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Sample records for posterolateral spinal fusion

  1. The role of spinal instrumentation in augmenting lumbar posterolateral fusion.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Y; Cunningham, B W; Cappuccino, A; Kaneda, K; McAfee, P C

    1996-02-01

    Using a sheep model, clinically practical posterolateral intertransverse process fusion was successfully achieved and biomechanically tested to determine the load-sharing environment provided by spinal instrumentation and posterolateral fusion mass following solid arthrodesis. To quantify the in vivo load-sharing capacity of spinal instrumentation on augmenting the posterolateral intertransverse fusion. The hypothesis was that transpedicular screw fixation maintains the biomechanical contribution to the posterolateral fusion stability even after successful arthrodesis because of its providing anterior and middle column support. Although many previous studies have documented the biological and biomechanical advantages of posterolateral fusion, it is known that posterolateral fusion without spinal instrumentation allowed significant remaining motion at the fused segment even after the solid arthrodesis. Whether spinal instrumentation, especially transpedicular screw fixation, augments in vivo posterolateral fusion stability after solid arthrodesis has not been previously investigated. Radiographic, macroscopic, and biomechanical analyses of a posterolateral intertransverse process fusion model were performed on 18 sheep at 4 months postoperatively. The load-sharing contribution of the spinal instrumentation was calculated based on the stability with or without spinal instrumentation tested in five loading modalities. Histomorphometry of the vertebral body spanned by spinal instrumentation provided the information regarding the biological effect of the load-sharing capacity of spinal instrumentation on bone remodeling. All sheep who received posterolateral intertransverse process fusion demonstrated successful solid arthrodesis and high biomechanical quality of the posterolateral fusion mass when compared to previous posterolateral fusion models. The significant difference in stiffness between fixation and subsequent fixation removal was observed in flexion, despite

  2. Posterolateral spinal fusion in a rabbit model using a collagen–mineral composite bone graft substitute

    PubMed Central

    Vizesi, F.; Cornwall, G. B.; Bell, D.; Oliver, R.; Yu, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Choosing the appropriate graft material to participate in the healing process in posterolateral spinal fusion continues to be a challenge. Combining synthetic graft materials with bone marrow aspirate (BMA) and autograft is a reasonable treatment option for surgeons to potentially reduce or replace the need for autograft. FormaGraft, a bone graft material comprising 12% bovine-derived collagen and 88% ceramic in the form of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) was evaluated in three possible treatment modalities for posterior spinal fusion in a standard rabbit model. These three treatment groups were FormaGraft alone, FormaGraft soaked in autogenous BMA, and FormaGraft with BMA and iliac crest autograft. No statistically demonstrable benefits or adverse effects of the addition of BMA were found in the current study based on macroscopic, radiology or mechanical data. This may reflect, in part, the good to excellent results of the collagen HA/TCP composite material alone in a well healing bony bed. Histology did, however, reveal a benefit with the use of BMA. Combining FormaGraft with autograft and BMA achieved results equivalent to autograft alone. The mineral and organic nature of the material provided a material that facilitated fusion between the transverse processes in a standard preclinical posterolateral fusion model. PMID:19475437

  3. Erythropoietin augments bone formation in a rabbit posterolateral spinal fusion model.

    PubMed

    Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Bendtsen, Michael; Jensen, Jonas; Stiehler, Maik; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Hellfritzsch, Michel Bach; Bünger, Cody

    2012-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that erythropoietin (EPO) enhances bone formation after posterolateral spinal fusion (PLF) in a rabbit model. Thirty-four adult rabbits underwent posterolateral intertransverse arthrodesis at the L5-L6 level using 2.0 g autograft per side. The animals were randomly divided into two groups receiving subcutaneous daily injections of either EPO or saline for 20 days. Treatment commenced 2 days preoperatively. Hemoglobin was monitored at baseline and 2, 4, and 6 weeks after fusion surgery. After euthanasia 6 weeks postoperatively, manual palpation, radiographic, and histomorphometric examinations were performed. Bone volume of the fusion mass was estimated by CT after 6 weeks. EPO increased bone fusion volume to 3.85 ccm (3.66-4.05) compared with 3.26 ccm (2.97-3.55) in the control group (p<0.01). EPO treatment improved vascularization of the fusion mass and increased hemoglobin levels (p<0.01). Fusion rate tended to be higher in the EPO group based on manual palpation, CT, and radiographic examinations. For the first time EPO has shown to augment bone formation after autograft PLF in a rabbit model. Increased vascularization provides a partial explanation for the efficacy of EPO as a bone autograft enhancer.

  4. Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Posterolateral Spinal Fusion: What's the Right Dose?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Clifford Barry; Sietsema, Debra Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Single center retrospective cohort analysis. Purpose The goal was to evaluate the influence of varying amount of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) per level on fusion rates and complications in posterolateral spinal fusions. Overview of Literature rhBMP-2 has been utilized for lumbar posterolateral fusions for many years. Initial rhBMP-2 recommendations were 20 mg/level of fusion. Dose and concentration per level in current studies vary from 4.2 to 40 mg and 1.5 to 2.0 mg/mL, respectively. Variable fusion and complication rates have been reported. Methods Patients (n=1,610) undergoing instrumented lumbar spinal fusion (2003–2009) with utilization of rhBMP-2 were retrospectively evaluated. Patient demographics, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities, number of levels, associated interbody fusion, and types of bone void filler were analyzed. Fusions rates and nonunions were subdivided into number of levels and amount of rhBMP-2 used per level. Results Patients (n=559) were evaluated with 58.5% females having an average age of 63 years, BMI of 31 kg/m2. Number of levels fused ranged from 1 to 8. rhBMP-2 averaged 7.3 mg/level (range, 1.5–24 mg/level) based upon length of collagen sponge in relation to length of fusion levels. Patients with non-union formation had lower rhBMP-2 dose per level (p=0.016). A significant difference in non-union rate was found between patients undergoing fusion with <6 mg/level compared to those with >6 mg/level (9.1% vs. 2.4%, χ2=0.012). No significant differences were noted between 6–11.9 mg/level and ≥12 mg/level. No threshold was found for seroma formation or bone overgrowth. Conclusions Previous recommendation of 20 mg/level of rhBMP-2 is more than what is required for predictable fusion rates of 98%. No dose related increase of infection, seroma formation, and bone overgrowth has been found. In order to provide variable dosing and cost reduction, industry generated rhBMP-2 kit size should be

  5. Evaluation of a new formulation of demineralized bone matrix putty in a rabbit posterolateral spinal fusion model.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Paul D; Brecevich, Antonio T; Taher, Fadi; Nguyen, Joseph T; Cammisa, Frank P; Abjornson, Celeste

    2014-09-01

    Alternatives to autologous bone graft (ABG) with osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic potential continue to prove elusive. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) however, with its osteoconductive and osteoinductive potential remains a viable option to ABG in posterolateral spine fusion. To compare the efficacy of a new formulation of DBM putty with that of ABG in a rabbit posterolateral spinal fusion model. Efficacy of a new formulation of DBM was studied in an experimental animal posterolateral spinal fusion model. Twenty-four male New Zealand White rabbits underwent bilateral posterolateral spine arthrodesis of the L5-L6 intertransverse processes, using either ABG (control group, n=12) or DBM (DBM made from rabbit bone) putty (test group, n=12). The animals were killed 12 weeks after surgery and the lumbar spines were excised. Fusion success was evaluated by manual palpation, high resolution X-rays, microcomputed tomography imaging, biomechanical four-point bending tests, and histology. Two animals were lost because of anesthetic related issues. Manual palpation to assess fusion success in the explanted lumbar spines showed no statistical significant difference in successful fusion in 81.8% (9/11) of DBM group and 72.7% (8/11) of ABG group (p=.99). Reliability of these assessments was measured between three independent observers and found near perfect agreement (intraclass correlation cofficient: 0.92 and 0.94, respectively). Fusion using high resolution X-rays was solid in 10 of the DBM group and 9 of the ABG group (p=.59). Biomechanical testing showed no significant difference in stiffness between the control and test groups on flexion, extension, and left lateral and right lateral bends, with p values accounting for .79, .42, .75, and .52, respectively. The bone volume/total volume was greater than 85% in the DBM treated fusion masses. Histologic evaluation revealed endochondral ossification in both groups, but the fusion masses were more mature in the DBM

  6. Effects of Local Administration of Boric Acid on Posterolateral Spinal Fusion with Autogenous Bone Grafting in a Rodent Model.

    PubMed

    Kömürcü, Erkam; Özyalvaçlı, Gülzade; Kaymaz, Burak; Gölge, Umut Hatay; Göksel, Ferdi; Cevizci, Sibel; Adam, Gürhan; Ozden, Raif

    2015-09-01

    Spinal fusion is among the most frequently applied spinal surgical procedures. The goal of the present study was to evaluate whether the local administration of boric acid (BA) improves spinal fusion in an experimental spinal fusion model in rats. Currently, there is no published data that evaluates the possible positive effects if the local administration of BA on posterolateral spinal fusion. Thirty-two rats were randomly divided into four independent groups: no material was added at the fusion area for group 1; an autogenous morselized corticocancellous bone graft was used for group 2; an autogenous morselized corticocancellous bone graft with boric acid (8.7 mg/kg) for group 3; and only boric acid was placed into the fusion area for group 4. The L4-L6 spinal segments were collected at week 6, and the assessments included radiography, manual palpation, and histomorphometry. A statistically significant difference was determined between the groups with regard to the mean histopathological scores (p = 0.002), and a paired comparison was made with the Mann-Whitney U test to detect the group/groups from which the difference originated. It was determined that only the graft + BA practice increased the histopathological score significantly with regard to the control group (p = 0.002). Whereas, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of the manual assessment of fusion and radiographic analysis (respectively p = 0.328 and p = 0.196). This preliminary study suggests that BA may clearly be useful as a therapeutic agent in spinal fusion. However, further research is required to show the most effective dosage of BA on spinal fusion, and should indicate whether BA effects spinal fusion in the human body.

  7. Effect of Hydroxyapatite porous characteristics on healing outcomes in rabbit posterolateral spinal fusion model.

    PubMed

    Motomiya, Makoto; Ito, Manabu; Takahata, Masahiko; Kadoya, Ken; Irie, Kazuharu; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Minami, Akio

    2007-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been commonly used as a bone graft substitute in various kinds of clinical fields. To improve the healing capability of HA, many studies have been performed to reveal its optimal structural characteristics for better healing outcomes. In spinal reconstruction surgery, non-interconnected porous HAs have already been applied as a bone graft extender in order to avoid autogenous bone harvesting. However, there have been few experimental studies regarding the effects of the structural characteristics of HA in posterolateral lumbar intertransverse process spine fusion (PLF). The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of HA porous characteristics on healing outcomes in a rabbit PLF model in order to elucidate appropriate structural characteristics of HA as a bone graft extender. Thirty-six adult female Japanese White rabbits underwent bilateral intertransverse process fusion at the level of L5-6 without internal fixation. We prepared three types of HA with different porosities: HA with 15% porosity (HA15%), HA with 50% porosity (HA50%), and HA with 85% porosity (HA85%), all of which were clinically available materials. The HA15% and HA50% had few interconnecting pores, whereas the HA85%, which was a recently developed material, had abundant interconnecting pores. All rabbits were randomly divided into the following four groups according to the grafted materials: (1) HA15% + autogenous bone, (2) HA50% + autogenous bone, (3) HA85% + autogenous bone, (4) pure autogenous bone graft. The animals were euthanized at 5 weeks after surgery, and post-mortem analyses including biomechanical testing, radiographical and histological evaluations were performed. There was no statistically significant difference in either fusion rate and/or bending stiffness among the three HA groups. However, in histological and radiological analyses, both bone ingrowth rate and direct bone bonding rate in the HA85% group were significantly higher than those in the HA

  8. The effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields on instrumented posterolateral spinal fusion and device-related stress shielding.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Fay, L A; Ito, Y; Yuan, M R; Edwards, W T; Yuan, H A

    1997-02-15

    This study was designed to examine stress-shielding effects on the spine caused by rigid implants and to investigate the effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on the instrumented spine. To investigate the effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on posterolateral spinal fusion, and to determine if osteopenia induced by rigid instrumentation can be diminished by pulsed electromagnetic fields. Although device-related osteopenia on vertebral bodies is of a great clinical importance, no method for preventing bone mineral loss in vertebrae by stiff spinal implants has been effective. Twenty-eight adult beagles underwent L5-L6 destabilization followed by posterolateral spinal fusion. The study was divided into four groups: 1) Group CNTL: without instrumentation, without pulsed electromagnetic fields, 2) Group PEMF: without Steffee, with pulsed electromagnetic fields, 3) Group INST: with Steffee, without pulsed electromagnetic fields, 4) Group PEMF + INST: with Steffee, with pulsed electromagnetic fields. At the end of 24 weeks, the dogs were killed, and L4-L7 segments were tested biomechanically without instrumentation. Radiographs and quantitative computed tomography assessed the condition of the fusion mass. Stress shielding was induced in the anterior vertebral bodies of L6 with the Steffee plates; bone mineral density was increased with the addition of pulsed electromagnetic fields, regardless of the presence or absence of fixation. A decrease in flexion and bending stiffness was observed in the Group INST; pulsed electromagnetic fields did increase the flexion stiffness regardless of the presence or absence of fixation, although this was not statistically significant. Use of pulsed electromagnetic fields has the potential to minimize device-related vertebral-bone mineral loss.

  9. Variables Affecting Fusion Rates in the Rat Posterolateral Spinal Fusion Model with Autogenic/Allogenic Bone Grafts: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Wataru; Elder, Benjamin D; Holmes, Christina; Lo, Sheng-Fu L; Witham, Timothy F

    2016-11-01

    The rat posterolateral spinal fusion model with autogenic/allogenic bone graft (rat PFABG) has been increasingly utilized as an experimental model to assess the efficacy of novel fusion treatments. The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability of the rat PFABG model and examine the effects of different variables on spinal fusion. A web-based literature search from January, 1970 to September, 2015, yielded 26 studies, which included 40 rat PFABG control groups and 449 rats. Data regarding age, weight, sex, and strain of rats, graft volume, graft type, decorticated levels, surgical approach, institution, the number of control rats, fusion rate, methods of fusion assessment, and timing of fusion assessment were collected and analyzed. The primary outcome variable of interest was fusion rate, as evaluated by manual palpation. Fusion rates varied widely, from 0 to 96%. The calculated overall fusion rate was 46.1% with an I (2) value of 62.4, which indicated moderate heterogeneity. Weight >300 g, age >14 weeks, male rat, Sprague-Dawley strain, and autogenic coccyx grafts increased fusion rates with statistical significance. Additionally, an assessment time-point ≥8 weeks had a trend towards statistical significance (p = 0.070). Multi-regression analysis demonstrated that timing of assessment and age as continuous variables, as well as sex as a categorical variable, can predict the fusion rate with R (2) = 0.82. In an inter-institution reliability analysis, the pooled overall fusion rate was 50.0% [44.8, 55.3%], with statistically significant differences among fusion outcomes at different institutions (p < 0.001 and I (2) of 72.2). Due to the heterogeneity of fusion outcomes, the reliability of the rat PFABG model was relatively limited. However, selection of adequate variables can optimize its use as a control group in studies evaluating the efficacy of novel fusion therapies.

  10. Micro-computed tomography-based three-dimensional kinematic analysis during lateral bending for spinal fusion assessment in a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomonori; Inoue, Nozomu; Sah, Robert L; Lee, Yu-Po; Taborek, Alexander P; Williams, Gregory M; Moseley, Timothy A; Bae, Won C; Masuda, Koichi

    2014-07-01

    Rat posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) models have been used to assess the safety and effectiveness of new bone substitutes and osteoinductive growth factors using palpation, radiography, micro-computed tomography (μCT), and histology as standard methods to evaluate spinal fusion. Despite increased numbers of PLF studies involving alternative bone substitutes and growth factors, the quantitative assessment of treatment efficacy during spinal motion has been limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of spinal fusion on lumbar spine segment stability during lateral bending using a μCT-based three-dimensional (3D) kinematic analysis in the rat PLF model. Fourteen athymic male rats underwent PLF surgery at L4/5 and received bone grafts harvested from the ilium and femurs of syngeneic rats (Isograft, n=7) or no graft (Sham, n=7). At 8 weeks after the PLF surgery, spinal fusion was assessed by manual palpation, plain radiography, μCT, and histology. To determine lumbar segmental motions at the operated level during lateral bending, 3D kinematic analysis was performed. The Isograft group, but not the Sham group, showed spinal fusion on manual palpation (6/7), solid fusion mass in radiographs (6/7), as well as bone bridging in μCT and histological images (5/7). Compared to the Sham group, the Isograft group revealed limited 3D lateral bending angular range of motion and lateral translation during lateral bending at the fused segment where disc height narrowing was observed. This μCT-based 3D kinematic analysis can provide a quantitative assessment of spinal fusion in a rat PLF model to complement current gold standard methods used for efficacy assessment of new therapeutic approaches.

  11. Local effect of zoledronic acid on new bone formation in posterolateral spinal fusion with demineralized bone matrix in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Pawel; Farei-Campagna, Jan; Jentzsch, Thorsten; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Werner, Clément M

    2017-10-10

    Posterolateral spinal fusion is a common orthopaedic surgery performed to treat degenerative and traumatic deformities of the spinal column. In posteriolateral spinal fusion, different osteoinductive demineralized bone matrix products have been previously investigated. We evaluated the effect of locally applied zoledronic acid in combination with commercially available demineralized bone matrix putty on new bone formation in posterolateral spinal fusion in a murine in vivo model. A posterolateral sacral spine fusion in murine model was used to evaluate the new bone formation. We used the sacral spine fusion model to model the clinical situation in which a bone graft or demineralized bone matrix is applied after dorsal instrumentation of the spine. In our study, group 1 received decortications only (n = 10), group 2 received decortication, and absorbable collagen sponge carrier, group 3 received decortication and absorbable collagen sponge carrier with zoledronic acid in dose 10 µg, group 4 received demineralized bone matrix putty (DBM putty) plus decortication (n = 10), and group 5 received DBM putty, decortication and locally applied zoledronic acid in dose 10 µg. Imaging was performed using MicroCT for new bone formation assessment. Also, murine spines were harvested for histopathological analysis 10 weeks after surgery. The surgery performed through midline posterior approach was reproducible. In group with decortication alone there was no new bone formation. Application of demineralized bone matrix putty alone produced new bone formation which bridged the S1-S4 laminae. Local application of zoledronic acid to demineralized bone matrix putty resulted in significant increase of new bone formation as compared to demineralized bone matrix putty group alone. A single local application of zoledronic acid with DBM putty during posterolateral fusion in sacral murine spine model increased significantly new bone formation in situ in our model. Therefore, our

  12. Reliability of the rabbit postero-lateral spinal fusion model: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Alexander M; Rangarajan, Rajesh; Balts, Joshua W; Hsu, Wellington K; Anderson, Paul A

    2013-08-01

    The rabbit model of spinal fusion with the autogenous iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) control is widely used to evaluate bone graft substitutes and enhancers. This study examined the reliability of this model using meta-analysis. A systematic literature search from January 1995 to May 2011 identified 56 studies, involving 733 animals. The primary outcome was fusion success calculated as logit event rate. Study design, surgical technique, rabbit characteristics (gender, species, age, weight), and institution were analyzed. Overall fusion success was 52.4%. Important positive variables were time-point >4 weeks, ICBG dose >1 cm(3) , initial weight of animals ≥3 kg, level at L4-5 or L5-6, and age ≥6 months. Inter- and intra-institutional reliability was excellent. The rabbit model ICBG control group is reliable, although several factors can affect results. Fusion under normal handling occurs reliably in 5 weeks. The volume of bone graft should be >1 cm(3) but no benefits are present with >2 cm(3) . The animals should weigh a minimum of 3 kg and be at least 6 months old. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  13. Posterolateral spinal fusion with nano-hydroxyapatite-collagen/PLA composite and autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zi-Bin; Cao, Jun-Kai; Wen, Ning; Wang, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Zhong-Wen; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Jin; Duan, Cui-Mi; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Wang, Chang-Yong

    2012-04-01

    Spinal fusion is routinely performed to treat low back pain caused by degeneration of intervertebral discs. An autologous bone graft derived from the iliac crest is the standard procedure used for spinal fusion. However, several shortcomings, including pseudarthrosis, pain and the need for blood transfusion are known to be associated with the procedure. Our study analysed the effectiveness of a new mineralized collagen matrix, nano-hydroxyapatite-collagen-polylactic acid (nHAC-PLA), combined with autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) as a graft material for posterolateral spinal fusion in a rabbit model. Forty rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: autologous iliac crest bone group (ACB), nHAC-PLA composite group (nHAC-PLA), autologous iliac crest bone mixed with nHAC-PLA composite group (ACB + nHAC-PLA), and nHAC-PLA composite combined with ADMSCs (ADMSCs + nHAC-PLA). The viability and the proliferation of the ADMSCs seeded on the scaffolds were evaluated by live/dead kit and MTT assay in vitro, respectively. Lumbar posterolateral fusions were assessed by manual palpation, radiographical and histological procedures, mechanical strength and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) in 10 weeks of observation. The results showed that the rate of fusion was significantly higher in the ACB and ADMSCs + nHAC-PLA groups than that in the nHAC-PLA and ACB + nHAC-PLA groups. It was not significantly higher in the ACB group than in the ADMSCs + nHAC-PLA group. From microstructural analysis of the samples using histological staining methods, there was more new bone-like tissue formation in the ACB and ADMSCs + nHAC-PLA groups than that in the other two groups at the 10th postoperative week. Our study demonstrated the effective impact of nHAC-PLA combined with ADMSCs in rabbit posterolateral spinal fusion. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of hydroxyapatite and beta-tricalcium phosphate mixed with bone marrow aspirate as a bone graft substitute for posterolateral spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Sanjay; Chauhan, Vijendra; Sharma, Sansar; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Juyal, Anil; Raghuvanshi, Shailendra

    2009-07-01

    Autologous cancellous bone is the most effective biological graft material. However, harvest of autologous bone is associated with significant morbidity. Since porous hydroxyapatite and beta-tricalcium phosphate are biodegradable materials and can be replaced by bone tissue, but it lacks osteogenic property. We conducted a study to assess their use as a scaffold and combine them with bone marrow aspirate for bone regeneration using its osteogenic property for posterolateral spinal fusion on one side and autologous bone graft on the other side and compare them radiologically in terms of graft incorporation and fusion. Thirty patients with unstable dorsal and lumbar spinal injuries who needed posterior stabilization and fusion were evaluated in this prospective study from October 2005 to March 2008. The posterior stabilization was done using pedicle screw and rod assembly, and fusion was done using hydroxyapatite and beta-tricalcium phosphate mixed with bone marrow aspirate as a bone graft substitute over one side of spine and autologous bone graft obtained from iliac crest over other side of spine. The patients were followed up to a minimum of 12 months. Serial radiographs were done at an interval of 3, 6, and 12 months and CT scan was done at one year follow-up. Graft incorporation and fusion were assessed at each follow-up. The study was subjected to statistical analysis using chi-square and kappa test to assess graft incorporation and fusion. At the end of the study, radiological graft incorporation and fusion was evident in all the patients on the bone graft substitute side and in 29 patients on the autologous bone graft side of the spine (P > 0.05). One patient showed lucency and breakage of distal pedicle screw in autologous bone graft side. The interobserver agreement (kappa) had an average of 0.72 for graft incorporation, 0.75 for fusion on radiographs, and 0.88 for the CT scan findings. Hydroxyapatite and beta-tricalcium phosphate mixed with bone marrow

  15. Evaluation of hydroxyapatite and beta-tricalcium phosphate mixed with bone marrow aspirate as a bone graft substitute for posterolateral spinal fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Sanjay; Chauhan, Vijendra; Sharma, Sansar; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Juyal, Anil; Raghuvanshi, Shailendra

    2009-01-01

    Background: Autologous cancellous bone is the most effective biological graft material. However, harvest of autologous bone is associated with significant morbidity. Since porous hydroxyapatite and beta-tricalcium phosphate are biodegradable materials and can be replaced by bone tissue, but it lacks osteogenic property. We conducted a study to assess their use as a scaffold and combine them with bone marrow aspirate for bone regeneration using its osteogenic property for posterolateral spinal fusion on one side and autologous bone graft on the other side and compare them radiologically in terms of graft incorporation and fusion. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with unstable dorsal and lumbar spinal injuries who needed posterior stabilization and fusion were evaluated in this prospective study from October 2005 to March 2008. The posterior stabilization was done using pedicle screw and rod assembly, and fusion was done using hydroxyapatite and beta-tricalcium phosphate mixed with bone marrow aspirate as a bone graft substitute over one side of spine and autologous bone graft obtained from iliac crest over other side of spine. The patients were followed up to a minimum of 12 months. Serial radiographs were done at an interval of 3, 6, and 12 months and CT scan was done at one year follow-up. Graft incorporation and fusion were assessed at each follow-up. The study was subjected to statistical analysis using chi-square and kappa test to assess graft incorporation and fusion. Results: At the end of the study, radiological graft incorporation and fusion was evident in all the patients on the bone graft substitute side and in 29 patients on the autologous bone graft side of the spine (P > 0.05). One patient showed lucency and breakage of distal pedicle screw in autologous bone graft side. The interobserver agreement (kappa) had an average of 0.72 for graft incorporation, 0.75 for fusion on radiographs, and 0.88 for the CT scan findings. Conclusion: Hydroxyapatite

  16. Spinal Fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... concept of fusion is similar to that of welding in industry. Spinal fusion surgery, however, does not ... bone taken from the patient has a long history of use and results in predictable healing. Autograft ...

  17. Spinal Fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... concept of fusion is similar to that of welding in industry. Spinal fusion surgery, however, does not ... bone taken from the patient has a long history of use and results in predictable healing. Autograft ...

  18. Long-term result of posterolateral fusion of the lumbar spine using the Tadpole system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Failure of pedicle screw fixation is often seen in patients with severe osteoporosis. We developed new lumbar spinal instrumentation (Tadpole system) for elderly patients who have osteoporotic bone and poor general health status. The objective of this study was to document the long-term clinical outcomes after Tadpole system fixation, the rate of spinal fusion, the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration, the rate of instrumentation failure, and the overall complications. Methods Sixty patients who underwent posterolateral spinal fusion using the Tadpole system, in whom a radiograph of the lumbar spine was taken at more than 5 years after operation, were involved in this study. The improvement rate of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, rate of spinal fusion, presence or absence of adjacent segment degeneration, rate of instrumentation failure, and postoperative complications of each patient were assessed at 5 years postoperatively. Results The mean JOA score improvement was 72.5%, and the posterolateral spinal fusion rate was 93.3% (56 of 60 patients) at the last follow-up. Adjacent segment degeneration occurred in only two patients who showed decreased intervertebral disc height, and instrumentation failure (hook deviation) was observed in one patient. No other complications were observed in any patients. Conclusion Tadpole system fixation shows favorable long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:24886530

  19. Posterolateral Fusion Versus Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ryan C; Mobbs, Ralph J; Lu, Victor M; Xu, Joshua; Rao, Prashanth J; Phan, Kevin

    2017-08-01

    Systematic review and meta-analysis. Current surgical management of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) involves decompression of the spinal canal followed by fusion with or without interbody. The additional functional and operative benefits derived from interbody inclusion has yet to be thoroughly established with a number of recent studies producing conflicting results. Thus, we aim to compare the functional and operative outcomes after fusion against interbody fusion in the treatment of DS. This systematic review of the literature comparing posterolateral fusion (PLF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) outcomes in the treatment of DS was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Electronic searches of 6 databases yielded 386 articles from database inception to July 2016, which were screening against established criteria for inclusion into this study. A total of 6 studies, satisfied criteria and reported outcomes for 721 patients. Fusion alone was performed in 458 (63.5%) patients and interbody fusion was performed in 263 (36.5%) patients. Functional outcomes Oswestry Disability Index (P = .29) and visual analog scale (P = .13) were not statistically different between the 2 approaches. Furthermore, there was no significant inferiority between fusion alone and with interbody in terms of the operative outcomes of blood loss (P = .38), reoperation rate (P = .66), hospital stay (P = .96), complication rate (P = .78), or fusion rate (P = .15). There was no statistically significant difference in functional and operative outcomes following fusion alone versus with interbody. Additional subgroup analysis of intrinsic DS features in future large, prospective, randomized controlled trials will improve the validity of these findings.

  20. Is lumbar facet fusion biomechanically equivalent to lumbar posterolateral onlay fusion?

    PubMed

    Toth, Jeffrey M; Foley, Kevin T; Wang, Mei; Seim, Howard B; Simon Turner, A

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE This study was designed with the following research objectives: 1) to determine the efficacy of facet fusion with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) in an ovine lumbar facet fusion model; 2) to radiographically and histologically compare the efficacy of lumbar facet fusion with rhBMP-2/ACS to facet fusion with an iliac crest bone graft (ICBG); and 3) to biomechanically compare lumbar facet fusion with rhBMP-2/ACS to lumbar posterolateral fusion (PLF) with ICBG. METHODS The efficacies of the 3 treatments to induce fusion were evaluated in an instrumented ovine lumbar fusion model. Eight sheep had 10 cm(3)/side ICBG placed as an onlay graft for PLF at L2-3. At the adjacent L3-4 level, 0.5 cm(3)/side ICBG was placed for facet fusion. Finally, 0.5 cm(3)/side rhBMP-2/ACS (0.43 mg/ml) was placed for facet fusion at L4-5. CT scans were obtained at 2, 4, and 6 months postoperatively with 2 reviewers conducting an evaluation of the 6-month results for all treated spinal levels. All 8 sheep were killed at 6 months, and all posterolateral instrumentation was removed at this time. The spines were then sectioned through L3-4 to allow for nondestructive unconstrained biomechanical testing of the L2-3 and L4-5 segments. All treated spinal levels were analyzed using undecalcified histology with corresponding microradiography. Statistical comparisons were made between the treatment groups. RESULTS The PLF with ICBG (ICBG PLF group) and the rhBMP-2 facet fusion (rhBMP-2 Facet group) treatment groups demonstrated similar levels of stiffness, with the rhBMP-2 Facet group having on average slightly higher stiffness in all 6 loading directions. All 8 levels in the autograft facet fusion treatment group demonstrated CT radiographic and histological fusion. All 8 levels in the rhBMP-2 Facet group showed bilateral CT radiographic and histological fusion. Six of 16 rhBMP-2/ACS-treated facet defects demonstrated small

  1. Fungal spinal infection treated with percutaneous posterolateral endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Akira; Ito, Manabu; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Sudo, Hideki; Kotani, Yoshihisa; Shono, Yasuhiro; Minami, Akio

    2014-05-01

    Fungal infection in the spine is rare and its treatment is challenging. Conservative treatment with antifungal drugs often fails, with the result that surgical intervention is required in many cases. Since the general conditions of patients with fungal infections is bad due to their comorbid medical problems, surgical invasiveness should be minimized. We have reported the effectiveness of posterolateral endoscopic surgery in treating pyogenic and tuberculous spondylodiscitis. This study reports the clinical results of posterolateral endoscopic surgery in treating fungal spinal infection. Between 2001 and 2009 we used posterolateral endoscopic surgery to treat four patients with fungal spinal infection. All were males, three in their 50s, and one in his 70s. The levels of infection were L2/3 and L5/S1 in one patient each, and L3/4 in two patients. As for the Griffiths classification, there was one patient in class 1, two in class 2, and one in class 3. Postoperative follow-up periods ranged from 26 to 92 months. Treatment history before surgery, species of causative fungus, selection of antifungal drugs and their duration, blood examinations, subsidence of infection, radiographic changes of the spine, and various complications were all investigated. All patients had been treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics followed by anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus drugs for more than several months by previous doctors. From cultures of the tissues taken during endoscopic surgery, Candida species were detected in three patients and Paecilomyces species in one. After endoscopic surgery, the patients were administered antifungal drugs for 3 months, except for one patient who had a side effect. All patients showed successful subsidence of infection at the final follow-up. Fungal spinal infection occurred in patients with a lengthy use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus drugs. Posterolateral endoscopic debridement and

  2. Diagnostic accuracy and reliability of fine-cut CT scans with reconstructions to determine the status of an instrumented posterolateral fusion with surgical exploration as reference standard.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Leah Y; Djurasovic, Mladen; Glassman, Steven D; Sailer, Philip

    2007-04-15

    Accuracy of a diagnostic test referenced to the gold standard. This study evaluated the reliability and accuracy of fine-cut computed tomography scans with coronal and sagittal reconstructions to determine the status of an instrumented posterolateral fusion by using surgical exploration as the reference standard. There is still a need for a reliable and accurate noninvasive method to determine the status of a spinal fusion. Three spine surgeons reviewed 93 prerevision fine-cut CT scans over 163 fused levels of consecutive patients who had revision surgery after an instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion. The facet joints and posterolateral gutters at each level were classified as fused or not. The surgeons were unaware of the findings on surgical exploration. Interobserver variability and likelihood ratios for a solid fusion when both, one, or none of the facets and when both, one, or none of the posterolateral gutters were fused, were calculated. There were 42 males and 51 females with a mean age of 57 years (range, 19-86 years) at revision. On exploration, there were 32 (19.6%) nonunions over 163 levels. The kappa for interobserver variability for evaluating facet fusions (0.42) was moderate and for posterolateral fusions (0.62) was substantial. The probability of a solid fusion on exploration was higher when both posterolateral gutters were fused on CT scan (89%) than when both facets were fused on CT scan (74%). When both facets and both posterolateral gutters were fused on CT scan, the probability of a solid fusion on exploration is 96%. The absence of fusion of one or both facets or one posterolateral gutter were poor predictors of nonunion on surgical exploration. The CT scan reading of either one or both posterolateral gutters fused or both facets fused were moderately predictive of a solid fusion on surgical exploration. Fine-cut CT scans with reconstructions are moderately predictive of the presence of nonunion when both facets are not fused.

  3. Comparison of a novel oxysterol molecule and rhBMP2 fusion rates in a rabbit posterolateral lumbar spine model.

    PubMed

    Scott, Trevor P; Phan, Kevin H; Tian, Haijun; Suzuki, Akinobu; Montgomery, Scott R; Johnson, Jared S; Atti, Elisa; Tetratis, Sotirios; Pereira, Renata C; Wang, Jeffrey C; Daubs, Michael D; Stappenbeck, Frank; Parhami, Farhad

    2015-04-01

    The nonunion rate after lumbar spinal fusion is as high as 25%. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP2) has been used as a biological adjunct to promote bony fusion. However, recently there have been concerns about BMP2. Oxysterol 133 (Oxy133) has been shown to promote excellent fusion rates in rodent lumbar spine models and offers a potential alternative to rhBMP2. The purpose of this study was to compare the fusion rate of rhBMP2 and Oxy133 in a randomized controlled trial using a posterolateral lumbar rabbit spinal fusion model. This was a randomized control animal study. Twenty-four male adult white New Zealand rabbits (3-3.5 kg) underwent bilateral posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion at L4-L5. Rabbits were divided into four groups: control (A), 30-μg rhBMP2 (B), 20-mg Oxy133 (C), and 60-mg Oxy133 (D). At 4 weeks, fusion was evaluated by fluoroscopy, and at 8 weeks, the rabbits were sacrificed and fusion was evaluated radiographically, by manual palpation, and with microcomputed tomography. Fusion rates by radiographic analysis at 8 weeks were Group A, 40.0%; Group B, 91.7%; Group C, 91.7%; and Group D, 100%. Evaluation of fusion masses by manual palpation of excised spines after sacrifice showed the following fusion rates: Group A, 0%; Group B, 83.3%; Group C, 83.3%; and Group D, 90%. Microcomputed tomography scanning confirmed these findings. These findings in a rabbit model demonstrate that both 20- and 60-mg Oxy133 doses promote fusion that is equivalent to fusion induced by 30-μg rhBMP2 and significantly greater than the control group. The present findings confirm that Oxy133 is a promising candidate for therapeutic development as an alternative to rhBMP2 to promote spinal fusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Delayed Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage due to Lumbar Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Lumbar Posterolateral Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Min; Choi, Ha Young

    2013-01-01

    A 55-year-old female patient presented with lower back pain and neurogenic intermittent claudication and underwent L3-L4 posterolateral fusion. To prepare the bone fusion bed, the transverse process of L3 and L4 was decorticated with a drill. On the 9th post-operative day, the patient complained of a sudden onset of severe abdominal pain and distension. Abdominal computed tomography revealed retroperitoneal hematoma in the right psoas muscle and iatrogenic right L3 transverse process fracture. Lumbar spinal angiography showed the delayed hematoma due to rupture of the 2nd lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and coil embolization was done at the ruptured lumbar artery pseudoaneusyrm. Since then, the patient's postoperative progress proceeded normally with recovery of the hemodynamic parameters. PMID:24294460

  5. The importance of proximal fusion level selection for outcomes of multi-level lumbar posterolateral fusion.

    PubMed

    Nam, Woo Dong; Cho, Jae Hwan

    2015-03-01

    There are few studies about risk factors for poor outcomes from multi-level lumbar posterolateral fusion limited to three or four level lumbar posterolateral fusions. The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcomes of multi-level lumbar posterolateral fusion and to search for possible risk factors for poor surgical outcomes. We retrospectively analyzed 37 consecutive patients who underwent multi-level lumbar or lumbosacral posterolateral fusion with posterior instrumentation. The outcomes were deemed either 'good' or 'bad' based on clinical and radiological results. Many demographic and radiological factors were analyzed to examine potential risk factors for poor outcomes. Student t-test, Fisher exact test, and the chi-square test were used based on the nature of the variables. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to exclude confounding factors. Twenty cases showed a good outcome (group A, 54.1%) and 17 cases showed a bad outcome (group B, 45.9%). The overall fusion rate was 70.3%. The revision procedures (group A: 1/20, 5.0%; group B: 4/17, 23.5%), proximal fusion to L2 (group A: 5/20, 25.0%; group B: 10/17, 58.8%), and severity of stenosis (group A: 12/19, 63.3%; group B: 3/11, 27.3%) were adopted as possible related factors to the outcome in univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that only the proximal fusion level (superior instrumented vertebra, SIV) was a significant risk factor. The cases in which SIV was L2 showed inferior outcomes than those in which SIV was L3. The odds ratio was 6.562 (95% confidence interval, 1.259 to 34.203). The overall outcome of multi-level lumbar or lumbosacral posterolateral fusion was not as high as we had hoped it would be. Whether the SIV was L2 or L3 was the only significant risk factor identified for poor outcomes in multi-level lumbar or lumbosacral posterolateral fusion in the current study. Thus, the authors recommend that proximal fusion levels be carefully determined when

  6. Posterolateral approach for spinal intradural meningioma with ventral attachment.

    PubMed

    Takami, Toshihiro; Naito, Kentaro; Yamagata, Toru; Yoshimura, Masaki; Arima, Hironori; Ohata, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Spinal meningioma with ventral attachment is a challenging pathology. Several technical modifications have been proposed to secure safe and precise resection of these tumors. This retrospective study focused on the precise and safe surgery of spinal meningiomas with strictly ventral attachment of cervical or thoracic spine. The surgical technique included a lateral oblique position for the patient, laminectomy with unilateral medial facetectomy on the tumor side, and spinal cord rotation with the dentate ligament. The neurological status of patients was assessed using the modified McCormick functional schema (mMFS) and sensory pain scale (SPS) before and at least 3 months after surgery. Patients were followed-up for a mean of 23.7 months. Tumor removal was graded using the Simpson grade for removal of meningiomas, and the extent of excision was confirmed using early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Simpson grade 1 or 2 resections were achieved in all cases. No major surgery-related complications were encountered, postoperatively. The mean mMFS score before surgery was 3.1, improving significantly to 1.7 after surgery (P < 0.05). The mean SPS score before surgery was 2.4, improving significantly to 1.6 after surgery (P < 0.05). This surgical technique offers a posterolateral surgical corridor to the ventral canal of both cervical and thoracic spine. The present preliminary analysis suggests that functional outcomes were satisfactory with minimal surgery-related complications, although considerable surgical experience is needed to achieve a high level of surgical confidence.

  7. Posterolateral approach for spinal intradural meningioma with ventral attachment

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Toshihiro; Naito, Kentaro; Yamagata, Toru; Yoshimura, Masaki; Arima, Hironori; Ohata, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal meningioma with ventral attachment is a challenging pathology. Several technical modifications have been proposed to secure safe and precise resection of these tumors. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study focused on the precise and safe surgery of spinal meningiomas with strictly ventral attachment of cervical or thoracic spine. The surgical technique included a lateral oblique position for the patient, laminectomy with unilateral medial facetectomy on the tumor side, and spinal cord rotation with the dentate ligament. The neurological status of patients was assessed using the modified McCormick functional schema (mMFS) and sensory pain scale (SPS) before and at least 3 months after surgery. Patients were followed-up for a mean of 23.7 months. Tumor removal was graded using the Simpson grade for removal of meningiomas, and the extent of excision was confirmed using early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Simpson grade 1 or 2 resections were achieved in all cases. No major surgery-related complications were encountered, postoperatively. The mean mMFS score before surgery was 3.1, improving significantly to 1.7 after surgery (P < 0.05). The mean SPS score before surgery was 2.4, improving significantly to 1.6 after surgery (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This surgical technique offers a posterolateral surgical corridor to the ventral canal of both cervical and thoracic spine. The present preliminary analysis suggests that functional outcomes were satisfactory with minimal surgery-related complications, although considerable surgical experience is needed to achieve a high level of surgical confidence. PMID:26692694

  8. Posterolateral versus posterior interbody fusion in isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Majid Reza; Rahmanian, Abdolkarim; Masoudi, Mohammad Sadegh

    2012-05-20

    Spondylolisthesis is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by subluxation of a vertebral body over another in the sagittal plane. Its most common form is isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS). This study aims to compare clinical outcomes of posterolateral fusion (PLF) with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with posterior instrumentation in the treatment of IS. We performed a randomized prospective study in which 80 patients out of a total of 85 patients with IS were randomly allocated to one of two groups: PLF with posterior instrumentation (group I) or PLIF with posterior instrumentation (group II). Posterior decompression was performed in the patients. The Oswestry low back pain disability (OLBP) scale and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) were used to evaluate the quality of life (QoL) and pain, respectively. Fisher's exact test was used to evaluate fusion rate and the Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare categorical data. Fusion in group II was significantly better than in group I (p=0.012). Improvement in low back pain was statistically more significant in group I (p=0.001). The incidence of neurogenic claudication was significantly lower in group I than in group II (p=0.004). In group I, there was no significant correlation between slip Meyerding grade and disc space height, radicular pain, and low back pain. There was no significant difference in post-operative complications at 1-year follow-up. Our data showed that PLF with posterior instrumentation provides better clinical outcomes and more improvement in low back pain compared to PLIF with posterior instrumentation despite the low fusion rate.

  9. Platelet-rich plasma enhances bone union in posterolateral lumbar fusion: A prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Go; Kamoda, Hiroto; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Ito, Michihiro; Yamashita, Masaomi; Nakamura, Junichi; Suzuki, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2017-07-20

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) accelerates bone union in vivo in a rodent model of spinal fusion surgery. However, PRP's effect on bone union after spinal surgery remains unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of PRP after posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) surgery. Single-center prospective randomized controlled clinical trial with 2-year follow-up. The patient sample included a total 62 patients (31 patients in the PRP group or 31 patients in the control group). The outcome measures included the bone fusion rate, the area of bone fusion mass, the duration of bone fusion, and the clinical score using the visual analog scale (VAS). We randomized 62 patients who underwent one- or two-level instrumented PLF for lumbar degenerative spondylosis with instability to either the PRP (31 patients) or the control (31 patients) groups. Platelet-rich plasma-treated patients underwent surgery using an autograft bone chip (local bone), and PRP was prepared from patient blood samples immediately before surgery; patients from the control group underwent PLF without PRP treatment. We assessed platelet counts and growth factor concentrations in PRP prepared immediately before surgery. The duration of bone union, the postoperative bone fusion rate, and the area of fusion mass were assessed using plain radiography every 3 months after surgery and by computed tomography at 12 or 24 months. The duration of bone fusion and the clinical scores for low back pain, leg pain, and leg numbness before and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery were evaluated using VAS. Data from 50 patients with complete data were included. The bone union rate at the final follow-up was significantly higher in the PRP group (94%) than in the control group (74%) (p=.002). The area of fusion mass was significantly higher in the PRP group (572 mm(2)) than in the control group (367 mm(2)) (p=.02). The mean period necessary for union was 7.8 months in the PRP group and 9.8 months in the

  10. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Baculovirus-Engineered Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7 Enhance Rabbit Posterolateral Fusion.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jen-Chung

    2016-07-05

    Previous studies have suggested that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDMSCs) genetically modified with baculoviral bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Bac-BMP-2) vectors could achieve successful fusion in a femur defect model or in a spinal fusion model. In this study, BMDMSCs expressing BMP-7 (Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs) were generated. We hypothesized that Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs could secrete more BMP-7 than untransduced BMDMSCs in vitro and achieve spinal posterolateral fusion in a rabbit model. Eighteen rabbits underwent posterolateral fusion at L4-5. Group I (n = 6) was implanted with collagen-β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP)-hydroxyapatite (HA), Group II (n = 6) was implanted with collagen-β-TCP-HA plus BMDMSCs, and Group III (n = 6) was implanted with collagen-β-TCP-HA plus Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs. In vitro production of BMP-7 was quantified with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Spinal fusion was examined using computed tomography (CT), manual palpation, and histological analysis. ELISA demonstrated that Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs produced four-fold to five-fold more BMP-7 than did BMDMSCs. In the CT results, 6 fused segments were observed in Group I (50%, 6/12), 8 in Group II (67%, 8/12), and 12 in Group III (100%, 12/12). The fusion rate, determined by manual palpation, was 0% (0/6) in Group I, 0% (0/6) in Group II, and 83% (5/6) in Group III. Histology showed that Group III had more new bone and matured marrow formation. In conclusion, BMDMSCs genetically transduced with the Bac-BMP-7 vector could express more BMP-7 than untransduced BMDMSCs. These Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs on collagen-β-TCP-HA scaffolds were able to induce successful spinal fusion in rabbits.

