice of connection in the construction of (a symmetry-reduced version of) loop quantum gravity. We start with the four-dimensional Lorentzian Holst action that we reduce to three dimensions in a way that preserves the presence of γ . In the time gauge, the phase space of the resulting three-dimensional theory mimics exactly that of the four-dimensional one. Its quantization can be performed, and on the kinematical Hilbert space spanned by SU(2) spin network states the spectra of geometric operators are discrete and γ dependent. However, because of the three-dimensional nature of the theory, its SU(2) Ashtekar-Barbero Hamiltonian constraint can be traded for the flatness constraint of an s l (2 ,C ) connection, and we show that this latter has to satisfy a linear simplicitylike condition analogous to the one used in the construction of spin foam models. The physically relevant solution to this constraint singles out the noncompact subgroup SU(1, 1), which in turn leads to the disappearance of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter and to a continuous length spectrum, in agreement with what is expected from Lorentzian three-dimensional gravity.

  14. Comparison between three option, four option and five option multiple choice question tests for quality parameters: A randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Vegada, Bhavisha; Shukla, Apexa; Khilnani, Ajeetkumar; Charan, Jaykaran; Desai, Chetna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most of the academic teachers use four or five options per item of multiple choice question (MCQ) test as formative and summative assessment. Optimal number of options in MCQ item is a matter of considerable debate among academic teachers of various educational fields. There is a scarcity of the published literature regarding the optimum number of option in each item of MCQ in the field of medical education. Objectives: To compare three options, four options, and five options MCQs test for the quality parameters – reliability, validity, item analysis, distracter analysis, and time analysis. Materials and Methods: Participants were 3rd semester M.B.B.S. students. Students were divided randomly into three groups. Each group was given one set of MCQ test out of three options, four options, and five option randomly. Following the marking of the multiple choice tests, the participants’ option selections were analyzed and comparisons were conducted of the mean marks, mean time, validity, reliability and facility value, discrimination index, point biserial value, distracter analysis of three different option formats. Results: Students score more (P = 0.000) and took less time (P = 0.009) for the completion of three options as compared to four options and five options groups. Facility value was more (P = 0.004) in three options group as compared to four and five options groups. There was no significant difference between three groups for the validity, reliability, and item discrimination. Nonfunctioning distracters were more in the four and five options group as compared to three option group. Conclusion: Assessment based on three option MCQs is can be preferred over four option and five option MCQs. PMID:27721545

  15. A posteriori registration and subtraction of periapical radiographs for the evaluation of external apical root resorption after orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chibinski, Ana Cláudia; Coelho, Ulisses; Wambier, Letícia Stadler; Zedebski, Rosário de Arruda Moura; de Moraes, Mari Eli Leonelli; de Moraes, Luiz Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study employed a posteriori registration and subtraction of radiographic images to quantify the apical root resorption in maxillary permanent central incisors after orthodontic treatment, and assessed whether the external apical root resorption (EARR) was related to a range of parameters involved in the treatment. Materials and Methods A sample of 79 patients (mean age, 13.5±2.2 years) with no history of trauma or endodontic treatment of the maxillary permanent central incisors was selected. Periapical radiographs taken before and after orthodontic treatment were digitized and imported to the Regeemy software. Based on an analysis of the posttreatment radiographs, the length of the incisors was measured using Image J software. The mean EARR was described in pixels and relative root resorption (%). The patient's age and gender, tooth extraction, use of elastics, and treatment duration were evaluated to identify possible correlations with EARR. Results The mean EARR observed was 15.44±12.1 pixels (5.1% resorption). No differences in the mean EARR were observed according to patient characteristics (gender, age) or treatment parameters (use of elastics, treatment duration). The only parameter that influenced the mean EARR of a patient was the need for tooth extraction. Conclusion A posteriori registration and subtraction of periapical radiographs was a suitable method to quantify EARR after orthodontic treatment, and the need for tooth extraction increased the extent of root resorption after orthodontic treatment. PMID:27051635

  16. Posteriori error estimation of h-p finite element approximations of frictional contact problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. Y.; Oden, J. T.

    1994-03-01

    Dynamic and static fractional contact problems are described using the normal compliance law on the contact boundary. Dynamic problems are recast into quasistatic problems by time discretization. An a posteriori error estimator is developed for nonlinear elliptic equation of corresponding static or quasistatic problems. The a posteriori error estimator is applied to a frictionless case and extended to frictional contact problems. An adaptive strategy is introduced and h-p finite element meshes are obtained through a procedure based on a priori and a posteriori error estimations. Numerical examples are given to support the theoretical results.

  17. Nonlinear model-based control of the Czochralski process III: Proper choice of manipulated variables and controller parameter scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, M.; Winkler, J.

    2012-12-01

    This contribution continues an article series [1,2] about the nonlinear model-based control of the Czochralski crystal growth process. The key idea of the presented approach is to use a sophisticated combination of nonlinear model-based and conventional (linear) PI controllers for tracking of both, crystal radius and growth rate. Using heater power and pulling speed as manipulated variables several controller structures are possible. The present part tries to systematize the properties of the materials to be grown in order to get unambiguous decision criteria for a most profitable choice of the controller structure. For this purpose a material specific constant M called interface mobility and a more process specific constant S called system response number are introduced. While the first one summarizes important material properties like thermal conductivity and latent heat the latter one characterizes the process by evaluating the average axial thermal gradients at the phase boundary and the actual growth rate at which the crystal is grown. Furthermore these characteristic numbers are useful for establishing a scheduling strategy for the PI controller parameters in order to improve the controller performance. Finally, both numbers give a better understanding of the general thermal system dynamics of the Czochralski technique.

  18. Rigorous a posteriori assessment of accuracy in EMG decomposition.

    PubMed

    McGill, Kevin C; Marateb, Hamid R

    2011-02-01

    If electromyography (EMG) decomposition is to be a useful tool for scientific investigation, it is essential to know that the results are accurate. Because of background noise, waveform variability, motor-unit action potential (MUAP) indistinguishability, and perplexing superpositions, accuracy assessment is not straightforward. This paper presents a rigorous statistical method for assessing decomposition accuracy based only on evidence from the signal itself. The method uses statistical decision theory in a Bayesian framework to integrate all the shape- and firing-time-related information in the signal to compute an objective a posteriori measure of confidence in the accuracy of each discharge in the decomposition. The assessment is based on the estimated statistical properties of the MUAPs and noise and takes into account the relative likelihood of every other possible decomposition. The method was tested on 3 pairs of real EMG signals containing 4-7 active MUAP trains per signal that had been decomposed by a human expert. It rated 97% of the identified MUAP discharges as accurate to within ± 0.5 ms with a confidence level of 99%, and detected six decomposition errors. Cross-checking between signal pairs verified all but two of these assertions. These results demonstrate that the approach is reliable and practical for real EMG signals.

  19. Preconditioned alternating projection algorithms for maximum a posteriori ECT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Li, Si; Shen, Lixin; Xu, Yuesheng

    2012-11-01

    We propose a preconditioned alternating projection algorithm (PAPA) for solving the maximum a posteriori (MAP) emission computed tomography (ECT) reconstruction problem. Specifically, we formulate the reconstruction problem as a constrained convex optimization problem with the total variation (TV) regularization. We then characterize the solution of the constrained convex optimization problem and show that it satisfies a system of fixed-point equations defined in terms of two proximity operators raised from the convex functions that define the TV-norm and the constraint involved in the problem. The characterization (of the solution) via the proximity operators that define two projection operators naturally leads to an alternating projection algorithm for finding the solution. For efficient numerical computation, we introduce to the alternating projection algorithm a preconditioning matrix (the EM-preconditioner) for the dense system matrix involved in the optimization problem. We prove theoretically convergence of the PAPA. In numerical experiments, performance of our algorithms, with an appropriately selected preconditioning matrix, is compared with performance of the conventional MAP expectation-maximization (MAP-EM) algorithm with TV regularizer (EM-TV) and that of the recently developed nested EM-TV algorithm for ECT reconstruction. Based on the numerical experiments performed in this work, we observe that the alternating projection algorithm with the EM-preconditioner outperforms significantly the EM-TV in all aspects including the convergence speed, the noise in the reconstructed images and the image quality. It also outperforms the nested EM-TV in the convergence speed while providing comparable image quality.

  20. Comparative analysis of a-priori and a-posteriori dietary patterns using state-of-the-art classification algorithms: a case/case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kastorini, Christina-Maria; Papadakis, George; Milionis, Haralampos J; Kalantzi, Kallirroi; Puddu, Paolo-Emilio; Nikolaou, Vassilios; Vemmos, Konstantinos N; Goudevenos, John A; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B

    2013-11-01

    To compare the accuracy of a-priori and a-posteriori dietary patterns in the prediction of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and ischemic stroke. This is actually the first study to employ state-of-the-art classification methods for this purpose. During 2009-2010, 1000 participants were enrolled; 250 consecutive patients with a first ACS and 250 controls (60±12 years, 83% males), as well as 250 consecutive patients with a first stroke and 250 controls (75±9 years, 56% males). The controls were population-based and age-sex matched to the patients. The a-priori dietary patterns were derived from the validated MedDietScore, whereas the a-posteriori ones were extracted from principal components analysis. Both approaches were modeled using six classification algorithms: multiple logistic regression (MLR), naïve Bayes, decision trees, repeated incremental pruning to produce error reduction (RIPPER), artificial neural networks and support vector machines. The classification accuracy of the resulting models was evaluated using the C-statistic. For the ACS prediction, the C-statistic varied from 0.587 (RIPPER) to 0.807 (MLR) for the a-priori analysis, while for the a-posteriori one, it fluctuated between 0.583 (RIPPER) and 0.827 (MLR). For the stroke prediction, the C-statistic varied from 0.637 (RIPPER) to 0.767 (MLR) for the a-priori analysis, and from 0.617 (decision tree) to 0.780 (MLR) for the a-posteriori. Both dietary pattern approaches achieved equivalent classification accuracy over most classification algorithms. The choice, therefore, depends on the application at hand. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Posteriori Finite Element Bounds for Sensitivity Derivatives of Partial-Differential-Equation Outputs. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert Michael; Patera, Anthony T.; Peraire, Jaume

    1998-01-01

    We present a Neumann-subproblem a posteriori finite element procedure for the efficient and accurate calculation of rigorous, 'constant-free' upper and lower bounds for sensitivity derivatives of functionals of the solutions of partial differential equations. The design motivation for sensitivity derivative error control is discussed; the a posteriori finite element procedure is described; the asymptotic bounding properties and computational complexity of the method are summarized; and illustrative numerical results are presented.

  2. Preconditioned Alternating Projection Algorithms for Maximum a Posteriori ECT Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Krol, Andrzej; Li, Si; Shen, Lixin; Xu, Yuesheng

    2012-01-01

    We propose a preconditioned alternating projection algorithm (PAPA) for solving the maximum a posteriori (MAP) emission computed tomography (ECT) reconstruction problem. Specifically, we formulate the reconstruction problem as a constrained convex optimization problem with the total variation (TV) regularization. We then characterize the solution of the constrained convex optimization problem and show that it satisfies a system of fixed-point equations defined in terms of two proximity operators raised from the convex functions that define the TV-norm and the constrain involved in the problem. The characterization (of the solution) via the proximity operators that define two projection operators naturally leads to an alternating projection algorithm for finding the solution. For efficient numerical computation, we introduce to the alternating projection algorithm a preconditioning matrix (the EM-preconditioner) for the dense system matrix involved in the optimization problem. We prove theoretically convergence of the preconditioned alternating projection algorithm. In numerical experiments, performance of our algorithms, with an appropriately selected preconditioning matrix, is compared with performance of the conventional MAP expectation-maximization (MAP-EM) algorithm with TV regularizer (EM-TV) and that of the recently developed nested EM-TV algorithm for ECT reconstruction. Based on the numerical experiments performed in this work, we observe that the alternating projection algorithm with the EM-preconditioner outperforms significantly the EM-TV in all aspects including the convergence speed, the noise in the reconstructed images and the image quality. It also outperforms the nested EM-TV in the convergence speed while providing comparable image quality. PMID:23271835

  3. Simultaneous maximum a posteriori longitudinal PET image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Sam; Reader, Andrew J.

    2017-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is frequently used to monitor functional changes that occur over extended time scales, for example in longitudinal oncology PET protocols that include routine clinical follow-up scans to assess the efficacy of a course of treatment. In these contexts PET datasets are currently reconstructed into images using single-dataset reconstruction methods. Inspired by recently proposed joint PET-MR reconstruction methods, we propose to reconstruct longitudinal datasets simultaneously by using a joint penalty term in order to exploit the high degree of similarity between longitudinal images. We achieved this by penalising voxel-wise differences between pairs of longitudinal PET images in a one-step-late maximum a posteriori (MAP) fashion, resulting in the MAP simultaneous longitudinal reconstruction (SLR) method. The proposed method reduced reconstruction errors and visually improved images relative to standard maximum likelihood expectation-maximisation (ML-EM) in simulated 2D longitudinal brain tumour scans. In reconstructions of split real 3D data with inserted simulated tumours, noise across images reconstructed with MAP-SLR was reduced to levels equivalent to doubling the number of detected counts when using ML-EM. Furthermore, quantification of tumour activities was largely preserved over a variety of longitudinal tumour changes, including changes in size and activity, with larger changes inducing larger biases relative to standard ML-EM reconstructions. Similar improvements were observed for a range of counts levels, demonstrating the robustness of the method when used with a single penalty strength. The results suggest that longitudinal regularisation is a simple but effective method of improving reconstructed PET images without using resolution degrading priors.

  4. Goal oriented adaptivity in the IRGNM for parameter identification in PDEs: I. reduced formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbacher, B.; Kirchner, A.; Veljović, S.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we study adaptive discretization of the iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton method (IRGNM) with an a posteriori (discrepancy principle) choice of the regularization parameter in each Newton step and of the stopping index. We first of all prove convergence and convergence rates under some accuracy requirements formulated in terms of four quantities of interest. Then computation of error estimators for these quantities based on a weighted dual residual method is discussed, which results in an algorithm for adaptive refinement. Finally we extend the results from the Hilbert space setting with quadratic penalty to Banach spaces and general Tikhonov functionals for the regularization of each Newton step.

  5. Combined Uncertainty and A-Posteriori Error Bound Estimates for General CFD Calculations: Theory and Software Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    This workshop presentation discusses the design and implementation of numerical methods for the quantification of statistical uncertainty, including a-posteriori error bounds, for output quantities computed using CFD methods. Hydrodynamic realizations often contain numerical error arising from finite-dimensional approximation (e.g. numerical methods using grids, basis functions, particles) and statistical uncertainty arising from incomplete information and/or statistical characterization of model parameters and random fields. The first task at hand is to derive formal error bounds for statistics given realizations containing finite-dimensional numerical error [1]. The error in computed output statistics contains contributions from both realization error and the error resulting from the calculation of statistics integrals using a numerical method. A second task is to devise computable a-posteriori error bounds by numerically approximating all terms arising in the error bound estimates. For the same reason that CFD calculations including error bounds but omitting uncertainty modeling are only of limited value, CFD calculations including uncertainty modeling but omitting error bounds are only of limited value. To gain maximum value from CFD calculations, a general software package for uncertainty quantification with quantified error bounds has been developed at NASA. The package provides implementations for a suite of numerical methods used in uncertainty quantification: Dense tensorization basis methods [3] and a subscale recovery variant [1] for non-smooth data, Sparse tensorization methods[2] utilizing node-nested hierarchies, Sampling methods[4] for high-dimensional random variable spaces.

  6. A regularized parameter choice in regularization for a common solution of a finite system of ill-posed equations involving Lipschitz continuous and accretive mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buong, Nguyen; Dung, Nguyen Dinh

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a regularized parameter choice in a new regularization method of Browder-Tikhonov type, for finding a common solution of a finite system of ill-posed operator equations involving Lipschitz continuous and accretive mappings in a real reflexive and strictly convex Banach space with a uniformly Gateaux differentiate norm. An estimate for convergence rates of regularized solution is also established.

  7. Ontology based log content extraction engine for a posteriori security control.

    PubMed

    Azkia, Hanieh; Cuppens-Boulahia, Nora; Cuppens, Frédéric; Coatrieux, Gouenou

    2012-01-01

    In a posteriori access control, users are accountable for actions they performed and must provide evidence, when required by some legal authorities for instance, to prove that these actions were legitimate. Generally, log files contain the needed data to achieve this goal. This logged data can be recorded in several formats; we consider here IHE-ATNA (Integrating the healthcare enterprise-Audit Trail and Node Authentication) as log format. The difficulty lies in extracting useful information regardless of the log format. A posteriori access control frameworks often include a log filtering engine that provides this extraction function. In this paper we define and enforce this function by building an IHE-ATNA based ontology model, which we query using SPARQL, and show how the a posteriori security controls are made effective and easier based on this function.

  8. A-Posteriori Error Estimation for Hyperbolic Conservation Laws with Constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    This lecture considers a-posteriori error estimates for the numerical solution of conservation laws with time invariant constraints such as those arising in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and gravitational physics. Using standard duality arguments, a-posteriori error estimates for the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method are then presented for MHD with solenoidal constraint. From these estimates, a procedure for adaptive discretization is outlined. A taxonomy of Green's functions for the linearized MHD operator is given which characterizes the domain of dependence for pointwise errors. The extension to other constrained systems such as the Einstein equations of gravitational physics are then considered. Finally, future directions and open problems are discussed.

  9. A-Posteriori Error Estimation for Hyperbolic Conservation Laws with Constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    This lecture considers a-posteriori error estimates for the numerical solution of conservation laws with time invariant constraints such as those arising in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and gravitational physics. Using standard duality arguments, a-posteriori error estimates for the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method are then presented for MHD with solenoidal constraint. From these estimates, a procedure for adaptive discretization is outlined. A taxonomy of Green's functions for the linearized MHD operator is given which characterizes the domain of dependence for pointwise errors. The extension to other constrained systems such as the Einstein equations of gravitational physics are then considered. Finally, future directions and open problems are discussed.

  10. A posteriori information effects on culpability judgments from a cross-cultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wendy W N; Chiu, Chi-Yue; Luk, Chung-Leung

    2005-10-01

    A posteriori information about the moral attributes of the victim of a crime can affect an observer's judgment on the culpability of the actor of the crime so that negative moral attributes of the victim will lead to a lower judgment of culpability. The authors found this effect of a posteriori information among 118 American and 123 Chinese participants, but the underlying mechanisms were different between the two cultural groups. The Americans considered the psychological state of the actor during the crime, whereas the Chinese considered the morality of the actor during the crime. The authors discussed these results in light of the respondents' implicit theories of morality.

  11. Segmenting pectoralis muscle on digital mammograms by a Markov random field-maximum a posteriori model

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Mei; Mainprize, James G.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Accurate and automatic segmentation of the pectoralis muscle is essential in many breast image processing procedures, for example, in the computation of volumetric breast density from digital mammograms. Its segmentation is a difficult task due to the heterogeneity of the region, neighborhood complexities, and shape variability. The segmentation is achieved by pixel classification through a Markov random field (MRF) image model. Using the image intensity feature as observable data and local spatial information as a priori, the posterior distribution is estimated in a stochastic process. With a variable potential component in the energy function, by the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate of the labeling image, given the image intensity feature which is assumed to follow a Gaussian distribution, we achieved convergence properties in an appropriate sense by Metropolis sampling the posterior distribution of the selected energy function. By proposing an adjustable spatial constraint, the MRF-MAP model is able to embody the shape requirement and provide the required flexibility for the model parameter fitting process. We demonstrate that accurate and robust segmentation can be achieved for the curving-triangle-shaped pectoralis muscle in the medio-lateral-oblique (MLO) view, and the semielliptic-shaped muscle in cranio-caudal (CC) view digital mammograms. The applicable mammograms can be either “For Processing” or “For Presentation” image formats. The algorithm was developed using 56 MLO-view and 79 CC-view FFDM “For Processing” images, and quantitatively evaluated against a random selection of 122 MLO-view and 173 CC-view FFDM images of both presentation intent types. PMID:26158068

  12. An Iterative Maximum a Posteriori Estimation of Proficiency Level to Detect Multiple Local Likelihood Maxima

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; Raiche, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    In this article the authors focus on the issue of the nonuniqueness of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimator of proficiency level in item response theory (with special attention to logistic models). The usual maximum a posteriori (MAP) method offers a good alternative within that framework; however, this article highlights some drawbacks of its…

  13. Weighted Maximum-a-Posteriori Estimation in Tests Composed of Dichotomous and Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Shan-Shan; Tao, Jian; Chang, Hua-Hua; Shi, Ning-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    For mixed-type tests composed of dichotomous and polytomous items, polytomous items often yield more information than dichotomous items. To reflect the difference between the two types of items and to improve the precision of ability estimation, an adaptive weighted maximum-a-posteriori (WMAP) estimation is proposed. To evaluate the performance of…

  14. Weighted Maximum-a-Posteriori Estimation in Tests Composed of Dichotomous and Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Shan-Shan; Tao, Jian; Chang, Hua-Hua; Shi, Ning-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    For mixed-type tests composed of dichotomous and polytomous items, polytomous items often yield more information than dichotomous items. To reflect the difference between the two types of items and to improve the precision of ability estimation, an adaptive weighted maximum-a-posteriori (WMAP) estimation is proposed. To evaluate the performance of…

  15. An Iterative Maximum a Posteriori Estimation of Proficiency Level to Detect Multiple Local Likelihood Maxima

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; Raiche, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    In this article the authors focus on the issue of the nonuniqueness of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimator of proficiency level in item response theory (with special attention to logistic models). The usual maximum a posteriori (MAP) method offers a good alternative within that framework; however, this article highlights some drawbacks of its…

  16. Estimation of parameters in linear structural relationships: Sensitivity to the choice of the ratio of error variances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayanan, M. Y.; Gunst, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Maximum likelihood estimation of parameters in linear structural relationships under normality assumptions requires knowledge of one or more of the model parameters if no replication is available. The most common assumption added to the model definition is that the ratio of the error variances of the response and predictor variates is known. The use of asymptotic formulae for variances and mean squared errors as a function of sample size and the assumed value for the error variance ratio is investigated.

  17. On parameter choice in the regularization of ill-posed problems with rough estimate of the noise level of the data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hämarik, U.; Kangro, U.; Palm, R.; Raus, T.

    2012-09-01

    We consider linear ill-posed problems in Hilbert space with noisy data. The noise level may be given exactly or approximately or there may be no information about the noise level. We regularize the problem using the Landweber method, the Tikhonov method or the iterated or extrapolated version of the Tikhonov method. For all three cases of noise information we propose rules for the choice of the regularization parameter and give recommendations for preferences of rules depending on the accuracy of noise level information. The main attention is paid for the case if the noise level is under-or overestimated.

  18. Nonmarket valuation of water quality in a rural transition economy in Turkey applying an a posteriori bid design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bederli Tümay, Aylin; Brouwer, Roy

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the economic benefits associated with public investments in wastewater treatment in one of the special protected areas along Turkey's touristic Mediterranean coast, the Köyceǧiz-Dalyan watershed. The benefits, measured in terms of boatable, fishable, swimmable and drinkable water quality, are estimated using a public survey format following the contingent valuation (CV) method. The study presented here is the first of its kind in Turkey. The study's main objective is to assess public perception, understanding, and valuation of improved wastewater treatment facilities in the two largest population centers in the watershed, facing the same water pollution problems as a result of lack of appropriate wastewater treatment. We test the validity and reliability of the application of the CV methodology to this specific environmental problem in a rural transition economy and evaluate the transferability of the results within the watershed. In order to facilitate willingness to pay (WTP) value elicitation we apply a novel dichotomous choice procedure where bid design takes place a posteriori instead of a priori. The statistical efficiency of different bid vectors is evaluated in terms of the estimated welfare measures' mean square errors using Monte Carlo simulation. The robustness of bid function specification is analyzed through average WTP and standard deviation estimated using parametric and nonparametric methods.

  19. [Correlations between colorimetric parameters of teeth, eyes and skin. Perspectives in the choice of tooth shade for complete denture].

    PubMed

    Seck, A; Guèye, M; Dieng, L; Mbodj, E B; Ndiaye, C; Seck, M T; Lo, A S; Ngom, P I

    2013-09-01

    Rehabilitation with complete denture include among other objectives, improvement of facial and dental esthetics. To these ends, the artificial teeth should mimic as far as possible, healthy and natural dentition. The main objective of this study was to investigate factors associated with tooth color among black African subjects. One hundred and two subjects (72 men and 30 women) were included in this investigation. The colorimetric parameters of their teeth as well as those of the conjunctiva of their eyes and skin were recorded from standardized photographs. Two software, Mesurim and Photoshop were used for that purpose. Univariate and linear regression analysis were run to assess the association between tooth color and the variables age, gender and colorimetric parameters of eyes and skin. It appears from the result of this study that tooth color was positively and significantly associated with age. Stepwise multiple regression analysis further revealed that tooth hue can be best predicted by a combination of skin complexion and brightness and eye lightness.

  20. Maximum a posteriori estimation of crystallographic phases in X-ray diffraction tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gürsoy, Doĝa; Biçer, Tekin; Almer, Jonathan D.; Kettimuthu, Raj; Stock, Stuart R.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A maximum a posteriori approach is proposed for X-ray diffraction tomography for reconstructing three-dimensional spatial distribution of crystallographic phases and orientations of polycrystalline materials. The approach maximizes the a posteriori density which includes a Poisson log-likelihood and an a priori term that reinforces expected solution properties such as smoothness or local continuity. The reconstruction method is validated with experimental data acquired from a section of the spinous process of a porcine vertebra collected at the 1-ID-C beamline of the Advanced Photon Source, at Argonne National Laboratory. The reconstruction results show significant improvement in the reduction of aliasing and streaking artefacts, and improved robustness to noise and undersampling compared to conventional analytical inversion approaches. The approach has the potential to reduce data acquisition times, and significantly improve beamtime efficiency. PMID:25939627

  1. A posteriori error estimation for hp -adaptivity for fourth-order equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Peter K.; Rangelova, Marina

    2010-04-01

    A posteriori error estimates developed to drive hp-adaptivity for second-order reaction-diffusion equations are extended to fourth-order equations. A C^1 hierarchical finite element basis is constructed from Hermite-Lobatto polynomials. A priori estimates of the error in several norms for both the interpolant and finite element solution are derived. In the latter case this requires a generalization of the well-known Aubin-Nitsche technique to time-dependent fourth-order equations. We show that the finite element solution and corresponding Hermite-Lobatto interpolant are asymptotically equivalent. A posteriori error estimators based on this equivalence for solutions at two orders are presented. Both are shown to be asymptotically exact on grids of uniform order. These estimators can be used to control various adaptive strategies. Computational results for linear steady-state and time-dependent equations corroborate the theory and demonstrate the effectiveness of the estimators in adaptive settings.

  2. [Experience with using mathematic model for evaluation of a posteriori occupational risk].

    PubMed

    Piktushanskaia, T E

    2009-01-01

    The author analyzed changes in occupational morbidity among workers of leading economic branches of Russian Federation, gave prognosis of occupational morbidity level for recent and distant future. The morbidity level is characterized by reliable decreasing trend--that is due to long decline in diagnostic rate of occupational diseases in periodic medical examinations. The author specified mathematic model to evaluate a posteriori occupational risk, based on materials concerning periodic medical examinations in coal miners.

  3. Explicit a posteriori error estimates for eigenvalue analysis of heterogeneous elastic structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy Francis; Reese, Garth M.; Hetmaniuk, Ulrich L.

    2005-07-01

    An a posteriori error estimator is developed for the eigenvalue analysis of three-dimensional heterogeneous elastic structures. It constitutes an extension of a well-known explicit estimator to heterogeneous structures. We prove that our estimates are independent of the variations in material properties and independent of the polynomial degree of finite elements. Finally, we study numerically the effectivity of this estimator on several model problems.

  4. Evaluation of a Maximum A-Posteriori Slope Estimator for a Hartmann Wavefront Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    MAXIMUM A-POSTERIORI SLOPE ESTIMATOR FOR A HARTMANN WAVEFRONT SENSOR THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force...Institute of Technology Air University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Electrical Engineering Troy B. Van...other post-processing techniques such as inverse filtering or blind deconvolution [1, 20]. Significant research has been done by the Air Force Maui

  5. A Posteriori Error Estimation for Discontinuous Galerkin Approximations of Hyperbolic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Mats G.; Barth, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    This article considers a posteriori error estimation of specified functionals for first-order systems of conservation laws discretized using the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element method. Using duality techniques, we derive exact error representation formulas for both linear and nonlinear functionals given an associated bilinear or nonlinear variational form. Weighted residual approximations of the exact error representation formula are then proposed and numerically evaluated for Ringleb flow, an exact solution of the 2-D Euler equations.

  6. Consistent robust a posteriori error majorants for approximate solutions of diffusion-reaction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    Efficiency of the error control of numerical solutions of partial differential equations entirely depends on the two factors: accuracy of an a posteriori error majorant and the computational cost of its evaluation for some test function/vector-function plus the cost of the latter. In the paper consistency of an a posteriori bound implies that it is the same in the order with the respective unimprovable a priori bound. Therefore, it is the basic characteristic related to the first factor. The paper is dedicated to the elliptic diffusion-reaction equations. We present a guaranteed robust a posteriori error majorant effective at any nonnegative constant reaction coefficient (r.c.). For a wide range of finite element solutions on a quasiuniform meshes the majorant is consistent. For big values of r.c. the majorant coincides with the majorant of Aubin (1972), which, as it is known, for relatively small r.c. (< ch -2 ) is inconsistent and looses its sense at r.c. approaching zero. Our majorant improves also some other majorants derived for the Poisson and reaction-diffusion equations.

  7. A posteriori correction for source decay in 3D bioluminescent source localization using multiview measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Wang, Pu; Tian, Jie; Liu, Dan; Wang, Ruifang

    2009-02-01

    As a novel optical molecular imaging technique, bioluminescence tomography (BLT) can be used to monitor the biological activities non-invasively at the cellular and molecular levels. In most of known BLT studies, however, the time variation of the bioluminescent source is neglected. It gives rise to the inconsistent views during the multiview continuous wave measurement. In other words, the real measured data from different measured views come from 'different' bioluminescent sources. It could bring large errors in bioluminescence reconstruction. In this paper, a posteriori correction strategy for adaptive FEM-based reconstruction is proposed and developed. The method helps to improve the source localization considering the bioluminescent energy variance during the multiview measurement. In the method, the correction for boundary signals by means of a posteriori correction strategy, which adopts the energy ratio of measured data in the overlapping domains between the adjacent measurements as the correcting factor, can eliminate the effect of the inconsistent views. Then the adaptive mesh refinement with a posteriori error estimation helps to improve the precision and efficiency of BLT reconstruction. In addition, a priori permissible source region selection based on the surface measured data further reduces the ill-posedness of BLT and enhances numerical stability. Finally, three-dimension numerical simulations using the heterogeneous phantom are performed. The numerically measured data is generated by Monte Carlo (MC) method which is known as the Gold standard and can avoid the inverse crime. The reconstructed result with correction shows more accuracy compared to that without correction.

  8. A posteriori error estimation of H1 mixed finite element method for the Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafie, Sabarina; Tran, Thanh

    2017-08-01

    Error estimations of H1 mixed finite element method for the Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation are considered. The problem is reformulated into a system of first order partial differential equations, which allows an approximation of the unknown function and its derivative. Local parabolic error estimates are introduced to approximate the true errors from the computed solutions; the so-called a posteriori error estimates. Numerical experiments show that the a posteriori error estimates converge to the true errors of the problem.

  9. A Kernel Density Estimator-Based Maximum A Posteriori Image Reconstruction Method for Dynamic Emission Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ihsani, Alvin; Farncombe, Troy H

    2016-05-01

    A novel maximum a posteriori (MAP) method for dynamic single-photon emission computed tomography image reconstruction is proposed. The prior probability is modeled as a multivariate kernel density estimator (KDE), effectively modeling the prior probability non-parametrically, with the aim of reducing the effects of artifacts arising from inconsistencies in projection measurements in low-count regimes where projections are dominated by noise. The proposed prior spatially and temporally limits the variation of time-activity functions (TAFs) and attracts similar TAFs together. The similarity between TAFs is determined by the spatial and range scaling parameters of the KDE-like prior. The resulting iterative image reconstruction method is evaluated using two simulated phantoms, namely the extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) heart phantom and a simulated Mini-Deluxe Phantom. The phantoms were chosen to observe the effects of the proposed prior on the TAFs based on the vicinity and abutments of regions with different activities. Our results show the effectiveness of the proposed iterative reconstruction method, especially in low-count regimes, which provides better uniformity within each region of activity, significant reduction of spatiotemporal variations caused by noise, and sharper separation between different regions of activity than expectation maximization and an MAP method employing a more traditional Gibbs prior.

  10. A Kernel Density Estimator-Based Maximum A Posteriori Image Reconstruction Method for Dynamic Emission Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ihsani, Alvin; Farncombe, Troy

    2016-03-25

    A novel maximum a posteriori (MAP) method for dynamic SPECT image reconstruction is proposed. The prior probability is modelled as a multivariate kernel density estimator (KDE), effectively modelling the prior probability nonparametrically, with the aim of reducing the effects of artifacts arising from inconsistencies in projection measurements in lowcount regimes where projections are dominated by noise. The proposed prior spatially and temporally limits the variation of time-activity functions (TAF) and "attracts" similar TAFs together. The similarity between TAFs is determined by the spatial and range scaling parameters of the KDE-like prior. The resulting iterative image reconstruction method is evaluated using two simulated phantoms, namely the XCAT heart phantom and a simulated Mini-Deluxe PhantomTM. The phantoms were chosen to observe the effects of the proposed prior on the TAFs based on the vicinity and abutments of regions with different activities. Our results show the effectiveness of the proposed iterative reconstruction method, especially in low-count regimes, which provides better uniformity within each region of activity, significant reduction of spatio-temporal variations caused by noise, and sharper separation between different regions of activity than expectation maximization and a MAP method employing a more "traditional" Gibbs prior.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of efficiency of the methods for a posteriori filtration of the slip-rate time histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristekova, M.; Galis, M.; Moczo, P.; Kristek, J.

    2012-04-01

    Simulated slip-rate time histories often are not free from spurious high-frequency oscillations. This is because the used spatial grid is not fine enough to properly discretize possibly broad-spectrum slip-rate and stress variations and the spatial breakdown zone of the propagating rupture. In order to reduce the oscillations some numerical modelers apply the artificial damping. An alternative way is the application of the adaptive smoothing algorithm (ASA, Galis et al. 2010). The other modelers, however, rely on the a posteriori filtration. If the oscillations do not affect (change) development and propagation of the rupture during simulations, it is possible to apply a posteriori filtration to reduce the oscillations. Often, however, the a posteriori filtration is a problematic trade-off between suppression of oscillations and distortion of a true slip rate. We present quantitative comparison of efficiency of several methods. We have analyzed slip-rate time histories simulated by the FEM-TSN method. Signals containing spurious high-frequency oscillations and signals after application of a posteriori filtering have been compared to the reference signal. The reference signal was created by application of a careful iterative and adjusted denoising of the slip rate simulated using the finest (technically possible) spatial grid. We performed extensive numerical simulations in order to test efficiency of a posteriori filtration for slip rates with different level and nature of spurious oscillations. We show that the time-frequency analysis and time-frequency misfit criteria (Kristekova et al. 2006, 2009) are suitable tools for evaluation of efficiency of a posteriori filtration methods and also clear indicators of possible distortions introduced by a posteriori filtration.

  12. A maximum a posteriori probability time-delay estimation for seismic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, A.; Got, J.-L.

    2014-09-01

    Cross-correlation and cross-spectral time delays often exhibit strong outliers due to ambiguities or cycle jumps in the correlation function. Their number increases when signal-to-noise, signal similarity or spectral bandwidth decreases. Such outliers heavily determine the time-delay probability density function and the results of further computations (e.g. double-difference location and tomography) using these time delays. In the present research we expressed cross-correlation as a function of the squared difference between signal amplitudes and show that they are closely related. We used this difference as a cost function whose minimum is reached when signals are aligned. Ambiguities may be removed in this function by using a priori information. We propose using the traveltime difference as a priori time-delay information. By modelling the probability density function of the traveltime difference by a Cauchy distribution and the probability density function of the data (differences of seismic signal amplitudes) by a Laplace distribution we were able to find explicitly the time-delay a posteriori probability density function. The location of the maximum of this a posteriori probability density function is the maximum a posteriori time-delay estimation for earthquake signals. Using this estimation to calculate time delays for earthquakes on the south flank of Kilauea statistically improved the cross-correlation time-delay estimation for these data and resulted in successful double-difference relocation for an increased number of earthquakes. This robust time-delay estimation improves the spatiotemporal resolution of seismicity rates in the south flank of Kilauea.

  13. A-posteriori error estimation for the finite point method with applications to compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Enrique; Flores, Roberto; Oñate, Eugenio; Idelsohn, Sergio

    2017-08-01

    An a-posteriori error estimate with application to inviscid compressible flow problems is presented. The estimate is a surrogate measure of the discretization error, obtained from an approximation to the truncation terms of the governing equations. This approximation is calculated from the discrete nodal differential residuals using a reconstructed solution field on a modified stencil of points. Both the error estimation methodology and the flow solution scheme are implemented using the Finite Point Method, a meshless technique enabling higher-order approximations and reconstruction procedures on general unstructured discretizations. The performance of the proposed error indicator is studied and applications to adaptive grid refinement are presented.

  14. Object detection and amplitude estimation based on maximum a posteriori reconstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    We report on the behavior of the linear maximum a posteriori (MAP) tomographic reconstruction technique as a function of the assumed rms noise {sigma}{sub n} in the measurements, which specifies the degree of confidence in the measurement data. The unconstrained MAP reconstructions are evaluated on the basis of the performance of two related tasks; object detection and amplitude estimation. It is found that the detectability of medium-sized discs remains constant up to relatively large {sigma}{sub n} before slowly diminishing. However, the amplitudes of the discs estimated from the MAP reconstructions increasingly deviate from their actual values as {sigma}{sub n} increases.

  15. Three-dimensional super-resolution structured illumination microscopy with maximum a posteriori probability image estimation.

    PubMed

    Lukeš, Tomáš; Křížek, Pavel; Švindrych, Zdeněk; Benda, Jakub; Ovesný, Martin; Fliegel, Karel; Klíma, Miloš; Hagen, Guy M

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and demonstrate a new high performance image reconstruction method for super-resolution structured illumination microscopy based on maximum a posteriori probability estimation (MAP-SIM). Imaging performance is demonstrated on a variety of fluorescent samples of different thickness, labeling density and noise levels. The method provides good suppression of out of focus light, improves spatial resolution, and allows reconstruction of both 2D and 3D images of cells even in the case of weak signals. The method can be used to process both optical sectioning and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy data to create high quality super-resolution images.

  16. Application of a posteriori granddaughter and modified granddaughter designs to determine Holstein haplotype effects.

    PubMed

    Weller, J I; VanRaden, P M; Wiggans, G R

    2013-08-01

    A posteriori and modified granddaughter designs were applied to determine haplotype effects for Holstein bulls and cows with BovineSNP50 [~50,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP); Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA] genotypes. The a posteriori granddaughter design was applied to 52 sire families, each with ≥100 genotyped sons with genetic evaluations based on progeny tests. For 33 traits (milk, fat, and protein yields; fat and protein percentages; somatic cell score; productive life; daughter pregnancy rate; heifer and cow conception rates; service-sire and daughter calving ease; service-sire and daughter stillbirth; 18 conformation traits; and net merit), the analysis was applied to the autosomal segment with the SNP with the greatest effect in the genomic evaluation of each trait. All traits except 2 had a within-family haplotype effect. The same design was applied with the genetic evaluations of sons corrected for SNP effects associated with chromosomes besides the one under analysis. The number of within-family contrasts was 166 without adjustment and 211 with adjustment. Of the 52 bulls analyzed, 36 had BovineHD (high density; Illumina Inc.) genotypes that were used to test for concordance between sire quantitative trait loci and SNP genotypes; complete concordance was not obtained for any effects. Of the 31 traits with effects from the a posteriori granddaughter design, 21 were analyzed with the modified granddaughter design. Only sires with a contrast for the a posteriori granddaughter design and ≥200 granddaughters with a record usable for genetic evaluation were included. Calving traits could not be analyzed because individual cow evaluations were not computed. Eight traits had within-family haplotype effects. With respect to milk and fat yields and fat percentage, the results on Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 14 corresponded to the hypothesis that a missense mutation in the diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) gene is the main causative mutation

  17. Residential electricity load decomposition method based on maximum a posteriori probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Guangpu; Zhou, Heng; Liu, Song; Liu, Peng

    2017-05-01

    In order to improvement problems that the computational complexity and the accuracy is not high in load decomposition, a load decomposition method based on the maximum a posteriori probability is proposed, the electrical equipment steady-state current is chosen as load characteristic, according to the Bayesian formula, all the electric equipment's' electricity information value can be acquired at a time exactly. Experimental results show that the method can identify the running state of each power equipment, and can get a higher decomposition accuracy. In addition, the data used can be collected by the common smart meters that can be directly got from the current market, reducing the cost of hardware input.

  18. A coordinate-invariant model for deforming geodetic networks: understanding rank deficiencies, non-estimability of parameters, and the effect of the choice of minimal constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzinikos, Miltiadis; Dermanis, Athanasios

    2017-04-01

    By considering a deformable geodetic network, deforming in a linear-in-time mode, according to a coordinate-invariant model, it becomes possible to get an insight into the rank deficiency of the stacking procedure, which is the standard method for estimating initial station coordinates and constant velocities, from coordinate time series. Comparing any two out of the infinitely many least squares estimates of stacking unknowns (initial station coordinates, velocity components and transformation parameters for the reference system in each data epoch), it is proven that the two solutions differ only by a linear-in-time trend in the transformation parameters. These pass over to the initial coordinates (the constant term) and to the velocity estimates (the time coefficient part). While the difference in initial coordinates is equivalent to a change of the reference system at the initial epoch, the differences in velocity components do not comply with those predicted by the same change of reference system for all epochs. Consequently, the different velocity component estimates, obtained by introducing different sets of minimal constraints, correspond to physically different station velocities, which are therefore non-estimable quantities. The theoretical findings are numerically verified for a global, a regional and a local network, by obtaining solutions based on four different types of minimal constraints, three usual algebraic ones (inner or partial inner) and the lately introduced kinematic constraints. Finally, by resorting to the basic ideas of Felix Tisserand, it is explained why the station velocities are non-estimable quantities in a very natural way. The problem of the optimal choice of minimal constraints and, hence, of the corresponding spatio-temporal reference system is shortly discussed.

  19. A coordinate-invariant model for deforming geodetic networks: understanding rank deficiencies, non-estimability of parameters, and the effect of the choice of minimal constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzinikos, Miltiadis; Dermanis, Athanasios

    2016-11-01

    By considering a deformable geodetic network, deforming in a linear-in-time mode, according to a coordinate-invariant model, it becomes possible to get an insight into the rank deficiency of the stacking procedure, which is the standard method for estimating initial station coordinates and constant velocities, from coordinate time series. Comparing any two out of the infinitely many least squares estimates of stacking unknowns (initial station coordinates, velocity components and transformation parameters for the reference system in each data epoch), it is proven that the two solutions differ only by a linear-in-time trend in the transformation parameters. These pass over to the initial coordinates (the constant term) and to the velocity estimates (the time coefficient part). While the difference in initial coordinates is equivalent to a change of the reference system at the initial epoch, the differences in velocity components do not comply with those predicted by the same change of reference system for all epochs. Consequently, the different velocity component estimates, obtained by introducing different sets of minimal constraints, correspond to physically different station velocities, which are therefore non-estimable quantities. The theoretical findings are numerically verified for a global, a regional and a local network, by obtaining solutions based on four different types of minimal constraints, three usual algebraic ones (inner or partial inner) and the lately introduced kinematic constraints. Finally, by resorting to the basic ideas of Felix Tisserand, it is explained why the station velocities are non-estimable quantities in a very natural way. The problem of the optimal choice of minimal constraints and, hence, of the corresponding spatio-temporal reference system is shortly discussed.

  20. Simple a posteriori slope limiter (Post Limiter) for high resolution and efficient flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Keiichi; Hashimoto, Atsushi

    2017-07-01

    A simple and efficient a posteriori slope limiter (;Post Limiter;) is proposed for compressible Navier-Stokes and Euler equations, and examined in 1D and 2D. The Post Limiter tries to employ un-limited solutions where and when possible (even at shocks), and blend the un-limited and (1st-order) limited solutions smoothly, leading to equivalently four times resolution in 1D. This idea was inspired by a posteriori limiting approaches originally developed by Clain et al. (2011) [18] for higher-order flow computations, but proposed here is an alternative suitable and simplified for 2nd-order spatial accuracy with improved both solution and convergence. In fact, any iteration processes are no longer required to determine optimal orders of accuracy, since the limited and un-limited values are available at one time at 2nd-order. In 2D, several numerical examples have been dealt with, and both the κ = 1 / 3 MUSCL (in a structured solver) and Green-Gauss (in an unstructured solver) reconstructions demonstrated resolution improvement (nearly 4 × 4 times), convergence acceleration, and removal of numerical noises. Even on triangular meshes (on which least-squares reconstruction is used), the unstructured solver showed the improved solutions if cell geometries (cell-orientation angles) are properly taken into account. Therefore, the Post Limiter is readily incorporated into existing codes.

  1. Phylogenomics and a posteriori data partitioning resolve the Cretaceous angiosperm radiation Malpighiales.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhenxiang; Ruhfel, Brad R; Schaefer, Hanno; Amorim, André M; Sugumaran, M; Wurdack, Kenneth J; Endress, Peter K; Matthews, Merran L; Stevens, Peter F; Mathews, Sarah; Davis, Charles C

    2012-10-23

    The angiosperm order Malpighiales includes ~16,000 species and constitutes up to 40% of the understory tree diversity in tropical rain forests. Despite remarkable progress in angiosperm systematics during the last 20 y, relationships within Malpighiales remain poorly resolved, possibly owing to its rapid rise during the mid-Cretaceous. Using phylogenomic approaches, including analyses of 82 plastid genes from 58 species, we identified 12 additional clades in Malpighiales and substantially increased resolution along the backbone. This greatly improved phylogeny revealed a dynamic history of shifts in net diversification rates across Malpighiales, with bursts of diversification noted in the Barbados cherries (Malpighiaceae), cocas (Erythroxylaceae), and passion flowers (Passifloraceae). We found that commonly used a priori approaches for partitioning concatenated data in maximum likelihood analyses, by gene or by codon position, performed poorly relative to the use of partitions identified a posteriori using a Bayesian mixture model. We also found better branch support in trees inferred from a taxon-rich, data-sparse matrix, which deeply sampled only the phylogenetically critical placeholders, than in trees inferred from a taxon-sparse matrix with little missing data. Although this matrix has more missing data, our a posteriori partitioning strategy reduced the possibility of producing multiple distinct but equally optimal topologies and increased phylogenetic decisiveness, compared with the strategy of partitioning by gene. These approaches are likely to help improve phylogenetic resolution in other poorly resolved major clades of angiosperms and to be more broadly useful in studies across the Tree of Life.

  2. Real-time maximum a-posteriori image reconstruction for fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbar, Anwar A.; Dilipkumar, Shilpa; C K, Rasmi; Rajan, K.; Mondal, Partha P.

    2015-08-01

    Rapid reconstruction of multidimensional image is crucial for enabling real-time 3D fluorescence imaging. This becomes a key factor for imaging rapidly occurring events in the cellular environment. To facilitate real-time imaging, we have developed a graphics processing unit (GPU) based real-time maximum a-posteriori (MAP) image reconstruction system. The parallel processing capability of GPU device that consists of a large number of tiny processing cores and the adaptability of image reconstruction algorithm to parallel processing (that employ multiple independent computing modules called threads) results in high temporal resolution. Moreover, the proposed quadratic potential based MAP algorithm effectively deconvolves the images as well as suppresses the noise. The multi-node multi-threaded GPU and the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) efficiently execute the iterative image reconstruction algorithm that is ≈200-fold faster (for large dataset) when compared to existing CPU based systems.

  3. Machine learning source separation using maximum a posteriori nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Ling, Bingo W-K

    2014-07-01

    A novel unsupervised machine learning algorithm for single channel source separation is presented. The proposed method is based on nonnegative matrix factorization, which is optimized under the framework of maximum a posteriori probability and Itakura-Saito divergence. The method enables a generalized criterion for variable sparseness to be imposed onto the solution and prior information to be explicitly incorporated through the basis vectors. In addition, the method is scale invariant where both low and high energy components of a signal are treated with equal importance. The proposed algorithm is a more complete and efficient approach for matrix factorization of signals that exhibit temporal dependency of the frequency patterns. Experimental tests have been conducted and compared with other algorithms to verify the efficiency of the proposed method.

  4. Maximum a posteriori video super-resolution using a new multichannel image prior.

    PubMed

    Belekos, Stefanos P; Galatsanos, Nikolaos P; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K

    2010-06-01

    Super-resolution (SR) is the term used to define the process of estimating a high-resolution (HR) image or a set of HR images from a set of low-resolution (LR) observations. In this paper we propose a class of SR algorithms based on the maximum a posteriori (MAP) framework. These algorithms utilize a new multichannel image prior model, along with the state-of-the-art single channel image prior and observation models. A hierarchical (two-level) Gaussian nonstationary version of the multichannel prior is also defined and utilized within the same framework. Numerical experiments comparing the proposed algorithms among themselves and with other algorithms in the literature, demonstrate the advantages of the adopted multichannel approach.

  5. Anatomical labeling of the circle of willis using maximum a posteriori graph matching.

    PubMed

    Robben, David; Sunaert, Stefan; Thijs, Vincent; Wilms, Guy; Maes, Frederik; Suetens, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A new method for anatomically labeling the vasculature is presented and applied to the Circle of Willis. Our method converts the segmented vasculature into a graph that is matched with an annotated graph atlas in a maximum a posteriori (MAP) way. The MAP matching is formulated as a quadratic binary programming problem which can be solved efficiently. Unlike previous methods, our approach can handle non tree-like vasculature and large topological differences. The method is evaluated in a leave-one-out test on MRA of 30 subjects where it achieves a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 85% with an average error of 1.5 mm on matching bifurcations in the vascular graph.

  6. Local a posteriori estimates for pointwise gradient errors in finite element methods for elliptic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demlow, Alan

    2007-03-01

    We prove local a posteriori error estimates for pointwise gradient errors in finite element methods for a second-order linear elliptic model problem. First we split the local gradient error into a computable local residual term and a weaker global norm of the finite element error (the ``pollution term''). Using a mesh-dependent weight, the residual term is bounded in a sharply localized fashion. In specific situations the pollution term may also be bounded by computable residual estimators. On nonconvex polygonal and polyhedral domains in two and three space dimensions, we may choose estimators for the pollution term which do not employ specific knowledge of corner singularities and which are valid on domains with cracks. The finite element mesh is only required to be simplicial and shape-regular, so that highly graded and unstructured meshes are allowed.

  7. Conjugate quasilinear Dirichlet and Neumann problems and a posteriori error bounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Quasilinear Dirichlet and Neumann problems on a rectangle D with boundary D prime are considered. Using these concepts, conjugate problems, that is, a pair of one Dirichlet and one Neumann problem, the minima of the energies of which add to zero, are introduced. From the concept of conjugate problems, two-sided bounds for the energy of the exact solution of any given Dirichlet or Neumann problem are constructed. These two-sided bounds for the energy at the exact solution are in turn used to obtain a posteriori error bounds for the norm of the difference of the approximate and exact solutions of the problem. These bounds do not involve the unknown exact solution and are easily constructed numerically.

  8. An a posteriori-driven adaptive Mixed High-Order method with application to electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pietro, Daniele A.; Specogna, Ruben

    2016-12-01

    In this work we propose an adaptive version of the recently introduced Mixed High-Order method and showcase its performance on a comprehensive set of academic and industrial problems in computational electromagnetism. The latter include, in particular, the numerical modeling of comb-drive and MEMS devices. Mesh adaptation is driven by newly derived, residual-based error estimators. The resulting method has several advantageous features: It supports fairly general meshes, it enables arbitrary approximation orders, and has a moderate computational cost thanks to hybridization and static condensation. The a posteriori-driven mesh refinement is shown to significantly enhance the performance on problems featuring singular solutions, allowing to fully exploit the high-order of approximation.

  9. A posteriori correction of camera characteristics from large image data sets.

    PubMed

    Afanasyev, Pavel; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Matadeen, Rishi; De Carlo, Sacha; van Duinen, Gijs; Alewijnse, Bart; Peters, Peter J; Abrahams, Jan-Pieter; Portugal, Rodrigo V; Schatz, Michael; van Heel, Marin

    2015-06-11

    Large datasets are emerging in many fields of image processing including: electron microscopy, light microscopy, medical X-ray imaging, astronomy, etc. Novel computer-controlled instrumentation facilitates the collection of very large datasets containing thousands of individual digital images. In single-particle cryogenic electron microscopy ("cryo-EM"), for example, large datasets are required for achieving quasi-atomic resolution structures of biological complexes. Based on the collected data alone, large datasets allow us to precisely determine the statistical properties of the imaging sensor on a pixel-by-pixel basis, independent of any "a priori" normalization routinely applied to the raw image data during collection ("flat field correction"). Our straightforward "a posteriori" correction yields clean linear images as can be verified by Fourier Ring Correlation (FRC), illustrating the statistical independence of the corrected images over all spatial frequencies. The image sensor characteristics can also be measured continuously and used for correcting upcoming images.

  10. A new anisotropic mesh adaptation method based upon hierarchical a posteriori error estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weizhang; Kamenski, Lennard; Lang, Jens

    2010-03-01

    A new anisotropic mesh adaptation strategy for finite element solution of elliptic differential equations is presented. It generates anisotropic adaptive meshes as quasi-uniform ones in some metric space, with the metric tensor being computed based on hierarchical a posteriori error estimates. A global hierarchical error estimate is employed in this study to obtain reliable directional information of the solution. Instead of solving the global error problem exactly, which is costly in general, we solve it iteratively using the symmetric Gauß-Seidel method. Numerical results show that a few GS iterations are sufficient for obtaining a reasonably good approximation to the error for use in anisotropic mesh adaptation. The new method is compared with several strategies using local error estimators or recovered Hessians. Numerical results are presented for a selection of test examples and a mathematical model for heat conduction in a thermal battery with large orthotropic jumps in the material coefficients.

  11. A posteriori error estimation for multi-stage Runge–Kutta IMEX schemes

    DOE PAGES

    Chaudhry, Jehanzeb H.; Collins, J. B.; Shadid, John N.

    2017-02-05

    Implicit–Explicit (IMEX) schemes are widely used for time integration methods for approximating solutions to a large class of problems. In this work, we develop accurate a posteriori error estimates of a quantity-of-interest for approximations obtained from multi-stage IMEX schemes. This is done by first defining a finite element method that is nodally equivalent to an IMEX scheme, then using typical methods for adjoint-based error estimation. Furthermore, the use of a nodally equivalent finite element method allows a decomposition of the error into multiple components, each describing the effect of a different portion of the method on the total error inmore » a quantity-of-interest.« less

  12. A posteriori compensation of the systematic error due to polynomial interpolation in digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Antonio; Bertolino, Filippo

    2013-10-01

    It is well known that displacement components estimated using digital image correlation are affected by a systematic error due to the polynomial interpolation required by the numerical algorithm. The magnitude of bias depends on the characteristics of the speckle pattern (i.e., the frequency content of the image), on the fractional part of displacements and on the type of polynomial used for intensity interpolation. In literature, B-Spline polynomials are pointed out as being able to introduce the smaller errors, whereas bilinear and cubic interpolants generally give the worst results. However, the small bias of B-Spline polynomials is partially counterbalanced by a somewhat larger execution time. We will try to improve the accuracy of lower order polynomials by a posteriori correcting their results so as to obtain a faster and more accurate analysis.

  13. A posteriori error estimates for the Johnson–Nédélec FEM–BEM coupling

    PubMed Central

    Aurada, M.; Feischl, M.; Karkulik, M.; Praetorius, D.

    2012-01-01

    Only very recently, Sayas [The validity of Johnson–Nédélec's BEM-FEM coupling on polygonal interfaces. SIAM J Numer Anal 2009;47:3451–63] proved that the Johnson–Nédélec one-equation approach from [On the coupling of boundary integral and finite element methods. Math Comput 1980;35:1063–79] provides a stable coupling of finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM). In our work, we now adapt the analytical results for different a posteriori error estimates developed for the symmetric FEM–BEM coupling to the Johnson–Nédélec coupling. More precisely, we analyze the weighted-residual error estimator, the two-level error estimator, and different versions of (h−h/2)-based error estimators. In numerical experiments, we use these estimators to steer h-adaptive algorithms, and compare the effectivity of the different approaches. PMID:22347772

  14. Cosmic shear measurement with maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Alex; Taylor, Andy

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the problem of noise bias in maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori estimators for cosmic shear. We derive the leading and next-to-leading order biases and compute them in the context of galaxy ellipticity measurements, extending previous work on maximum likelihood inference for weak lensing. We show that a large part of the bias on these point estimators can be removed using information already contained in the likelihood when a galaxy model is specified, without the need for external calibration. We test these bias-corrected estimators on simulated galaxy images similar to those expected from planned space-based weak lensing surveys, with promising results. We find that the introduction of an intrinsic shape prior can help with mitigation of noise bias, such that the maximum a posteriori estimate can be made less biased than the maximum likelihood estimate. Second-order terms offer a check on the convergence of the estimators, but are largely subdominant. We show how biases propagate to shear estimates, demonstrating in our simple set-up that shear biases can be reduced by orders of magnitude and potentially to within the requirements of planned space-based surveys at mild signal-to-noise ratio. We find that second-order terms can exhibit significant cancellations at low signal-to-noise ratio when Gaussian noise is assumed, which has implications for inferring the performance of shear-measurement algorithms from simplified simulations. We discuss the viability of our point estimators as tools for lensing inference, arguing that they allow for the robust measurement of ellipticity and shear.

  15. Variance Difference between Maximum Likelihood Estimation Method and Expected A Posteriori Estimation Method Viewed from Number of Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmud, Jumailiyah; Sutikno, Muzayanah; Naga, Dali S.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine variance difference between maximum likelihood and expected A posteriori estimation methods viewed from number of test items of aptitude test. The variance presents an accuracy generated by both maximum likelihood and Bayes estimation methods. The test consists of three subtests, each with 40 multiple-choice…

  16. Edge-based a posteriori error estimators for generation of d-dimensional quasi-optimal meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Agouzal, Abdellatif; Vassilevski, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method of metric recovery for minimization of L{sub p}-norms of the interpolation error or its gradient. The method uses edge-based a posteriori error estimates. The method is analyzed for conformal simplicial meshes in spaces of arbitrary dimension d.

  17. Experimental delayed-choice entanglement swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiao-Song; Zotter, Stefan; Kofler, Johannes; Ursin, Rupert; Jennewein, Thomas; Brukner, Časlav; Zeilinger, Anton

    2012-06-01

    Motivated by the question of which kind of physical interactions and processes are needed for the production of quantum entanglement, Peres has put forward the radical idea of delayed-choice entanglement swapping. There, entanglement can be `produced a posteriori, after the entangled particles have been measured and may no longer exist'. Here, we report the realization of Peres's gedanken experiment. Using four photons, we can actively delay the choice of measurement--implemented through a high-speed tunable bipartite-state analyser and a quantum random-number generator--on two of the photons into the time-like future of the registration of the other two photons. This effectively projects the two already registered photons onto one of two mutually exclusive quantum states in which the photons are either entangled (quantum correlations) or separable (classical correlations). This can also be viewed as `quantum steering into the past'.

  18. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  19. Historical Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schick, James B. M.

    1988-01-01

    States that history instruction can be made meaningful and enlightening only by examining historical choices and their results against available options and likely consequences. Presenting examples, the author argues that well-crafted historical simulations focusing on such elements as choice and consequence, strategy and tactics provide a useful…

  20. Choice experiments

    Treesearch

    Thomas P Holmes; Wiktor L Adamawicz; Fredrik Carlsson

    2017-01-01

    There has been an explosion of interest during the past two decades in a class of nonmarket stated-preference valuation methods known as choice experiments. The overall objective of a choice experiment is to estimate economic values for characteristics (or attributes) of an environmental good that is the subject of policy analysis, where...

  1. Image Bit-depth Enhancement via Maximum-A-Posteriori Estimation of AC Signal.

    PubMed

    Wan, Pengfei; Cheung, Gene; Florencio, Dinei; Zhang, Cha; Au, Oscar C

    2016-04-13

    When images at low bit-depth are rendered at high bit-depth displays, missing least significant bits need to be estimated. We study the image bit-depth enhancement problem: estimating an original image from its quantized version from a minimum mean squared error (MMSE) perspective. We first argue that a graph-signal smoothness prior-one defined on a graph embedding the image structure-is an appropriate prior for the bit-depth enhancement problem. We next show that solving for the MMSE solution directly is in general too computationally expensive to be practical. We then propose an efficient approximation strategy. Specifically, we first estimate the AC component of the desired signal in a maximum a posteriori (MAP) formulation, efficiently computed via convex programming. We then compute the DC component with an MMSE criterion in closed form given the computed AC component. Experiments show that our proposed two-step approach has improved performance over conventional bit-depth enhancement schemes in both objective and subjective comparisons.

  2. On Evaluation of Recharge Model Uncertainty: a Priori and a Posteriori

    SciTech Connect

    Ming Ye; Karl Pohlmann; Jenny Chapman; David Shafer

    2006-01-30

    Hydrologic environments are open and complex, rendering them prone to multiple interpretations and mathematical descriptions. Hydrologic analyses typically rely on a single conceptual-mathematical model, which ignores conceptual model uncertainty and may result in bias in predictions and under-estimation of predictive uncertainty. This study is to assess conceptual model uncertainty residing in five recharge models developed to date by different researchers based on different theories for Nevada and Death Valley area, CA. A recently developed statistical method, Maximum Likelihood Bayesian Model Averaging (MLBMA), is utilized for this analysis. In a Bayesian framework, the recharge model uncertainty is assessed, a priori, using expert judgments collected through an expert elicitation in the form of prior probabilities of the models. The uncertainty is then evaluated, a posteriori, by updating the prior probabilities to estimate posterior model probability. The updating is conducted through maximum likelihood inverse modeling by calibrating the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model corresponding to each recharge model against observations of head and flow. Calibration results of DVRFS for the five recharge models are used to estimate three information criteria (AIC, BIC, and KIC) used to rank and discriminate these models. Posterior probabilities of the five recharge models, evaluated using KIC, are used as weights to average head predictions, which gives posterior mean and variance. The posterior quantities incorporate both parametric and conceptual model uncertainties.

  3. Comparative assessment of four a-posteriori uncertainty quantification methods for PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Pavlos; Sciacchitano, Andrea; Neal, Douglas; Smith, Barton; Warner, Scott

    2014-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a well-established technique for the measurement of the flow velocity in a two or three dimensional domain. As in any other technique, PIV data are affected by measurement errors, defined as the difference between the measured velocity and its actual value, which is unknown. The objective of uncertainty quantification is estimating an interval that contains the (unknown) actual error magnitude with a certain probability. In the present work, four methods for the a-posteriori uncertainty quantification of PIV data are assessed. The methods are: the uncertainty surface method (Timmins et al., 2012), the particle disparity approach (Sciacchitano et al., 2013; the peak ratio approach (Charonko and Vlachos, 2013) and the correlation statistics method (Wieneke 2014). For the assessment, a dedicated experimental database of a rectangular jet flow has been produced (Neal et al., 2014) where a reference velocity is known with a high degree of confidence. The comparative assessment has shown strengths and weaknesses of the four uncertainty quantification methods under different flow fields and imaging conditions.

  4. Phylogenetic assignment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing clinical isolates in Japan by maximum a posteriori estimation.

    PubMed

    Seto, Junji; Wada, Takayuki; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Tamaru, Aki; Maeda, Shinji; Yamamoto, Kaori; Hase, Atsushi; Murakami, Koichi; Maeda, Eriko; Oishi, Akira; Migita, Yuji; Yamamoto, Taro; Ahiko, Tadayuki

    2015-10-01

    Intra-species phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been regarded as a clue to estimate its potential risk to develop drug-resistance and various epidemiological tendencies. Genotypic characterization of variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), a standard tool to ascertain transmission routes, has been improving as a public health effort, but determining phylogenetic information from those efforts alone is difficult. We present a platform based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation to estimate phylogenetic information for M. tuberculosis clinical isolates from individual profiles of VNTR types. This study used 1245 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates obtained throughout Japan for construction of an MAP estimation formula. Two MAP estimation formulae, classification of Beijing family and other lineages, and classification of five Beijing sublineages (ST11/26, STK, ST3, and ST25/19 belonging to the ancient Beijing subfamily and modern Beijing subfamily), were created based on 24 loci VNTR (24Beijing-VNTR) profiles and phylogenetic information of the isolates. Recursive estimation based on the formulae showed high concordance with their authentic phylogeny by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) of the isolates. The formulae might further support phylogenetic estimation of the Beijing lineage M. tuberculosis from the VNTR genotype with various geographic backgrounds. These results suggest that MAP estimation can function as a reliable probabilistic process to append phylogenetic information to VNTR genotypes of M. tuberculosis independently, which might improve the usage of genotyping data for control, understanding, prevention, and treatment of TB.

  5. Item exposure control for multidimensional computer adaptive testing under maximum likelihood and expected a posteriori estimation.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Alan R; Wang, Chun; Quinlan, Kari; Seubert, Lauren

    2016-12-01

    Item bank stratification has been shown to be an effective method for combating item overexposure in both uni- and multidimensional computer adaptive testing. However, item bank stratification cannot guarantee that items will not be overexposed-that is, exposed at a rate exceeding some prespecified threshold. In this article, we propose enhancing stratification for multidimensional computer adaptive tests by combining it with the item eligibility method, a technique for controlling the maximum exposure rate in computerized tests. The performance of the method was examined via a simulation study and compared to existing methods of item selection and exposure control. Also, for the first time, maximum likelihood (MLE) and expected a posteriori (EAP) estimation of examinee ability were compared side by side in a multidimensional computer adaptive test. The simulation suggested that the proposed method is effective in suppressing the maximum item exposure rate with very little loss of measurement accuracy and precision. As compared to MLE, EAP generates smaller mean squared errors of the ability estimates in all simulation conditions.

  6. Finite Element A Posteriori Error Estimation for Heat Conduction. Degree awarded by George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Christapher G.; Bey, Kim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This research investigates residual-based a posteriori error estimates for finite element approximations of heat conduction in single-layer and multi-layered materials. The finite element approximation, based upon hierarchical modelling combined with p-version finite elements, is described with specific application to a two-dimensional, steady state, heat-conduction problem. Element error indicators are determined by solving an element equation for the error with the element residual as a source, and a global error estimate in the energy norm is computed by collecting the element contributions. Numerical results of the performance of the error estimate are presented by comparisons to the actual error. Two methods are discussed and compared for approximating the element boundary flux. The equilibrated flux method provides more accurate results for estimating the error than the average flux method. The error estimation is applied to multi-layered materials with a modification to the equilibrated flux method to approximate the discontinuous flux along a boundary at the material interfaces. A directional error indicator is developed which distinguishes between the hierarchical modeling error and the finite element error. Numerical results are presented for single-layered materials which show that the directional indicators accurately determine which contribution to the total error dominates.

  7. Noise stochastic corrected maximum a posteriori estimator for birefringence imaging using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kasaragod, Deepa; Makita, Shuichi; Hong, Young-Joo; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a noise-stochastic corrected maximum a posteriori estimator for birefringence imaging using Jones matrix optical coherence tomography. The estimator described in this paper is based on the relationship between probability distribution functions of the measured birefringence and the effective signal to noise ratio (ESNR) as well as the true birefringence and the true ESNR. The Monte Carlo method is used to numerically describe this relationship and adaptive 2D kernel density estimation provides the likelihood for a posteriori estimation of the true birefringence. Improved estimation is shown for the new estimator with stochastic model of ESNR in comparison to the old estimator, both based on the Jones matrix noise model. A comparison with the mean estimator is also done. Numerical simulation validates the superiority of the new estimator. The superior performance of the new estimator was also shown by in vivo measurement of optic nerve head. PMID:28270974

  8. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Jakeman, J.D. Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the physical discretization error and the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity of the sparse grid. Utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this paper we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.

  9. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Jakeman, J. D.; Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity. We show that utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this paper we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.

  10. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    DOE PAGES

    Jakeman, J. D.; Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity. We show that utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this papermore » we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.« less

  11. A functional-type a posteriori error estimate of approximate solutions for Reissner-Mindlin plates and its implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Maxim; Chistiakova, Olga

    2017-06-01

    Paper is devoted to a numerical justification of the recent a posteriori error estimate for Reissner-Mindlin plates. This majorant provides a reliable control of accuracy of any conforming approximate solution of the problem including solutions obtained with commercial software for mechanical engineering. The estimate is developed on the basis of the functional approach and is applicable to several types of boundary conditions. To verify the approach, numerical examples with mesh refinements are provided.

  12. Delay aversion but preference for large and rare rewards in two choice tasks: implications for the measurement of self-control parameters

    PubMed Central

    Adriani, Walter; Laviola, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    Background Impulsivity is defined as intolerance/aversion to waiting for reward. In intolerance-to-delay (ID) protocols, animals must choose between small/soon (SS) versus large/late (LL) rewards. In the probabilistic discount (PD) protocols, animals are faced with choice between small/sure (SS) versus large/luck-linked (LLL) rewards. It has been suggested that PD protocols also measure impulsivity, however, a clear dissociation has been reported between delay and probability discounting. Results Wistar adolescent rats (30- to 46-day-old) were tested using either protocol in drug-free state. In the ID protocol, animals showed a marked shift from LL to SS reward when delay increased, and this despite adverse consequences on the total amount of food obtained. In the PD protocol, animals developed a stable preference for LLL reward, and maintained it even when SS and LLL options were predicted and demonstrated to become indifferent. We demonstrate a clear dissociation between these two protocols. In the ID task, the aversion to delay was anti-economical and reflected impulsivity. In the PD task, preference for large reward was maintained despite its uncertain delivery, suggesting a strong attraction for unitary rewards of great magnitude. Conclusion Uncertain delivery generated no aversion, when compared to delays producing an equivalent level of large-reward rarefaction. The PD task is suggested not to reflect impulsive behavior, and to generate patterns of choice that rather resemble the features of gambling. In summary, present data do indicate the need to interpret choice behavior in ID and PD protocols differently. PMID:16796752

  13. Delay aversion but preference for large and rare rewards in two choice tasks: implications for the measurement of self-control parameters.

    PubMed

    Adriani, Walter; Laviola, Giovanni

    2006-06-23

    Impulsivity is defined as intolerance/aversion to waiting for reward. In intolerance-to-delay (ID) protocols, animals must choose between small/soon (SS) versus large/late (LL) rewards. In the probabilistic discount (PD) protocols, animals are faced with choice between small/sure (SS) versus large/luck-linked (LLL) rewards. It has been suggested that PD protocols also measure impulsivity, however, a clear dissociation has been reported between delay and probability discounting. Wistar adolescent rats (30- to 46-day-old) were tested using either protocol in drug-free state. In the ID protocol, animals showed a marked shift from LL to SS reward when delay increased, and this despite adverse consequences on the total amount of food obtained. In the PD protocol, animals developed a stable preference for LLL reward, and maintained it even when SS and LLL options were predicted and demonstrated to become indifferent. We demonstrate a clear dissociation between these two protocols. In the ID task, the aversion to delay was anti-economical and reflected impulsivity. In the PD task, preference for large reward was maintained despite its uncertain delivery, suggesting a strong attraction for unitary rewards of great magnitude. Uncertain delivery generated no aversion, when compared to delays producing an equivalent level of large-reward rarefaction. The PD task is suggested not to reflect impulsive behavior, and to generate patterns of choice that rather resemble the features of gambling. In summary, present data do indicate the need to interpret choice behavior in ID and PD protocols differently.

  14. Determination of quantitative trait variants by concordance via application of the a posteriori granddaughter design to the U.S. Holstein population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Experimental designs that exploit family information can provide substantial predictive power in quantitative trait variant discovery projects. Concordance between quantitative trait locus genotype as determined by the a posteriori granddaughter design and marker genotype was determined for 29 trai...

  15. Parameter adaptive estimation of random processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the parameter adaptive least squares estimation of random processes. The main result is a general representation theorem for the conditional expectation of a random variable on a product probability space. Using this theorem along with the general likelihood ratio expression, the least squares estimate of the process is found in terms of the parameter conditioned estimates. The stochastic differential for the a posteriori probability and the stochastic differential equation for the a posteriori density are found by using simple stochastic calculus on the representations obtained. The results are specialized to the case when the parameter has a discrete distribution. The results can be used to construct an implementable recursive estimator for certain types of nonlinear filtering problems. This is illustrated by some simple examples.

  16. Safer Choice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Safer Choice is a voluntary program that works to advance the mission of EPA to protect human health and the environment by helping product manufacturers choose the safest chemical ingredients possible.

  17. A Posteriori Study of a DNS Database Describing Super critical Binary-Species Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Taskinoglu, Ezgi

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the modeling of supercritical-pressure flows through Large Eddy Simulation (LES) uses models derived for atmospheric-pressure flows. Those atmospheric-pressure flows do not exhibit the particularities of high densitygradient magnitude features observed both in experiments and simulations of supercritical-pressure flows in the case of two species mixing. To assess whether the current LES modeling is appropriate and if found not appropriate to propose higher-fidelity models, a LES a posteriori study has been conducted for a mixing layer that initially contains different species in the lower and upper streams, and where the initial pressure is larger than the critical pressure of either species. An initially-imposed vorticity perturbation promotes roll-up and a double pairing of four initial span-wise vortices into an ultimate vortex that reaches a transitional state. The LES equations consist of the differential conservation equations coupled with a real-gas equation of state, and the equation set uses transport properties depending on the thermodynamic variables. Unlike all LES models to date, the differential equations contain, additional to the subgrid scale (SGS) fluxes, a new SGS term that is a pressure correction in the momentum equation. This additional term results from filtering of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) equations, and represents the gradient of the difference between the filtered pressure and the pressure computed from the filtered flow field. A previous a priori analysis, using a DNS database for the same configuration, found this term to be of leading order in the momentum equation, a fact traced to the existence of high-densitygradient magnitude regions that populated the entire flow; in the study, models were proposed for the SGS fluxes as well as this new term. In the present study, the previously proposed constantcoefficient SGS-flux models of the a priori investigation are tested a posteriori in LES, devoid of or including, the

  18. Modelling of turbulent lifted jet flames using flamelets: a priori assessment and a posteriori validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shaohong; Swaminathan, Nedunchezhian; Darbyshire, Oliver

    2014-03-01

    This study focuses on the modelling of turbulent lifted jet flames using flamelets and a presumed Probability Density Function (PDF) approach with interest in both flame lift-off height and flame brush structure. First, flamelet models used to capture contributions from premixed and non-premixed modes of the partially premixed combustion in the lifted jet flame are assessed using a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data for a turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame. The joint PDFs of mixture fraction Z and progress variable c, including their statistical correlation, are obtained using a copula method, which is also validated using the DNS data. The statistically independent PDFs are found to be generally inadequate to represent the joint PDFs from the DNS data. The effects of Z-c correlation and the contribution from the non-premixed combustion mode on the flame lift-off height are studied systematically by including one effect at a time in the simulations used for a posteriori validation. A simple model including the effects of chemical kinetics and scalar dissipation rate is suggested and used for non-premixed combustion contributions. The results clearly show that both Z-c correlation and non-premixed combustion effects are required in the premixed flamelets approach to get good agreement with the measured flame lift-off heights as a function of jet velocity. The flame brush structure reported in earlier experimental studies is also captured reasonably well for various axial positions. It seems that flame stabilisation is influenced by both premixed and non-premixed combustion modes, and their mutual influences.

  19. Is a picture worth a thousand words: an analysis of the difficulty and discrimination parameters of illustrated vs. text-alone vignettes in histology multiple choice questions.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jane; O'Sullivan, Robin; Arnett, Richard

    2015-10-26

    Advances in cognitive load theory have led to greater understanding of how we process verbal and visual material during learning, but the evidence base with regard to the use of images within written assessments is still sparse. This study examines whether the inclusion of images within the stimulus format of multiple choice questions (MCQs) has a predictable or consistent influence on psychometric item properties, such as difficulty or discrimination. Item analysis data from three consecutive years of histology multiple choice examinations were included in this study. All items were reviewed and categorised according to whether their stem, or stimulus format, was purely textual or included an associated image. A total of 195 MCQs were identified for inclusion and analysed using classical test theory; 95 used text alone and 100 included an image within the question stem. The number of students per examination ranged from 277 to 347, with a total of 60,850 student-question interactions. We initially examined whether the inclusion of an image within the item stem altered the item difficulty using Mann-Whitney U. The median item difficulty for images with purely textual stems was 0.77, while that for items incorporating an appropriate image was 0.80; this difference was not significant (0.77 vs. 0.80; p = 0.862, Mann-Whitney-U = 4818.5). Mean values showed that the Item Discrimination Index appeared unaffected by the inclusion of an image within the stem, and Item point biserial correlation also showed no difference in means between these two groups (Independent samples t-test; 2-tailed). We demonstrate that the addition of illustrations within undergraduate histology Multiple Choice Question stems has no overall influence on item difficulty, or measures of item discrimination. We conclude that the use of images in this context is statistically uncritical, and suggest that their inclusion within item stems should be based upon the principles of constructive

  20. Using Short-term Hindcast Skill to Add Confidence to the Choice of Uncertain Model Parameter Values in CESM Climate Change Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, C.; Neale, R. B.; Rothstein, M.

    2016-12-01

    Projections of future climate change are inherently uncertain and regional details are heavily dependent on coupled climate model formulations. Bernstein and Neelin (2016) show that projections of future climate using the Community Earth System Model (CESM) can vary significantly depending on the (reasonable) value used for important but uncertain model parameters. This includes a wide variation in the tropical precipitation response due to perturbations of parameters inherent to the formulation of deep convection parameterization. The question is therefore which model formulation should be trusted most? Since true validation is, of course, not possible at present day, guidance has to be provided by other proxies. Using a simple metric that climate models that performing best in a standard present-day (AMIP-type) configuration should be trusted most for future climate projections is unsatisfactory here, as only a small tuning effort is required to produce simulations equally skillful to the unperturbed model configurations. Here we employ an alternative approach for "trusting" the future climate projections. It is based on using CESM for a series of CAPT-type hindcast simulations, mirroring the limited perturbed parameter ensemble approach of Bernstein and Neelin (2016). Simulation sets are run for the YOTC period of 2009-2010 using CAM5 at 1 degree resolution. In this talk we will show the regional variations of climate change signals in the hydrological cycle in response to deep convection dependent parameter sets (e.g., entrainment, timescale) and contrast them with the equivalent hindcast experiments using the same parameter set. With this analysis we are able to provide guidance as to which parameter value selections result in the highest skill in the hindcasts and how that corresponds with the equivalent CESM future climate change signals.

  1. [An analysis of using the graphic monitoring of ventilation for an optimal choice of respiratory management parameters in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gritsan, A I; Kolesnichenko, A P; Skorobogatov, A Iu; Gritsan, G V

    2004-01-01

    The potentialities of graphic ventilation monitoring (graphic monitor "Servo Screen 390", Siemens Elema, Sweden) were analyzed for optimizing the respiratory management parameters in 48 obstetric and gynecology patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The ventilation loops and curves, ALV parameters, mechanical lung properties, gas blood composition and gas indices were dynamically evaluated during examination stages. The graphic ventilation monitoring, when used for respiratory management in patients with ARDS, provides for optimizing, in the real time mode, the PEEP and Vt levels, which is in line with the AVL "safety" concept.