  11. Single-level instrumented posterolateral fusion of lumbar spine with beta-tricalcium phosphate versus autograft: a prospective, randomized study with 3-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Yang; Jiang, Lei-Sheng

    2008-05-20

    A prospective, randomized clinical study comparing beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) with autograft bone graft with follow-up of 3 years. To determine the efficacy of beta-TCP as a bone graft substitute combined with local autograft obtained from decompression compared with the use of autologous iliac crest bone graft in single-level instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion. A variety of bone graft substitutes have been used in posterolateral lumbar fusion with different efficacy reported, but no controlled study was conducted on the clinical performance of beta-TCP in instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion. Sixty-two patients with symptomatic degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis were treated with single-level instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion. They were randomly assigned to fusion with beta-TCP combined with local bone obtained from the decompression (group A, n = 32) or autogenous iliac crest bone graft plus decompression bone (group B, n = 30). The patients were observed up for 3 years after surgery. The results were assessed clinically and radiographically. There were no significant differences in recovery rate of Japanese Orthopedic Association score and SF-36 score at all time intervals. Successful radiographic fusion was documented in all patients in both treatment groups. All patients in group B, however, complained bone graft donor site pain although significant improvement of pain was observed during the follow-up. Instrumented posterolateral fusion with beta-TCP combined with local autograft results in the same radiographic fusion rates and similar improvement of clinical outcomes and life quality compared with autograft alone. The authors therefore recommend the use of beta-TCP as bone graft substitute for instrumented posterolateral fusion of lumbar spine to eliminate the need of bone grafting harvesting from the ilium.

  12. A comparative study of radiographic results using HEALOS collagen-hydroxyapatite sponge with bone marrow aspiration versus local bone graft in the same patients undergoing posterolateral lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Kunakornsawat, Sombat; Kirinpanu, Arthithat; Piyaskulkaew, Chaiwat; Sathira-Angkura, Vera

    2013-08-01

    Autologous bone harvested from the iliac crest is the gold standard for lumbar spinal fusion. However postoperative donor site pain and morbidity have been reported. Local bone graft is insufficient and contains some soft-tissue attachment. Therefore, Healos (DePuy Spine, Raynham, MA, USA) is currently bone graft substitute that was introduced for spinal fusion with good results but radiographic fusion rate has not been clearly defined yet. To assess the radiographic fusion rate of HEALOS with bone marrow aspiration versus autologous bone graft in the same patients undergoing posterolateral lumbar fusion. A retrospective radiographic outcome study of radiographic fusion rate from plain radiographs in 55patients indicatedforposterolateral lumbar fusion in Lerdsin General Hospital between April 2005 and December 2006 was done. The patients were implanted with HEALOS collagen-hydroxyapatite sponge with bone marrow aspiration and local bone graft on each side of Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion. Twenty-seven patients were included in the present study according to the authors'inclusion criteria. Plain radiographs were collected and radiographic fusion rate was assessed for at least two years follow-up. The two years post operative radiographic fusion rate was 29.63% (8/27) in Healos/BMA group and 62.96% (17/27) in LBG group. At three-years follow-up, radiographic fusion rate of 36.84% (7/19) was achieved in the Healos/ BMA group and 78.93% (15/19) in the LBG group. In the present study, Healos collagen-hydroxyapatite sponge with bone marrow aspiration had lower radiographic fusion rate when compared to local bone graft in posterolateral lumbar fusion at two years post operative. The results of the Healos/BMA group was increased fusion rate with time but remained lower than LBG group at three and four years follow-up.

  13. Experimental and clinical analysis of a posterolateral lumbar appendicular bone graft fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Wen; Xiao, Dong-Min; Wu, Hong; Ye, Ming; Li, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the animal experimental and clinical results of the bone graft fusion of a posterolateral lumbar appendicular bone. Methods: 1. Sixty rabbits were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Posterolateral lumbar bone graft with the appendicular bone and iliac bones, respectively, was then performed on these two groups. A lumbar spine X-ray was performed on the postoperative 4th, 8th and 16th weeks, and the gray value changes of the bone graft fusion area were measured to calculate fusion rates. Histology analysis was also performed to observe and count osteoblasts. 2. The appendicular bones of 106 patients who suffered from lumbar disorders were cut during lumbar surgery, and a posterolateral lumbar bone graft was performed. The postoperative follow-up used the Steffee criteria to evaluate clinical efficacy and the White criteria to evaluate fusion conditions. Results: No significant difference was observed in the relative gray values of X-ray bone density, bone graft fusion rates, and osteoblast counts in the bone graft regions between the two groups (P > 0.05). The follow-up duration of the 106 patients were 4-8 years (6.12 years), the clinical efficacy rate was 85.85%, and the fusion rate was 83.02%. Conclusions: The animal experimental and clinical results of posterolateral lumbar bone graft fusion with autologous iliac and appendicular bones were similar. PMID:26885221

  14. Experimental and clinical analysis of a posterolateral lumbar appendicular bone graft fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Wen; Xiao, Dong-Min; Wu, Hong; Ye, Ming; Li, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the animal experimental and clinical results of the bone graft fusion of a posterolateral lumbar appendicular bone. 1. Sixty rabbits were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Posterolateral lumbar bone graft with the appendicular bone and iliac bones, respectively, was then performed on these two groups. A lumbar spine X-ray was performed on the postoperative 4(th), 8(th) and 16(th) weeks, and the gray value changes of the bone graft fusion area were measured to calculate fusion rates. Histology analysis was also performed to observe and count osteoblasts. 2. The appendicular bones of 106 patients who suffered from lumbar disorders were cut during lumbar surgery, and a posterolateral lumbar bone graft was performed. The postoperative follow-up used the Steffee criteria to evaluate clinical efficacy and the White criteria to evaluate fusion conditions. No significant difference was observed in the relative gray values of X-ray bone density, bone graft fusion rates, and osteoblast counts in the bone graft regions between the two groups (P > 0.05). The follow-up duration of the 106 patients were 4-8 years (6.12 years), the clinical efficacy rate was 85.85%, and the fusion rate was 83.02%. The animal experimental and clinical results of posterolateral lumbar bone graft fusion with autologous iliac and appendicular bones were similar.

  15. The use of cultured bone marrow cells in type I collagen gel and porous hydroxyapatite for posterolateral lumbar spine fusion.

    PubMed

    Minamide, Akihito; Yoshida, Munehito; Kawakami, Mamoru; Yamasaki, Satoru; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Boden, Scott D

    2005-05-15

    Posterolateral lumbar transverse process fusion was completed using the cultured bone marrow cells in type I collagen gel and porous hydroxyapatite. To compare the efficacy of cultured bone marrow cells with that of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) as a graft alternative to autologous bone for posterolateral spine fusion. The clinical application of BMP for spinal fusion may be limited by high dose and cost. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells have been studied in various fields because of their capability to differentiate into various cells, including those in the osteogenic lineage. Thirty adult rabbits were used. Each underwent single-level, bilateral, posterolateral intertransverse process fusions at L4-L5. The animals were divided into 4 groups, each according to the material implanted: (1) autologous bone (autograft, n = 9); (2) porous hydroxyapatite (HA) particles and type I collagen sheet with 100 microg rhBMP-2 (BMP-HA, n = 7); (3) bone marrow cells (1 x 10(6) cells/mL, low-marrow-HA, n = 7); and (4) bone marrow cells (1 x 10(8) cells/mL, high-marrow-HA, n = 7). Before implantation for groups 3 and 4, fresh bone marrow cells from the iliac crest of each animal were cultured in a standard medium for 2 weeks. For one additional week, the marrow cells were cultured in 10(-8) M dexamethasone, type I collagen gel, and HA. Animals were euthanized 6 weeks after surgery. Spinal fusions were evaluated by radiograph, manual palpation, and histology. The fusion rates were 4 of 7 in the autograft group, 7 of 7 in the BMP-HA group, 0 of 7 in the low-marrow-HA group, and 5 of 7 in the high-marrow-HA group. The histology in the BMP-HA and high-marrow-HA groups showed that grafted HA fragments were connected with mature new bone. The pores of HA fragments were filled up with bone matrix. In the low-marrow-HA group, fibrous tissue was predominant in the grafted fragments. This study shows that the cultured bone marrow cells can act as a substitute for autograft or BMP in

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells expressing baculovirus-engineered BMP-2 and VEGF enhance posterolateral spine fusion in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tsai-Sheng; Chang, Yu-Han; Wong, Chak-Bor; Wang, I-Chun; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based cell therapy and gene transfer have converged and show great potential for accelerating bone healing. Gene therapy can provide more sustained expression of osteogenic factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). We previously demonstrated that low-dose BMP-2 enhanced spinal posterolateral fusion by MSCs in a rabbit model. Herein, we genetically modified rabbit MSCs with a recombinant baculovirus encoding BMP-2 (Bac-CB) and vascular endothelial growth factor (Bac-VEGF) seeded into porous scaffolds to enhance spinal fusion. This study evaluates the success rate of the MSC-based cell therapy and gene transfer approach for single-level posterolateral spine fusion. We hypothesize that combining three-dimensional tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds and genetically modified allogeneic MSCs with baculovirus-mediated growth factor expression would increase the success rate of spinal fusion. The study design was based on an animal model (approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee) using 18 adult male New Zealand rabbits. This study included 18 male New Zealand rabbits, weighing 3.5 to 4 kg. Allogeneic bone marrow-derived MSCs were isolated and genetically modified with Bac-CB and Bac-CV seeded onto TCP scaffolds (MSC/Bac/TCP). The animals were divided into three groups according to the material implanted into the bilateral L4-L5 intertransverse space: TCP scaffold (n=6), MSC/TCP (n=6), and MSC/Bac/TCP (n=6). After 12 weeks, the rabbits were euthanized for radiographic examination, manual palpation, and histologic study. Bilateral fusion areas in each animal were evaluated independently. The radiographic fusion rates at 12 sites were 0 of 12 in the TCP scaffold group, 4 of 12 in the MSC/TCP group, and 10 of 12 in the MSC/Bac/TCP group. By manual palpation, there were zero solid fusions in the TCP scaffold group, two solid fusions in the MSC/TCP group, and five solid fusions in the MSC/Bac/TCP group. Fusion rates

  17. Outcomes of Posterolateral Fusion with and without Instrumentation and of Interbody Fusion for Isthmic Spondylolisthesis: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Endler, Peter; Ekman, Per; Möller, Hans; Gerdhem, Paul

    2017-05-03

    Various methods for the treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis are available. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes after posterolateral fusion without instrumentation, posterolateral fusion with instrumentation, and interbody fusion. The Swedish Spine Register was used to identify 765 patients who had been operated on for isthmic spondylolisthesis and had at least preoperative and 2-year outcome data; 586 of them had longer follow-up (a mean of 6.9 years). The outcome measures were a global assessment of leg and back pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) Questionnaire, the Short Form-36 (SF-36), a visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, and satisfaction with treatment. Data on additional lumbar spine surgery was searched for in the register, with the mean duration of follow-up for this variable being 10.6 years after the index procedure. Statistical analyses were performed with analysis of covariance or competing-risks proportional hazards regression, adjusted for baseline differences in the studied variables, smoking, employment status, and level of fusion. Posterolateral fusion without instrumentation was performed in 102 patients; posterolateral fusion with instrumentation, in 452; and interbody fusion, in 211. At 1 year, improvement was reported in the global assessment for back pain by 54% of the patients who had posterolateral fusion without instrumentation, 68% of those treated with posterolateral fusion with instrumentation, and 70% of those treated with interbody fusion (p = 0.009). The VAS for back pain and reported satisfaction with treatment showed similar patterns (p = 0.003 and p = 0.017, respectively), whereas other outcomes did not differ among the treatment groups at 1 year. At 2 years, the global assessment for back pain indicated improvement in 57% of the patients who had undergone posterolateral fusion without instrumentation, 70% of those who had posterolateral fusion with instrumentation

  18. The outcome of pedicle screw instrumentation removal for ongoing low back pain following posterolateral lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Zotti, Mario G; Brumby-Rendell, Oscar P; McDonald, Ben; Fisher, Tom; Tsimiklis, Christovalantis; Yoon, Wai Weng; Osti, Orso L

    2015-12-01

    Our aim was to determine whether patients derived benefit from removal of pedicle screw instrumentation for axial pain without other cause using our surgical technique and patient selection. A secondary aim was to investigate factors that were associated with poorer outcomes for this procedure as well as complication rate in this cohort. Theater records from a single spinal surgeon's practice were reviewed to identify patients that had undergone lumbar fusion for discogenic back pain with subsequent pedicle screw instrumentation removal (Expedium, DePuy Synthes) in the preceding 3 years with a minimum of 18 months follow-up. Inclusion criteria were persisting midline axial back pain with computed tomography (CT)-confirmed solid fusion with non-radicular symptoms and nil other potential causes found, e.g., infection. Case note review along with pre- and post-operative Oswestry disability index (ODI) questionnaires and visual analog scores (VAS) were assessed for all patients. Surgical technique included re-use of previous midline posterior incision and the Wiltse approach with removal of implants, confirmation of a solid fusion mass, washout and bone grafting of removal sites. From 50 consecutive patients who underwent removal of posterolateral instrumentation for an index elective lumbar fusion for discogenic back pain, 34 patients were identified that met the criteria with a mean follow-up of 25 months (range, 18-36 months). The VAS and ODI improved in 22/34 (65%) of participants. The mean cohort VAS score was 6.6 pre-surgery and 4.3 post-surgery (P=0.04). Preoperative and postoperative mean Oswestry disability scores were 64 and 41, respectively (P=0.05). There was a statistically significant difference in the proportion of patients with poorer compared to satisfactory outcomes with regards to compensable status, preoperative grade II opioid use and shorter time between fusion and removal procedure. Complications were one postoperative hematoma and one

  19. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion versus instrumented posterolateral fusion in Grade I/II spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pooswamy, Shanmugasundaram; Muralidharagopalan, Niranjanan Raghavn; Subbaiah, Sivasubramaniam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Spondylolisthesis refers to slippage of one vertebra over the other, which may be caused by a variety of reasons such as degenerative, trauma, and isthmic. Surgical management forms the mainstay of treatment to prevent further slip and worsening. However, there is no consensus regarding the best surgical option to treat these patients. This study compares TLIF and instrumented PLF in patients with Grade I and II spondylolisthesis and analysis the outcome with respect to functional outcome, pain, fusion rate, adequacy of medial facetectomy for decompression, and complications. Materials and Methods: Forty patients operated for spondylolisthesis by instrumented posterolateral or transforaminal fusion between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2012 were included in this retrospective study. They were followed up for 3 years. Twenty one cases were of instrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF) and 19 cases were of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). The patients were asked to fill up the Oswestry disability index (ODI), Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ), and low back pain rating scale (LBPRS) preoperatively, at 1-month postoperatively, and at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months postoperatively. Radiological parameters were assessed using radiographs. Results: No significant differences were found in DPQ, LBPRS, or ODI scores preoperative, 1-month postoperative, and at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months followup. No significant difference was found between the two groups in blood loss. The only significant difference between the two groups was in the operative time, in which the instrumented PLF group had a mean of 50 min lesser than the TLIF group (P = 0.02). Conclusions: TLIF and instrumented PLF are equally efficacious options in the treatment of Grade I and II spondylolisthesis, except lytic type. PMID:28400657

  20. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion versus instrumented posterolateral fusion in Grade I/II spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Pooswamy, Shanmugasundaram; Muralidharagopalan, Niranjanan Raghavn; Subbaiah, Sivasubramaniam

    2017-01-01

    Spondylolisthesis refers to slippage of one vertebra over the other, which may be caused by a variety of reasons such as degenerative, trauma, and isthmic. Surgical management forms the mainstay of treatment to prevent further slip and worsening. However, there is no consensus regarding the best surgical option to treat these patients. This study compares TLIF and instrumented PLF in patients with Grade I and II spondylolisthesis and analysis the outcome with respect to functional outcome, pain, fusion rate, adequacy of medial facetectomy for decompression, and complications. Forty patients operated for spondylolisthesis by instrumented posterolateral or transforaminal fusion between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2012 were included in this retrospective study. They were followed up for 3 years. Twenty one cases were of instrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF) and 19 cases were of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). The patients were asked to fill up the Oswestry disability index (ODI), Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ), and low back pain rating scale (LBPRS) preoperatively, at 1-month postoperatively, and at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months postoperatively. Radiological parameters were assessed using radiographs. No significant differences were found in DPQ, LBPRS, or ODI scores preoperative, 1-month postoperative, and at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months followup. No significant difference was found between the two groups in blood loss. The only significant difference between the two groups was in the operative time, in which the instrumented PLF group had a mean of 50 min lesser than the TLIF group (P = 0.02). TLIF and instrumented PLF are equally efficacious options in the treatment of Grade I and II spondylolisthesis, except lytic type.

  1. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus posterolateral instrumented fusion (PLF) in degenerative lumbar disorders: a randomized clinical trial with 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Høy, Kristian; Bünger, Cody; Niederman, Bent; Helmig, Peter; Hansen, Ebbe Stender; Li, Haisheng; Andersen, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze outcome, with respect to functional disability, pain, fusion rate, and complications of patients treated with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in compared to instrumented poserolateral fusion (PLF) alone, in low back pain. Spinal fusion has become a major procedure worldwide. However, conflicting results exist. Theoretical circumferential fusion could improve functional outcome. However, the theoretical advantages lack scientific documentation. Prospective randomized clinical study with a 2-year follow-up period. From November 2003 to November 2008 100 patients with severe low back pain and radicular pain were randomly selected for either posterolateral lumbar fusion [titanium TSRH (Medtronic)] or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion [titanium TSRH (Medtronic)] with anterior intervertebral support by tantalum cage (Implex/Zimmer). The primary outcome scores were obtained using Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ), Oswestry disability Index, SF-36, and low back pain Rating Scale. All measures assessed the endpoints at 2-year follow-up after surgery. The overall follow-up rate was 94 %. Sex ratio was 40/58. 51 patients had TLIF, 47 PLF. Mean age 49(TLIF)/45(PLF). No statistic difference in outcome between groups could be detected concerning daily activity, work leisure, anxiety/depression or social interest. We found no statistic difference concerning back pain or leg pain. In both the TLIF and the PLF groups the patients had significant improvement in functional outcome, back pain, and leg pain compared to preoperatively. Operation time and blood loss in the TLIF group were significantly higher than in the PLF group (p < 0.001). No statistic difference in fusion rates was detected. Transforaminal interbody fusion did not improve functional outcome in patients compared to posterolateral fusion. Both groups improved significantly in all categories compared to preoperatively. Operation time and blood loss were

  2. Injectable and compression-resistant low-viscosity polymer/ceramic composite carriers for rhBMP-2 in a rabbit model of posterolateral fusion: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shiels, Stefanie M; Talley, Anne D; McGough, Madison A P; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J; Kalpakci, Kerem; Shimko, Daniel; Guelcher, Scott A; Wenke, Joseph C

    2017-07-11

    The challenging biological and mechanical environment of posterolateral fusion (PLF) requires a carrier that spans the transverse processes and resists the compressive forces of the posterior musculature. The less traumatic posterolateral approach enabled by minimally invasive surgical techniques has prompted investigations into alternative rhBMP-2 carriers that are injectable, settable, and compression-resistant. In this pilot study, we investigated injectable low-viscosity (LV) polymer/composite bone grafts as compression-resistant carriers for rhBMP-2 in a single-level rabbit PLF model. LV grafts were augmented with ceramic microparticles: (1) hydrolytically degradable bioactive glass (BG), or (2) cell-degradable 85% β-tricalcium phosphate/15% hydroxyapatite (CM). Material properties, such as pore size, viscosity, working time, and bulk modulus upon curing, were measured for each LV polymer/ceramic material. An in vivo model of posterolateral fusion in a rabbit was used to assess the grafts' capability to encourage spinal fusion. These materials maintained a working time between 9.6 and 10.3 min, with a final bulk modulus between 1.2 and 3.1 MPa. The LV polymer/composite bone grafts released 55% of their rhBMP-2 over a 14-day period. As assessed by manual palpation in vivo, fusion was achieved in all (n = 3) animals treated with LV/BG or LV/CM carriers incorporating 430 μg rhBMP-2/ml. Images of μCT and histological sections revealed evidence of bone fusion near the transverse processes. This study highlights the potential of LV grafts as injectable and compression-resistant rhBMP-2 carriers for posterolateral spinal fusion.

  3. Surgery for ventral intradural thoracic spinal tumors with a posterolateral transpedicular approach.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kiyoshi; Aoyama, Tatsuro; Miyaoka, Yoshinari; Seguchi, Tatsuya; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Surgery for ventrally seated thoracic tumors requires an anatomically specific approach that is distinct from cervical or lumbar spinal cord surgery as the narrower spinal canal of the thoracic spinal cord makes it sensitive to surgical procedures. However, reports describing this operative technique are few. To obtain a wide operative field and minimize thoracic spinal cord retraction, we employed a posterolateral transpedicular approach in ventral-located tumors and investigated the efficacy and limitations of this technique. Eighteen patients with lesions (meningioma or neurinoma) located in the ventral intradural thoracic region were surgically treated between 2009 and 2014. The relationship among the clinical outcome, tumor location, and postoperative spinal alignment was analyzed. Postoperative neurological function improved in all patients, namely those with meningioma (p = 0.012) and schwannoma (p = 0.018). One patient who underwent removal of two facet joints suffered a postoperative compression fracture. Removal of two facet joints and pedicles resulted in a worsening of spinal alignment (p = 0.03), while this was not the case for the removal of one facet joint and pedicle (p = 0.72). This case series clarified the benefits of the posterolateral transpedicular approach for resection of ventral intradural extramedullary tumors. Removal of one pedicle and facet joint seems to be more beneficial.

  4. The Effects of Ketorolac Injected via Patient Controlled Analgesia Postoperatively on Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Si-Young; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Park, Moon-Soo; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2005-01-01

    Lumbar spinal fusions have been performed for spinal stability, pain relief and improved function in spinal stenosis, scoliosis, spinal fractures, infectious conditions and other lumbar spinal problems. The success of lumbar spinal fusion depends on multifactors, such as types of bone graft materials, levels and numbers of fusion, spinal instrumentation, electrical stimulation, smoking and some drugs such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). From January 2000 to December 2001, 88 consecutive patients, who were diagnosed with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis, were retrospectively enrolled in this study. One surgeon performed all 88 posterolateral spinal fusions with instrumentation and autoiliac bone graft. The patients were divided into two groups. The first group (n=30) was infused with ketorolac and fentanyl intravenously via patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively and the second group (n=58) was infused only with fentanyl. The spinal fusion rates and clinical outcomes of the two groups were compared. The incidence of incomplete union or nonunion was much higher in the ketorolac group, and the relative risk was approximately 6 times higher than control group (odds ratio: 5.64). The clinical outcomes, which were checked at least 1 year after surgery, showed strong correlations with the spinal fusion status. The control group (93.1%) showed significantly better clinical results than the ketorolac group (77.6%). Smoking had no effect on the spinal fusion outcome in this study. Even though the use of ketorolac after spinal fusion can reduce the need for morphine, thereby decreasing morphine related complications, ketorolac used via PCA at the immediate postoperative state inhibits spinal fusion resulting in a poorer clinical outcome. Therefore, NSAIDs such as ketorolac, should be avoided after posterolateral spinal fusion. PMID:15861498

  5. Spinal fusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... vertebrae are the bones that make up the spinal column, which surrounds and protects the spinal cord. The ... cushions between vertebrae, and absorb energy while the spinal column flexes, extends, and twists. Nerves from the spinal ...

  6. Evaluation of a novel silicate substituted hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute in a rabbit posterolateral fusion model.

    PubMed

    Fredericks, Douglas C; Petersen, Emily B; Sahai, Nikhil; Corley, Katherine Gibson N; DeVries, Nicole; Grosland, Nicole M; Smucker, Joseph D

    2013-01-01

    Randomized, controlled study in a laboratory setting. Blinded observations/assessment of study outcomes. The purpose of this study is to determine the performance characteristics of a novel silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute (BGS), SiCaP EP (Baxter Healthcare/ ApaTech, Elstree, UK), in a stand-alone mode, a stand-alone with bone marrow aspirate (BMA) mode, and an extender mode with iliac crest autograft (ICBG) in a rabbit posterolateral spine fusion model. The investigational BGS is compared to a standard iliac crest autograft (ICBG) control. The rabbit posterolateral fusion model is an established environment for testing of fusion efficacy. It offers the opportunity to obtain radiographic, histological, and biomechanical data on novel bone graft substitutes. One hundred and twenty rabbits were entered into the study with 116 used for analysis. Bilateral posterolateral lumbar intertransverse fusions were performed at L5-L6. The lateral two thirds of the transverse processes were decorti cated and covered with graft material in the following five groups: ICBG, SiCaP EP stand-alone, SiCaP EP with BMA (1:0.5 by volume), and SiCaP EP with ICBG (1:3 by volume). Rabbits were necropsied at 4, 8, and 12-week time points and fusion rate, quantity, and quality was evaluated based on manual palpation, mechanical stiffness testing, pqCT, and histological assessment. SiCaP EP, ICBG+SiCaP EP (3:1), and SiCaP EP+BMA (1:0.5) compare favorably to iliac crest autologous bone by multiple metrics in this rabbit posterolateral fusion model. Fusion efficacy via manual palpation and mechanical stiffness testing metrics indicate that all SiCaP EP groups had similar group-to-group performance, and were not significantly different than the ICBG control at each time period evaluated. In this commonly used rabbit posterolateral fusion model, SiCaP EP utilized as a stand-alone, as a stand-alone with BMA, and as an autograft (ICBG) extender produces results that are

  7. Reliability analysis of radiographic methods for determination of posterolateral lumbossacral fusion.

    PubMed

    Gotfryd, Alberto Ofenhejm; Pomar, Felipe de Moraes; Carneiro Neto, Nicola Jorge; Franzin, Fernando José; Rodrigues, Luciano Miller Reis; Poletto, Patricia Rios

    2014-04-01

    To analyze intra and interobserver agreement of two radiographic methods for evaluation of posterolateral lumbar arthrodesis. Twenty patients undergoing instrumented posterolateral fusion were evaluated by anteroposterior and dynamic lateral radiographs in maximal flexion and extension. The images were evaluated initially by 6 orthopedic surgeons, and after 8 weeks, reassessed by 4 of them, totaling 400 radiographic measurements. Intra and interobserver reliability were analyzed using the Kappa coefficient and Landis and Koch criteria. Intra and interobserver agreement regarding anteroposterior radiographs were, respectively, 76 and 63%. On lateral views, these values were 78 and 84%, respectively. However, the Kappa analysis showed poor intra and interobserver agreement in most cases, regardless of the radiographic method used. There was poor intra and interobserver agreement in the evaluation of lumbosacral fusion by plain film in anteroposterior and dynamic lateral views, with no statistical superiority between the methods.

  8. Reliability analysis of radiographic methods for determination of posterolateral lumbossacral fusion

    PubMed Central

    Gotfryd, Alberto Ofenhejm; de Moraes Pomar, Felipe; Carneiro, Nicola Jorge; Franzin, Fernando José; Rodrigues, Luciano Miller Reis; Poletto, Patricia Rios

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze intra and interobserver agreement of two radiographic methods for evaluation of posterolateral lumbar arthrodesis. Methods Twenty patients undergoing instrumented posterolateral fusion were evaluated by anteroposterior and dynamic lateral radiographs in maximal flexion and extension. The images were evaluated initially by 6 orthopedic surgeons, and after 8 weeks, reassessed by 4 of them, totaling 400 radiographic measurements. Intra and interobserver reliability were analyzed using the Kappa coefficient and Landis and Koch criteria. Results Intra and interobserver agreement regarding anteroposterior radiographs were, respectively, 76 and 63%. On lateral views, these values were 78 and 84%, respectively. However, the Kappa analysis showed poor intra and interobserver agreement in most cases, regardless of the radiographic method used. Conclusion There was poor intra and interobserver agreement in the evaluation of lumbosacral fusion by plain film in anteroposterior and dynamic lateral views, with no statistical superiority between the methods. PMID:25003926

  9. The cost-effectiveness of interbody fusions versus posterolateral fusions in 137 patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Abt, Nicholas B; Witham, Timothy F; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2015-03-01

    Reimbursements for interbody fusions have declined recently because of their questionable cost-effectiveness. A Markov model was adopted to compare the cost-effectiveness of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (/TLIF) versus noninterbody fusion and posterolateral fusion (PLF) in patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. Decision model analysis based on retrospective data from a single institutional series. One hundred thirty-seven patients underwent first-time instrumented lumbar fusions for degenerative or isthmic spondylolisthesis. Quality of life adjustments and expenditures were assigned to each short-term complication (durotomy, surgical site infection, and medical complication) and long-term outcome (bowel/bladder dysfunction and paraplegia, neurologic deficit, and chronic back pain). Patients were divided into a PLF cohort and a PLF plus PLIF/TLIF cohort. Anterior techniques and multilevel interbody fusions were excluded. Each short-term complication and long-term outcome was assigned a numerical quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), based on time trade-off values in the Beaver Dam Health Outcomes Study. The cost data for short-term complications were calculated from charges accrued by the institution's finance sector, and the cost data for long-term outcomes were estimated from the literature. The difference in cost of PLF plus PLIF/TLIF from the cost of PLF alone divided by the difference in QALY equals the cost-effectiveness ratio (CER). We do not report any study funding sources or any study-specific appraisal of potential conflict of interest-associated biases in this article. Of 137 first-time lumbar fusions for spondylolisthesis, 83 patients underwent PLF and 54 underwent PLIF/TLIF. The average time to reoperation was 3.5 years. The mean QALY over 3.5 years was 2.81 in the PLF cohort versus 2.66 in the PLIFo/TLIF cohort (p=.110). The mean 3.5-year costs of $54,827.05 after index interbody fusion were

  10. Posterolateral lumbar fusion: Relationship between computed tomography Hounsfield units and symptomatic pseudoarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Shabani, Saman; Patel, Mohit; Maiman, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of bone quality can guide spinal surgery. However, surgeons infrequently evaluate bone quality in a quantitative manner. Recent literature suggests a role for computed tomography (CT) Hounsfield units (HUs) as a marker for bone quality. Limited data exist regarding its utility with respect to posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF). From fall 2010 to winter 2012, 10 patients underwent revision surgery for symptomatic pseudoarthrosis (defined as intractable pain associated with either radiographic evidence of nonunion or intraoperative evidence of nonunion) after a prior L4-S1 PLF. These patients were age-matched (±5 years) to 10 patients who underwent L4-S1 PLF with no clinical signs of pseudoarthrosis at 1-year follow-up. Available CT imaging (with or without instrumentation) was evaluated from L1 to L5 for the averaged HU. Data were pooled among L1-L3 values and between L4 and L5 values. Within the pseudoarthrosis group, the pooled L1-L3 HU value was similar to the pooled L4-L5 HU value (168.39 ± 22.84 HU vs. 166.98 ± 23.20 HU respectively, P = 0.89). The same pattern was observed for the control group (190.24 ± 37.13 HU vs. 201.89 ± 36.59 HU respectively, P = 0.44). On the other hand, the pooled L1-L3 and L4-L5 HU values were larger for the control group compared to the pseudoarthrosis group, with the pooled L4-L5 HU demonstrating statistical significance, P = 0.01. Currently, CT imaging is typically not obtained prior to lumbar fusion. Results demonstrated that CT HU values were significantly larger for patients who did not exhibit symptomatic pseudoarthrosis at 1-year follow-up compared to those who required revision surgery. As such, CT HU values may serve as a predictor for bony fusion to guide surgical management of patients under consideration for PLF.

  11. Posterolateral lumbar fusion: Relationship between computed tomography Hounsfield units and symptomatic pseudoarthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Shabani, Saman; Patel, Mohit; Maiman, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Assessment of bone quality can guide spinal surgery. However, surgeons infrequently evaluate bone quality in a quantitative manner. Recent literature suggests a role for computed tomography (CT) Hounsfield units (HUs) as a marker for bone quality. Limited data exist regarding its utility with respect to posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF). Methods: From fall 2010 to winter 2012, 10 patients underwent revision surgery for symptomatic pseudoarthrosis (defined as intractable pain associated with either radiographic evidence of nonunion or intraoperative evidence of nonunion) after a prior L4–S1 PLF. These patients were age-matched (±5 years) to 10 patients who underwent L4–S1 PLF with no clinical signs of pseudoarthrosis at 1-year follow-up. Available CT imaging (with or without instrumentation) was evaluated from L1 to L5 for the averaged HU. Data were pooled among L1–L3 values and between L4 and L5 values. Results: Within the pseudoarthrosis group, the pooled L1–L3 HU value was similar to the pooled L4–L5 HU value (168.39 ± 22.84 HU vs. 166.98 ± 23.20 HU respectively, P = 0.89). The same pattern was observed for the control group (190.24 ± 37.13 HU vs. 201.89 ± 36.59 HU respectively, P = 0.44). On the other hand, the pooled L1–L3 and L4–L5 HU values were larger for the control group compared to the pseudoarthrosis group, with the pooled L4–L5 HU demonstrating statistical significance, P = 0.01. Conclusion: Currently, CT imaging is typically not obtained prior to lumbar fusion. Results demonstrated that CT HU values were significantly larger for patients who did not exhibit symptomatic pseudoarthrosis at 1-year follow-up compared to those who required revision surgery. As such, CT HU values may serve as a predictor for bony fusion to guide surgical management of patients under consideration for PLF. PMID:26693390

  12. The outcome of pedicle screw instrumentation removal for ongoing low back pain following posterolateral lumbar fusion

    PubMed Central

    Brumby-Rendell, Oscar P.; McDonald, Ben; Fisher, Tom; Tsimiklis, Christovalantis; Yoon, Wai Weng; Osti, Orso L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Our aim was to determine whether patients derived benefit from removal of pedicle screw instrumentation for axial pain without other cause using our surgical technique and patient selection. A secondary aim was to investigate factors that were associated with poorer outcomes for this procedure as well as complication rate in this cohort. Methods Theater records from a single spinal surgeon’s practice were reviewed to identify patients that had undergone lumbar fusion for discogenic back pain with subsequent pedicle screw instrumentation removal (Expedium, DePuy Synthes) in the preceding 3 years with a minimum of 18 months follow-up. Inclusion criteria were persisting midline axial back pain with computed tomography (CT)−confirmed solid fusion with non-radicular symptoms and nil other potential causes found, e.g., infection. Case note review along with pre- and post-operative Oswestry disability index (ODI) questionnaires and visual analog scores (VAS) were assessed for all patients. Surgical technique included re-use of previous midline posterior incision and the Wiltse approach with removal of implants, confirmation of a solid fusion mass, washout and bone grafting of removal sites. Results From 50 consecutive patients who underwent removal of posterolateral instrumentation for an index elective lumbar fusion for discogenic back pain, 34 patients were identified that met the criteria with a mean follow-up of 25 months (range, 18-36 months). The VAS and ODI improved in 22/34 (65%) of participants. The mean cohort VAS score was 6.6 pre-surgery and 4.3 post-surgery (P=0.04). Preoperative and postoperative mean Oswestry disability scores were 64 and 41, respectively (P=0.05). There was a statistically significant difference in the proportion of patients with poorer compared to satisfactory outcomes with regards to compensable status, preoperative grade II opioid use and shorter time between fusion and removal procedure. Complications were one

  13. Risk factors for L5-S1 disk height reduction after lumbar posterolateral floating fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Gen; Takaso, Masashi; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Imura, Takayuki; Ueno, Masaki; Saito, Wataru; Uchida, Kentaro; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2014-07-01

    This is a retrospective study. To investigate the risk factors for radiographic L5-S1 disk height reduction after lumbar posterolateral floating fusion surgery. We investigated data from 86 patients (45 men) who underwent posterolateral floating fusion surgery from 2007 to 2010. The follow-up was from 2 to 6 years. The mean age of the patients was 65.4 years. L5-S1 disk height was calculated and >2 mm reduction was defined as significant. Age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, number of fused levels, grade of disk degeneration, disk height and diameter, sacrolumbar alignment, alignment of fused level, achievement of union, and proximal adjacent segment disorder at final follow-up were compared. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed. L5-S1 disk height reduction occurred in 14 patients (30.2%). The number of fused levels was significantly greater (1.8±0.8 vs. 1.4±0.6) in patients without disk height reduction. Radiology showed a significant change of L1-S1 sacrolumbar alignment after surgery in patients without disk height reduction (0.3±6.6 vs. -4.5±7.6 degrees). The height of the disk posterior to the L5-S1 intervertebral disk before surgery was significantly greater (7.3±2.1 vs. 6.1±2.1 mm) in patients without disk height reduction. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, fusion of >3 levels was a significant risk factor for L5-S1 disk height reduction. In posterolateral floating fusion surgery, there was a higher risk of L5-S1 disk height reduction and consequent foraminal stenosis in patients with multiple-level fusion. Surgical methods and fusion levels should be chosen after considering their association with L5-S1 disk height reduction.

  14. The outcome of posterolateral fusion in highly selected patients with discogenic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Parker, L M; Murrell, S E; Boden, S D; Horton, W C

    1996-08-15

    A prospective analysis of the clinical outcome of a consecutive series of patients treated with posterior lumbar arthrodesis. Preoperative data were collected retrospectively by chart review. To measure by independent review the clinical outcome of posterolateral intertransverse fusion as a treatment for discogenic low back pain in a highly selected group of patients. Although numerous studies have reported on the surgical management of degenerative disc disease, they have been difficult to interpret because they lack patient-oriented outcome assessment and objective pain measurement criteria, independent review, and include patients with diagnoses other than degenerative disc disease. Between 1991 and February 1993 all patients seen by a single surgeon, evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging and discography, and treated with posterolateral lumbar fusion were reviewed by independent investigation. Outcome was assessed in the areas of radiographic fusion, pain, function, and patient satisfaction. Twenty-three patients (12 women, 11 men; 100% follow-up an average of 47 months after surgery [range, 24-84 months]) met the inclusion criteria. Overall, 39% had a good or excellent result, 13% fair, and 48% poor. Nine of 10 patients receiving worker's compensation had a poor result, four of five patients with radiographic pseudarthrosis had a poor result. Statistically significant improvement in the visual analogue scale was noted in the good and excellent group (P = 0.0001) and the fair group (P = 0.002) with no change in the poor group. Patients out of work more than 3 months before surgery tended to have poor results. Overall, 56% of patients were extremely satisfied with the result of their surgery. Posterolateral intertransverse fusion can be used to successfully manage chronic discogenic back pain. However, patient selection remains a challenge, and successful outcome appears to be limited in the subset of patients receiving worker's compensation and those

  15. Radiologic assessment of spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Selby, Michael Derrick; Clark, Simon Richard; Hall, David John; Freeman, Brian J C

    2012-11-01

    Since surgical fusion of the spine was first described in 1911, multiple methods have been used to assess it. Although open surgical exploration remains the standard of care for determination of fusion, it is impractical in most clinical situations. Static radiographs have long been used as a practical method of fusion assessment, but they tend to significantly overestimate the presence of a solid fusion. Dynamic radiographs improve accuracy but limitations include measurement reliability, disagreement on allowable motion, and the two-dimensional nature of radiographs. Ultimately, lack of movement at a fused segment does not confirm fusion. Radiostereometric analysis further improves accuracy; however, methodological demands make it largely impractical for routine use. CT is now widely accepted as the standard for noninvasive assessment of spinal fusion. Fine-cut imaging, multiplanar reconstruction, and metal artifact reduction have increased the ability to assess fusion on CT. However, significant concerns remain regarding the effects of high radiation exposure. Although MRI is appealing, its utility in assessing fusion remains unproven. Understanding the limitations of each technique allows judicious use of radiology in the assessment of spinal fusion.

  16. Experimental Design and Surgical Approach to Create a Spinal Fusion Model in a New Zealand White Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Coble, Dondrae; Bertone, Alicia L; Hussein, Hayam Hamaz; Khan, Safdar N

    2017-08-01

    There are several animal models routinely used for study of the spinal fusion process and animal selection largely depends on the scientific question to be answered. This review outlines the advantages and disadvantages of various animal models used to study spinal fusion and describes the New Zealand White (NSW) rabbit which is the most popular preclinical model to study spinal fusion. We outline critical steps required in planning and performing spinal fusion surgery in this model. This includes determination of the required animal number to obtain statistical significance, an outline of appropriate technique for posterolateral fusion and other components of completing a study. As advances in drug delivery move forward and our understanding of the cascade of gene expression occurring during the fusion process grows, performing and interpreting preclinical animal models will be vital to validating new therapies to enhance spinal fusion.

  17. Efficacy comparison of Accell Evo3 and Grafton demineralized bone matrix putties against autologous bone in a rat posterolateral spine fusion model.

    PubMed

    Brecevich, Antonio T; Kiely, Paul D; Yoon, B Victor; Nguyen, Joseph T; Cammisa, Frank P; Abjornson, Celeste

    2017-06-01

    Spinal fusion procedures are intended to stabilize the spinal column for a multitude of disorders including abnormal curvature, traumatic instability, degenerative instability, and damage from infections or tumors. As an aid in the bone healing response, bone graft materials are used to bridge joints for arthrodesis and promote unions in pseudoarthrosis. Currently, the gold standard for stabilizing fusion masses in spinal procedures involves using the osteogenic, osteoinductive, and osteoconductive properties of autologous iliac crest corticocancellous bone. However, considerable morbidity is associated with harvesting the autologous graft. Donor site complications including infection, large hematomas, and pain have been reported at rates as high as 50% (Boden and Jeffrey, 1995). Biologically, the rate of bone repair dictates the rate at which the fusion mass will unite under autologous graft conditions. The purpose of this study is to compare the quality and rate of fusion between Accell Evo3 and Grafton demineralized bone matrix (DBM), with the gold standard iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) as the control, in athymic rat posterolateral fusion. This study was a randomized, controlled study in a laboratory setting at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. Blinded observations were made, which created an assessment of outcomes for successful fusions between each method. Forty-eight (48) athymic rats were used in this study and underwent posterolateral lumbar fusion. They were assessed at either 3 weeks or 9 weeks to see the rate and efficacy of fusion. Outcome measures will be the efficacy of the different bone grafts and their success rates of fusion in the rats. A comparison of the quality and rate of fusion between Accell Evo3® (DBM A) and Grafton (DBM B), with the gold standard iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) as the control, was performed using the established posterolateral intertransverse process on an athymic rat model. Materials were evaluated for

  18. Local autogenous bone mixed with bone expander: an optimal option of bone graft in single-segment posterolateral lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Lin, Mou-Zen; Chen, Yen-Jen; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Chen, Hsien-Te

    2008-12-01

    This was a retrospective study of clinical results for single-segment posterolateral lumbar fusion using local autograft bone with bone expander. Sixty-six patients underwent single-segment decompression with instrumented posterolateral fusion. Locally harvested morselized bone from the decompressive site mixed with 2 mL calcium sulfate (OSTEOSET, Wright Medical Technology, Arlington, TN, USA) was used for the fusion at the posterolateral aspect of the lumbar spine. The minimum follow-up period was 15 months. The status of the fusion was evaluated by plain film, flexion-extension view, and fine-cut computed tomography (CT) with coronal reconstruction. Radiographic fusion criteria included less than 5 degrees of angular motion, less than 2 mm of translation, and evidence of bridging bone in the posterolateral lumbar area on the CT scan. The clinical outcome was recorded using VAS score and the ODI. The results were then compared with the result of the other group who had received the same procedure except that a pure autogenous bone graft harvested from the PSIS was used. In the group using local bone and OSTEOSET, the fusion rate was 92.3% by the strict criteria. The VAS scores for leg pain and back pain were decreased in the 2 groups, but there was no significant difference between them. The improvement in the ODI was also similar between the 2 groups. Intraoperative blood loss and the time needed for the operation were significantly decreased in the group using local bone and OSTEOSET as the bone graft. In the group using autogenous bone graft, donor site morbidity was still encountered. Using local laminectomy bone with calcium sulfate as bone graft is a practical option in posterolateral lumbar fusion with the advantages of less operative time, less blood loss, and avoidance of donor site morbidity.