  2. Choice Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Darcy

    2001-01-01

    Describes how the author allows the children to make choices about their art and writing, enabling them to make connections between their own lives and work. Suggests that educators need to provide doorways to the things that give students ideas: books, music, objects, pictures, smells, sounds, and textures. (SG)

  3. Project Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO.

    Project Choice was begun with the goal of increasing the number of inner-city students who graduate on time. Ewing M. Kauffman and his business and foundation associates designed and elected to test a model that used the promise of postsecondary education or training as the incentive to stay in school. This report details the evolution of Project…

  4. Choice Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Darcy

    2001-01-01

    Describes how the author allows the children to make choices about their art and writing, enabling them to make connections between their own lives and work. Suggests that educators need to provide doorways to the things that give students ideas: books, music, objects, pictures, smells, sounds, and textures. (SG)

  5. An Analysis of a Finite Element Method for Convection-Diffusion Problems. Part II. A Posteriori Error Estimates and Adaptivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    UNCLASSIFIED N G SZYMCZAK ET AL. MAR 83 BN-i@82 F/G 12/1 NL I hhhhhhh EhhhhhhhhhhhE mhhhhomhhlhhhEIEEIEEEEEIlUso o.4 Q.8 L-A -J1 IIIII1 L MICROCOPY...AN ANALYSIS OF A FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR CONVECTION-DIFFUSION PROBLEMS PART II: A POSTERIORI ERROR ESTIMATES AND ADAPTIVITY by W. G. Szymczak Y 6a...ESTIMATES AND ADAPTIVITY 6. PERFORMING OR. REPORT NMBER 7. AUTNOR(e) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUM11CR’ s) W. G. Szymczak and I. Babu~ka ONR N00014-77-0623 S

  6. Blind deconvolution of images with model discrepancies using maximum a posteriori estimation with heavy-tailed priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, Jan; Å roubek, Filip

    2015-02-01

    Single image blind deconvolution aims to estimate the unknown blur from a single observed blurred image and recover the original sharp image. Such task is severely ill-posed and typical approaches involve some heuristic or other steps without clear mathematical explanation to arrive at an acceptable solution. We show that a straight- forward maximum a posteriori estimation incorporating sparse priors and mechanism to deal with boundary artifacts, combined with an efficient numerical method can produce results which compete with or outperform much more complicated state-of-the-art methods. Our method is naturally extended to deal with overexposure in low-light photography, where linear blurring model is violated.

  7. The choice of the mathematical method for prediction of electrochemical accumulator parameters value in power installations of space-rocket objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezruchko, K. V.; Davidov, A. O.; Katorgina, J. G.; Logvin, V. M.; Kharchenko, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    The review and analysis of several mathematical methods for prediction of electrochemical accumulator parameters are provided in the article: according to the mathematical expectation, the latest entry, a statistical prediction, Box-Jenkins model, decomposition Volta, ARMA, ARIMA and Kalman filter. The results of these methods for prediction of the electrochemical battery 22НКГ-4CK characteristics which is a part of spacecraft power plant of the “Mikrosputnik” type are given. Possible usage of these methods for long prediction of electrochemical accumulator characteristics on space-rocket objects power plants is showed.

  8. Combined Uncertainty and A-Posteriori Error Bound Estimates for CFD Calculations: Theory and Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Simulation codes often utilize finite-dimensional approximation resulting in numerical error. Some examples include, numerical methods utilizing grids and finite-dimensional basis functions, particle methods using a finite number of particles. These same simulation codes also often contain sources of uncertainty, for example, uncertain parameters and fields associated with the imposition of initial and boundary data,uncertain physical model parameters such as chemical reaction rates, mixture model parameters, material property parameters, etc.

  9. Evaluation of experimental design and computational parameter choices affecting analyses of ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data in undomesticated poplar trees

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the great advantages of next generation sequencing is the ability to generate large genomic datasets for virtually all species, including non-model organisms. It should be possible, in turn, to apply advanced computational approaches to these datasets to develop models of biological processes. In a practical sense, working with non-model organisms presents unique challenges. In this paper we discuss some of these challenges for ChIP-seq and RNA-seq experiments using the undomesticated tree species of the genus Populus. Results We describe specific challenges associated with experimental design in Populus, including selection of optimal genotypes for different technical approaches and development of antibodies against Populus transcription factors. Execution of the experimental design included the generation and analysis of Chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data for RNA polymerase II and transcription factors involved in wood formation. We discuss criteria for analyzing the resulting datasets, determination of appropriate control sequencing libraries, evaluation of sequencing coverage needs, and optimization of parameters. We also describe the evaluation of ChIP-seq data from Populus, and discuss the comparison between ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data and biological interpretations of these comparisons. Conclusions These and other "lessons learned" highlight the challenges but also the potential insights to be gained from extending next generation sequencing-supported network analyses to undomesticated non-model species. PMID:25081589

  10. Modelling the CheY(D10K,Yl00W) Halobacterium salinarum mutant: sensitivity analysis allows choice of parameter to be modified in the phototaxis model.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, R C H; Staudinger, W F; Streif, S; Pfeiffer, F; Mendoza, E; Oesterhelt, D

    2007-07-01

    A recent phototaxis model of Halobacterium salinarum composed of the signalling pathway and the switch complex of the motor explained all considered experimental data on spontaneous switching and response time to repellent or attractant light stimuli. However, the model which considers symmetric processes in the clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations of the motor cannot explain the behaviour of a CheY(D10K,Yl00W) mutant which always moves forward and does not respond to light. We show that the introduction of asymmetry in the motor switch model can explain this behaviour. Sensitivity analysis allowed us to choose parameters for which the model is sensitive and whose values we then change in either direction to obtain an asymmetric model. We also demonstrate numerically that at low concentrations of CheYP, the symmetric and asymmetric models behave similarly, but at high concentrations, differences in the clockwise and counter-clockwise modes become apparent. Thus, those experimental data that could previously be explained only by ad hoc assumptions are now obtained 'naturally' from the revised model.

  11. Relevance of the choice of spark plasma sintering parameters in obtaining a suitable microstructure for iodine-bearing apatite designed for the conditioning of I-129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campayo, L.; Le Gallet, S.; Perret, D.; Courtois, E.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Grin, Yu.; Bernard, F.

    2015-02-01

    The high chemical durability of iodine-bearing apatite phases makes them potentially attractive for immobilizing radioactive iodine. Reactive spark plasma sintering provides a dense ceramic as a wasteform. A design-of-experiments (DOE) approach was adopted to identify the main process/material parameters and their first order interactions in order to specify experimental conditions guaranteeing complete reaction, relative density of the wasteform exceeding 92% and the largest possible grain size. For a disposal of the wasteform in a deep geological repository, these characteristics allow minimization of the iodine release by contact with groundwater. It was found that sintering at a temperature of 450 °C with an initial specific surface area of 3.3 m2 g-1 for the powder reactants is sufficient in itself to achieve the targeted characteristics of the wasteform. However, this relies on a liquid sintering regime the efficiency of which can be limited by the lead iodide initial content in the mix as well as by its particle size.

  12. Effect of parameter choice in root water uptake models - the arrangement of root hydraulic properties within the root architecture affects dynamics and efficiency of root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechmann, M.; Schneider, C.; Carminati, A.; Vetterlein, D.; Attinger, S.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2014-10-01

    Detailed three-dimensional models of root water uptake have become increasingly popular for investigating the process of root water uptake. However, they suffer from a lack of information on important parameters, particularly on the spatial distribution of root axial and radial conductivities, which vary greatly along a root system. In this paper we explore how the arrangement of those root hydraulic properties and branching within the root system affects modelled uptake dynamics, xylem water potential and the efficiency of root water uptake. We first apply a simple model to illustrate the mechanisms at the scale of single roots. By using two efficiency indices based on (i) the collar xylem potential ("effort") and (ii) the integral amount of unstressed root water uptake ("water yield"), we show that an optimal root length emerges, depending on the ratio between roots axial and radial conductivity. Young roots with high capacity for radial uptake are only efficient when they are short. Branching, in combination with mature transport roots, enables soil exploration and substantially increases active young root length at low collar potentials. Second, we investigate how this shapes uptake dynamics at the plant scale using a comprehensive three-dimensional root water uptake model. Plant-scale dynamics, such as the average uptake depth of entire root systems, were only minimally influenced by the hydraulic parameterization. However, other factors such as hydraulic redistribution, collar potential, internal redistribution patterns and instantaneous uptake depth depended strongly on the arrangement on the arrangement of root hydraulic properties. Root systems were most efficient when assembled of different root types, allowing for separation of root function in uptake (numerous short apical young roots) and transport (longer mature roots). Modelling results became similar when this heterogeneity was accounted for to some degree (i.e. if the root systems contained between

  13. Hard choices.

    PubMed

    Furedi, A

    1999-01-01

    The cultural discourse that frames the abortion debate has changed and become more complex over the years. To date, concerns about the need to defend the choice have shifted to moral and ethical issues surrounding abortion. The right of women to abortion can be situated in the context of ethical principles, which are basic to what we hold valuable in the modern society. The ethical principle of "procreative autonomy", the right of humans to control their own role in procreation has an unusually significant place in modern political culture in which human dignity was an important feature. Central to human dignity was the principle that "people possess the moral right and responsibility to answer the basic questions about the value and meaning of their own lives." Another crucial issue is the need to defend the "bodily autonomy" of women. Forcing women to support the fetus against her will flies against such principles as the need for voluntary consent to medical treatment. These arguments do not suggest for a moral indifference towards abortion choices, but as Ronald Dworkin argues, "tolerance is a cost we must pay for our adventure in liberty."

  14. Choice-Based Conjoint Analysis: Classification vs. Discrete Choice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesen, Joachim; Mueller, Klaus; Taneva, Bilyana; Zolliker, Peter

    Conjoint analysis is a family of techniques that originated in psychology and later became popular in market research. The main objective of conjoint analysis is to measure an individual's or a population's preferences on a class of options that can be described by parameters and their levels. We consider preference data obtained in choice-based conjoint analysis studies, where one observes test persons' choices on small subsets of the options. There are many ways to analyze choice-based conjoint analysis data. Here we discuss the intuition behind a classification based approach, and compare this approach to one based on statistical assumptions (discrete choice models) and to a regression approach. Our comparison on real and synthetic data indicates that the classification approach outperforms the discrete choice models.

  15. Comparison of an assumption-free Bayesian approach with Optimal Sampling Schedule to a maximum a posteriori Approach for Personalizing Cyclophosphamide Dosing.

    PubMed

    Laínez, José M; Orcun, Seza; Pekny, Joseph F; Reklaitis, Gintaras V; Suvannasankha, Attaya; Fausel, Christopher; Anaissie, Elias J; Blau, Gary E

    2014-01-01

    Variable metabolism, dose-dependent efficacy, and a narrow therapeutic target of cyclophosphamide (CY) suggest that dosing based on individual pharmacokinetics (PK) will improve efficacy and minimize toxicity. Real-time individualized CY dose adjustment was previously explored using a maximum a posteriori (MAP) approach based on a five serum-PK sampling in patients with hematologic malignancy undergoing stem cell transplantation. The MAP approach resulted in an improved toxicity profile without sacrificing efficacy. However, extensive PK sampling is costly and not generally applicable in the clinic. We hypothesize that the assumption-free Bayesian approach (AFBA) can reduce sampling requirements, while improving the accuracy of results. Retrospective analysis of previously published CY PK data from 20 patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. In that study, Bayesian estimation based on the MAP approach of individual PK parameters was accomplished to predict individualized day-2 doses of CY. Based on these data, we used the AFBA to select the optimal sampling schedule and compare the projected probability of achieving the therapeutic end points. By optimizing the sampling schedule with the AFBA, an effective individualized PK characterization can be obtained with only two blood draws at 4 and 16 hours after administration on day 1. The second-day doses selected with the AFBA were significantly different than the MAP approach and averaged 37% higher probability of attaining the therapeutic targets. The AFBA, based on cutting-edge statistical and mathematical tools, allows an accurate individualized dosing of CY, with simplified PK sampling. This highly accessible approach holds great promise for improving efficacy, reducing toxicities, and lowering treatment costs. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  16. Reliable and efficient a posteriori error estimation for adaptive IGA boundary element methods for weakly-singular integral equations

    PubMed Central

    Feischl, Michael; Gantner, Gregor; Praetorius, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    We consider the Galerkin boundary element method (BEM) for weakly-singular integral equations of the first-kind in 2D. We analyze some residual-type a posteriori error estimator which provides a lower as well as an upper bound for the unknown Galerkin BEM error. The required assumptions are weak and allow for piecewise smooth parametrizations of the boundary, local mesh-refinement, and related standard piecewise polynomials as well as NURBS. In particular, our analysis gives a first contribution to adaptive BEM in the frame of isogeometric analysis (IGABEM), for which we formulate an adaptive algorithm which steers the local mesh-refinement and the multiplicity of the knots. Numerical experiments underline the theoretical findings and show that the proposed adaptive strategy leads to optimal convergence. PMID:26085698

  17. Reliable and efficient a posteriori error estimation for adaptive IGA boundary element methods for weakly-singular integral equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feischl, Michael; Gantner, Gregor; Praetorius, Dirk

    2015-06-01

    We consider the Galerkin boundary element method (BEM) for weakly-singular integral equations of the first-kind in 2D. We analyze some residual-type a posteriori error estimator which provides a lower as well as an upper bound for the unknown Galerkin BEM error. The required assumptions are weak and allow for piecewise smooth parametrizations of the boundary, local mesh-refinement, and related standard piecewise polynomials as well as NURBS. In particular, our analysis gives a first contribution to adaptive BEM in the frame of isogeometric analysis (IGABEM), for which we formulate an adaptive algorithm which steers the local mesh-refinement and the multiplicity of the knots. Numerical experiments underline the theoretical findings and show that the proposed adaptive strategy leads to optimal convergence.

  18. A Novel Gibbs Maximum A Posteriori (GMAP) Approach on Bayesian Nonlinear Mixed-Effects Population Pharmacokinetics (PK) Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongho; Hall, Stephen D.; Li, Lang

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, various Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) methods and the proposed algorithm, Gibbs maximum a posteriori (GMAP) algorithm, are compared for implementing the nonlinear mixed-effects model in pharmacokinetics (PK) studies. An intravenous two-compartmental PK model is adopted to fit the PK data from the midazolam (MDZ) studies, which recruited 24 individuals with 9 different time points per subject. The three-stage hierarchical nonlinear mixed model is constructed. Data analysis and model performance comparisons show that GMAP converges the fastest, and provides reliable results. At the mean time, data augmentation (DA) methods are used for the Random-walk Metropolis method. Data analysis shows that the speed of the convergence of Random-walk Metropolis can be improved by DA, but all of them are not as fast as GMAP. The performance of GMAP and various MCMC algorithms are compared through Midazolam data analysis and simulation. PMID:20183435

  19. Allowing for MSD prevention during facilities planning for a public service: an a posteriori analysis of 10 library design projects.

    PubMed

    Bellemare, Marie; Trudel, Louis; Ledoux, Elise; Montreuil, Sylvie; Marier, Micheline; Laberge, Marie; Vincent, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Research was conducted to identify an ergonomics-based intervention model designed to factor in musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) prevention when library projects are being designed. The first stage of the research involved an a posteriori analysis of 10 recent redesign projects. The purpose of the analysis was to document perceptions about the attention given to MSD prevention measures over the course of a project on the part of 2 categories of employees: librarians responsible for such projects and personnel working in the libraries before and after changes. Subjects were interviewed in focus groups. Outcomes of the analysis can guide our ergonomic assessment of current situations and contribute to a better understanding of the way inclusion or improvement of prevention measures can support the workplace design process.

  20. An a-posteriori error estimator for linear elastic fracture mechanics using the stable generalized/extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, R. M.; Ferreira, M. D. C.; Proença, S. P. B.; Duarte, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a recovery-based a-posteriori error estimator originally proposed for the Corrected XFEM is investigated in the framework of the stable generalized FEM (SGFEM). Both Heaviside and branch functions are adopted to enrich the approximations in the SGFEM. Some necessary adjustments to adapt the expressions defining the enhanced stresses in the original error estimator are discussed in the SGFEM framework. Relevant aspects such as effectivity indexes, error distribution, convergence rates and accuracy of the recovered stresses are used in order to highlight the main findings and the effectiveness of the error estimator. Two benchmark problems of the 2-D fracture mechanics are selected to assess the robustness of the error estimator hereby investigated. The main findings of this investigation are: the SGFEM shows higher accuracy than G/XFEM and a reduced sensitivity to blending element issues. The error estimator can accurately capture these features of both methods.

  1. A posteriori error estimates for continuous/discontinuous Galerkin approximations of the Kirchhoff-Love buckling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansbo, Peter; Larson, Mats G.

    2015-11-01

    Second order buckling theory involves a one-way coupled coupled problem where the stress tensor from a plane stress problem appears in an eigenvalue problem for the fourth order Kirchhoff plate. In this paper we present an a posteriori error estimate for the critical buckling load and mode corresponding to the smallest eigenvalue and associated eigenvector. A particular feature of the analysis is that we take the effect of approximate computation of the stress tensor and also provide an error indicator for the plane stress problem. The Kirchhoff plate is discretized using a continuous/discontinuous finite element method based on standard continuous piecewise polynomial finite element spaces. The same finite element spaces can be used to solve the plane stress problem.

  2. Comparison of minimum-norm maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori wavefront reconstructions for large adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Clémentine; Tallon, Michel; Thiébaut, Eric

    2009-03-01

    The performances of various estimators for wavefront sensing applications such as adaptive optics (AO) are compared. Analytical expressions for the bias and variance terms in the mean squared error (MSE) are derived for the minimum-norm maximum likelihood (MNML) and the maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstructors. The MAP estimator is analytically demonstrated to yield an optimal trade-off that reduces the MSE, hence leading to a better Strehl ratio. The implications for AO applications are quantified thanks to simulations on 8-m- and 42-m-class telescopes. We show that the MAP estimator can achieve twice as low MSE as MNML methods do. Large AO systems can thus benefit from the high quality of MAP reconstruction in O(n) operations, thanks to the fast fractal iterative method (FrIM) algorithm (Thiébaut and Tallon, submitted to J. Opt. Soc. Am. A).

  3. A Maximum a Posteriori Estimation Framework for Robust High Dynamic Range Video Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuelong; Lee, Chul; Monga, Vishal

    2017-03-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) image synthesis from multiple low dynamic range (LDR) exposures continues to be actively researched. The extension to HDR video synthesis is a topic of significant current interest due to potential cost benefits. For HDR video, a stiff practical challenge presents itself in the form of accurate correspondence estimation of objects between video frames. In particular, loss of data resulting from poor exposures and varying intensity make conventional optical flow methods highly inaccurate. We avoid exact correspondence estimation by proposing a statistical approach via maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation, and under appropriate statistical assumptions and choice of priors and models, we reduce it to an optimization problem of solving for the foreground and background of the target frame. We obtain the background through rank minimization and estimate the foreground via a novel multiscale adaptive kernel regression technique, which implicitly captures local structure and temporal motion by solving an unconstrained optimization problem. Extensive experimental results on both real and synthetic datasets demonstrate that our algorithm is more capable of delivering high-quality HDR videos than current state-of-the-art methods, under both subjective and objective assessments. Furthermore, a thorough complexity analysis reveals that our algorithm achieves better complexity-performance trade-off than conventional methods.

  4. Exploring the impact of walk–bike infrastructure, safety perception, and built-environment on active transportation mode choice: a random parameter model using New York City commuter data

    DOE PAGES

    Aziz, H. M. Abdul; Nagle, Nicholas N.; Morton, April M.; ...

    2017-02-06

    Here, this study finds the effects of traffic safety, walk-bike network facilities, and land use attributes on walk and bicycle mode choice decision in the New York City for home-to-work commute. Applying the flexible econometric structure of random parameter models, we capture the heterogeneity in the decision making process and simulate scenarios considering improvement in walk-bike infrastructure such as sidewalk width and length of bike lane. Our results indicate that increasing sidewalk width, total length of bike lane, and proportion of protected bike lane will increase the likelihood of more people taking active transportation mode This suggests that the localmore » authorities and planning agencies to invest more on building and maintaining the infrastructure for pedestrians. Furthermore, improvement in traffic safety by reducing traffic crashes involving pedestrians and bicyclists will increase the likelihood of taking active transportation modes. Our results also show positive correlation between number of non-motorized trips by the other family members and the likelihood to choose active transportation mode. The findings will help to make smart investment decisions in context of building sustainable transportation systems accounting for active transportation.« less

  5. School Choice. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robledo Montecel, Maria, Ed.; Supik, Josie Danini, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter contains five articles on the implications of school choice for minority and disadvantaged students. "School Choice: Choices for Whom? Promises and Panaceas," by Maria Robledo Montecel, discusses some major problems related to school choice and vouchers, particularly who would have the choice (families or schools), who…

  6. The psychopathology of choice.

    PubMed

    Headlee, R; Kalogjera, I J

    1988-10-01

    The important, often neglected factor of choice, learned in childhood, is examined in detail and illustrated by clinical examples. The primary etiological factors in psychopathology of choice are: (1) Too much choice allowed before integration is possible; (2) Too little choice allowed and (3) Distortions of choice due to racial, sexual, and religious prejudices or cognitive distortions.

  7. School Choice vs. School Choice. Policy Backgrounder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, John C.; Moore, Matt

    This paper recommends replacing the existing U.S. school choice system, which relies on the housing market to ration educational opportunity, with one that creates a level playing field upon which schools compete for students, and students and their parents exercise choice. Section 1 describes the current school choice system, which works well for…

  8. Noise-bias and polarization-artifact corrected optical coherence tomography by maximum a-posteriori intensity estimation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Aaron C.; Hong, Young-Joo; Makita, Shuichi; Miura, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    We propose using maximum a-posteriori (MAP) estimation to improve the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in polarization diversity (PD) optical coherence tomography. PD-detection removes polarization artifacts, which are common when imaging highly birefringent tissue or when using a flexible fiber catheter. However, dividing the probe power to two polarization detection channels inevitably reduces the SNR. Applying MAP estimation to PD-OCT allows for the removal of polarization artifacts while maintaining and improving image SNR. The effectiveness of the MAP-PD method is evaluated by comparing it with MAP-non-PD, intensity averaged PD, and intensity averaged non-PD methods. Evaluation was conducted in vivo with human eyes. The MAP-PD method is found to be optimal, demonstrating high SNR and artifact suppression, especially for highly birefringent tissue, such as the peripapillary sclera. The MAP-PD based attenuation coefficient image also shows better differentiation of attenuation levels than non-MAP attenuation images. PMID:28736656

  9. A Priori and a Posteriori Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy and Gestational Weight Gain: The Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Tielemans, Myrte J; Erler, Nicole S; Leermakers, Elisabeth T M; van den Broek, Marion; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Steegers, Eric A P; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Franco, Oscar H

    2015-11-12

    Abnormal gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We examined whether dietary patterns are associated with GWG. Participants included 3374 pregnant women from a population-based cohort in the Netherlands. Dietary intake during pregnancy was assessed with food-frequency questionnaires. Three a posteriori-derived dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis: a "Vegetable, oil and fish", a "Nuts, high-fiber cereals and soy", and a "Margarine, sugar and snacks" pattern. The a priori-defined dietary pattern was based on national dietary recommendations. Weight was repeatedly measured around 13, 20 and 30 weeks of pregnancy; pre-pregnancy and maximum weight were self-reported. Normal weight women with high adherence to the "Vegetable, oil and fish" pattern had higher early-pregnancy GWG than those with low adherence (43 g/week (95% CI 16; 69) for highest vs. lowest quartile (Q)). Adherence to the "Margarine, sugar and snacks" pattern was associated with a higher prevalence of excessive GWG (OR 1.45 (95% CI 1.06; 1.99) Q4 vs. Q1). Normal weight women with higher scores on the "Nuts, high-fiber cereals and soy" pattern had more moderate GWG than women with lower scores (-0.01 (95% CI -0.02; -0.00) per SD). The a priori-defined pattern was not associated with GWG. To conclude, specific dietary patterns may play a role in early pregnancy but are not consistently associated with GWG.

  10. A posteriori testing of algebraic flame surface density models for LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, T.; Stein, O. T.; Chakraborty, N.; Kempf, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    In the application of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to premixed combustion, the unknown filtered chemical source term can be modelled by the generalised flame surface density (FSD) using algebraic models for the wrinkling factor Ξ. The present study compares the behaviour of the various models by first examining the effect of sub-grid turbulent velocity fluctuation on Ξ through a one-dimensional analysis and by the LES of the ORACLES burner (Nguyen, Bruel, and Reichstadt, Flow, Turbulence and Combustion Vol. 82 [2009], pp. 155-183) and the Volvo Rig (Sjunnesson, Nelsson, and Max, Laser Anemometry, Vol. 3 [1991], pp. 83-90; Sjunnesson, Henrikson, and Löfström, AIAA Journal, Vol. 28 [1992], pp. AIAA-92-3650). Several sensitivity studies on parameters such as the turbulent viscosity and the grid resolution are also carried out. A statistically 1-D analysis of turbulent flame propagation reveals that counter gradient transport of the progress variable needs to be accounted for to obtain a realistic flame thickness from the simulations using algebraic FSD based closure. The two burner setups are found to operate mainly within the wrinkling/corrugated flamelet regime based on the premixed combustion diagram for LES (Pitsch and Duchamp de Lageneste, Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Vol. 29 [2002], pp. 2001-2008) and this suggests that the models are operating within their ideal range. The performance of the algebraic models are then assessed by comparing velocity statistics, followed by a detailed error analysis for the ORACLES burner. Four of the tested models were found to perform reasonably well against experiments, and one of these four further excels in being the most grid-independent. For the Volvo Rig, more focus is placed upon the comparison of temperature data and identifying changes in flame structure amongst the different models. It is found that the few models which largely over-predict velocities in the ORACLES case and volume averaged ? in a

  11. A Priori and a Posteriori Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy and Gestational Weight Gain: The Generation R Study

    PubMed Central

    Tielemans, Myrte J.; Erler, Nicole S.; Leermakers, Elisabeth T. M.; van den Broek, Marion; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.; Franco, Oscar H.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We examined whether dietary patterns are associated with GWG. Participants included 3374 pregnant women from a population-based cohort in the Netherlands. Dietary intake during pregnancy was assessed with food-frequency questionnaires. Three a posteriori-derived dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis: a “Vegetable, oil and fish”, a “Nuts, high-fiber cereals and soy”, and a “Margarine, sugar and snacks” pattern. The a priori-defined dietary pattern was based on national dietary recommendations. Weight was repeatedly measured around 13, 20 and 30 weeks of pregnancy; pre-pregnancy and maximum weight were self-reported. Normal weight women with high adherence to the “Vegetable, oil and fish” pattern had higher early-pregnancy GWG than those with low adherence (43 g/week (95% CI 16; 69) for highest vs. lowest quartile (Q)). Adherence to the “Margarine, sugar and snacks” pattern was associated with a higher prevalence of excessive GWG (OR 1.45 (95% CI 1.06; 1.99) Q4 vs. Q1). Normal weight women with higher scores on the “Nuts, high-fiber cereals and soy” pattern had more moderate GWG than women with lower scores (−0.01 (95% CI −0.02; −0.00) per SD). The a priori-defined pattern was not associated with GWG. To conclude, specific dietary patterns may play a role in early pregnancy but are not consistently associated with GWG. PMID:26569303

  12. Choosing Choice: School Choice in International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plank, David N., Ed.; Sykes, Gary, Ed.

    The chapters in this book originated as papers for a conference, School Choice and Educational Change, held in March 2000 at Michigan State University. An introductory chapter provides a comparative analysis of the lessons learned from international experience with school-choice policies, based on a review of case studies in several countries. The…

  13. Choosing Choice: School Choice in International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plank, David N., Ed.; Sykes, Gary, Ed.

    The chapters in this book originated as papers for a conference, School Choice and Educational Change, held in March 2000 at Michigan State University. An introductory chapter provides a comparative analysis of the lessons learned from international experience with school-choice policies, based on a review of case studies in several countries. The…

  14. Privatization and Educational Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Myron

    This book describes how and why educational choice movements will affect public education. It uses a public-choice approach to argue that both the supporters and opponents of private and school choice have failed to address several critical issues. Following an introductory chapter, chapter 2 is devoted to the rationale for contracting out…

  15. Goal oriented adaptivity in the IRGNM for parameter identification in PDEs: II. all-at-once formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbacher, B.; Kirchner, A.; Vexler, B.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we investigate adaptive discretization of the iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton method IRGNM. All-at-once formulations considering the PDE and the measurement equation simultaneously allow to avoid (approximate) solution of a potentially nonlinear PDE in each Newton step as compared to the reduced form Kaltenbacher et al (2014 Inverse Problems 30 045001). We analyze a least squares and a generalized Gauss-Newton formulation and in both cases prove convergence and convergence rates with a posteriori choice of the regularization parameters in each Newton step and of the stopping index under certain accuracy requirements on four quantities of interest. Estimation of the error in these quantities by means of a weighted dual residual method is discussed, which leads to an algorithm for adaptive mesh refinement. Numerical experiments with an implementation of this algorithm show the numerical efficiency of this approach, which especially for strongly nonlinear PDEs outperforms the nonlinear Tikhonov regularization considered in Kaltenbacher et al (2011 Inverse Problems 27 125008).

  16. A comparative estimation of the errors in the sunspot coordinate catalog compiled at Cuba and the methods of their a posteriori decrease.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Nikonov, O. V.; Perez Doval, J.

    1992-06-01

    A comparison of the accuracy of the Cuba, Greenwich and Debrecen catalogs of sunspot coordinates has been made. A new method for a posteriori decrease of coordinate errors is given. The following conclusions have been made: 1. The accuracy of absolute heliographic coordinates for the Cuban catalog is 0.26 and for the Greenwich catalog is 0.32 of the heliographic degree. 2. Reduction to smoothed coordinate values improves the accuracy by a factor of 1.5. 3. Reduction values within the frame of the proposed technique REPORT to "pseudorelative" coordinates enables an improvement of the initial accuracy of sunspot coordinate measurement by 5 - 7 times.

  17. The impact of the choice of radiative transfer model and inversion method on the OSIRIS ozone and nitrogen dioxide retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Craig; McLinden, Chris; Sioris, Christopher; Brohede, Samuel

    Key to the retrieval of stratospheric minor species information from limb-scatter measurements are the selections of a radiative transfer model (RTM) and inversion method (solver). Here we assess the impact of choice of RTM and solver on the retrievals of stratospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide from the OSIRIS instrument using the ‘Ozone Triplet' and Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) techniques that are used in the operational Level 2 processing algorithms. The RTMs assessed are LIMBTRAN, VECTOR, SCIARAYS, and SASKTRAN. The solvers studied include the Maximum A Posteriori (MAP), Maximum Likelihood (ML), Iterative Least Squares (ILS), and Chahine methods.

  18. Measuring saliency in images: which experimental parameters for the assessment of image quality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredembach, Clement; Woolfe, Geoff; Wang, Jue

    2012-01-01

    Predicting which areas of an image are perceptually salient or attended to has become an essential pre-requisite of many computer vision applications. Because observers are notoriously unreliable in remembering where they look a posteriori, and because asking where they look while observing the image necessarily in uences the results, ground truth about saliency and visual attention has to be obtained by gaze tracking methods. From the early work of Buswell and Yarbus to the most recent forays in computer vision there has been, perhaps unfortunately, little agreement on standardisation of eye tracking protocols for measuring visual attention. As the number of parameters involved in experimental methodology can be large, their individual in uence on the nal results is not well understood. Consequently, the performance of saliency algorithms, when assessed by correlation techniques, varies greatly across the literature. In this paper, we concern ourselves with the problem of image quality. Specically: where people look when judging images. We show that in this case, the performance gap between existing saliency prediction algorithms and experimental results is signicantly larger than otherwise reported. To understand this discrepancy, we rst devise an experimental protocol that is adapted to the task of measuring image quality. In a second step, we compare our experimental parameters with the ones of existing methods and show that a lot of the variability can directly be ascribed to these dierences in experimental methodology and choice of variables. In particular, the choice of a task, e.g., judging image quality vs. free viewing, has a great impact on measured saliency maps, suggesting that even for a mildly cognitive task, ground truth obtained by free viewing does not adapt well. Careful analysis of the prior art also reveals that systematic bias can occur depending on instrumental calibration and the choice of test images. We conclude this work by proposing a

  19. A twofold quantum delayed-choice experiment in a superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Roy, Tanay; Kundu, Suman; Chand, Madhavi; Ranadive, Arpit; Vijay, Rajamani; Song, Yipu; Duan, Luming; Sun, Luyan

    2017-01-01

    Wave-particle complementarity lies at the heart of quantum mechanics. To illustrate this mysterious feature, Wheeler proposed the delayed-choice experiment, where a quantum system manifests the wave- or particle-like attribute, depending on the experimental arrangement, which is made after the system has entered the interferometer. In recent quantum delayed-choice experiments, these two complementary behaviors were simultaneously observed with a quantum interferometer in a superposition of being closed and open. We suggest and implement a conceptually different quantum delayed-choice experiment by introducing a which-path detector (WPD) that can simultaneously record and neglect the system’s path information, but where the interferometer itself is classical. Our experiment is realized with a superconducting circuit, where a cavity acts as the WPD for an interfering qubit. Using this setup, we implement the first twofold delayed-choice experiment, which demonstrates that the system’s behavior depends not only on the measuring device’s configuration that can be chosen even after the system has been detected but also on whether we a posteriori erase or mark the which-path information, the latter of which cannot be revealed by previous quantum delayed-choice experiments. Our results represent the first demonstration of both counterintuitive features with the same experimental setup, significantly extending the concept of quantum delayed-choice experiment. PMID:28508079

  20. A twofold quantum delayed-choice experiment in a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Roy, Tanay; Kundu, Suman; Chand, Madhavi; Ranadive, Arpit; Vijay, Rajamani; Song, Yipu; Duan, Luming; Sun, Luyan

    2017-05-01

    Wave-particle complementarity lies at the heart of quantum mechanics. To illustrate this mysterious feature, Wheeler proposed the delayed-choice experiment, where a quantum system manifests the wave- or particle-like attribute, depending on the experimental arrangement, which is made after the system has entered the interferometer. In recent quantum delayed-choice experiments, these two complementary behaviors were simultaneously observed with a quantum interferometer in a superposition of being closed and open. We suggest and implement a conceptually different quantum delayed-choice experiment by introducing a which-path detector (WPD) that can simultaneously record and neglect the system's path information, but where the interferometer itself is classical. Our experiment is realized with a superconducting circuit, where a cavity acts as the WPD for an interfering qubit. Using this setup, we implement the first twofold delayed-choice experiment, which demonstrates that the system's behavior depends not only on the measuring device's configuration that can be chosen even after the system has been detected but also on whether we a posteriori erase or mark the which-path information, the latter of which cannot be revealed by previous quantum delayed-choice experiments. Our results represent the first demonstration of both counterintuitive features with the same experimental setup, significantly extending the concept of quantum delayed-choice experiment.

  1. Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian Discontinuous Galerkin schemes with a posteriori subcell finite volume limiting on moving unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscheri, Walter; Dumbser, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Lagrangian formulations that are based on a fixed computational grid and which instead evolve the mapping of the reference configuration to the current one. Our new Lagrangian-type DG scheme adopts the novel a posteriori sub-cell finite volume limiter method recently developed in [62] for fixed unstructured grids. In this approach, the validity of the candidate solution produced in each cell by an unlimited ADER-DG scheme is verified against a set of physical and numerical detection criteria, such as the positivity of pressure and density, the absence of floating point errors (NaN) and the satisfaction of a relaxed discrete maximum principle (DMP) in the sense of polynomials. Those cells which do not satisfy all of the above criteria are flagged as troubled cells and are recomputed at the aid of a more robust second order TVD finite volume scheme. To preserve the subcell resolution capability of the original DG scheme, the FV limiter is run on a sub-grid that is 2 N + 1 times finer compared to the mesh of the original unlimited DG scheme. The new subcell averages are then gathered back into a high order DG polynomial by a usual conservative finite volume reconstruction operator. The numerical convergence rates of the new ALE ADER-DG schemes are studied up to fourth order in space and time and several test problems are simulated in order to check the accuracy and the robustness of the proposed numerical method in the context of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for compressible gas dynamics, considering both inviscid and viscous fluids. Finally, an application inspired by Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) type flows is considered by solving the Euler equations and the PDE of viscous and resistive magnetohydrodynamics (VRMHD).

  2. Estimating random signal parameters from noisy images with nuisance parameters

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Meredith Kathryn; Clarkson, Eric; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2008-01-01

    In a pure estimation task, an object of interest is known to be present, and we wish to determine numerical values for parameters that describe the object. This paper compares the theoretical framework, implementation method, and performance of two estimation procedures. We examined the performance of these estimators for tasks such as estimating signal location, signal volume, signal amplitude, or any combination of these parameters. The signal is embedded in a random background to simulate the effect of nuisance parameters. First, we explore the classical Wiener estimator, which operates linearly on the data and minimizes the ensemble mean-squared error. The results of our performance tests indicate that the Wiener estimator can estimate amplitude and shape once a signal has been located, but is fundamentally unable to locate a signal regardless of the quality of the image. Given these new results on the fundamental limitations of Wiener estimation, we extend our methods to include more complex data processing. We introduce and evaluate a scanning-linear estimator that performs impressively for location estimation. The scanning action of the estimator refers to seeking a solution that maximizes a linear metric, thereby requiring a global-extremum search. The linear metric to be optimized can be derived as a special case of maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation when the likelihood is Gaussian and a slowly varying covariance approximation is made. PMID:18545527

  3. Children's Choices for 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Each year 12,500 school children from different regions of the United States read and vote on the newly published children's and young adults' trade books that they like best. The Children's Choices for 2008 list is the 34th in a series that first appeared as "Classroom Choices" in the November 1975 issue of "The Reading Teacher" (RT), a…

  4. California's Districts of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronholz, June

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the results of a California state law established in 2010 that created "Districts of Choice." The District of Choice law was meant to encourage districts to compete for students by offering innovative programs and this-school-fits-my-child options that parents wanted. This designation meant that children from any…

  5. The Illusion of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitty, Clyde

    2004-01-01

    Both New Labour and the Conservatives are keen to emphasise choice and diversity in crucial areas of public provision--and particularly with regard to education and health. In this article, "FORUM" co-Editor Clyde Chitty concentrates on recent proposals by the two main parties for promoting greater choice in secondary schooling in…

  6. School Choice Marches forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    One year ago, the "Wall Street Journal" dubbed 2011 "the year of school choice," opining that "this year is shaping up as the best for reformers in a very long time." School-choice laws took great strides in 2011, both in the number of programs that succeeded across states and also in the size and scope of the adopted…

  7. Tense Choices in Citations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawes, Thomas; Thomas, Sarah

    1997-01-01

    Examines tense, aspect, and voice choices in the reporting verbs in a corpus of research articles from the "Journal of Psychosomatic Medicine." Investigates how such choices correlate with other syntactic elements in the citations, as well as with the discourse functions of the citations in their contexts. (TB)

  8. School Choice Marches forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    One year ago, the "Wall Street Journal" dubbed 2011 "the year of school choice," opining that "this year is shaping up as the best for reformers in a very long time." School-choice laws took great strides in 2011, both in the number of programs that succeeded across states and also in the size and scope of the adopted…

  9. Making School Choice Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeArmond, Michael; Jochim, Ashley; Lake, Robin

    2014-01-01

    School choice is increasingly the new normal in urban education. But in cities with multiple public school options, how can civic leaders create a choice system that works for all families, whether they choose a charter or district public school? To answer this question, the Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE) researchers surveyed 4,000…

  10. More Choice, Less Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dills, Angela K.; Hernandez-Julian, Rey

    2011-01-01

    Previous research debates whether public school choice improves students' academic outcomes, but there is little examination of its effects on their nonacademic outcomes. We use data from a nationally representative sample of high school students, a previously developed Tiebout choice measure, and metropolitan-level data on teenage arrest rates to…

  11. The Choice Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cookson, Peter W., Jr., Ed.

    Issues in school choice--constitutionality, feasibility, equity, and educational productivity--are examined in this book. The controversy requires an ongoing analysis of the origins of the school-choice movement, the kinds of plans proposed and implemented, their educational and social consequences, and the philosophical assumptions underlying the…

  12. More Choice, Less Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dills, Angela K.; Hernandez-Julian, Rey

    2011-01-01

    Previous research debates whether public school choice improves students' academic outcomes, but there is little examination of its effects on their nonacademic outcomes. We use data from a nationally representative sample of high school students, a previously developed Tiebout choice measure, and metropolitan-level data on teenage arrest rates to…

  13. Choice and reinforcement delay

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, G.D.; Marr, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies of choice between two delayed reinforcers have indicated that the relative immediacy of the reinforcer is a major determinant of the relative frequency of responding. Parallel studies of choice between two interresponse times have found exceptions to this generality. The present study looked at the choice by pigeons between two delays, one of which was always four times longer than the other, but whose absolute durations were varied across conditions. The results indicated that choice is not uniquely determined by the relative immediacy of reinforcement, but that absolute delays are also involved. Models for concurrent chained schedules appear to be more applicable to the present data than the matching relation; however, these too failed to predict choice for long delays.

  14. Resurgence as Choice.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A; Craig, Andrew R

    2016-10-26

    Resurgence is typically defined as an increase in a previously extinguished target behavior when a more recently reinforced alternative behavior is later extinguished. Some treatments of the phenomenon have suggested that it might also extend to circumstances where either the historic or more recently reinforced behavior is reduced by other non-extinction related means (e.g., punishment, decreases in reinforcement rate, satiation, etc.). Here we present a theory of resurgence suggesting that the phenomenon results from the same basic processes governing choice. In its most general form, the theory suggests that resurgence results from changes in the allocation of target behavior driven by changes in the values of the target and alternative options across time. Specifically, resurgence occurs when there is an increase in the relative value of an historically effective target option as a result of a subsequent devaluation of a more recently effective alternative option. We develop a more specific quantitative model of how extinction of the target and alternative responses in a typical resurgence paradigm might produce such changes in relative value across time using a temporal weighting rule. The example model does a good job in accounting for the effects of reinforcement rate and related manipulations on resurgence in simple schedules where Behavioral Momentum Theory has failed. We also discuss how the general theory might be extended to other parameters of reinforcement (e.g., magnitude, quality), other means to suppress target or alternative behavior (e.g., satiation, punishment, differential reinforcement of other behavior), and other factors (e.g., non- contingent versus contingent alternative reinforcement, serial alternative reinforcement, and multiple schedules).

  15. Quantifying the impact of material-model error on macroscale quantities-of-interest using multiscale a posteriori error-estimation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Judith A.; Bishop, Joseph E.

    2016-07-20

    An a posteriori error-estimation framework is introduced to quantify and reduce modeling errors resulting from approximating complex mesoscale material behavior with a simpler macroscale model. Such errors may be prevalent when modeling welds and additively manufactured structures, where spatial variations and material textures may be present in the microstructure. We consider a case where a <100> fiber texture develops in the longitudinal scanning direction of a weld. Transversely isotropic elastic properties are obtained through homogenization of a microstructural model with this texture and are considered the reference weld properties within the error-estimation framework. Conversely, isotropic elastic properties are considered approximate weld properties since they contain no representation of texture. Errors introduced by using isotropic material properties to represent a weld are assessed through a quantified error bound in the elastic regime. Lastly, an adaptive error reduction scheme is used to determine the optimal spatial variation of the isotropic weld properties to reduce the error bound.

  16. Quantifying the impact of material-model error on macroscale quantities-of-interest using multiscale a posteriori error-estimation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Judith A.; Bishop, Joseph E.

    2016-07-20

    An a posteriori error-estimation framework is introduced to quantify and reduce modeling errors resulting from approximating complex mesoscale material behavior with a simpler macroscale model. Such errors may be prevalent when modeling welds and additively manufactured structures, where spatial variations and material textures may be present in the microstructure. We consider a case where a <100> fiber texture develops in the longitudinal scanning direction of a weld. Transversely isotropic elastic properties are obtained through homogenization of a microstructural model with this texture and are considered the reference weld properties within the error-estimation framework. Conversely, isotropic elastic properties are considered approximate weld properties since they contain no representation of texture. Errors introduced by using isotropic material properties to represent a weld are assessed through a quantified error bound in the elastic regime. Lastly, an adaptive error reduction scheme is used to determine the optimal spatial variation of the isotropic weld properties to reduce the error bound.

  17. Estimating nuisance parameters in inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravkin, Aleksandr Y.; van Leeuwen, Tristan

    2012-11-01

    Many inverse problems include nuisance parameters which, while not of direct interest, are required to recover primary parameters. The structure of these problems allows efficient optimization strategies—a well-known example is variable projection, where nonlinear least-squares problems which are linear in some parameters can be very efficiently optimized. In this paper, we extend the idea of projecting out a subset over the variables to a broad class of maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori likelihood problems with nuisance parameters, such as variance or degrees of freedom (d.o.f.). As a result, we are able to incorporate nuisance parameter estimation into large-scale constrained and unconstrained inverse problem formulations. We apply the approach to a variety of problems, including estimation of unknown variance parameters in the Gaussian model, d.o.f. parameter estimation in the context of robust inverse problems, and automatic calibration. Using numerical examples, we demonstrate improvement in recovery of primary parameters for several large-scale inverse problems. The proposed approach is compatible with a wide variety of algorithms and formulations, and its implementation requires only minor modifications to existing algorithms.

  18. Make Better Food Choices

    MedlinePlus

    10 tips Nutrition Education Series make better food choices 10 tips for women’s health Fruits Grains Dairy Vegetables Protein Make yourself a priority and take time to care for yourself. ChooseMyPlate. gov ...

  19. Recursive Rational Choice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Press. Debreu , Gerard , [19591, The Theory of Value, John Wiley & Sons, New York. "Continuity Properties of Paretian Utility," L1964], International...infinite cardinality, as found in the traditional treatment of Paretian utility as set forth by Debreu [7] II. Rational Choice Functions Typically, one...setting for the problem of consumer choice in economic theory ( Debreu , [1959], Ch.IV). This capability is obtained by means of the concept of a recursive

  20. Intertemporal choice in lemurs.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jeffrey R; Mühlhoff, Nelly

    2012-02-01

    Different species vary in their ability to wait for delayed rewards in intertemporal choice tasks. Models of rate maximization account for part of this variation, but other factors such as social structure and feeding ecology seem to underly some species differences. Though studies have evaluated intertemporal choice in several primate species, including Old World monkeys, New World monkeys, and apes, prosimians have not been tested. This study investigated intertemporal choices in three species of lemur (black-and-white ruffed lemurs, Varecia variegata, red ruffed lemurs, Varecia rubra, and black lemurs, Eulemur macaco) to assess how they compare to other primate species and whether their choices are consistent with rate maximization. We offered lemurs a choice between two food items available immediately and six food items available after a delay. We found that by adjusting the delay to the larger reward, the lemurs were indifferent between the two options at a mean delay of 17 s, ranging from 9 to 25 s. These data are comparable to data collected from common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). The lemur data were not consistent with models of rate maximization. The addition of lemurs to the list of species tested in these tasks will help uncover the role of life history and socio-ecological factors influencing intertemporal choices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fixing the c Parameter in the Three-Parameter Logistic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.

    2012-01-01

    For several decades, the "three-parameter logistic model" (3PLM) has been the dominant choice for practitioners in the field of educational measurement for modeling examinees' response data from multiple-choice (MC) items. Past studies, however, have pointed out that the c-parameter of 3PLM should not be interpreted as a guessing parameter. This…

  2. Fixing the c Parameter in the Three-Parameter Logistic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.

    2012-01-01

    For several decades, the "three-parameter logistic model" (3PLM) has been the dominant choice for practitioners in the field of educational measurement for modeling examinees' response data from multiple-choice (MC) items. Past studies, however, have pointed out that the c-parameter of 3PLM should not be interpreted as a guessing parameter. This…

  3. A Posteriori Quantification of Rate-Controlling Effects from High-Intensity Turbulence-Flame Interactions Using 4D Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-22

    and the turn-over time of the smallest resolved turbulent structures, τ(λm), viz. Ce = ∆tm/τ(λm). The Ce parameter is analogous to the Courant ...J. Kompenhans, H. Richard , M. Raffel, Aerospace Science Technology 5 (2001) 357–64. [10] N. Fukushima, M. Katayama, Y. Naka, T. Oobayashi, M. Shimura

  4. Optimal filtration of the atmospheric parameters profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuev, V. E.; Glazov, G. N.; Igonin, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    The idea of optimal Marcovian filtration of fluctuating profiles from lidar signals is developed but as applied to a double-frequency sounding which allows the use of large cross sections of elastic scattering and correct separation of the contributions due to aerosol and Rayleigh scatterings from the total lidar return. The filtration efficiency is shown under different conditions of sounding using a computer model. The accuracy of restituted profiles (temperature, pressure, density) is determined by the elements of a posteriori matrix K. The results obtained allow the determination of the lidar power required for providing the necessary accuracy of restitution of the atmospheric parameter profiles at chosen wavelengths of sounding in the ultraviolet and visible range.

  5. Factors that influence beverage choices at meal times. An application of the food choice kaleidoscope framework.

    PubMed

    Mueller Loose, S; Jaeger, S R

    2012-12-01

    Beverages are consumed at almost every meal occasion, but knowledge about the factors that influence beverage choice is less than for food choice. The aim of this research was to characterize and quantify factors that influence beverage choices at meal times. Insights into what beverages are chosen by whom, when and where can be helpful for manufacturers, dieticians/health care providers, and health policy makers. A descriptive framework - the food choice kaleidoscope (Jaeger et al., 2011) - was applied to self-reported 24h food recall data from a sample of New Zealand consumers. Participants (n=164) described 8356 meal occasions in terms of foods and beverages consumed, and the contextual characteristics of the occasion. Beverage choice was explored with random-parameter logit regressions to reveal influences linked to food items eaten, context factors and person factors. Thereby this study contributed to the food choice kaleidoscope research approach by expressing the degree of context dependency in the form of odds ratios and according significance levels. The exploration of co-occurrence of beverages with food items suggests that beverage-meal item combinations can be meal specific. Furthermore, this study integrates psychographic variables into the 'person' mirror of the food choice kaleidoscope. A measure of habit in beverage choice was obtained from the inter-participant correlation.

  6. Predicting affective choice.

    PubMed

    Suri, Gaurav; Sheppes, Gal; Gross, James J

    2013-08-01

    Affect is increasingly recognized as central to decision making. However, it is not clear whether affect can be used to predict choice. To address this issue, we conducted 4 studies designed to create and test a model that could predict choice from affect. In Study 1, we used an image rating task to develop a model that predicted approach-avoidance motivations. This model quantified the role of two basic dimensions of affect--valence and arousal--in determining choice. We then tested the predictive power of this model for two types of decisions involving images: preference based selections (Study 2) and risk-reward trade-offs (Study 3). In both cases, the model derived in Study 1 predicted choice and outperformed competing models drawn from well-established theoretical views. Finally, we showed that this model has ecological validity: It predicted choices between news articles on the basis of headlines (Study 4). These findings have implications for diverse fields, including neuroeconomics and judgment and decision making. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Choice and conditioned reinforcement.

    PubMed Central

    Fantino, E; Freed, D; Preston, R A; Williams, W A

    1991-01-01

    A potential weakness of one formulation of delay-reduction theory is its failure to include a term for rate of conditioned reinforcement, that is, the rate at which the terminal-link stimuli occur in concurrent-chains schedules. The present studies assessed whether or not rate of conditioned reinforcement has an independent effect upon choice. Pigeons responded on either modified concurrent-chains schedules or on comparable concurrent-tandem schedules. The initial link was shortened on only one of two concurrent-chains schedules and on only one of two corresponding concurrent-tandem schedules. This manipulation increased rate of conditioned reinforcement sharply in the chain but not in the tandem schedule. According to a formulation of delay-reduction theory, when the outcomes chosen (the terminal links) are equal, as in Experiment 1, choice should depend only on rate of primary reinforcement; thus, choice should be equivalent for the tandem and chain schedules despite a large difference in rate of conditioned reinforcement. When the outcomes chosen are unequal, however, as in Experiment 2, choice should depend upon both rate of primary reinforcement and relative signaled delay reduction; thus, larger preferences should occur in the chain than in the tandem schedules. These predictions were confirmed, suggesting that increasing the rate of conditioned reinforcement on concurrent-chains schedules may have no independent effect on choice. PMID:2037826

  8. A Bayesian approach to tracking patients having changing pharmacokinetic parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Jelliffe, Roger W.

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the updating of Bayesian posterior densities for pharmacokinetic models associated with patients having changing parameter values. For estimation purposes it is proposed to use the Interacting Multiple Model (IMM) estimation algorithm, which is currently a popular algorithm in the aerospace community for tracking maneuvering targets. The IMM algorithm is described, and compared to the multiple model (MM) and Maximum A-Posteriori (MAP) Bayesian estimation methods, which are presently used for posterior updating when pharmacokinetic parameters do not change. Both the MM and MAP Bayesian estimation methods are used in their sequential forms, to facilitate tracking of changing parameters. Results indicate that the IMM algorithm is well suited for tracking time-varying pharmacokinetic parameters in acutely ill and unstable patients, incurring only about half of the integrated error compared to the sequential MM and MAP methods on the same example.

  9. Choosing health, constrained choices.

    PubMed

    Chee Khoon Chan

    2009-12-01

    In parallel with the neo-liberal retrenchment of the welfarist state, an increasing emphasis on the responsibility of individuals in managing their own affairs and their well-being has been evident. In the health arena for instance, this was a major theme permeating the UK government's White Paper Choosing Health: Making Healthy Choices Easier (2004), which appealed to an ethos of autonomy and self-actualization through activity and consumption which merited esteem. As a counterpoint to this growing trend of informed responsibilization, constrained choices (constrained agency) provides a useful framework for a judicious balance and sense of proportion between an individual behavioural focus and a focus on societal, systemic, and structural determinants of health and well-being. Constrained choices is also a conceptual bridge between responsibilization and population health which could be further developed within an integrative biosocial perspective one might refer to as the social ecology of health and disease.

  10. Choice of screening tests.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, P R; Chamberlain, J

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, we consider one of the decisions that have to be made about a screening programme: which type of test to use. Our study shows that knowledge of the sensitivities, specificities, and costs of alternative tests is an inadequate basis for the choice of test. The monetary values of the different possible results of the test must also be estimated, or judgements made about the likely magnitude of these values. If judgements have to be made, they should be explicit, because different individuals are likely to judge differently, and their opinions will critically affect the choice of test. PMID:101568

  11. Methods for Linking Item Parameters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    of Linking Adequacy ... ........... ... 27 Evaluation of Linking Techniques .. ......... ... 28 Rasch model . ................. 28 Three-parameter...class are models for use when the response is dichotomous (Lord & Novick, 1968; lirnbaum, 1968), models for use when the response is polychotomous... dichotomous ability items of a multiple-choice nature. Two IRT models are appropriate for such items: the three-parameter normal and logistic ogive models

  12. A Matter of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vriend, John

    1973-01-01

    Since the goal of helping the client make wise decisions is at the core of counseling, it is suggested that existentialism as a state of mind may give the contemporary counselor an outlook most conducive to achieving that goal. The entire role of choice must be dealt with by the counselor in light of the reality of current events. (Author)

  13. Deterministic Walks with Choice

    SciTech Connect

    Beeler, Katy E.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Cooper, Joshua N.; Hunter, Meagan N.; Barr, Peter S.

    2014-01-10

    This paper studies deterministic movement over toroidal grids, integrating local information, bounded memory and choice at individual nodes. The research is motivated by recent work on deterministic random walks, and applications in multi-agent systems. Several results regarding passing tokens through toroidal grids are discussed, as well as some open questions.

  14. Learning from School Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Paul E., Ed.; Hassel, Bryan C., Ed.

    This volume contains revised versions of 16 essays presented at a conference, "Rethinking School Governance," hosted by Harvard's Program on Education Policy and Governance in June 1997. Part 1, "Introduction," contains two chapters: (1) "School Choice: A Report Card" (Paul E. Peterson); and (2) "The Case for Charter Schools" (Bryan C. Hassel).…

  15. Choices, Not Circumstances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Div. of Instruction and Professional Development.

    Following a brief account of the circumstances of migrant workers and the status of migrant education in the United States, this pamphlet describes how the National Education Association (NEA) has impacted and will continue to impact the process of providing educational choices for migrant students. The NEA has consistently testified before…

  16. Project Choice: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO.

    Project Choice began with a simple goal: to increase the number of inner-city students who graduate from high school on time and become productive members of society. To that end, Ewing M. Kauffman, his Foundation, and associates designed and implemented a program that promised postsecondary education or training to some students in the Kansas…

  17. Variation, Repetition, and Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abreu-Rodrigues, Josele; Lattal, Kennon A.; dos Santos, Cristiano V.; Matos, Ricardo A.

    2005-01-01

    Experiment 1 investigated the controlling properties of variability contingencies on choice between repeated and variable responding. Pigeons were exposed to concurrent-chains schedules with two alternatives. In the REPEAT alternative, reinforcers in the terminal link depended on a single sequence of four responses. In the VARY alternative, a…

  18. Making Smart Food Choices

    MedlinePlus

    ... weight, balance the calories you take in from food and beverages with the calories burned through physical activity. VISIT ... and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Read More "Healthy Aging" ... / Making Smart Food Choices / What's On Your Plate? Winter 2015 Issue: ...

  19. The Choice for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Scott

    2006-01-01

    We are building conventional library space without making the paradigm shift our digital environment requires. The chief obstacles to change lie in our conception of readers as information consumers, in our allegiance to library operations as the drivers of library design, and in the choice made between foundational and non-foundational views of…

  20. Too Few Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Meg

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author, who is a scientist, a wife and a mother of two preschool children talks about how these two roles exerted a disproportionate impact on her career choices. She is also an X-Gal, one of a group of nine female biologists who have banded together to offer one another advice and support as they seek careers in academic…

  1. Finland's energy choices

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffs, E.

    1994-01-01

    In Finland, a decision on a fifth nuclear power plant is stalled for at least two years. This leaves the country with a difficult choice for meeting anticipated electricity demand in the years ahead. This article examines the various energy alternatives of Finland and the political aspects of their energy development.

  2. A Matter of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vriend, John

    1973-01-01

    Since the goal of helping the client make wise decisions is at the core of counseling, it is suggested that existentialism as a state of mind may give the contemporary counselor an outlook most conducive to achieving that goal. The entire role of choice must be dealt with by the counselor in light of the reality of current events. (Author)

  3. Children's Choices for 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents 103 titles for the 2003 Children's Choice grouped by reading levels: beginning, young, intermediate, and advanced readers. Provides the title, author, illustrator, publisher, ISBN, and price for each title as well as a brief annotation prepared by a review team. (SG)

  4. A Matter of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dance, Frank E. X.

    The intent of a liberal education is to enhance the student's freedom, the faculty of intentional choice. The capacity of humans to step outside of themselves, which allows development of self-concept and subsequently self-esteem, is potentiated by the humans' unique sign, the symbol. Each of the liberal arts is concerned with the development and…

  5. Choices, Frameworks and Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Roy H.; Islam, Nayeem; Johnson, Ralph; Kougiouris, Panos; Madany, Peter

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for designing operating systems using object-oriented frameworks. A framework can be refined into subframeworks. Constraints specify the interactions between the subframeworks. We describe how we used object-oriented frameworks to design Choices, an object-oriented operating system.

  6. A Scalar Product Model for the Multidimensional Scaling of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechtel, Gordon G.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Contains a solution for the multidimensional scaling of pairwise choice when individuals are represented as dimensional weights. The analysis supplies an exact least squares solution and estimates of group unscalability parameters. (DG)

  7. New method for tuning hyperparameter for the total variation norm in the maximum a posteriori ordered subsets expectation maximization reconstruction in SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoxia; Krol, Andrzej; Xu, Yuesheng; Feiglin, David H.

    2011-03-01

    In order to improve the tradeoff between noise and bias, and to improve uniformity of the reconstructed myocardium while preserving spatial resolution in parallel-beam collimator SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) we investigated the most advantageous approach to provide reliable estimate of the optimal value of hyperparameter for the Total Variation (TV) norm in the iterative Bayesian Maximum A Posteriori Ordered Subsets Expectation Maximization (MAP-OSEM) one step late tomographic reconstruction with Gibbs prior. Our aim was to find the optimal value of hyperparameter corresponding to the lowest bias at the lowest noise while maximizing uniformity and spatial resolution for the reconstructed myocardium in SPECT MPI. We found that the L-curve method that is by definition a global technique provides good guidance for selection of the optimal value of the hyperparameter. However, for a heterogeneous object such as human thorax the fine-tuning of the hyperparameter's value can be only accomplished by means of a local method such as the proposed bias-noise distance (BND) curve. We established that our BND-curve method provides accurate optimized hyperparameter's value estimation as long as the region of interest volume for which it is defined is sufficiently large and is located sufficiently close to the myocardium.

  8. Identification of change-points in the relationship between food groups in the Mediterranean diet and overall mortality: an 'a posteriori' approach.

    PubMed

    Sofi, Francesco; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Casini, Alessandro; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina

    2012-03-01

    Adherence to Mediterranean diet has been shown to be associated with a better health and greater survival. The aim of the present study was to identify change-points in the relationship between food groups composing Mediterranean diet and overall mortality. The population of the Greek EPIC prospective cohort study (23,349 adult men and women in the Greek EPIC sample who had not previously been diagnosed as having cancer, coronary heart disease or diabetes mellitus at enrolment) was analysed. Segmented logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the association between each of the food groups contributing to the Mediterranean diet score and overall mortality. This analysis allowed the determination of the following change-points: among men: 1 change-point for vegetables, legumes, cereals, fish and seafood and dairy products and 2 change-points for fruit and nuts, meat and meat products and ethanol; among women: 1 change-point for legumes and fish and seafood and 2 change-points for the remaining food groups. These cut-off points were used to construct an 'a posteriori' score that may be better in capturing the health-promoting potential of the traditional Mediterranean diet. Identification of change-points in the relationship between components of the Mediterranean diet and mortality can be used to increase the discriminatory ability of a widely used Mediterranean diet score in relation to mortality.

  9. Quantifying the impact of material-model error on macroscale quantities-of-interest using multiscale a posteriori error-estimation techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Judith A.; Bishop, Joseph E.

    2016-07-20

    An a posteriori error-estimation framework is introduced to quantify and reduce modeling errors resulting from approximating complex mesoscale material behavior with a simpler macroscale model. Such errors may be prevalent when modeling welds and additively manufactured structures, where spatial variations and material textures may be present in the microstructure. We consider a case where a <100> fiber texture develops in the longitudinal scanning direction of a weld. Transversely isotropic elastic properties are obtained through homogenization of a microstructural model with this texture and are considered the reference weld properties within the error-estimation framework. Conversely, isotropic elastic properties are considered approximatemore » weld properties since they contain no representation of texture. Errors introduced by using isotropic material properties to represent a weld are assessed through a quantified error bound in the elastic regime. Lastly, an adaptive error reduction scheme is used to determine the optimal spatial variation of the isotropic weld properties to reduce the error bound.« less

  10. A simple robust and accurate a posteriori sub-cell finite volume limiter for the discontinuous Galerkin method on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbser, Michael; Loubère, Raphaël

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we propose a simple, robust and accurate nonlinear a posteriori stabilization of the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element method for the solution of nonlinear hyperbolic PDE systems on unstructured triangular and tetrahedral meshes in two and three space dimensions. This novel a posteriori limiter, which has been recently proposed for the simple Cartesian grid case in [62], is able to resolve discontinuities at a sub-grid scale and is substantially extended here to general unstructured simplex meshes in 2D and 3D. It can be summarized as follows: At the beginning of each time step, an approximation of the local minimum and maximum of the discrete solution is computed for each cell, taking into account also the vertex neighbors of an element. Then, an unlimited discontinuous Galerkin scheme of approximation degree N is run for one time step to produce a so-called candidate solution. Subsequently, an a posteriori detection step checks the unlimited candidate solution at time t n + 1 for positivity, absence of floating point errors and whether the discrete solution has remained within or at least very close to the bounds given by the local minimum and maximum computed in the first step. Elements that do not satisfy all the previously mentioned detection criteria are flagged as troubled cells. For these troubled cells, the candidate solution is discarded as inappropriate and consequently needs to be recomputed. Within these troubled cells the old discrete solution at the previous time tn is scattered onto small sub-cells (Ns = 2 N + 1 sub-cells per element edge), in order to obtain a set of sub-cell averages at time tn. Then, a more robust second order TVD finite volume scheme is applied to update the sub-cell averages within the troubled DG cells from time tn to time t n + 1. The new sub-grid data at time t n + 1 are finally gathered back into a valid cell-centered DG polynomial of degree N by using a classical conservative and higher order

  11. Multiple choice minority game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, F. K.; Chau, H. F.

    2003-03-01

    Minority game is a model of heterogeneous players who think inductively. In this game, each player chooses one out of two alternatives every turn and those who end up in the minority side wins. It is instructive to extend the minority game by allowing players to choose one out of many alternatives. Nevertheless, such an extension is not straight-forward due to difficulties in finding a set of reasonable, unbiased and computationally feasible strategies. Here, we propose a variation of the minority game where every player has more than two options. Results of numerical simulations agree with the expectation that our multiple choices minority game exhibits similar behavior as the original two-choice minority game.

  12. Influencing choice without awareness.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jay A; Amlani, Alym A; Raz, Amir; Rensink, Ronald A

    2015-12-01

    Forcing occurs when a magician influences the audience's decisions without their awareness. To investigate the mechanisms behind this effect, we examined several stimulus and personality predictors. In Study 1, a magician flipped through a deck of playing cards while participants were asked to choose one. Although the magician could influence the choice almost every time (98%), relatively few (9%) noticed this influence. In Study 2, participants observed rapid series of cards on a computer, with one target card shown longer than the rest. We expected people would tend to choose this card without noticing that it was shown longest. Both stimulus and personality factors predicted the choice of card, depending on whether the influence was noticed. These results show that combining real-world and laboratory research can be a powerful way to study magic and can provide new methods to study the feeling of free will. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sweden: no easy choices.

    PubMed

    Calltorp, J

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes some characteristic aspects of the Swedish health care model which can explain why choices and prioritizing have been difficult to discuss officially until very recently. Health care is an important symbol and cornerstone of the welfare society and it is therefore difficult to admit and formulate the concept of limits regarding this part of society. Parallel to a considerable decrease in the health care sector's fraction of GDP during the last 10 years, where real cuts have been more and more visible, a public discussion on choices has emerged. A parliamentary committee of politicians and experts has addressed the issue and published a final report in the spring of 1995. It proposes an 'ethical platform' as a base for addressing the issue and describes guidelines for prioritizing on a political-administrative level and clinical level.

  14. Retirement Choice 2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Distribution unlimited; cleared for public release Retirement Choice 2016 Anita Hattiangadi, Lewis G. Lee, Robert Shuford...Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202- 4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be...PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98

  15. Alternative fuels and vehicles choice model

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the theory and implementation of a model of alternative fuel and vehicle choice (AFVC), designed for use with the US Department of Energy`s Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). The AFTM is a static equilibrium model of the world supply and demand for liquid fuels, encompassing resource production, conversion processes, transportation, and consumption. The AFTM also includes fuel-switching behavior by incorporating multinomial logit-type equations for choice of alternative fuel vehicles and alternative fuels. This allows the model to solve for market shares of vehicles and fuels, as well as for fuel prices and quantities. The AFVC model includes fuel-flexible, bi-fuel, and dedicated fuel vehicles. For multi-fuel vehicles, the choice of fuel is subsumed within the vehicle choice framework, resulting in a nested multinomial logit design. The nesting is shown to be required by the different price elasticities of fuel and vehicle choice. A unique feature of the AFVC is that its parameters are derived directly from the characteristics of alternative fuels and vehicle technologies, together with a few key assumptions about consumer behavior. This not only establishes a direct link between assumptions and model predictions, but facilitates sensitivity testing, as well. The implementation of the AFVC model as a spreadsheet is also described.

  16. Does Correct Answer Distribution Influence Student Choices When Writing Multiple Choice Examinations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, Jacqueline A.

    2017-01-01

    Summative evaluation for large classes of first- and second-year undergraduate courses often involves the use of multiple choice question (MCQ) exams in order to provide timely feedback. Several versions of those exams are often prepared via computer-based question scrambling in an effort to deter cheating. An important parameter to consider when…

  17. The malleability of intertemporal choice

    PubMed Central

    Lempert, Karolina M.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Intertemporal choices are ubiquitous: people often have to choose between outcomes realized at different times. Although it is generally believed that people have stable tendencies toward being impulsive or patient, an emerging body of evidence indicates that intertemporal choice is malleable and can be profoundly influenced by context. How the choice is framed, or the state of the decision-maker at the time of choice, can induce a shift in preference. Framing effects are underpinned by: allocation of attention to choice attributes, reference-dependence and time construal. Incidental affective states and prospection also influence intertemporal choice. We advocate that intertemporal choice models account for these context effects, and encourage the use of this knowledge to nudge people toward making more advantageous choices. PMID:26483153

  18. Objective choice of phylogeographic models.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Bryan C; Morales, Ariadna E; Jackson, Nathan D; O'Meara, Brian C

    2017-09-05

    Phylogeography seeks to discover the evolutionary processes that have given rise to organismal and genetic diversity. This requires explicit hypotheses (i.e., models) to be evaluated with genetic data in order to identify those hypotheses that best explain the data. In recent years, advancements in the model-based tools used to estimate phylogeographic parameters of interest such as gene flow, divergence time, and relationships among groups have been made. However, given the complexity of these models, available methods can typically only compare a handful of possible hypotheses, requiring researchers to specify in advance the small set of models to consider. Without formal quantitative approaches to model selection, researchers must rely on their intuition to formulate the model space to be explored. We explore the adequacy of intuitive choices made by researchers during the process of data analysis by reanalyzing 20 empirical phylogeographic datasets using PHRAPL, an objective tool for phylogeographic model selection. We show that the best models for most datasets include both gene flow and population divergence parameters, and that species tree methods (which do not consider gene flow) tend to be overly simplistic for many phylogeographic systems. Objective approaches to phylogeographic model selection offer an important complement to researcher intuition. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Dynamics of Choice: A Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Choice may be defined as the allocation of behavior among activities. Since all activities take up time, choice is conveniently thought of as the allocation of time among activities, even if activities like pecking are most easily measured by counting. Since dynamics refers to change through time, the dynamics of choice refers to change of…

  20. Ethics and Challenge by Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussbaum, Gary

    1996-01-01

    An experiential practitioner discusses the foundations of his ethical perspective on challenge by choice--participant choice within adventure activities. These foundations include existential and experiential philosophy, leisure theory, and the adventure-based counseling model. The ethics of choice and informed consent is discussed in relation to…

  1. Student Curriculum Choice and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Norris

    This study investigated changes in student curriculum choice at Seminole Junior College (Florida) A code system was developed for 72 curriculum choices (23 in terminal degree areas), grouped into 19 broad clusters. A computerized Student Flow Matrix was then constructed to display the first and second term curriculum choices of 1,391 students who…

  2. School Choice. Trends and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadderman, Margaret, Comp.

    This document examines many of the issues surrounding school choice. It summarizes the prevalence of school choice and touches on elements of the debate, such as the dilemma in finding the right balance between individual/family freedom and the interests of the community. In looking at school-choice options, the paper divides them into…

  3. Free choice and career choice: Clerkship electives in medical education.

    PubMed

    Mihalynuk, Tanis; Leung, Gentson; Fraser, Joan; Bates, Joanna; Snadden, David

    2006-11-01

    Medical education experiences, particularly in clinical years, are reported determinants of career choice. Less is known about features of clinical education experiences including length, discipline, setting and choice, which may serve as landmarks in career choice decisions. This study's purpose was to explore the benefits of a free choice clerkship elective, and more specifically, its role in clarifying career choice. Using framework and content analysis methodology, we analysed University of British Columbia, third-year medical student anonymised assignments regarding free choice and 2-week clerkship elective experiences. This clerkship was designed to provide students with clerkship experiences outside the conventional curricular model, while encouraging student choice of ambulatory and community settings. Assignment questions included: reasons for choosing elective; whether learning objectives were met; influence of elective on career choice; and unique elective experiences. Iterative review, coding, analysis and indexing of assignments were carried out to identify themes and corroborate findings. Emergent themes included: positive views of experience; transferable knowledge and skills; and influencer of future education and career choices. Although students were encouraged to choose clerkship experiences outside the conventional curricular model, most students chose the elective to clarify future career decisions. This qualitative descriptive study highlights the influence of highly regarded, free choice clerkship elective experiences in the career decision making process in medical education. Further examination of the details of clerkship elective experiences which influence career choice is recommended.

  4. SU-E-J-170: Beyond Single-Cycle 4DCT: Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) Reconstruction-Based Binning-Free Multicycle 4DCT for Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Y; Sawant, A; Hinkle, J; Joshi, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Thoracic motion changes from cycle-to-cycle and day-to-day. Conventional 4DCT does not capture these cycle to cycle variations. We present initial results of a novel 4DCT reconstruction technique based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction. The technique uses the same acquisition process (and therefore dose) as a conventional 4DCT in order to create a high spatiotemporal resolution cine CT that captures several breathing cycles. Methods: Raw 4DCT data were acquired from a lung cancer patient. The continuous 4DCT was reconstructed using MAP algorithm which uses the raw, time-stamped CT data to reconstruct images while simultaneously estimating deformation in the subject's anatomy. This framework incorporates physical effects such as hysteresis and is robust to detector noise and irregular breathing patterns. The 4D image is described in terms of a 3D reference image defined at one end of the hysteresis loop, and two deformation vector fields (DVFs) corresponding to inhale motion and exhale motion respectively. The MAP method uses all of the CT projection data and maximizes the log posterior in order to iteratively estimate a timevariant deformation vector field that describes the entire moving and deforming volume. Results: The MAP 4DCT yielded CT-quality images for multiple cycles corresponding to the entire duration of CT acquisition, unlike the conventional 4DCT, which only yielded a single cycle. Variations such as amplitude and frequency changes and baseline shifts were clearly captured by the MAP 4DC Conclusion: We have developed a novel, binning-free, parameterized 4DCT reconstruction technique that can capture cycle-to-cycle variations of respiratory motion. This technique provides an invaluable tool for respiratory motion management research. This work was supported by funding from the National Institutes of Health and VisionRT Ltd. Amit Sawant receives research funding from Varian Medical Systems, Vision RT and Elekta.

  5. Economic analysis of the first 20 years of universal hepatitis B vaccination program in Italy: an a posteriori evaluation and forecast of future benefits.

    PubMed

    Boccalini, Sara; Taddei, Cristina; Ceccherini, Vega; Bechini, Angela; Levi, Miriam; Bartolozzi, Dario; Bonanni, Paolo

    2013-05-01

    Italy was one of the first countries in the world to introduce a routine vaccination program against HBV for newborns and 12-y-old children. From a clinical point of view, such strategy was clearly successful. The objective of our study was to verify whether, at 20 y from its implementation, hepatitis B universal vaccination had positive effects also from an economic point of view. An a posteriori analysis evaluated the impact that the hepatitis B immunization program had up to the present day. The implementation of vaccination brought an extensive reduction of the burden of hepatitis B-related diseases in the Italian population. As a consequence, the past and future savings due to clinical costs avoided are particularly high. We obtained a return on investment nearly equal to 1 from the National Health Service perspective, and a benefit-to-cost ratio slightly less than 1 for the Societal perspective, considering only the first 20 y from the start of the program. In the longer-time horizon, ROI and BCR values were positive (2.78 and 2.46, respectively). The break-even point was already achieved few years ago for the NHS and for the Society, and since then more and more money is progressively saved. The implementation of universal hepatitis B vaccination was very favorable during the first 20 y of adoption, and further benefits will be increasingly evident in the future. The hepatitis B vaccination program in Italy is a clear example of the great impact that universal immunization is able to provide in the medium-long-term when health care authorities are so wise as to invest in prevention.

  6. Overconfidence and Career Choice.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Jonathan F; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in their own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find that our experimental confidence measures significantly vary between fields of study: While students in business related academic disciplines (Political Science, Law, Economics, and Business Administration) exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and professions students select themselves in.

  7. Overconfidence and Career Choice

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Jonathan F.; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in their own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find that our experimental confidence measures significantly vary between fields of study: While students in business related academic disciplines (Political Science, Law, Economics, and Business Administration) exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and professions students select themselves in. PMID:26808273

  8. Variation, Repetition, And Choice

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Rodrigues, Josele; Lattal, Kennon A; dos Santos, Cristiano V; Matos, Ricardo A

    2005-01-01

    Experiment 1 investigated the controlling properties of variability contingencies on choice between repeated and variable responding. Pigeons were exposed to concurrent-chains schedules with two alternatives. In the REPEAT alternative, reinforcers in the terminal link depended on a single sequence of four responses. In the VARY alternative, a response sequence in the terminal link was reinforced only if it differed from the n previous sequences (lag criterion). The REPEAT contingency generated low, constant levels of sequence variation whereas the VARY contingency produced levels of sequence variation that increased with the lag criterion. Preference for the REPEAT alternative tended to increase directly with the degree of variation required for reinforcement. Experiment 2 examined the potential confounding effects in Experiment 1 of immediacy of reinforcement by yoking the interreinforcer intervals in the REPEAT alternative to those in the VARY alternative. Again, preference for REPEAT was a function of the lag criterion. Choice between varying and repeating behavior is discussed with respect to obtained behavioral variability, probability of reinforcement, delay of reinforcement, and switching within a sequence. PMID:15828592

  9. [Choice of bread].

    PubMed

    Rolland, M F; Chabert, C; Serville, Y

    1978-01-01

    Bread can vary according to the flours used, extraction rate of fermentation methods, but the wast majority of French people usually consume white bread made with wheat flour. Size more than composition is the main criterion in the choice of bread. The choice of loaves with a large diameter corresponds to the traditional consumer in rural areas, but the general tendency is in favour of long loaves with a maximum of crust. This shape is more related to the qualities sought by consumers who want a "light", "crusty", well-baked (golden brown) loaf. Thus they are more interested in the consistency than in the taste, as bread is now only an accessory to a well-flavoured dish. Despite the large drop in the consumption of bread, this search for a good consistency is strong enough to justify quite frequently a detour to a baker whose quality of bread is better. However, this desire for quality does not seem to lead to a larger individual consumption. For various reasons, since the beginning of this century, man has lost his "taste for bread" and any improvement in the "taste of bread" would not be sufficient to make him find it again.

  10. Understanding Parameter Invariance in Unidimensional IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupp, Andre A.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2006-01-01

    One theoretical feature that makes item response theory (IRT) models those of choice for many psychometric data analysts is parameter invariance, the equality of item and examinee parameters from different examinee populations or measurement conditions. In this article, using the well-known fact that item and examinee parameters are identical only…

  11. Effects of calibration methods on quantitative material decomposition in photon-counting spectral computed tomography using a maximum a posteriori estimator.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Tyler E; Roeder, Ryan K

    2017-07-06

    Advances in photon-counting detectors have enabled quantitative material decomposition using multi-energy or spectral computed tomography (CT). Supervised methods for material decomposition utilize an estimated attenuation for each material of interest at each photon energy level, which must be calibrated based upon calculated or measured values for known compositions. Measurements using a calibration phantom can advantageously account for system-specific noise, but the effect of calibration methods on the material basis matrix and subsequent quantitative material decomposition has not been experimentally investigated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the range and number of contrast agent concentrations within a modular calibration phantom on the accuracy of quantitative material decomposition in the image domain. Gadolinium was chosen as a model contrast agent in imaging phantoms, which also contained bone tissue and water as negative controls. The maximum gadolinium concentration (30, 60, and 90 mM) and total number of concentrations (2, 4, and 7) were independently varied to systematically investigate effects of the material basis matrix and scaling factor calibration on the quantitative (root mean squared error, RMSE) and spatial (sensitivity and specificity) accuracy of material decomposition. Images of calibration and sample phantoms were acquired using a commercially available photon-counting spectral micro-CT system with five energy bins selected to normalize photon counts and leverage the contrast agent k-edge. Material decomposition of gadolinium, calcium, and water was performed for each calibration method using a maximum a posteriori estimator. Both the quantitative and spatial accuracy of material decomposition were most improved by using an increased maximum gadolinium concentration (range) in the basis matrix calibration; the effects of using a greater number of concentrations were relatively small in

  12. Drivers of choice of resuscitation fluid in the intensive care unit: a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Colman B; Hammond, Naomi E; Laba, Tracey-Lea; Watts, Nicola; Thompson, Kelly; Saxena, Manoj; Micallef, Sharon; Finfer, Simon; Myburgh, John

    2017-06-01

    To understand the fundamental drivers, and their relative importance, of doctors' and nurses' choice of resuscitation fluid in critically ill patients in Australia and New Zealand. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) administered via an online survey. Respondents were presented with one of four randomly selected DCE choice sets, each including five patient scenarios. The respondent chose between two types of hypothetical resuscitation fluid. The fluid type was characterised by several attributes and each attribute had pre-specified levels. Convenience sample of 367 Australian and New Zealand intensive care unit doctors and nurses. The dependent variable was fluid choice, and a regression equation was used to estimate the effect of each fluid attribute on the probability of observing the sequence of choices made over the five patient scenarios. The relative importance of each of the respective fluid attributes was calculated based on the percentage contribution to overall utility (ie, fluid preference). For doctors, safety concerns, patient type and fluid type were collectively responsible for almost three-quarters of decision-making utility (71%). The volume of intravenous fluid administered was the only clinical parameter not reaching statistical significance as a driver of fluid choice (P = 0.06). For nurses, decision making was influenced to a greater extent by the same three attributes (90%), although other unmeasured attributes may have been driving choice. Doctors and nurses rely on different information when choosing resuscitation fluids, although both cohorts are heavily influenced by safety concerns, patient type and fluid type. This information can be used to modify prescribing behaviour.