  19. Ovariectomy-Induced Osteoporosis Does Not Impact Fusion Rates in a Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2–Dependent Rat Posterolateral Arthrodesis Model

    PubMed Central

    Ghodasra, Jason H.; Nickoli, Michael S.; Hashmi, Sohaib Z.; Nelson, John T.; Mendoza, Marco; Nicolas, Joseph D.; Bellary, Sharath S.; Sonn, Kevin; Ashtekar, Amruta; Park, Christian J.; Babu, Jacob; Yun, Chawon; Ghosh, Anjan; Kannan, Abhishek; Stock, Stuart R.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Hsu, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Randomized, controlled animal study. Objective Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is frequently utilized as a bone graft substitute in spinal fusions to overcome the difficult healing environment in patients with osteoporosis. However, the effects of estrogen deficiency and poor bone quality on rhBMP-2 efficacy are unknown. This study sought to determine whether rhBMP-2-induced healing is affected by estrogen deficiency and poor bone quality in a stringent osteoporotic posterolateral spinal fusion model. Methods Aged female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent an ovariectomy (OVX group) or a sham procedure, and the OVX animals were fed a low-calcium, low-phytoestrogen diet. After 12 weeks, the animals underwent a posterolateral spinal fusion with 1 μg rhBMP-2 on an absorbable collagen sponge. Representative animals were sacrificed at 1 week postoperative for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin serum analyses. The remaining animals underwent radiographs 2 and 4 weeks after surgery and were subsequently euthanized for fusion analysis by manual palpation, micro–computed tomography (CT) imaging, and histologic analysis. Results The ALP and osteocalcin levels were similar between the control and OVX groups. Manual palpation revealed no significant differences in the fusion scores between the control (1.42 ± 0.50) and OVX groups (1.83 ± 0.36; p = 0.07). Fusion rates were 100% in both groups. Micro-CT imaging revealed no significant difference in the quantity of new bone formation, and histologic analysis demonstrated bridging bone across the transverse processes in fused animals from both groups. Conclusions This study demonstrates that estrogen deficiency and compromised bone quality do not negatively influence spinal fusion when utilizing rhBMP-2, and the osteoinductive capacity of the growth factor is not functionally reduced under osteoporotic conditions in the rat. Although osteoporosis is a risk factor

  20. Comparison of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion in Monosegmental Vacuum Phenomenon within an Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    An, Ki-Chan; Kong, Gyu-Min; Park, Dae-Hyun; Youn, Ji-Hong; Lee, Woon-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of posterolateral lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in monosegmental vacuum phenomenon within an intervertebral disc. Overview of Literature The vacuum phenomenon within an intervertebral disc is a serious form of degenerative disease that destabilizes the intervertebral body. Outcomes of PLIF and PLF in monosegmental vacuum phenomenon are unclear. Methods Monosegmental instrumented PLIF and PLF was performed on 84 degenerative lumbar disease patients with monosegmental vacuum phenomenon (PLIF, n=38; PLF, n=46). Minimum follow-up was 24 months. Clinical outcomes of leg and back pain were assessed using visual analogue scales for leg pain (LVAS) and back pain (BVAS), and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). The radiographic outcome was the estimated bony union rate. Results LVAS, BVAS, and ODI improved in both groups. There was no significant difference in the degree of these improvements between PLIF and PLF patients (p>0.05). Radiological union rate was 91.1% in PLIF group and 89.4% in PLF group at postoperative 24 months (p>0.05). Conclusions No significant differences in clinical results and union rates were found between PLIF and PLF patients. Selection of the operation technique will reflect the surgeon's preferences and patient condition. PMID:26949464

  1. The relationship between serum vitamin D levels and spinal fusion success: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Melodie F; Kanim, Linda E A; Zhao, Li; Robinson, Samuel T; Delamarter, Rick B

    2015-04-15

    An in vivo dosing study of vitamin D in a rat posterolateral spinal fusion model with autogenous bone grafting. Rats randomized to 4 levels of vitamin D-adjusted rat chow, longitudinal serum validation, surgeons/observers blinded to dietary conditions, and rats followed prospectively for fusion endpoint. To assess the impact of dietary and serum levels of vitamin D on fusion success, consolidation of fusion mass, and biomechanical stiffness after posterolateral spinal fusion procedure. Metabolic risk factors, including vitamin D insufficiency, are often overlooked by spine surgeons. Currently, there are no published data on the causal effect of insufficient or deficient vitamin D levels on the success of establishing solid bony union after a spinal fusion procedure. Fifty rats were randomized to 4 experimentally controlled rat chow diets: normal control, vitamin D-deficient, vitamin D-insufficient, and a nontoxic high dose of vitamin D, 4 weeks prior to surgery and maintained postsurgery until sacrifice. Serum levels of 25(OH)D were determined at surgery and sacrifice using radioimmunoassay. Posterolateral fusion surgery with tail autograft was performed. Rats were sacrificed 12 weeks postoperatively, and fusion was evaluated via manual palpation, high-resolution radiographs, micro-computed tomographic scans, and biomechanical testing. Serum 25(OH)D and calcium levels were significantly correlated with vitamin D-adjusted chow (P < 0.001). There was a dose-dependent relationship between vitamin D-adjusted chow and manual palpation fusion, with greatest differences found in measures of radiographical density between high and deficient vitamin D (P < 0.05). Adequate levels of vitamin D (high and normal control) yielded stiffer fusion than inadequate levels (insufficient and deficient) (P < 0.05). Manual palpation fusion rates increased with supplementation of dietary vitamin D. Biomechanical stiffness, bone volume, and density were also positively related to vitamin D

  2. Bone Union Rate Following Instrumented Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion: Comparison between Demineralized Bone Matrix versus Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Woo Dong

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To compare the union rate of posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) using demineralized bone matrix (DBM) versus hydroxyapatite (HA) as bone graft extender. Overview of Literature To our knowledge, there has been no clinical trial to compare the outcomes of DBM versus HA as a graft material for PLF. Methods We analyzed prospectively collected data from consecutive 79 patients who underwent instrumented PLF. Patients who received DBM were assigned to group B (n=38), and patients who received HA were assigned into group C (n=41). The primary study outcome was fusion rate assessed with radiographs. The secondary outcomes included pain intensity using a visual analogue scale, functional outcome using Oswestry disability index score, laboratory tests of inflammatory profiles and infection rate. Results One year postoperatively, bone fusion was achieved in 73% in group B and 58% in group C without significant difference between the groups (p=0.15). There were no differences between the groups with respect to secondary outcomes. Conclusions DBM would provide noninferior outcomes compared to the HA as a fusion material for PLF, and could be a notable alternative. PMID:27994793

  3. Posterolateral surface electrical stimulation of abdominal expiratory muscles to enhance cough in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jane E; Lim, Julianne; Gorman, Robert B; Boswell-Ruys, Claire; Saboisky, Julian P; Lee, Bonsan B; Gandevia, Simon C

    2011-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients have respiratory complications because of abdominal muscle weakness and paralysis, which impair the ability to cough. This study aims to enhance cough in high-level SCI subjects (n = 11, SCI at or above T6) using surface electrical stimulation of the abdominal muscles via 2 pairs of posterolaterally placed electrodes. From total lung capacity, subjects performed maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) efforts against a closed airway and voluntary cough efforts. Both efforts were performed with and without superimposed trains of electrical stimulation (50 Hz, 1 second) at a submaximal intensity set to evoke a gastric pressure (P(ga)) of 40 cm H(2)O at functional residual capacity. In the MEP effort, stimulation increased the maximal P(ga) (from 21.4 ± 7.0 to 59.0 ± 5.7 cm H(2)O) and esophageal pressure (P(es); 47.2 ± 11.7 to 65.6 ± 13.6 cm H(2)O). During the cough efforts, stimulation increased P(ga) (19.5 ± 6.0 to 57.9 ± 7.0 cm H(2)O) and P(es) (31.2 ± 8.7 to 56.6 ± 10.5 cm H(2)O). The increased expiratory pressures during cough efforts with stimulation increased peak expiratory flow (PEF, by 36% ± 5%), mean expiratory flow (by 80% ± 8%), and expired lung volume (by 41% ± 16%). In every subject, superimposed electrical stimulation improved peak expiratory flow during cough efforts (by 0.99 ± 0.12 L/s; range, 0.41-1.80 L/s). Wearing an abdominal binder did not improve stimulated cough flows or pressures. The increases in P(ga) and PEF with electrical stimulation using the novel posterolateral electrode placement are 2 to 3 times greater than improvements reported in other studies. This suggests that posterolateral electrical stimulation of abdominal muscles is a simple noninvasive way to enhance cough in individuals with SCI.

  4. The cost effectiveness of single-level instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion at 5 years after surgery.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Steven D; Polly, David W; Dimar, John R; Carreon, Leah Y

    2012-04-20

    Cost effectiveness analysis for single-level instrumented fusion during a 5-year postoperative interval. To determine the cost/quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for single-level instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion for degenerative lumbar spine conditions during a 5-year period. Cost/QALY has become a standard measure among healthcare economists because it is generic and can be used across medical treatments. Prior studies have reported widely variable estimates of cost/QALY for lumbar spine fusion. This variability may be related to factors including study design, sample population, baseline assumptions, and length of the observation period. To determine QALY, the Short Form 6D (SF-6D), a utility index derived from the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36) was used. Cost analysis was performed based on actual reimbursements from third-party payors, including those for the index surgical procedure, treatment of complications, emergency room outpatient visits, and revision surgery. A second cost analysis using only the contemporaneous Medicare Fee schedule was also performed, in addition to a subanalysis including indirect costs from days off work. The mean SF-6D health utility value showed a gradual increase throughout the follow-up period. The mean health utility value gained in each year postoperatively was 0.12, 0.14, 0.13, 0.15, and 0.15, for a cumulative 0.69 QALY improvement during the 5-year interval. Mean direct medical costs based on actual reimbursements for 5 years after surgery, including the index and revision procedures, was $22,708. The resultant cost per QALY gained at the 5-year postoperative interval was $33,018. The analogous mean direct cost based on Medicare reimbursement for 5 years was $20,669, with a resultant cost per QALY gained of $30,053. The mean total work productivity cost for 5 years was $14,377. The resultant total cost (direct and indirect) per QALY gained ranged from $53,949 to $53,914 at 5 years postoperatively. In

  5. The perioperative cost of Infuse bone graft in posterolateral lumbar spine fusion.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Steven D; Carreon, Leah Y; Campbell, Mitchell J; Johnson, John R; Puno, Rolando M; Djurasovic, Mladen; Dimar, John R

    2008-01-01

    There is mounting evidence supporting the efficacy of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) for both anterior interbody and posterolateral lumbar fusion. However, the relative cost of BMP remains an important concern for physicians, hospitals, and payers. The purpose of this study is to report on the perioperative costs for patients treated with rhBMP-2 as compared with an iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) supplemented with graft extenders. A prospective randomized controlled trial of rhBMP-2/ACS (Infuse Bone Graft; Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) versus ICBG+/-graft extender for lumbar spine fusion in patients over 60 years old. One hundred two patients over 60 years old who required a posterolateral lumbar spine fusion randomized between receiving rhBMP-2/ACS or ICBG. All health-care costs over the first 3 months after surgery. As part of a prospective randomized trial of rhBMP-2/ACS versus ICBG+/-graft extender for lumbar spine fusion, all costs over the first 3 months after surgery were directly recorded by a dedicated coder funded by Norton Healthcare, Louisville, KY. A dedicated research nurse also followed all patients throughout their hospital stay and posthospitalization recovery to identify any adverse events or additional outpatient medical care. Fifty patients received rhBMP-2/ACS and 52 underwent ICBG harvest. The mean hospital cost for the index admission was $24,736 for the rhBMP-2/ACS group and $21,138 for the ICBG group. Mean inpatient physician costs were $5,082 in the rhBMP-2/ACS group and $5,316 in the ICBG group. Costs associated with posthospital rehabilitation averaged $4,906 in the rhBMP-2/ACS group versus $6,820 in the ICBG group. Total payer expenditure for the 3-month perioperative period averaged $33,860 in the rhBMP-2/ACS group and $37,227 in the ICBG group. The hospital carries the cost burden associated with the utilization of rhBMP-2/ACS. In contrast, the payer in a Diagnosis-Related Group (DRG) model achieves a net savings, based

  6. Efficacy of Escherichia coli-derived recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in posterolateral lumbar fusion: an open, active-controlled, randomized, multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Hwan; Lee, Jae Hyup; Yeom, Jin Sup; Chang, Bong-Soon; Yang, Jae Jun; Koo, Ki Hyoung; Hwang, Chang Ju; Lee, Kwang Bok; Kim, Ho-Joong; Lee, Choon-Ki; Kim, Hyoungmin; Suk, Kyung-Soo; Nam, Woo Dong; Han, Jumi

    2017-06-23

    The efficacy and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) as a bone graft substitute in spinal fusion has been widely researched. However, no study of the efficacy and safety of Escherichia coli-derived rhBMP-2 (E.BMP-2) with a hydroxyapatite (HA) carrier has been proposed. This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of fusion materials between E.BMP-2 and autogenous iliac bone graft in posterolateral fusion (PLF). An open, active-controlled, randomized, multicenter trial was carried out. This study included 93 patients who underwent single-level lumbar or lumbosacral PLF. The primary outcome measure was computed tomography (CT)-based fusion rate at 12 and 24 weeks. Secondary outcome measures were fusion grade by radiographs and CT at 12 and 24 weeks and changes in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 (SF-36) Health Survey, and visual analogue scale (VAS). Patients who underwent 1-level PLF (between L1 and S1) for severe spinal stenosis or grade 1 spondylolisthesis were randomized to receive E.BMP-2 with an HA carrier (E.BMP-2 group) or autogenous iliac bone graft (AIBG group). Thin-section CT (<2 mm), VAS, ODI, and SF-36 were obtained pre- and postoperatively at 12 and 24 weeks. Outcome measures were compared between the groups. A total of 100 patients were enrolled in this trial. Among them, 93 patients underwent planned surgery. Preoperative demographic and clinical data showed no difference between groups. CT-based fusion rates were 100.0% (41/41) for the E.BMP-2 group and 90.2% (46/51) for the AIBG group (p=.062) at 12 weeks and 100.0% (41/41) and 94.1% (48/51) (p=.251) at 24 weeks, respectively. Fusion grade based on radiographs and CT showed non-inferiority of the E.BMP-2 group compared with the AIBG group. All clinical parameters improved postoperatively. However, there was no difference in changes in VAS, ODI, or SF-36 between the groups. No serious adverse event related to E.BMP-2 was found. The fusion rate of

  7. Comparison of TLIF with rhBMP-2 versus no TLIF and higher posterolateral rhBMP-2 dose at L5-S1 for long fusions to the sacrum with sacropelvic fixation in patients with primary adult deformity.

    PubMed

    Rahman, RaʼKerry K; Buchowski, Jacob M; Stephens, Bradley; Dorward, Ian G; Koester, Linda A; Bridwell, Keith H

    2013-12-15

    Comparvative case series. Data was prospectively entered and retrospectively analyzed. To evaluate the need for distal lumbar interbody fusion when sufficient recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is used posterolaterally at L5-S1 in long spinal constructs for adult deformity via costs and radiographical and patient-reported outcome comparisons. Many authors and investigators have suggested that an interbody fusion is mandatory at L5-S1 with long fusion to the sacrum with sacropelvic fixation. Past studies have shown competitive fusion rates using rhBMP-2 versus iliac crest bone graft for long fusions. There are various advocates for anterior lumbar interbody fusion versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). The optimal strategy remains elusive. Fifty-seven patients were studied at one institution. Thirty-one patients had no interbody fusion (NI group) with 20 mg of rhBMP-2 posterolaterally on 10 mL of carrier and 26 patients had TLIF at L5-S1 (TLIF group) with 6 mg of rhBMP-2 in the interbody space along with local bone graft and 6 mg of rhBMP-2 on carrier posterolaterally at L5-S1. Patients were followed for 24 to 87 months (mean follow-up, 3.92 yr). Demographics of the 2 groups were similar. There were no detected nonunions at L5-S1 in either group. By our limited cost analysis, the expense of performing a TLIF at L5-S1 is higher than that of using extra rhBMP-2 posterolaterally at that segment. Improvement in outcomes scores, namely Scoliosis Research Society-22 and Oswestry Disability Index, were the same statistically in both groups. Blood loss was greater in the TLIF group than the NI group. There were no identified rhBMP-2 adverse events in either group. Utilization of 20 mg of rhBMP-2 at L5-S1 has the potential to be less expensive than an interbody fusion in most patients having a primary long fusion for adult spinal deformity. The apparent fusion rates at L5-S1 were identical in both

  8. Comparison of three calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes from biomechanical, histological, and crystallographic perspectives using a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Hsien; Lee, Pei-Yuan; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Hu, Jin-Jia

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of three calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes with different chemical compositions on spinal fusion using a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model. Specifically, two recently developed non-dispersive tetracalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous-based calcium phosphate cements (CPCs), namely a CPC consisting of equimolar amounts of the two compounds (nd-CPC) and a CPC consisting of a two-fold greater amount of dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCP-rich CPC), were compared with a commercial calcium phosphate bone graft (c-CPG) consisting of hydroxyapatite (60%) and β-tricalcium phosphate (40%). Single-level posterolateral lumbar fusion was performed at the L4-L5 vertebrae in fifteen adult rats (n=5 for each group). Spinal fusion was evaluated with radiographs, manual palpation, mechanical testing, micro-CT, and histology 8 weeks post-surgery. In particular, the crystallographic phases in the three substitutes were identified before and 8 weeks after their implantation. Manual palpation revealed stable constructs in nearly all of the spine specimens. The stiffness and bending load of fused spines in the two CPC groups were comparable to those in the c-CPG group. The radiographs specifically revealed implant resorption and bone remodeling in the DCP-rich CPC group. Analysis of 3D micro-CT images revealed that the bone volume ratio in the DCP-rich CPC group was significantly greater than those in the nd-CPC and c-CPG groups. Histology showed that the DCP-rich CPC group exhibited the highest degree of bone regeneration and osseointegration. Notably, DCP-rich CPC led to a pronounced phase transformation, generating the greatest amount of poorly crystalline apatite among the three groups, which together with adequate resorption may explain the aforementioned positive findings. We therefore conclude that of the bone graft substitutes considered, DCP-rich CPC has the greatest potential to be used in spinal fusion. Copyright

  9. Clinical outcomes after posterolateral lumbar fusion in workers' compensation patients: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Leah Y; Glassman, Steven D; Kantamneni, Neha R; Mugavin, Mark O; Djurasovic, Mladen

    2010-09-01

    Case-control propensity matched. To compare clinical outcomes after lumbar fusion in patients receiving workers' compensation with a case-matched control group who are not on workers' compensation. Previous studies have demonstrated poor outcomes in patients receiving workers' compensation after lumbar fusion. However, a case-control study where patients are matched for covariates known to affect outcomes after lumbar fusion, including baseline clinical outcome measures, has not been done. From 783 patients who underwent posterolateral fusion with complete preoperative and 2-year postoperative outcome measures, 60 patients who were receiving workers' compensation were identified. Outcome measures included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 (SF-36), and back and leg pain numerical rating scales. Propensity scoring technique was used to match these patients with a control group not receiving workers' compensation using sex, age, smoking status, body mass index, diagnosis, number of levels fused, preoperative ODI, SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS), SF-36 Mental Component Summary, and back and leg pain scores, producing 58 matched pairs. There were no significant differences between the demographics, job classification, and preoperative outcome scores in the two groups. At 2 years after operation, patients not receiving workers' compensation had a significantly greater improvement in ODI (P=0.009) and SF-36 PCS (P=0.007) compared with those receiving workers' compensation. Although patients not receiving workers' compensation had greater improvements in back and leg pain compared with those receiving workers' compensation, this did not reach statistical significance (P=0.079). The mean 2-year ODI, SF-36 PCS, and back pain raw scores of patients receiving workers' compensation were significantly lower than those not receiving workers' compensation. Only 19% of workers' compensation patients achieved minimum clinically important difference in terms

  10. Effect of Freeze-Dried Allograft Bone With Human Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Containing a Collagen-Binding Domain From Clostridium histolyticum Collagenase on Bone Formation After Lumbar Posterolateral Fusion Surgery in Rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Gen; Uchida, Kentaro; Matsushita, Osamu; Fujimaki, Hisako; Saito, Wataru; Miyagi, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Nozomu; Ohtori, Seiji; Yogoro, Mizuki; Takaso, Masashi

    2017-09-01

    An experimental study. To evaluate the effectiveness of freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) fused with the polycystic kidney disease domain (PKD) and the collagen-binding domain (CBD) of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase, for the acceleration of lumbar posterolateral fusion in rats. Reports indicate bFGF is an effective growth factor with osteogenic potential for promoting bone regeneration, although its efficiency decreases rapidly following its diffusion in body fluid from the host site. We developed a bFGF fusion protein containing the PKD and the CBD of C histolyticum collagenase (bFGF-PKD-CBD), which markedly enhanced bone formation at a relatively low concentration when applied to the surface of rat femurs in a previous study. The potential of this novel protein to accelerate bone fusion in a rat model of lumbar posterolateral fusion has yet to be investigated. Bilateral L4-L5 posterolateral fusions were performed, using 150 mg of FDBA powder per side. A total of 20 male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200 to 250 g/each were divided into two groups of 10 rats: FDBA was incubated with either phosphate-buffered saline (control group) or 0.58 nmol bFGF-PKD-CBD (bFGF-PKD-CBD group) before fusion surgery. The effect of bFGF-PKD-CBD was estimated using radiographs, microcomputed tomography, and histology (hematoxylin-eosin and von Kossa staining). Both grafted bone volume in the posterolateral lesion and the volume of new bone formation on the surface of laminae and spinal processes were significantly higher in the bFGF-PKD-CBD group than in the control group. Histologically, new bone formation and surrounding chondrocytes and fibroblasts were prominent in the bFGF-PKD-CBD group. FDBA infused with bFGF-PKD-CBD may be a promising material for accelerating spinal fusion, and the FDBA-based delivery system for localizing bFGF-PKD-CBD may offer novel therapeutic approaches to augment spinal fusion. N/A.

  11. Predictors of outcome after decompressive lumbar surgery and instrumented posterolateral fusion.

    PubMed

    Cobo Soriano, Javier; Sendino Revuelta, Marcos; Fabregate Fuente, Martín; Cimarra Díaz, Ignacio; Martínez Ureña, Paloma; Deglané Meneses, Roberto

    2010-11-01

    There has been no agreement among different authors on guidelines to specify the situations in which arthrodesis is justified in terms of results, risks and complications. The aim of this study was to identify preoperative predictors of outcome after decompressive lumbar surgery and instrumented posterolateral fusion. A prospective observational study design was performed on 203 consecutive patients. Potential preoperative predictors of outcome included sociodemographic factors as well as variables pertaining to the preoperative clinical situation, diagnosis, expectations and surgery. Separate multiple linear regression models were used to assess the association between selected predictors and outcome variables, defined as the improvement after 1 year on the visual analog scale (VAS) for back pain, VAS for leg pain, physical component scores (PCS) of SF-36 and Oswestry disability index (ODI). Follow-up was available for 184 patients (90.6%). Patients with higher educational level and optimistic preoperative expectations had a more favourable postoperative leg pain (VAS) and ODI. Smokers had less leg pain relief. Patients with better mental component score (emotional health) had greater ODI improvement. Less preoperative walking capacity predicted more leg pain relief. Patients with disc herniation had greater relief from back pain and more PCS and ODI improvement. More severe lumbar pain was predictive of less improvement on ODI and PCS. Age, sex, body mass index, analgesic use, surgeon, self-rated health, the number of decompressed levels and the length of fusion had no association with outcome. This study concludes that a higher educational level, optimistic expectations for improvement, the diagnosis of "disc herniation", less walking capacity and good emotional health may significantly improve clinical outcome. Smoking and more severe lumbar pain are predictors of worse results.

  12. Predictors of outcome after decompressive lumbar surgery and instrumented posterolateral fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sendino Revuelta, Marcos; Cimarra Díaz, Ignacio; Martínez Ureña, Paloma; Deglané Meneses, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    There has been no agreement among different authors on guidelines to specify the situations in which arthrodesis is justified in terms of results, risks and complications. The aim of this study was to identify preoperative predictors of outcome after decompressive lumbar surgery and instrumented posterolateral fusion. A prospective observational study design was performed on 203 consecutive patients. Potential preoperative predictors of outcome included sociodemographic factors as well as variables pertaining to the preoperative clinical situation, diagnosis, expectations and surgery. Separate multiple linear regression models were used to assess the association between selected predictors and outcome variables, defined as the improvement after 1 year on the visual analog scale (VAS) for back pain, VAS for leg pain, physical component scores (PCS) of SF-36 and Oswestry disability index (ODI). Follow-up was available for 184 patients (90.6%). Patients with higher educational level and optimistic preoperative expectations had a more favourable postoperative leg pain (VAS) and ODI. Smokers had less leg pain relief. Patients with better mental component score (emotional health) had greater ODI improvement. Less preoperative walking capacity predicted more leg pain relief. Patients with disc herniation had greater relief from back pain and more PCS and ODI improvement. More severe lumbar pain was predictive of less improvement on ODI and PCS. Age, sex, body mass index, analgesic use, surgeon, self-rated health, the number of decompressed levels and the length of fusion had no association with outcome. This study concludes that a higher educational level, optimistic expectations for improvement, the diagnosis of “disc herniation”, less walking capacity and good emotional health may significantly improve clinical outcome. Smoking and more severe lumbar pain are predictors of worse results. PMID:20135333

  13. Fusion mass bone quality after uninstrumented spinal fusion in older patients.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Thomas; Christensen, Finn B; Langdahl, Bente L; Ernst, Carsten; Fruensgaard, Søren; Ostergaard, Jørgen; Andersen, Jens Langer; Rasmussen, Sten; Niedermann, Bent; Høy, Kristian; Helmig, Peter; Holm, Randi; Lindblad, Bent Erling; Hansen, Ebbe Stender; Egund, Niels; Bünger, Cody

    2010-12-01

    Older people are at increased risk of non-union after spinal fusion, but little is known about the factors determining the quality of the fusion mass in this patient group. The aim of this study was to investigate fusion mass bone quality after uninstrumented spinal fusion and to evaluate if it could be improved by additional direct current (DC) electrical stimulation. A multicenter RCT compared 40 and 100 μA DC stimulation with a control group of uninstrumented posterolateral fusion in patients older than 60 years. This report comprised 80 patients who underwent DEXA scanning at the 1 year follow-up. The study population consisted of 29 men with a mean age of 72 years (range 62-85) and 51 women with a mean age of 72 years (range 61-84). All patients underwent DEXA scanning of their fusion mass. Fusion rate was assessed at the 2 year follow-up using thin slice CT scanning. DC electrical stimulation did not improve fusion mass bone quality. Smokers had lower fusion mass BMD (0.447 g/cm(2)) compared to non-smokers (0.517 g/cm(2)) (P = 0.086). Women had lower fusion mass BMD (0.460 g/cm(2)) compared to men (0.552 g/cm(2)) (P = 0.057). Using linear regression, fusion mass bone quality, measured as BMD, was significantly influenced by gender, age of the patient, bone density of the remaining part of the lumbar spine, amount of bone graft applied and smoking. Fusion rates in this cohort was 34% in the control group and 33 and 43% in the 40 and 100 μA groups, respectively (not significant). Patients classified as fused after 2 years had significant higher fusion mass BMD at 1 year (0.592 vs. 0.466 g/cm(2), P = 0.0001). Fusion mass bone quality in older patients depends on several factors. Special attention should be given to women with manifest or borderline osteoporosis. Furthermore, bone graft materials with inductive potential might be considered for this patient population.

  14. Complications of rhBMP-2 utilization for posterolateral lumbar fusions requiring reoperation: a single practice, retrospective case series report.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Martin F; Jones, Clifford B; Sietsema, Debra L

    2013-10-01

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) (INFUSE, Medtronic, Memphis, TN, USA) has been used off-label for posterolateral lumbar fusions for many years. The goal of this study was to evaluate the complications requiring reoperation associated with rhBMP-2 application for posterolateral lumbar fusions. During a 7-year period of time (2002-2009), all patients undergoing lumbar posterolateral fusion using rhBMP-2 (INFUSE) were retrospectively evaluated within a large orthopedic surgery private practice. A total of 1,158 consecutive patients were evaluated with 468 (40.4%) males and 690 (59.6%) females. Complications related to rhBMP were defined as reoperation secondary to symptomatic failed fusion (nonunion), symptomatic seroma formation, symptomatic reformation of foraminal bone, and infection. Inclusion criteria were posterolateral fusion with rhBMP-2 implant and age equal to or older than 18 years. Surgical indications and treatment were performed in accordance with the surgeon's best knowledge, discretion, and experience. Patients consented to lumbar decompression and arthrodesis using rhBMP-2. All patients were educated and informed of the off-label utilization of rhBMP-2. Patient follow-up was performed at regular intervals of 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and later if required or indicated. Average age was 59.2 years, and body mass index was 30.7 kg/m². Numbers of levels fused were 1 (414, 35.8%), 2 (469, 40.5%), 3 (162, 14.0%), 4 (70, 6.0%), 5 (19, 1.6%), 6 (11, 0.9%), 7 (7, 0.6%), 8 (4, 0.3%), and 9 (2, 0.2%). Patients having complications requiring reoperation were 117 of 1,158 (10.1%): symptomatic nonunion requiring redo fusion and instrumentation 41 (3.5%), seroma with acute neural compression 32 (2.8%), excess bone formation with delayed neural compression 4 (0.3%), and infection requiring debridement 26 (2.2%). Nonunion was related to male sex and previous BMP exposure. Seroma formation was significantly higher in

  15. Sagittal spinal balance after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support results from a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year radiographic follow-up.

    PubMed

    Videbaek, Tina S; Bünger, Cody E; Henriksen, Mads; Neils, Egund; Christensen, Finn B

    2011-02-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To analyze the long-term clinical impact of anterior column support on sagittal balance after lumbar spinal fusion. Several investigators have stressed the importance of maintaining sagittal balance in relation to spinal fusion to avoid lumbar 'flat back,' accelerated adjacent segment degeneration, pain, and inferior functional outcome. Only limited evidence exists on how sagittal alignment affects clinical outcome. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. No randomized controlled trial has been published analyzing the effect of anterior support on radiographic measurements of sagittal balance. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for posterolateral lumbar fusion plus anterior support (PLF + ALIF) or posterolateral lumbar fusion. A total of 92 patients participated. Sagittal balance parameters were examined on full lateral radiographs of the spine: pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and positioning of C7 plumb line. The type of lumbar lordosis was evaluated and outcome assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Follow-up rate was 74%. Sagittal balance parameters were similar between randomization groups. None of the parameters differed significantly between patients with an ODI from 0 to 40 and patients with ODI over 40. Balanced patients had a significantly superior outcome as measured by ODI (P < 0.05) compared with unbalanced patients. No difference in the investigated sagittal balance parameters was seen between patients treated with PLF + ALIF or posterolateral fusion alone. Lumbar lordosis and type of lordosis correlated with outcome but could not explain the superior outcome in the group with anterior support. Whether sagittal balance and anterior support during fusion provide a protective effect

  16. rhBMP-2 (ACS and CRM formulations) overcomes pseudarthrosis in a New Zealand white rabbit posterolateral fusion model.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, James P; Waked, Walid; Gillon, Thomas J; White, Andrew P; Spock, Christopher R; Biswas, Debdut; Rosenberger, Patricia; Troiano, Nancy; Albert, Todd J; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2007-05-15

    The study design consisted of a New Zealand white rabbit model of pseudarthrosis repair. Study groups consisting of no graft, autograft, or recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) with absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) or compression resistant matrix (CRM) were evaluated. To evaluate the relative efficacy of bone graft materials (autograft, ACS, and CRM). rhBMP-2 has been shown to have a 100% fusion rate in a primary rabbit fusion model, even in the presence of nicotine, which is known to inhibit fusion. Seventy-two New Zealand white rabbits underwent posterolateral lumbar fusion with iliac crest autograft. To establish pseudarthroses, nicotine was administered to all animals. At 5 weeks, the spines were explored and all pseudarthroses were redecorticated and implanted with no graft, autograft, rhBMP-2/ACS, or rhBMP-2/CRM. At 10 weeks, fusions were assessed by manual palpation and histology. Eight rabbits (11%) were lost to complications. At 5 weeks, 66 (97%) had pseudarthroses. At 10 weeks, attempted pseudarthrosis repairs were fused in 1 of 16 of no graft rabbits (6%), 5 of 17 autograft rabbits (29%), and 31 of 31 rhBMP-2 rabbits (with ACS or CRM) (100%). Histologic analysis demonstrated more mature bone formation in the rhBMP-2 groups. The 2 rhBMP-2 formulations led to significantly higher fusion rates and histologic bone formation than no graft and autograft controls in this pseudarthrosis repair model.

  17. [Non fusion techniques in spinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Schizas, C; Duff, J M; Tessitore, E; Faundez, A

    2009-12-16

    In order to prevent adjacent segment degeneration following spinal fusion new techniques are being used. Lumbar disc arthroplasty yields mid term results equivalent to those of spinal fusion. Cervical disc arthroplasty is indicated in the treatment of cervicobrachialgia with encouraging initial results. The ability of arthroplasty to prevent adjacent segment degeneration has yet to be proven. Although dynamic stabilization had not been proven effective in treating chronic low back pain, it might be useful following decompression of lumbar spinal stenosis in degenerative spondylolisthesis. Interspinal devices are useful in mild lumbar spinal stenosis but their efficacy in treating low back pain is yet to be proven. Confronted with a growing number of new technologies clinicians should remain critical while awaiting long term results.

  18. Modeled cost-effectiveness of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion compared with posterolateral fusion for spondylolisthesis using N(2)QOD data.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Leah Y; Glassman, Steven D; Ghogawala, Zoher; Mummaneni, Praveen V; McGirt, Matthew J; Asher, Anthony L

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) has become the most commonly used fusion technique for lumbar degenerative disorders. This suggests an expectation of better clinical outcomes with this technique, but this has not been validated consistently. How surgical variables and choice of health utility measures drive the cost-effectiveness of TLIF relative to posterolateral fusion (PSF) has not been established. The authors used health utility values derived from Short Form-6D (SF-6D) and EQ-5D and different cost-effectiveness thresholds to evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of TLIF compared with PSF. METHODS From the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N(2)QOD), 101 patients with spondylolisthesis who underwent PSF were propensity matched to patients who underwent TLIF. Health-related quality of life measures and perioperative parameters were compared. Because health utility values derived from the SF-6D and EQ-5D questionnaires have been shown to vary in patients with low-back pain, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were derived from both measures. On the basis of these matched cases, a sensitivity analysis for the relative cost per QALY of TLIF versus PSF was performed in a series of cost-assumption models. RESULTS Operative time, blood loss, hospital stay, and 30-day and 90-day readmission rates were similar for the TLIF and PSF groups. Both TLIF and PSF significantly improved back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, and EQ-5D and SF-6D scores at 3 and 12 months postoperatively. At 12 months postoperatively, patients who had undergone TLIF had greater improvements in mean ODI scores (30.4 vs 21.1, p = 0.001) and mean SF-6D scores (0.16 vs 0.11, p = 0.001) but similar improvements in mean EQ-5D scores (0.25 vs 0.22, p = 0.415) as patients treated with PSF. At a cost per QALY threshold of $100,000 and using SF-6D-based QALYs, the authors found that TLIF would be cost-prohibitive compared with PSF at a

  19. Freeze-Dried Platelet-Rich Plasma Accelerates Bone Union with Adequate Rigidity in Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion Surgery Model in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Yasuhiro; Orita, Sumihisa; Kubota, Go; Kamoda, Hiroto; Yamashita, Masaomi; Matsuura, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Suzuki, Miyako; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Inoue, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Toyone, Tomoaki; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Fresh platelet-rich plasma (PRP) accelerates bone union in rat model. However, fresh PRP has a short half-life. We suggested freeze-dried PRP (FD-PRP) prepared in advance and investigated its efficacy in vivo. Spinal posterolateral fusion was performed on 8-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats divided into six groups based on the graft materials (n = 10 per group): sham control, artificial bone (A hydroxyapatite–collagen composite) –alone, autologous bone, artificial bone + fresh-PRP, artificial bone + FD-PRP preserved 8 weeks, and artificial bone + human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP) as a positive control. At 4 and 8 weeks after the surgery, we investigated their bone union–related characteristics including amount of bone formation, histological characteristics of trabecular bone at remodeling site, and biomechanical strength on 3-point bending. Comparable radiological bone union was confirmed at 4 weeks after surgery in 80% of the FD-PRP groups, which was earlier than in other groups (p < 0.05). Histologically, the trabecular bone had thinner and more branches in the FD-PRP. Moreover, the biomechanical strength was comparable to that of autologous bone. FD-PRP accelerated bone union at a rate comparable to that of fresh PRP and BMP by remodeling the bone with thinner, more tangled, and rigid trabecular bone. PMID:27833116

  20. Freeze-Dried Platelet-Rich Plasma Accelerates Bone Union with Adequate Rigidity in Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion Surgery Model in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiga, Yasuhiro; Orita, Sumihisa; Kubota, Go; Kamoda, Hiroto; Yamashita, Masaomi; Matsuura, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Suzuki, Miyako; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Inoue, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Toyone, Tomoaki; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-11-01

    Fresh platelet-rich plasma (PRP) accelerates bone union in rat model. However, fresh PRP has a short half-life. We suggested freeze-dried PRP (FD-PRP) prepared in advance and investigated its efficacy in vivo. Spinal posterolateral fusion was performed on 8-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats divided into six groups based on the graft materials (n = 10 per group): sham control, artificial bone (A hydroxyapatite-collagen composite) -alone, autologous bone, artificial bone + fresh-PRP, artificial bone + FD-PRP preserved 8 weeks, and artificial bone + human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP) as a positive control. At 4 and 8 weeks after the surgery, we investigated their bone union-related characteristics including amount of bone formation, histological characteristics of trabecular bone at remodeling site, and biomechanical strength on 3-point bending. Comparable radiological bone union was confirmed at 4 weeks after surgery in 80% of the FD-PRP groups, which was earlier than in other groups (p < 0.05). Histologically, the trabecular bone had thinner and more branches in the FD-PRP. Moreover, the biomechanical strength was comparable to that of autologous bone. FD-PRP accelerated bone union at a rate comparable to that of fresh PRP and BMP by remodeling the bone with thinner, more tangled, and rigid trabecular bone.

  1. Formation of painful seroma and edema after the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in posterolateral lumbar spine fusions.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Mark P; Kakarla, Udaya K; Porter, Randall W; Sonntag, Volker K H

    2010-06-01

    The use of bone morphogenetic proteins for fusion augmentation in spine surgery has increased dramatically in recent years. Information is continually emerging regarding the effectiveness and safety profile of these compounds. We have noted an increased incidence in sterile seroma formation and painful edema after the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) for posterolateral lumbar fusion. We present a retrospective review to determine the incidence of seroma formation and to discuss its clinical implications. We retrospectively reviewed the operative reports of patients who underwent posterolateral lumbar fusion with the addition of rhBMP-2. We identified all patients who required surgical exploration of a postoperative sterile seroma. Of the 130 patients who underwent posterolateral lumbar fusion with rhBMP-2, 6 (4.6%) were returned to the operating room for exploration of a sterile seroma. The total amount of rhBMP-2 delivered to the posterolateral space per patient was 2.1 to 14.7 mg (mean, 8.4 mg per patient). The patients were returned to the operating room 5 to 13 days (mean, 7.7 days) after their initial surgery, and infection was ruled out in all cases by intraoperative cultures. There seems to be an increased incidence of formation of sterile seroma and painful edema in the lumbar region after posterolateral fusion with rhBMP-2. This report, along with other series highlighting the potential complications of bone morphogenetic proteins, suggests that more caution should be used when these compounds are used. Further studies are required to better define the risks and benefits of using bone morphogenetic proteins for spine surgery.

  2. One, two-, and three-level instrumented posterolateral fusion of the lumbar spine with a local bone graft: a prospective study with a 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Inage, Kazuhide; Ohtori, Seiji; Koshi, Takana; Suzuki, Munetaka; Takaso, Masashi; Yamashita, Masaomi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Arai, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Takane; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2011-08-01

    Prospective trial. To examine the difference in bone union and clinical results after one-, two-, and three-level instrumented posterolateral fusion surgery using a local bone graft. The iliac crest bone graft technique for lumbar posterolateral fusion surgery is widely used; however, donor site problems such as pain and sensory disturbance have been reported. Local bone has been used for fusion surgery; however, its reliability as a graft for multiple segments has not been fully reported. One hundred twenty-two patients diagnosed with degenerated spondylolisthesis were divided into three groups [spondylolisthesis at 1 level (n = 42), at 2 levels (n = 40), and at 3 levels (n = 40)]. All patients underwent decompression and instrumented posterolateral fusion with a local bone graft. The amount of bone graft, proportion of patients with (rate) and duration of bone union, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score, Japanese Orthopedic Association Score (JOAS), and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were evaluated before and 2 years after therapy. VAS score, JOA score, and ODI were not significantly different among the three groups before and after surgery (P > 0.05). Average amount of local bone graft used for one segment significantly decreased in proportion to the number of fusion levels (P < 0.05). The rate of bone union was 88% in the one-level group, 85% in the two-level group, and 62.5% in the three-level group, which was significantly lower than that in the one- and two-level groups (P < 0.05). If one- and two-level posterolateral fusion were performed, the local bone graft technique provides a good and uniform bone union rate; however, for three-level fusion poor results were obtained because of an insufficient amount of local bone.