  13. Parental Voucher Enrollment Decisions: Choice within Choice in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beabout, Brian R.; Cambre, Belinda M.

    2013-01-01

    Set in the context of a choice-saturated public school system, this study examines the school choice process of low-income parents who participated in Louisiana's 2008 voucher program. Based on semistructured interviews with 16 parents at 1 Catholic school, we report that spirituality, small class and school size, character/values, familiarity,…

  14. Introduction: What Will Be the Supreme Court's Choice on Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces article by Kemerer that takes issue with the conclusions reached by Elizabeth and Andrew Lugg in their article entitled "Vouchers as School Choice: An Analysis of 'Jackson v. Benson': The Milwaukee Parental Choice Program" in the April 2000 issue of "The Journal of Law and Education." (PKP)

  15. Parental Voucher Enrollment Decisions: Choice within Choice in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beabout, Brian R.; Cambre, Belinda M.

    2013-01-01

    Set in the context of a choice-saturated public school system, this study examines the school choice process of low-income parents who participated in Louisiana's 2008 voucher program. Based on semistructured interviews with 16 parents at 1 Catholic school, we report that spirituality, small class and school size, character/values, familiarity,…

  16. Introduction: What Will Be the Supreme Court's Choice on Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces article by Kemerer that takes issue with the conclusions reached by Elizabeth and Andrew Lugg in their article entitled "Vouchers as School Choice: An Analysis of 'Jackson v. Benson': The Milwaukee Parental Choice Program" in the April 2000 issue of "The Journal of Law and Education." (PKP)

  17. Deafness, culture, and choice.

    PubMed

    Levy, N

    2002-10-01

    The recent controversy surrounding the choice, by a deaf lesbian couple, to have children who were themselves deaf, has focused attention on the ethics of choosing (apparent) disabilities for children. Deaf activists argue that deafness is not a disability, but instead the constitutive condition of access to a rich culture. Being deaf carries disadvantages with it, but these are a product of discrimination, not of the condition itself. It is, however, implausible to think that all the disadvantages which stem from deafness are social in origin. Moreover, though it may be true that being deaf carries with it the important compensation of access to a rich culture, no physical condition is required for such access. Cultures are simply the kind of things to which we are born, and therefore to which the children of deaf parents, hearing or deaf, normally belong. Thus these parents are making a mistake in choosing deafness for their children. Given their own experience of isolation as children, however, it is a mistake which is understandable, and our reaction to them ought to be compassion, not condemnation.

  18. Addiction: Choice or Compulsion?

    PubMed Central

    Henden, Edmund; Melberg, Hans Olav; Røgeberg, Ole Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Normative thinking about addiction has traditionally been divided between, on the one hand, a medical model which sees addiction as a disease characterized by compulsive and relapsing drug use over which the addict has little or no control and, on the other, a moral model which sees addiction as a choice characterized by voluntary behavior under the control of the addict. Proponents of the former appeal to evidence showing that regular consumption of drugs causes persistent changes in the brain structures and functions known to be involved in the motivation of behavior. On this evidence, it is often concluded that becoming addicted involves a transition from voluntary, chosen drug use to non-voluntary compulsive drug use. Against this view, proponents of the moral model provide ample evidence that addictive drug use involves voluntary chosen behavior. In this article we argue that although they are right about something, both views are mistaken. We present a third model that neither rules out the view of addictive drug use as compulsive, nor that it involves voluntary chosen behavior. PMID:23966955

  19. Making strategic choices.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Many decision factors enter into making the right strategic choices in today's healthcare environment. Physicians have their perspective. Hospital managers may have a different perspective. Having worked on both sides of the equation, this author suggests that the successful design of an integrated healthcare system will depend on the ability of each to understand the other's agenda. Physician needs aren't necessarily incompatible with those of an organization and vice versa. Cultural differences aren't necessarily cast in stone. If hospital managers can develop an understanding of the physicians' decision factors and tailor a program around the key issues, there will be a greater likelihood of success. At the same time, physicians who are considering an alignment with a health system will need to understand what it will take to make the organization successful. The personal futures of these physicians may be at stake once they are in an integrated relationship. Finally, integrated systems will have new decision criteria for formulating strategy. Both sides should look forward to addressing mutual interests in creative ways.

  20. Evidence based contraceptive choices.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alison; Glasier, Anna

    2006-10-01

    People who attend for contraceptive advice have usually formulated an idea of the type of contraceptive that will suit them best. They may wish to use a method that is long, short or medium acting. These are defined as follows: Long-acting method requires renewal no more frequently than every 3 months (e.g. injectable or intrauterine). Short-acting method used daily or with every act of intercourse (e.g. pills, condoms) Medium-acting method requires renewal weekly or monthly (e.g. ring, patch). For men the choice is limited to condoms or vasectomy. Some women do not wish to use hormonal preparations or have an intrauterine device (IUD) or implant inserted. There may also be cultural influences making certain methods of contraception unacceptable. Each of these factors influences the final decision of which method of contraception is decided upon. In addition to taking a full medical and sexual history to identify any risks to the individual's health, which might be increased by a particular contraceptive, time must be spent discussing the options available. It is important to ensure that there is a full understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The most successful contraceptive method is likely to be the one that the woman (or man) chooses, rather than the one the clinician chooses for them. Access for women to contraception can be improved by having convenient clinic times and service developments such as nurse prescribing and Patient Group Directions.

  1. DETERMINING PRESCHOOLERS' PREFERENCES FOR CHOICE-MAKING OPPORTUNITIES: CHOICE OF TASK VERSUS CHOICE OF CONSEQUENCE

    PubMed Central

    Fenerty, Katherine A; Tiger, Jeffrey H

    2010-01-01

    Individuals may prefer contexts with the option to choose between 2 reinforcing stimuli or between 2 tasks relative to contexts in which others select the same events. We evaluated children's preferences for conditions characterized by (a) the opportunity to choose between tasks and (b) the opportunity to choose between putative reinforcers delivered following the completion of a task relative to no-choice and no-reinforcement control conditions. Three of 4 participants preferred the consequence-choice condition; the task-choice condition was no more preferred than the no-choice condition in any case. PMID:21358910

  2. Inside a School of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fizzell, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the benefits individual students experience at the Alternative Learning Center in Evergreen, Washington. An important element in the successful operation of a school of choice is the admissions procedure. To provide a clear and informed decision in school choice this school's admission procedure includes information, screening, and…

  3. School: A Matter of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    Measures to improve parent and student choice of school have recently become an important issue for educational reform in a number of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. This book summarizes the school-choice experiences of selected OECD countries. The data, collected by the OECD/Centre for Educational Research…

  4. Educational Choice. A Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quality Education for Minorities Network, Washington, DC.

    This paper addresses school choice, one proposal to address parental involvement concerns, focusing on historical background, definitions, rationale for advocating choice, implementation strategies, and implications for minorities and low-income families. In the past, transfer payment programs such as tuition tax credits and vouchers were…

  5. School: A Matter of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    Measures to improve parent and student choice of school have recently become an important issue for educational reform in a number of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. This book summarizes the school-choice experiences of selected OECD countries. The data, collected by the OECD/Centre for Educational Research…

  6. School Choice in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maile, Simeon

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author investigates the basic elements of choice and markets theory. In recent years, children were moving from rural and township schools to suburban White schools. This trend emerged in the late 1980s and simmered after the demise of apartheid. At face value, school choice appears to be happening merely for the reason of…

  7. School Choice with Chinese Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Xiaoxin

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the major characteristics of school choice in the Chinese context. It highlights the involvement of cultural and economic capital, such as choice fees, donations, prize-winning certificates and awards in gaining school admission, as well as the use of social capital in the form of "guanxi". The requirement for these…

  8. College Choice in the Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Christine Joy

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive and correlational study examined the applicability of major U.S. college choice factors to Philippine high school seniors. A sample of 226 students from a private school in Manila completed the College Choice Survey for High School Seniors. Cronbach's alpha for the survey composite index was 0.933. The purposes of this…

  9. PATERNAL INFLUENCE ON CAREER CHOICE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WERTS, CHARLES E.

    FATHER'S OCCUPATION WAS COMPARED WITH SON'S CAREER CHOICE FOR A SAMPLE OF 76,015 MALE, COLLEGE FRESHMEN. RESULTS INDICATED THAT CERTAIN TYPES OF FATHERS' OCCUPATIONS WERE ASSOCIATED WITH SIMILAR TYPES OF CAREER CHOICES BY SONS. BOYS WHOSE FATHERS WERE IN SCIENTIFIC OCCUPATIONS (ENGINEERS, MILITARY OFFICERS, ARCHITECTS, BIOLOGISTS, CHEMISTS, AND…

  10. Sex Education: Challenges and Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Alison; Hedge, Nicki; Enslin, Penny

    2017-01-01

    Noting public concern about sexual exploitation, abuse and sexualisation, we argue that sex education in the UK needs revision. Choice is a feature of current sex education policy and, acknowledging that choice can be problematic, we defend its place in an approach to sex education premised on informed deliberation, relational autonomy, a…

  11. School Choice with Chinese Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Xiaoxin

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the major characteristics of school choice in the Chinese context. It highlights the involvement of cultural and economic capital, such as choice fees, donations, prize-winning certificates and awards in gaining school admission, as well as the use of social capital in the form of "guanxi". The requirement for these…

  12. The Globalisation of School Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsey, Martin, Ed.; Davies, Scott, Ed.; Walford, Geoffrey, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Which school should I choose for my child?" For many parents, this question is one of the most important of their lives. "School choice" is a slogan being voiced around the globe, conjuring images of a marketplace with an abundance of educational options. Those promoting educational choice also promise equality, social…

  13. School Choice: To What End?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Tony

    1996-01-01

    Debunks two fantasies: the feasibility of a free-market educational system and the idea that greater choice automatically means better schools. Public education is too labor-intensive and undercapitalized to be profitable. Communities need "skunk works" schools of choice to do research and development and smaller, collaboratively managed…

  14. School Choice: To What End?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Tony

    1996-01-01

    Debunks two fantasies: the feasibility of a free-market educational system and the idea that greater choice automatically means better schools. Public education is too labor-intensive and undercapitalized to be profitable. Communities need "skunk works" schools of choice to do research and development and smaller, collaboratively managed…

  15. Religious Education and Religious Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    According to the "religious choice case" for compulsory religious education, pupils have a right to be made aware of the religious and irreligious paths open to them and equipped with the wherewithal to choose between them. A familiar objection to this argument is that the idea of religious choice reduces religion to a matter of taste. I…

  16. Preference Reversal in Multiattribute Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-01-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity…

  17. Preference Reversal in Multiattribute Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-01-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity…

  18. Eye Movements in Risky Choice

    PubMed Central

    Hermens, Frouke; Matthews, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We asked participants to make simple risky choices while we recorded their eye movements. We built a complete statistical model of the eye movements and found very little systematic variation in eye movements over the time course of a choice or across the different choices. The only exceptions were finding more (of the same) eye movements when choice options were similar, and an emerging gaze bias in which people looked more at the gamble they ultimately chose. These findings are inconsistent with prospect theory, the priority heuristic, or decision field theory. However, the eye movements made during a choice have a large relationship with the final choice, and this is mostly independent from the contribution of the actual attribute values in the choice options. That is, eye movements tell us not just about the processing of attribute values but also are independently associated with choice. The pattern is simple—people choose the gamble they look at more often, independently of the actual numbers they see—and this pattern is simpler than predicted by decision field theory, decision by sampling, and the parallel constraint satisfaction model. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27522985

  19. The Globalisation of School Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsey, Martin, Ed.; Davies, Scott, Ed.; Walford, Geoffrey, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Which school should I choose for my child?" For many parents, this question is one of the most important of their lives. "School choice" is a slogan being voiced around the globe, conjuring images of a marketplace with an abundance of educational options. Those promoting educational choice also promise equality, social…

  20. College Choice in the Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Christine Joy

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive and correlational study examined the applicability of major U.S. college choice factors to Philippine high school seniors. A sample of 226 students from a private school in Manila completed the College Choice Survey for High School Seniors. Cronbach's alpha for the survey composite index was 0.933. The purposes of this…

  1. After Busing: Education and Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armor, David J.

    1989-01-01

    Argues that mandatory busing, while resulting in cases of "White flight," has had positive consequences in the re-emergence of "choice" programs and magnet schools. Contends that choice programs can be expanded on intradistrict, metropolitan, and statewide levels. Suggests that Federal funding and private education should be…

  2. Religious Education and Religious Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    According to the "religious choice case" for compulsory religious education, pupils have a right to be made aware of the religious and irreligious paths open to them and equipped with the wherewithal to choose between them. A familiar objection to this argument is that the idea of religious choice reduces religion to a matter of taste. I…

  3. The Supply Side of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Paul T.

    2005-01-01

    New school creation is key to success of choice. For the last two decades, the struggle over school choice has focused on freeing up parents to choose. It continues to this day, with growing success in the forms of public and private voucher programs, charter school laws in 40 states and the District of Columbia, and state and federal laws that…

  4. Substitution in recreation choice behavior

    Treesearch

    George L. Peterson; Daniel J. Stynes; Donald H. Rosenthal; John F. Dwyer

    1985-01-01

    This review discusses concepts and theories of substitution in recreation choice. It brings together the literature of recreation research, psychology, geography, economics, and transportation. Parallel and complementary developments need integration into an improved theory of substitution. Recreation decision behavior is characterized as a nested or sequential choice...

  5. School Choice: Examining the Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasell, Edith, Ed.; Rothstein, Richard, Ed.

    This book presents a summary of school-choice issues, and is organized around a 1992 seminar entitled "Choice: What Role in American Education?" Each part presents a set of conference papers, followed by discussants' remarks and excerpts from audience discussion. The introduction summarizes the papers' positions and conclusions. Participants…

  6. The Supply Side of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Paul T.

    2005-01-01

    New school creation is key to success of choice. For the last two decades, the struggle over school choice has focused on freeing up parents to choose. It continues to this day, with growing success in the forms of public and private voucher programs, charter school laws in 40 states and the District of Columbia, and state and federal laws that…

  7. Preference for free choice over forced choice in pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Catania, A. Charles; Sagvolden, Terje

    1980-01-01

    In a six-key chamber variable-interval initial links of concurrent-chain schedules operated on two lower white keys. Terminal links operated on four upper keys; green keys were correlated with fixed-interval reinforcement and red keys with extinction. Free-choice terminal links arranged three green keys and one red key; forced-choice terminal links arranged one green key and three red keys. Thus, terminal links were equivalent in number, variety, and information value (in bits) of the keylights. Preferences (relative initial-link rates) were studied both with location of the odd key color varying over successive terminal links and with the odd color fixed at key locations that had controlled either relatively high or relatively low terminal-link response rates. Free choice was consistently preferred to forced choice. Magnitude of preference did not vary systematically with terminal-link response rate or stimulus control by green and red keys. The origins of free-choice preference could be ontogenic or phylogenic: organisms may learn that momentarily preferred alternatives are more often available in free than in forced choice, and evolutionary contingencies may favor the survival of organisms that prefer free to forced choice. PMID:16812181

  8. Articulatory Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladefoged, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes the 16 parameters hypothesized to be necessary and sufficient for linguistic phonetic specifications. Suggests seven parameters affecting tongue shapes, three determining the positions of the lips, one controlling the position of the velum, four varying laryngeal actions, and one controlling respiratory activity. (RL)

  9. A priori and a posteriori investigations for developing large eddy simulations of multi-species turbulent mixing under high-pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Borghesi, Giulio; Bellan, Josette

    2015-03-15

    , and the filtered species mass fluxes. Improved models were developed based on a scale-similarity approach and were found to perform considerably better than the classical ones. These improved models were also assessed in an a posteriori study. Different combinations of the standard models and the improved ones were tested. At the relatively small Reynolds numbers achievable in DNS and at the relatively small filter widths used here, the standard models for the filtered pressure, the filtered heat flux, and the filtered species fluxes were found to yield accurate results for the morphology of the large-scale structures present in the flow. Analysis of the temporal evolution of several volume-averaged quantities representative of the mixing layer growth, and of the cross-stream variation of homogeneous-plane averages and second-order correlations, as well as of visualizations, indicated that the models performed equivalently for the conditions of the simulations. The expectation is that at the much larger Reynolds numbers and much larger filter widths used in practical applications, the improved models will have much more accurate performance than the standard one.

  10. A priori and a posteriori approaches for finding genes of evolutionary interest in non-model species: osmoregulatory genes in the kidney transcriptome of the desert rodent Dipodomys spectabilis (banner-tailed kangaroo rat).

    PubMed

    Marra, Nicholas J; Eo, Soo Hyung; Hale, Matthew C; Waser, Peter M; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2012-12-01

    One common goal in evolutionary biology is the identification of genes underlying adaptive traits of evolutionary interest. Recently next-generation sequencing techniques have greatly facilitated such evolutionary studies in species otherwise depauperate of genomic resources. Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys sp.) serve as exemplars of adaptation in that they inhabit extremely arid environments, yet require no drinking water because of ultra-efficient kidney function and osmoregulation. As a basis for identifying water conservation genes in kangaroo rats, we conducted a priori bioinformatics searches in model rodents (Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus) to identify candidate genes with known or suspected osmoregulatory function. We then obtained 446,758 reads via 454 pyrosequencing to characterize genes expressed in the kidney of banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis). We also determined candidates a posteriori by identifying genes that were overexpressed in the kidney. The kangaroo rat sequences revealed nine different a priori candidate genes predicted from our Mus and Rattus searches, as well as 32 a posteriori candidate genes that were overexpressed in kidney. Mutations in two of these genes, Slc12a1 and Slc12a3, cause human renal diseases that result in the inability to concentrate urine. These genes are likely key determinants of physiological water conservation in desert rodents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Eye Movements in Strategic Choice

    PubMed Central

    Gächter, Simon; Noguchi, Takao; Mullett, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In risky and other multiattribute choices, the process of choosing is well described by random walk or drift diffusion models in which evidence is accumulated over time to threshold. In strategic choices, level‐k and cognitive hierarchy models have been offered as accounts of the choice process, in which people simulate the choice processes of their opponents or partners. We recorded the eye movements in 2 × 2 symmetric games including dominance‐solvable games like prisoner's dilemma and asymmetric coordination games like stag hunt and hawk–dove. The evidence was most consistent with the accumulation of payoff differences over time: we found longer duration choices with more fixations when payoffs differences were more finely balanced, an emerging bias to gaze more at the payoffs for the action ultimately chosen, and that a simple count of transitions between payoffs—whether or not the comparison is strategically informative—was strongly associated with the final choice. The accumulator models do account for these strategic choice process measures, but the level‐k and cognitive hierarchy models do not. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27513881

  12. Effort, success, and nonuse determine arm choice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yupeng; Kim, Sujin; Yoshioka, Toshinori; Gordon, James; Osu, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    How do humans choose one arm or the other to reach single targets in front of the body? Current theories of reward-driven decisionmaking predict that choice results from a comparison of “action values,” which are the expected rewards for possible actions in a given state. In addition, current theories of motor control predict that in planning arm movements, humans minimize an expected motor cost that balances motor effort and endpoint accuracy. Here, we test the hypotheses that arm choice is determined by comparison of action values comprising expected effort and expected task success for each arm, as well as a handedness bias. Right-handed subjects, in either a large or small target condition, were first instructed to use each hand in turn to shoot through an array of targets and then to choose either hand to shoot through the same targets. Effort was estimated via inverse kinematics and dynamics. A mixed-effects logistic-regression analysis showed that, as predicted, both expected effort and expected success predicted choice, as did arm use in the preceding trial. Finally, individual parameter estimation showed that the handedness bias correlated with mean difference between right- and left-arm success, leading to overall lower use of the left arm. We discuss our results in light of arm nonuse in individuals' poststroke. PMID:25948869

  13. Effort, success, and nonuse determine arm choice.

    PubMed

    Schweighofer, Nicolas; Xiao, Yupeng; Kim, Sujin; Yoshioka, Toshinori; Gordon, James; Osu, Rieko

    2015-07-01

    How do humans choose one arm or the other to reach single targets in front of the body? Current theories of reward-driven decisionmaking predict that choice results from a comparison of "action values," which are the expected rewards for possible actions in a given state. In addition, current theories of motor control predict that in planning arm movements, humans minimize an expected motor cost that balances motor effort and endpoint accuracy. Here, we test the hypotheses that arm choice is determined by comparison of action values comprising expected effort and expected task success for each arm, as well as a handedness bias. Right-handed subjects, in either a large or small target condition, were first instructed to use each hand in turn to shoot through an array of targets and then to choose either hand to shoot through the same targets. Effort was estimated via inverse kinematics and dynamics. A mixed-effects logistic-regression analysis showed that, as predicted, both expected effort and expected success predicted choice, as did arm use in the preceding trial. Finally, individual parameter estimation showed that the handedness bias correlated with mean difference between right- and left-arm success, leading to overall lower use of the left arm. We discuss our results in light of arm nonuse in individuals' poststroke.

  14. The logistics of choice.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Peter R

    2015-07-01

    The generalized matching law (GML) is reconstructed as a logistic regression equation that privileges no particular value of the sensitivity parameter, a. That value will often approach 1 due to the feedback that drives switching that is intrinsic to most concurrent schedules. A model of that feedback reproduced some features of concurrent data. The GML is a law only in the strained sense that any equation that maps data is a law. The machine under the hood of matching is in all likelihood the very law that was displaced by the Matching Law. It is now time to return the Law of Effect to centrality in our science. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  15. Hyperbolic value addition and general models of animal choice.

    PubMed

    Mazur, J E

    2001-01-01

    Three mathematical models of choice--the contextual-choice model (R. Grace, 1994), delay-reduction theory (N. Squires & E. Fantino, 1971), and a new model called the hyperbolic value-added model--were compared in their ability to predict the results from a wide variety of experiments with animal subjects. When supplied with 2 or 3 free parameters, all 3 models made fairly accurate predictions for a large set of experiments that used concurrent-chain procedures. One advantage of the hyperbolic value-added model is that it is derived from a simpler model that makes accurate predictions for many experiments using discrete-trial adjusting-delay procedures. Some results favor the hyperbolic value-added model and delay-reduction theory over the contextual-choice model, but more data are needed from choice situations for which the models make distinctly different predictions.

  16. Making the right hardware choices.

    PubMed

    DeGaspari, John

    2011-12-01

    A rapid expansion of computing hardware options is paving the way to better patient engagement and increased productivity. For that to happen, CIOs must balance their choices against workflow issues, infrastructure requirements, and budgetary constraints.

  17. The Neuroscience of Consumer Choice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ming; Yoon, Carolyn

    2015-10-01

    We review progress and challenges relating to scientific and applied goals of the nascent field of consumer neuroscience. Scientifically, substantial progress has been made in understanding the neurobiology of choice processes. Further advances, however, require researchers to begin clarifying the set of developmental and cognitive processes that shape and constrain choices. First, despite the centrality of preferences in theories of consumer choice, we still know little about where preferences come from and the underlying developmental processes. Second, the role of attention and memory processes in consumer choice remains poorly understood, despite importance ascribed to them in interpreting data from the field. The applied goal of consumer neuroscience concerns our ability to translate this understanding to augment prediction at the population level. Although the use of neuroscientific data for market-level predictions remains speculative, there is growing evidence of superiority in specific cases over existing market research techniques.

  18. Connecting cognition and consumer choice.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Daniel M; Johnson, Eric J

    2015-02-01

    We describe what can be gained from connecting cognition and consumer choice by discussing two contexts ripe for interaction between the two fields. The first-context effects on choice-has already been addressed by cognitive science yielding insights about cognitive process but there is promise for more interaction. The second is learning and representation in choice where relevant theories in cognitive science could be informed by consumer choice, and in return, could pose and answer new questions. We conclude by discussing how these two fields of research stand to benefit from more interaction, citing examples of how interfaces of cognitive science with other fields have been illuminating for theories of cognition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Neuroscience of Consumer Choice

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ming; Yoon, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    We review progress and challenges relating to scientific and applied goals of the nascent field of consumer neuroscience. Scientifically, substantial progress has been made in understanding the neurobiology of choice processes. Further advances, however, require researchers to begin clarifying the set of developmental and cognitive processes that shape and constrain choices. First, despite the centrality of preferences in theories of consumer choice, we still know little about where preferences come from and the underlying developmental processes. Second, the role of attention and memory processes in consumer choice remains poorly understood, despite importance ascribed to them in interpreting data from the field. The applied goal of consumer neuroscience concerns our ability to translate this understanding to augment prediction at the population level. Although the use of neuroscientific data for market-level predictions remains speculative, there is growing evidence of superiority in specific cases over existing market research techniques. PMID:26665152

  20. How do stereotypes influence choice?

    PubMed

    Chaxel, Anne-Sophie

    2015-05-01

    In the study reported here, I tracked one process through which stereotypes affect choice. The Implicit Association Test (IAT) and a measurement of predecisional information distortion were used to assess the influence of the association between male gender and career on the evaluation of information related to the job performance of stereotypical targets (male) and nonstereotypical targets (female). When the IAT revealed a strong association between male gender and career and the installed leader in the choice process was a stereotypical target, decision makers supported the leader with more proleader distortion; when the IAT revealed a strong association between male gender and career and the installed leader in the choice process was a nonstereotypical target, decision makers supported the trailer with less antitrailer distortion. A stronger association between male gender and career therefore resulted in an upward shift of the evaluation related to the stereotypical target (both as a trailer and a leader), which subsequently biased choice.

  1. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    PubMed Central

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Gutjar, Swetlana; ter Horst, Gert J.; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J.; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM) to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively). After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products) for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores. PMID:25521352

  2. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    PubMed

    Dalenberg, Jelle R; Gutjar, Swetlana; Ter Horst, Gert J; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM) to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively). After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products) for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  3. Semiparametric Thurstonian Models for Recurrent Choices: A Bayesian Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansari, Asim; Iyengar, Raghuram

    2006-01-01

    We develop semiparametric Bayesian Thurstonian models for analyzing repeated choice decisions involving multinomial, multivariate binary or multivariate ordinal data. Our modeling framework has multiple components that together yield considerable flexibility in modeling preference utilities, cross-sectional heterogeneity and parameter-driven…

  4. Semiparametric Thurstonian Models for Recurrent Choices: A Bayesian Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansari, Asim; Iyengar, Raghuram

    2006-01-01

    We develop semiparametric Bayesian Thurstonian models for analyzing repeated choice decisions involving multinomial, multivariate binary or multivariate ordinal data. Our modeling framework has multiple components that together yield considerable flexibility in modeling preference utilities, cross-sectional heterogeneity and parameter-driven…

  5. Mechanisms of Individual Differences in Impulsive and Risky Choice in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Kimberly; Marshall, Andrew T; Smith, Aaron P

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in impulsive and risky choice are key risk factors for a variety of maladaptive behaviors such as drug abuse, gambling, and obesity. In our rat model, ordered individual differences are stable across choice parameters, months of testing, and span a broad spectrum, suggesting that rats, like humans, exhibit trait-level impulsive and risky choice behaviors. In addition, impulsive and risky choices are highly correlated, suggesting a degree of correlation between these two traits. An examination of the underlying cognitive mechanisms has suggested an important role for timing processes in impulsive choice. In addition, in an examination of genetic factors in impulsive choice, the Lewis rat strain emerged as a possible animal model for studying disordered impulsive choice, with this strain demonstrating deficient delay processing. Early rearing environment also affected impulsive behaviors, with rearing in an enriched environment promoting adaptable and more self-controlled choices. The combined results with impulsive choice suggest an important role for timing and reward sensitivity in moderating impulsive behaviors. Relative reward valuation also affects risky choice, with manipulation of objective reward value (relative to an alternative reference point) resulting in loss chasing behaviors that predicted overall risky choice behaviors. The combined results are discussed in relation to domain-specific versus domain-general subjective reward valuation processes and the potential neural substrates of impulsive and risky choice.

  6. Mechanisms of Individual Differences in Impulsive and Risky Choice in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Kimberly; Marshall, Andrew T.; Smith, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Individual differences in impulsive and risky choice are key risk factors for a variety of maladaptive behaviors such as drug abuse, gambling, and obesity. In our rat model, ordered individual differences are stable across choice parameters, months of testing, and span a broad spectrum, suggesting that rats, like humans, exhibit trait-level impulsive and risky choice behaviors. In addition, impulsive and risky choices are highly correlated, suggesting a degree of correlation between these two traits. An examination of the underlying cognitive mechanisms has suggested an important role for timing processes in impulsive choice. In addition, in an examination of genetic factors in impulsive choice, the Lewis rat strain emerged as a possible animal model for studying disordered impulsive choice, with this strain demonstrating deficient delay processing. Early rearing environment also affected impulsive behaviors, with rearing in an enriched environment promoting adaptable and more self-controlled choices. The combined results with impulsive choice suggest an important role for timing and reward sensitivity in moderating impulsive behaviors. Relative reward valuation also affects risky choice, with manipulation of objective reward value (relative to an alternative reference point) resulting in loss chasing behaviors that predicted overall risky choice behaviors. The combined results are discussed in relation to domain-specific versus domain-general subjective reward valuation processes and the potential neural substrates of impulsive and risky choice. PMID:27695580

  7. Kinetics of Aggregation with Choice

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Naim, Eli; Krapivsky, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Here we generalize the ordinary aggregation process to allow for choice. In ordinary aggregation, two random clusters merge and form a larger aggregate. In our implementation of choice, a target cluster and two candidate clusters are randomly selected and the target cluster merges with the larger of the two candidate clusters.We study the long-time asymptotic behavior and find that as in ordinary aggregation, the size density adheres to the standard scaling form. However, aggregation with choice exhibits a number of different features. First, the density of the smallest clusters exhibits anomalous scaling. Second, both the small-size and the large-size tails of the density are overpopulated, at the expense of the density of moderate-size clusters. Finally, we also study the complementary case where the smaller candidate cluster participates in the aggregation process and find an abundance of moderate clusters at the expense of small and large clusters. Additionally, we investigate aggregation processes with choice among multiple candidate clusters and a symmetric implementation where the choice is between two pairs of clusters.

  8. Kinetics of Aggregation with Choice

    DOE PAGES

    Ben-Naim, Eli; Krapivsky, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Here we generalize the ordinary aggregation process to allow for choice. In ordinary aggregation, two random clusters merge and form a larger aggregate. In our implementation of choice, a target cluster and two candidate clusters are randomly selected and the target cluster merges with the larger of the two candidate clusters.We study the long-time asymptotic behavior and find that as in ordinary aggregation, the size density adheres to the standard scaling form. However, aggregation with choice exhibits a number of different features. First, the density of the smallest clusters exhibits anomalous scaling. Second, both the small-size and the large-size tailsmore » of the density are overpopulated, at the expense of the density of moderate-size clusters. Finally, we also study the complementary case where the smaller candidate cluster participates in the aggregation process and find an abundance of moderate clusters at the expense of small and large clusters. Additionally, we investigate aggregation processes with choice among multiple candidate clusters and a symmetric implementation where the choice is between two pairs of clusters.« less

  9. Choice Rules and Accumulator Networks

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a preference accumulation model that can be used to implement a number of different multi-attribute heuristic choice rules, including the lexicographic rule, the majority of confirming dimensions (tallying) rule and the equal weights rule. The proposed model differs from existing accumulators in terms of attribute representation: Leakage and competition, typically applied only to preference accumulation, are also assumed to be involved in processing attribute values. This allows the model to perform a range of sophisticated attribute-wise comparisons, including comparisons that compute relative rank. The ability of a preference accumulation model composed of leaky competitive networks to mimic symbolic models of heuristic choice suggests that these 2 approaches are not incompatible, and that a unitary cognitive model of preferential choice, based on insights from both these approaches, may be feasible. PMID:28670592

  10. Does health affect portfolio choice?

    PubMed

    Love, David A; Smith, Paul A

    2010-12-01

    A number of recent studies find that poor health is empirically associated with a safer portfolio allocation. It is difficult to say, however, whether this relationship is truly causal. Both health status and portfolio choice are influenced by unobserved characteristics such as risk attitudes, impatience, information, and motivation, and these unobserved factors, if not adequately controlled for, can induce significant bias in the estimates of asset demand equations. Using the 1992-2006 waves of the Health and Retirement Study, we investigate how much of the connection between health and portfolio choice is causal and how much is due to the effects of unobserved heterogeneity. Accounting for unobserved heterogeneity with fixed effects and correlated random effects models, we find that health does not appear to significantly affect portfolio choice among single households. For married households, we find a small effect (about 2-3 percentage points) from being in the lowest of five self-reported health categories.

  11. Suboptimal choice behavior by pigeons.

    PubMed

    Stagner, Jessica P; Zentall, Thomas R

    2010-06-01

    Contrary to the law of effect and optimal foraging theory, pigeons show suboptimal choice behavior by choosing an alternative that provides 20% reinforcement over another that provides 50% reinforcement. They choose the 20% reinforcement alternative--in which 20% of the time, that choice results in a stimulus that always predicts reinforcement, and 80% of the time, it results in another stimulus that predicts its absence--rather than the 50% reinforcement alternative, which results in one of two stimuli, each of which predicts reinforcement 50% of the time. This choice behavior may be related to suboptimal human monetary gambling behavior, because in both cases, the organism overemphasizes the infrequent occurrence of the winning event and underemphasizes the more frequent occurrence of the losing event.

  12. From School Choice to Educational Choice. Education Outlook. No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M.; Meeks, Olivia; Manno, Bruno V.

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, many calls for transformative change in American schooling have advocated school choice. Yet these calls themselves have too often accepted the orthodoxies of the nineteenth-century schoolhouse. In the new book "Customized Schooling: Beyond Whole-School Reform" (Harvard Education Press, 2011), the authors worked with the Walton…

  13. Foundation doctors career choice and factors influencing career choice.

    PubMed

    Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Begg, Drummond; Dixon, Guy

    2015-11-01

    This study is seeking to establish the factors influencing foundation doctors' decision-making when applying for speciality training. A questionnaire was sent to all foundation doctors in Scotland (n = 1602, response rate 34%) asking them about their career intention in relation to General Practice, whether they received career advice and the extent to which certain factors influenced their career choice. For the majority of trainees, General Practice was not their first choice but just under half were considering it as a career. There were significant differences in career choices between the four Scottish regions and between the medical schools, with a greater proportion of those who studied in Aberdeen and Dundee Medical Schools opting for a career in General Practice. Undergraduate GP placement was reported as the strongest influence in favour of a career in General Practice followed by discussion with family and friends and discussion with speciality trainees. There were differences between medical schools in the way hospital placements, General Practice placements and role models influenced career choices. Career advice on General Practice was reported to be less available and more difficult to find.

  14. Florida CHOICES Counselor's Manual 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Thomas R.; Rogers, Zelda

    This manual for counselors is intended for use with CHOICES, a computer assisted career guidance system. Following a brief introduction to CHOICES, the structure (in chart form) and an overview of the contents of the CHOICES system are given. Chapter 2 focuses on counseling clients, emphasizing the three-step helping process, i.e., preCHOICES, to…

  15. More Choice Isn't Always Better

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Choice is important to everyone, for one's identity as well as one's material satisfaction. Everyone has choices, but even the head of state's choices are constrained. In recent years choice has risen up the political agenda in the UK. It has become a key component of the drive to reform public services such as health and education. The…

  16. School Choice in Less Populated Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Tom; Dennison, Bill

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a parental choice case involving a rural (British) school with a 13+ transfer age to determine parents' use of the open enrollment system, effects of transport policy on exercising parental choice, quality of information provided, and factors influencing choice. Transportation was problematic. Four choice factors stood out: teacher…

  17. More Choice Isn't Always Better

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Choice is important to everyone, for one's identity as well as one's material satisfaction. Everyone has choices, but even the head of state's choices are constrained. In recent years choice has risen up the political agenda in the UK. It has become a key component of the drive to reform public services such as health and education. The…

  18. School Choice in an Established Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    This book examines the trend toward markets in UK schools by outlining the varied economic and political arguments both for and against increased parental choice. It describes how choice actually takes place--including when the choice takes place, who has the final say, how many schools are considered, and which choice criteria are reported. One…

  19. School Choice in Less Populated Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Tom; Dennison, Bill

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a parental choice case involving a rural (British) school with a 13+ transfer age to determine parents' use of the open enrollment system, effects of transport policy on exercising parental choice, quality of information provided, and factors influencing choice. Transportation was problematic. Four choice factors stood out: teacher…

  20. The Surprising Consensus on School Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jay P.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses whether school choice benefits students who do and do not receive vouchers, noting how choice affects integration and democratic ideals. Overall, there are important benefits for families participating in choice programs. Choice does not cream off the best students. Educational vouchers may influence public schools to improve. Private…

  1. The Additive Effects of Choice and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karbowski, Joseph; And Others

    In separate research studies, students who were given a choice of learning materials or who had control over aversive noise, demonstrated higher motivation and better task performance. To investigate the additive effects of choice and control on perception of control, 80 male and female college students participated in a 2 (choice vs. no-choice) X…

  2. Impulsive Choice and Workplace Safety: A New Area of Inquiry for Research in Occupational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Brady; Schiffbauer, Ryan M.

    2004-01-01

    A conceptual argument is presented for the relevance of behavior-analytic research on impulsive choice to issues of occupational safety and health. Impulsive choice is defined in terms of discounting, which is the tendency for the value of a commodity to decrease as a function of various parameters (e.g., having to wait or expend energy to receive…

  3. Impulsive Choice and Workplace Safety: A New Area of Inquiry for Research in Occupational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Brady; Schiffbauer, Ryan M.

    2004-01-01

    A conceptual argument is presented for the relevance of behavior-analytic research on impulsive choice to issues of occupational safety and health. Impulsive choice is defined in terms of discounting, which is the tendency for the value of a commodity to decrease as a function of various parameters (e.g., having to wait or expend energy to receive…

  4. Bayesian Parameter Estimation and Segmentation in the Multi-Atlas Random Orbit Model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoying; Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V; Hillis, Argye E; Albert, Marilyn S; Mori, Susumu; Miller, Michael I

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the multiple atlas random diffeomorphic orbit model in Computational Anatomy (CA) for parameter estimation and segmentation of subcortical and ventricular neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance imagery. We assume that there exist multiple magnetic resonance image (MRI) atlases, each atlas containing a collection of locally-defined charts in the brain generated via manual delineation of the structures of interest. We focus on maximum a posteriori estimation of high dimensional segmentations of MR within the class of generative models representing the observed MRI as a conditionally Gaussian random field, conditioned on the atlas charts and the diffeomorphic change of coordinates of each chart that generates it. The charts and their diffeomorphic correspondences are unknown and viewed as latent or hidden variables. We demonstrate that the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm arises naturally, yielding the likelihood-fusion equation which the a posteriori estimator of the segmentation labels maximizes. The likelihoods being fused are modeled as conditionally Gaussian random fields with mean fields a function of each atlas chart under its diffeomorphic change of coordinates onto the target. The conditional-mean in the EM algorithm specifies the convex weights with which the chart-specific likelihoods are fused. The multiple atlases with the associated convex weights imply that the posterior distribution is a multi-modal representation of the measured MRI. Segmentation results for subcortical and ventricular structures of subjects, within populations of demented subjects, are demonstrated, including the use of multiple atlases across multiple diseased groups.

  5. Educational Choice and Educational Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Kathleen Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation entitled "Educational choice and educational space" aims to explore the confluence of constructed space and geographic space using a supply-side context for New Zealand's public school system of quasi-open enrollment. In Part I, New Zealand's state and state-integrated school system across four urban areas is analyzed…

  6. Self-Determination and Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Abery, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Promoting self-determination and choice opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities has become best practice in the field. This article reviews the research and development activities conducted by the authors over the past several decades and provides a synthesis of the knowledge in the field pertaining to efforts to…

  7. Denver Makes a Fairer Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teske, Paul; Yettick, Holly; Ely, Todd; Klute, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Denver Public Schools traditional and charter schools combined to create a single system that allowed all students to indicate their school choice preferences, replacing a system of more than 60 different selection processes. The new system also gave families a wealth of information regarding school quality. A study of the new system found it was…

  8. Improving Multiple-Choice Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Cristina; Lopes, Ana Paula; Babo, Lurdes; Azevedo, Jose

    2011-01-01

    A MC (multiple-choice) question can be defined as a question in which students are asked to select one alternative from a given set of alternatives in response to a question stem. The objective of this paper is to analyse if MC questions may be considered as an interesting alternative for assessing knowledge, particularly in the mathematics area,…

  9. Coming Around on School Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viteritti, Joseph P.

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that opponent's predictions that school choice would result in mass exodus of students and a disparate impact on public schools have failed to materialize. Argues that disadvantaged students, especially blacks, in inner-city schools are the principal beneficiaries of voucher programs. (Contains 13 references.) (PKP)

  10. Choice in P-16 Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Rhonda

    2008-01-01

    A system of PK-16 parental choice would look much more like the current situation in early education and in postsecondary education than like the system of K-12 neighborhood schools. The changes required would provide more options for a tailored or customized educational experience for each child than those now offered by the K-12 public school…

  11. Young Adults' Choices for 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents annotations of 30 trade books on the 2008 list of Young Adults' Choices that are the result of voting by students in five different regions of the United States. Trade books (books other than textbooks) published in 2006 were submitted by more than 50 publishers. Each book had to have at least two positive reviews from…

  12. Language Choice in Bilingual Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legarreta, Dorothy

    1977-01-01

    Language choices in Spanish bilingual kindergartens are discussed and pupil and teacher language compared. In Concurrent Translation classrooms, English was used over 70 percent of class time, especially for directing and correcting children. In Alternate Day classrooms, there was a more balanced use of Spanish and English. (CHK)

  13. Students' Choices and Moral Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Joan F.

    2006-01-01

    Can schools encourage children to become independent moral decision-makers, maintaining controlled environments suitable to instructing large numbers of children? Two opposing responses are reviewed: one holds that the road to morality is through discipline and obedience, the other through children's experimentation and choice-making.…

  14. Moral Dimensions of Curriculum Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMillan, C. J. B.

    This paper argues that just as subject matter is inherently value-laden, educators should not feel trepidation about morally justifying their criteria for choosing curricula to be taught in the classroom. It recommends that true "moral" choices should be made on the bases of relevance to student experiences; moral propriety of subject matter…

  15. Choice in P-16 Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Rhonda

    2008-01-01

    A system of PK-16 parental choice would look much more like the current situation in early education and in postsecondary education than like the system of K-12 neighborhood schools. The changes required would provide more options for a tailored or customized educational experience for each child than those now offered by the K-12 public school…

  16. Dimensions of Charter School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyoke, Thomas T.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I develop indices capturing business/market and nonprofit/mission characteristics of charter schools that can be used to explain many of their observed operational and political choices. This improves on earlier research using only a binary variable classifying charter schools as market or mission rather than letting them take on…

  17. No Easy Road to Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2008-01-01

    In the new educational landscape of New Orleans--where public school choice is a fundamental element--pounding the pavement to drum up students has become a familiar pursuit. Proponents say a central idea of the education system that has emerged since Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005 is to provide a diverse array of high-quality school options, with…

  18. Educational Choice and Educational Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Kathleen Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation entitled "Educational choice and educational space" aims to explore the confluence of constructed space and geographic space using a supply-side context for New Zealand's public school system of quasi-open enrollment. In Part I, New Zealand's state and state-integrated school system across four urban areas is analyzed…

  19. Dimensions of Charter School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyoke, Thomas T.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I develop indices capturing business/market and nonprofit/mission characteristics of charter schools that can be used to explain many of their observed operational and political choices. This improves on earlier research using only a binary variable classifying charter schools as market or mission rather than letting them take on…

  20. Accommodations for Multiple Choice Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trammell, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Students with learning or learning-related disabilities frequently struggle with multiple choice assessments due to difficulty discriminating between items, filtering out distracters, and framing a mental best answer. This Practice Brief suggests accommodations and strategies that disability service providers can utilize in conjunction with…

  1. Methodological Individualism and Public Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sproule-Jones, Mark, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The economic reasoning that individuals use in making public choices regarding politics, society, and the economy is examined in these essays. All of the essays set the agenda for addressing the perplexing problems of understanding individual behavior in relation to the behavior of others. (RM)

  2. No Easy Road to Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2008-01-01

    In the new educational landscape of New Orleans--where public school choice is a fundamental element--pounding the pavement to drum up students has become a familiar pursuit. Proponents say a central idea of the education system that has emerged since Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005 is to provide a diverse array of high-quality school options, with…

  3. Choice: Wisconsin Style. Education Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Julie K.

    In March 1990, the Wisconsin legislature passed into law the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program. Its enactment made Wisconsin the only state in the nation with a private school voucher plan. Litigation concerning the constitutionality of the program has involved the following actions: (1) the Wisconsin Supreme Court refused to hear the case; (2)…

  4. "America's Choice" Taps Profit Motive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author features the America's Choice School Design, a school improvement program that has enlisted 547 schools in 16 states in its brand of comprehensive reform, and describes the program's move to loosen its nonprofit moorings and change to a for-profit company. The purpose of the move to for-profit status is to raise capital…

  5. PEER REVIEW FOR THE CONSUMER VEHICLE CHOICE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Transportation and Air Quality (OTAQ) has recently sponsored the development of a Consumer Vehicle Choice Model (CVCM) by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The specification by OTAQ to ORNL for consumer choice model development was to develop a Nested Multinomial Logit (NMNL) or other appropriate model capable of estimating the consumer surplus impacts and the sales mix effects of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission standards. The CVCM will use output from the EPA’s Optimization Model for reducing Emissions of Greenhouse gases from Automobiles (OMEGA), including changes in retail price equivalents, changes in fuel economy, and changes in emissions, to estimate these impacts. In addition, the CVCM will accept approximately 60 vehicle types, with the flexibility to function with fewer or more vehicle types, and will use a 15 year planning horizon, matching the OMEGA parameters. It will be calibrated to baseline sales projection data provided by the EPA and will include a buy/no-buy option to simulate the possibility that consumers will choose to keep their old vehicle or to buy a used vehicle. To support EPA's future assessment of potential light duty greenhouse gas standards

  6. PEER REVIEW FOR THE CONSUMER VEHICLE CHOICE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Transportation and Air Quality (OTAQ) has recently sponsored the development of a Consumer Vehicle Choice Model (CVCM) by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The specification by OTAQ to ORNL for consumer choice model development was to develop a Nested Multinomial Logit (NMNL) or other appropriate model capable of estimating the consumer surplus impacts and the sales mix effects of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission standards. The CVCM will use output from the EPA’s Optimization Model for reducing Emissions of Greenhouse gases from Automobiles (OMEGA), including changes in retail price equivalents, changes in fuel economy, and changes in emissions, to estimate these impacts. In addition, the CVCM will accept approximately 60 vehicle types, with the flexibility to function with fewer or more vehicle types, and will use a 15 year planning horizon, matching the OMEGA parameters. It will be calibrated to baseline sales projection data provided by the EPA and will include a buy/no-buy option to simulate the possibility that consumers will choose to keep their old vehicle or to buy a used vehicle. To support EPA's future assessment of potential light duty greenhouse gas standards

  7. [The choice of a pediatric anesthesia ventilator].

    PubMed

    Kern, D; Larcher, C; Cottron, N; Ait Aissa, D; Fesseau, R; Alacoque, X; Delort, F; Masquère, P; Agnès, E; Visnadi, G; Fourcade, O

    2013-12-01

    The technology of anesthesia ventilators has substantially progressed during last years. The choice of a pediatric anesthesia ventilator needs to be led by multiple parameters: requirement, technical (pneumatic performance, velocity of halogenated or oxygen delivery), cost (purchase, in operation, preventive and curative maintenance), reliability, ergonomy, upgradability, and compatibility. The demonstration of the interest of pressure support mode during maintenance of spontaneous ventilation anesthesia makes this mode essential in pediatrics. In contrast, the financial impact of target controlled inhalation of halogenated has not be studied in pediatrics. Paradoxically, complex and various available technologies had not been much prospectively studied. Anesthesia ventilators performances in pediatrics need to be clarified in further clinical and bench test studies. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Supergranular Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2016-07-01

    I study the complexity of supergranular cells using intensity patterns from Kodaikanal solar observatory. The chaotic and turbulent aspect of the solar supergranulation can be studied by examining the interrelationships amongst the parameters characterizing supergranular cells namely size, horizontal flow field, lifetime and physical dimensions of the cells and the fractal dimension deduced from the size data. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The Data consists of visually identified supergranular cells, from which a fractal dimension 'D' for supergranulation is obtained according to the relation P α AD/2 where 'A' is the area and 'P' is the perimeter of the supergranular cells. I find a fractal dimension close to about 1.3 which is consistent with that for isobars and suggests a possible turbulent origin. The cell circularity shows a dependence on the perimeter with a peak around (1.1-1.2) x 105 m. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence.

  9. A Bayesian Approach for Parameter Estimation with Uncertainty for Dynamic Power Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Petra, Noemi; Petra, Cosmin G.; Zhang, Zheng; ...

    2017-07-01

    We address the problem of estimating the uncertainty in the solution of power grid inverse problems within the framework of Bayesian inference. We investigate two approaches, an adjoint-based method and a stochastic spectral method. These methods are used to estimate the maximum a posteriori point of the parameters and their variance, which quantifies their uncertainty. Within this framework, we estimate several parameters of the dynamic power system, such as generator inertias, which are not quantifiable in steady- state models. We illustrate the performance of these approaches on a 9-bus power grid example and analyze the dependence on measurement frequency, estimationmore » horizon, perturbation size, andmeasurement noise. We assess the computational efficiency, and discuss the expected performance when these methods are applied to large systems.« less

  10. Street choice logit model for visitors in shopping districts.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Ko; Yamada, Takashi; Kishimoto, Tatsuya

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we propose two models for predicting people's activity. The first model is the pedestrian distribution prediction (or postdiction) model by multiple regression analysis using space syntax indices of urban fabric and people distribution data obtained from a field survey. The second model is a street choice model for visitors using multinomial logit model. We performed a questionnaire survey on the field to investigate the strolling routes of 46 visitors and obtained a total of 1211 street choices in their routes. We proposed a utility function, sum of weighted space syntax indices, and other indices, and estimated the parameters for weights on the basis of maximum likelihood. These models consider both street networks, distance from destination, direction of the street choice and other spatial compositions (numbers of pedestrians, cars, shops, and elevation). The first model explains the characteristics of the street where many people tend to walk or stay. The second model explains the mechanism underlying the street choice of visitors and clarifies the differences in the weights of street choice parameters among the various attributes, such as gender, existence of destinations, number of people, etc. For all the attributes considered, the influences of DISTANCE and DIRECTION are strong. On the other hand, the influences of Int.V, SHOPS, CARS, ELEVATION, and WIDTH are different for each attribute. People with defined destinations tend to choose streets that "have more shops, and are wider and lower". In contrast, people with undefined destinations tend to choose streets of high Int.V. The choice of males is affected by Int.V, SHOPS, WIDTH (positive) and CARS (negative). Females prefer streets that have many shops, and couples tend to choose downhill streets. The behavior of individual persons is affected by all variables. The behavior of people visiting in groups is affected by SHOP and WIDTH (positive).

  11. Multialternative drift-diffusion model predicts the relationship between visual fixations and choice in value-based decisions

    PubMed Central

    Krajbich, Ian; Rangel, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    How do we make decisions when confronted with several alternatives (e.g., on a supermarket shelf)? Previous work has shown that accumulator models, such as the drift-diffusion model, can provide accurate descriptions of the psychometric data for binary value-based choices, and that the choice process is guided by visual attention. However, the computational processes used to make choices in more complicated situations involving three or more options are unknown. We propose a model of trinary value-based choice that generalizes what is known about binary choice, and test it using an eye-tracking experiment. We find that the model provides a quantitatively accurate description of the relationship between choice, reaction time, and visual fixation data using the same parameters that were estimated in previous work on binary choice. Our findings suggest that the brain uses similar computational processes to make binary and trinary choices. PMID:21808009

  12. Breech presentation: increasing maternal choice.

    PubMed

    Tiran, Denise

    2004-11-01

    Pregnant women with a third trimester breech presentation are almost invariably offered Caesarean section as the mode of delivery of first choice, especially when external version has failed to turn the fetus to cephalic. However, increasingly women are resorting to alternatives, to avoid either operative delivery or manipulative intervention in late pregnancy. This paper reviews some of the options for women with breech presentation, focusing especially on integrating these options into conventional maternity care.

  13. Spontaneous prosocial choice by chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Horner, Victoria; Carter, J Devyn; Suchak, Malini; de Waal, Frans B M

    2011-08-16

    The study of human and primate altruism faces an evolutionary anomaly: There is ample evidence for altruistic preferences in our own species and growing evidence in monkeys, but one of our closest relatives, the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), is viewed as a reluctant altruist, acting only in response to pressure and solicitation. Although chimpanzee prosocial behavior has been reported both in observational captive studies and in the wild, thus far Prosocial Choice Tests have failed to produce evidence. However, methodologies of previous Prosocial Choice Tests may have handicapped the apes unintentionally. Here we present findings of a paradigm in which chimpanzees chose between two differently colored tokens: one "selfish" token resulting in a reward for the actor only (1/0), and the other "prosocial" token rewarding both the actor and a partner (1/1). Seven female chimpanzees, each tested with three different partners, showed a significant bias for the prosocial option. Prosocial choices occurred both in response to solicitation by the partner and spontaneously without solicitation. However, directed requests and pressure by the partner reduced the actor's prosocial tendency. These results draw into question previous conclusions indicating that chimpanzees have a limited sensitivity to the needs of others and behave prosocially only in response to significant prompting.

  14. Spontaneous prosocial choice by chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Victoria; Carter, J. Devyn; Suchak, Malini; de Waal, Frans B. M.

    2011-01-01

    The study of human and primate altruism faces an evolutionary anomaly: There is ample evidence for altruistic preferences in our own species and growing evidence in monkeys, but one of our closest relatives, the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), is viewed as a reluctant altruist, acting only in response to pressure and solicitation. Although chimpanzee prosocial behavior has been reported both in observational captive studies and in the wild, thus far Prosocial Choice Tests have failed to produce evidence. However, methodologies of previous Prosocial Choice Tests may have handicapped the apes unintentionally. Here we present findings of a paradigm in which chimpanzees chose between two differently colored tokens: one “selfish” token resulting in a reward for the actor only (1/0), and the other “prosocial” token rewarding both the actor and a partner (1/1). Seven female chimpanzees, each tested with three different partners, showed a significant bias for the prosocial option. Prosocial choices occurred both in response to solicitation by the partner and spontaneously without solicitation. However, directed requests and pressure by the partner reduced the actor's prosocial tendency. These results draw into question previous conclusions indicating that chimpanzees have a limited sensitivity to the needs of others and behave prosocially only in response to significant prompting. PMID:21825175

  15. How suboptimal is suboptimal choice?

    PubMed

    Hinnenkamp, Jay E; Shahan, Timothy A; Madden, Gregory J

    2017-01-01

    In a frequently used suboptimal-choice procedure pigeons choose between an alternative that delivers three food pellets with p = 1.0 and an alternative that delivers ten pellets with p = 0.2. Because pigeons reliably choose the probabilistic (suboptimal) alternative, the procedure has been proposed as a nonhuman analog of human gambling. The present experiments were conducted to evaluate two potential threats to the validity of this procedure. Experiments 1 and 2 evaluated if pigeons obtained food at a lower unit price (i.e., pecks per pellet) on the suboptimal alternative than on the optimal alternative. When pigeons worked under this suboptimal procedure they all preferred the suboptimal alternative despite some pigeons paying a higher price for food on that alternative. In Experiment 2, when the unit price ratio more closely approximated the inverse of the expected value ratio, pigeons continued to prefer the suboptimal alternative despite its economic suboptimality. Experiment 3 evaluated if, in accord with the string-theory of gambling, the valuation of the suboptimal alternative was increased when pigeons misattributed a subset of the suboptimal no-food trials to the optimal alternative. When trial sequences were arranged to minimize these possible attribution errors, pigeons still preferred the suboptimal alternative. These data remove two threats to the validity of the suboptimal choice procedure; threats that would have suggested that suboptimal choice reflects economic maximization.

  16. Factors influencing children's food choice.

    PubMed

    Hursti, Ulla-Kaisa Koivisto

    1999-01-01

    Although food habits arc not stable and unchanging during a person's lifetime, a base for healthy food habits can be created in early childhood. Children's food habits can be assumed to be influenced by their parents' food habits and choices. The aim of this article is to review factors influencing food choice in children as well as in adults. The results demonstrate that the development of children's food habits is influenced by a multitude of factors. Parents play an important role in the formation of food habits and preferences of young children. They can influence their children's food choice by making specific foods available, by acting as models for their children and by their behaviour in specific situations. Children tend to be afraid of new foods and do not readily accept them. However, experience is known to enhance preference, and earlier experiences of a particular food are the major determinants of the development of children's food acceptance patterns. Thus, parents should be encouraged to make healthy foods easily available to the child and serve these foods in positive mealtime situations in order to help their child to develop healthy food habits.

  17. Factors influencing children's food choice.

    PubMed

    Koivisto Hursti, U K

    1999-04-01

    Although food habits are not stable and unchanging during a person's lifetime, a base for healthy food habits can be created in early childhood. Children's food habits can be assumed to be influenced by their parents' food habits and choices. The aim of this article is to review factors influencing food choice in children as well as in adults. The results demonstrate that the development of children's food habits is influenced by a multitude of factors. Parents play an important role in the formation of food habits and preferences of young children. They can influence their children's food choice by making specific foods available, by acting as models for their children and by their behaviour in specific situations. Children tend to be afraid of new foods and do not readily accept them. However, experience is known to enhance preference, and earlier experiences of a particular food are the major determinants of the development of children's food acceptance patterns. Thus, parents should be encouraged to make healthy foods easily available to the child and serve these foods in positive mealtime situations in order to help their child to develop healthy food habits.

  18. Preference reversal in multiattribute choice.

    PubMed

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-10-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity effects, have been explained by a number of theoretical proposals. Yet a major theoretical challenge is capturing all 3 effects simultaneously. We review the range of mechanisms that have been proposed to account for decoy effects and analyze in detail 2 computational models, decision field theory (Roe, Busemeyer, & Townsend, 2001) and leaky competing accumulators (Usher & McClelland, 2004), that aim to combine several such mechanisms into an integrated account. By simulating the models, we examine differences in the ways the decoy effects are predicted. We argue that the LCA framework, which follows on Tversky's relational evaluation with loss aversion (Tversky & Kahneman, 1991), provides a more robust account, suggesting that common mechanisms are involved in both high-level decision making and perceptual choice, for which LCA was originally developed.

  19. How the twain can meet: Prospect theory and models of heuristics in risky choice.

    PubMed

    Pachur, Thorsten; Suter, Renata S; Hertwig, Ralph

    2017-03-01

    Two influential approaches to modeling choice between risky options are algebraic models (which focus on predicting the overt decisions) and models of heuristics (which are also concerned with capturing the underlying cognitive process). Because they rest on fundamentally different assumptions and algorithms, the two approaches are usually treated as antithetical, or even incommensurable. Drawing on cumulative prospect theory (CPT; Tversky & Kahneman, 1992) as the currently most influential instance of a descriptive algebraic model, we demonstrate how the two modeling traditions can be linked. CPT's algebraic functions characterize choices in terms of psychophysical (diminishing sensitivity to probabilities and outcomes) as well as psychological (risk aversion and loss aversion) constructs. Models of heuristics characterize choices as rooted in simple information-processing principles such as lexicographic and limited search. In computer simulations, we estimated CPT's parameters for choices produced by various heuristics. The resulting CPT parameter profiles portray each of the choice-generating heuristics in psychologically meaningful ways-capturing, for instance, differences in how the heuristics process probability information. Furthermore, CPT parameters can reflect a key property of many heuristics, lexicographic search, and track the environment-dependent behavior of heuristics. Finally, we show, both in an empirical and a model recovery study, how CPT parameter profiles can be used to detect the operation of heuristics. We also address the limits of CPT's ability to capture choices produced by heuristics. Our results highlight an untapped potential of CPT as a measurement tool to characterize the information processing underlying risky choice.

  20. Grading School Choice: Evaluating School Choice Programs by the Friedman Gold Standard. School Choice Issues in Depth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enlow, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, The Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice published a report titled "Grading Vouchers: Ranking America's School Choice Programs." Its purpose was to measure every existing school choice program against the gold standard set by Milton and Rose Friedman: that the most effective way to improve K-12 education and thus ensure a stable…

  1. Parameter Estimation and Model Selection in Computational Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lillacci, Gabriele; Khammash, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    A central challenge in computational modeling of biological systems is the determination of the model parameters. Typically, only a fraction of the parameters (such as kinetic rate constants) are experimentally measured, while the rest are often fitted. The fitting process is usually based on experimental time course measurements of observables, which are used to assign parameter values that minimize some measure of the error between these measurements and the corresponding model prediction. The measurements, which can come from immunoblotting assays, fluorescent markers, etc., tend to be very noisy and taken at a limited number of time points. In this work we present a new approach to the problem of parameter selection of biological models. We show how one can use a dynamic recursive estimator, known as extended Kalman filter, to arrive at estimates of the model parameters. The proposed method follows. First, we use a variation of the Kalman filter that is particularly well suited to biological applications to obtain a first guess for the unknown parameters. Secondly, we employ an a posteriori identifiability test to check the reliability of the estimates. Finally, we solve an optimization problem to refine the first guess in case it should not be accurate enough. The final estimates are guaranteed to be statistically consistent with the measurements. Furthermore, we show how the same tools can be used to discriminate among alternate models of the same biological process. We demonstrate these ideas by applying our methods to two examples, namely a model of the heat shock response in E. coli, and a model of a synthetic gene regulation system. The methods presented are quite general and may be applied to a wide class of biological systems where noisy measurements are used for parameter estimation or model selection. PMID:20221262

  2. Parameter estimation and model selection in computational biology.

    PubMed

    Lillacci, Gabriele; Khammash, Mustafa

    2010-03-05

    A central challenge in computational modeling of biological systems is the determination of the model parameters. Typically, only a fraction of the parameters (such as kinetic rate constants) are experimentally measured, while the rest are often fitted. The fitting process is usually based on experimental time course measurements of observables, which are used to assign parameter values that minimize some measure of the error between these measurements and the corresponding model prediction. The measurements, which can come from immunoblotting assays, fluorescent markers, etc., tend to be very noisy and taken at a limited number of time points. In this work we present a new approach to the problem of parameter selection of biological models. We show how one can use a dynamic recursive estimator, known as extended Kalman filter, to arrive at estimates of the model parameters. The proposed method follows. First, we use a variation of the Kalman filter that is particularly well suited to biological applications to obtain a first guess for the unknown parameters. Secondly, we employ an a posteriori identifiability test to check the reliability of the estimates. Finally, we solve an optimization problem to refine the first guess in case it should not be accurate enough. The final estimates are guaranteed to be statistically consistent with the measurements. Furthermore, we show how the same tools can be used to discriminate among alternate models of the same biological process. We demonstrate these ideas by applying our methods to two examples, namely a model of the heat shock response in E. coli, and a model of a synthetic gene regulation system. The methods presented are quite general and may be applied to a wide class of biological systems where noisy measurements are used for parameter estimation or model selection.

  3. Total protein measurement in canine cerebrospinal fluid: agreement between a turbidimetric assay and 2 dye-binding methods and determination of reference intervals using an indirect a posteriori method.

    PubMed

    Riond, B; Steffen, F; Schmied, O; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Lutz, H

    2014-03-01

    In veterinary clinical laboratories, qualitative tests for total protein measurement in canine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have been replaced by quantitative methods, which can be divided into dye-binding assays and turbidimetric methods. There is a lack of validation data and reference intervals (RIs) for these assays. The aim of the present study was to assess agreement between the turbidimetric benzethonium chloride method and 2 dye-binding methods (Pyrogallol Red-Molybdate method [PRM], Coomassie Brilliant Blue [CBB] technique) for measurement of total protein concentration in canine CSF. Furthermore, RIs were determined for all 3 methods using an indirect a posteriori method. For assay comparison, a total of 118 canine CSF specimens were analyzed. For RIs calculation, clinical records of 401 canine patients with normal CSF analysis were studied and classified according to their final diagnosis in pathologic and nonpathologic values. The turbidimetric assay showed excellent agreement with the PRM assay (mean bias 0.003 g/L [-0.26-0.27]). The CBB method generally showed higher total protein values than the turbidimetric assay and the PRM assay (mean bias -0.14 g/L for turbidimetric and PRM assay). From 90 of 401 canine patients, nonparametric reference intervals (2.5%, 97.5% quantile) were calculated (turbidimetric assay and PRM method: 0.08-0.35 g/L (90% CI: 0.07-0.08/0.33-0.39); CBB method: 0.17-0.55 g/L (90% CI: 0.16-0.18/0.52-0.61). Total protein concentration in canine CSF specimens remained stable for up to 6 months of storage at -80°C. Due to variations among methods, RIs for total protein concentration in canine CSF have to be calculated for each method. The a posteriori method of RIs calculation described here should encourage other veterinary laboratories to establish RIs that are laboratory-specific. ©2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  4. Enabling Predictive Simulation and UQ of Complex Multiphysics PDE Systems by the Development of Goal-Oriented Variational Sensitivity Analysis and a-Posteriori Error Estimation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, Donald

    2015-11-30

    This project addressed the challenge of predictive computational analysis of strongly coupled, highly nonlinear multiphysics systems characterized by multiple physical phenomena that span a large range of length- and time-scales. Specifically, the project was focused on computational estimation of numerical error and sensitivity analysis of computational solutions with respect to variations in parameters and data. In addition, the project investigated the use of accurate computational estimates to guide efficient adaptive discretization. The project developed, analyzed and evaluated new variational adjoint-based techniques for integration, model, and data error estimation/control and sensitivity analysis, in evolutionary multiphysics multiscale simulations.

  5. TAFV Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Choice Model Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.

    2001-07-27

    A model for predicting choice of alternative fuel and among alternative vehicle technologies for light-duty motor vehicles is derived. The nested multinomial logit (NML) mathematical framework is used. Calibration of the model is based on information in the existing literature and deduction based on assuming a small number of key parameters, such as the value of time and discount rates. A spreadsheet model has been developed for calibration and preliminary testing of the model.

  6. School Choice as a Bounded Ideal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Porath, Sigal R.

    2009-01-01

    School choice is most often viewed through the lens of provision: most of the debate on the issue searches for desirable ways to offer vouchers, scholarships or other tools that provides choice as a way to achieve equality and/or freedom. This paper focuses on the consumer side of school choice, and utilises behavioural economics as well as…

  7. Choice: The Route to Community Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margonis, Frank; Parker, Laurence

    1999-01-01

    While school choice offers inner-city parents a means of educating their children well, it represents further deterioration of society's commitment to educating all students. This paper describes: the push for private school choice; parent choice in context (historical context and failures of desegregation); and segregationist strategies and…

  8. Risk and Career Choice: Evidence from Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caner, Asena; Okten, Cagla

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the college major choice decision in a risk and return framework using university entrance exam data from Turkey. Specifically we focus on the choice between majors with low income risk such as education and health and others with riskier income streams. We use a unique dataset that allows us to control for the choice set…

  9. The Principal's New Role in Implementing Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Ruth E.

    The role of the principal in implementing school choice policy is examined in this paper. Choice policy is viewed as a triad composed of three points--policy, consumer information, and diversity of the learning environment. Guidelines are offered for principals to help parents make school choice decisions, and several helpful booklets are…

  10. A Framework for Choice Remedy Litigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolick, Clint

    2008-01-01

    Although school choice proponents have generally been on the offensive in legislative arenas over the past 2 decades, they have played almost constant defense in the judiciary, seeking to prevent courts from undoing school choice programs. Opponents typically wield state constitutional provisions against school choice programs. Properly construed,…

  11. Risk and Career Choice: Evidence from Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caner, Asena; Okten, Cagla

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the college major choice decision in a risk and return framework using university entrance exam data from Turkey. Specifically we focus on the choice between majors with low income risk such as education and health and others with riskier income streams. We use a unique dataset that allows us to control for the choice set…

  12. Proceedings--symposium on recreation choice behavior

    Treesearch

    George H. Stankey; Stephen F. McCool

    1985-01-01

    Presents an overview paper and 11 contributed papers focused on the issue of the processes that underlie decision making by recreationists. The papers span a range of topics including the theory of choice behavior, empirical investigations of choice, and methodological approaches to the study of choice behavior.

  13. Public School Choice: Searching for Direction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    If high- and middle-income parents make disproportionate use of school choice through residential and private school decisions, lower-income parents are more strongly represented in public school choices, many related to desegregation options. Magnet schools and voucher systems benefit those who hear about them. Universal controlled choice has had…

  14. Discrepancy between Snack Choice Intentions and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weijzen, Pascalle L. G.; de Graaf, Cees; Dijksterhuis, Garmt B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate dietary constructs that affect the discrepancy between intentioned and actual snack choice. Design: Participants indicated their intentioned snack choice from a set of 4 snacks (2 healthful, 2 unhealthful). One week later, they actually chose a snack from the same set. Within 1 week after the actual choice, they completed…

  15. Vocational Choice: A Decision Making Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauermann, Henry

    2005-01-01

    We propose a model of vocational choice that can be used for analyzing and guiding the decision processes underlying career and job choices. Our model is based on research in behavioral decision making (BDM), in particular the choice goals framework developed by Bettman, Luce, and Payne (1998). The basic model involves two major processes. First,…

  16. School Choice Acceptance: An Exploratory Explication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koven, Steven G.; Khan, Mobin

    2014-01-01

    School choice is presented by some as a panacea to the challenges facing education in the United States. Acceptance of choice as a solution, however, is far from universal. This article examines two possible contributors to choice adoption: ideology and political culture. Political culture was found to better explain the complex phenomenon of…

  17. Choice Awareness: A Systematic, Eclectic Counseling Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard C.

    This book presents choice awareness as an eclectic counseling theory. The five choice principles of CREST are listed as Caring, Ruling, Enjoying, Sorrowing, and Thinking/Working. The focus is on providing the counselor with a direct and concise approach which will enable clients to make more effective choices and to exercise more responsibility in…

  18. School Choice Acceptance: An Exploratory Explication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koven, Steven G.; Khan, Mobin

    2014-01-01

    School choice is presented by some as a panacea to the challenges facing education in the United States. Acceptance of choice as a solution, however, is far from universal. This article examines two possible contributors to choice adoption: ideology and political culture. Political culture was found to better explain the complex phenomenon of…

  19. Reconstruction of signals with unknown spectra in information field theory with parameter uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Ensslin, Torsten A.; Frommert, Mona

    2011-05-15

    The optimal reconstruction of cosmic metric perturbations and other signals requires knowledge of their power spectra and other parameters. If these are not known a priori, they have to be measured simultaneously from the same data used for the signal reconstruction. We formulate the general problem of signal inference in the presence of unknown parameters within the framework of information field theory. To solve this, we develop a generic parameter-uncertainty renormalized estimation (PURE) technique. As a concrete application, we address the problem of reconstructing Gaussian signals with unknown power-spectrum with five different approaches: (i) separate maximum-a-posteriori power-spectrum measurement and subsequent reconstruction, (ii) maximum-a-posteriori reconstruction with marginalized power-spectrum, (iii) maximizing the joint posterior of signal and spectrum, (iv) guessing the spectrum from the variance in the Wiener-filter map, and (v) renormalization flow analysis of the field-theoretical problem providing the PURE filter. In all cases, the reconstruction can be described or approximated as Wiener-filter operations with assumed signal spectra derived from the data according to the same recipe, but with differing coefficients. All of these filters, except the renormalized one, exhibit a perception threshold in case of a Jeffreys prior for the unknown spectrum. Data modes with variance below this threshold do not affect the signal reconstruction at all. Filter (iv) seems to be similar to the so-called Karhune-Loeve and Feldman-Kaiser-Peacock estimators for galaxy power spectra used in cosmology, which therefore should also exhibit a marginal perception threshold if correctly implemented. We present statistical performance tests and show that the PURE filter is superior to the others, especially if the post-Wiener-filter corrections are included or in case an additional scale-independent spectral smoothness prior can be adopted.

  20. Pricing effects on food choices.

    PubMed

    French, Simone A

    2003-03-01

    Individual dietary choices are primarily influenced by such considerations as taste, cost, convenience and nutritional value of foods. The current obesity epidemic has been linked to excessive consumption of added sugars and fat, as well as to sedentary lifestyles. Fat and sugar provide dietary energy at very low cost. Food pricing and marketing practices are therefore an essential component of the eating environment. Recent studies have applied economic theories to changing dietary behavior. Price reduction strategies promote the choice of targeted foods by lowering their cost relative to alternative food choices. Two community-based intervention studies used price reductions to promote the increased purchase of targeted foods. The first study examined lower prices and point-of-purchase promotion on sales of lower fat vending machine snacks in 12 work sites and 12 secondary schools. Price reductions of 10%, 25% and 50% on lower fat snacks resulted in an increase in sales of 9%, 39% and 93%, respectively, compared with usual price conditions. The second study examined the impact of a 50% price reduction on fresh fruit and baby carrots in two secondary school cafeterias. Compared with usual price conditions, price reductions resulted in a four-fold increase in fresh fruit sales and a two-fold increase in baby carrot sales. Both studies demonstrate that price reductions are an effective strategy to increase the purchase of more healthful foods in community-based settings such as work sites and schools. Results were generalizable across various food types and populations. Reducing prices on healthful foods is a public health strategy that should be implemented through policy initiatives and industry collaborations.

  1. Taste perception and food choices.

    PubMed

    Negri, Rossella; Di Feola, Mariarosaria; Di Domenico, Simone; Scala, M Giuseppa; Artesi, Ginevra; Valente, Serena; Smarrazzo, Andrea; Turco, Francesca; Morini, Gabriella; Greco, Luigi

    2012-05-01

    The extent to which variation in taste perception influences food preferences is, to date, controversial. Bitterness in food triggers an innate aversion that is responsible for dietary restriction in children. We investigated the association among genetic variations in bitter receptor TAS2R38 and food choices in healthy children in the Mediterranean area, to develop appropriate tools to evaluate the relation among genetic predisposition, dietary habits, and feeding disorders. The aims of the study were to get a first baseline picture of taste sensitivity in healthy adults and their children and to explore taste sensitivity in a preliminary sample of obese children and in samples affected by functional gastrointestinal diseases. Individuals (98 children, 87 parents, 120 adults) were recruited from the general population in southern Italy. Bitterness sensitivity was assessed by means of a suprathreshold method with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil. Genomic DNA from saliva was used to genotype individuals for 3 polymorphisms of TAS2R38 receptor, A49P, A262 V, and V296I. Food intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Children's taste sensation differed from that of adults: we observed a higher frequency of supertasters among children even in the mother-child dyads with the same diplotypes. Among adults, supertaster status was related with proline-alanine-valine (taster allele) homozygous haplotype, whereas supertaster children were mainly heterozygous. Regarding the food choices, we found that a higher percentage of taster children avoided bitter vegetables or greens altogether compared with taster adults. Taster status was also associated with body mass index in boys. Greater sensitivity to 6-propyl-2-thiouracil predicts lower preferences for vegetables in children, showing an appreciable effect of the genetic predisposition on food choices. None of the obese boys was a supertaster.

  2. Rational choice theory and suicide.

    PubMed

    Lester, D

    1988-12-01

    The implications of viewing the decision to kill oneself as a rational choice, based on an analysis of the costs and benefits, were explored. Suicide is but one symptom for an individual in distress to choose, and if suicide is prevented, other symptoms may appear in its place. Similarly, a critical question to be asked in suicide prevention is whether restriction of the availability of one method for suicide (such as detoxifying domestic gas or car exhaust) will result in suicidal individuals switching to a different method for suicide or to a different symptom of distress.

  3. The PXIE LEBT Design Choices

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel; Shemyakin, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Typical front-ends of modern light-ion high-intensity accelerators typically consist of an ion source, a Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), a Radiofrequency Quadrupole and a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT), which is followed by the main linac accelerating structures. Over the years, many LEBTs have been designed, constructed and operated very successfully. In this paper, we present the guiding principles and compromises that lead to the design choices of the PXIE LEBT, including the rationale for a beam line that allows un-neutralized transport over a significant portion of the LEBT whether the beam is pulsed or DC.

  4. BRST symmetry and fictitious parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, A. A.; Pimentel, B. M.

    2017-03-01

    Our goal in this work is to present the variational method of fictitious parameters and its connection with the Bechi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) symmetry. First, we implement the method in QED at zero temperature and then we extend the analysis to generalized QED at finite temperature. As we see the core of the study is the general statement in gauge theories at finite temperature, assigned by Tyutin work, that the physical degrees of freedom do not depend on the gauge choices, covariant or not, due to BRST symmetry.

  5. S-SAD phasing of monoclinic histidine kinase from Brucella abortus combining data from multiple crystals and orientations: an example of data-collection strategy and a posteriori analysis of different data combinations.

    PubMed

    Klinke, Sebastián; Foos, Nicolas; Rinaldi, Jimena J; Paris, Gastón; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Legrand, Pierre; Guimarães, Beatriz G; Thompson, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    The histidine kinase (HK) domain belonging to the light-oxygen-voltage histidine kinase (LOV-HK) from Brucella abortus is a member of the HWE family, for which no structural information is available, and has low sequence identity (20%) to the closest HK present in the PDB. The `off-edge' S-SAD method in macromolecular X-ray crystallography was used to solve the structure of the HK domain from LOV-HK at low resolution from crystals in a low-symmetry space group (P21) and with four copies in the asymmetric unit (∼108 kDa). Data were collected both from multiple crystals (diffraction limit varying from 2.90 to 3.25 Å) and from multiple orientations of the same crystal, using the κ-geometry goniostat on SOLEIL beamline PROXIMA 1, to obtain `true redundancy'. Data from three different crystals were combined for structure determination. An optimized HK construct bearing a shorter cloning artifact yielded crystals that diffracted X-rays to 2.51 Å resolution and that were used for final refinement of the model. Moreover, a thorough a posteriori analysis using several different combinations of data sets allowed us to investigate the impact of the data-collection strategy on the success of the structure determination.