  3. Posterolateral instrumented fusion with and without transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis: A randomized clinical trial with 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Etemadifar, Mohammad Reza; Hadi, Abdollah; Masouleh, Mehran Feizi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spondylolisthesis is a common cause of surgery in patients with lower back pain. Although posterolateral fusion and pedicle screw fixation are a relatively common treatment method for the treatment of spondylolisthesis, controversy exists about the necessity of adding interbody fusion to posterolateral fusion. The aim of our study was to assess the functional disability, pain, and complications in patients with spondylolisthesis treated by posterolateral instrumented fusion (PLF) with and without transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in a randomized clinical trial. Materials and Methods: From February 2007 to February 2011, 50 adult patients with spondylolisthesis were randomly assigned to be treated with PLF or PLF+TLIF techniques (25 patients in each group) by a single surgeon. Back pain, leg pain, and disability were assessed before treatment and until 2 years after surgical treatment using visual analog scale (VAS) and oswestry disability index (ODI). Patients were also evaluated for postoperative complications such as infection, neurological complications, and instrument failure. Results: All patients completed the 24 months of follow-up. Twenty patients were females and 30 were males. Average age of the patients was 53 ± 11 years for the PLF group and 51 ± 13 for the PLF + TLIF group. Back pain, leg pain, and disability score were significantly improved postoperatively compared to preoperative scores (P < 0.001). At 3 months of follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference in VAS score for back pain and leg pain in both groups; however, after 6 months and 1 year and 2 years follow-up, the reported scores for back pain and leg pain were significantly lower in the PLF+TLIF group (P < 0.05). The ODI score was also significantly lower in the PLF+TLIF group at 1 year and 2 years of follow-up (P < 0.05). One screw breakage and one superficial infection occurred in the PLF+TLIF group, which had no statistical significance (P = 0

  4. Enhancement of posterolateral lumbar spine fusion using recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 and mesenchymal stem cells delivered in fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zunpeng; Zhu, Yue; Zhu, Haitao; He, Xiaoning; Liu, Xinchun

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have shown great potential for accelerating bone healing. In the present study, we evaluate the efficacy of fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 composite for posterolateral spinal fusion in a rabbit model. Forty adult rabbits underwent posterolateral intertransverse fusion at the L5-L6 level. The animals were randomly divided into four groups based on the implant material: fibrin glue, fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells composite, fibrin glue-recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (fibrin glue/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2) composite, and fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 composite. After six weeks, the rabbits were euthanized for manual palpation, radiographic examination, biomechanical testing, and histology. Manual palpation results showed that the fusion rate for fibrin glue, fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells, fibrin glue/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2, and fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 was 0, 0, 40%, and 70%, respectively. Moreover, fusion rate determined by radiographic examination for fibrin glue, fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells, fibrin glue/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2, and fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 was 0, 0, 40%, and 80%, respectively. Gray analysis showed that fibrin glue/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 group had higher ossification area and density than fibrin glue group; and fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 group had higher ossification area and density than fibrin glue/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 group. Formation of continuous bone masses between L5 and L6 level in mesenchymal stem cells/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2/fibrin glue group was further confirmed by computed

  5. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion. A follow-up study in 136 consecutive patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel; Bünger, Cody

    2006-01-01

    Although cost-effectiveness is becoming the foremost evaluative criterion within health service management of spine surgery, scientific knowledge about cost-patterns and cost-effectiveness is limited. The aims of this study were (1) to establish an activity-based method for costing at the patient-level, (2) to investigate the correlation between costs and effects, (3) to investigate the influence of selected patient characteristics on cost-effectiveness and, (4) to investigate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of (a) posterior instrumentation and (b) intervertebral anterior support in lumbar spinal fusion. We hypothesized a positive correlation between costs and effects, that determinants of effects would also determine cost-effectiveness, and that posterolateral instrumentation and anterior intervertebral support are cost-effective adjuncts in posterolateral lumbar fusion. A cohort of 136 consecutive patients with chronic low back pain, who were surgically treated from January 2001 through January 2003, was followed until 2 years postoperatively. Operations took place at University Hospital of Aarhus and all patients had either (1) non-instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, (2) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, or (3) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support. Analysis of costs was performed at the patient-level, from an administrator’s perspective, by means of Activity-Based-Costing. Clinical effects were measured by means of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire and the Low Back Pain Rating Scale at baseline and 2 years postoperatively. Regression models were used to reveal determinants for costs and effects. Costs and effects were analyzed as a net-benefit measure to reveal determinants for cost-effectiveness, and finally, adjusted analysis (for non-random allocation of patients) was performed in order to reveal the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of (a) posterior instrumentation and

  6. Posterior spinal fusion using pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Athanasakopoulos, Michael; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Triantafyllopoulos, George; Koufos, Spiros; Pneumaticos, Spiros G

    2013-07-01

    Few clinical studies have reported polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rod pedicle screw spinal instrumentation systems (CD-Horizon Legacy PEEK rods; Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota). This article describes a clinical series of 52 patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion using the PEEK Rod System between 2007 and 2010. Of the 52 patients, 25 had degenerative disk disease, 10 had lateral recess stenosis, 6 had degenerative spondylolisthesis, 6 had lumbar spine vertebral fracture, 4 had combined lateral recess stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis, and 1 had an L5 giant cell tumor. Ten patients had 1-segment fusion, 29 had 2-segment fusion, and 13 had 3-segment fusion. Mean follow-up was 3 years (range, 1.5-4 years); no patient was lost to follow-up. Clinical evaluation was performed using the Oswestry Disability Index and a low back and leg visual analog pain scale. Imaging evaluation of fusion was performed with standard and dynamic radiographs. Complications were recorded. Mean Oswestry Disability Index scores improved from 76% preoperatively (range, 52%-90%) to 48% at 6 weeks postoperatively, and to 34%, 28%, and 30% at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, respectively. Mean low back and leg pain improved from 8 and 9 points preoperatively, respectively, to 6 and 5 points immediately postoperatively, respectively, and to 2 points each thereafter. Imaging union of the arthrodesis was observed in 50 (96%) patients by 1-year follow-up. Two patients sustained screw breakage: 1 had painful loss of sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine and underwent revision spinal surgery with pedicle screws and titanium rods and the other had superficial wound infection and was treated with wound dressing changes and antibiotics for 6 weeks. No adjacent segment degeneration was observed in any patient until the time of this writing. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Autograft versus Allograft for Cervical Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Brodke, Darrel S.; Youssef, Jim A.; Meisel, Hans-Jörg; Dettori, Joseph R.; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S. Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objective To compare the effectiveness and safety between iliac crest bone graft (ICBG), non-ICBG autologous bone, and allograft in cervical spine fusion. To avoid problems at the donor site, various allograft materials have been used as a substitute for autograft. However, there are still questions as to the comparative effectiveness and safety of cadaver allograft compared with autologous ICBG. Methods A systematic search of multiple major medical reference databases was conducted to identify studies evaluating spinal fusion in patients with cervical degenerative disk disease using ICBG compared with non-ICBG autograft or allograft or non-ICBG autograft compared with allograft in the cervical spine. Radiographic fusion, patient-reported outcomes, and functional outcomes were the primary outcomes of interest. Adverse events were evaluated for safety. Results The search identified 13 comparative studies that met our inclusion criteria: 2 prospective cohort studies and 11 retrospective cohort studies. Twelve cohort studies compared allograft with ICBG autograft during anterior cervical fusion and demonstrated with a low evidence level of support that there are no differences in fusion percentages, pain scores, or functional results. There was insufficient evidence comparing patients receiving allograft with non-ICBG autograft for fusion, pain, revision, and functional and safety outcomes. No publications directly comparing non-ICBG autograft with ICBG were found. Conclusion Although the available literature suggests ICBG and allograft may have similar effectiveness in terms of fusion rates, pain scores, and functional outcomes following anterior cervical fusion, there are too many limitations in the available literature to draw any significant conclusions. No individual study provided greater than class III evidence, and when evaluating the overall body of literature, no conclusion had better than low evidence support. A prospective

  8. Effect of Oxy133, an osteogenic oxysterol, on new bone formation in rat two-level posterolateral fusion model.

    PubMed

    Buser, Zorica; Drapeau, Susan; Stappenbeck, Frank; Pereira, Renata C; Parhami, Farhad; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2017-05-25

    The aim of our study was to determine the effect of Oxy133 and rhBMP2 on fusion rates and new bone formation in a rat posterolateral fusion (PLF) model. Furthermore, we examined whether Oxy133 could inhibit the adipogenesis that is often present in rhBMP2-induced fusions. Sixty-four male Lewis rats underwent two levels PLF (L3-L5). All animals were randomly divided into eight groups based on the test compound that they received: control (DMSO), low-dose rhBMP2 (0.5 µg), high-dose rhBMP2 (5 µg), low-dose Oxy133 (5 mg), high-dose Oxy133 (20 mg), low rhBMP2 + high Oxy133, high rhBMP2 + high Oxy133, and low rhBMP2 + low Oxy133. Fusion rates were assessed 8 weeks after surgery with manual palpation and plain radiographs. Bone parameters were measured using microCT. Histology was used to evaluate adipogenesis. No fusion was observed in the control group. Based on the manual palpation, 100% fusion was observed in all other groups except in the low-dose rhBMP2 group (69%). At 8 weeks based on X-rays, 100% fusion was observed in the following groups: high-dose rhBMP2, low-dose Oxy133, and low rhBMP2 + low Oxy133. In the other groups, the fusion rates were between 95 and 97%, except for the low rhBMP2 group (72%). We observed similar values in BV/TV ratio at L3-4 when Oxy133 groups were compared to rhBMP2 groups alone (44.62% in high-dose Oxy133 vs. 41.47% in high-dose rhBMP2 and 47.18% in low-dose Oxy133 vs. 54.98% in low-dose rhBMP2). Trabecular thickness was slightly lower in Oxy133 groups compared to rhBMP2 when comparing low- and high-dose groups from each group (118.44 µm for high-dose Oxy133 vs. 122.39 µm for high-dose rhBMP2 and 123.51 µm for low-dose Oxy133 vs. 135.74 µm for low-dose rhBMP2). At the same time, trabecular separation was lower in Oxy133 groups compared to rhBMP2 groups. Similar trends in bone parameters were observed at the L4-5 levels. Fusion masses with low- and high-dose Oxy133 had significantly less adipocytes than rhBMP2

  9. Effectiveness of Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion Varies with the Physical Properties of Demineralized Bone Matrix Strip

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hee; Park, Ji-Hun; Johnstone, Brian; Yoo, Jung-U

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A randomized, controlled animal study. Purpose To investigate the effectiveness of fusion and new bone formation induced by demineralized bone matrix (DBM) strips with jelly strengths. Overview of Literature The form of the DBM can make a difference to the outcome. The effect of different jelly strengths on the ability of DBM to form new bone is not known. Methods Forty-eight rabbits were randomized into a control group and two experimental groups. In the control group (group 1), 1.4 g of autologous iliac crest bone was placed bilaterally. In the experimental groups, a high jelly strength DBM-hyaluronic acid (HA)-gelatin strip (group 2) and a low jelly strength DBM-HA-gelatin strip (group 3) were used. The fusion was assessed with manual manipulation and radiographs. The volume of the fusion mass was determined from computed tomographic images. Results The fusion rates as determined by manual palpation were 37.5%, 93.8% and 50.0% in group 1, group 2, and group 3, respectively (p<0.05). By radiography, the fusion rate of High jelly strength DBM strip was statistically significantly greater than that of the other alternatives (p<0.05). The mean bone volume of the fusion mass as determined by computed tomography was 2,142.2±318.5 mm3, 3,132.9±632.1 mm3, and 2,741.5±380.4 mm3 in group 1, group 2, and group 3, respectively (p<0.05). Conclusions These results indicate that differences in the structural and mechanical properties of gelatin that are associated with jelly strength influenced cellular responses such as cell viability and bony tissue ingrowth, facilitating greater bone fusion around high jelly strength implants. PMID:26097660

  10. Outcomes of bone morphogenetic protein-2 in mature adults: posterolateral non-instrument-assisted lumbar decompression and fusion.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D Kojo; Jones-Quaidoo, Sean M; Sansur, Charles; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Oskouian, Rod; Jane, John A

    2008-05-01

    Bone morphogenic protein products enable lumber spine fusion. Few outcome studies have been performed to evaluate function and pain relief after posterior lumber decompression for degenerative disease, and few studies have provided detailed results of posterior lumbar fusion in elderly patients. This retrospective analysis presents a comprehensive examination of spinal fusion, functional outcomes, and pain relief in a growing elderly population in which a BMP was used. Fifty-five patients, 25 men and 30 women (moderately disabled to bedridden), with both mean and median ages of 68 years, underwent surgery for symptoms of lumbar degenerative disease between August 2003 and June 2004. Surgery involved multilevel lumbar total laminectomies with medial facetectomies and posterior lateral fusion, which was performed using INFUSE Bone Graft (Medtronic Sofamor Dane K. Inc, Minneapolis, MN) with recombinant human BMP-2 as the active ingredient. Forty-seven patients (22 men and 25 women) were available for follow-up and participated in this study. Of these 47 patients, the average number of levels decompressed and fused was 2. Thirteen patients had 1 level, 18 patients with 2 levels, 15 patients with 3 levels, and 1 patient with 4 levels. An analysis of fusion was performed using computed tomography beginning at an average of 6 months (range, 3-36 months) postsurgery. At an average of 34 months (range, 29-36 months) of follow-up, 2 questionnaires--the Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire and the SF-12 Health Survey--were completed by the patient. Long-term follow-up indicates that more than 85% of patients exhibited high functioning ability and had improved index scores and pain relief. Patients with improved pain and function scores also had better than average health status. In addition, grading the patients' fusion rates with the Lenke fusion scale [J Spinal Disord 5(4) (1992) 433-442] showed an 80% fusion (Lenke Grades A and B) rate. The use of rh

  11. Impact of iliac crest bone graft harvesting on fusion rates and postoperative pain during instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllopoulos, Dimitrios; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Stafylas, Kosmas

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the influence of bone harvesting on postoperative pain and fusion rates. Group 1 patients received iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) either alone or augmented with local bone. Group 2 received only local bone. No statistical significance was found in radiological union or in the Oswestry Disability Index scores. Visual Analogue Scale scores showed less pain in group 2. Logistic regression showed no correlation between residual pain and occurrence of fusion. Harvesting ICBG did not appear to increase fusion rates and no relation was found between radiological non-union and pain. PMID:17724591

  12. Biomaterials and Bioactive Agents in Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Rui M; Varanda, Pedro; Reis, Rui L; Duarte, Ana Rita C; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2017-06-28

    Management of degenerative spine pathologies frequently leads to the need for spinal fusion (SF), where bone growth is induced toward stabilization of the interventioned spine. Autologous bone graft (ABG) remains the gold-standard inducer, whereas new bone graft substitutes attempt to achieve effective de novo bone formation and solid fusion. Limited fusion outcomes have driven motivation for more sophisticated and multidisciplinary solutions, involving new biomaterials and/or biologics, through innovative delivery platforms. The present review will analyze the most recent body of literature that is focused on new approaches for consistent bone fusion of spinal vertebrae, including the development of new biomaterials that pursue physical and chemical aptitudes; the delivery of growth factors (GF) to accelerate new bone formation; and the use of cells to improve functional bone development. Bone graft substitutes currently in clinical practice, such as demineralized bone matrix and ceramics, are still used as a starting point for the study of new bioactive agents. Polyesters such as polycaprolactone and polylactic acid arise as platforms for the development of composites, where a mineral element and cell/GF constitute the delivery system. Exciting fusion outcomes were obtained in several small and large animal models with these. On what regards bioactive agents, mesenchymal stem cells, preferentially derived from the bone marrow or adipose tissue, were studied in this context. Autologous and allogeneic approaches, as well as osteogenically differentiated cells, have been tested. These cell sources have further been genetically engineered for specific GF expression. Nevertheless, results on fusion efficacy with cells have been inconsistent. On the other hand, the delivery of GF (most commonly bone morphogenetic protein-2 [BMP-2]) has provided favorable outcomes. Complications related to burst release and dosing are still the target of research through the development

  13. The fusion rate of calcium sulfate with local autograft bone compared with autologous iliac bone graft for instrumented short-segment spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Jer; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Chen, Lih-Huei; Niu, Chi-Chien; Lai, Po-Liang; Fu, Tsai-Sheng; McCarthy, Kevin

    2005-10-15

    A prospective study. To compare the efficacy of calcium sulfate pellets plus laminectomy bone chips with a fresh autologous iliac bone graft for short-segment lumbar fusion. Bone graft substitute material can be used to expand an existing quantity of available laminectomy bone chips. Seventy-four patients underwent surgery for instrumented one- or two-segment fusion with decompression. Autologous iliac crest bone graft was placed in one posterolateral gutter, while on the other side, an equal quantity of autogenous laminectomy bone supplemented with calcium sulfate was placed. Radiographic assessment included radiographs alone; this was performed every 3 months (3 months to 12 months), then annually. The status of fusion and the relative size of the fusion bone mass on either side of the vertebra were compared. Using iliac crest bone graft (control side) versus autograft laminectomy bone with calcium sulfate (test side), there was no significant difference between the fusion rate and sizes of the fusion bone mass (P > 0.05). Follow-up periods ranged from 30 months to 34 months, averaging 32.5 months. For the 39 patients who received single-segment fusion, 34 patients (87.2%) exhibited bone fusion on the test side, and 35 patients (89.7%) had evidence of fusion on the control side. For the 35 patients who received two-segment fusion, 29 patients (82.9%) exhibited bone fusion on the test side and 30 patients (85.7%) demonstrated complete fusion on the control side. The fusion rate and fusion size between the two groups are similar. Calcium sulfate pellets may play a role as a bone graft extender in short-segment spinal fusion.

  14. The temporal expression of adipokines during spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab; Bertone, Alicia L; Hussein, Hayam Hamaz; Toth, Jeffrey M; Kaido, Mari; Khan, Safdar

    2017-06-21

    Adipokines are secreted by white adipose tissue and have been associated with fracture healing. Our goal was to report the temporal expression of adipokines during spinal fusion in an established rabbit model. Our goal was to report the temporal expression of adipokines during spinal fusion in an established rabbit model. The study design included a laboratory animal model. New Zealand white rabbits were assigned to either sham surgery (n=2), unilateral posterior spinal fusion (n=14), or bilateral posterior spinal fusion (n=14). Rabbits were euthanized 1-6 and 10 weeks out from surgery. Fusion was evaluated by radiographs, manual palpation, and histology. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction on the bone fusion mass catalogued the gene expression of leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) at each time point. Results were normalized to the internal control gene, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) (2^ΔCt), and control bone sites (2^ΔΔCt). Quantitative data were analyzed by two-factor analysis of variance (p<.05). Manual palpation scores, radiograph scores, and histologic findings showed progression of boney fusion over time (p<.0003). The frequency of fusion by palpation after 4 weeks was 68.75%. Leptin expression in decortication and bone graft sites peaked at 5 weeks after the fusion procedure (p=.0143), adiponectin expression was greatest 1 week after surgery (p<.001), VEGF expression peaked at 4 weeks just after initial increases in leptin expression (p<.001), and resistin decreased precipitously 1 week after the fusion procedure (p<.001). Leptin expression is likely associated with the maturation phase of bone fusion. Adiponectin and resistin may play a role early on during the fusion process. Our results suggest that leptin expression may be upstream of VEGF expression during spinal fusion, and both appear to play an important role in bone spinal fusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  15. Human Perivascular Stem Cell-Based Bone Graft Substitute Induces Rat Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Choon G.; James, Aaron W.; Asatrian, Greg; Chang, Le; Nguyen, Alan; Le, Khoi; Bayani, Georgina; Lee, Robert; Stoker, David; Zhang, Xinli

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) because of its abundance and accessibility. We have previously defined a population of native MSCs termed perivascular stem cells (PSCs), purified from diverse human tissues, including adipose tissue. Human PSCs (hPSCs) are a bipartite cell population composed of pericytes (CD146+CD34−CD45−) and adventitial cells (CD146−CD34+CD45−), isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and with properties identical to those of culture identified MSCs. Our previous studies showed that hPSCs exhibit improved bone formation compared with a sample-matched unpurified population (termed stromal vascular fraction); however, it is not known whether hPSCs would be efficacious in a spinal fusion model. To investigate, we evaluated the osteogenic potential of freshly sorted hPSCs without culture expansion and differentiation in a rat model of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion. We compared increasing dosages of implanted hPSCs to assess for dose-dependent efficacy. All hPSC treatment groups induced successful spinal fusion, assessed by manual palpation and microcomputed tomography. Computerized biomechanical simulation (finite element analysis) further demonstrated bone fusion with hPSC treatment. Histological analyses showed robust endochondral ossification in hPSC-treated samples. Finally, we confirmed that implanted hPSCs indeed differentiated into osteoblasts and osteocytes; however, the majority of the new bone formation was of host origin. These results suggest that implanted hPSCs positively regulate bone formation via direct and paracrine mechanisms. In summary, hPSCs are a readily available MSC population that effectively forms bone without requirements for culture or predifferentiation. Thus, hPSC-based products show promise for future efforts in clinical bone regeneration and repair. PMID:25154782

  16. Human perivascular stem cell-based bone graft substitute induces rat spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Choon G; James, Aaron W; Asatrian, Greg; Chang, Le; Nguyen, Alan; Le, Khoi; Bayani, Georgina; Lee, Robert; Stoker, David; Zhang, Xinli; Ting, Kang; Péault, Bruno; Soo, Chia

    2014-10-01

    Adipose tissue is an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) because of its abundance and accessibility. We have previously defined a population of native MSCs termed perivascular stem cells (PSCs), purified from diverse human tissues, including adipose tissue. Human PSCs (hPSCs) are a bipartite cell population composed of pericytes (CD146+CD34-CD45-) and adventitial cells (CD146-CD34+CD45-), isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and with properties identical to those of culture identified MSCs. Our previous studies showed that hPSCs exhibit improved bone formation compared with a sample-matched unpurified population (termed stromal vascular fraction); however, it is not known whether hPSCs would be efficacious in a spinal fusion model. To investigate, we evaluated the osteogenic potential of freshly sorted hPSCs without culture expansion and differentiation in a rat model of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion. We compared increasing dosages of implanted hPSCs to assess for dose-dependent efficacy. All hPSC treatment groups induced successful spinal fusion, assessed by manual palpation and microcomputed tomography. Computerized biomechanical simulation (finite element analysis) further demonstrated bone fusion with hPSC treatment. Histological analyses showed robust endochondral ossification in hPSC-treated samples. Finally, we confirmed that implanted hPSCs indeed differentiated into osteoblasts and osteocytes; however, the majority of the new bone formation was of host origin. These results suggest that implanted hPSCs positively regulate bone formation via direct and paracrine mechanisms. In summary, hPSCs are a readily available MSC population that effectively forms bone without requirements for culture or predifferentiation. Thus, hPSC-based products show promise for future efforts in clinical bone regeneration and repair. ©AlphaMed Press.

  17. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Results of Posterolateral Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in the Treatment of L4 Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kuraishi, Shugo; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Shimizu, Masayuki; Ikegami, Shota; Futatsugi, Toshimasa; Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Hashidate, Hiroyuki; Tateiwa, Yutaka; Kinoshita, Hisatoshi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Multicenter analysis of two groups of patients surgically treated for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Purpose To compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of posterolateral fusion (PLF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis is widely performed. However, few reports have compared the outcome of PLF to that of PLIF for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Methods Patients with L4 unstable spondylolisthesis with Meyerding grade II or more, slip of >10° or >4 mm upon maximum flexion and extension bending, and posterior opening of >5 degree upon flexion bending were studied. Patients were treated from January 2008 to January 2010. Patients who underwent PLF (n=12) and PLIF (n=19) were followed-up for >2 years. Radiographic findings and clinical outcomes evaluated by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score were compared between the two groups. Radiographic evaluation included slip angle, translation, slip angle and translation during maximum flexion and extension bending, intervertebral disc height, lumbar lordotic angle, and fusion rate. Results JOA scores of the PLF group before surgery and at final follow-up were 12.3±4.8 and 24.1±3.7, respectively; those of the PLIF group were 14.7±4.8 and 24.2±7.8, respectively, with no significant difference between the two groups. Correction of slip estimated from postoperative slip angle, translation, and maintenance of intervertebral disc height in the PLIF group was significantly (p<0.05) better than those in the PLF group. However, there was no significant difference in lumbar lordotic angle, slip angle and translation angle upon maximum flexion, or extension bending. Fusion rates of the PLIF and PLF groups had no significant difference. Conclusions The L4–L5 level posterior instrumented fusion for unstable spondylolisthesis using both PLF and PLIF

  18. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumented posterolateral fusion in adult spondylolisthesis: description and association of clinico-surgical variables with prognosis in a series of 36 cases

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Moreta, Juan A.; Hernandez-Vicente, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background We present our experience in the treatment of patients with isthmic or degenerative spondylolisthesis, by means of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and instrumented posterolateral fusion (IPLF), and we compare them with those published in the literature. We analyse whether there exists any statistical association between the clinical characteristics of the patient, radiological characteristics of the disease and our surgical technique, with the complications and the clinical-radiological prognosis of the cases. Method We designed a prospective study. A total of 36 cases were operated. The patients included were 14 men and 22 women, with an average age of 57.17±27.32 years. Our technique consists of PLIF+IPLF, using local bone for the fusion. The clinical results were evaluated with the Visual Analogical Scale (VAS) and the Kirkaldy-Willis criteria. The radiological evaluation followed the Bratingan (PLIF) and Lenke (IPLF) methodology. A total of 42 variables were statistically analysed by means of SPSS18. We used the Paired Student's T-test, logistic regression and Pearson's Chi-square-test. Results The spondylolisthesis was isthmic in 15 cases and degenerative in 21 cases. The postoperative evaluations had excellent or good results in 94.5% (n = 34), with a statistically significant improvement in the back pain and sciatica (p < 0.01). The rate of circumferential fusion reached was approximately 92%. We had 13.88% of transitory morbility and 0% of mortality associated with our technique. A greater age, degree of listhesis or length of illness before the intervention, weakly correlated with worse clinical results (p< -0.2). In our series, the logistical regression showed that the clinical characteristics of the patient, radiological characteristics of the lesion and our surgical technique were not associated with greater postoperative complications. Conclusion Although a higher level of training is necessary, we believe that the described

  19. Percutaneous Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (pTLIF) with a Posterolateral Approach for the Treatment of Degenerative Disk Disease: Feasibility and Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Interbody fusion by open discectomy is the usual treatment for degenerative disk disease but requires a relatively long recovery period. The transforaminal posterolateral approach is a well-known standard in endoscopic spine surgery that allows direct access to the disk with progressive tissue dilation. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of percutaneous transforaminal interbody fusion (pTLIF) with percutaneous insertion of an expandable or a standard rigid interbody implant for patients with degenerative disk disease with or without spondylolisthesis and for revision surgery with the endoscopic posterolateral approach. Methods Between 2009 and 2014, the pTLIF procedure was performed in 30 patients. Ten patients underwent insertion of a rigid implant (group A) and the remaining 20 underwent insertion of an expandable titanium interbody implant as the initial procedure (n = 10) (group B) or after failed back surgery (n = 10) (group C). Patient outcomes were scored with visual analogic scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and modified Macnab criteria. Results The mean follow-up period was 38 (17) (range 11 to 67) months. The outcome was excellent in 18, good in 10 and fair in 2. No poor results and no major complications were reported. No significant (p<0.05) differences in VAS and ODI scores according to the study group were found. Median postoperative time until hospital discharge was 26 hours (20 to 68 hours). Postoperative values for VAS and ODI scores improved significantly (p<0.05) compared to preoperative data in all study groups. Conclusions These preliminary results have shown the feasibility and efficacy of the pTLIF procedure using a percutaneous posterolateral approach for the treatment of degenerative disk disease with or without spondylolisthesis up to grade 2 and in revision surgery. No significant differences in outcome were observed between an expandable and a rigid cage. Median postoperative time until hospital

  20. Comparison of the osteogenesis and fusion rates between activin A/BMP-2 chimera (AB204) and rhBMP-2 in a beagle's posterolateral lumbar spine model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guang Bin; Yoon, Byung-Hak; Lee, Jae Hyup

    2017-10-01

    Activin A/BMP-2 chimera (AB204) could promote bone healing more effectively than recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) with much lower dose in a rodent model, but there is no report about the effectiveness of AB204 in a large animal model. The purpose of this study was to compare the osteogenesis and fusion rate between AB204 and rhBMP-2 using biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) as a carrier in a beagle's posterolateral lumbar fusion model. This is a randomized control animal study. Seventeen male beagle dogs were included. Bilateral posterolateral fusion was performed at the L1-L2 and L4-L5 levels. Biphasic calcium phosphate (2 cc), rhBMP-2 (50 µg)+BCP (2 cc), or AB204 (50 µg)+BCP (2 cc) were implanted into the intertransverse space randomly. X-ray was performed at 4 and 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and new bone formation and fusion rate were evaluated by manual palpation, computed tomography (CT), and undecalcified histology. The AB204 group showed significantly higher fusion rate (90%) than the rhBMP-2 group (15%) or the Osteon group (6.3%) by manual palpation. On x-ray and CT assessment, fusion rate and the volume of newly formed bone were also significantly higher in AB204 group than other groups. In contrast, more osteolysis was found in rhBMP-2 group (40%) than in AB204 group (10%) on CT study. In histologic results, new bone formation was sufficient between transverse processes in AB204 group, and obvious trabeculation and bone remodeling were observed. But in rhBMP-2 group, new bone formation was less than AB204 group and osteolysis was observed between the intertransverse spaces. A low dose of AB204 with BCP as a carrier significantly promotes the fusion rate in a large animal model when compared with the rhBMP-2. These findings demonstrate that AB204 could be an alternative to rhBMP-2 to improve fusion rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization and spinal fusion effect of rabbit mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The surface markers of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of rabbits have been reported only sporadically. However, interest in the spinal fusion effect of MSCs has risen recently. The purpose of this research was to study the surface markers and spinal fusion effect of rabbit MSCs. Results Of our rabbit MSCs, 2% expressed CD14, CD29, and CD45, 1% expressed CD90 and 97% expressed CD44. These results implied the MSCs were negative for CD14, CD29, CD45, and CD90, but positive for CD44. The surgical results showed that satisfactory fusion occurred in 10 rabbits (83%) in the study group and unsatisfactory fusion in 2 (17%). In the control group, satisfactory fusion was found in 3 rabbits (25%) and unsatisfactory fusion in 9 (75%). Statistical analysis showed the study group had significantly better spinal fusion results than the control group. Conclusions The surface markers of human and rabbit MSCs are not exactly the same. Rabbit MSCs do not have positive reactivity for CD29 and CD90, which are invariably present on human MSCs. The allogeneic undifferentiated rabbit MSCs were able to promote spinal fusion and did not induce an adverse immune response. PMID:24325928

  2. Single-level instrumented posterolateral fusion of the lumbar spine with a local bone graft versus an iliac crest bone graft: a prospective, randomized study with a 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ohtori, Seiji; Suzuki, Miyako; Koshi, Takana; Takaso, Masashi; Yamashita, Masaomi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Inoue, Gen; Suzuki, Munetaka; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Nakamura, Junichi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Arai, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2011-04-01

    The iliac crest bone grafting (ICBG) technique for lumbar posterolateral fusion surgery is widely used; however, donor site problems such as pain and sensory disturbance have been reported. Local bone is available for fusion surgery, but its reliability as a graft has not been fully reported. In the current study, we examined single-level instrumented posterolateral fusion with a local bone graft versus an ICBG in a prospective randomized study. Eighty-two patients diagnosed with L4 degenerated spondylolisthesis were divided into two groups at random. Forty-two patients underwent instrumented posterolateral fusion with a local bone graft (L4-L5 level), and 40 patients underwent instrumented posterolateral fusion with an ICBG (L4-L5 level). Rate and duration of bone union, visual analog scale (VAS) score, Japanese orthopedic association score (JOAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and complications were evaluated before and 2 years after therapy. VAS score, JOAS, and ODI were not significantly different between the two groups before and after surgery (P > 0.05). Rate and average duration of bone union were 90% and 8.5 months in the local bone graft group, and 85% and 7.7 months in the ICBG group, but without significant difference (P > 0.05). Prolonged surgical time and complications such as donor site pain (8 patients) and sensory disturbance (6 patients) were observed in the ICBG group. If single-level posterolateral fusion was performed, local bone graft technique has the same bone union rate compared with ICBG, requires less surgical time, and has fewer complications.

  3. Promoting spinal fusions by biomineralized silk fibroin films seeded with bone marrow stromal cells: An in vivo animal study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yong; Chen, Liang; Niu, Hai-Yun; Shen, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Hui-Lin

    2016-03-01

    To prepare a biomineralized nano silk fibroin film seeded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), and to evaluate its performance in spinal fusion. The silk fibroin film was mineralized in a modified, simulated body fluid, seeded with BMSCs, and evaluated in a rat model of posterolateral lumbar fusion, compared with pure silk fibroin, silk fibroin/bone marrow stromal cells, mineralized silk fibroin, mineralized silk fibroin/bone marrow stromal cells, iliac crest bone, and no graft. After 12 weeks, all rats were sacrificed and underwent manual palpation, micro-CT scanning, biomechanical testing, and histology. The infrared spectrum, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated deposition of mineral layers on the silk fibroin film surface. The fusion rate, bone volume, relative strength and stiffness, and histological score of the mineralized silk fibroin/bone marrow stromal cells were slightly lower than the autograft, but without any significant difference (p > 0.05). In addition, the mineralized silk fibroin was significantly greater in most parameters than the silk fibroin/bone marrow stromal cells (p < 0.05). The mineralized silk fibroin resembles natural bone structurally, and the cellular and mineral layers of silk fibroin are both critical to bone regeneration. The ability to promote spinal fusion is enhanced when the mineralized silk fibroin is seeded with bone marrow stromal cells. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Clinical outcomes following spinal fusion using an intraoperative computed tomographic 3D imaging system.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Roy; Miller, Jacob A; Sabharwal, Navin C; Lubelski, Daniel; Alentado, Vincent J; Healy, Andrew T; Mroz, Thomas E; Benzel, Edward C

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Improvements in imaging technology have steadily advanced surgical approaches. Within the field of spine surgery, assistance from the O-arm Multidimensional Surgical Imaging System has been established to yield superior accuracy of pedicle screw insertion compared with freehand and fluoroscopic approaches. Despite this evidence, no studies have investigated the clinical relevance associated with increased accuracy. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to investigate the clinical outcomes following thoracolumbar spinal fusion associated with O-arm-assisted navigation. The authors hypothesized that increased accuracy achieved with O-arm-assisted navigation decreases the rate of reoperation secondary to reduced hardware failure and screw misplacement. METHODS A consecutive retrospective review of all patients who underwent open thoracolumbar spinal fusion at a single tertiary-care institution between December 2012 and December 2014 was conducted. Outcomes assessed included operative time, length of hospital stay, and rates of readmission and reoperation. Mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards modeling, with surgeon as a random effect, was used to investigate the association between O-arm-assisted navigation and postoperative outcomes. RESULTS Among 1208 procedures, 614 were performed with O-arm-assisted navigation, 356 using freehand techniques, and 238 using fluoroscopic guidance. The most common indication for surgery was spondylolisthesis (56.2%), and most patients underwent a posterolateral fusion only (59.4%). Although O-arm procedures involved more vertebral levels compared with the combined freehand/fluoroscopy cohort (4.79 vs 4.26 vertebral levels; p < 0.01), no significant differences in operative time were observed (4.40 vs 4.30 hours; p = 0.38). Patients who underwent an O-arm procedure experienced shorter hospital stays (4.72 vs 5.43 days; p < 0.01). O-arm-assisted navigation trended toward predicting decreased risk of spine

  5. Osteogenic potential of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) as an alternative to rhBMP-2 in a mouse spinal fusion model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung Ju; Arai, Yoshie; Park, Eun-Mi; Park, Sunghyun; Bello, Alvin Bacero; Han, In-Bo; Lee, Soo-Hong

    2017-08-21

    The non-union rate following lumbar spinal fusion is potentially as high as 48%. To support efficient bone regeneration, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is commonly used as it is regarded as the most potent bone inducing molecule. However recently, there have been increasing concerns on the use of rhMBMP-2 such as serious complications including seroma and heterotopic ossification and the low quality of bone at the center of fusion mass. Thus, many studies were conducted to find and to develop a potential alternative to rhBMP-2. In this study, we investigated the osteogenic potential of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) in mouse fusion model and compared its effects with rhBMP-2. Twenty-four mice underwent bilateral posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion bone formation at L4-L5. Collagen sponge infused with either saline, TUDCA, or rhBMP-2 were implanted at the fusion area. Two (2) and four (4) weeks post-implantation, bone formation and tissue regeneration were evaluated via micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. Compared to TUDCA treated group, the rhBMP-2 treatment produced higher amount of bone fusion formation after 2 weeks but also showed higher resorption of the centralized bone after 4 weeks. Interestingly, TUDCA treated group developed higher trabecular thickness compared to rhBMP-2 after 4 weeks. Moreover, TUDCA treatment showed distinct angiogenic activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as confirmed by in vitro tube formation assay. Our findings suggest that TUDCA is comparable to rhBMP-2 in supporting bone regeneration and spinal bone formationfusion by increasing trabecular thickness and promoting angiogenesis. Finally, our results indicate that TUDCA can be utilized as a potential alternative to rhBMP-2.

  6. Family satisfaction following spinal fusion in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jenny; Torode, Ian; Ellaway, Carolyn; Jacoby, Peter; Bunting, Catherine; Wong, Kingsley; Christodoulou, John; Leonard, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated family satisfaction following spinal fusion in girls with Rett syndrome. Families participating in the population-based and longitudinal Australian Rett Syndrome Database whose daughter had undergone spinal fusion provided data on satisfaction overall, care processes and expected changes in health and function. Content analysis of responses to open-ended questions was conducted. Families reported high levels of overall satisfaction and consistently high ratings in relation to surgical and ICU care. Outstanding clinical care and the development of strong partnerships with clinical staff were much appreciated by families, whereas poor information exchange and inconsistent care caused concerns. Family satisfaction is an important outcome within a patient-centred quality of care framework. Our findings suggest strategies to inform the delivery of care in relation to spinal fusion for Rett syndrome and could also inform the hospital care of other children with disability and a high risk of hospitalization.

  7. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound enhances posterior spinal fusion implanted with mesenchymal stem cells-calcium phosphate composite without bone grafting.

    PubMed

    Hui, Celine Fan Fong; Chan, Chun Wai; Yeung, Hiu Yan; Lee, Kwong Man; Qin, Ling; Li, Gang; Leung, Kwok Sui; Hu, Yun Yu; Cheng, Jack Chun Yiu

    2011-06-01

    Experimental study on the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on rabbit spinal fusion with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-derived osteogenic cells and bioceramic composite. To investigate the efficacy of LIPUS in enhancing fusion rate and bone formation with porous tricalcium phosphate (TCP) bioceramic scaffold impregnated with MSCs without any bone grafts. The goal of spinal fusion in the corrective spinal surgery for spinal deformities is to achieve solid bony fusion between selected vertebral segments. Previous studies with bone morphogenetic proteins and genetically manipulated materials revealed significant difficulties in actual clinical application. Alternative such as LIPUS has been shown to be effective in enhancing healing of fracture and nonunion clinically. Its potential for enhancing spinal fusion warrants further in-depth study. Posterolateral intertransverse processes spinal fusion at the L5 and L6 levels were evaluated in New Zealand white rabbit model. The animals were divided into three groups with (A) TCP alone, (B) TCP with differentiated MSCs, and (C) TCP with differentiated MSCs and LIPUS treatment. At week 7 postoperation, manual palpation, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and histomorphometric assessments were performed. At week 7 postoperation, a statistically significant increase in clinical fusion by manual palpation was observed in group C animals treated with LIPUS (86%) in comparing with groups A (0%) and B (14%) without LIPUS. With peripheral quantitative computed tomographic analysis, the bone volume of group C fusion mass was significantly larger than the other two groups. Group C fusion also had better osteointegration length between host bone and implanted composite and more new bone formed in the TCP implants. Importantly, all the group C animals had osteochondral bridging--early stage of bony fusion histologically. Endochondral ossification was observed at the junction between the cartilaginous and osseous

  8. Within Patient Radiological Comparative Analysis of the Performance of Two Bone Graft Extenders Utilized in Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Geoffrey; Gage, Gary B.; Neidert, Gary; Adkisson, Huston Davis

    2016-01-01

    Two bone graft extenders differing in chemical composition were implanted contralaterally in 27 consecutive patients undergoing instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion as standard-of-care. Bone marrow aspirate and autogenous bone graft were equally combined either with β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) or a hybrid biomaterial [containing hyaluronic acid (HyA) but lacking a calcium salt] and implanted between the transverse processes. Fusion status on each side of the vertebrae was retrospectively graded (1–5 scale) on AP planar X-ray at multiple visits as available, through approximately 12 months. Additionally, consolidation or resorption since prior visit for each treatment was recorded. Sides receiving β-TCP extender showed marked resorption prior to bone consolidation during the first 6 months. By contrast, sides receiving the hybrid biomaterial containing integrated HyA showed rapid bone consolidation by week 6–8, with maintenance of initial bone volume through 12 months. Fusion grade was superior for the hybrid biomaterial, differing significantly from β-TCP at day 109 and beyond. Fusion success at >12 months was 92.9 vs. 67.9% for the hybrid biomaterial and β-TCP-treated sides, respectively. The hybrid biomaterial extender demonstrated a shortened time-to-fusion compared to the calcium-based graft. Mode of action has been demonstrated in the literature to differ between these compositions. Therefore, choice of synthetic biomaterial composition may significantly influence the mode of action of cellular events regulating appositional bone growth. PMID:26835455

  9. Use of autologous growth factors in lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Lowery, G L; Kulkarni, S; Pennisi, A E

    1999-08-01

    The results of spinal fusion, especially posteriorly above the lumbosacral junction, have been mixed. Autologous growth factor concentrate (AGF) prepared by ultraconcentration of platelets contains multiple growth factors having a chemotactic and mitogenic effect on mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts and may play a role in initiating bone healing. The purpose of this retrospective study is to review our results with AGF in lumbar spinal fusions. To date, AGF has been used in 39 patients having lumbar spinal fusion. The study group consisted of the first 19 consecutive cases to allow at least 6 months follow-up. The average follow-up was 13 months (range 6 to 18 months). Follow-up compliance was 91%. There were 7 men and 12 women. Average age was 52 years (range 30-72 years). Nine patients had prior back surgery. There were 8 smokers. AGF was used in posterior (n = 15) or anterior intradiscal (n = 4) fusions. AGF was used with autograft and coraline hydroxyapatite in all posterior fusions, and autograft, coral, and intradiscal spacer (carbon fiber spinal fusion cages or Synthes femoral ring) in intradiscal fusions. Posterior stabilization was used in all cases. Eight cases were single-level fusions, 6 were two-level, and 1 was a three-level fusion. Autologous iliac crest bone graft was taken in 14 cases and local autograft used in 5 cases. Posteriorly, a total of 23 levels were fused; of these, nine were at L5-S1, eight at L4-L5, five at L3-L4, and one at L2-L3. No impending pseudoarthroses were noted on plain radiographic examination at last follow-up visit. Solid fusion was confirmed in 3 patients having routine hardware removal, and in 2 patients who had surgery at an adjacent level. There was one posterior wound infection, which was managed without sequelae. When used as an adjunct to autograft, AGF offers theoretical advantages that need to be examined in controlled studies. Further study is necessary to determine whether coralline hydroxyapatite used as a

  10. Radiological and functional outcome after anterior lumbar interbody spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Christensen, F B; Karlsmose, B; Hansen, E S; Bünger, C E

    1996-01-01

    Outcome after anterior spinal fusion has mainly been studied radiologically and reported fusion rates vary greatly. The aim of this study was to investigate radiological and long-term clinical outcome. The study comprised 120 consecutive patients, operated on during the period 1979-1987, with single-or two-level anterior interbody spinal fusion due to disc degeneration or isthmic spondylolisthesis with lumbar instability. In 64 patients a supplemental facet joint fusion was performed. Clinical outcome was evaluated 5-13 years after surgery using the patient-administered Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ). Radiological outcome was determined on the basis of radiographs taken at a 2-year follow-up assessed by independent observers. The radiological follow-up rate was 98%. Complete fusion was found in 52%, questionable fusion in 24%, and definitive pseudoarthrosis in 24% of patients. Radiological results were poor in patients who had undergone previous spinal surgery (P < 0.05) and in those with two-level fusion (P < 0.05). The DPQ reply rate was 80%. Sixty-six patients claimed improvement in all functional groups. Patients with complete or questionable union had significantly better results than did those with non-union (P < 0.01). Poorer functional outcome was found in patients who had undergone previous spinal surgery (P < 0.01) or fusion at the L4/L5 level (P < 0.05), in those who had responded poorly to the preoperative test brace (P < 0.05), and in those above 45 years old at the time of surgery (P < 0.05). Radiological and functional outcome did not vary according to whether patients were treated postoperatively with a plaster jacket or with facet screw fixation. The study demonstrated a functional success rate of approximately 66% following anterior lumbar spinal fusion after a mean follow-up of 8 years. There was a clear tendency for poorer prognosis for patients who had undergone previous spinal surgery, those aged above 45 years, those operated at the L4/L5

  11. Roseomonas spinal epidural abscess complicating instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Bantouna, Vasiliki; Lianoudakis, Efstratios; Stavrakakis, Ioannis; Scoulica, Efstathia

    2013-07-01

    The first case of a spinal epidural abscess caused by Roseomonas mucosa following instrumented posterior lumbar fusion is presented. Although rare, because of its highly resistant profile, Roseomonas species should be included in the differential diagnosis of epidural abscesses in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts.