  6. Neural Activity Reveals Preferences Without Choices

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alec; Bernheim, B. Douglas; Camerer, Colin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of inferring the choices people would make (if given the opportunity) based on their neural responses to the pertinent prospects when they are not engaged in actual decision making. The ability to make such inferences is of potential value when choice data are unavailable, or limited in ways that render standard methods of estimating choice mappings problematic. We formulate prediction models relating choices to “non-choice” neural responses and use them to predict out-of-sample choices for new items and for new groups of individuals. The predictions are sufficiently accurate to establish the feasibility of our approach. PMID:25729468

  7. Choice as a Global Language in Local Practice: A Mixed Model of School Choice in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Chin-Ju

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses school choice policy as an example to demonstrate how local actors adopt, mediate, translate, and reformulate "choice" as neo-liberal rhetoric informing education reform. Complex processes exist between global policy about school choice and the local practice of school choice. Based on the theoretical sensibility of…

  8. Choice as a Global Language in Local Practice: A Mixed Model of School Choice in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Chin-Ju

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses school choice policy as an example to demonstrate how local actors adopt, mediate, translate, and reformulate "choice" as neo-liberal rhetoric informing education reform. Complex processes exist between global policy about school choice and the local practice of school choice. Based on the theoretical sensibility of…

  9. Prospect theory based estimation of drivers' risk attitudes in route choice behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lizhen; Zhong, Shiquan; Ma, Shoufeng; Jia, Ning

    2014-12-01

    This paper applied prospect theory (PT) to describe drivers' route choice behavior under Variable Message Sign (VMS), which presented visual traffic information to assist them to make route choice decisions. A quite rich empirical data from questionnaire and field spot was used to estimate parameters of PT. In order to make the parameters more realistic with drivers' attitudes, they were classified into different types by significant factors influencing their behaviors. Based on the travel time distribution of alternative routes and route choice results from questionnaire, the parameterized value function of each category was figured out, which represented drivers' risk attitudes and choice characteristics. The empirical verification showed that the estimates were acceptable and effective. The result showed drivers' risk attitudes and route choice characteristics could be captured by PT under real-time information shown on VMS. For practical application, once drivers' route choice characteristics and parameters were identified, their route choice behavior under different road conditions could be predicted accurately, which was the basis of traffic guidance measures formulation and implementation for targeted traffic management. Moreover, the heterogeneous risk attitudes among drivers should be considered when releasing traffic information and regulating traffic flow.

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Choices

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Alec A.; Perfetti, Dean C.; Levine, William N.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common surgical procedure; however, there is no consensus to what the best graft option is to replace the injured ACL. The main options available consist of allografts and autografts, which include patellar tendon, hamstring tendon, and quadriceps tendon autografts. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database was searched in August 2010 for English-language articles pertaining to ACL grafts. Results: Postoperative outcome variables were analyzed to determine similarities and differences among the different graft options. These variables include stability, strength, function, return to sports, patient satisfaction, complications, and cost. Conclusions: Both allografts and the 3 main options for autografts can provide excellent results in ACL reconstruction and lead to a high percentage of satisfied patients. However, differences exist among the graft choices. Both the similarities and the differences are important to discuss with a patient who will be undergoing ACL reconstruction so that he or she has the best information available when making a choice of graft. PMID:23016071

  11. Social determinants of food choice.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, R

    1999-11-01

    Food choice is influenced by a large number of factors, including social and cultural factors. One method for trying to understand the impact of these factors is through the study of attitudes. Research is described which utilizes social psychological attitude models of attitude-behaviour relationships, in particular the Theory of Planned Behaviour. This approach has shown good prediction of behaviour, but there are a number of possible extensions to this basic model which might improve its utility. One such extension is the inclusion of measures of moral concern, which have been found to be important both for the choice of genetically-modified foods and also for foods to be eaten by others. It has been found to be difficult to effect dietary change, and there are a number of insights from social psychology which might address this difficulty. One is the phenomenon of optimistic bias, where individuals believe themselves to be at less risk from various hazards than the average person. This effect has been demonstrated for nutritional risks, and this might lead individuals to take less note of health education messages. Another concern is that individuals do not always have clear-cut attitudes, but rather can be ambivalent about food and about healthy eating. It is important, therefore, to have measures for this ambivalence, and an understanding of how it might impact on behaviour.

  12. The determinants of food choice.

    PubMed

    Leng, Gareth; Adan, Roger A H; Belot, Michele; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; de Graaf, Kees; Dickson, Suzanne L; Hare, Todd; Maier, Silvia; Menzies, John; Preissl, Hubert; Reisch, Lucia A; Rogers, Peter J; Smeets, Paul A M

    2016-12-01

    Health nudge interventions to steer people into healthier lifestyles are increasingly applied by governments worldwide, and it is natural to look to such approaches to improve health by altering what people choose to eat. However, to produce policy recommendations that are likely to be effective, we need to be able to make valid predictions about the consequences of proposed interventions, and for this, we need a better understanding of the determinants of food choice. These determinants include dietary components (e.g. highly palatable foods and alcohol), but also diverse cultural and social pressures, cognitive-affective factors (perceived stress, health attitude, anxiety and depression), and familial, genetic and epigenetic influences on personality characteristics. In addition, our choices are influenced by an array of physiological mechanisms, including signals to the brain from the gastrointestinal tract and adipose tissue, which affect not only our hunger and satiety but also our motivation to eat particular nutrients, and the reward we experience from eating. Thus, to develop the evidence base necessary for effective policies, we need to build bridges across different levels of knowledge and understanding. This requires experimental models that can fill in the gaps in our understanding that are needed to inform policy, translational models that connect mechanistic understanding from laboratory studies to the real life human condition, and formal models that encapsulate scientific knowledge from diverse disciplines, and which embed understanding in a way that enables policy-relevant predictions to be made. Here we review recent developments in these areas.

  13. Cultures of choice: towards a sociology of choice as a cultural phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Ori

    2017-09-07

    The article explores different ways to conceptualize the relationship between choice and culture. These two notions are often constructed as opposites: while sociologies of modernization (such as Giddens') portray a shift from cultural traditions to culturally disembedded choice, dispositional sociologies (such as Bourdieu's) uncover cultural determination as the hidden truth behind apparent choice. However, choice may be real and cultural simultaneously. Culture moulds choice not only by inculcating dispositions or shaping repertoires of alternatives, but also by offering culturally specific choice practices, ways of choosing embedded in meaning, normativity, and materiality; and by shaping attributions of choice in everyday life. By bringing together insights from rival schools, I portray an outline for a comparative cultural sociology of choice, and demonstrate its purchase while discussing the digitalization of choice; and cultural logics that shape choice attribution in ways opposing neoliberal trends. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  14. A Simplified Model of Choice Behavior under Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Hung; Lin, Yu-Kai; Song, Tzu-Jiun; Huang, Jong-Tsun; Chiu, Yao-Chu

    2016-01-01

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) has been standardized as a clinical assessment tool (Bechara, 2007). Nonetheless, numerous research groups have attempted to modify IGT models to optimize parameters for predicting the choice behavior of normal controls and patients. A decade ago, most researchers considered the expected utility (EU) model (Busemeyer and Stout, 2002) to be the optimal model for predicting choice behavior under uncertainty. However, in recent years, studies have demonstrated that models with the prospect utility (PU) function are more effective than the EU models in the IGT (Ahn et al., 2008). Nevertheless, after some preliminary tests based on our behavioral dataset and modeling, it was determined that the Ahn et al. (2008) PU model is not optimal due to some incompatible results. This study aims to modify the Ahn et al. (2008) PU model to a simplified model and used the IGT performance of 145 subjects as the benchmark data for comparison. In our simplified PU model, the best goodness-of-fit was found mostly as the value of α approached zero. More specifically, we retested the key parameters α, λ, and A in the PU model. Notably, the influence of the parameters α, λ, and A has a hierarchical power structure in terms of manipulating the goodness-of-fit in the PU model. Additionally, we found that the parameters λ and A may be ineffective when the parameter α is close to zero in the PU model. The present simplified model demonstrated that decision makers mostly adopted the strategy of gain-stay loss-shift rather than foreseeing the long-term outcome. However, there are other behavioral variables that are not well revealed under these dynamic-uncertainty situations. Therefore, the optimal behavioral models may not have been found yet. In short, the best model for predicting choice behavior under dynamic-uncertainty situations should be further evaluated. PMID:27582715

  15. A Simplified Model of Choice Behavior under Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hung; Lin, Yu-Kai; Song, Tzu-Jiun; Huang, Jong-Tsun; Chiu, Yao-Chu

    2016-01-01

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) has been standardized as a clinical assessment tool (Bechara, 2007). Nonetheless, numerous research groups have attempted to modify IGT models to optimize parameters for predicting the choice behavior of normal controls and patients. A decade ago, most researchers considered the expected utility (EU) model (Busemeyer and Stout, 2002) to be the optimal model for predicting choice behavior under uncertainty. However, in recent years, studies have demonstrated that models with the prospect utility (PU) function are more effective than the EU models in the IGT (Ahn et al., 2008). Nevertheless, after some preliminary tests based on our behavioral dataset and modeling, it was determined that the Ahn et al. (2008) PU model is not optimal due to some incompatible results. This study aims to modify the Ahn et al. (2008) PU model to a simplified model and used the IGT performance of 145 subjects as the benchmark data for comparison. In our simplified PU model, the best goodness-of-fit was found mostly as the value of α approached zero. More specifically, we retested the key parameters α, λ, and A in the PU model. Notably, the influence of the parameters α, λ, and A has a hierarchical power structure in terms of manipulating the goodness-of-fit in the PU model. Additionally, we found that the parameters λ and A may be ineffective when the parameter α is close to zero in the PU model. The present simplified model demonstrated that decision makers mostly adopted the strategy of gain-stay loss-shift rather than foreseeing the long-term outcome. However, there are other behavioral variables that are not well revealed under these dynamic-uncertainty situations. Therefore, the optimal behavioral models may not have been found yet. In short, the best model for predicting choice behavior under dynamic-uncertainty situations should be further evaluated.

  16. Design parameters for wearable optical imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, Ata; Kim, Sanghyun; Pourrezaei, Kambiz; Chance, Britton; Nioka, Shoko

    2001-06-01

    This paper summarizes the design steps that are followed during the development of the portable optical imager for breast cancer screening. The design steps considered the parameters such as total power consumption versus battery weight and size, speed of data acquisition versus cost and complexity of the design (functionality), graphical display versus operating system choice. We have used a single board computer system that uses Windows CE as the real time operating system. This choice was preferred since our graphical display requirements can only be carried out with the CE environment's GUI kernels.

  17. Compositions and their application to the analysis of choice.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Greg

    2014-07-01

    Descriptions of steady-state patterns of choice allocation under concurrent schedules of reinforcement have long relied on the "generalized matching law" (Baum, 1974), a log-odds power function. Although a powerful model in some contexts, a series of conflicting empirical results have cast its generality in doubt. The relevance and analytic relevance of matching models can be greatly expanded by considering them in terms of compositions (Aitchison, 1986). A composition encodes a set of ratios (e.g., 5:3:2) as a vector with a constant sum, and this constraint (called closure) restricts the data to a nonstandard sample space. By exploiting this sample space, unbiased estimates of model parameters can be obtained to predict behavior given any number of choice alternatives. Additionally, the compositional analysis of choice provides tools that can accommodate both violations of scale invariance and unequal discriminability of stimuli signaling schedules of reinforcement. In order to demonstrate how choice data can be analyzed using the compositional approach, data from three previously published studies are reanalyzed. Additionally, new data is reported comparing matching behavior given four, six, and eight response alternatives. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  18. Psychophysics of time perception and intertemporal choice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Taiki; Oono, Hidemi; Radford, Mark H. B.

    2008-03-01

    Intertemporal choice and psychophysics of time perception have been attracting attention in econophysics and neuroeconomics. Several models have been proposed for intertemporal choice: exponential discounting, general hyperbolic discounting (exponential discounting with logarithmic time perception of the Weber-Fechner law, a q-exponential discount model based on Tsallis's statistics), simple hyperbolic discounting, and Stevens' power law-exponential discounting (exponential discounting with Stevens' power time perception). In order to examine the fitness of the models for behavioral data, we estimated the parameters and AICc (Akaike Information Criterion with small sample correction) of the intertemporal choice models by assessing the points of subjective equality (indifference points) at seven delays. Our results have shown that the orders of the goodness-of-fit for both group and individual data were [Weber-Fechner discounting (general hyperbola) > Stevens' power law discounting > Simple hyperbolic discounting > Exponential discounting], indicating that human time perception in intertemporal choice may follow the Weber-Fechner law. Indications of the results for neuropsychopharmacological treatments of addiction and biophysical processing underlying temporal discounting and time perception are discussed.

  19. A simple computational algorithm of model-based choice preference.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Asako; Katahira, Kentaro; Ohira, Hideki

    2017-06-01

    A broadly used computational framework posits that two learning systems operate in parallel during the learning of choice preferences-namely, the model-free and model-based reinforcement-learning systems. In this study, we examined another possibility, through which model-free learning is the basic system and model-based information is its modulator. Accordingly, we proposed several modified versions of a temporal-difference learning model to explain the choice-learning process. Using the two-stage decision task developed by Daw, Gershman, Seymour, Dayan, and Dolan (2011), we compared their original computational model, which assumes a parallel learning process, and our proposed models, which assume a sequential learning process. Choice data from 23 participants showed a better fit with the proposed models. More specifically, the proposed eligibility adjustment model, which assumes that the environmental model can weight the degree of the eligibility trace, can explain choices better under both model-free and model-based controls and has a simpler computational algorithm than the original model. In addition, the forgetting learning model and its variation, which assume changes in the values of unchosen actions, substantially improved the fits to the data. Overall, we show that a hybrid computational model best fits the data. The parameters used in this model succeed in capturing individual tendencies with respect to both model use in learning and exploration behavior. This computational model provides novel insights into learning with interacting model-free and model-based components.

  20. Object choice and actual bisexuality.

    PubMed

    Limentani, A

    1976-01-01

    Actual bisexuality is to be distinguished from homosexuality in a latent state and from conscious bisexual fantasies. Contemporary social changes have caused an increased demand for help for those men and women capable of engaging in protracted heterosexual and homosexual relations. Among such people narcissistic and borderline states are common. Clinical material is presented in some detail. The author suggests that the condition is associated with a tendency to be caught up between the anaclitic and narcissistic types of object choice. The concurrent involvement with a male and female love object against a background of pseudogenitality creates the illusory appearance of two objects being involved, covering up the fact that there is splitting of the original love object together with severe preoedipal disturbance.

  1. An organizational model of choice: a theoretical analysis differentiating choice, personal control, and self-determination.

    PubMed

    Williams, S

    1998-11-01

    Individuals experience choice when they select one option from among meaningful alternatives that possess relatively equal attractiveness and some degree of indeterminacy. Choice has been found to influence important psychological and behavioral outcomes. After differentiating among choice, personal control, and self-determination, the author offers a model of choice, with self-determination as the key mechanism regulating how choice influences intrinsic motivation. The model suggests specific types of choice-relevant information that should affect whether choice results in an internal (self-determined) or external (controlled) locus of causality. The individual characteristics of locus of control, self-presentation, self-esteem, and Type A personality are suggested as possible moderators of the effects of choice. Finally, the implications of the choice model for organizations and further areas of research are discussed.

  2. Nuclear position dictates DNA repair pathway choice

    PubMed Central

    Lemaître, Charlène; Grabarz, Anastazja; Tsouroula, Katerina; Andronov, Leonid; Furst, Audrey; Pankotai, Tibor; Heyer, Vincent; Rogier, Mélanie; Attwood, Kathleen M.; Kessler, Pascal; Dellaire, Graham; Klaholz, Bruno; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo; Soutoglou, Evi

    2014-01-01

    Faithful DNA repair is essential to avoid chromosomal rearrangements and promote genome integrity. Nuclear organization has emerged as a key parameter in the formation of chromosomal translocations, yet little is known as to whether DNA repair can efficiently occur throughout the nucleus and whether it is affected by the location of the lesion. Here, we induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at different nuclear compartments and follow their fate. We demonstrate that DSBs induced at the nuclear membrane (but not at nuclear pores or nuclear interior) fail to rapidly activate the DNA damage response (DDR) and repair by homologous recombination (HR). Real-time and superresolution imaging reveal that DNA DSBs within lamina-associated domains do not migrate to more permissive environments for HR, like the nuclear pores or the nuclear interior, but instead are repaired in situ by alternative end-joining. Our results are consistent with a model in which nuclear position dictates the choice of DNA repair pathway, thus revealing a new level of regulation in DSB repair controlled by spatial organization of DNA within the nucleus. PMID:25366693

  3. Color as a factor in food choice.

    PubMed

    Clydesdale, F M

    1993-01-01

    From birth, nature teaches us to make judgements on our environment based in large measure on color. As such, it plays a key role in food choice by influencing taste thresholds, sweetness perception, food preference, pleasantness, and acceptability. Its role is elusive and difficult to quantify, however, which at times has placed color in a secondary role to the other sensory characteristics, a position not entirely consistent with the facts. Color, in a quantitative sense, has been shown to be able to replace sugar and still maintain sweetness perception in flavored foods. It interferes with judgments of flavor intensity and identification and in so doing has been shown to dramatically influence the pleasantness and acceptability of foods. Studies in the literature have used cross-sectional population panels to study these effects, but a recent investigation of color-sensory interactions in beverages has compared the response of a college age group with the response of a panel consisting of a more mature population. Interestingly, the older group showed significant differences from the college age group in their response to the effects of color on several sensory parameters as well as showing a direct correlation between beverage consumption and color. Color is often taken for granted, but this position must be reevaluated in view of such studies and the need to create more appealing foods for different segments of our society.

  4. Behavioural social choice: a status report.

    PubMed

    Regenwetter, Michel; Grofman, Bernard; Popova, Anna; Messner, William; Davis-Stober, Clintin P; Cavagnaro, Daniel R

    2009-03-27

    Behavioural social choice has been proposed as a social choice parallel to seminal developments in other decision sciences, such as behavioural decision theory, behavioural economics, behavioural finance and behavioural game theory. Behavioural paradigms compare how rational actors should make certain types of decisions with how real decision makers behave empirically. We highlight that important theoretical predictions in social choice theory change dramatically under even minute violations of standard assumptions. Empirical data violate those critical assumptions. We argue that the nature of preference distributions in electorates is ultimately an empirical question, which social choice theory has often neglected. We also emphasize important insights for research on decision making by individuals. When researchers aggregate individual choice behaviour in laboratory experiments to report summary statistics, they are implicitly applying social choice rules. Thus, they should be aware of the potential for aggregation paradoxes. We hypothesize that such problems may substantially mar the conclusions of a number of (sometimes seminal) papers in behavioural decision research.

  5. Behavioural social choice: a status report

    PubMed Central

    Regenwetter, Michel; Grofman, Bernard; Popova, Anna; Messner, William; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.; Cavagnaro, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Behavioural social choice has been proposed as a social choice parallel to seminal developments in other decision sciences, such as behavioural decision theory, behavioural economics, behavioural finance and behavioural game theory. Behavioural paradigms compare how rational actors should make certain types of decisions with how real decision makers behave empirically. We highlight that important theoretical predictions in social choice theory change dramatically under even minute violations of standard assumptions. Empirical data violate those critical assumptions. We argue that the nature of preference distributions in electorates is ultimately an empirical question, which social choice theory has often neglected. We also emphasize important insights for research on decision making by individuals. When researchers aggregate individual choice behaviour in laboratory experiments to report summary statistics, they are implicitly applying social choice rules. Thus, they should be aware of the potential for aggregation paradoxes. We hypothesize that such problems may substantially mar the conclusions of a number of (sometimes seminal) papers in behavioural decision research. PMID:19073478

  6. Multiple Choice Knapsack Problem: example of planning choice in transportation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tao; Young, Rhonda

    2010-05-01

    Transportation programming, a process of selecting projects for funding given budget and other constraints, is becoming more complex as a result of new federal laws, local planning regulations, and increased public involvement. This article describes the use of an integer programming tool, Multiple Choice Knapsack Problem (MCKP), to provide optimal solutions to transportation programming problems in cases where alternative versions of projects are under consideration. In this paper, optimization methods for use in the transportation programming process are compared and then the process of building and solving the optimization problems is discussed. The concepts about the use of MCKP are presented and a real-world transportation programming example at various budget levels is provided. This article illustrates how the use of MCKP addresses the modern complexities and provides timely solutions in transportation programming practice. While the article uses transportation programming as a case study, MCKP can be useful in other fields where a similar decision among a subset of the alternatives is required. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Making healthy choices easy choices: the role of empowerment.

    PubMed

    Koelen, M A; Lindström, B

    2005-08-01

    An important goal of health promotion is to make it easier for people to make healthy choices. However, this may be difficult if people do not feel control over their environment and their personal circumstances. An important concept in relation to this is empowerment. Health professionals are expected to facilitate and enable people moving towards empowerment. In this paper, we address the question what is meant by individual empowerment. In an attempt to provide a theoretical framework, we discuss individual empowerment from a salutogenic perspective. This perspective introduces two fundamental concepts: the general resistance resources, and the sense of coherence. In addition, in order to further clarify and operationalise the concept, some factors influencing individual empowerment are identified, that is, locus of control, learned helplessness, self-efficacy and outcome expectations. These concepts find common ground in feelings of (lack of) control, but they differ in stability and changeability. We provide some suggestions how these factors can be influenced, and we discuss the meaning of the identified factors for empowering interactions between professionals and their clients. Health professionals can facilitate people to see a correspondence between their efforts and the outcomes thereof, improve and facilitate health literacy, in a relationship which can be characterised as partnership.

  8. Suboptimal Choice in Pigeons: Stimulus Value Predicts Choice over Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Alexandria R.; Chow, Jonathan J.; Beckmann, Joshua S.; Zentall, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Pigeons have shown suboptimal gambling-like behavior when preferring a stimulus that infrequently signals reliable reinforcement over alternatives that provide greater reinforcement overall. As a mechanism for this behavior, recent research proposed that the stimulus value of alternatives with more reliable signals for reinforcement will be preferred relatively independently of their frequencies. The present study tested this hypothesis using a simplified design of a Discriminative alternative that, 50% of the time, led to either a signal for 100% reinforcement or a blackout period indicative of 0% reinforcement against a Nondiscriminative alternative that always led to a signal that predicted 50% reinforcement. Pigeons showed a strong preference for the Discriminative alternative that remained despite reducing the frequency of the signal for reinforcement in subsequent phases to 25% and then 12.5%. In Experiment 2, using the original design of Experiment 1, the stimulus following choice of the Nondiscriminative alternative was increased to 75% and then to 100%. Results showed that preference for the Discriminative alternative decreased only when the signals for reinforcement for the two alternatives predicted the same probability of reinforcement. The ability of several models to predict this behavior are discussed, but the terminal link stimulus value offers the most parsimonious account of this suboptimal behavior. PMID:27441394

  9. Basic and applied research on choice responding.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, W W; Mazur, J E

    1997-01-01

    Choice responding refers to the manner in which individuals allocate their time or responding among available response options. In this article, we first review basic investigations that have identified and examined variables that influence choice responding, such as response effort and reinforcement rate, immediacy, and quality. We then describe recent bridge and applied studies that illustrate how the results of basic research on choice responding can help to account for human behavior in natural environments and improve clinical assessments and interventions. PMID:9316255

  10. Not all choices are created equal: Task-relevant choices enhance motor learning compared to task-irrelevant choices.

    PubMed

    Carter, Michael J; Ste-Marie, Diane M

    2017-02-21

    Lewthwaite et al. (2015) reported that the learning benefits of exercising choice (i.e., their self-controlled condition) are not restricted to task-relevant features (e.g., feedback). They found that choosing one's golf ball color (Exp. 1) or choosing which of two tasks to perform at a later time plus which of two artworks to hang (Exp. 2) resulted in better retention than did being denied these same choices (i.e., yoked condition). The researchers concluded that the learning benefits derived from choice, whether irrelevant or relevant to the to-be-learned task, are predominantly motivational because choice is intrinsically rewarding and satisfies basic psychological needs. However, the absence of a group that made task-relevant choices and the lack of psychological measures significantly weakened their conclusions. Here, we investigated how task-relevant and task-irrelevant choices affect motor-skill learning. Participants practiced a spatiotemporal motor task in either a task-relevant group (choice over feedback schedule), a task-irrelevant group (choice over the color of an arm-wrap plus game selection), or a no-choice group. The results showed significantly greater learning in the task-relevant group than in both the task-irrelevant and no-choice groups, who did not differ significantly. Critically, these learning differences were not attributed to differences in perceptions of competence or autonomy, but instead to superior error-estimation abilities. These results challenge the perspective that motivational influences are the root cause of self-controlled learning advantages. Instead, the findings add to the growing evidence highlighting that the informational value gained from task-relevant choices makes a greater relative contribution to these advantages than motivational influences do.

  11. Tragic choices in humanitarian health work.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Matthew R; Sinding, Christina; Schwartz, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Humanitarian healthcare work presents a range of ethical challenges for expatriate healthcare professionals, including tragic choices requiring the selection of a least-worst option. In this paper we examine a particular set of tragic choices related to the prioritization of care and allocation of scarce resources between individuals in situations of widespread and urgent health needs. Drawing on qualitative interviews with clinicians, we examine the nature of these choices. We offer recommendations to clinical teams and aid organizations for preparing and supporting frontline clinicians in their efforts to determine the least-worst option, and in their responsibility for making such choices.

  12. Neural correlates of affective influence on choice.

    PubMed

    Piech, Richard M; Lewis, Jade; Parkinson, Caroline H; Owen, Adrian M; Roberts, Angela C; Downing, Paul E; Parkinson, John A

    2010-03-01

    Making the right choice depends crucially on the accurate valuation of the available options in the light of current needs and goals of an individual. Thus, the valuation of identical options can vary considerably with motivational context. The present study investigated the neural structures underlying context dependent evaluation. We instructed participants to choose from food menu items based on different criteria: on their anticipated taste or on ease of preparation. The aim of the manipulation was to assess which neural sites were activated during choice guided by incentive value, and which during choice based on a value-irrelevant criterion. To assess the impact of increased motivation, affect-guided choice and cognition-guided choice was compared during the sated and hungry states. During affective choice, we identified increased activity in structures representing primarily valuation and taste (medial prefrontal cortex, insula). During cognitive choice, structures showing increased activity included those implicated in suppression and conflict monitoring (lateral orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate). Hunger influenced choice-related activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. Our results show that choice is associated with the use of distinct neural structures for the pursuit of different goals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Consumers, health insurance and dominated choices.

    PubMed

    Sinaiko, Anna D; Hirth, Richard A

    2011-03-01

    We analyze employee health plan choices when the choice set offered by their employer includes a dominated plan. During our study period, one-third of workers were enrolled in the dominated plan. Some may have selected the plan before it was dominated and then failed to switch out of it. However, a substantial number actively chose the dominated plan when they had an unambiguously better choice. These results suggest limitations in the ability of health reform based solely on consumer choice to achieve efficient outcomes and that implementation of health reform should anticipate, monitor and account for this consumer behavior.

  14. A priori and a posteriori dietary patterns at the age of 1 year and body composition at the age of 6 years: the Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Voortman, Trudy; Leermakers, Elisabeth T M; Franco, Oscar H; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Moll, Henriette A; Hofman, Albert; van den Hooven, Edith H; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C

    2016-08-01

    Dietary patterns have been linked to obesity in adults, however, not much is known about this association in early childhood. We examined associations of different types of dietary patterns in 1-year-old children with body composition at school age in 2026 children participating in a population-based cohort study. Dietary intake at the age of 1 year was assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire. At the children's age of 6 years we measured their body composition with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and we calculated body mass index, fat mass index (FMI), and fat-free mass index (FFMI). Three dietary pattern approaches were used: (1) An a priori-defined diet quality score; (2) dietary patterns based on variation in food intake, derived from principal-component-analysis (PCA); and (3) dietary patterns based on variations in FMI and FFMI, derived with reduced-rank-regression (RRR). Both the a priori-defined diet score and a 'Health-conscious' PCA-pattern were characterized by a high intake of fruit, vegetables, grains, and vegetable oils, and, after adjustment for confounders, children with higher adherence to these patterns had a higher FFMI at 6 years [0.19 SD (95 % CI 0.08;0.30) per SD increase in diet score], but had no different FMI. One of the two RRR-patterns was also positively associated with FFMI and was characterized by intake of whole grains, pasta and rice, and vegetable oils. Our results suggest that different a priori- and a posteriori-derived health-conscious dietary patterns in early childhood are associated with a higher fat-free mass, but not with fat mass, in later childhood.

  15. Teen Choice of Inwood House.

    PubMed

    1994-05-01

    The Teen Choice Program in New York City was described and the outcome of the program evaluation was reported. Teen Choice is a school based sex education and pregnancy prevention program run by trained social workers. The aim is to provide information, counseling, and referrals on a range of issues relating to sexuality. The program is elective and meets during a regularly scheduled gym period for one or two semesters from the 7th to the 12th grades. There are single sex and coeducational classes. The program aim is to change attitudes toward birth control, to change risky sexual behavior, such as unprotected coitus, to offer accurate knowledge about contraception, and to prevent unplanned pregnancies. Abstinence is encouraged, but for those sexually experienced, there is attention to responsible and reliable use of contraception. Program methods include small group discussion, individual counseling, and classroom discussion. Topics of discussion range from sexuality issues and birth control to values clarification and peer pressure. Small groups may discuss human sexual growth, relationship formation, family life, responsibility to self and others, consequences of teenage pregnancy, and social and cultural peer pressures. Girls are encouraged to assume more assertive and less reactive roles. Communication skills are reinforced in respectful exchanges of personal views and questions. Differentiating facts and issues is a primary focus. A question about when an individual first had sex would be redirected to asking about the appropriate age to first have sex. Respect for privacy helps to build students confidence in the program. A longitudinal evaluation conducted between 1984 and 1987 found that the program was effective in reaching and recruiting high risk adolescents. Students left the program with increased knowledge about contraception, more mature and responsible attitudes about the use of birth control, and reduced frequency of unprotected coitus. Boys were

  16. Evaluating choices by single neurons in the frontal lobe: outcome value encoded across multiple decision variables.

    PubMed

    Kennerley, Steven W; Wallis, Jonathan D

    2009-05-01

    Damage to the frontal lobe can cause severe decision-making impairments. A mechanism that may underlie this is that neurons in the frontal cortex encode many variables that contribute to the valuation of a choice, such as its costs, benefits and probability of success. However, optimal decision-making requires that one considers these variables, not only when faced with the choice, but also when evaluating the outcome of the choice, in order to adapt future behaviour appropriately. To examine the role of the frontal cortex in encoding the value of different choice outcomes, we simultaneously recorded the activity of multiple single neurons in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) while subjects evaluated the outcome of choices involving manipulations of probability, payoff and cost. Frontal neurons encoded many of the parameters that enabled the calculation of the value of these variables, including the onset and offset of reward and the amount of work performed, and often encoded the value of outcomes across multiple decision variables. In addition, many neurons encoded both the predicted outcome during the choice phase of the task as well as the experienced outcome in the outcome phase of the task. These patterns of selectivity were more prevalent in ACC relative to OFC and LPFC. These results support a role for the frontal cortex, principally ACC, in selecting between choice alternatives and evaluating the outcome of that selection thereby ensuring that choices are optimal and adaptive.

  17. Male contraception: expanding reproductive choice.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, M

    2005-11-01

    The development of steroid-based oral contraceptives had revolutionized the availability of contraceptive choice for women. In order to expand the contraceptive options for couples by developing an acceptable, safe and effective male contraceptive, scientists have been experimenting with various steroidal/non-steroidal regimens to suppress testicular sperm production. The non-availability of a long-acting androgen was a limiting factor in the development of a male contraceptive regimen since all currently tested anti-spermatogenic agents also concurrently decrease circulating testosterone levels. A combination regimen of long-acting progestogen and androgen would have advantage over an androgen-alone modality since the dose of androgen required would be much smaller in the combination regimen, thereby decreasing the adverse effects of high steroid load. The progestogen in the combination regimen would act as the primary anti-spermatogenic agent. Currently, a number of combination regimens using progestogen or GnRH analogues combined with androgen are undergoing trials. The side effects of long-term use of androgens and progestogens have also undergone evaluation in primate models and the results of these studies need to be kept in view, while considering steroidal regimens for contraceptive use in men. Efforts are also being made to popularize non-scalpel vasectomy and to develop condoms of greater acceptability. The development of contraceptive vaccines for men, using sperm surface epitopes not expressed in female reproductive tract as source, still requires considerable research efforts.

  18. Dopaminergic function and intertemporal choice

    PubMed Central

    Joutsa, J; Voon, V; Johansson, J; Niemelä, S; Bergman, J; Kaasinen, V

    2015-01-01

    The discounting of delayed rewards, also known as temporal or delay discounting, is intrinsic to everyday decisions and can be impaired in pathological states such as addiction disorders. Preclinical and human studies suggest a role for dopaminergic function in temporal discounting but this relationship has not yet been verified using molecular imaging of the living human brain. Here, we evaluated dopaminergic function in temporal discounting using positron emission tomography (PET) with two different dopaminergic ligands assessing three populations in whom temporal discounting has been shown to be impaired. First, we show using [11C]raclopride PET that in pathological gamblers, greater temporal discounting correlates with decreased ventral striatal binding potential, convergent with translational findings of lower nucleus accumbens D2/D3 receptor density in high-impulsive rodents. Temporal discounting also correlates with lower ventral striatal dopamine release in response to high-reward magnitude suggesting that dopamine-mediated devaluation of larger delayed rewards may drive choice preferences. Second, we show using [18F]fluorodopa PET that in Parkinson's disease, temporal discounting correlates with greater left caudate dopaminergic terminal function. Finally, in subjects with Parkinson's disease and dopamine medication-induced behavioral addictions, temporal discounting is further correlated with greater dopaminergic terminal function in the anterior putamen. These findings provide insights into the relationship between striatal dopamine function and temporal discounting, and its potential role in pathological disorders and mechanisms underlying treatment interventions. PMID:25562841

  19. Parameter screening: the use of a dummy parameter to identify non-influential parameters in a global sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorashadi Zadeh, Farkhondeh; Nossent, Jiri; van Griensven, Ann; Bauwens, Willy

    2017-04-01

    Parameter estimation is a major concern in hydrological modeling, which may limit the use of complex simulators with a large number of parameters. To support the selection of parameters to include in or exclude from the calibration process, Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) is widely applied in modeling practices. Based on the results of GSA, the influential and the non-influential parameters are identified (i.e. parameters screening). Nevertheless, the choice of the screening threshold below which parameters are considered non-influential is a critical issue, which has recently received more attention in GSA literature. In theory, the sensitivity index of a non-influential parameter has a value of zero. However, since numerical approximations, rather than analytical solutions, are utilized in GSA methods to calculate the sensitivity indices, small but non-zero indices may be obtained for the indices of non-influential parameters. In order to assess the threshold that identifies non-influential parameters in GSA methods, we propose to calculate the sensitivity index of a "dummy parameter". This dummy parameter has no influence on the model output, but will have a non-zero sensitivity index, representing the error due to the numerical approximation. Hence, the parameters whose indices are above the sensitivity index of the dummy parameter can be classified as influential, whereas the parameters whose indices are below this index are within the range of the numerical error and should be considered as non-influential. To demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed "dummy parameter approach", 26 parameters of a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model are selected to be analyzed and screened, using the variance-based Sobol' and moment-independent PAWN methods. The sensitivity index of the dummy parameter is calculated from sampled data, without changing the model equations. Moreover, the calculation does not even require additional model evaluations for the Sobol

  20. School Choice for Transnational Parents in Tokyo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velliaris, Donna M.; Willis, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    School choice is centred on parents deciding where and how their children will be educated, and this issue is similar--to varying degrees--for parents all around the world. Parental school choice is the authority that parents exercise in making decisions about where their children will attend school, and choosing a particular educational pathway…

  1. Making the Most of Multiple Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-choice questions draw criticism because many people perceive they test only recall or atomistic, surface-level objectives and do not require students to think. Although this can be the case, it does not have to be that way. Susan M. Brookhart suggests that multiple-choice questions are a useful part of any teacher's questioning repertoire…

  2. Linking harvest choices to timber supply

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey P. Prestemon; David N. Wear

    2000-01-01

    Aggregate timber supply by ownership was investigated for a small region by applying stand-level harvest choice models to a representative sample of stands and then aggregating to regional totals using the area-frame of the forest survey. Timber harvest choices were estimated as probit models for three ownership categories in coastal plain southern pine stands of North...

  3. School Choice for Transnational Parents in Tokyo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velliaris, Donna M.; Willis, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    School choice is centred on parents deciding where and how their children will be educated, and this issue is similar--to varying degrees--for parents all around the world. Parental school choice is the authority that parents exercise in making decisions about where their children will attend school, and choosing a particular educational pathway…

  4. Generic Interests and School Subject Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsworth, Gerald R.; Harvey-Beavis, Adrian; Ainley, John; Fabris, Sergio

    1999-01-01

    Reviews results of five recent Australian studies in which interests were related to school subject preferences and choices. Presents multilevel models of data from the most recent study that offer a coherent summary of the interest-school choice relationships. Suggests that J. Holland's "RIASEC" typology provides a coherent account of…

  5. Career Choice and Development. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Duane; And Others

    This book contains 12 papers examining established and newly emerging theories of career choice and development. Following prefaces to the third, second, and first editions by Duane Brown and Linda Brooks, the following papers are included: "Introduction to Theories of Career Development and Choice: Origins, Evolution, and Current Efforts" (Duane…

  6. Work Values and College Major Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balsamo, Michela; Lauriola, Marco; Saggino, Aristide

    2013-01-01

    Our study sought to clarify the nature of the known individual differences in work values associated with academic college major choice, specifically the question whether these precede or follow the choice of an academic major. To rule out environmental influences during academic study, group differences in five value orientations were evaluated…

  7. The Operational Narrative in Wars of Choice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-26

    barriers - which in a sense consist only in man’s ignorance of what is possible-are torn down, they are not so easily set up again.”3 As a result... barriers to achieve strategic objectives in wars of choice. This monograph posits that in wars of choice it is beneficial for the operational artist to...

  8. Personality Differences in Career Choice Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Roth, Karl S.; Seibel, Hugo R.

    2004-01-01

    Vocational identity is an important construct for physician career development. Physician vocational development has been grouped into three tasks (crystallization, specification, and implementation) pertaining to career choice and specialty choice (1) In defining the construct of vocational identity, it has been suggested that the relation…

  9. A Personalized Parents' Workshop on Vocational Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lea, H. Daniel

    1976-01-01

    A Parent's Workshop on Vocational Choice was conducted to stimulate thought and dialogue about career choice between secondary school students and their parents. Holland's Vocational Preference Inventory (VPI) was administered to students and their parents. Student responses were compared to their parents' predictions of their responses. A…

  10. Voices on Choice: The Education Reform Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billingsley, K. L., Ed.

    This collection presents a sampling of opinions of both proponents and opponents in the school choice debate from a variety of professional perspectives, including academics, bureaucrats, politicians, union leaders, economists, lawyers, parents, and activists. The following essays are included: (1) "School Choice Promotes Educational…

  11. Consumer empowerment behavior and hospital choice.

    PubMed

    Weng, Hui-Ching

    2006-01-01

    The association between empowerment behavior and a patient's choice of hospitals was examined. Enhancing empowerment behavior did not lead to greater satisfaction with the choice made. The demographic profiles of three patient groups are presented and key health care marketing strategies are discussed.

  12. Instructional Innovation, School Choice, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berends, Mark; Penaloza, Roberto V.; Cannata, Marisa; Goldring, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    There is limited empirical research about innovation in various types of schools of choice, although viable choice policies tend to assume clear differentiation amongst schools. Innovation can be conceptualized in many ways and takes place at multiple levels of the school organization. Schools can innovate in terms of the roles and responsibility…

  13. Making the Most of Multiple Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-choice questions draw criticism because many people perceive they test only recall or atomistic, surface-level objectives and do not require students to think. Although this can be the case, it does not have to be that way. Susan M. Brookhart suggests that multiple-choice questions are a useful part of any teacher's questioning repertoire…

  14. Informed Consumer Choice in Community Rehabilitation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen-Foley, Debra L.; Rosenthal, David A.; Thomas, Dale F.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated consumer and staff member perceptions regarding the extent of consumer choice and participatory planning in community-based rehabilitation programs (CRPs) and the relationship between these elements, satisfaction, and outcomes. Consumers reported moderate to high levels of choice in services and employment goals, and…

  15. Introducing Nonlinear Pricing into Consumer Choice Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSalvo, Joseph S.; Huq, Mobinul

    2002-01-01

    Describes and contrasts nonlinear and linear pricing in consumer choice theory. Discusses the types of nonlinear pricing: block-declining tariff, two-part tariff, three-part tariff, and quality discounts or premia. States that understanding nonlinear pricing enhances student comprehension of consumer choice theory. Suggests teaching the concept in…

  16. 34 CFR 361.52 - Informed choice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... informed choice, including the availability of support services for individuals with cognitive or other... acquiring information that enables them to exercise informed choice in the development of their IPEs with... vocational rehabilitation needs and during development of the IPE, the designated State unit must provide...

  17. 34 CFR 361.52 - Informed choice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... informed choice, including the availability of support services for individuals with cognitive or other... acquiring information that enables them to exercise informed choice in the development of their IPEs with... vocational rehabilitation needs and during development of the IPE, the designated State unit must provide...

  18. 34 CFR 361.52 - Informed choice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... informed choice, including the availability of support services for individuals with cognitive or other... acquiring information that enables them to exercise informed choice in the development of their IPEs with... vocational rehabilitation needs and during development of the IPE, the designated State unit must provide...

  19. 34 CFR 361.52 - Informed choice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... informed choice, including the availability of support services for individuals with cognitive or other... acquiring information that enables them to exercise informed choice in the development of their IPEs with... vocational rehabilitation needs and during development of the IPE, the designated State unit must provide...

  20. Student Diversity, Choice, and School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willie, Charles V.; Edwards, Ralph; Alves, Michael J.

    This book examines research about trends affecting public school diversity, improvement, and choice. It finds that schools with socioeconomically and racially diversified student bodies are more effective learning communities than schools that are poverty-concentrated and racially homogenous; public school choice implemented via the controlled…

  1. Household Mobility, School Choices, and School Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Patrick J.

    This paper summarizes work from a dissertation, the main contribution of which was to develop and estimate a new empirical framework for analyzing the equilibrium outcomes of families' choices for choosing a particular residence. The principal component of the framework is a random-coefficients discrete-choice model of the residential location…

  2. A developmental model of recreation choice behavior

    Treesearch

    Daniel R. Williams

    1985-01-01

    Recreation choices are viewed as including, at least implicitly, a selection of an activity, a setting, and a set of companions. With development these three elements become increasingly differentiated from one another. The model is tested by examining the perceived similarities among a set of 15 recreation choices depicted in color slides.

  3. School Choice and the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeynes, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The possibility is examined that school choice programs could be a means to reducing the achievement gap. Data based on meta-analytic research and the examination of nationwide data sets suggest that school choice programs that include private schools could reduce the achievement gap by 25%. The propounding of this possibility is based on research…

  4. Choice and Diversity in Education: A Defence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tooley, James

    1997-01-01

    Considers the criticism that recent reforms involving school choice and diversity do not adequately address issues of educational equity in Great Britain. Outlines a series of three reforms that could make the system more equitable given the assumption that school choice is desirable. Examines and criticizes these assumptions. (MJP)

  5. Work Values and College Major Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balsamo, Michela; Lauriola, Marco; Saggino, Aristide

    2013-01-01

    Our study sought to clarify the nature of the known individual differences in work values associated with academic college major choice, specifically the question whether these precede or follow the choice of an academic major. To rule out environmental influences during academic study, group differences in five value orientations were evaluated…

  6. Constructive Multiple-Choice Testing System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jooyong

    2010-01-01

    The newly developed computerized Constructive Multiple-choice Testing system is introduced. The system combines short answer (SA) and multiple-choice (MC) formats by asking examinees to respond to the same question twice, first in the SA format, and then in the MC format. This manipulation was employed to collect information about the two…

  7. Responsibility and School Choice in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colburn, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Consider the following argument for school choice, based on an appeal to the virtues of the market: allowing parents some measure of choice over their particular children's education ultimately serves the interests of all children, because creating a market mechanism in state education will produce improvements through the same pressures that lead…

  8. A Chronology of Parental Choice in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Sister Dale

    2001-01-01

    Traces the history of parental rights in education since the landmark case Pierce vs. the Society of Sisters (1925), when the existence of private schools was validated. States that initiatives promoting parental choice include : (1) tax relief/credits; (2) vouchers or scholarships; (3) public school choice; and (4) home schooling. Provides a…

  9. Can "Word Choices" Compromise a Woman's Career?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    A letter of recommendation can catapult a woman into the next phase of the interview process for a particular job--or land her in the slush pile. Word choice in describing this female candidate can make or break her career. Letters of recommendation--especially when a reference's word choice paints a negative, less than stellar picture of the…

  10. Factors Influencing Career Choice among Police Recruits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative, non-experimental study examined the career choice factors of 154 (n = 154) police recruits to determine a correlation of age group generation to the five career choice factors presented in the Sibson Reward of Work Model. Law enforcement agencies faced a shortage of viable candidates to fill vacant positions. While extensive…

  11. Factors Influencing Career Choice among Police Recruits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative, non-experimental study examined the career choice factors of 154 (n = 154) police recruits to determine a correlation of age group generation to the five career choice factors presented in the Sibson Reward of Work Model. Law enforcement agencies faced a shortage of viable candidates to fill vacant positions. While extensive…

  12. Can "Word Choices" Compromise a Woman's Career?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    A letter of recommendation can catapult a woman into the next phase of the interview process for a particular job--or land her in the slush pile. Word choice in describing this female candidate can make or break her career. Letters of recommendation--especially when a reference's word choice paints a negative, less than stellar picture of the…

  13. Responsibility and School Choice in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colburn, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Consider the following argument for school choice, based on an appeal to the virtues of the market: allowing parents some measure of choice over their particular children's education ultimately serves the interests of all children, because creating a market mechanism in state education will produce improvements through the same pressures that lead…

  14. Choices of local anesthetics for ocular surgery.

    PubMed

    Cass, Gary D

    2006-06-01

    This article will help clinicians to be aware of their choices of local anesthetic solutions before they make their ocular anesthetic plan based on the specific requirements of the patient, the surgical procedure, and the properties of the local anesthetic. Choices of local anesthetic solutions and additives for both topical anesthesia and conduction blockade are discussed.

  15. Democratic Education and School Choice Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquette, Jerry

    2005-01-01

    This article features the author's reply to John Coons's "Dodging Democracy: The Educator's Flight from the Specter of Choice." First, he wants to thank Coons for his thoughtful and thought-provoking reply to "Public Funding for 'Private' Education: The Equity Challenge of Enhanced Choice." So thought provoking, in fact, did the author find…

  16. An Update on School Choice in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This article gives an update on school choice in Canada. Currently, school choice in Canada is stable. Provincialism, in both senses of the word, is a major factor in Canadian political life. There is no contradiction between Ontario's recent electoral rejection of the extension of funding to non-Catholic religious schools, and the strong support…

  17. Parental Choice in East Harlem Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fliegel, Sy

    Poor students and parents in the East Harlem schools of New York City's Community District 4 should have the same opportunity to obtain the benefits of school choice available to the wealthy, who can afford private and parochial schools. Parental choice can provide the catalyst for educational reform by introducing a market mechanism to the public…

  18. Democratic Education and School Choice Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquette, Jerry

    2005-01-01

    This article features the author's reply to John Coons's "Dodging Democracy: The Educator's Flight from the Specter of Choice." First, he wants to thank Coons for his thoughtful and thought-provoking reply to "Public Funding for 'Private' Education: The Equity Challenge of Enhanced Choice." So thought provoking, in fact, did the author find…

  19. "Score Choice": A Tempest in a Teapot?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2009-01-01

    A new option that allows students to choose which of their test scores to send to colleges has generated renewed criticism of the College Board. College Board officials tout the option, called Score Choice, as a way to ease test taker anxiety. Some prominent admissions officials have publicly described Score Choice as a sales tactic that will…

  20. Using a Foreign Language Changes Our Choices.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Sayuri; Costa, Albert; Foucart, Alice; Keysar, Boaz

    2016-11-01

    A growing literature demonstrates that using a foreign language affects choice. This is surprising because if people understand their options, choice should be language independent. Here, we review the impact of using a foreign language on risk, inference, and morality, and discuss potential explanations, including reduced emotion, psychological distance, and increased deliberation.

  1. A Teacher Examines School Choice Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, William

    1994-01-01

    Examines the school choice movement in the United States, which advocates claim will make schools more efficient by allowing parents to select the best schools for their children. Argues that the school choice movement is a surreptitious plan to gradually put the functions of public education in private hands, with public funds going to support…

  2. Career Choice Anxiety, Coping, and Perceived Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Faye M.; Healy, Charles C.; Ender, Philip B.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a study exploring whether perceived control moderates the relation between coping with career indecision and choice anxiety among women in low-level jobs. Results revealed that perceived control interacted with problem-focused coping to increase accountable variance in choice anxiety. Discusses implications for interventions with women in…

  3. Career Choice and Development. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Duane; And Others

    This book contains 12 papers examining established and newly emerging theories of career choice and development. Following prefaces to the third, second, and first editions by Duane Brown and Linda Brooks, the following papers are included: "Introduction to Theories of Career Development and Choice: Origins, Evolution, and Current Efforts" (Duane…

  4. Choice policies in Northern European health systems.

    PubMed

    Vrangbaek, Karsten; Robertson, Ruth; Winblad, Ulrika; Van de Bovenkamp, Hester; Dixon, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares the introduction of policies to promote or strengthen patient choice in four Northern European countries - Denmark, England, the Netherlands and Sweden. The paper examines whether there has been convergence in choice policies across Northern Europe. Following Christopher Pollitt's suggestion, the paper distinguishes between rhetorical (discursive) convergence, decision (design) convergence and implementation (operational) convergence (Pollitt, 2002). This leads to the following research question for the article: Is the introduction of policies to strengthen choice in the four countries characterised by discursive, decision and operational convergence? The paper concludes that there seems to be convergence among these four countries in the overall policy rhetoric about the objectives associated with patient choice, embracing both concepts of empowerment (the intrinsic value) and market competition (the instrumental value). It appears that the institutional context and policy concerns such as waiting times have been important in affecting the timing of the introduction of choice policies and implementation, but less so in the design of choice policies. An analysis of the impact of choice policies is beyond the scope of this paper, but it is concluded that further research should investigate how the institutional context and timing of implementation affect differences in how the choice policy works out in practice.

  5. Leadership Practices and School Choice. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cravens, Xiu; Goldring, Ellen; Penaloza, Roberto V.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a larger study on school choice, researchers at the National Center on School Choice examined variation in leadership practices across school types, relying on a convenience matched sample of schools that included charter, magnet, private, and traditional public schools. A total of 284 schools agreed to participate in the study--116…

  6. Race, Social Background, and School Choice Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyette, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This research contributes to discussions about social inequality in school choices in two ways. First, educational choices include the multitude of options families may consider, including choosing a home in a particular area and home-schooling. Decision-making is considered not at a single point in time, but over children's educational careers.…

  7. Food choice: beyond the chemical content.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Maura

    2012-03-01

    How are food choices formulated? Which are the factors that mostly affect food choice? These questions are crucially important both for efforts in food innovation and for institutions that face consequences and costs of diets that are harmful to human health and to the environment. On these matters, several reports have been developed following the angel of various disciplines, focusing on the analysis of the factors affecting food choices. Large-scale research on consumption behaviours has neither stopped the growing number of unsuccessful products entering the market, nor provided adequate support for institutions that are taking elaborate actions towards promoting health-orientated behaviours. These preliminary remarks highlight the need to think about the approaches and categories with which research programmes on food choices should be updated. This article discusses the reasons why food choices are determined by beliefs and identity, are conditioned by social images that influence preferences by indicating to individuals what foods are 'good' and 'right'; belong to the field of individual choice, and therefore, cannot be assimilated into medical prescriptions or merely reduced to a question of rules. Taste involves beliefs and identity as well as perceptions. This is why it has to be analyzed as a cultural and relational object. This paper aims to explore the complex mix of influences on food choice stressing that food choice is a matter of identity.

  8. School Choice: Panacea or Pandora's Box?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kevin B.; Meier, Kenneth J.

    1995-01-01

    Choice theory does not adequately account for the relationship between private schools' success and public school performance. School-choice theory failed every empirical test the authors administered. Religion and a desire for racial segregation, not poor public-school performance, appear to be driving increased private-school enrollment. (MLH)

  9. A Normalized Direct Approach for Estimating the Parameters of the Normal Ogive Three-Parameter Model for Ability Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gugel, John F.

    A new method for estimating the parameters of the normal ogive three-parameter model for multiple-choice test items--the normalized direct (NDIR) procedure--is examined. The procedure is compared to a more commonly used estimation procedure, Lord's LOGIST, using computer simulations. The NDIR procedure uses the normalized (mid-percentile)…

  10. Schools of Choice: An Annotated Catalog of Key Choice Elements: Open Enrollment, Diversity and Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI. School of Human and Educational Services.

    This catalog, an outcome of the Project To Access Choice in Education (PACE), lists examples of public schools throughout the nation offering choices in education. "Schools of Choice" are defined as those offering one or more of the following three dynamics: (1) open enrollment, the freedom for families to choose the elementary or secondary…

  11. Agency and Choice in Education: Does School Choice Enhance the Work Effort of Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Geoffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates effects of school-choice laws on U.S. teachers' work incentives, using 1993-94 Schools and Staffing Survey data. Examines whether school system competitiveness works to solve the principal-agent problem in education. Results are mixed, but suggest that one type of choice policy--intradistrict choice--enhances teacher motivation.…

  12. Gendered Educational and Occupational Choices: Applying the Eccles et al. Model of Achievement-Related Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccles, Jacquelynne

    2011-01-01

    I summarize a theoretical model of the social, cultural, and psychological influences on achievement-related choices and outline how this model can help us understand gendered educational and occupational choices. I argue that both gender differences and individual differences within each gender in educational and occupational choices are linked…

  13. Increasing Choice-Making and Choice Awareness for Students with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Shannon Lynn

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have suggested that when children with disabilities are presented with choice-making opportunities, they can make choices (Bambara, 2004; Carlson, Luiselli, Slyman, & Markowski, 2008; Dibley & Lim, 1999; Manhertz, 2006). Teaching choice-making to students with intellectual disability is an important skill. Students with…

  14. Differential neurobiological effects of expert advice on risky choice in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Jan B; Moore, Sara; Monica Capra, C; Berns, Gregory S

    2012-06-01

    We investigated behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms by which risk-averse advice, provided by an expert, affected risky decisions across three developmental groups [early adolescents (12-14 years), late adolescents (15-17 years), adults (18+ years)]. Using cumulative prospect theory, we modeled choice behavior during a risky-choice task. Results indicate that advice had a significantly greater impact on risky choice in both adolescent groups than in adults. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated the neural correlates of this behavioral effect. Developmental effects on correlations between brain activity and valuation parameters were obtained in regions that can be classified into (i) cognitive control regions, such as dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and ventrolateral PFC; (ii) social cognition regions, such as posterior temporoparietal junction; and (iii) reward-related regions, such as ventromedial PFC (vmPFC) and ventral striatum. Within these regions, differential effects of advice on neural correlates of valuation were observed across development. Specifically, advice increased the correlation strength between brain activity and parameters reflective of safe choice options in adolescent DLPFC and decreased correlation strength between activity and parameters reflective of risky choice options in adult vmPFC. Taken together, results indicate that, across development, distinct brain systems involved in cognitive control and valuation mediate the risk-reducing effect of advice during decision making under risk via specific enhancements and reductions of the correlation strength between brain activity and valuation parameters.

  15. Dynamics in the Parameter Space of a Neuron Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, C. Rech

    2012-06-01

    Some two-dimensional parameter-space diagrams are numerically obtained by considering the largest Lyapunov exponent for a four-dimensional thirteen-parameter Hindmarsh—Rose neuron model. Several different parameter planes are considered, and it is shown that depending on the combination of parameters, a typical scenario can be preserved: for some choice of two parameters, the parameter plane presents a comb-shaped chaotic region embedded in a large periodic region. It is also shown that there exist regions close to these comb-shaped chaotic regions, separated by the comb teeth, organizing themselves in period-adding bifurcation cascades.

  16. Giving preschoolers choice increases sharing behavior.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Nadia; Kushnir, Tamar

    2013-10-01

    Young children are remarkably prosocial, but the mechanisms driving their prosociality are not well understood. Here, we propose that the experience of choice is critically tied to the expression of young children's altruistic behavior. Three- and 4-year-olds were asked to allocate resources to an individual in need by making a costly choice (allocating a resource they could have kept for themselves), a noncostly choice (allocating a resource that would otherwise be thrown away), or no choice (following instructions to allocate the resource). We measured subsequent prosociality by allowing children to then allocate new resources to a new individual. Although the majority of children shared with the first individual, children who were given costly alternatives shared more with the new individual. Results are discussed in terms of a prosocial-construal hypothesis, which suggests that children rationally infer their prosociality through the process of making difficult, autonomous choices.

  17. Prenatal Screening, Reproductive Choice, and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    One widely held view of prenatal screening (PNS) is that its foremost aim is, or should be, to enable reproductive choice; this is the Pure Choice view. The article critiques this position by comparing it with an alternative: Public Health Pluralism. It is argued that there are good reasons to prefer the latter, including the following. (1) Public Health Pluralism does not, as is often supposed, render PNS more vulnerable to eugenics-objections. (2) The Pure Choice view, if followed through to its logical conclusions, may have unpalatable implications, such as extending choice well beyond health screening. (3) Any sensible version of Public Health Pluralism will be capable of taking on board the moral seriousness of abortion and will advocate, where practicable, alternative means of reducing the prevalence of disease and disability. (4) Public Health Pluralism is at least as well-equipped as the Pure Choice model to deal with autonomy and consent issues. PMID:25521971

  18. Choice and responsibility in the NHS.

    PubMed

    Downie, Robin; Randall, Fiona

    2008-04-01

    Patient choice is becoming the centre of health policy in the UK and other countries. But there is ambiguity about what choice means. As the term is used in everyday life, choice is the foundation of the doctrine of patient consent. The doctor is responsible for choosing appropriate treatment, and the patient is responsible for choosing (for consenting to or refusing) what is offered and accepts responsibility for that choice. That simple and ethically acceptable doctrine is being replaced politically by consumerist choice. But consumerism in healthcare is incompatible with a publicly funded service. Moreover, consumerism changes the locus of responsibility from the doctor to the consumer (the patient). The doctor will cease to have the values of a professional and will become simply an agent of the patient's demands.

  19. Junior doctors' preferences for specialty choice.

    PubMed

    Sivey, Peter; Scott, Anthony; Witt, Julia; Joyce, Catherine; Humphreys, John

    2012-12-01

    A number of studies suggest that there is an over-supply of specialists and an under-supply of general practitioners in many developed countries. Previous econometric studies of specialty choice from the US suggest that although income plays a role, other non-pecuniary factors may be important. This paper presents a novel application of a choice experiment to identify the effects of expected future earnings and other attributes on specialty choice. We find the implied marginal wage estimated from our discrete choice model is close to the actual wages of senior specialists, but much higher than those of senior GPs. In a policy simulation we find that increasing GPs' earnings by $50,000, or increasing opportunities for procedural or academic work can increase the number of junior doctors choosing general practice by between 8 and 13 percentage points. The simulation implies an earnings elasticity of specialty choice of 0.95.

  20. Hierarchical competitions subserving multi-attribute choice

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Laurence T; Dolan, Raymond J; Behrens, Timothy EJ

    2015-01-01

    Valuation is a key tenet of decision neuroscience, where it is generally assumed that different attributes of competing options are assimilated into unitary values. Such values are central to current neural models of choice. By contrast, psychological studies emphasize complex interactions between choice and valuation. Principles of neuronal selection also suggest competitive inhibition may occur in early valuation stages, before option selection. Here, we show behavior in multi-attribute choice is best explained by a model involving competition at multiple levels of representation. This hierarchical model also explains neural signals in human brain regions previously linked to valuation, including striatum, parietal and prefrontal cortex, where activity represents competition within-attribute, competition between attributes, and option selection. This multi-layered inhibition framework challenges the assumption that option values are computed before choice. Instead our results indicate a canonical competition mechanism throughout all stages of a processing hierarchy, not simply at a final choice stage. PMID:25306549

  1. [Adolescence and choice of contraceptive].

    PubMed

    Theunissen, L

    1986-11-01

    The majority of books, studies, and publications on adolescence are written by adults, whose frequent focus on unbridled adolescent sexuality, adolescents in crisis, or immature adolescents does not seem to correspond to the self-image of adolescents. All authors agree that adolescence is the period between childhood and adulthood beginning at puberty, but opinions differ as to the termination of adolescence and entrance into adulthood. The most significant consensus about adolescence is its tendency to become prolonged. The majority of authors regard adolescence as a preparation for adult life and hence as a natural phase necessary and indispensable to human existence. Ethnographic studies of societies that do not acknowledge adolescence demonstrate, however, that it is not a natural phase. It is also evident that comparatively few roles in modern society require lengthy periods of preparation such as adolescence. It is therefore difficult to regard adolescence as a time of preparation for adult life. From a historic perspective, adolescence emerged with the socioeconomic transformations of industrialization. Mechanization and automation excluded numerous types of workers, especially young workers, from the labor force. Adolescence represents marginalization of young people in response to socioeconomic exigencies rather than a period of preparation for a better adult life. The marginalization is internalized in the consciousness of adults and youth alike and in their hierarchical relations. The marginalization of young people is expressed in the domain of sexuality by the fact that, although physiologically mature, adolescents are not viewed as psychologically mature enough to have children. Adolescents have sexual relations at increasingly young ages, but unlike adults they are not permitted by society the choice of having a child. Contraception, an option for adults, becomes obligatory for sexually active adolescents. The refusal of contraception or failure to

  2. Tomographic inversion for sediment parameters in shallow water

    PubMed

    Potty; Miller; Lynch; Smith

    2000-09-01

    This article discusses inversions for bottom geoacoustic properties using broadband acoustic signals obtained from explosive sources. The experimental data used for the inversions are SUS charge explosions acquired on a vertical hydrophone array during the Shelf Break Primer Experiment conducted south of New England in the Middle Atlantic Bight in August 1996. The SUS signals were analyzed for their time-frequency behavior using wavelets. The group speed dispersion curves were obtained from the wavelet scalogram of the SUS signals. A genetic algorithm (GA) was used for the inversion of sound speeds in the water column and compressional wave speeds in the sediment layers. The variations in the sound speeds in the water column were represented using empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). A range-independent normal mode routine was used to construct the replica fields corresponding to the parameters. Comparison of group speeds for modes 1 to 9 and for a range of frequencies 8 to 200 Hz was used to arrive at the best parameter fit. An efficient hybrid optimization scheme using the GA and a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is presented. Linear perturbation methods were also used to "fine tune" the inversions and to obtain resolution and variance estimates. Analysis was also done to compute the degree of convergence of each of the parameters by explicitly calculating the Hessian matrices numerically. A posteriori estimation of mean and covariance was also done to obtain error estimates. Group speeds for the inverted sound speed fields provide an excellent match to the experimental data. The inverted sediment compressional speed profile compares well with in situ measurements.

  3. Estimation of Dynamic Discrete Choice Models by Maximum Likelihood and the Simulated Method of Moments

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhauer, Philipp; Heckman, James J.; Mosso, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We compare the performance of maximum likelihood (ML) and simulated method of moments (SMM) estimation for dynamic discrete choice models. We construct and estimate a simplified dynamic structural model of education that captures some basic features of educational choices in the United States in the 1980s and early 1990s. We use estimates from our model to simulate a synthetic dataset and assess the ability of ML and SMM to recover the model parameters on this sample. We investigate the performance of alternative tuning parameters for SMM. PMID:26494926

  4. Choice of Variables and Preconditioning for Time Dependent Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, Eli; Vatsa, Verr N.

    2003-01-01

    We consider the use of low speed preconditioning for time dependent problems. These are solved using a dual time step approach. We consider the effect of this dual time step on the parameter of the low speed preconditioning. In addition, we compare the use of two sets of variables, conservation and primitive variables, to solve the system. We show the effect of these choices on both the convergence to a steady state and the accuracy of the numerical solutions for low Mach number steady state and time dependent flows.

  5. CHAMP: Changepoint Detection Using Approximate Model Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    detecting changes in the parameters and mod- els that generate observed data. Commonly cited examples include detecting changes in stock market behavior [4...experimentally verified using artifi- cially generated data and are compared to those of Fearnhead and Liu [5]. 2 Related work Hidden Markov Models ( HMMs ) are...largely the de facto tool of choice when analyzing time series data, but the standard HMM formulation has several undesirable properties. The number of

  6. A fair range of choice: justifying maximum patient choice in the British National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Wilmot, Stephen

    2007-06-01

    In this paper I put forward an ethical argument for the provision of extensive patient choice by the British National Health Service. I base this argument on traditional liberal rights to freedom of choice, on a welfare right to health care, and on a view of health as values-based. I argue that choice, to be ethically sustainable on this basis, must be values-based and rational. I also consider whether the British taxpayer may be persuadable with regard to the moral acceptability of patient choice, making use of Rawls' theory of political liberalism in this context. I identify issues that present problems in terms of public acceptance of choice, and also identify a boundary issue with regard to public health choices as against individual choices.

  7. Young Australian women explain their contraceptive choices.

    PubMed

    Wigginton, Britta; Moran, Claire; Harris, Melissa L; Loxton, Deborah; Lucke, Jayne

    2016-07-01

    New developments in female contraceptives allow women increased options for preventing pregnancy, while men's options for reversible contraception have not advanced beyond the condom. There has been little discursive exploration of how neoliberal and postfeminist discourses shape women's accounts of choosing whether or not to use contraception. Our thematic discourse analysis of 760 free-text responses to a question about contraceptive choice considers the social and political climate that promotes the self-governed woman who freely chooses contraception. We examine the ways in which women formulated and defended their accounts of choice, focusing on the theme of free contraceptive choice that constructed women's choices as unconstrained by material, social and political forces. We identify two discursive strategies that underpinned this theme: a woman's body, a woman's choice and planning parenthood, and explore the ways in which choice was understood as a gendered entitlement and how contraceptive choices were shaped (and constrained) by women's plans for parenthood. We discuss the implications of these discursive strategies, and neoliberal and postfeminist discourses, in terms of the disallowance of any contextual, social and structural factors, including the absence of men in the 'contraceptive economy'.

  8. Brain microstructural correlates of visuospatial choice reaction time in children.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Kathrine Skak; Baaré, William F C; Skimminge, Arnold; Vestergaard, Martin; Siebner, Hartwig R; Jernigan, Terry L

    2011-10-15

    The corticospinal tracts and the basal ganglia continue to develop during childhood and adolescence, and indices of their maturation can be obtained using diffusion-weighted imaging. Here we show that a simple measure of visuomotor function is correlated with diffusion parameters in the corticospinal tracts and neostriatum. In a cohort of 75 typically-developing children aged 7 to 13years, mean 5-choice reaction times (RTs) were assessed. We hypothesised that children with faster choice RTs would show lower mean diffusivity (MD) in the corticospinal tracts and neostriatum and higher fractional anisotropy (FA) in the corticospinal tracts, after controlling for age, gender, and handedness. Mean MD and/or FA were extracted from the right and left corticospinal tracts, putamen, and caudate nuclei. As predicted, faster 5-choice RTs were associated with lower MD in the corticospinal tracts, putamen, and caudate. MD effects on RT were bilateral in the corticospinal tracts and putamen, whilst right caudate MD was more strongly related to performance than was left caudate MD. Our results suggest a link between motor performance variability in children and diffusivity in the motor system, which may be related to: individual differences in the phase of fibre tract and neostriatal maturation in children of similar age, individual differences in motor experience during childhood (i.e., use-dependent plasticity), and/or more stable individual differences in the architecture of the motor system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stochastic Matching and the Voluntary Nature of Choice

    PubMed Central

    Neuringer, Allen; Jensen, Greg; Piff, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Attempts to characterize voluntary behavior have been ongoing for thousands of years. We provide experimental evidence that judgments of volition are based upon distributions of responses in relation to obtained rewards. Participants watched as responses, said to be made by “actors,” appeared on a computer screen. The participant's task was to estimate how well each actor represented the voluntary choices emitted by a real person. In actuality, all actors' responses were generated by algorithms based on Baum's (1979) generalized matching function. We systematically varied the exponent values (sensitivity parameter) of these algorithms: some actors matched response proportions to received reinforcer proportions, others overmatched (predominantly chose the highest-valued alternative), and yet others undermatched (chose relatively equally among the alternatives). In each of five experiments, we found that the matching actor's responses were judged most closely to approximate voluntary choice. We found also that judgments of high volition depended upon stochastic (or probabilistic) generation. Thus, stochastic responses that match reinforcer proportions best represent voluntary human choice. PMID:17725049

  10. Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson Models of Primate Choice Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Corrado, Greg S; Sugrue, Leo P; Sebastian Seung, H; Newsome, William T

    2005-01-01

    The equilibrium phenomenon of matching behavior traditionally has been studied in stationary environments. Here we attempt to uncover the local mechanism of choice that gives rise to matching by studying behavior in a highly dynamic foraging environment. In our experiments, 2 rhesus monkeys (Macacca mulatta) foraged for juice rewards by making eye movements to one of two colored icons presented on a computer monitor, each rewarded on dynamic variable-interval schedules. Using a generalization of Wiener kernel analysis, we recover a compact mechanistic description of the impact of past reward on future choice in the form of a Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson model. We validate this model through rigorous predictive and generative testing. Compared to our earlier work with this same data set, this model proves to be a better description of choice behavior and is more tightly correlated with putative neural value signals. Refinements over previous models include hyperbolic (as opposed to exponential) temporal discounting of past rewards, and differential (as opposed to fractional) comparisons of option value. Through numerical simulation we find that within this class of strategies, the model parameters employed by animals are very close to those that maximize reward harvesting efficiency. PMID:16596981

  11. Propulsion System Choices and Their Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, Claude R., II; Levack, Daniel J. H.; Rhodes, Russell, E.; Robinson, John W.

    2010-01-01

    In defining a space vehicle architecture, the propulsion system and related subsystem choices will have a major influence on achieving the goals and objectives desired. There are many alternatives and the choices made must produce a system that meets the performance requirements, but at the same time also provide the greatest opportunity of reaching all of the required objectives. Recognizing the above, the SPST Functional Requirements subteam has drawn on the knowledge, expertise, and experience of its members, to develop insight that wiIJ effectively aid the architectural concept developer in making the appropriate choices consistent with the architecture goals. This data not only identifies many selected choices, but also, more importantly, presents the collective assessment of this subteam on the "pros" and the "cons" of these choices. The propulsion system choices with their pros and cons are presented in five major groups. A. System Integration Approach. Focused on the requirement for safety, reliability, dependability, maintainability, and low cost. B. Non-Chemical Propulsion. Focused on choice of propulsion type. C. Chemical Propulsion. Focused on propellant choice implications. D. Functional Integration. Focused on the degree of integration of the many propulsive and closely associated functions, and on the choice of the engine combustion power cycle. E. Thermal Management. Focused on propellant tank insulation and integration. Each of these groups is further broken down into subgroups, and at that level the consensus pros and cons are presented. The intended use of this paper is to provide a resource of focused material for architectural concept developers to use in designing new advanced systems including college design classes. It is also a possible source of input material for developing a model for designing and analyzing advanced concepts to help identify focused technology needs and their priorities.

  12. GALAPAGOS: from pixels to parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Marco; Häußler, Boris; Peng, Chien Y.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Guo, Yicheng

    2012-05-01

    To automate source detection, two-dimensional light profile Sérsic modelling and catalogue compilation in large survey applications, we introduce a new code Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas: Parameter Assessment by GALFITting Objects from SEXTRACTOR (GALAPAGOS). Based on a single set-up, GALAPAGOS can process a complete set of survey images. It detects sources in the data, estimates a local sky background, cuts postage stamp images for all sources, prepares object masks, performs Sérsic fitting including neighbours and compiles all objects in a final output catalogue. For the initial source detection, GALAPAGOS applies SEXTRACTOR, while GALFIT is incorporated for modelling Sérsic profiles. It measures the background sky involved in the Sérsic fitting by means of a flux growth curve. GALAPAGOS determines postage stamp sizes based on SEXTRACTOR shape parameters. In order to obtain precise model parameters, GALAPAGOS incorporates a complex sorting mechanism and makes use of modern CPU's multiplexing capabilities. It combines SEXTRACTOR and GALFIT data in a single output table. When incorporating information from overlapping tiles, GALAPAGOS automatically removes multiple entries from identical sources. GALAPAGOS is programmed in the Interactive Data Language (IDL). We test the stability and the ability to properly recover structural parameters extensively with artificial image simulations. Moreover, we apply GALAPAGOS successfully to the STAGES data set. For one-orbit Hubble Space Telescope data, a single 2.2-GHz CPU processes about 1000 primary sources per 24 h. Note that GALAPAGOS results depend critically on the user-defined parameter set-up. This paper provides useful guidelines to help the user make sensible choices.

  13. Monkeys are more patient in a foraging task than in a standard intertemporal choice task.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Tommy C; Hayden, Benjamin Y

    2015-01-01

    Studies of animal impulsivity generally find steep subjective devaluation, or discounting, of delayed rewards - often on the order of a 50% reduction in value in a few seconds. Because such steep discounting is highly disfavored in evolutionary models of time preference, we hypothesize that discounting tasks provide a poor measure of animals' true time preferences. One prediction of this hypothesis is that estimates of time preferences based on these tasks will lack external validity, i.e. fail to predict time preferences in other contexts. We examined choices made by four rhesus monkeys in a computerized patch-leaving foraging task interleaved with a standard intertemporal choice task. Monkeys were significantly more patient in the foraging task than in the intertemporal choice task. Patch-leaving behavior was well fit by parameter-free optimal foraging equations but poorly fit by the hyperbolic discount parameter obtained from the intertemporal choice task. Day-to-day variation in time preferences across the two tasks was uncorrelated with each other. These data are consistent with the conjecture that seemingly impulsive behavior in animals is an artifact of their difficulty understanding the structure of intertemporal choice tasks, and support the idea that animals are more efficient rate maximizers in the multi-second range than intertemporal choice tasks would suggest.

  14. School Choice, School Quality and Postsecondary Attainment

    PubMed Central

    Deming, David J.; Hastings, Justine S.; Kane, Thomas J.; Staiger, Douglas O.

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of a public school choice lottery in Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools on college enrollment and degree completion. We find a significant overall increase in college attainment among lottery winners who attend their first choice school. Using rich administrative data on peers, teachers, course offerings and other inputs, we show that the impacts of choice are strongly predicted by gains on several measures of school quality. Gains in attainment are concentrated among girls. Girls respond to attending a better school with higher grades and increases in college-preparatory course-taking, while boys do not. PMID:27244675

  15. Is your choice my choice? The owners' effect on pet dogs' (Canis lupus familiaris) performance in a food choice task.

    PubMed

    Prato-Previde, E; Marshall-Pescini, S; Valsecchi, P

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of owners on their dogs' performance in a food choice task using either different or equal quantities of food. Fifty-four pet dogs were tested in three different conditions. In Condition 1 we evaluated their ability to choose between a large and small amount of food (quantity discrimination task). In Condition 2 dogs were again presented with a choice between the large and small food quantity, but only after having witnessed their owner favouring the small quantity. In Condition 3 dogs were given a choice between two equally small quantities of food having witnessed their owner favouring either one or the other. A strong effect of the owner on the dogs' performance was observed. In Condition 1 dogs as a group chose significantly more often the large food quantity, thus showing their ability to solve the quantity discrimination task. After observing their owner expressing a preference for the small food quantity they chose the large quantity of food significantly less than in the independent choice situation. The tendency to conform to the owner's choice was higher when the dogs had to choose between equally small quantities of food (Condition 3) rather than between a large and a small one (Condition 2). These results provide evidence that dogs can be influenced by their owners even when their indications are clearly in contrast with direct perceptual information, thus leading dogs to ultimately make counterproductive choices.

  16. Improved discriminability of spatiotemporal neural patterns in rat motor cortical areas as directional choice learning progresses.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hongwei; Yuan, Yuan; Si, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    Animals learn to choose a proper action among alternatives to improve their odds of success in food foraging and other activities critical for survival. Through trial-and-error, they learn correct associations between their choices and external stimuli. While a neural network that underlies such learning process has been identified at a high level, it is still unclear how individual neurons and a neural ensemble adapt as learning progresses. In this study, we monitored the activity of single units in the rat medial and lateral agranular (AGm and AGl, respectively) areas as rats learned to make a left or right side lever press in response to a left or right side light cue. We noticed that rat movement parameters during the performance of the directional choice task quickly became stereotyped during the first 2-3 days or sessions. But learning the directional choice problem took weeks to occur. Accompanying rats' behavioral performance adaptation, we observed neural modulation by directional choice in recorded single units. Our analysis shows that ensemble mean firing rates in the cue-on period did not change significantly as learning progressed, and the ensemble mean rate difference between left and right side choices did not show a clear trend of change either. However, the spatiotemporal firing patterns of the neural ensemble exhibited improved discriminability between the two directional choices through learning. These results suggest a spatiotemporal neural coding scheme in a motor cortical neural ensemble that may be responsible for and contributing to learning the directional choice task.

  17. Improved discriminability of spatiotemporal neural patterns in rat motor cortical areas as directional choice learning progresses

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Hongwei; Yuan, Yuan; Si, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    Animals learn to choose a proper action among alternatives to improve their odds of success in food foraging and other activities critical for survival. Through trial-and-error, they learn correct associations between their choices and external stimuli. While a neural network that underlies such learning process has been identified at a high level, it is still unclear how individual neurons and a neural ensemble adapt as learning progresses. In this study, we monitored the activity of single units in the rat medial and lateral agranular (AGm and AGl, respectively) areas as rats learned to make a left or right side lever press in response to a left or right side light cue. We noticed that rat movement parameters during the performance of the directional choice task quickly became stereotyped during the first 2–3 days or sessions. But learning the directional choice problem took weeks to occur. Accompanying rats' behavioral performance adaptation, we observed neural modulation by directional choice in recorded single units. Our analysis shows that ensemble mean firing rates in the cue-on period did not change significantly as learning progressed, and the ensemble mean rate difference between left and right side choices did not show a clear trend of change either. However, the spatiotemporal firing patterns of the neural ensemble exhibited improved discriminability between the two directional choices through learning. These results suggest a spatiotemporal neural coding scheme in a motor cortical neural ensemble that may be responsible for and contributing to learning the directional choice task. PMID:25798093

  18. Multi-choice stochastic bi-level programming problem in cooperative nature via fuzzy programming approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Sumit Kumar; Roy, Sankar Kumar

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a Multi-Choice Stochastic Bi-Level Programming Problem (MCSBLPP) is considered where all the parameters of constraints are followed by normal distribution. The cost coefficients of the objective functions are multi-choice types. At first, all the probabilistic constraints are transformed into deterministic constraints using stochastic programming approach. Further, a general transformation technique with the help of binary variables is used to transform the multi-choice type cost coefficients of the objective functions of Decision Makers(DMs). Then the transformed problem is considered as a deterministic multi-choice bi-level programming problem. Finally, a numerical example is presented to illustrate the usefulness of the paper.

  19. Impulsive choice and workplace safety: A new area of inquiry for research in occupational settings

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Brady; Schiffbauer, Ryan M.

    2004-01-01

    A conceptual argument is presented for the relevance of behavior-analytic research on impulsive choice to issues of occupational safety and health. Impulsive choice is defined in terms of discounting, which is the tendency for the value of a commodity to decrease as a function of various parameters (e.g., having to wait or expend energy to receive the commodity). A high degree of discounting is often considered an index of impulsivity. We argue that for workers, possible negative consequences (e.g., injury or disease) are often disregarded, or discounted, in choices about workplace safety because such consequences are typically delayed and uncertain. Furthermore, some evidence suggests that certain environmental conditions, such as those that lead to stress or sleep deprivation, may increase discounting. Increased discounting, by extension, leads to a further devaluation of safety practices and their benefits. A call is made for research aimed at more clearly delineating the relation between impulsive choice and workplace safety. PMID:22478432

  20. Choice and timing in pigeons under differing levels of food deprivation.

    PubMed

    Fox, Adam E; Kyonka, Elizabeth G E

    2014-07-01

    State-dependent valuation learning (SDVL) is a preference for stimuli associated with relative food deprivation over stimuli associated with relative satiety. Pigeons were exposed to experimental conditions designed to investigate SDVL and to test the hypothesis that obtained relative immediacy during training predicts choice during test probes. Energy states were manipulated using a procedure that has previously revealed SDVL in starlings and pigeons. In Experiment 1, pigeons preferred the stimulus associated with deprivation in the first choice probe session, but were indifferent in the second. Changes in choice were consistent with changes in obtained relative immediacy. In Experiment 2, training parameters were altered and SDVL did not occur. Obtained relative immediacy again predicted choice. Results of both experiments provide evidence that obtained relative immediacy may be an important contributing factor to the SDVL phenomenon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.