  12. Adolescents' perceptions of music therapy following spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Kleiber, Charmaine; Adamek, Mary S

    2013-02-01

    To explore adolescents' memories about music therapy after spinal fusion surgery and their recommendations for future patients. Spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is one of the most painful surgeries performed. Music therapy is shown to decrease postoperative pain in children after minor surgery. In preparation for developing a preoperative information program, we interviewed adolescents who had spinal fusion and postoperative music therapy to find out what they remembered and what they recommended for future patients. Eight adolescents who had spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were interviewed about their experiences. For this qualitative study, the investigators independently used thematic analysis techniques to formulate interpretive themes. Together they discussed their ideas and assigned overall meanings to the information. The eight participants were 13-17 years of age and had surgery between 2-24 months previously. The overarching themes identified from the interviews were relaxation and pain perception, choice and control, therapist interaction and preoperative information. Participants stated that music therapy helped with mental relaxation and distraction from pain. It was important to be able to choose the type of music for the therapy and to use self-control to focus on the positive. Their recommendation was that future patients should be provided with information preoperatively about music therapy and pain management. Participants recommended a combination of auditory and visual information, especially the experiences of previous patients who had spinal fusion and music therapy. Music provided live at the bedside by a music therapist was remembered vividly and positively by most of the participants. The presence of a music therapist providing patient-selected music at the bedside is important. Methods to introduce adolescents to music therapy and how to use music for relaxation should be developed and tested. © 2012

  13. Spinal fusion-hardware construct: Basic concepts and imaging review

    PubMed Central

    Nouh, Mohamed Ragab

    2012-01-01

    The interpretation of spinal images fixed with metallic hardware forms an increasing bulk of daily practice in a busy imaging department. Radiologists are required to be familiar with the instrumentation and operative options used in spinal fixation and fusion procedures, especially in his or her institute. This is critical in evaluating the position of implants and potential complications associated with the operative approaches and spinal fixation devices used. Thus, the radiologist can play an important role in patient care and outcome. This review outlines the advantages and disadvantages of commonly used imaging methods and reports on the best yield for each modality and how to overcome the problematic issues associated with the presence of metallic hardware during imaging. Baseline radiographs are essential as they are the baseline point for evaluation of future studies should patients develop symptoms suggesting possible complications. They may justify further imaging workup with computed tomography, magnetic resonance and/or nuclear medicine studies as the evaluation of a patient with a spinal implant involves a multi-modality approach. This review describes imaging features of potential complications associated with spinal fusion surgery as well as the instrumentation used. This basic knowledge aims to help radiologists approach everyday practice in clinical imaging. PMID:22761979

  14. Theoretical model of a piezoelectric composite spinal fusion interbody implant.

    PubMed

    Tobaben, Nicholas E; Domann, John P; Arnold, Paul M; Friis, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-01

    Failure rates of spinal fusion are high in smokers and diabetics. The authors are investigating the development of a piezoelectric composite biomaterial and interbody device design that could generate clinically relevant levels of electrical stimulation to help improve the rate of fusion for these patients. A lumped parameter model of the piezoelectric composite implant was developed based on a model that has been utilized to successfully predict power generation for piezoceramics. Seven variables (fiber material, matrix material, fiber volume fraction, fiber aspect ratio, implant cross-sectional area, implant thickness, and electrical load resistance) were parametrically analyzed to determine their effects on power generation within reasonable implant constraints. Influences of implant geometry and fiber aspect ratio were independent of material parameters. For a cyclic force of constant magnitude, implant thickness was directly and cross-sectional area inversely proportional to power generation potential. Fiber aspect ratios above 30 yielded maximum power generation potential while volume fractions above 15% showed superior performance. This investigation demonstrates the feasibility of using composite piezoelectric biomaterials in medical implants to generate therapeutic levels of direct current electrical stimulation. The piezoelectric spinal fusion interbody implant shows promise for helping increase success rates of spinal fusion. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cell Therapy to Obtain Spinal Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Development 109:833–844, 1990. 28Marx, R. E.. Clinical application of bone biology to man- dibular and maxillary reconstruction. Clin. Plast. Surg. 21...in sympathetic neuron development . Drug News Perspect 16, 589, 2003. 8. Cayuso, J., and Marti, E. Morphogens in motion: growth control of the...this study is to develop a safe efficacious system for inducing spine fusion which will eliminate the need for invasive surgery. We have currently

  16. Cell Therapy to Obtain Spinal Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    creates controlled flexion and extension in a mouse spine, so that spine fusions could be assessed using the same computer-assisted methods that are...reducing motion within the spine, we set up some experiments to look at flexion /tension under bending at specific angles. Briefly, three groups of...significant drop in the disc angle and in turn flexion of the spine. The reduction in flexion is consistent with what has been demonstrated in human

  17. Electrical Stimulation to Enhance Spinal Fusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul; Lau, Darryl; Brodt, Erika D.; Dettori, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Clinical Questions Compared with no stimulation, does electrical stimulation promote bone fusion after lumbar spinal fusion procedures? Does the effect differ based on the type of electrical stimulation used? Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched up to October 15, 2013, to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effect of electrical stimulation to no electrical stimulation on fusion rates after lumbar spinal fusion for the treatment of degenerative disease. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Results Six RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The following types of electrical stimulation were investigated: direct current (three studies), pulsed electromagnetic field (three studies), and capacitive coupling (one study). The control groups consisted of no stimulation (two studies) or placebo (four studies). Marked heterogeneity in study populations, characteristics, and design prevented a meta-analysis. Regardless of the type of electrical stimulation used, cumulative incidences of fusion varied widely across the RCTs, ranging from 35.4 to 90.6% in the intervention groups and from 33.3 to 81.9% in the control groups across 9 to 24 months of follow-up. Similarly, when stratified by the type of electrical stimulation used, fusion outcomes from individual studies varied, leading to inconsistent and conflicting results. Conclusion Given the inconsistency in study results, possibly due to heterogeneity in study populations/characteristics and quality, we are unable to conclude that electrical stimulation results in better fusion outcomes compared with no stimulation. The overall strength of evidence for the conclusions is low. PMID:25278882

  18. Autograft versus Allograft for Cervical Spinal Fusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tuchman, Alexander; Brodke, Darrel S; Youssef, Jim A; Meisel, Hans-Jörg; Dettori, Joseph R; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2017-02-01

    Systematic review. To compare the effectiveness and safety between iliac crest bone graft (ICBG), non-ICBG autologous bone, and allograft in cervical spine fusion. To avoid problems at the donor site, various allograft materials have been used as a substitute for autograft. However, there are still questions as to the comparative effectiveness and safety of cadaver allograft compared with autologous ICBG. A systematic search of multiple major medical reference databases was conducted to identify studies evaluating spinal fusion in patients with cervical degenerative disk disease using ICBG compared with non-ICBG autograft or allograft or non-ICBG autograft compared with allograft in the cervical spine. Radiographic fusion, patient-reported outcomes, and functional outcomes were the primary outcomes of interest. Adverse events were evaluated for safety. The search identified 13 comparative studies that met our inclusion criteria: 2 prospective cohort studies and 11 retrospective cohort studies. Twelve cohort studies compared allograft with ICBG autograft during anterior cervical fusion and demonstrated with a low evidence level of support that there are no differences in fusion percentages, pain scores, or functional results. There was insufficient evidence comparing patients receiving allograft with non-ICBG autograft for fusion, pain, revision, and functional and safety outcomes. No publications directly comparing non-ICBG autograft with ICBG were found. Although the available literature suggests ICBG and allograft may have similar effectiveness in terms of fusion rates, pain scores, and functional outcomes following anterior cervical fusion, there are too many limitations in the available literature to draw any significant conclusions. No individual study provided greater than class III evidence, and when evaluating the overall body of literature, no conclusion had better than low evidence support. A prospective randomized trial with adequate sample size to

  19. Impact of Instrumented Spinal Fusion on the Development of Vertebral Compression Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yen-Chun; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Hung-Shu; Kao, Yu-Hsien; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Instrumented spinal fusion has become one of the most common surgeries for patients with various spinal disorders. Only few studies have reported subsequent vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) after instrumented spinal fusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of new VCFs in patients undergoing instrumented spinal fusion. We obtained claims data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan and retrospectively reviewed 6949 patients with instrumented spinal fusion as the spinal fusion cohort. Control subjects were individually matched at a ratio of 10:1 with those of the spinal fusion cohort according to age, sex, and the index day. Comorbidities were classified as those existing before the index day, and these included diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis, and cerebrovascular accident. The end of the follow-up period for the analyses was marked on the day new VCFs developed, enrolment in the National Health Insurance was terminated, on the day of death, or until the end of 2012. We used the Cox proportion hazards model to analyze the hazard ratio (HR) for developing new VCFs. Patients with instrumented spinal fusion were significantly more likely to develop new VCFs (1.87% vs .25%, HR: 8.56; P < 0.001). Female, elderly, and osteoporotic patients had a high incidence of new VCFs after spinal fusion. The HR for developing new VCFs after instrumented spinal fusion was higher in patients younger than 65 years than in those 65 years or older (HR: 10.61 vs 8.09). Male patients with instrumented spinal fusion also had a higher HR of developing new VCFs than female patients (men, HR: 26.42; women, HR: 7.53). In our retrospective cohort study, patients who had undergone instrumented spinal fusion surgery exhibited an increased risk of developing new VCFs. Particularly, the HR increased in young (age <65 years) and male patients. PMID:27124040

  20. Novel Oxysterols Have Pro-Osteogenic and Anti-Adipogenic Effects In Vitro and Induce Spinal Fusion In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jared S.; Meliton, Vicente; Kim, Woo Kyun; Lee, Kwang-Bok; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Nguyen, KhanhLinh; Yoo, Dongwon; Jung, Michael E.; Atti, Elisa; Tetradis, Sotirios; Pereira, Renata C.; Magyar, Clara; Nargizyan, Taya; Hahn, Theodore J.; Farouz, Francine; Thies, Scott; Parhami, Farhad

    2011-01-01

    Stimulation of bone formation by osteoinductive materials is of great clinical importance in spinal fusion surgery, repair of bone fractures, and in the treatment of osteoporosis. We previously reported that specific naturally occurring oxysterols including 20(S)-hydroxycholesterol (20S) induce the osteogenic differentiation of pluripotent mesenchymal cells, while inhibiting their adipogenic differentiation. Here we report the characterization of two structural analogs of 20S, Oxy34 and Oxy49, which induce the osteogenic and inhibit the adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) through activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Treatment of M2-10B4 MSC with Oxy34 or Oxy49 induced the expression of osteogenic differentiation markers Runx2, Osterix (Osx), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcin (OCN), as well as ALP enzymatic activity and robust mineralization. Treatment with oxysterols together with PPARγ activator, troglitazone (Tro), inhibited mRNA expression for adipogenic genes PPARγ, LPL, and aP2, and inhibited the formation of adipocytes. Efficacy of Oxy34 and Oxy49 in stimulating bone formation in vivo was assessed using the posterolateral intertransverse process rat spinal fusion model. Rats receiving collagen implants with Oxy 34 or Oxy49 showed comparable osteogenic efficacy to BMP2/collagen implants as measured by radiography, MicroCT, and manual inspection. Histological analysis showed trabecular and cortical bone formation by oxysterols and rhBMP2 within the fusion mass, with robust adipogenesis in BMP2-induced bone and significantly less adipocytes in oxysterol-induced bone. These data suggest that Oxy34 and Oxy49 are effective novel osteoinductive molecules and may be suitable candidates for further development and use in orthopaedic indications requiring local bone formation. PMID:21503957

  1. Extensive Fusion of Mitochondria in Spinal Cord Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Geoffrey C.; Walcott, Elisabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles played by trafficking, fission and fusion in the dynamics of mitochondria in neurons have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, a slow widespread redistribution of mitochondria within cultured spinal cord motor neurons was observed as a result of extensive organelle fusion. Mitochondria were labeled with a photoconvertible fluorescent protein (mitoKaede) that is red-shifted following brief irradiation with blue light. The behavior of these selectively labeled mitochondria was followed by live fluorescence imaging. Marking mitochondria within the cell soma revealed a complete mixing, within 18 hours, of these organelles with mitochondria coming from the surrounding neurites. Fusion of juxtaposed mitochondria was directly observed in neuritic processes at least 200 microns from the cell body. Within 24 hours, photoconverted mitoKaede was dispersed to all of the mitochondria in the portion of neurite under observation. When time lapse imaging over minutes was combined with long-term observation of marked mitochondria, moving organelles that traversed the field of view did not initially contain photoconverted protein, but after several hours organelles in motion contained both fluorescent proteins, coincident with widespread fusion of all of the mitochondria within the length of neurite under observation. These observations suggest that there is a widespread exchange of mitochondrial components throughout a neuron as a result of organelle fusion. PMID:22701641

  2. Extensive fusion of mitochondria in spinal cord motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Owens, Geoffrey C; Walcott, Elisabeth C

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles played by trafficking, fission and fusion in the dynamics of mitochondria in neurons have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, a slow widespread redistribution of mitochondria within cultured spinal cord motor neurons was observed as a result of extensive organelle fusion. Mitochondria were labeled with a photoconvertible fluorescent protein (mitoKaede) that is red-shifted following brief irradiation with blue light. The behavior of these selectively labeled mitochondria was followed by live fluorescence imaging. Marking mitochondria within the cell soma revealed a complete mixing, within 18 hours, of these organelles with mitochondria coming from the surrounding neurites. Fusion of juxtaposed mitochondria was directly observed in neuritic processes at least 200 microns from the cell body. Within 24 hours, photoconverted mitoKaede was dispersed to all of the mitochondria in the portion of neurite under observation. When time lapse imaging over minutes was combined with long-term observation of marked mitochondria, moving organelles that traversed the field of view did not initially contain photoconverted protein, but after several hours organelles in motion contained both fluorescent proteins, coincident with widespread fusion of all of the mitochondria within the length of neurite under observation. These observations suggest that there is a widespread exchange of mitochondrial components throughout a neuron as a result of organelle fusion.

  3. An update on bone substitutes for spinal fusion

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Tsumura, Hiroshi; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    With the current advances in spinal surgery, an understanding of the precise biological mechanism of each bone substitute is necessary for inducing successful spinal fusion. In this review, the categories of bone substitutes include allografts, ceramics, demineralized bone matrix, osteoinductive factors, autogenous platelet concentrate, mesenchymal stem cells, and gene therapy. Further, clinical studies have been evaluated by their levels of evidence in order to elucidate the precise effect of the bone substitute employed and to establish clinical guidance. This article will review both clinical studies based on evidence and basic research in current advances in order to avoid as far as possible any chances of failure in the future and to understand cellular biology in novel technologies. PMID:19280232

  4. Comorbidities and Complications of Spinal Fusion for Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jay G; Glotzbecker, Michael; Rodean, Jonathan; Leahy, Izabela; Hall, Matt; Ferrari, Lynne

    2017-03-01

    General pediatricians and hospitalists are increasingly summoned to optimize the comorbid conditions of children with medical complexity (CMC) undergoing major surgery. We assessed the relationship between specific chronic conditions of CMC and hospital resource use with spinal fusion for scoliosis, an operation with high cost and morbidity. Retrospective analysis of 7252 children age ≥5 years with an underlying complex chronic condition undergoing spinal fusion between January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2014 in 41 children's hospitals. Hospital length of stay (LOS), cost, and 30-day readmission rate were compared across comorbid conditions by using linear and logistic regression accounting for demographic characteristics and clustering of patients by hospital. Fifty-nine percent of children had ≥4 comorbid conditions. As the number of chronic conditions increased from 1-3 to ≥10, median LOS increased 60% (5 [interquartile range (IQR), 4-7] to 8 [IQR, 5-13] days); median hospital cost increased 53% ($52 319 [IQR, $37 937-71 513] to $80 429 [IQR, $58 602-$111 965]); and readmission rates increased 293% (5.4% to 15.8%) (P < .001 for all). In multivariable analysis, conditions strongly associated with LOS and cost were chronic respiratory insufficiency (LOS: +2.1 days; cost: +$12 070; and bladder dysfunction (LOS: +0.8 days; cost: +$4014) (P < .001 for all). Readmission likelihood was highest with bladder dysfunction (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.0) and epilepsy (odds ratio, 1.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.5). Chronic respiratory insufficiency, bladder dysfunction, and epilepsy had significant associations with hospital resource use for CMC undergoing spinal fusion. Pediatricians, patients, and families may find it useful to consider these conditions when striving to benefit the children's perioperative health and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Bisphosphonate's and Intermittent Parathyroid Hormone's Effect on Human Spinal Fusion: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael A; Jakoi, Andre M; Iorio, Justin A; Pham, Martin H; Patel, Neil N; Hsieh, Patrick C; Liu, John C; Acosta, Frank L; Hah, Raymond; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2017-06-01

    There has been a conscious effort to address osteoporosis in the aging population. As bisphosphonate and intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) therapy become more widely prescribed to treat osteoporosis, it is important to understand their effects on other physiologic processes, particularly the impact on spinal fusion. Despite early animal model studies and more recent clinical studies, the impact of these medications on spinal fusion is not fully understood. Previous animal studies suggest that bisphosphonate therapy resulted in inhibition of fusion mass with impeded maturity and an unknown effect on biomechanical strength. Prior animal studies demonstrate an improved fusion rate and fusion mass microstructure with the use of intermittent PTH. The purpose of this study was to determine if bisphosphonates and intermittent PTH treatment have impact on human spinal fusion. A systematic review of the literature published between 1980 and 2015 was conducted using major electronic databases. Studies reporting outcomes of human subjects undergoing 1, 2, or 3-level spinal fusion while receiving bisphosphonates and/or intermittent PTH treatment were included. The results of relevant human studies were analyzed for consensus on the effects of these medications in regards to spinal fusion. There were nine human studies evaluating the impact of these medications on spinal fusion. Improved fusion rates were noted in patients receiving bisphosphonates compared to control groups, and greater fusion rates in patients receiving PTH compared to control groups. Prior studies involving animal models found an improved fusion rate and fusion mass microstructure with the use of intermittent PTH. No significant complications were demonstrated in any study included in the analysis. Bisphosphonate use in humans may not be a deterrent to spinal fusion. Intermittent parathyroid use has shown early promise to increase fusion mass in both animal and human studies but further studies are

  6. Bisphosphonate's and Intermittent Parathyroid Hormone's Effect on Human Spinal Fusion: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    There has been a conscious effort to address osteoporosis in the aging population. As bisphosphonate and intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) therapy become more widely prescribed to treat osteoporosis, it is important to understand their effects on other physiologic processes, particularly the impact on spinal fusion. Despite early animal model studies and more recent clinical studies, the impact of these medications on spinal fusion is not fully understood. Previous animal studies suggest that bisphosphonate therapy resulted in inhibition of fusion mass with impeded maturity and an unknown effect on biomechanical strength. Prior animal studies demonstrate an improved fusion rate and fusion mass microstructure with the use of intermittent PTH. The purpose of this study was to determine if bisphosphonates and intermittent PTH treatment have impact on human spinal fusion. A systematic review of the literature published between 1980 and 2015 was conducted using major electronic databases. Studies reporting outcomes of human subjects undergoing 1, 2, or 3-level spinal fusion while receiving bisphosphonates and/or intermittent PTH treatment were included. The results of relevant human studies were analyzed for consensus on the effects of these medications in regards to spinal fusion. There were nine human studies evaluating the impact of these medications on spinal fusion. Improved fusion rates were noted in patients receiving bisphosphonates compared to control groups, and greater fusion rates in patients receiving PTH compared to control groups. Prior studies involving animal models found an improved fusion rate and fusion mass microstructure with the use of intermittent PTH. No significant complications were demonstrated in any study included in the analysis. Bisphosphonate use in humans may not be a deterrent to spinal fusion. Intermittent parathyroid use has shown early promise to increase fusion mass in both animal and human studies but further studies are

  7. Composite piezoelectric spinal fusion implant: Effects of stacked generators.

    PubMed

    Goetzinger, Nathan C; Tobaben, Eric J; Domann, John P; Arnold, Paul M; Friis, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Spinal fusion surgeries have a high failure rate for difficult-to-fuse patients. A piezoelectric spinal fusion implant was developed to overcome the issues with other adjunct therapies. Stacked generators were used to improve power generation at low electrical load resistances. The effects of the number of layers on average maximum power and the optimal electrical load resistance were characterized. The effects of mechanical preload, load frequency, and amplitude on maximum power and optimal electrical load resistance were also characterized. Increasing the number of layers from one to nine was found to lower the optimal electrical load resistance from 1.00 GΩ to 16.78 MΩ while maintaining maximum power generation. Mechanical preload did not have a significant effect on power output or optimal electrical load resistance. Increases in mechanical loading frequency increased average maximum power, while decreasing the optimal electrical load resistance. Increases in mechanical loading amplitude increased average maximum power output without affecting the optimal electrical load resistance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Novel spinal instrumentation to enhance osteogenesis and fusion: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    MacEwan, Matthew R; Talcott, Michael R; Moran, Daniel W; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Instrumented spinal fusion continues to exhibit high failure rates in patients undergoing multilevel lumbar fusion or pseudarthrosis revision; with Grade II or higher spondylolisthesis; or in those possessing risk factors such as obesity, tobacco use, or metabolic disorders. Direct current (DC) electrical stimulation of bone growth represents a unique surgical adjunct in vertebral fusion procedures, yet existing spinal fusion stimulators are not optimized to enhance interbody fusion. To develop an advanced method of applying DC electrical stimulation to promote interbody fusion, a novel osteogenic spinal system capable of routing DC through rigid instrumentation and into the vertebral bodies was fabricated. A pilot study was designed to assess the feasibility of osteogenic instrumentation and compare the ability of osteogenic instrumentation to promote successful interbody fusion in vivo to standard spinal instrumentation with autograft. METHODS Instrumented, single-level, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with autologous graft was performed at L4-5 in adult Toggenburg/Alpine goats, using both osteogenic spinal instrumentation (plus electrical stimulation) and standard spinal instrumentation (no electrical stimulation). At terminal time points (3 months, 6 months), animals were killed and lumbar spines were explanted for radiographic analysis using a SOMATOM Dual Source Definition CT Scanner and high-resolution Microcat II CT Scanner. Trabecular continuity, radiodensity within the fusion mass, and regional bone formation were examined to determine successful spinal fusion. RESULTS Quantitative analysis of average bone density in pedicle screw beds confirmed that electroactive pedicle screws used in the osteogenic spinal system focally enhanced bone density in instrumented vertebral bodies. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of high-resolution CT scans of explanted lumbar spines further demonstrated that the osteogenic spinal system induced solid

  9. Hospital competitive intensity and perioperative outcomes following lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Durand, Wesley M; Johnson, Joseph R; Li, Neill Y; Yang, JaeWon; Eltorai, Adam E M; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-09-04

    Inter-hospital competition has been shown to influence adoption of surgical techniques and approaches, clinical patient outcomes, and healthcare resource utilization for select surgical procedures. However, little is known regarding these dynamics as they relate to spine surgery. This investigation sought to examine the relationship between inter-hospital competitive intensity and perioperative outcomes following lumbar spinal fusion. This study utilized the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) dataset, years 2003, 2006, and 2009. Patients were included based on the presence of International Classification of Disease, 9(th) Edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes corresponding to lumbar spinal fusion, as well as on the presence of data on the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI). Perioperative complications, defined using an ICD-9-CM coding algorithm. The HHI, a validated measure of competition within a market, was utilized to assess hospital market competitiveness. HHI was calculated based on hospital cachement area. Multiple regression was performed to adjust for confounding variables including: patient age, sex, primary payer, severity of illness score, primary vs. revision fusion, anterior vs. posterior approach, national region, hospital bed size, location/teaching status, ownership, and year. Perioperative clinical outcomes were assessed based on ICD-9-CM codes with modifications. In total, 417,520 weighted patients (87,999 unweighted records) were analyzed. The mean cachement area HHI was 0.31 (range 0.099 - 0.724). The average patient age was 55.4 years (SE = 0.194), and the majority of patients were female (55.8%, n=232,727). The majority of procedures were primary spinal fusions (92.7%, n=386,998), and fusions with posterior-only technique (81.5%, n=340,271). Most procedures occurred in the South (42.5%, n=177,509) or Midwest (27.0%, n=112,758) regions. In multiple regression analysis, increased hospital competitive intensity was associated with

  10. Junctional disc herniation syndrome in post spinal fusion treated with endoscopic spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiu, John C; Clifford, Thomas; Princenthal, Robert; Shaw, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Fusions of the cervical and lumbar spine are often followed within months or several years by protrusion of discs at the adjacent level or levels. Biomechanical alterations and mobility lost at the fused levels are thought to be transferring the stress to the adjacent segments or discs, which results in accelerated degeneration of the discs and causes disc protrusion. This post-spinal fusion "junctional disc herniation syndrome" (JDHS), or the post-spinal fusion "adjacent segment disease (ASD)" can occur from 15% to 52% of post-spinal fusion, in both superior and/or inferior adjacent levels. The ways in which endoscopic minimally invasive spinal discectomy procedure can be used to treat this JDHS and preserve spinal segmental motion are discussed herein. Also, case illustrations are presented.

  11. MIS Fusion of the SI Joint: Does Prior Lumbar Spinal Fusion Affect Patient Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Sacroiliac (SI) joint pain is a challenging condition to manage as it can mimic discogenic or radicular low back pain, and present as low back, hip, groin and/or buttock pain. Patients may present with a combination of lumbar spine and SI joint symptoms, further complicating the diagnosis and treatment algorithm [1-3]. SI joint pain after lumbar spinal fusion has been reported in the literature. Both clinical and biomechanical studies show the SI joint to be susceptible to increased motion and stress at the articular surface with up to 40-75% of patients developing significant SI joint degeneration after 5 years. In a recent case series study of 50 patients who underwent minimally invasive SI joint arthrodesis, 50% had undergone previous lumbar spinal fusion and 18% had symptomatic lumbar spine pathology treated conservatively [4]. The purpose of this study is to determine if history of previous lumbar fusion or lumbar pathology affects patient outcomes after MIS SI joint fusion surgery. We report on 40 patients with 24 month follow up treated with MIS SI joint fusion using a series of triangular porous plasma coated titanium implants (iFuse, SI-Bone, Inc. San Jose, CA). Outcomes using a numerical rating scale (NRS) for pain were obtained at 3-, 6-, 12- and 24 month follow up intervals. Additionally, patient satisfaction was collected at the latest follow up interval. Patients were separated into 3 cohorts: 1) underwent prior lumbar spine fusion (PF), 2) no history of previous lumbar spine fusion (NF), 3) no history of previous lumbar spine fusion with symptomatic lumbar spine pathology treated conservatively (LP). A repeated measures analysis of variance (rANOVA) was used to determine if the change in NRS pain scores differed across timepoints and subgroups. A decrease in NRS by 2 points was deemed clinically significant [5]. Mean age was 54 (±13) years and varied slightly but not statistically between groups. All subgroups experienced a clinically and

  12. Pain prevalence and trajectories following pediatric spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Sieberg, Christine B; Simons, Laura E; Edelstein, Mark R; DeAngelis, Maria R; Pielech, Melissa; Sethna, Navil; Hresko, M Timothy

    2013-12-01

    Factors contributing to pain following surgery are poorly understood, with previous research largely focused on adults. With approximately 6 million children undergoing surgery each year, there is a need to study pediatric persistent postsurgical pain. The present study includes patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery enrolled in a prospective, multicentered registry examining postsurgical outcomes. The Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire-Version 30, which includes pain, activity, mental health, and self-image subscales, was administered to 190 patients prior to surgery and at 1 and 2 years postsurgery. A subset (n = 77) completed 5-year postsurgery data. Pain prevalence at each time point and longitudinal trajectories of pain outcomes derived from SAS PROC TRAJ were examined using analyses of variance and post hoc pairwise analyses across groups. Thirty-five percent of patients reported pain in the moderate to severe range presurgery. One year postoperation, 11% reported pain in this range, whereas 15% reported pain at 2 years postsurgery. At 5 years postsurgery, 15% of patients reported pain in the moderate to severe range. Among the 5 empirically derived pain trajectories, there were significant differences on self-image, mental health, and age. Identifying predictors of poor long-term outcomes in children with postsurgical pain may prevent the development of chronic pain into adulthood. This investigation explores the prevalence of pediatric pain following surgery, up to 5 years after spinal fusion surgery. Five pain trajectories were identified and were distinguishable on presurgical characteristics of age, mental health, and self-image. This is the largest study to examine longitudinal pediatric pain trajectories after surgery. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. In situ posterolateral spine arthrodesis for grades III, IV, and V spondylolisthesis in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewski, A; Kumar, S J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the results after in situ posterolateral arthrodesis without reduction in children and adolescents with Meyerding grades III and IV spondylolisthesis and in patients with spondyloptosis who had an average follow-up of 12.8 years. The study population consisted of 21 patients who underwent an in situ posterolateral spinal fusion from L4 to S1 with autogenous iliac bone graft and were immobilized in a pantaloon cast for 4 months. All patients reported improvement after the operation and had no limitation in daily activities. Only four of 21 patients complained of occasional mild pain after physical activity, which resolved with rest and did not disturb their work. After surgery there were no motor deficits, incontinence of bowel or bladder, or sexual dysfunction. Roentgenographic findings showed progression of the slip in five patients and increase of the slip angle and the displacement index in two patients. These changes happened during the first year after the operation. Progression of the slip was not associated with symptoms. There was no pseudarthrosis. In situ posterolateral arthrodesis with a large amount of autogenous bone graft followed by immobilization in a pantaloon cast yields a solid arthrodesis and provides satisfactory results.

  14. LIPUS promotes spinal fusion coupling proliferation of type H microvessels in bone

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ximing; Wang, Fei; Yang, Yahong; Zhou, Xiaoyi; Cheng, Yajun; Wei, Xianzhao; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been found to accelerate spinal fusion. Type H microvessels are found in close relation with bone development. We analyzed the role of type H vessels in rat spinal fusion model intervened by LIPUS. It was found LIPUS could significantly accelerate bone fusion rate and enlarge bone callus. Osteoblasts were specifically located on the bone meshwork of the allograft, and were surrounded by type H microvessels. LIPUS could significantly increase the quantity of osteoblasts during spine fusion, which process was coupled with elevated angiogenesis of type H microvessels. Our results suggest that LIPUS may be a noninvasive adjuvant treatment modality in spinal fusion for clinical use. The treatment is recommended for usage for at least one month. PMID:26830666

  15. Laminoplasty after anterior spinal fusion for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chun-Hong; Leung, Hon-Bong; Yen, Chi-Hung

    2009-12-01

    To review outcomes of laminoplasty after anterior spinal fusion (ASF) in 8 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Records of 3 men and 5 women aged 49 to 80 (mean, 60) years who underwent laminoplasty after ASF for CSM were reviewed. Before and after ASF and laminoplasty, the causes of CSM, mechanical instability, the Pavlov Torg ratio, the numbers of levels of stenosis, myelomalacia, ASF, and laminoplasty, the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, and the Hirabayashi recovery rate were recorded in all the patients. After ASF, the mean modified JOA score improved to 9.6 from 8.3 (p=0.05), with a mean Hirabayashi recovery rate of 12.5% at the 12-month follow-up. However, it deteriorated to 9 after a mean of 25 (range, 3-54) months follow-up. Indications for a secondary laminoplasty included inadequate decompression (n=5), progression of prolapsed discs (n=4), osteophytes (n=3), ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (n=1), and hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum (n=4). The mean interval between ASF and laminoplasty was 30 (range, 14-55) months. The mean number of levels of laminoplasty was 4.5 (range, 4-5). After laminoplasty, all patients had adequate spinal decompression with no cord compromise, neck pain or stiffness, despite the signal change remaining the same. Two patients improved, 2 deteriorated, and 4 remained unchanged with respect to walking status. The mean modified JOA scores improved to 9.7 from 9 (p=0.38); the mean Hirabayashi recovery rate was -1.5%. All patients had persistent myelomalacia, which was not reflected in the improved modified JOA score. Initial surgery (such as ASF) is more effective in relieving cord compromise and myelopathy. Inadequate decompression and progression of disease may necessitate secondary laminoplasty, which conferred additional benefits that 5 of our 8 patients enjoyed despite persistence of myelomalacia.

  16. Off-label innovation: characterization through a case study of rhBMP-2 for spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Schnurman, Zane; Smith, Michael L; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Off-label therapies are widely used in clinical practice by spinal surgeons. Some patients and practitioners have advocated for increased regulation of their use, and payers have increasingly questioned reimbursment for off-label therapies. In this study, the authors applied a model that quantifies publication data to analyze the developmental process from initial on-label use to off-label innovation, using as an example recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) because of its wide off-label use. METHODS As a case study of off-label innovation, the developmental patterns of rhBMP-2 from FDA-approved use for anterior lumbar interbody fusion to several of its off-label uses, including posterolateral lumbar fusion, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, were evaluated using the "progressive scholarly acceptance" (PSA) model. In this model, PSA is used as an end point indicating acceptance of a therapy or procedure by the relevant scientific community and is reached when the total number of peer-reviewed studies devoted to refinement or improvement of a therapy surpasses the total number assessing initial efficacy. Report characteristics, including the number of patients studied and study design, were assessed in addition to the time to and pattern of community acceptance, and results compared with previous developmental study findings. Disclosures and reported conflicts of interest for all articles were reviewed, and these data were also used in the analysis. RESULTS Publication data indicated that the acceptance of rhBMP-2 off-label therapies occurred more rapidly and with less evidence than previously studied on-label therapies. Additionally, the community appeared to respond more robustly (by rapidly changing publication patterns) to reports of adverse events than to new questions of efficacy. CONCLUSIONS The development of off-label therapies, including the

  17. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite coated PEEK for spinal fusion surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Byung-Dong; Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Yoon, Byung-Ho; Jung, In-Kwon

    2013-10-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much interest as biomaterial for interbody fusion cages due to its similar stiffness to bone and good radio-transparency for post-op visualization. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating stimulates bone growth to the medical implant. The objective of this work is to make an implant consisting of biocompatible PEEK with an osteoconductive HA surface for spinal or orthopedic applications. Highly dense and well-adhered HA coating was developed on medical-grade PEEK using aerosol deposition (AD) without thermal degradation of the PEEK. The HA coating had a dense microstructure with no cracks or pores, and showed good adhesion to PEEK at adhesion strengths above 14.3 MPa. The crystallinity of the HA coating was remarkably enhanced by hydrothermal annealing as post-deposition heat-treatment. In addition, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of cell adhesion morphology, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone-to-implant contact ratio, were remarkably enhanced by the HA coating through AD.

  18. Difference in Spinal Fusion Process in Osteopenic and Nonosteopenic Living Rat Models Using Serial Microcomputed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Bae; Yang, Hee-Jin; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee

    2017-05-01

    To identify and investigate differences in spinal fusion between the normal and osteopenic spine in a rat model. Female Sprague Dawley rats underwent either an ovariectomy (OVX) or sham operation and were randomized into two groups: non-OVX group and OVX group. Eight weeks after OVX, unilateral lumbar spinal fusion was performed using autologous iliac bone. Bone density (BD) was measured 2 days and 8 weeks after fusion surgery. Microcomputed tomography was used to evaluate the process of bone fusion every two weeks for 8 weeks after fusion surgery. The fusion rate, fusion process, and bone volume parameters of fusion bed were compared between the two groups. BD was significantly higher in the non-OVX group than in the OVX group 2 days and 8 weeks after fusion surgery. The fusion rate in the non-OVX group was higher than that in the OVX group 8 weeks after surgery (p=0.044). The bony connection of bone fragments with transverse processes and bone formation between transverse processes in non-OVX group were significantly superior to those of OVX group from 6 weeks after fusion surgery. The compactness and bone maturation of fusion bed in non-OVX were prominent compared with the non-OVX group. The fusion rate in OVX group was inferior to non-OVX group at late stage after fusion surgery. Bone maturation of fusion bed in the OVX group was inferior compared with the non-OVX group. Fusion enhancement strategies at early stage may be needed to patients with osteoporosis who need spine fusion surgery.

  19. Effect of Spinal Fusion Surgery on Total Hip Arthroplasty Outcomes: A Matched Comparison Study.

    PubMed

    Loh, Jing Loong Moses; Jiang, Lei; Chong, Hwei Chi; Yeo, Seng Jin; Lo, Ngai Nung

    2017-08-01

    Studies regarding postoperative outcomes after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients who have comorbid factors tend to focus on medical diseases. However, there is a paucity of literature examining the effect of a patient's orthopedic surgical history on outcomes after THA. Significantly, there are currently no studies on the effect of spinal fusion surgery on THA outcomes. A review of 82 consecutive patients who had prior spinal fusion surgery who underwent elective THA from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2015, was conducted. A matching cohort of 82 patients was selected from the remaining THA patients to maintain a 1:1 ratio control group. This cohort of 82 patients was matched for age, gender, body mass index ±5, preoperative Oxford score ±10, total Short Form-36 score ±10, and total Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) score ±50. Data on the same functional outcomes were prospectively collected at 6-month and 2-year follow-up for comparison. Patients without spinal fusion had better outcome scores than patients with prior spinal fusion, specifically in their 6-month WOMAC scores (253.33-225.07; P = .046), their 2-year Short Form-36 total scores (79.71-69.21; P = .041), and their 2-year WOMAC scores (213.5-267.41; P = .054). This study demonstrates that patients with prior spinal fusion had worse outcomes after THA than patients without prior spinal fusion. This has clinical significance in counseling patients with previous spinal fusion undergoing THA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Epidemiologic and Economic Burden Attributable to First Spinal Fusion Surgery: Analysis From an Italian Administrative Database.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, Paolo A; Assietti, Roberto; Cuzzocrea, Fabrizio; Prestamburgo, Domenico; Pluderi, Mauro; Cozzolino, Paolo; Tito, Patrizia; Vanelli, Roberto; Cecconi, Davide; Borsa, Stefano; Cesana, Giancarlo; Mantovani, Lorenzo G

    2017-09-15

    Retrospective large population based-study. Assessment of the epidemiologic trends and economic burden of first spinal fusions. No adequate data are available regarding the epidemiology of spinal fusion surgery and its economic impact in Europe. The study population was identified through a data warehouse (DENALI), which matches clinical and economic data of different Healthcare Administrative databases of the Italian Lombardy Region. The study population consisted of all subjects, resident in Lombardy, who, during the period January 2001 to December 2010, underwent spinal fusion surgery (ICD-9-CM codes: 81.04, 81.05, 81.06, 81.07, and 81.08). The first procedure was used as the index event. We estimated the incidence of first spinal fusion surgery, the population and surgery characteristics and the healthcare costs from the National Health Service's perspective. The analysis was performed for the entire population and divided into the main groups of diagnosis. The analysis identified 17,772 [mean age (SD): 54.6 (14.5) years, 55.3% females] spinal fusion surgeries. Almost 67% of the patients suffered from a lumbar degenerative disease. The incidence rate of interventions increased from 11.5 to 18.5 per 100,000 person-year between 2001 and 2006, and was above 20.0 per 100,000 person-year in the last 4 years. The patients' mean age increased during the observational time period from 48.1 to 55.9 years; whereas the median hospital length of stay reported for the index event decreased. The average cost of the spinal fusion surgery increased during the observational period, from &OV0556; 4726 up to &OV0556; 9388. The study showed an increasing incidence of spinal fusion surgery and costs from 2001 to 2010. These results can be used to better understand the epidemiological and economic burden of these interventions, and help to optimize the resources available considering the different clinical approaches accessible today. 4.

  1. What is the Impact of a Spinal Fusion on Acetabular Implant Orientation in Functional Standing and Sitting Positions?

    PubMed

    Lazennec, Jean Y; Clark, Ian C; Folinais, Dominique; Tahar, Imen N; Pour, Aidin E

    2017-10-01

    This study used EOS imaging of primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients, with and without predating spinal fusion, to investigate (1) the impact of spinal fusion on acetabular implant anteversion and inclination, and (2) whether more extensive spinal fusion (fusion starting above the thoracolumbar junction or extension of fusion to the sacrum) affects acetabular implant orientation differently than lumbar only spinal fusion. Ninety-three patients had spinal fusion (case group), and 150 patients were without spinal fusion (controls). None of the patients experienced dislocation. The change in sacral slope (SS) and cup orientation from standing to sitting was measured. Mean SS change from the standing to sitting positions was -7.9°in the fusion group vs -18.4°in controls (P = .0001). Mean change in cup inclination from the standing to sitting positions was 4.9°in the fusion group vs 10.2°in controls (P = .0001). Mean change in cup anteversion from standing to sitting positions was 7.1°in the fusion group vs 12.1°in controls (P = .0001). For each additional level of spinal fusion, the change in SS from standing to sitting positions decreased by 1.6(95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2073-1.0741), the change in cup inclination decreased by 0.8(95% CI, 0.380-1.203), and the change in cup anteversion decreased by 0.9(95% CI, 0.518-1.352; P < .001 in all cases). Patients with spinal fusion demonstrated less adaptability of the lumbosacral junction. Longer spinal fusion or inclusion of the pelvis in the fusion critically impacts hip-spine biomechanics and significantly affects the ability to compensate in the standing-to-sitting transition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Zygapophyseal Joint Fusion in Ankylosing Spondylitis Assessed by Computed Tomography: Associations with Syndesmophytes and Spinal Motion.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Flynn, John A; Yao, Lawrence; Ward, Michael M

    2017-07-01

    Because zygapophyseal joints (ZJ) are difficult to visualize on radiographs, little is known about the relationship of ZJ fusion to other features of spinal damage in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We used computed tomography (CT) to investigate the concordance of ZJ fusion and syndesmophytes, and examined the contribution of both features to spinal motion. We performed thoracolumbar CT scans (T10-T11 to L3-L4) on 55 patients. Two readers scored scans for ZJ fusion, which were compared to syndesmophyte height and extent of bridging, measured by computer algorithm at the same levels. We used multiple regression analysis to evaluate the relative contributions of ZJ fusion and syndesmophytes to spinal mobility. Fifty-one percent of patients had ZJ fusion in at least 1 vertebral level. Fusion was present in 129 of 652 individual ZJ. Syndesmophytes and bridging were often present in vertebral levels without ZJ fusion, suggesting that syndesmophytes most often develop first. ZJ fusion was present in 34% of vertebral levels with syndesmophytes and 55.9% of levels with bridging, suggesting a closer association with bridging. Syndesmophytes and ZJ fusion had similar associations with the modified Schober test, but syndesmophytes were more strongly associated with limitations in lateral thoracolumbar flexion. ZJ rarely showed new fusion over 4 years. Thoracolumbar ZJ fusion in AS is rarely present at vertebral levels without syndesmophytes. Syndesmophytes, therefore, likely appear before ZJ fusion at a given vertebral level. Both syndesmophytes and ZJ fusion contribute to limited forward lumbar flexion, but syndesmophytes contribute more to limited lateral flexion.

  3. The Effect of Perioperative Radiation Therapy on Spinal Bone Fusion Following Spine Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Kyum; Youn, Sang Min; Chang, Ung-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative irradiation is often combined with spine tumor surgery. Radiation is known to be detrimental to healing process of bone fusion. We tried to investigate bone fusion rate in spine tumor surgery cases with perioperative radiation therapy (RT) and to analyze significant factors affecting successful bone fusion. Methods Study cohort was 33 patients who underwent spinal tumor resection and bone graft surgery combined with perioperative RT. Their medical records and radiological data were analyzed retrospectively. The analyzed factors were surgical approach, location of bone graft (anterior vs. posterior), kind of graft (autologous graft vs. allograft), timing of RT (preoperative vs. postoperative), interval of RT from operation in cases of postoperative RT (within 1 month vs. after 1 month) radiation dose (above 38 Gy vs. below 38 Gy) and type of radiation therapy (conventional RT vs. stereotactic radiosurgery). The bone fusion was determined on computed tomography images. Result Bone fusion was identified in 19 cases (57%). The only significant factors to affect bony fusion was the kind of graft (75% in autograft vs. 41 in allograft, p=0.049). Other factors proved to be insignificant relating to postoperative bone fusion. Regarding time interval of RT and operation in cases of postoperative RT, the time interval was not significant (p=0.101). Conclusion Spinal fusion surgery which was combined with perioperative RT showed relatively low bone fusion rate (57%). For successful bone fusion, the selection of bone graft was the most important. PMID:27847573

  4. Effects of Strontium Ranelate on Spinal Interbody Fusion Surgery in an Osteoporotic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Ho, Natalie Yi-Ju; Lai, Po-Liang; Fu, Tsai-Sheng; Niu, Chi-Chien; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a bone disease that afflicts millions of people around the world, and a variety of spinal integrity issues, such as degenerative spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis, are frequently concomitant with osteoporosis and are sometimes treated with spinal interbody fusion surgery. Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of strontium ranelate (SrR) treatment of osteoporosis in improving bone strength, promoting bone remodeling, and reducing the risk of fractures, but its effects on interbody fusion surgery have not been adequately investigated. SrR-treated rats subjected to interbody fusion surgery exhibited significantly higher lumbar vertebral bone mineral density after 12 weeks of treatment than rats subjected to the same surgery but not treated with SrR. Furthermore, histological and radiographic assessments showed that a greater amount of newly formed bone tissue was present and that better fusion union occurred in the SrR-treated rats than in the untreated rats. Taken together, these results show significant differences in bone mineral density, PINP level, histological score, SrR content and mechanical testing, which demonstrate a relatively moderate effect of SrR treatment on bone strength and remodeling in the specific context of recovery after an interbody fusion surgery, and suggest the potential of SrR treatment as an effective adjunct to spinal interbody fusion surgery for human patients. PMID:28052066

  5. A systematic review of mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury, intervertebral disc repair and spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shujhat; Mafi, Pouya; Mafi, Reza; Khan, Wasim

    2017-09-07

    Spinal surgery presents a challenge for both neurosurgery and orthopaedic surgery. Due to the heterogeneous differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells, there is much interest in the treatment of spine surgery. Animal and human trials focussing on the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury, spine fusion and disc degeneration were included in this systematic review. Published articles up to January 2016 from MEDLINE, PubMed and Ovid were used by searching for specific terms. Of the 2595 articles found, 53 met the selection criteria and were included for analysis (16 on spinal cord injury, 28 on intervertebral disc repair and 9 on spinal fusion). Numerous studies reported better results when the mesenchymal stem cells were used in co-culture with other cells or used in scaffolds. Mesenchymal stem cells were also found to have an immune-modulatory role, which can improve surgical outcome. This systematic review suggests mesenchymal stem cells can be used safely and effectively for these spinal surgery treatments. Whilst, in certain studies, mesenchymal stem cells did not necessarily show improved results from existing treatments, they provide an alternative option. This can reduce morbidity that arises from current surgical treatment. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections Following Neurosurgical Spinal Fusion Operations: A Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Thomas L; Querry, Ashley M; McCool, Sheila; Galdys, Alison L; Shutt, Kathleen A; Saul, Melissa I; Muto, Carlene A

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine risk factors for the development of surgical site infections (SSIs) in neurosurgery patients undergoing spinal fusion. DESIGN Retrospective case-control study. SETTING Large, academic, quaternary care center. PATIENTS The study population included all neurosurgery patients who underwent spinal fusion between August 1, 2009, and August 31, 2013. Cases were defined as patients in the study cohort who developed an SSI. Controls were patients in the study cohort who did not develop an SSI. METHODS To achieve 80% power with an ability to detect an odds ratio (OR) of 2, we performed an unmatched case-control study with equal numbers of cases and controls. RESULTS During the study period, 5,473 spinal fusion procedures were performed by neurosurgeons in our hospital. With 161 SSIs recorded during the study period, the incidence of SSIs associated with these procedures was 2.94%. While anterior surgical approach was found to be a protective factor (OR, 0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.08-0.52), duration of procedure (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.29-1.93), American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or 4 (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.00-3.18), and hospitalization within the prior 30 days (OR, 5.8; 95% CI, 1.37-24.57) were found in multivariate analysis to be independent predictors of SSI following spinal fusion. Prior methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nares colonization was highly associated with odds 20 times higher of SSI following spinal fusion (OR, 20.30; 95% CI, 4.64-8.78). CONCLUSIONS In additional to nonmodifiable risk factors, prior colonization with MRSA is a modifiable risk factor very strongly associated with development of SSI following spinal fusion. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:348-352.

  7. Early experience with endoscopic revision of lumbar spinal fusions.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Lynn B; Madhavan, Karthik; Chieng, Lee Onn; Wang, Michael Y; Hofstetter, Christoph P

    2016-02-01

    Approximately half a million spinal fusion procedures are performed annually in the US. It is estimated that up to one-third of arthrodesis constructs require revision surgeries. In this study the authors present endoscopic treatment strategies targeting 3 types of complications following arthrodesis surgery: 1) adjacent-level foraminal stenosis; 2) foraminal stenosis at an arthrodesis segment; and 3) stenosis caused by a displaced interbody cage. A retrospective chart review of 11 patients with a mean age of 68 ± 15 years was performed (continuous variables are shown as the mean ± SEM). All patients had a history of lumbar arthrodesis surgery and suffered from unilateral radiculopathy. Endoscopic revision surgeries were done as outpatient procedures, and there were no intraoperative or perioperative complications. The cohort included 3 patients with foraminal stenosis at the level of previous arthrodesis. They presented with unilateral radicular leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS] score: 7.3 ± 2.1) and were severely disabled, as evidenced by an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) of 46 ± 4.9. Transforaminal endoscopic foraminotomies were performed, and at a mean follow-up time of 9.0 ± 2.5 months VAS was reduced by an average of 6.3. The cohort also includes 7 patients suffering unilateral radiculopathy due to adjacent-level foraminal stenosis. Preoperative VAS for leg pain of the symptomatic side was 6.0 ± 1.6, VAS for back pain was 5.2 ± 1.7, and ODI was 40 ± 6.33. Endoscopic decompression led to reduction of the ipsilateral leg VAS score by an average of 5, resulting in leg pain of 1 ± 0.5 at an average of 8 months of follow-up. The severity of back pain remained stable (VAS 4.2 ± 1.4). Two of these patients required revision surgery for recurrent symptoms. Finally, this study includes 1 patient who presented with weakness and pain due to retropulsion of an L5/S1 interbody spacer. The patient underwent an endoscopic interlaminar approach with partial

  8. Spatiotemporal Changes of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Innervation in Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Yi; Xu, Xi-Ming; Wu, Sui-Yi; Wang, Fei; Yang, Yi-Lin; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the role calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays in the process of spinal fusion. The aim of the present study is to observe the temporal and spatial changes of CGRP induced by experimental fusion surgery in rats and elucidate the role of CGRP in spinal fusion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the study and the specimens were collected on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day, respectively. Then, histological and immunohistochemical analysis were applied to evaluate the fusion mass and spatiotemporal changes of CGRP chronologically. The results demonstrated that density of CGRP reached peak on the 21st day after surgery and most of the CGRP expression located surrounding the interface of allograft and fibrous tissue where the cells differentiate into osteoblasts, indicating that CGRP might be involved in the process of bone formation and absorption. PMID:27990431

  9. Bone graft options for spinal fusion following resection of spinal column tumors: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Elder, Benjamin D; Ishida, Wataru; Goodwin, C Rory; Bydon, Ali; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Sciubba, Daniel M; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy F

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE With the advent of new adjunctive therapy, the overall survival of patients harboring spinal column tumors has improved. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the optimal bone graft options following resection of spinal column tumors, due to their relative rarity and because fusion outcomes in this cohort are affected by various factors, such as radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy. Furthermore, bone graft options are often limited following tumor resection because the use of local bone grafts and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are usually avoided in light of microscopic infiltration of tumors into local bone and potential carcinogenicity of BMP. The objective of this study was to review and meta-analyze the relevant clinical literature to provide further clinical insight regarding bone graft options. METHODS A web-based MEDLINE search was conducted in accordance with preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines, which yielded 27 articles with 383 patients. Information on baseline characteristics, tumor histology, adjunctive treatments, reconstruction methods, bone graft options, fusion rates, and time to fusion were collected. Pooled fusion rates (PFRs) and I(2) values were calculated in meta-analysis. Meta-regression analyses were also performed if each variable appeared to affect fusion outcomes. Furthermore, data on 272 individual patients were available, which were additionally reviewed and statistically analyzed. RESULTS Overall, fusion rates varied widely from 36.0% to 100.0% due to both inter- and intrastudy heterogeneity, with a PFR of 85.7% (I(2) = 36.4). The studies in which cages were filled with morselized iliac crest autogenic bone graft (ICABG) and/or other bone graft options were used for anterior fusion showed a significantly higher PFR of 92.8, compared with the other studies (83.3%, p = 0.04). In per-patient analysis, anterior plus posterior fusion resulted in a higher fusion rate

  10. Analysis of the spinal nerve roots in relation to the adjacent vertebral bodies with respect to a posterolateral vertebral body replacement procedure

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Waleed; Bourget-Murray, Jonathan; Zeiadin, Nadil; Mejia, Juan P; Steffen, Thomas; Algarni, Abdulrahman D; Alsaleh, Khalid; Ouellet, Jean; Weber, Michael; Jarzem, Peter F

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to improve the understanding of the anatomic variations along the thoracic and lumbar spine encountered during an all-posterior vertebrectomy, and reconstruction procedure. This information will help improve our understanding of human spine anatomy and will allow better planning for a vertebral body replacement (VBR) through either a transpedicular or costotransversectomy approach. Summary of Background Data: The major challenge to a total posterior approach vertebrectomy and VBR in the thoracolumbar spine lies in the preservation of important neural structures. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis. Hundred normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spinal studies (T1–L5) on sagittal T2-weighted MRI images were studied to quantify: (1) mid-sagittal vertebral body (VB) dimensions (anterior, midline, and posterior VB height), (2) midline VB and associated intervertebral discs height, (3) mean distance between adjacent spinal nerve roots (DNN) and mean distance between the inferior endplate of the superior vertebrae to its respective spinal nerve root (DNE), and (4) posterior approach expansion ratio (PAER). Results: (1) The mean anterior VB height gradually increased craniocaudally from T1 to L5. The mean midline and posterior VB height showed a similar pattern up to L2. Mean posterior VB height was larger than the mean anterior VB height from T1 to L2, consistent with anterior wedging, and then measured less than the mean anterior VB height, indicating posterior wedging. (2) Midline VB and intervertebral disc height gradually increased from T1 to L4. (3) DNN and DNE were similar, whereby they gradually increased from T1 to L3. (5) Mean PAER varied between 1.69 (T12) and 2.27 (L5) depending on anatomic level. Conclusions: The dimensions of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae and discs vary greatly. Thus, any attempt at carrying out a VBR from a posterior approach should take into account the specifications at each spinal level. PMID

  11. Spinal fusion in patients with congenital heart disease. Predictors of outcome.

    PubMed

    Coran, D L; Rodgers, W B; Keane, J F; Hall, J E; Emans, J B

    1999-07-01

    The strong association between congenital heart disease and spinal deformity is well established, but data on the risks and outcome of spinal fusion surgery in patients with congenital heart disease are scarce. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of perioperative risk and outcome in a large series of children and adolescents with congenital heart disease who underwent spinal fusion for scoliosis or kyphosis. In the authors' retrospective analysis of 74 consecutive patients with congenital heart disease undergoing spinal fusion, there were two deaths (2.7%) and 18 significant complications (24.3%) in the perioperative period. Preoperative cyanosis (arterial oxygen saturation < 90% at rest) with uncorrected or incompletely corrected congenital heart disease was associated with both deaths. Complications occurred in nine of 18 (50%) patients with cyanosis and in 11 of 56 (20%) patients without cyanosis. As judged by multivariate analysis the best predictors of perioperative outcome were the overall physical status of the patient as represented by the American Society of Anesthesiologists' preoperative score and a higher rate of intraoperative blood loss. Seventeen of 43 patients (40%) with an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher experienced complications including two perioperative deaths. Successful spinal fusion and correction were achieved in 97% of patients. Children and adolescents with congenital heart disease can undergo elective spinal fusion with risks that relate to overall cardiac status. Careful assessment of preoperative status by pediatric cardiologists and cardiac anesthesiologists familiar with surgical treatment of patients with congenital heart disease will assist the orthopaedic surgeon in providing the most realistic estimate of risk.

  12. Continuous irrigation and drainage for early postoperative deep wound infection after posterior instrumented spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Jian-Guang; Zeng, Bing-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Kang; Li, Hao; Qiu, Man-le; Yang, Er-Zhu

    2014-12-01

    A retrospective study of clinical cases. To evaluate the efficacy of continuous irrigation and drainage for early postoperative deep wound infection after posterior instrumented spinal fusion. Aggressive debridement and irrigation has been recommended to treat postoperative wound infections after instrumented spinal fusion. However, this method of management, indicating repeating visits to the operating room until the wound is clean enough for closure, often results in prolonged hospitalization, increased cost, and sometimes compromise of the desired outcome. We hypothesize that repeat visits to the operating room for debridements can be avoided by aggressive debridements and primary closure with continuous irrigation and drainage for postoperative wound infections. From 2004 to 2009, 23 patients with early postoperative deep wound infections after spinal fusion with instrumentation were surgically treated with thorough debridement and primary closure with continuous irrigation and drainage. All patients were followed up for 30.6 months (range, 24-54 mo). The mean duration of irrigation was 12.0 days (range, 7-16 d). In 21 patients (91.3%), the wound healed after continuous irrigation. The removal of the instrumentation or cages was not required in any case. Spinal fusion was achieved in all cases, except 1, where the patient developed a pseudoarthrosis at the L4-L5 level after L4-S1 fusion. The mean ODI for these 23 patients improved significantly from 53.4±18.7 preoperatively to 18.3±11.2 at the final follow-up visit (P<0.001). The mean JOA scores increased significantly from 15.5±4.1 preoperatively to 24.3±3.8 at the final follow-up (P<0.001). Continuous irrigation and drainage is an effective and safe method for the treatment of early postoperative deep wound infection after posterior instrumented spinal fusion.

  13. A novel synthetic material for spinal fusion: a prospective clinical trial of porous bioactive titanium metal for lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Neo, Masashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Doi, Kenji; Ito, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Akira; Nakamura, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the efficacy and safety of porous bioactive titanium metal for use in a spinal fusion device, based on a prospective human clinical trial. A high-strength spinal interbody fusion device was manufactured from porous titanium metal. A bioactive surface was produced by simple chemical and thermal treatment. Five patients with unstable lumbar spine disease were treated surgically using this device in a clinical trial approved by our Ethics Review Committee and the University Hospital Medical Information Network. Clinical and radiological results were reported at the minimum follow-up period of 1 year. The optimal mechanical strength and interconnected structure of the porous titanium metal were adjusted for the device. The whole surface of porous titanium metal was treated uniformly and its bioactive ability was confirmed before clinical use. Successful bony union was achieved in all cases within 6 months without the need for autologous iliac crest bone grafting. Two specific findings including an anchoring effect and gap filling were evident radiologically. All clinical parameters improved significantly after the operation and no adverse effects were encountered during the follow-up period. Although a larger and longer-term follow-up clinical study is mandatory to reach any firm conclusions, the study results show that this porous bioactive titanium metal is promising material for a spinal fusion device.

  14. The Multiple Benefits of Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery: Results Comparing Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Starkweather, Angela R.; Witek-Janusek, Linda; Nockels, Russ P.; Peterson, Jonna; Mathews, Herb L.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) offers equivalent postoperative fusion rates compared to posterior lumbar fusion (PLF) and minimizes the amount of iatrogenic injury to the spinal muscles. The objective of this study was to examine the difference in pain perception, stress, mood disturbance, quality of life, and immunological indices throughout the perioperative course among patients undergoing TLIF and PLF. A prospective, nonrandomized descriptive design was used to evaluate these measures among patients undergoing TLIF (n = 17) or PLF (n = 18) at 1 week prior to surgery (T1), the day of surgery (T2), 24 hours postoperatively (T3), and 6 weeks postoperatively (T4). Among TLIF patients, pain, stress, fatigue, and mood disturbance were significantly decreased at the 6-week follow-up visit (T4) compared to patients who underwent PLF. The TLIF group also demonstrated significantly higher levels (near baseline) of CD8 cells atT4 than the PLF group. Interleukin-6 levels were significantly higher in the TLIF group as well, which may be an indicator of ongoing nerve regeneration and healing. Knowledge concerning the effect of pain and the psychological experience on immunity among individuals undergoing spinal fusion can help nurses tailor interventions to improve outcomes, regardless of the approach used. PMID:18330408

  15. Management of adjacent segment disease after cervical spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Hilibrand, Alan S

    2012-01-01

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) was described after long-term follow-up of patients treated with cervical fusion. The term describes new-onset radiculopathy or myelopathy referable to a motion segment adjacent to previous arthrodesis and often attributed to alterations in the biomechanical environment after fusion. Evidence suggests that ASD affects between 2% and 3% of patients per year. Although prevention of ASD was one major impetus behind the development of motion-sparing surgery, the literature does not yet clearly distinguish a difference in the rate of ASD between fusion and disk replacement. Surgical techniques during index surgery may reduce the rate of ASD.

  16. Analysis of mechanical failure associated with reoperation in spinal fusion to the sacrum in adult spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shinichi; Khashan, Morsi; Fujimori, Takahito; Berven, Sigurd H

    2015-07-01

    Long fusion to the sacrum has been demonstrated to increase the mechanical failure rate after adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery, and these mechanical failures are the most common etiology for reoperation. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for mechanical failure associated with reoperation after spinal fusion to the sacrum in ASD. The study included 76 patients with ASD who underwent spinal fusion surgery including the sacrum at a single institution between 2005 and 2010. The inclusion criteria were a minimum age of 20 years and fusion of ≥ 5 levels. The terminal event was defined as either the first reoperation for mechanical failure or a minimum of 2 years following surgery in patients who did not undergo reoperation. The cumulative reoperation rate for mechanical failure was 37 % (n = 28). The procedure survival rate was 79 % at 1 year and 72 % at 2 years. Mechanical failures consisted of proximal junctional complications in 16 patients and pseudarthrosis in 12 patients. Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) was the most frequent cause (n = 15), and seven patients were diagnosed with fractures at the UIV or one level above the UIV. Multivariate analysis identified the following as independent factors predicting mechanical failure: three or more comorbidities, smoking, and a preoperative sagittal vertical axis of >95 mm. SRS-22r and ODI scores were lower in patients with mechanical failure. Overall, 37 % of the patients who underwent ASD surgery involving the sacrum required reoperation for mechanical failure. The most frequent form of mechanical failure associated with reoperation was surgical PJK. Significant risk factors for mechanical failure included medical comorbidities, smoking, and severe preoperative sagittal imbalance. Critical mechanical failure may have a negative influence on health status.

  17. Epidemiological trends in the utilization of bone morphogenetic protein in spinal fusions from 2002 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kern; Nandyala, Sreeharsha V; Marquez-Lara, Alejandro; Fineberg, Steven J

    2014-03-15

    Retrospective database analysis. A nationwide population-based database was analyzed to assess the utilization trends of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in spine fusion surgery from 2002-2011. The utilization of off-label BMP in spine procedures is not well characterized. The purpose of this study was to analyze a population-based database to characterize the national trends of BMP utilization in terms of incidence, demographics, costs, and mortality. Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project was queried for each year from 2002-2011. Patients undergoing an anterior cervical fusion or posterior cervical fusion, anterior lumbar fusion or posterior lumbar fusion, or a posterior thoracic fusion were identified and separated into cohorts. The frequency of BMP utilization was assessed in each surgical cohort by year. Patient demographics, hospital parameters, costs, and mortality rates were assessed. The adjusted annual number of procedures with BMP increased from 1116 in 2002 to 79,294 in 2011 (P < 0.001), representing 26.9% of all spinal fusion procedures. The rate of BMP utilization within each surgical cohort also significantly increased during the 10-year period (P < 0.001). The posterior lumbar fusion cohort accounted for the majority of spinal fusions that used BMP, representing 76.8% of all spinal fusions between 2002 and 2011. The anterior lumbar fusion cohort was associated with the highest proportion of BMP utilization, peaking at 56.9% of all anterior lumbar interbody fusions in 2006. The trend of BMP utilization in the anterior cervical fusion cohort peaked in 2007 with 10.6% of cases and then declined to 6.4% in 2011. There was a statistically significant trend of older patients with increasing comorbidities receiving BMP during this period. Hospital costs (adjusted for inflation) significantly increased an average of $9560 from 2002-2010. There were no significant trends with regard to the length of

  18. Minimally Invasive Oblique Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Spinal Endoscope Assistance: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Hwa; Choi, Won Suh; Park, Choon-Keun; Kim, Jin-Sung

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the surgical methodology and effectiveness of minimally invasive oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) assisted by spinal endoscopy, which can treat disk herniation from the central to contralateral foramen. OLIF showed indirect decompression effects on reduction of spondylolisthesis and a foraminal widening effect on disk height restoration. In this study, the indirect decompression effect of OLIF was augmented by direct endoscopic decompression and spinal endoscopy for removal of herniated disk materials. Twelve patients with confirmed degenerative lumbar stenosis, herniated lumbar disks, and degenerative spondylolisthesis were treated using OLIF with spinal endoscopic discectomy. Direct ventral decompression was achieved by removal of herniated disk materials. The symptoms of all patients improved postoperatively. OLIF with spinal endoscopic discectomy can achieve neural decompression without additional posterior decompression and can be used as an alternative treatment in selected cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The biomechanical effects of spinal fusion on the sacral loading in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Saba; Aubin, Carl-Eric; Labelle, Hubert; Parent, Stefan; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2015-11-01

    Posterior spinal surgical correction is performed to correct spinal deformities in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Although the relative spino-pelvic alignment changes after spinal surgery, pelvis remains unfused in idiopathic scoliosis surgery. The impact of the spinal fusion on the transferred load to the pelvis via sacrum is not documented in the scoliotic subgroups. Bi-planar radiographs of 9 scoliotic subjects before and in average 16 months after spinal instrumentation surgery, and 12 controls were selected retrospectively. Patient-specific 3D reconstruction and finite element models of the spine, ribcage, and pelvis were developed. Spinal parameters (Cobb angles, kyphosis, lordosis), sacro-pelvic parameters (pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope), frontal and sagittal balances, the position of the trunk center of mass, and the centroid of the stress distribution on the sacrum superior endplate were measured and computed before operation and in the last follow-up. The position of the stress distribution centroid on the sacrum superior endplate with respect to the central hip vertical axis was significantly different between pre-operative and post-operative patients p<0.05. The distance between the anterior-posterior position of the trunk center of mass and the center of pressure on the superior sacral endplate significantly decreased after the spinal surgery p<0.05. The impact of the scoliosis spinal fusion on the transferred load between the spine and pelvis was evaluated. The biomechanical loading of the sacrum endplate was related to the post-operative postural balance and compensatory changes in the spino-pelvic alignment after scoliosis surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Lower preoperative Hounsfield unit measurements are associated with adjacent segment fracture after spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Dennis S; Schreiber, Joseph J; Taher, Fadi; Cammisa, Frank P; Girardi, Federico P

    2013-03-01

    Retrospective case-control study. To determine the association of Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements with adjacent segment fractures after spinal fusion. Adjacent segment fracture is a potentially devastating complication after spinal fusion surgery in osteoporotic patient. Recently, a technique for assessing bone mineral density using HU measurements from computed tomography was described and correlated with both dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-assessed bone mineral density and compressive strength in an osseous model. Patients with adjacent segment fractures after spinal fusion were identified from a prospectively collected patient database and matched 1:1 with nonfracture controls on the basis of age, sex, and fusion construct. Minimum follow-up was 6 months. Patients with metabolic bone disease other than osteoporosis or those taking medications known to negatively alter bone strength were excluded. HU assessment was done according to the previously published protocol using the preoperative computed tomography. Twenty patients had complete imaging data and could be matched to nonfracture controls. The groups were well matched with respect to age, sex, body mass index, and number of levels fused. Following the index surgical procedure, the fracture group had more positive sagittal balance than the control group (10.7 cm vs. 9.1 cm). Analysis of HU values at the fracture level showed a significantly lower value in the fracture group than in the controls (145.6 vs. 199.4, P = 0.006). Similarly, global assessment of HU across the thoracic and lumbar spines was significantly lower in the fracture group (139.9 vs. 170.1, P = 0.032). HU was significantly lower both locally and globally in the fracture cohort. Because computed tomographic scans are frequently part of preoperative planning for spinal fusion, this information should be incorporated in preoperative planning. Studies to prospectively validate HU as a predictor of adjacent segment fracture risk and to

  1. Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis by Debridement, Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation via Posterior Approach Only.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming-xing; Zhang, Hong-qi; Wang, Yu-xiang; Guo, Chao-feng; Liu, Jin-yang

    2016-02-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis includes focal tuberculosis debridement, segmental stability reconstruction, neural decompression and kyphotic deformity correction. For the lesions mainly involved anterior and middle column of the spine, anterior operation of debridement and fusion with internal fixation has been becoming the most frequently used surgical technique for the spinal tuberculosis. However, high risk of structural damage might relate with anterior surgery, such as damage in lungs, heart, kidney, ureter and bowel, and the deformity correction is also limited. Due to the organs are in the front of spine, there are less complications in posterior approach. Spinal pedicle screw passes through the spinal three-column structure, which provides more powerful orthopedic forces compared with the vertebral body screw, and the kyphotic deformity correction effect is better in posterior approach. In this paper, we report a 68-year-old male patient with thoracic tuberculosis who underwent surgical treatment by debridement, interbody fusion and internal fixation via posterior approach only. The patient was placed in prone position under general anesthesia. Posterior midline incision was performed, and the posterior spinal construction was exposed. Then place pedicle screw, and fix one side rod temporarily. Make the side of more bone destruction and larger abscess as lesion debridement side. Resect the unilateral facet joint, and retain contralateral structure integrity. Protect the spinal cord, nerve root. Clear sequestrum, necrotic tissue, abscess of paravertebral and intervertebral space. Specially designed titanium mesh cages or bone blocks were implanted into interbody. Fix both side rods and compress both sides to make the mesh cages and bone blocks tight. Reconstruct posterior column structure with allogeneic bone and autologous bone. Using this technique, the procedures of debridement, spinal cord decompression, deformity correction, bone grafting

  2. Outcomes of Spinal Fusion for Cervical Kyphosis in Children with Neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Helenius, Ilkka J; Sponseller, Paul D; Mackenzie, William; Odent, Thierry; Dormans, John P; Asghar, Jahangir; Rathjen, Karl; Pahys, Joshua M; Miyanji, Firoz; Hedequist, Daniel; Phillips, Jonathan H

    2016-11-02

    Cervical kyphosis may occur with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) and is often associated with vertebral dysplasia. Outcomes of cervical spinal fusion in patients with NF1 are not well described because of the rarity of the condition. We aimed to (1) characterize the clinical presentation of cervical kyphosis and (2) report the outcomes of posterior and anteroposterior cervical fusion for the condition in these children. The medical records and imaging studies of 22 children with NF1 who had undergone spinal fusion for cervical kyphosis (mean, 67°) at a mean age of 11 years and who had been followed for a minimum of 2 years were reviewed. Thirteen children presented with neck pain; 10, with head tilt; 9, with a previous cervical laminectomy or fusion; and 5, with a neurologic deficit. Two patients had spontaneous dislocation of the mid-cervical spine without a neurologic deficit. Eleven had scoliosis, with the major curve measuring a mean of 61°. Nine patients underwent posterior and 13 underwent anteroposterior surgery. Twenty-one received spinal instrumentation, and 1 was not treated with instrumentation. Preoperative halo traction was used for 9 patients, and it reduced the mean preoperative kyphosis by 34% (p = 0.0059). At the time of final follow-up, all spinal fusion sites had healed and the cervical kyphosis averaged 21° (mean correction, 69%; p < 0.001). The cervical kyphosis correction was significantly better after the anteroposterior procedures (83%) than after the posterior-only procedures (58%) (p = 0.031). Vertebral dysplasia and erosion continued in all 17 patients who had presented with dysplasia preoperatively. Thirteen patients had complications, including 5 new neurologic deficits and 8 cases of junctional kyphosis. Nine patients required revision surgery. Junctional kyphosis was more common in children in whom ≤5 levels had been fused (p = 0.054). Anteroposterior surgery provided better correction of cervical kyphosis than posterior spinal

  3. Effect of zoledronic acid on lumbar spinal fusion in osteoporotic patients.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qirui; Chen, Jian; Fan, Jin; Li, Qingqing; Yin, Guoyong; Yu, Lipeng

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of zoledronic acid (ZA) on lumbar spinal fusion in patients with osteoporosis. This retrospective study includes 94 osteoporotic patients suffering from lumbar degenerative diseases or lumbar fracture who underwent lumbar spinal fusion in our institution from January 2013 to August 2014. They were divided into ZA group and control group according to whether the patient received ZA infusion or not. The patients in ZA group were given 5 mg intravenous ZA at the 3rd-5th days after operation. All patients took daily oral supplement of 600 mg calcium carbonate and 800 IU vitamin D during the follow-up after operation. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form 36 (SF-36) scores were recorded preoperatively and post-operatively to evaluate the clinic outcomes; the spinal fusion was assessed by X-ray or CT Scan. 64 patients finished the final follow-up, including 30 patients in ZA group and 34 patients in control group. No significant difference was observed in gender, age, and preoperative BMI VAS, ODI, and SF-36 scores between the two groups (P > 0.05). The post-operative VAS and ODI scores decreased rapidly at 3 and 6 months, but rose back slightly at 12 and 24 months in both groups. On the contrary, post-operative SF-36 scores increased rapidly at 3 and 6 months, while fell back slightly at 12 and 24 months, with a statistically significant difference between the two groups at 12 months, but not at 3 and 6 month post-operation. The spinal fusion rate in ZA group was 90% at 6 months, 92% at 12 months, while it was 75% at 6 months, 92.86% at 12 months in control group, significantly different between the two groups at 12 months, but not at 6 months. In the whole follow-up period, adjacent vertebral compressing fracture occurred in five patients in control group, none in ZA group. No pedicle screw loosening was observed in ZA group, with six in control group. Zoledronic acid accelerates

  4. Comparison of bone grafts for posterior spinal fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Price, Charles T; Connolly, John F; Carantzas, Anthony C; Ilyas, Imran

    2003-04-15

    A retrospective comparison of three different types of bone grafts for posterior spinal fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. To determine the efficacy of bone marrow and demineralized bone matrix as a bone graft substitute for spinal fusion. Several reports have documented a high morbidity associated with harvesting autologous iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) for spinal fusion. Composite bone graft consisting of demineralized bone matrix and aspirated bone marrow may reduce the morbidity and still retain the osteoinductive properties of iliac crest autograft. Three different bone grafting techniques were used by a single surgeon in 88 consecutive patients who had posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Segmental instrumentation with dual-rod fixation was used in all cases. Selection of type of graft was determined historically by the time when the operations were performed. Autologous ICBG was used in Group A, freeze-dried corticocancellous allograft in Group B, and composite graft of autologous bone marrow and demineralized bone matrix in Group C. Seventy-seven patients were reviewed, with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up (mean, 3 years 7 months; range, 2 years-9 years 5 months). Radiographs were assessed for pseudarthrosis and loss of correction of 10 degrees or more. Loss of 10 degrees of correction has been previously identified as an indicator of potential pseudarthrosis or fusion instability. Both of these criteria were used to compare success of fusion. Failure caused by pseudarthroses was seen in two patients (2.6%), one in Group A and one in Group B. Eleven patients lost greater than 10 degrees of correction, but only one demonstrated pseudarthroses. The 13 patients with pseudarthroses or loss of correction constitute the failure group for purposes of graft assessment. The failure rate was 12.5% in Group A (ICBG), 28% in Group B (freeze-dried corticocancellous allograft), and 11.1% in Group C (composite graft of autologous bone

  5. Cost-effectiveness evaluation of an RCT in rehabilitation after lumbar spinal fusion: a low-cost, behavioural approach is cost-effective over individual exercise therapy.

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Rikke; Bünger, Cody E; Laurberg, Ida; Christensen, Finn B

    2008-02-01

    Recently, Christensen et al. reported the clinical effects of a low-cost rehabilitation program equally efficient to a relatively intensive program of individual, physiotherapist-guided exercise therapy. Yet, the low-cost approach is not fully supported as an optimal strategy until a full-scale economic evaluation, including extra-hospital effects such as service utilization in the primary health care sector and return-to-work, is conducted. The objective of this study was to conduct such evaluation i.e. investigate the cost-effectiveness of (1) a low-cost rehabilitation regimen with a behavioural element and (2) a regimen of individual exercise therapy, both in comparison with usual practice, from a health economic, societal perspective. Study design was a cost-effectiveness evaluation of an RCT with a 2-year follow-up. Ninety patients having had posterolateral or circumferential fusion (indicated by chronic low back pain and localized pathology) were randomized 3 months after their spinal fusion. Validated pain- and disability index scales were applied at baseline and at 2 years postoperative. Costs were measured in a full-scale societal perspective. The probability of the behavioural approach being cost-effective was close to 1 given pain as the prioritized effect measure, and 0.8 to 0.6 (dependent on willingness to pay per effect unit) given disability as the prioritized effect measure. The probability of the exercise therapy approach being cost-effective was modest due to inferior effectiveness. Results proved robust to relevant sensitivity analysis although a differentiated cost-effectiveness ratio between males and females was suspected. In conclusion, a simple behavioural extension, of setting up group meetings for patients, to a regimen with a strict physiotherapeutic focus was found cost-effective, whereas the cost-effectiveness of increasing frequency and guidance of a traditional physiotherapeutic regimen was unlikely in present trial setting.

  6. Dislocation of a primary total hip arthroplasty is more common in patients with a lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Buckland, A J; Puvanesarajah, V; Vigdorchik, J; Schwarzkopf, R; Jain, A; Klineberg, E O; Hart, R A; Callaghan, J J; Hassanzadeh, H

    2017-05-01

    Lumbar fusion is known to reduce the variation in pelvic tilt between standing and sitting. A flexible lumbo-pelvic unit increases the stability of total hip arthroplasty (THA) when seated by increasing anterior clearance and acetabular anteversion, thereby preventing impingement of the prosthesis. Lumbar fusion may eliminate this protective pelvic movement. The effect of lumbar fusion on the stability of total hip arthroplasty has not previously been investigated. The Medicare database was searched for patients who had undergone THA and spinal fusion between 2005 and 2012. PearlDiver software was used to query the database by the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedural code for primary THA and lumbar spinal fusion. Patients who had undergone both lumbar fusion and THA were then divided into three groups: 1 to 2 levels, 3 to 7 levels and 8+ levels of fusion. The rate of dislocation in each group was established using ICD-9-CM codes. Patients who underwent THA without spinal fusion were used as a control group. Statistical significant difference between groups was tested using the chi-squared test, and significance set at p < 0.05. At one-year follow-up, 14 747 patients were found to have had a THA after lumbar spinal fusion (12 079 1 to 2 levels, 2594 3 to 7 levels, 74 8+ levels). The control group consisted of 839 004 patients. The dislocation rate in the control group was 1.55%. A higher rate of dislocation was found in patients with a spinal fusion of 1 to 2 levels (2.96%, p < 0.0001) and 3 to 7 levels (4.12%, p < 0.0001). Patients with 3 to 7 levels of fusion had a higher rate of dislocation than patients with 1 to 2 levels of fusion (odds ratio (OR) = 1.60, p < 0.0001). When groups were matched for age and gender to the unfused cohort, patients with 1 to 2 levels of fusion had an OR of 1.93 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.42 to 2.32, p < 0.001), and those with 3 to 7 levels of fusion an OR of 2.77 (CI

  7. Migration of titanium cable into spinal cord and spontaneous C2 and C3 fusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huibo; Lou, Jigang; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Atlantoaxial instability is a common and serious injury of the upper cervical spine. Brooks’ procedure is widely used to reconstruct the unstable atlantoaxial joint. The migration into spinal cord of titanium cable and spontaneous fusion between C2 and C3 has been little reported and the management of such a patient is difficult. We describe an unusual case of fatigue failure of posterior titanium atlantoaxial cable fixation with migration into the spinal cord and spontaneous fusion between C2 and C3. Case report: A 16-year-old girl complained of cervico-occipital pain with numbness and weakness of extremities 3 months ago. The girl underwent posterior C1–C2 arthrodesis with titanium cables and autogenous iliac crest bone grafting when she was 6 years old. When presented to our emergency department, imaging revealed the cracked titanium atlantoaxial cable and the spontaneous fusion between C2 and C3. Computed tomography demonstrated a broken wire with anterior migration of the cable into the spinal cord. The patient underwent posterior approach cervical spinal surgery to remove the broken cables. She remains neurologically intact a year following the posterior approach cervical spine surgery. Conclusions: Brooks’ posterior stabilization could not effectively control rotation at the atlantoaxial articulation, so surgeons must be aware of the potential of fatigue failure of cables as well as the possibility of its migration into the spinal cord when using Brooks’ posterior stabilization. Bilateral C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw fixation or transarticular screw fixation are recommended by the authors in the event of rotatory instability. PMID:28033285

  8. Operative treatment of symptomatic lumbar spondylolysis and mild isthmic spondylolisthesis in young patients: direct repair of the defect or segmental spinal fusion?

    PubMed

    Schlenzka, D; Seitsalo, S; Poussa, M; Osterman, K

    1993-08-01

    Summary. The results of 23 patients with symptomatic spondylolysis or mild isthmic spondylolisthesis treated by Scott's direct repair of the defect (secclusion) were analyzed with particular reference to spinal mobility and the condition of the intervertebral discs, and compared with the outcome of 25 patients treated by posterolateral segmental fusion without instrumentation. The two groups were comparable as to age at operation (17.4 +/- 5.7 vs. 15.6 +/- 2.6 years), follow-up time (54 +/- 8 vs. 54 +/- 25 months), gender, and preoperative subjective symptoms. The mean preoperative vertebral slip was greater in the fusion group (7.2 +/- 8.4 vs. 13.1 +/- 4, P = 0.003). The follow-up assessment was carried out by an independent observer. It included an interview, Oswestry questionnaire, pain scale drawing, physical examination, plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and functional testing (lumbar spine mobility, static lifting power). For statistical analysis, the Student's t-test, the chi2 test, and the paired t-test were used. At followup, 87% of the Scott's group and 96% of the fusion group had occasional pain, not interfering with daily activities, or no pain at all. There was no statistical difference in the subjective, clinical, or functional outcome between the two operation groups. Plain radiographs in both groups showed significant loss of disc height in the operated segment during follow-up, indicating postoperative progression of disc degeneration. In flexion/extension radiographs the total range of movement in the three lowermost lumbar segments was slightly greater after secclusion. This difference was not significant. In MRI there was no statistical difference in disc hydration index between the two groups. The condition of the disc above the fusion was not worse than that of the corresponding disc above the secclusion. There was no correlation between pathologic disc findings in MRI and clinical outcome. It is concluded that in a small

  9. Coagulation Profile of Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Undergoing Posterior Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Patrick; Kenkre, Tanya S; Londino, Joanne A; Cassara, Antonio; Yang, Charles; Waters, Jonathan H

    2016-10-19

    Blood loss and transfusion requirements during posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis remain a concern. The mechanism of bleeding in these patients is poorly characterized. Thromboelastography is a comprehensive test of a patient's coagulation system commonly used in cardiac surgical procedures. It has not been well studied for use in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A prospective, observational study of the coagulation profile of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing posterior spinal fusion is presented. Healthy patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis without a bleeding abnormality were analyzed during posterior spinal fusion. Standard coagulation laboratory and thromboelastogram measures were obtained at the time of the incision and at 1-hour intervals during the surgical procedure. Laboratory values were analyzed in relation to outcomes such as bleeding, transfusion, and a fibrinolysis score. Fifty-eight patients were observed. Eighty-one percent of patients were female, the mean age was 13.5 years, a mean of 11.1 levels were fused, the median estimated blood loss was 645 mL, and 47% of patients received blood products. Overall, laboratory values remained stable throughout the surgical procedure. Mild increases in prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time were observed, and platelets remained stable. From thromboelastogram analysis, an acceleration of clot formation (decreased reaction time) and a slight increase in clot lysis (increased lysis percentage at 30 minutes) were observed. A fibrinolysis score compiled from the presence of fibrin degradation products, the presence of D-dimers, and increased prothrombin time rose steadily over surgical time. The fibrinolysis score was predictive of both transfusion and greater estimated blood loss per level. The stress of posterior spinal fusion induces a hypercoagulable state in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Over the first 2 hours of a

  10. Spinal fusion in girls with Rett syndrome: postoperative recovery and family experiences

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Caitlin; Leonard, Helen; Torode, Ian; Downs, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Background Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder mainly affecting females and scoliosis is a common comorbidity. Spinal fusion may be recommended if the scoliosis is progressive. This qualitative study investigated recovery of girls with Rett syndrome during the first 12 postoperative months and explored family perspectives and coping around the time of surgery. Method Parents registered with the population-based Australian Rett Syndrome Database were recruited to this study if their daughter had a confirmed pathogenic MECP2 mutation and spinal fusion between 2006 and 2012. Twenty-five interviews were conducted to determine their daughter’s recovery and parental stresses and coping. Themes in the interview data were identified with content analysis and the regaining of gross motor skills over the first 12 postoperative months were described with time-to-event (survival) analysis. Results Pain and energy levels, appetite, mood and coinciding health issues influenced their daughter’s postoperative recovery. The majority of girls recovered preoperative sitting (88%), standing (81%) and walking (80%) by 12 months. The decision to proceed with surgery was associated with feelings of fear, obligation, relief and guilt for families. Development of complications, poor support and feelings of isolation increased their emotional burden whilst adequate information and discharge preparation, confidence in self and staff, and balancing personal needs with their daughter’s care relieved this burden. Interpretation Our study identified clinical practice issues in relation to families whose daughter with Rett syndrome undergoes spinal fusion, issues that are also relevant to other severe disabilities. Return of wellness and gross motor skills following spinal fusion in girls with Rett syndrome occurred within the first 12 postoperative months in most cases. Parents require information and practical support to alleviate their emotional burden. PMID:25752500

  11. Spinal fusion in girls with Rett syndrome: post-operative recovery and family experiences.

    PubMed

    Marr, C; Leonard, H; Torode, I; Downs, J

    2015-11-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder mainly affecting females and scoliosis is a common co-morbidity. Spinal fusion may be recommended if the scoliosis is progressive. This qualitative study investigated recovery of girls with Rett syndrome during the first 12 post-operative months and explored family perspectives and coping around the time of surgery. Parents registered with the population-based Australian Rett Syndrome Database were recruited to this study if their daughter had a confirmed pathogenic MECP2 mutation and spinal fusion between 2006 and 2012. Twenty-five interviews were conducted to determine their daughter's recovery and parental stresses and coping. Themes in the interview data were identified with content analysis, and the regaining of gross motor skills over the first 12 post-operative months was described with time-to-event (survival) analysis. Pain and energy levels, appetite, mood and coinciding health issues influenced their daughter's post-operative recovery. The majority of girls recovered preoperative sitting (88%), standing (81%) and walking (80%) by 12 months. The decision to proceed with surgery was associated with feelings of fear, obligation, relief and guilt for families. Development of complications, poor support and feelings of isolation increased their emotional burden whereas adequate information and discharge preparation, confidence in self and staff, and balancing personal needs with their daughter's care relieved this burden. Our study identified clinical practice issues in relation to families whose daughter with Rett syndrome undergoes spinal fusion, issues that are also relevant to other severe disabilities. Return of wellness and gross motor skills following spinal fusion in girls with Rett syndrome occurred within the first 12 post-operative months in most cases. Parents require information and practical support to alleviate their emotional burden. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Spinal fusion in patients with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy and a low forced vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Marsh, A; Edge, G; Lehovsky, J

    2003-10-01

    Traditionally, spinal fusion has been denied to patients with scoliosis secondary to Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) when their forced vital capacity (FVC) is less than 30-40% of predicted values (PFVC). The reasons for this decision are a theoretically increased risk of adverse events from a prolonged anaesthetic and extensive surgery. This paper presents a retrospective analysis of 30 patients with DMD scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal fusion at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital. Two subgroups of patients were compared: those with more than 30% PFVC (17 patients) and those with less than 30% PVFC (13 patients). One patient in each group required a temporary tracheotomy and there were nine complications in total. The post-operative stay for patients in each group was similar (24 days in the >30% group, 20 days in the <30% group) and the complication rate was comparable with other published series. We conclude that spinal fusion can be offered to patients with DMD even in the presence of a low FVC.

  13. Robust GM/WM segmentation of the spinal cord with iterative non-local statistical fusion.

    PubMed

    Asman, Andrew J; Smith, Seth A; Reich, Daniel S; Landman, Bennett A

    2013-01-01

    New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences are enabling clinical study of the in vivo spinal cord's internal structure. Yet, low contrast-to-noise ratio, artifacts, and imaging distortions have limited the applicability of tissue segmentation techniques pioneered elsewhere in the central nervous system. Recently, methods have been presented for cord/non-cord segmentation on MRI and the feasibility of gray matter/white matter tissue segmentation has been evaluated. To date, no automated algorithms have been presented. Herein, we present a non-local multi-atlas framework that robustly identifies the spinal cord and segments its internal structure with submillimetric accuracy. The proposed algorithm couples non-local fusion with a large number of slice-based atlases (as opposed to typical volumetric ones). To improve performance, the fusion process is interwoven with registration so that segmentation information guides registration and vice versa. We demonstrate statistically significant improvement over state-of-the-art benchmarks in a study of 67 patients. The primary contributions of this work are (1) innovation in non-volumetric atlas information, (2) advancement of label fusion theory to include iterative registration/segmentation, and (3) the first fully automated segmentation algorithm for spinal cord internal structure on MRI.

  14. Synthetic bone graft versus autograft or allograft for spinal fusion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Buser, Zorica; Brodke, Darrel S; Youssef, Jim A; Meisel, Hans-Joerg; Myhre, Sue Lynn; Hashimoto, Robin; Park, Jong-Beom; Tim Yoon, S; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to compare the efficacy and safety of synthetic bone graft substitutes versus autograft or allograft for the treatment of lumbar and cervical spinal degenerative diseases. Multiple major medical reference databases were searched for studies that evaluated spinal fusion using synthetic bone graft substitutes (either alone or with an autograft or allograft) compared with autograft and allograft. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) and cohort studies with more than 10 patients were included. Radiographic fusion, patient-reported outcomes, and functional outcomes were the primary outcomes of interest. The search yielded 214 citations with 27 studies that met the inclusion criteria. For the patients with lumbar spinal degenerative disease, data from 19 comparative studies were included: 3 RCTs, 12 prospective, and 4 retrospective studies. Hydroxyapatite (HA), HA+collagen, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), calcium sulfate, or polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) were used. Overall, there were no differences between the treatment groups in terms of fusion, functional outcomes, or complications, except in 1 study that found higher rates of HA graft absorption. For the patients with cervical degenerative conditions, data from 8 comparative studies were included: 4 RCTs and 4 cohort studies (1 prospective and 3 retrospective studies). Synthetic grafts included HA, β-TCP/HA, PMMA, and biocompatible osteoconductive polymer (BOP). The PMMA and BOP grafts led to lower fusion rates, and PMMA, HA, and BOP had greater risks of graft fragmentation, settling, and instrumentation problems compared with iliac crest bone graft. The overall quality of evidence evaluating the potential use and superiority of the synthetic biological materials for lumbar and cervical fusion in this systematic review was low or insufficient, largely due to the high potential for bias and small sample sizes. Thus, definitive conclusions or recommendations regarding the use of these

  15. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-Yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  16. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  17. Fatal intraoperative hemorrhage during spinal fusion surgery for osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Sperry, K

    1989-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an uncommon inherited systemic disorder of the connective tissues characterized primarily by varying degrees of bony fragility. Consequently, individuals affected by this condition frequently suffer severe skeletal injuries from otherwise innocuous traumatic events. This syndrome has other associated abnormalities, including hydrocephalus and brain stem compression on the basis of cranial developmental defects (platybasia), cardiac and vascular problems, respiratory disease from spinal deformities, vascular fragility, a bleeding disorder caused by an apparent platelet function abnormality, and anesthesia-related hyperpyrexia. A case is presented here of a young girl with advanced OI in whom intraoperative death occurred as a consequence of inadvertent rib fractures, with subsequent uncontrollable hemorrhage. OI may also potentially be mistaken for child abuse by an inexperienced examiner.

  18. Selective retention of bone marrow-derived cells to enhance spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Muschler, George F; Matsukura, Yoichi; Nitto, Hironori; Boehm, Cynthia A; Valdevit, Antonio D; Kambic, Helen E; Davros, William J; Easley, Kirk A; Powell, Kimerly A

    2005-03-01

    Connective tissue progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from fresh bone marrow aspirates using some porous matrices as a surface for cell attachment and selective retention, and for creating a cellular graft that is enriched with respect to the number of progenitor cells. We evaluated the potential value of this method using demineralized cortical bone powder as the matrix. Matrix alone, matrix plus marrow, and matrix enriched with marrow cells were compared in an established canine spinal fusion model. Fusions were compared based on union score, fusion mass, fusion volume, and by mechanical testing. Enriched matrix grafts delivered a mean of 2.3 times more cells and approximately 5.6 times more progenitors than matrix mixed with bone marrow. The union score with enriched matrix was superior to matrix alone and matrix plus marrow. Fusion volume and fusion area also were greater with the enriched matrix. These data suggest that the strategy of selective retention provides a rapid, simple, and effective method for concentration and delivery of marrow-derived cells and connective tissue progenitors that may improve the outcome of bone grafting procedures in various clinical settings.

  19. Treatment of neuromuscular scoliosis with posterior spinal fusion using the Galveston technique: a retrospective review and results of 62 patients.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Bryan T; Zura, Robert; Bertrand, Styles; Leonard, Sharon; Pellett, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Historically, the operative treatment of neuromuscular scoliosis has been associated with a high rate of complication. Recent literature has shown a decreased rate of complication (less 50%) in the management of neuromuscular scoliosis with spinal arthrodesis techniques. A retrospective chart and radiographic review of 62 spinal fusions for neuromuscular scoliosis was performed. There were 53 posterior spinal fusions and 9 anteroposterior spinal fusions. The Galveston technique was used in all patients. The average age at surgery was 13 years 7 months, with an average follow-up of 23 months (minimum 10 months). The mean preoperative and postoperative curve magnitudes were 66 degree and 31 degree, respectively. There were 20 minor complications and 5 major complications in 20 patients. There were no neurologic complications or deaths.

  20. Clinical outcome of deep wound infection after instrumented posterior spinal fusion: a matched cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Mok, James M; Guillaume, Tenner J; Talu, Ufuk; Berven, Sigurd H; Deviren, Vedat; Kroeber, Markus; Bradford, David S; Hu, Serena S

    2009-03-15

    Retrospective case control study. Determine the impact of infection on clinical outcome in patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion surgery. The outcome of patients treated for infection after spinal surgery is not well established because of variability in cohort identification, definition of infection, outcomes instrument, use of a control group, and/or sample size. Thirty-two patients were included. Sixteen patients ("infection group") met inclusion criteria of deep wound infection after spinal fusion with posterior segmental instrumentation (including combined approach). A 1:1 matched cohort ("control group") was created based on primary or revision status, length of fusion, diagnosis, and age. Postoperative patient outcomes were evaluated using the physical components of SF-36 v2.0 with minimum 2-year follow-up. No significant difference in the Physical Function, Role Physical, Bodily Pain, and General Health domains was detected between the infection group and control group. Mean follow-up was 62 months. Mean Physical Component Summary was 41.4 in the infection group and 44.3 in the control group (P = 0.6). Infection occurred early in 12 patients and late in 4 patients. Most common organisms isolated were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus sp., and Staphylococcus aureus. Multiple debridements were significantly associated with polymicrobial infections and later pseudarthrosis requiring reoperation. An aggressive approach to deep wound infection emphasizing early irrigation and debridement allowed preservation of instrumentation and successful fusion in most cases. At the conclusion of treatment, patients can expect a medium-term clinical outcome similar to patients in whom this complication did not occur.

  1. 1989 Volvo Award in basic science. Device-related osteoporosis with spinal instrumentation.

    PubMed

    McAfee, P C; Farey, I D; Sutterlin, C E; Gurr, K R; Warden, K E; Cunningham, B W

    1989-09-01

    An animal model of anterior and posterior column instability was developed to allow in vivo observation of bone remodeling and arthrodesis after spinal instrumentation. After an initial anterior and posterior destabilizing lesion was created at the L5-L6 vertebral levels in 42 adult beagles, various spinal reconstructive surgical procedures were performed--with or without bilateral posterolateral bone grafting, and with or without spinal instrumentation (Harrington distraction; Luque rectangular, or Cotrel-Dubousset transpedicular methods). After 6 months' postoperative observation, there was a significantly improved probability of achieving a spinal fusion if spinal instrumentation had been used (P = 0.058). Nondestructive mechanical testing after removal of all metal instrumentation in torsion, axial compression, and flexion revealed that the fusions performed in conjunction with spinal instrumentation were more rigid (P less than 0.05). Quantitative histomorphometry showed that the volumetric density of bone was significantly lower (ie, device-related osteoporosis occurred) for fused versus unfused spines; and Harrington- and Cotrel-Dubousset-instrumented dogs became more osteoporotic than the other three groups. The rigidity of spinal instrumentation led to device-related osteoporosis (stress shielding) of the vertebra. However, as the rigidity of spinal instrumentation increased, there was an increased probability of achieving a successful spinal fusion. The improved mechanical properties of spinal instrumentation on spinal arthrodesis more than compensate for the occurrence of device-related osteoporosis in the spine.

  2. Iliac Crest Bone Graft versus Local Autograft or Allograft for Lumbar Spinal Fusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tuchman, Alexander; Brodke, Darrel S.; Youssef, Jim A.; Meisel, Hans-Jörg; Dettori, Joseph R.; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S. Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To compare the effectiveness and safety between iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) and local autologous bone and allograft in the lumbar spine. Methods  A systematic search of multiple major medical reference databases identified studies evaluating spinal fusion in patients with degenerative joint disease using ICBG, local autograft, or allograft in the thoracolumbar spine. Results  Six comparative studies met our inclusion criteria. A “low” strength of the overall body of evidence suggested no difference in fusion percentages in the lumbar spine between local autograft and ICBG. We found no difference in fusion percentages based on low evidence comparing allograft with ICBG autograft. There were no differences in pain or functional results comparing local autograft or allograft with ICBG autograft. Donor site pain and hematoma/seroma occurred more frequently in ICBG autograft group for lumbar fusion procedures. There was low evidence around the estimate of patients with donor site pain following ICBG harvesting, ranging from 16.7 to 20%. With respect to revision, low evidence demonstrated no difference between allograft and ICBG autograft. There was no evidence comparing patients receiving allograft with local autograft for fusion, pain, functional, and safety outcomes. Conclusion  In the lumbar spine, ICBG, local autograft, and allograft have similar effectiveness in terms of fusion rates, pain scores, and functional outcomes. However, ICBG is associated with an increased risk for donor site-related complications. Significant limitations exist in the available literature when comparing ICBG, local autograft, and allograft for lumbar fusion, and thus ICBG versus other fusion methods necessitates further investigation. PMID:27556001

  3. Perioperative and short-term advantages of mini-open approach for lumbar spinal fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vela, J.; Joven-Aliaga, E.; Herrera, A.; Vicente, J.; Suñén, E.; Loste, A.; Tabuenca, A.

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely reported a vascular and neurologic damage of the lumbar muscles produced in the classic posterior approach for lumbar spinal fusions. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a better clinical and functional outcome in the postoperative and short term in patients undergoing minimal invasive surgery (“mini-open”) for this lumbar spinal arthrodesis. We designed a prospective study with a 30 individuals cohort randomized in two groups, depending on the approach performed to get a instrumented lumbar circumferential arthrodesis: “classic posterior” (CL group) or “mini-open” approach (MO group). Several clinical and functional parameters were assessed, including blood loss, postoperative pain, analgesic requirements and daily life activities during hospital stay and at the 3-month follow-up. Patients of the “mini-open approach” group had a significant lower blood loss and hospital stay during admission. They also had significant lower analgesic requirements and faster recovery of daily life activities (specially moderate efforts) when compared to the patients of the “classic posterior approach” group. No significant differences were found between two groups in surgery timing, X-rays exposure or sciatic postoperative pain. This study, inline with previous investigations, reinforces the concept of minimizing the muscular lumbar damage with a mini-open approach for a faster and better recovery of patients’ disability in the short term. Further investigations are necessary to confirm these findings in the long term, and to verify the achievement of a stable lumbar spinal fusion. PMID:19399538

  4. Spinal fusion for pediatric neuromuscular scoliosis: national trends, complications, and in-hospital outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rumalla, Kavelin; Yarbrough, Chester K; Pugely, Andrew J; Koester, Linda; Dorward, Ian G

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine if the recent changes in technology, surgical techniques, and surgical literature have influenced practice trends in spinal fusion surgery for pediatric neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS). In this study the authors analyzed recent trends in the surgical management of NMS and investigated the effect of various patient and surgical factors on in-hospital complications, outcomes, and costs, using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. METHODS The NIS was queried from 2002 to 2011 using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification codes to identify pediatric cases (age < 18 years) of spinal fusion for NMS. Several patient, surgical, and short-term outcome factors were included in the analyses. Trend analyses of these factors were conducted. Both univariate and multivariable analyses were used to determine the effect of the various patient and surgical factors on short-term outcomes. RESULTS Between 2002 and 2011, a total of 2154 NMS fusion cases were identified, and the volume of spinal fusion procedures increased 93% from 148 in 2002 to 286 in 2011 (p < 0.0001). The mean patient age was 12.8 ± 3.10 years, and 45.6% of the study population was female. The overall complication rate was 40.1% and the respiratory complication rate was 28.2%. From 2002 to 2011, upward trends (p < 0.0001) were demonstrated in Medicaid insurance status (36.5% to 52.8%), presence of ≥ 1 comorbidity (40.2% to 52.1%), and blood transfusions (25.2% to 57.3%). Utilization of posterior-only fusions (PSFs) increased from 66.2% to 90.2% (p < 0.0001) while combined anterior release/fusions and PSF (AR/PSF) decreased from 33.8% to 9.8% (< 0.0001). Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) underwent increasing utilization from 2009 to 2011 (15.5% to 20.3%, p < 0.0001). The use/harvest of autograft underwent a significant upward trend between 2002 and 2011 (31.3% to 59.8%, p < 0.0001). In univariate

  5. Analyzer-based imaging of spinal fusion in an animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, M. E.; Beavis, R. C.; Fiorella, David; Schültke, E.; Allen, L. A.; Juurlink, B. H.; Zhong, Z.; Chapman, L. D.

    2008-05-01

    Analyzer-based imaging (ABI) utilizes synchrotron radiation sources to create collimated monochromatic x-rays. In addition to x-ray absorption, this technique uses refraction and scatter rejection to create images. ABI provides dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging techniques. Twenty-one adult male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups to undergo the following interventions: (1) non-injured control, (2) decortication alone, (3) decortication with iliac crest bone grafting and (4) decortication with iliac crest bone grafting and interspinous wiring. Surgical procedures were performed at the L5-6 level. Animals were killed at 2, 4 and 6 weeks after the intervention and the spine muscle blocks were excised. Specimens were assessed for the presence of fusion by (1) manual testing, (2) conventional absorption radiography and (3) ABI. ABI showed no evidence of bone fusion in groups 1 and 2 and showed solid or possibly solid fusion in subjects from groups 3 and 4 at 6 weeks. Metal artifacts were not present in any of the ABI images. Conventional absorption radiographs did not provide diagnostic quality imaging of either the graft material or fusion masses in any of the specimens in any of the groups. Synchrotron-based ABI represents a novel imaging technique which can be used to assess spinal fusion in a small animal model. ABI produces superior image quality when compared to conventional radiographs.

  6. Factors favoring regain of the lost vertical spinal height through posterior spinal fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Benlong; Mao, Saihu; Xu, Leilei; Sun, Xu; Liu, Zhen; Zhu, Zezhang; Lam, Tsz Ping; Cheng, Jack CY; Ng, Bobby; Qiu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Height gain is a common beneficial consequence following correction surgery in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), yet little is known concerning factors favoring regain of the lost vertical spinal height (SH) through posterior spinal fusion. A consecutive series of AIS patients from February 2013 to August 2015 were reviewed. Surgical changes in SH (ΔSH), as well as the multiple coronal and sagittal deformity parameters were measured and correlated. Factors associated with ΔSH were identified through Pearson correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis. A total of 172 single curve and 104 double curve patients were reviewed. The ΔSH averaged 2.5 ± 0.9 cm in single curve group and 2.9 ± 1.0 cm in double curve group. The multivariate regression analysis revealed the following pre-operative variables contributed significantly to ΔSH: pre-op Cobb angle, pre-op TK (single curve group only), pre-op GK (double curve group only) and pre-op LL (double curve group only) (p < 0.05). Thus change in height (in cm) = 0.044 × (pre-op Cobb angle) + 0.012 × (pre-op TK) (Single curve, adjusted R2 = 0.549) or 0.923 + 0.021 × (pre-op Cobb angle1) + 0.028 × (pre-op Cobb angle2) + 0.015 × (pre-op GK)-0.012 × (pre-op LL) (Double curve, adjusted R2 = 0.563). Severer pre-operative coronal Cobb angle and greater sagittal curves were beneficial factors favoring more contribution to the surgical lengthening effect in vertical spinal height in AIS. PMID:27373798

  7. Posterior cervical spinal fusion in a 3-week-old infant with a severe subaxial distraction injury.

    PubMed

    Holland, Christopher M; Kebriaei, Meysam A; Wrubel, David M

    2016-03-01

    Unstable spinal injuries in the neonate pose particular challenges in the clinical and radiographic assessment as well as the surgical stabilization of the spine. In this report, the authors present the unfortunate case of a 3-week-old infant who suffered a severe subaxial cervical fracture dislocation with spinal cord injury that occurred as a result of nonaccidental trauma. Imaging demonstrated severe distraction at C5-6 and near-complete spinal cord transection resulting in quadri-paresis. Open surgical reduction was performed with noninstrumented posterior fusion augmented with split rib autograft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2. Postoperative imaging demonstrated progressive bony fusion at 2 months, and clinical examination findings progressed to a motor examination classification of ASIA C. At 2 years, the fusion mass is stable and cervical alignment is maintained. The patient remains flaccid in the bilateral lower extremities, but has movement with some dexterity in both hands. Follow-up MRI shows severe spinal cord injury with evidence of bilateral C-5 nerve root avulsions. This case represents the first report of spinal fusion in an infant of less than 1 month of age. Given the extreme young age of the patient, the diagnostic challenges as well as the mechanical and technical considerations of surgical fusion are discussed.

  8. The effects of internal fixation on calcium carbonate. Ceramic anterior spinal fusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fuller, D A; Stevenson, S; Emery, S E

    1996-09-15

    An anterior interbody fusion was performed in the canine thoracic spine. Either calcium carbonate or autologous iliac crest bone graft was used to fill a surgically created spinal defect between T7 and T8. Some of the spines were stabilized intraoperatively with anterior instrumentation. Four experimental arthrodesis groups were studied: iliac crest bone graft with or without instrumentation and ceramic with or without instrumentation. To evaluate the effects of internal fixation on an anterior interbody fusion using calcium carbonate ceramic, and to compare this with autologous iliac crest bone grafting. Bone grafting can be associated with significant morbidity, and an acceptable substitute material is sought. In vivo analysis of ceramic as a substitute has revealed fracture and failure of the implant. Creating a stable environment with internal fixation may improve the performance of ceramic as a bone graft substitute. Fusions were evaluated in 20 adult beagles 8 weeks after surgery. Structural properties of the fusion segment were evaluated with biomechanical testing. Histologic analysis was performed to determine junction healing, new bone formation, and revascularization. Fusion segments with iliac crest bone graft and instrumentation were significantly stiffer than the other three groups in all tested modes of angular deformation. Greater junction healing was seen when instrumentation was used with iliac crest bone graft. Greater junction healing, new bone formation, and revascularization were observed when instrumentation was used with calcium carbonate ceramic. Most of the ceramic implants without fixation demonstrated near complete isolation with no revascularization. Internal fixation resulted in histologically and biomechanically superior healing of autologous iliac crest bone graft in this canine model of anterior interbody fusion. Although fixation did not statistically improve the biomechanical properties of ceramic fusion segments, it had a profound

  9. Interdisciplinary Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as Part of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Lindgreen, Pil; Rolving, Nanna; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients receiving lumbar spinal fusion surgery often have persisting postoperative pain negatively affecting their daily life. These patients may be helped by interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral therapy which is recognized as an effective intervention for improving beneficial pain coping behavior, thereby facilitating the rehabilitation process of patients with chronic pain. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experience of patients recovering from lumbar spinal fusion surgery and to explore potential similarities and disparities in pain coping behavior between receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. METHODS: We conducted semistructured interviews with 10 patients; 5 receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy in connection with their lumbar spinal fusion surgery and 5 receiving usual care. We conducted a phenomenological analysis to reach our first aim and then conducted a comparative content analysis to reach our second aim. RESULTS: Patients' postoperative experience was characterized by the need to adapt to the limitations imposed by back discomfort (coexisting with the back), need for recognition and support from others regarding their pain, a relatively long rehabilitation period during which they “awaited the result of surgery”, and ambivalence toward analgesics. The patients in both groups had similar negative perception of analgesics and tended to abstain from them to avoid addiction. Coping behavior apparently differed among receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. Receivers prevented or minimized pain by resting before pain onset, whereas nonreceivers awaited pain onset before resting. CONCLUSION: The postoperative experience entailed ambivalence, causing uncertainty, worry and insecurity. This ambivalence was relieved when others recognized the patient's pain and offered support. Cognitive-behavioral therapy as part of

  10. Remifentanil in combination with ketamine versus remifentanil in spinal fusion surgery--a double blind study.

    PubMed

    Hadi, B A; Al Ramadani, R; Daas, R; Naylor, I; Zelkó, R

    2010-08-01

    This study is aimed at conducting a program for two different anesthetic methods used during a spinal fusion surgery to ensure better intra-operative hemodynamic stability and post-operative pain control. A prospective, randomized, double blind study in patients scheduled for spinal fusion surgery, who were randomly allocated to two groups, G1 and G2, (n = 15 per group), class I-II ASA, was carried out. Both groups received pre-operatively midazolam, followed intra-operatively by propofol, sevoflurane, atracurium, and either remifentanil infusion 0.2 microg/kg/min (G1), or the same dose of remifentanil infusion and low doses of ketamine infusion 1 microg/kg/min (G2) anesthetics, antidote medication and post-operative morphine doses. HR, MAP, vital signs, surgical bleeding, urine output, duration of surgery and duration of anesthesia were recorded. In a 24-h recovery period in a post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) the recovery time, the first pain score and analgesic requirements were measured. Intra-operative HR and arterial BP were significantly less (p < 0.05) in G1 as compared to G2. In the PACU the first pain scores were significantly less (p < 0.05) in G2 than in G1. The time for the first patient analgesia demand dose was greater in G2, as also morphine consumption which was greater in G1 than G2 (p < 0.05). Other results were the same. None of the patients had any adverse drug reaction. Adding low doses of ketamine hydrochloride could be a routine therapy to improve the hemodynamic stability and reduce the post-operative morphine consumption during spinal fusion surgery.

  11. Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: Practice Patterns Among Greek Spinal Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Spanos, Savvas L.; Siasios, Ioannis D.; Dimopoulos, Vassilios G.; Fountas, Kostas N.

    2016-01-01

    Background A web-based survey was conducted among Greek spinal surgeons to outline the current practice trends in regard to the surgical management of patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for degenerative cervical spine pathology. Various practice patterns exist in the surgical management of patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy for degenerative pathology. No consensus exists regarding the type of the employed graft, the necessity of implanting a plate, the prescription of an external orthotic device, and the length of the leave of absence in these patients. Methods A specially designed questionnaire was used for evaluating the criteria for surgical intervention, the frequency of fusion employment, the type of the graft, the frequency of plate implantation, the employment of an external spinal orthosis (ESO), the length of the leave of absence, and the prescription of postoperative physical therapy. Physicians’ demographic factors were assessed including residency and spinal fellowship training, as well as type and length in practice. Results Eighty responses were received. Neurosurgeons represented 70%, and orthopedic surgeons represented 30%. The majority of the participants (91.3%) considered fusion necessary. Allograft was the preferred type of graft. Neurosurgeons used a plate in 42.9% of cases, whereas orthopedic surgeons in 100%. An ESO was recommended for 87.5% of patients without plates, and in 83.3% of patients with plates. The average duration of ESO usage was 4 weeks. Physical therapy was routinely prescribed postoperatively by 75% of the neurosurgeons, and by 83.3% of the orthopedic surgeons. The majority of the participants recommended 4 weeks leave of absence. Conclusions The vast majority of participants considered ACDF a better treatment option than an ACD, and preferred an allograft. The majority of them employed a plate, prescribed an ESO postoperatively, and recommended physical therapy to their

  12. Resting energy expenditure and respiratory quotient in adolescents following spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    McMulkin, Mark L; Ferguson, Ron L

    2004-08-15

    Prospective, 2-factor design. The first factor was the group with 2 levels, spine surgery and control. The second factor was timing with 3 levels, baseline, 1-week follow-up, and 6-week follow-up. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in caloric requirements and the body's nutritional substrate utilization following spinal surgery in adolescents. In an effort to optimize recovery from and assure best possible outcomes after spinal surgery in adolescents, the nutritional requirements of spine surgery patients were evaluated. Indirect calorimetry was used to measure resting energy expenditure, a measure of caloric requirements, and respiratory quotient, an indication of percentages of fat, protein, and carbohydrate utilization. Twenty-three patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery were evaluated immediately before surgery, at an average of 4.8 days after surgery, and at an average 53 days follow-up. A control group of 15 patients completed the same series of 3 tests: baseline, 1-week later, and 6-weeks later. Resting energy expenditure increased significantly by 150 kcal/day (2.7 kcal/kg/day) following spinal fusion surgery in adolescents. By 6 weeks postoperation, patient's caloric requirements returned to baseline level. No changes in resting energy expenditure occurred in the control group between the 3 test periods. Anterior/posterior surgeries and single surgeries had similar kcal/kg/day requirements after surgery. Respiratory quotient decreased significantly following surgery (0.79 to 0.70), indicating a shift to fat oxidation after surgery. At 6 weeks postoperation, the respiratory quotient returned to baseline level. The control group demonstrated no change in the respiratory quotient during the 3 testing periods. Substrate utilization shifts to fat oxidation in adolescents following spinal surgery, indicating lipids would be the alimentation of choice immediately after surgery. Caloric requirements increase 9% above the baseline measurements

  13. Mini-Open Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Combined with Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Corrective Surgery for Adult Spinal Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Chung, Sung-Soo; Lee, Jun-Young; Yum, Tae-Hoon; Shin, Seong-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective observational study. Purpose To introduce the techniques and present the surgical outcomes of mini-open anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) at the most caudal segments of the spine combined with lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) for the correction of adult spinal deformity Overview of Literature Although LLIF is increasingly used to correct adult spinal deformity, the correction of sagittal plane deformity with LLIF alone is reportedly suboptimal. Methods Thirty-two consecutive patients with adult spinal deformity underwent LLIF combined with mini-open ALIF at the L5–S1 or L4–S1 levels followed by 2-stage posterior fixation. ALIF was performed for a mean 1.3 levels and LLIF for a mean 2.7 levels. Then, percutaneous fixation was performed in 11 patients (percutaneous group), open correction with facetectomy with or without laminectomy in 16 (open group), and additional pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) in 5 (PSO group). Spinopelvic parameters were compared preoperatively and postoperatively. Hospitalization data and clinical outcomes were recorded. Results No major medical complications developed, and clinical outcomes improved postoperatively in all groups. The mean postoperative segmental lordosis was greater after ALIF (17.5°±5.5°) than after LLIF (8.1°±5.3°, p <0.001). Four patients (12.5%) had lumbar lordosis with a pelvic incidence of ±9° preoperatively, whereas this outcome was achieved postoperatively in 30 patients (93.8%). The total increase in lumbar lordosis was 14.7° in the percutaneous group, 35.3° in the open group, and 57.0° in the PSO group. The ranges of potential lumbar lordosis increase were estimated as 4°–25°, 23°–42°, and 45°–65°, respectively. Conclusions Mini-open ALIF combined with LLIF followed by posterior fixation may be a feasible technique for achieving optimal sagittal balance and reducing the necessity of more extensive surgery. PMID:27994777

  14. Spinal fusion limits upper body range of motion during gait without inducing compensatory mechanisms in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    PubMed

    Holewijn, R M; Kingma, I; de Kleuver, M; Schimmel, J J P; Keijsers, N L W

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies show a limited alteration of gait at normal walking speed after spinal fusion surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), despite the presumed essential role of spinal mobility during gait. This study analyses how spinal fusion affects gait at more challenging walking speeds. More specifically, we investigated whether thoracic-pelvic rotations are reduced to a larger extent at higher gait speeds and whether compensatory mechanisms above and below the stiffened spine are present. 18 AIS patients underwent gait analysis at increasing walking speeds (0.45 to 2.22m/s) before and after spinal fusion. The range of motion (ROM) of the upper (thorax, thoracic-pelvic and pelvis) and lower body (hip, knee and ankle) was determined in all three planes. Spatiotemporal parameters of interest were stride length and cadence. Spinal fusion diminished transverse plane thoracic-pelvic ROM and this difference was more explicit at higher walking speeds. Transversal pelvis ROM was also decreased but this effect was not affected by speed. Lower body ROM, step length and cadence remained unaffected. Despite the reduction of upper body ROM after spine surgery during high speed gait, no altered spatiotemporal parameters or increased compensatory ROM above or below the fusion (i.e. in the shoulder girdle or lower extremities) was identified. Thus, it remains unclear how patients can cope so well with such major surgery. Future studies should focus on analyzing the kinematics of individual spinal levels above and below the fusion during gait to investigate possible compensatory mechanisms within the spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Samartzis D, Fessler RG, eds. Textbook of the Cervical Spine . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 34. Wood ... the A.D.A.M. Editorial team Back Injuries Read more Bone Grafts Read more Herniated Disk ...

  16. Orthopedic Management of Scoliosis by Garches Brace and Spinal Fusion in SMA Type 2 Children

    PubMed Central

    Catteruccia, Michela; Vuillerot, Carole; Vaugier, Isabelle; Leclair, Danielle; Azzi, Viviane; Viollet, Louis; Estournet, Brigitte; Bertini, Enrico; Quijano-Roy, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scoliosis is the most debilitating issue in SMA type 2 patients. No evidence confirms the efficacy of Garches braces (GB) to delay definitive spinal fusion. Objective: Compare orthopedic and pulmonary outcomes in children with SMA type 2 function to management. Method: We carried out a monocentric retrospective study on 29 SMA type 2 children who had spinal fusion between 1999 and 2009. Patients were divided in 3 groups: group 1-French patients (12 children) with a preventive use of GB; group 2-French patients (10 children) with use of GB after the beginning of the scoliosis curve; and group 3-Italian patients (7 children) with use of GB after the beginning of the scoliosis curve referred to our centre to perform orthopedic preoperative management. Results: Mean preoperative and postoperative Cobb angle were significantly lower in the group 1 of proactively braced than in group 2 or 3 (Anova p = 0.03; Kruskal Wallis test p = 0.05). Better surgical results were observed in patients with a minor preoperative Cobb angle (r = 0.92 p <  0.0001). Fewer patients in the group 1 proactively braced required trunk casts and/or halo traction and an additional anterior fusion in comparison with patients in the group 2 and 3. Moreover, major complications tend to be less in the group 1 proactively braced. No significant differences were found between groups in pulmonary outcome measures. Conclusions: A proactive orthotic management may improve orthopedic outcome in SMA type 2. Further prospective studies comparing SMA management are needed to confirm these results. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions to Authors on jbjs.org for a complete description of levels of evidence (Retrospective comparative study). PMID:27858747

  17. Orthopedic Management of Scoliosis by Garches Brace and Spinal Fusion in SMA Type 2 Children.

    PubMed

    Catteruccia, Michela; Vuillerot, Carole; Vaugier, Isabelle; Leclair, Danielle; Azzi, Viviane; Viollet, Louis; Estournet, Brigitte; Bertini, Enrico; Quijano-Roy, Susana

    2015-11-21

    Scoliosis is the most debilitating issue in SMA type 2 patients. No evidence confirms the efficacy of Garches braces (GB) to delay definitive spinal fusion. Compare orthopedic and pulmonary outcomes in children with SMA type 2 function to management. We carried out a monocentric retrospective study on 29 SMA type 2 children who had spinal fusion between 1999 and 2009. Patients were divided in 3 groups: group 1-French patients (12 children) with a preventive use of GB; group 2-French patients (10 children) with use of GB after the beginning of the scoliosis curve; and group 3-Italian patients (7 children) with use of GB after the beginning of the scoliosis curve referred to our centre to perform orthopedic preoperative management. Mean preoperative and postoperative Cobb angle were significantly lower in the group 1 of proactively braced than in group 2 or 3 (Anova p = 0.03; Kruskal Wallis test p = 0.05). Better surgical results were observed in patients with a minor preoperative Cobb angle (r = 0.92 p <  0.0001). Fewer patients in the group 1 proactively braced required trunk casts and/or halo traction and an additional anterior fusion in comparison with patients in the group 2 and 3. Moreover, major complications tend to be less in the group 1 proactively braced. No significant differences were found between groups in pulmonary outcome measures. A proactive orthotic management may improve orthopedic outcome in SMA type 2. Further prospective studies comparing SMA management are needed to confirm these results. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions to Authors on jbjs.org for a complete description of levels of evidence (Retrospective comparative study).

  18. Risk factors for progressive neuromuscular scoliosis requiring posterior spinal fusion after selective dorsal rhizotomy.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Christensen, Michael T; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Smith, John T; Halvorson, Kyle; Brockmeyer, Douglas L; Walker, Marion L; Bollo, Robert J

    2017-09-08

    OBJECTIVE Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) via limited laminectomy is an effective treatment of lower-extremity spasticity in the pediatric population. Children with spasticity are also at risk for neuromuscular scoliosis; however, specific risk factors for progressive spinal deformity requiring posterior spinal fusion (PSF) after SDR are unknown. The authors' goal was to identify potential risk factors. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent SDR via limited laminectomy between 2003 and 2014 and who had at least 1 year of follow-up. They analyzed demographic, clinical, and radiographic variables to elucidate risk factors for progressive neuromuscular scoliosis. The primary outcome was need for PSF. RESULTS One hundred thirty-four patients underwent SDR and had at least 12 months of follow-up (mean 65 months); 48 patients (36%) had detailed pre- and postoperative radiographic data available. The mean age at surgery was 10 years (SD 5.1 years). Eighty-four patients (63%) were ambulatory before SDR, 109 (82%) underwent a single-level laminectomy, and a mean of 53% of the dorsal rootlets from L-1 to S-1 were sectioned. Fifteen patients (11.2%) subsequently required PSF for progressive deformity. Nonambulatory status (p < 0.001) and a preoperative Cobb angle > 30° (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with PSF on univariate analysis, but no statistically significant correlation was found with any clinical or radiographic variable and PSF after SDR on multivariate regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS Patients with preoperative nonambulatory status and Cobb angle > 30° may be at risk for progressive spinal deformity requiring PSF after SDR. These are well-known risk factors for progressive deformity in children with spasticity in general. Although our analysis suggests SDR via limited laminectomy may not significantly accelerate the development of neuromuscular scoliosis, further case-control studies are critical to

  19. Effect of sagittal spinal balance, levels of posterior instrumentation, and length of follow-up on low back pain in patients undergoing posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar spine disease: a multifactorial analysis.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Repantis, Thomas; Papazisis, Zisis; Iliopoulos, Panagiotis

    2010-04-15

    Prospective controlled clinical study on low back pain (LBP). To investigate the possible effects of radiographic and other related parameters on LBP in patients underwent decompression and posterolateral instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar spine disease. Sagittal balance of the spine after spine surgery has gained increasing interest regarding its correlation with LBP and fusion rate. To our knowledge, no advanced statistical analysis on the effects of sagittal roentgenographic and other parameters on LBP after lumbar surgery has been published. Forty-five patients with an average age of 63 years, who underwent pedicle-screw fixation in 2, 3, and 4 vertebrae for degenerative lumbar spine disease were selected to be included in this study. Radiographic and self-assessment (bodily pain, short form-36) data were evaluated using advanced statistics (multifactorial analysis) to investigate all possible correlations between a dependent parameter (LBP) and independent parameters (sex, extension of instrumentation, sagittal spinal balance, and angular motion at the adjacent free level above instrumentation). All patients were observed for an average of 5.5 years (range, 5-7 years). Male patients showed significantly more improvement of LBP than female counterparts (P = 0.024). LBP improved after surgery by the first year (P < 0.000) and thereafter decreased (P < 0.000) at the final evaluation, but remained at levels significantly higher than before surgery (P < 0.000). The deviation of the apical lumbar vertebra from C7-plumbline was correlated with LBP (P < 0.000). Patients, who received third- and fourth- level instrumentation had less LBP (P = 0.0245) than their counterparts, who received second-level instrumentation. Improvement of sagittal deviation of apical lumbar vertebra, instrumentation of third or fourth vertebrae, male gender, and fusion success were correlated with postoperative improvement of LBP after posterior decompression and pedicle screw

  20. Comparison of Functional Outcome and Quality of Life in Patients With Idiopathic Scoliosis Treated by Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hengwei; Wang, Qifei; Huang, Zifang; Sui, Wenyuan; Yang, Jingfan; Deng, Yaolong; Yang, Junlin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Longer spinal fusions have been shown to result in improved deformity correction; however, loss of normal flexibility in the fusion area should not be ignored. Current consensus was to achieve a shorter fusion in primary surgery, with the goal of preserving as much of the distal motion segment as possible. However, the correlation between the length of fusion and functional outcome remains controversial. To the best of our knowledge, a previous study has demonstrated the function outcomes and the differences in HRQoL with specific fusion levels. In this cross-sectional study, 172 patients (mean age, 17.8 y) with idiopathic scoliosis treated by spinal fusion (mean time since surgery, 29.7 mo) were included to measure lumbar spine mobility and quality of life using validated outcome instruments in the study population. Patients were assigned to 5 groups according to the lower instrumented vertebra (LIV) level: group A (fusion above L2) 26 patients; group B (fusion to L2) 21 patients; group C (fusion to L3) 46 patients; group D (fusion to L4) 53 patients; and group E (fusion to L5) 26 patients. At each follow-up, patients were asked to complete the Scoliosis Research Society 22 (SRS-22) Questionnaire. Lumbar mobility was assessed using a dual digital inclinometer. Average spinal range of motion (ROM) was 41.4 degrees (SD, 20.7), forward flexion was 29.2 degrees (SD, 15.0), and backward extension was 12.2 degrees (SD, 9.5). The total spinal range of motion and forward flexion dropped noticeably as the LIV got more distal. Statistically significant between-group differences (1-way ANOVA) were found for ROM (P < 0.001), forward flexion (P < 0.001), or backward extension (P < 0.001). The motion segments preserved significantly correlated with ROM (r = 0.76, P < 0.001), ROMF (r = 0.76, P < 0.001), and ROME (r = 0.39, P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences was found for each domain of SRS-22 questionnaire

  1. One-stage lateral rhachotomy and posterior spinal fusion with compression hooks for Pott's paralysis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Ozawa, H; Tanaka, Y; Matsumoto, F; Aizawa, T; Kokubun, S

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of one-stage lateral rhachotomy and posterior fusion with compression hooks, for the treatment of Pott's paralysis in the elderly. 11 elderly patients underwent lateral rhachotomy (costotransversectomy and pediculectomy) to debride the tuberculosis focus extending into the epidural space and to decompress the spinal cord. After debridement, the interbody cavity was packed with autologous iliac bone chips. For stabilisation, posterior fusion was performed using a compression lamina hook system. Patients were followed up for at least 2 years for complications. Neurological status was assessed using the Frankel score. The kyphotic deformity was measured on lateral radiographs taken before surgery and at follow-up. During separation of the adhesion around the abscess, a dural tear occurred in one patient and a pleural tear in another. Both tears were successfully repaired. One patient had mild pneumonia after surgery. The Frankel scores of the 11 patients improved from C or D before surgery to D or E after surgery. No relapse of spinal tuberculosis was encountered. The mean deformity angle was 25.5 degrees before surgery and 23.2 degrees at the final follow-up. Spinal fusion was achieved in all patients. Without the need of thoracotomy, one-stage lateral rhachotomy with posterior spinal fusion using compression hooks was an effective option for treating Pott's paralysis in the elderly.

  2. National trends in the use of fusion techniques to treat degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Hilibrand, Alan S; Anderson, D Greg; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Albert, Todd J; Radcliff, Kristen E

    2014-09-01

    Retrospective review. (1) To describe change in treatment patterns for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). (2) To report regional variation in treatment of DS. (3) To describe variation in surgeon-reported outcomes for DS based on treatment. Spinal stenosis associated with DS is commonly treated with decompression and fusion but little is known about the optimal fusion technique. During a 6-month period, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery step II candidates submit procedure lists; these lists have been stored in an electronic database since 1999. The American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery database was retrospectively queried to identify patients who underwent surgery for DS from 1999 to 2011. Included patients underwent uninstrumented fusion, fusion with posterior instrumentation, fusion using interbody device, or decompression without fusion. Utilization of these procedures was analyzed by year and geographic region. The study period included 5639 cases; the annual number of cases doubled during the study period. The percentage of cases treated with interbody fusion (IF) increased significantly throughout the study period, from 13.6% (1999-2001) to 32% (2009-2011) (P<0.001). The percentage of DS cases treated with posterolateral fusion peaked in 2003 then decreased as the rate of IF increased. In 2011, the rates of posterolateral fusion (40%) and posterolateral fusion with IF (37%) were nearly identical. The Northwest had the highest rate of IF (41%), >10% higher than any other region (P<0.001) and more than 23% higher than the Southeast (P<0.001). Despite little evidence guiding treatment strategy for DS, national treatment patterns have changed dramatically during the past 13 years. The rapid adoption of IF and substantial regional variation in treatment utilization patterns raises questions about drivers of change including perceptions about associated fusion rates, the importance of sagittal balance and differential reimbursement. 4.

  3. Malnutrition Predicts Infectious and Wound Complications Following Posterior Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Bohl, Daniel D; Shen, Mary R; Mayo, Benjamin C; Massel, Dustin H; Long, William W; Modi, Krishna D; Basques, Bryce A; Singh, Kern

    2016-11-01

    A retrospective review of data collected prospectively by the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between preoperative hypoalbuminemia, a marker for malnutrition, and complications during the 30 days following posterior lumbar fusion surgery. Malnutrition is a potentially modifiable risk factor that may contribute to complications following spinal surgery. Although prior studies have identified associations between malnutrition, delayed wound healing, and surgical site infection (SSI), the evidence for such a relationship within spine surgery is mixed. Patients who underwent posterior lumbar spinal fusion of one to three levels as part of the ACS-NSQIP were identified. Patients without preoperative serum albumin concentration were excluded. Outcomes were compared between patients with and without hypoalbuminemia (defined as serum albumin concentration <3.5 g/dL). All comparisons were adjusted for baseline differences between populations. Four thousand three hundred ten patients were included. The prevalence of hypoalbuminemia was 4.8%. In comparison to patients with normal albumin concentration, patients with hypoalbuminemia had a higher risk for occurrence of wound dehiscence [1.5% vs. 0.2%, adjusted relative risk (RR) = 5.8, P = 0.006], SSI (5.4% vs. 1.7%, adjusted RR = 2.3, P = 0.010), and urinary tract infection (5.4% vs. 1.5%, adjusted RR = 2.5, P = 0.005). Similarly, patients with hypoalbuminemia had a higher risk for unplanned hospital readmission within 30 days of surgery (11.7% vs. 5.4%, RR = 1.8, P < 0.001). Finally, patients with hypoalbuminemia had a longer mean inpatient stay (5.2 vs. 3.7 days, RR = 1.2, P < 0.001). The present study suggests that malnutrition is an independent risk factor for infectious and wound complications following posterior lumbar fusion. Malnutrition was also associated with an

  4. Metabolic Syndrome and 30-Day Outcomes in Elective Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Andrew S; Campbell, David; Waldrop, Robert; Crandall, Dennis

    2017-08-29

    Retrospective cohort study OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate the effect of MetS on 30-day morbidity and mortality following elective lumbar spinal fusion SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a variable combination of hypertension, obesity, elevated fasting plasma glucose, and dyslipidemia.MetS has been associated with an increased risk of post-operative morbidity and mortality in multiple surgical settings. To our knowledge, the effect of MetS on 30-day outcomes following elective lumbar spinal fusion has not been well studied. An analysis of ACS-NSQIP data was performed between 2006-2013. Patients undergoing elective posterior lumbar fusion were identified. Emergency procedures, infections, tumor cases, and revision surgeries were excluded. Patients were defined as having MetS if they had a history of hypertension requiring medication, diabetes, and a BMI ≥ 30. 1,590 (10.2%) patients with MetS were identified. A mild increase in major (p = 0.040) and minor complications (p = 0.003) in patients with MetS was noted. MetS was associated with increased rates of pulmonary complications (1.9% compared to 1.0%; p = 0.001), sepsis (1.7% compared to 0.9%; p = 0.005), and acute post-op renal failure (0.4% compared to 0%; p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed MetS to be an independent predictor of pulmonary complications (OR 1.51; 95% CI 1.00 - 2.27; p = 0.048), sepsis (OR 1.56; 95% CI 1.01 to 2.42; p = 0.039), and acute post-operative renal failure (OR 6.95; 95% CI 2.23 to 21.67; p = 0.001). MetS status was associated with a mild increase in total hospital length of stay (4.38 days compared to 3.81 days; p < 0.001). While MetS is a predictor of post-operative acute renal failure, it only slightly increases the risk of overall complications and is not associated with increased rates of 30-day re-operations or re-admissions following elective lumbar fusion. 3.

  5. Non-fusion technology in degenerative lumbar spinal disorders: facts, questions, challenges.

    PubMed

    Mayer, H Michael; Korge, Andreas

    2002-10-01

    Although surgical fusion of the painful degenerating functional spinal unit (FSU) of the lumbar spine has always been a matter of debate, it has become a gold-standard procedure for all cases that lack an alternative treatment. However, a detailed and honest review of the clinical data reveals a considerable number of undesired side effects, complications and poor outcomes. The continuous search for alternative surgical treatment modalities has led to the development of numerous ideas for surgical reconstruction of the anterior and/or posterior column. The term "spine arthroplasty" summarises all procedures that have the goal of restoring function. This article describes the principles of the most current surgical techniques and implants, it points out potential challenges and poses a number of questions that need evidence-based answers before the incorporation of these innovations into surgical routine can be justified.

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of ϵ-aminocaproic acid in adolescents undergoing posterior spinal fusion surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, P. A.; Gastonguay, M. R.; Singh, D.; Fiadjoe, J. E.; Sussman, E. M.; Pruitt, E. Y.; Goebel, T. K.; Zuppa, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite demonstrated efficacy of ϵ-aminocaproic acid (EACA) in reducing blood loss in adolescents undergoing spinal fusion, there are no population-specific pharmacokinetic data to guide dosing. The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of EACA in adolescents undergoing spinal fusion surgery and make dosing recommendations. Methods Twenty children ages 12–17 years were enrolled, with 10 children in each of two groups based on diagnosis (idiopathic scoliosis or non-idiopathic scoliosis). Previously reported data from infants undergoing craniofacial surgery were included in the model to enable dosing recommendations over a wide range of weights, ages, and diagnoses. A population non-linear mixed effects modelling approach was used to characterize EACA pharmacokinetics. Results Population pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using a two-compartment disposition model with allometrically scaled weight and an age effect on clearance. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the typical patient were a plasma clearance of 153 ml min−1 70 kg−1 (6.32 ml min−1 kg−0.75), intercompartmental clearance of 200 ml min−1 70 kg−1 (8.26 ml min−1 kg−0.75), central volume of distribution of 8.78 litre 70 kg−1 (0.13 litre kg−1), and peripheral volume of distribution of 15.8 litre 70 kg−1 (0.23 litre kg−1). Scoliosis aetiology did not have a clinically significant effect on drug pharmacokinetics. Conclusions The following dosing schemes are recommended according to patient weight: weight <25 kg, 100 mg kg−1 loading dose and 40 mg kg−1 h−1 infusion; weight ≤25 kg–<50 kg, 100 mg kg−1 loading dose and 35 mg kg−1 h−1 infusion; and weight ≥50 kg, 100 mg kg−1 loading dose and 30 mg kg−1 h−1 infusion. An efficacy trial employing this dosing strategy is warranted. Clinical trial registration NCT01408823. PMID:25586726

  7. Effect of spinal construct stiffness on short segment fusion mass incorporation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C E; Welch, R D; Baker, K J; Ashman, R B

    1995-11-15

    Three segment (L3-L5) pedicle screw constructs were implanted in caprine spines, and the resulting ankylosis evaluated mechanically and compared 12 weeks after surgery. To determine if a construct of maximal stiffness could impair the biologic process of spinal arthrodesis by "stress-shielding." Fusion mass stiffness is believed to be enhanced by increasing construct stiffness, although previous studies have used semirigid, nonconstrained constructs, which lose stiffness through cyclical loading. Device-related osteoporosis, reported to occur with stiff, constrained implants, may be more related to the presence of fusion induced by the implants rather than the implants themselves. In 15 goats, L3-L5 segments were instrumented with pedicle screws, and four different diameters of rods (3.2 cm, 4.8 cm, 6.4 mm, and no rods) were implanted as longitudinal connections to vary the stiffness of the constructs. After 12 weeks, animals were killed and the segments were tested to determine their stiffness. In lateral bending, spines "fused" with rods (any size) were significantly stiffer (P = 0.03) than nonrodded spines. There was a trend toward stiffer segments with larger rods (4.8 cm or 6.4 mm) compared with 3.2 mm or no rods. There was a highly significant (P < 0.0001) increase in stiffness of all operated (rodded or nonrodded) segments compared with unoperated controls. The enhancement of segmental stiffness by stiffer constructs was confirmed, suggesting a beneficial effect on spinal arthrodesis by increasing stiffness. Stress shielding could not be shown.

  8. Intrathecal morphine in younger patients for postoperative pain following spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Blackman, R G; Reynolds, J; Shively, J

    1991-09-01

    Intrathecal morphine in an average dose of 0.01 mg/kg was given to 33 patients between ages 11 and 16 years who had spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The morphine was administered intrathecally as a 10 cc bolus at the conclusion of the arthrodesis, but before closure. The goal was to study safety in terms of respiratory depression and pain relief. Respirations occurred spontaneously in 30 of the 33 patients within 15 minutes of cessation of anesthesia. Respiratory depression occurred in five patients, four of whom had arterial blood pCO2 levels greater than 60 mm Hg. Thirty-one patients had relief of pain for 8 to greater than 40 hours, averaging 18 hours. Two patients had no noticeable pain relief. There appeared to be no relation between dose and pain relief in this limited dose range. We were unable to duplicate the long duration of pain relief reported elsewhere. We also were unable to decrease the side effects of respiratory depression and nausea to a level reported by others. It may be that the 10 cc bolus injected intrathecally circulates to the brain and ventricles faster than desired, or that factors relating to type of anesthesia or dose need to be considered. Low-dose intrathecal morphine does provide noticeable pain relief in younger patients undergoing spinal fusion. The side effects of nausea and respiratory depression can be managed safely with medication.

  9. Clinical Outcomes of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion versus Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Three-Level Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guoxin; Wu, Xinbo; Yu, Shunzhi; Sun, Qi; Zhang, Hailong; Gu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to directly compare the clinical outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in three-level lumbar spinal stenosis. This retrospective study involved a total of 60 patients with three-level degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis who underwent MIS-TLIF or PLIF from January 2010 to February 2012. Back and leg visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scale were used to assess the pain, disability, and health status before surgery and postoperatively. In addition, the operating time, estimated blood loss, and hospital stay were also recorded. There were no significant differences in back VAS, leg VAS, ODI, SF-36, fusion condition, and complications at 12-month follow-up between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, significantly less blood loss and shorter hospital stay were observed in MIS-TLIF group (P < 0.05). Moreover, patients undergoing MIS-TLIF had significantly lower back VAS than those in PLIF group at 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05). Compared with PLIF, MIS-TLIF might be a prior option because of noninferior efficacy as well as merits of less blood loss and quicker recovery in treating three-level lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:27747244

  10. Posterior spinal fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with or without intraoperative cell salvage system: a retrospective comparison.

    PubMed

    Ersen, Omer; Ekıncı, Safak; Bılgıc, Serkan; Kose, Ozkan; Oguz, Erbil; Sehırlıoglu, Ali

    2012-08-01

    This study investigates efficacy and safety of routine cell salvage system use in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients undergoing primary posterior spinal fusion surgery with segmental spinal instrumentation. Forty-five consecutive adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion by two surgeons at a single hospital were studied. Intraoperative cell salvage system was used in 23 patients, and the control group was 22 patients who underwent surgery without cell salvage system. The cell salvage system was the Haemonetics Cell Saver 5. The primary outcome measures were intraoperative and perioperative allogeneic transfusion rate, difference between preoperative and discharge Hg and Hct levels. Average patient age was 14.65 ± 1.49 in cell saver group and 13.86 ± 2.0 in control group. In cell saver group, average intraoperative autotransfusion was 382.1 ± 175 ml. Average perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion need was 1.04 ± 0.7 unit in cell saver group and 2.5 ± 1.14 unit in control group. No transfusion reactions occurred in either group. Average hemoglobin level in cell saver group was 10.7 ± 0.86 and average hemoglobin level in control group was 10.7 ± 0.82 on discharge. Cell saver reduces perioperative transfusion rate in patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

  11. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and spinal fusion do not substantially impact on postural balance.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Janneke Jp; Groen, Brenda E; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; de Kleuver, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    The spinal curvature in patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) causes an asymmetry of upper body postural alignment, which might affect postural balance. However, the currently available studies on balance in AIS patients are not consistent. Furthermore, it is not known whether potential deficits are similar between patients with single and double curves. Finally, the effects of a corrective posterior spinal fusion on postural balance have not yet been well established. Postural balance was tested on a force plate, in 26 female subjects with AIS (12-18 years old; preoperative Cobb-angle: 42-71°; single curve n = 18, double curve n = 6) preoperatively, at 3 months and 1 year postoperatively. We also conducted a balance assessment in 18 healthy age-matched female subjects. Subjects were tested during quiet double-leg standing in four conditions (eyes open/closed; foam/solid surface), while standing on one leg, while performing a dynamic balance (weight shifting) task and while performing a reaching task in four directions. AIS subjects did not demonstrate greater COP velocities than controls during the double-leg standing tasks. In the reaching task, however, they achieved smaller COP displacements than healthy controls, except in the anterior direction. AIS patients with double curves had significantly greater COP velocities in all test conditions compared to those with a single curve (p < 0.05). For the AIS group, a slight increase in COP velocities was observed in the foam eyes closed and right leg standing condition at 3 months post surgery. At 1-year post surgery, however, there were no significant differences in any of the outcome measures compared to the pre-surgery assessment, irrespective of the curve type. Postural balance in AIS patients scheduled for surgery was similar to healthy age matched controls, except for a poorer reaching capacity. The latter finding may be related to their reduced range of motion of the spine

  12. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Tsuyoki; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Shoji, Shintaro; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Gen; Imura, Takayuki; Minehara, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Terumasa; Kawamura, Tadashi; Namba, Takanori; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case. PMID:26989542

  13. Clinical and radiological outcomes of spinal endoscopic discectomy-assisted oblique lumbar interbody fusion: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Hwa; Kim, Jin-Sung

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Direct neural decompression cannot be achieved by performing lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). To overcome the indirect decompressive effect of LLIF, additional endoscopic discectomy with oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) has been attempted. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients who underwent OLIF with additional endoscopic discectomy. METHODS Spinal endoscopic discectomy-assisted OLIF was attempted to remove herniated disc material. Only patients with a follow-up time that exceeded 12 months were enrolled. Clinical parameters examined were the Oswestry Disability Index and visual analog scale scores of back and leg pain. Postoperative MRI was also performed. RESULTS Fourteen patients were enrolled. Central and foraminal disc herniations were evident in 8 and 6 patients, respectively. Concomitant central or foraminal herniated discs were removed completely after additional endoscopic discectomy, and disc removal was confirmed by postoperative MRI. Mean preoperative visual analog scale scores and Oswestry Disability Index scores improved postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS OLIF with additional endoscopic discectomy results in successful direct neural decompression without posterior decompressive procedures. Endoscopic assistance might overcome the limitations of LLIF.

  14. 18F-FDG PET/CT evaluation of children and young adults with suspected spinal fusion hardware infection.

    PubMed

    Bagrosky, Brian M; Hayes, Kari L; Koo, Phillip J; Fenton, Laura Z

    2013-08-01

    Evaluation of the child with spinal fusion hardware and concern for infection is challenging because of hardware artifact with standard imaging (CT and MRI) and difficult physical examination. Studies using (18)F-FDG PET/CT combine the benefit of functional imaging with anatomical localization. To discuss a case series of children and young adults with spinal fusion hardware and clinical concern for hardware infection. These people underwent FDG PET/CT imaging to determine the site of infection. We performed a retrospective review of whole-body FDG PET/CT scans at a tertiary children's hospital from December 2009 to January 2012 in children and young adults with spinal hardware and suspected hardware infection. The PET/CT scan findings were correlated with pertinent clinical information including laboratory values of inflammatory markers, postoperative notes and pathology results to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT. An exempt status for this retrospective review was approved by the Institution Review Board. Twenty-five FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 20 patients. Spinal fusion hardware infection was confirmed surgically and pathologically in six patients. The most common FDG PET/CT finding in patients with hardware infection was increased FDG uptake in the soft tissue and bone immediately adjacent to the posterior spinal fusion rods at multiple contiguous vertebral levels. Noninfectious hardware complications were diagnosed in ten patients and proved surgically in four. Alternative sources of infection were diagnosed by FDG PET/CT in seven patients (five with pneumonia, one with pyonephrosis and one with superficial wound infections). FDG PET/CT is helpful in evaluation of children and young adults with concern for spinal hardware infection. Noninfectious hardware complications and alternative sources of infection, including pneumonia and pyonephrosis, can be diagnosed. FDG PET/CT should be the first-line cross-sectional imaging study in patients

  15. Effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for adults with lumbar spine pseudarthrosis following spinal fusion surgery

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, V.; Kaila, R.; Wilson, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the safety and efficacy of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) compared with bone graft when used specifically for revision spinal fusion surgery secondary to pseudarthrosis. Methods The MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases were searched using defined search terms. The primary outcome measure was spinal fusion, assessed as success or failure in accordance with radiograph, MRI or CT scan review at 24-month follow-up. The secondary outcome measure was time to fusion. Results A total of six studies (three prospective and three retrospective) reporting on the use of BMP2 met the inclusion criteria (203 patients). Of these, four provided a comparison of BMP2 and bone graft whereas the other two solely investigated the use of BMP2. The primary outcome was seen in 92.3% (108/117) of patients following surgery with BMP2. Although none of the studies showed superiority of BMP2 to bone graft for fusion, its use was associated with a statistically quicker time to achieving fusion. BMP2 did not appear to increase the risk of complication. Conclusion The use of BMP2 is both safe and effective within the revision setting, ideally in cases where bone graft is unavailable or undesirable. Further research is required to define its optimum role. Cite this article: Mr P. Bodalia. Effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for adults with lumbar spine pseudarthrosis following spinal fusion surgery: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:145–152. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000418. PMID:27121215

  16. Posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic thoracolumbar/lumbar scoliosis: clinical outcomes and predictive radiological factors for extension of fusion distal to caudal end vertebra.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S B; Tsirikos, A I; Subramanian, A S

    2014-08-01

    Clinical, radiological, and Scoliosis Research Society-22 questionnaire data were reviewed pre-operatively and two years post-operatively for patients with thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated by posterior spinal fusion using a unilateral convex segmental pedicle screw technique. A total of 72 patients were included (67 female, 5 male; mean age at surgery 16.7 years (13 to 23)) and divided into groups: group 1 included 53 patients who underwent fusion between the vertebrae at the limit of the curve (proximal and distal end vertebrae); group 2 included 19 patients who underwent extension of the fusion distally beyond the caudal end vertebra. A mean scoliosis correction of 80% (45% to 100%) was achieved. The mean post-operative lowest instrumented vertebra angle, apical vertebra translation and trunk shift were less than in previous studies. A total of five pre-operative radiological parameters differed significantly between the groups and correlated with the extension of the fusion distally: the size of the thoracolumbar/lumbar curve, the lowest instrumented vertebra angle, apical vertebra translation, the Cobb angle on lumbar convex bending and the size of the compensatory thoracic curve. Regression analysis allowed an equation incorporating these parameters to be developed which had a positive predictive value of 81% in determining whether the lowest instrumented vertebra should be at the caudal end vertebra or one or two levels more distal. There were no differences in the Scoliosis Research Society-22 outcome scores between the two groups (p = 0.17). In conclusion, thoracolumbar/lumbar curves in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis may be effectively treated by posterior spinal fusion using a unilateral segmental pedicle screw technique. Five radiological parameters correlate with the need for distal extension of the fusion, and an equation incorporating these parameters reliably informs selection of the lowest instrumented

  17. Large spinal intraosseous arteriovenous fistula: case report.

    PubMed

    Imajo, Yasuaki; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Nishida, Norihiro; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2015-04-01

    Here the authors report the case of a fresh vertebral body fracture with a large spinal intraosseous arteriovenous fistula (AVF). A 74-year-old woman started to experience low-back pain following a rear-end car collision. Plain radiography showed diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Sagittal CT sections revealed a transverse fracture of the L-4 vertebral body with a bone defect. Sagittal fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI revealed a flow void in the fractured vertebra. Spinal angiography revealed an intraosseous AVF with a feeder from the right L-4 segmental artery. A fresh fracture of the L-4 vertebral body with a spinal intraosseous AVF was diagnosed. Observation of a flow void in the vertebral body on fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI was important for the diagnosis of the spinal intraosseous AVF. Because conservative treatment was ineffective, surgery was undertaken. The day before surgery, embolization through the right L-4 segmental artery was performed using 2 coils to achieve AVF closure. Posterolateral fusion with instrumentation at the T12-S2 vertebral levels was performed without L-4 vertebroplasty. The spinal intraosseous AVF had disappeared after 4 months. At 24 months after surgery, the bone defect was completely replaced by bone and the patient experienced no limitations in daily activities. Given their experience with the present case, the authors believe that performing vertebroplasty or anterior reconstruction may not be necessary in treating spinal intraosseous AVF.

  18. Coronal Spinal Balance in Adult Spine Deformity Patients With Long Spinal Fusions: A Minimum 2- to 5-Year Follow-up Study.

    PubMed

    Ploumis, Avraam; Simpson, Andrew K; Cha, Thomas D; Herzog, Joshua P; Wood, Kirkham B

    2015-11-01

    This study was a retrospective one. The objective of the study was to analyze the causes, prevalence of, and risk factors for coronal decompensation in long adult lumbar spinal instrumentation and fusion (from thoracic or upper lumbar spine) to L5 or S1. Coronal and sagittal decompensation after long fusions for spinal deformities can affect outcomes negatively. There is no study reporting the natural history of coronal spinal balance after long spinal fusions. A single-center retrospective review of data from 54 patients with spinal deformity was performed. Inclusion criteria were patients over 18 years with long fusions (>4 segments) to L5 or the pelvis who had full spine standing radiographs before surgery and up to 2-5 years postoperatively. Radiographic data included C7PL, magnitude of scoliotic curve, shoulder or pelvic asymmetry in the coronal plane, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and pelvic parameters (pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope). Coronal imbalance (CI) was considered if the C7PL was >4 cm lateral to the central sacral line, and sagittal imbalance (SI) was considered when the C7 plumbline was >4 cm anterior to the middle of the upper sacral plate. Paired t test, χ test, and repeated measures regression analysis using demographic data (age, sex, body mass index), operative (previous fusion, posterior only or anteroposterior fusion, iliac fixation or not, decompression or not, osteotomy or not) and postoperative (complications, use of bracing) data, and radiographic parameters (including SI) were performed. Patients showing CI equaled 11 (19.3%) preoperatively, remained 11 (19.3%) (4 of whom were new patients with CI) at 6 weeks postoperatively, and increased (P<0.001) to 18 (31.6%) (8 of them without initial CI) at 2-5 years follow-up. However, in terms of numeric distance of C7PL from the midsacrum, there was no statistically significant change (P>0.05) from preoperative to last follow-up. SI showed significant improvement (P<0

  19. Lateral interbody fusion combined with open posterior surgery for adult spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Strom, Russell G; Bae, Junseok; Mizutani, Jun; Valone, Frank; Ames, Christopher P; Deviren, Vedat

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) with percutaneous screw fixation can treat adult spinal deformity (ASD) in the coronal plane, but sagittal correction is limited. The authors combined LIF with open posterior (OP) surgery using facet osteotomies and a rod-cantilever technique to enhance lumbar lordosis (LL). It is unclear how this hybrid strategy compares to OP surgery alone. The goal of this study was to evaluate the combination of LIF and OP surgery (LIF+OP) for ASD. METHODS All thoracolumbar ASD cases from 2009 to 2014 were reviewed. Patients with < 6 months follow-up, prior fusion, severe sagittal imbalance (sagittal vertical axis > 200 mm or pelvic incidence-LL > 40°), and those undergoing anterior lumbar interbody fusion were excluded. Deformity correction, complications, and outcomes were compared between LIF+OP and OP-only surgery patients. RESULTS LIF+OP (n = 32) and OP-only patients (n = 60) had similar baseline features and posterior fusion levels. On average, 3.8 LIFs were performed. Patients who underwent LIF+OP had less blood loss (1129 vs 1833 ml, p = 0.016) and lower durotomy rates (0% vs 23%, p = 0.002). Patients in the LIF+OP group required less ICU care (0.7 vs 2.8 days, p < 0.001) and inpatient rehabilitation (63% vs 87%, p = 0.015). The incidence of new leg pain, numbness, or weakness was similar between groups (28% vs 22%, p = 0.609). All leg symptoms resolved within 6 months, except in 1 OP-only patient. Follow-up duration was similar (28 vs 25 months, p = 0.462). LIF+OP patients had significantly less pseudarthrosis (6% vs 27%, p = 0.026) and greater improvement in visual analog scale back pain (mean decrease 4.0 vs 1.9, p = 0.046) and Oswestry Disability Index (mean decrease 21 vs 12, p = 0.035) scores. Lumbar coronal correction was greater with LIF+OP surgery (mean [± SD] 22° ± 13° vs 14° ± 13°, p = 0.010). LL restoration was 22° ± 13°, intermediately between OP-only with facet osteotomies (11° ± 7°, p < 0.001) and

  20. [Analysis of radiological criteria correlation and clinical manifestation of central lumbosacral spinal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Shevelev, I N; Kornienko, V N; Konovalov, N A; Cherkashov, A M; Nazarenko, A G; Asiutin, D S

    2012-01-01

    to assess the correlation analysis of radiologic criteria referred to central degenerative spinal stenosis and intensity of clinical manifestation. a retrospective cohort data were collected from 2010 till 2011, 27 patients who underwent surgical treatment of central spinal stenosis in Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. 16 male and 11 female patients were included in the present study. Mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 57.9 years. All patients had spinal canal decompression and transpedicular or oblique transcorporal fusion. Stabilization included different types of pedicle screws, including transcutaneous stabilization systems. Interbody fusion was achieved by posterolateral transforaminal approach (TLIF --transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion). 13 cases included combination of interbody fusion and guided oblique lumbar interbody fusion "GO-LIF", which could not be managed without robotic assistance. All patients underwent full preoperative examination. MR image evaluation included: antero-posterior diameter of the spinal canal (mm), interfacet interval (mm), and cross-section area of the spinal canal (mm2). Patients were evaluated by outcome analysis scales: Degenerative Disease Intensity Level (DDIL) and Swiss Spinal Stenosis Score (Zurich Claudication Questionnaire, Brigham spinal stenosis questionnaire). Surgical outcomes were evaluated according to modified classes of Kawabata et al. analysis of our patients group demonstrated absence of correlation between intensity level of degenerative central spinal stenosis based on neurovisualization methods and intensity of its clinical manifestation. Pearson's coefficient of correlation and Spearmen rank correlation for variable which evaluates clinical signs (DDIL in %) and neurovisualization data (antero-posterior diameter of the spinal canal (mm), interfacet interval (mm), and cross-section area of the spinal canal (mm2)) are not significant to zero (p > 0.2).

  1. Postoperative Pain Management after Spinal Fusion Surgery: An Analysis of the Efficacy of Continuous Infusion of Local Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Richard A. K.; Legakis, Julie E.; Tweedie, Jillian; Chung, YoungKey; Ren, Emily J.; BeVier, Patricia A.; Thomas, Ronald L.; Thomas, Suresh T.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal fusion surgery is a major surgery that results in severe postoperative pain, therefore pain reduction is a primary concern. New strategies for pain management are currently under investigation and include multimodal treatment. A 3-year retrospective analysis of patients with idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery was performed at our hospital, assessing patient pain scores, opioid use, and recovery. We evaluated the effect of adding continuous infusion of local anesthetics (CILA) to a postoperative pain management protocol that includes intraoperative intrathecal morphine, as well as postoperative patient-controlled analgesia and oral opioid/acetaminophen combination. The study compared 25 patients treated according to the standard protocol, with 62 patients treated with CILA in addition to the pain management protocol. Patients in the CILA group used nearly 0.5 mg/kg less opioid analgesics during the first 24 hours after surgery. PMID:24436846

  2. Epidural tramadol via intraoperatively placed catheter as a standalone analgesic after spinal fusion procedure: An analysis of efficacy and cost.

    PubMed

    Ilangovan, Vijaysundar; Vivakaran, Thanga Tirupathi Rajan; Gunasekaran, D; Devikala, D

    2017-01-01

    This was a prospective analysis of epidural tramadol as a single analgesic agent delivered through intraoperatively placed epidural catheter for postoperative pain relief after spinal fusion procedures in terms of efficacy and cost. Twenty patients who underwent spinal fusion procedures were included in the study. After completion of the procedure, an epidural catheter was placed at the highest level of exposed dura and brought out through a separate tract. Postoperatively, tramadol was infused into the epidural space via the catheter at a dose of 1 mg/kg diluted in 10 ml of saline. The dosage frequency was arbitrarily fixed at every 6 h during the first 2 days and thereafter reduced to every 8 h after the first 2 days till day 5. Conventional intravenous analgesics were used only if additional analgesia was required as assessed by visual analog scale (VAS). Patients' VAS score was assessed every 4 h from the day of surgery. Patients with a VAS score of 6 or more were given additional analgesia in the form of intravenous paracetamol. Of the twenty patients, eight patients needed additional analgesia during the first 24 h and none required additional analgesia after the first 24 h. The median VAS score was 7 within the first 24 h and progressively declined thereafter. Epidural tramadol was noted to be many times cheaper than conventional parenteral analgesics. Epidural tramadol infusion is safe and effective as a standalone analgesic after open spinal fusion surgery, especially after the 1(st) postoperative day. Intraoperative placement of the epidural catheter is a simple way of delivering tramadol to the epidural space. The cost of analgesia after spinal fusion surgery can be reduced significantly using epidural tramadol alone.

  3. Epidural tramadol via intraoperatively placed catheter as a standalone analgesic after spinal fusion procedure: An analysis of efficacy and cost

    PubMed Central

    Ilangovan, Vijaysundar; Vivakaran, Thanga Tirupathi Rajan; Gunasekaran, D.; Devikala, D.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This was a prospective analysis of epidural tramadol as a single analgesic agent delivered through intraoperatively placed epidural catheter for postoperative pain relief after spinal fusion procedures in terms of efficacy and cost. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who underwent spinal fusion procedures were included in the study. After completion of the procedure, an epidural catheter was placed at the highest level of exposed dura and brought out through a separate tract. Postoperatively, tramadol was infused into the epidural space via the catheter at a dose of 1 mg/kg diluted in 10 ml of saline. The dosage frequency was arbitrarily fixed at every 6 h during the first 2 days and thereafter reduced to every 8 h after the first 2 days till day 5. Conventional intravenous analgesics were used only if additional analgesia was required as assessed by visual analog scale (VAS). Results: Patients’ VAS score was assessed every 4 h from the day of surgery. Patients with a VAS score of 6 or more were given additional analgesia in the form of intravenous paracetamol. Of the twenty patients, eight patients needed additional analgesia during the first 24 h and none required additional analgesia after the first 24 h. The median VAS score was 7 within the first 24 h and progressively declined thereafter. Epidural tramadol was noted to be many times cheaper than conventional parenteral analgesics. Conclusion: Epidural tramadol infusion is safe and effective as a standalone analgesic after open spinal fusion surgery, especially after the 1st postoperative day. Intraoperative placement of the epidural catheter is a simple way of delivering tramadol to the epidural space. The cost of analgesia after spinal fusion surgery can be reduced significantly using epidural tramadol alone. PMID:28149082

  4. The Use of Bone Morphogenetic Protein in Spinal Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Colom-Beauchamp, Eduardo; Beaton-Comulada, David; Rodriguez, Julio A; Pérez-López, José C; Montañez-Huertas, José; Escobar-Medina, Enrique; Massanet-Vollrath, José

    2017-09-01

    Since its introduction and FDA approval, rhBMP-2 has been adopted by spine surgeons as a substitute for ICBG in numerous spinal fusion techniques. As broad clinical use increased, reports on potential complications associated with rhBMP-2 also increased. We provide our experience with TLIF using rhBMP-2 or ICBG in an entirely Hispanic population. This was a 2-year retrospective study of 67 patients, with 26 in the rhBMP-2 group and 41 in the ICBG group, who underwent TLIF. Pertinent information was obtained through review of the medical records documenting complications, intraoperative times, and EBL, among other things. There were 28 post-operative complications with 15 (53.6%) in the ICBG group and 13 (46.4%) in the rhBMP-2 group. The average EBL was 572.3 mL (SD: 411.8) in the ICBG group and 397.9 mL (SD: 312.2) in the rhBMP-2 group. The average intraoperative time was 243.1 minutes (SD: 79.5) in the ICBG group and 226.5 minutes (SD: 64.7) in the rhBMP-2 group. Fifty-two patients underwent open TLIF and 15 patients underwent MI TLIF. The average EBL was 571.2 mL (SD: 375.3) in the open TLIF group and 228.3 mL (SD: 299.3) in the MI-TLIF group. The average intraoperative time was 241.0 minutes (SD: 76.0) for patients in the open TLIF group and 218.8 minutes (SD: 65.0) for those in the MI-TLIF group. There were no new cancer events at any of the 2-year follow-up visits. Our results suggest that the safety profile of rhBMP-2 may be inferior to that of ICBG, rejecting the possibility of ICBG being replaced by rhBMP-2 as the gold standard for spinal fusion.

  5. Evaluating Osteogenic Potential of Ligamentum Flavum Cells Cultivated in Photoresponsive Hydrogel that Incorporates Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 for Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Liu, Hsia-Wei; Wang, I-Chun; Chen, Chih-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is increasingly important in clinical practice. Ligamentum flava (LF) are typically removed during spine-related surgeries. LF may be a source of cells for spinal fusion that is conducted using tissue engineering techniques. In this investigation, LF cells of rabbits were isolated and then characterized by flow cytometry, morphological observation, and immunofluorescence staining. The LF cells were also cultivated in polyethylene (glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels that incorporated bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) growth factor, to evaluate their proliferation and secretion of ECM and differentiation in vitro. The experimental results thus obtained that the proliferation, ECM secretion, and differentiation of the PEGDA-BMP-2 group exceeded those of the PEGDA group during the period of cultivation. The mineralization and histological staining results differed similarly. A nude mice model was utilized to prove that LF cells on hydrogels could undergo osteogenic differentiation in vivo. These experimental results also revealed that the PEGDA-BMP-2 group had better osteogenic effects than the PEGDA group following a 12 weeks after transplantation. According to all of these experimental results, LF cells are a source of cells for spinal fusion and PEGDA-BMP-2 hydrogel is a candidate biomaterial for spinal fusion by tissue engineering. PMID:26426006

  6. Risk factors for adjacent segment pathology requiring additional surgery after single-level spinal fusion: impact of pre-existing spinal stenosis demonstrated by preoperative myelography.

    PubMed

    Yugué, Itaru; Okada, Seiji; Masuda, Muneaki; Ueta, Takayoshi; Maeda, Takeshi; Shiba, Keiichiro

    2016-05-01

    We determined the incidence of and risk factors for clinical adjacent segment pathology (C-ASP) requiring additional surgeries among patients previously treated with one-segment lumbar decompression and fusion surgery. We retrospectively analysed 161 consecutive patients who underwent one-segment lumbar decompression and fusion surgery for L4 degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patient age, sex, body mass index (BMI), facet orientation and tropism, laminar inclination angle, spinal canal stenosis ratio [on myelography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)], preoperative adjacent segment instability, arthrodesis type, pseudarthrosis, segmental lordosis at L4-5, and the present L4 slip were evaluated by a log-rank test using the Kaplan-Meier method. A multivariate Cox proportional-hazards model was used to analyse all factors found significant by the log-rank test. Of 161 patients, 22 patients (13.7 %) had additional surgeries at cranial segments located adjacent to the index surgery's location. Pre-existing canal stenosis ≥47 % at the adjacent segment on myelography, greater facet tropism, and high BMI were significant risk factors for C-ASP. The estimated incidences at 10 years postoperatively for each of these factors were 51.3, 39.6, and 32.5 %, and the risks for C-ASP were 4.9, 3.7, and, 3.1 times higher than their counterparts, respectively. Notably, spinal canal stenosis on myelography, but not on MRI, was found to be a significant risk factor for C-ASP (log-rank test P < 0.0001 and 0.299, respectively). Pre-existing spinal stenosis, greater facet tropism, and higher BMI significantly increased C-ASP risk. Myelography is a more accurate method for detecting latent spinal canal stenosis as a risk factor for C-ASP.

  7. Relaxation Training and Postoperative Music Therapy for Adolescents Undergoing Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kirsten; Adamek, Mary; Kleiber, Charmaine

    2017-02-01

    Spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis is one of the most painful surgeries experienced by adolescents. Music therapy, utilizing music-assisted relaxation with controlled breathing and imagery, is a promising intervention for reducing pain and anxiety for these patients. It can be challenging to teach new coping strategies to post-operative patients who are already in pain. This study evaluated the effects of introducing music-assisted relaxation training to adolescents before surgery. Outcome measures were self-reported pain and anxiety, recorded on 0-10 numeric rating scale, and observed behavioral indicators of pain and relaxation. The training intervention was a 12-minute video about music-assisted relaxation with opportunities to practice before surgery. Forty-four participants between the ages of 10 and 19 were enrolled. Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental group that watched the video at the preoperative visit or to the control group that did not watch the video. All subjects received a music therapy session with a board certified music therapist on post-operative day 2 while out of bed for the first time. Pain and anxiety were significantly reduced from immediately pre-therapy to post-therapy (paired t-test; p). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Positioning Performance of Power and Manual Drivers in Posterior Spinal Fusion Procedures.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, J Micah; Perry, Alexander C; Patel, Vikas V; Lindley, Emily M; Rentschler, Mark E

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an analysis and comparison of the efficacy of two methods for pedicle screw placement during posterior spinal fusion surgery. A total of 100 screws (64 manual and 36 power driven), all placed utilizing a surgical navigation system, were analyzed and compared. Final screw placement was compared to initial surgical plans using the navigation system, and the final screw locations were analyzed on the basis of angular deviation from these planned trajectories as well as screw translation within a critical reference plane. The power driver was found to insignificantly decrease the resulting angular deviation of these pedicle screws with a mean deviation of 3.35 degrees compared to 3.44 degrees with the manual driver (p = 0.853). Conversely, the power driver was found to increase the translational distance in the critical region, with mean deviations of 2.45 mm for the power driver compared to 1.54 mm with the manual driver. The increase in translational deviation was significant (p = 0.002) indicating that there may be some loss in performance from the adoption of the power driver.

  9. Factors predicting postoperative complications following spinal fusions in children with cerebral palsy scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Nishnianidze, Tristan; Bayhan, Ilhan A; Abousamra, Oussama; Sees, Julieanne; Rogers, Kenneth J; Dabney, Kirk W; Miller, Freeman

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the postoperative complications after posterior spinal fusion (PSF) in cerebral palsy (CP) scoliosis and identify the predictive preoperative risk factors. All PSFs consecutively performed for CP scoliosis between 2004 and 2013 were reviewed. Preoperative risk score (ORS) and postoperative complications score (POCS) were used as measures of all recorded preoperative risk factors and postoperative complications, respectively. The review included 303 children with a mean age of 14.6 ± 3.0 years. Mean hospitalization was 16 days. Dependence on G-tube feeding was associated with higher POCS (P = 0.027). Postoperative fever, seizures, and septicemia were associated with higher ORS (P < 0.01). Specifically, postoperative pancreatitis and deep wound infections were more common in children with G-tube. This study suggests that G-tube dependence is a predictive risk factor of complications after PSF in CP scoliosis. Children with G-tube need special perioperative care. No other specific preoperative risk factor predicted postoperative complications.

  10. Fusion angle affects intervertebral adjacent spinal segment joint forces-Model-based analysis of patient specific alignment.

    PubMed

    Senteler, Marco; Weisse, Bernhard; Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Farshad, Mazda T; Snedeker, Jess G

    2017-01-01

    This study addresses the hypothesis that adjacent segment intervertebral joint loads are sensitive to the degree of lordosis that is surgically imposed during vertebral fusion. Adjacent segment degeneration is often observed after lumbar fusion, but a causative mechanism is not yet clearly evident. Altered kinematics of the adjacent segments and potentially nonphysiological mechanical joint loads have been implicated in this process. However, little is known of how altered alignment and kinematics influence loading of the adjacent intervertebral joints under consideration of active muscle forces. This study investigated these effects by simulating L4/5 fusions using kinematics-driven musculoskeletal models of one generic and eight sagittal alignment-specific models. Models featured different spinopelvic configurations but were normalized by body height, masses, and muscle properties. Fusion of the L4/5 segment was implemented in an in situ (22°), hyperlordotic (32°), and hypolordotic (8°) fashion and kinematic input parameters were changed accordingly based on findings of an in vitro investigation. Bending motion from upright standing to 45° forward flexion and back was simulated for all models in intact and fused conditions. Joint loads at adjacent levels and moment arms of spinal muscles experienced changes after all types of fusion. Hypolordotic configuration led to an increase of adjacent segment (L3/4) shear forces of 29% on average, whereas hyperlordotic fusion reduced shear by 39%. Overall, L4/5 in situ fusion resulted in intervertebral joint forces closest to intact loading conditions. An artificial decrease in lumbar lordosis (minus 14° on average) caused by an L4/5 fusion lead to adverse loading conditions, particularly at the cranial adjacent levels, and altered muscle moment arms, in particular for muscles in the vicinity of the fusion. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:131-139, 2017. © 2016

  11. Factors associated with spinal fusion after posterior fossa decompression in pediatric patients with Chiari I malformation and scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Mackel, Charles E; Cahill, Patrick J; Roguski, Marie; Samdani, Amer F; Sugrue, Patrick A; Kawakami, Noriaki; Sturm, Peter F; Pahys, Joshua M; Betz, Randal R; El-Hawary, Ron; Hwang, Steven W

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors performed a study to identify clinical characteristics of pediatric patients diagnosed with Chiari I malformation and scoliosis associated with a need for spinal fusion after posterior fossa decompression when managing the scoliotic curve. METHODS The authors conducted a multicenter retrospective review of 44 patients, aged 18 years or younger, diagnosed with Chiari I malformation and scoliosis who underwent posterior fossa decompression from 2000 to 2010. The outcome of interest was the need for spinal fusion after decompression. RESULTS Overall, 18 patients (40%) underwent posterior fossa decompression alone, and 26 patients (60%) required a spinal fusion after the decompression. The mean Cobb angle at presentation and the proportion of patients with curves > 35° differed between the decompression-only and fusion cohorts (30.7° ± 11.8° vs 52.1° ± 26.3°, p = 0.002; 5 of 18 vs 17 of 26, p = 0.031). An odds ratio of 1.0625 favoring a need for fusion was established for each 1° of increase in Cobb angle (p = 0.012, OR 1.0625, 95% CI 1.0135-1.1138). Among the 14 patients older than 10 years of age with a primary Cobb angle exceeding 35°, 13 (93%) ultimately required fusion. Patients with at least 1 year of follow-up whose curves progressed more 10° after decompression were younger than those without curve progression (6.1 ± 3.0 years vs 13.7 ± 3.2 years, p = 0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test). Left apical thoracic curves constituted a higher proportion of curves in the decompression-only group (8 of 16 vs 1 of 21, p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS The need for fusion after posterior fossa decompression reflected the curve severity at clinical presentation. Patients presenting with curves measuring > 35°, as well as those greater than 10 years of age, may be at greater risk for requiring fusion after posterior fossa decompression, while patients less than 10 years of age may require routine monitoring for curve progression. Left apical thoracic curves

  12. [Posterior interbody fusion versus improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in segmental spinal fixation for aged spondylolisthesis with lumbar spinal canal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Wu, Ji-bin; Zhao, Meng; Dai, Wei-xiang; Wu, De-hui; Wang, Zhao-hong; Feng, Jie; Liu, Chao; Zhao, Qing-hua; Tian, Ji-wei

    2012-03-06

    To assess the clinical and radiographic outcomes of posterior lumbar fixation and posterior interbody fusion or improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for Meyerding grade II/III spondylolisthesis so as to address the suitability of a dynamic stabilization. A total of 28 consecutive patients underwent posterior lumbar fixation and posterior interbody fusion or improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for Meyerding grade II/III spondylolisthesis. Among them, 13 patients underwent posterior interface fusion (PLIF) and pedicle screw fixation. And improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ITLIF) and placement of the same system were performed in 15 patients. Their clinical, economic, functional, and radiographic data were recorded both pre- and postoperatively. The average changes of economic and functional scores on the Prolo scale were 1.36 and 1.48 respectively. In patients with posterior interbody fusion; the average preoperative vertebral slippage was 46.9% (range: 25 - 75%) versus 14.6% (range: 15 - 25%) postoperatively. In patients with ITLIF, the average changes in economic and functional scores were 1.75 and 1.63 respectively. And the average preoperative vertebral slippage was 45.2% (range: 28 - 78%) compared with 26.3% (range: 14 - 28%) postoperatively. When two fusion techniques were compared, an overall superior reliability and resistance of systems was associated with the ITLIF procedure. But their clinical outcomes did not differ greatly (P > 0.05). The application of a segmental pedicle screw fixation is both feasible and efficacious.

  13. Histologic evaluation of the efficacy of rhBMP-2 compared with autograft bone in sheep spinal anterior interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Harvinder S; Toth, Jeffrey M; Diwan, Ashish D; Seim, H B; Kanim, Linda E A; Kabo, J Michael; Turner, A Simon

    2002-03-15

    The sheep anterior lumbar spinal fusion model was used to study the efficacy of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2)-collagen composite in comparison with autograft to enhance spinal interbody fusion. Comparisons were drawn from temporal radiographic and end-point biomechanical and histologic data. To analyze histologically the ability of rhBMP-2 to achieve complete arthrodesis between vertebral bodies. Studies using rhBMP for enhancement of anterior interbody fusion have used numerous endpoints. However, systematic histologic evaluation of the fusion has not been conducted. Twelve sheep underwent single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion performed with a cylindrical fenestrated titanium interbody fusion device (INTER FIX, Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Inc., Memphis, TN). The device was filled either with rhBMP-2-collagen (n = 6) or autogenous iliac crest bone graft (n = 6). Radiologic evaluation was carried out at 2-month intervals, and all sheep were killed 6 months after surgery. Nondestructive biomechanical testing for stiffness to flexion, extension, and lateral bending moments, un-decalcified histology, and qualitative and quantitative histologic evaluation were performed. Radiographs revealed a bony bridge anterior to the cage in five of six rhBMP-2-treated animals, whereas it was present only in one of five in the autogenous bone graft group. Segments treated with rhBMP-2 were 20% stiffer in flexion than autograft-treated segments at 6 months. Six of six in the rhBMP-2 group and two of six in the autograft group showed complete fusion. There was a significantly higher rate of bony continuity observed at the fenestrations of the rhBMP-2 group. Three times more number of cage fenestrations in the rhBMP-2 group demonstrated "all-bone" when compared with the autograft group (P < 0.001). Further, the scar tissue in and around the autograft-treated cages was 16-fold more (P < 0.01) than that seen for rhBMP-2-treated cages. The study

  14. Surgical fusion in childhood spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Stanton, R P; Meehan, P; Lovell, W W

    1985-01-01

    Twenty cases of surgical fusion for spondylolisthesis were reviewed at the Scottish Rite Hospital (Atlanta, GA, U.S.A.) to determine whether a procedure other than a simple posterolateral fusion is necessary for most patients. The patients were treated postoperatively with pantaloon spica cast immobilization. The fusion rate was high (90%), and patient satisfaction was high. One patient developed neurologic loss postoperatively. Two patients' slips progressed greater than 10% before solid fusion occurred. Thus, bilateral posterolateral fusion, followed by pantaloon spica cast immobilization, is effective for patients with symptomatic spondylolisthesis or asymptomatic children with grade 3 or greater slips. Reduction was not performed in this series.

  15. The Influences of Different Ratios of Biphasic Calcium Phosphate and Collagen Augmentation on Posterior Lumbar Spinal Fusion in Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Park, Hyo-Suk; Kim, Keun-Su; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the influence of different ratios of hydroxyapatite (HA)/beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and collagen augmentation for posterior lumbar fusion in a rat model. Materials and Methods We generated a posterior lumbar fusion model in 50 rats and divided it into five groups of equal number as follows; 1) autologous bone graft as group A, 2) 70% HA+30% β-TCP as group B, 3) 70% HA+30% β-TCP+collagen as group C, 4) 30% HA+70% β-TCP as group D, and 5) 30% HA+70% β-TCP+collagen as group E. Rats were euthanized at 12 weeks after surgery and fusion was assessed by manual palpation, quantitative analysis using microCT and histology. Results The score of manual palpation was significantly higher in group C than group E (3.1±1.1 vs. 1.8±0.8, p=0.033). However, in terms of microCT analysis, group D showed significantly higher scores than group B (5.5±0.8 vs. 3.1±1.1, p=0.021). According to quantitative volumetric analysis, 30% HA+70% β-TCP groups (group D and E) showed significantly reduced fusion mass at 12 weeks after surgery (123±14.2, 117±46.3 vs. 151±27.3, p=0.008, 0.003, respectively). Collagen augmentation groups revealed superior results in terms of both microCT score and histologic grade. Conclusion A 7:3 HA/β-TCP ratio with collagen augmentation rather than a 3:7 HA/β-TCP ratio could be a more favorable graft substitute for lumbar spinal fusion. There was positive role of collagen as an adjunct for spinal bone fusion process. PMID:28120573

  16. The Influences of Different Ratios of Biphasic Calcium Phosphate and Collagen Augmentation on Posterior Lumbar Spinal Fusion in Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hyun; Park, Jeong Yoon; Park, Hyo Suk; Kim, Keun Su; Chin, Dong Kyu; Cho, Yong Eun; Kuh, Sung Uk

    2017-03-01

    To determine the influence of different ratios of hydroxyapatite (HA)/beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and collagen augmentation for posterior lumbar fusion in a rat model. We generated a posterior lumbar fusion model in 50 rats and divided it into five groups of equal number as follows; 1) autologous bone graft as group A, 2) 70% HA+30% β-TCP as group B, 3) 70% HA+30% β-TCP+collagen as group C, 4) 30% HA+70% β-TCP as group D, and 5) 30% HA+70% β-TCP+collagen as group E. Rats were euthanized at 12 weeks after surgery and fusion was assessed by manual palpation, quantitative analysis using microCT and histology. The score of manual palpation was significantly higher in group C than group E (3.1±1.1 vs. 1.8±0.8, p=0.033). However, in terms of microCT analysis, group D showed significantly higher scores than group B (5.5±0.8 vs. 3.1±1.1, p=0.021). According to quantitative volumetric analysis, 30% HA+70% β-TCP groups (group D and E) showed significantly reduced fusion mass at 12 weeks after surgery (123±14.2, 117±46.3 vs. 151±27.3, p=0.008, 0.003, respectively). Collagen augmentation groups revealed superior results in terms of both microCT score and histologic grade. A 7:3 HA/β-TCP ratio with collagen augmentation rather than a 3:7 HA/β-TCP ratio could be a more favorable graft substitute for lumbar spinal fusion. There was positive role of collagen as an adjunct for spinal bone fusion process.

  17. Does Spinal Fusion and Scoliosis Correction Improve Activity and Participation for Children With GMFCS level 4 and 5 Cerebral Palsy?

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Mathew David; Wallace, Charlie; Malagelada, Francesc; Gibson, Alex; Noordeen, Hilali; Tucker, Stewart; Molloy, Sean; Lehovsky, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spinal fusion is used to treat scoliosis in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Following intervention, the WHO considers activity and participation should be assessed to guide intervention and assess the effects. This study assesses whether spinal fusion for scoliosis improves activity and participation for children with severe CP. Retrospective cohort study of 70 children (39M:31F) with GMFCS level 4/5 CP and significant scoliosis. Thirty-six underwent observational and/or brace treatment as the sole treatment for their scoliosis, and 34 underwent surgery. Children in the operative group were older and had worse scoliosis than those in the observational group. Questionnaire and radiographic data were recorded over a 2-year period. The ASKp was used to measure activity and participation. In the observational group, Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity increased from 51o (40–90) and 10o (0–30) to 70o (43–111) and 14o (0–37). Mean ASKp decreased from 16.3 (1–38) to 14.2 (1–36). In the operative group, Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity decreased from 81o (50–131) and 14o (1–35) to 38o (10–76) and 9o (0–24). Mean ASKp increased from 10.5 (0–29) to 15.9 (3–38). Spinal-related pain correlated most with change in activity and participation in both groups. There was no difference in mobility, GMFCS level, feeding or communication in either group before and after treatment. In children with significant scoliosis and CP classified within GMFCS levels 4 and 5, spinal fusion was associated with an improvement in activity and participation, whereas nonoperative treatment was associated with a small reduction. Pain should be carefully assessed to guide intervention. PMID:26656322

  18. Does Spinal Fusion and Scoliosis Correction Improve Activity and Participation for Children With GMFCS level 4 and 5 Cerebral Palsy?

    PubMed

    Sewell, Mathew David; Wallace, Charlie; Malagelada, Francesc; Gibson, Alex; Noordeen, Hilali; Tucker, Stewart; Molloy, Sean; Lehovsky, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Spinal fusion is used to treat scoliosis in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Following intervention, the WHO considers activity and participation should be assessed to guide intervention and assess the effects. This study assesses whether spinal fusion for scoliosis improves activity and participation for children with severe CP.Retrospective cohort study of 70 children (39M:31F) with GMFCS level 4/5 CP and significant scoliosis. Thirty-six underwent observational and/or brace treatment as the sole treatment for their scoliosis, and 34 underwent surgery. Children in the operative group were older and had worse scoliosis than those in the observational group. Questionnaire and radiographic data were recorded over a 2-year period. The ASKp was used to measure activity and participation.In the observational group, Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity increased from 51 (40-90) and 10 (0-30) to 70 (43-111) and 14 (0-37). Mean ASKp decreased from 16.3 (1-38) to 14.2 (1-36). In the operative group, Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity decreased from 81 (50-131) and 14 (1-35) to 38 (10-76) and 9 (0-24). Mean ASKp increased from 10.5 (0-29) to 15.9 (3-38). Spinal-related pain correlated most with change in activity and participation in both groups. There was no difference in mobility, GMFCS level, feeding or communication in either group before and after treatment.In children with significant scoliosis and CP classified within GMFCS levels 4 and 5, spinal fusion was associated with an improvement in activity and participation, whereas nonoperative treatment was associated with a small reduction. Pain should be carefully assessed to guide intervention.

  19. Clinical decision making in spinal fusion for chronic low back pain. Results of a nationwide survey among spine surgeons.

    PubMed

    Willems, Paul; de Bie, Rob; Oner, Cumhur; Castelein, René; de Kleuver, Marinus

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the use of prognostic patient factors and predictive tests in clinical decision making for spinal fusion in patients with chronic low back pain. Design and setting Nationwide survey among spine surgeons in the Netherlands. Participants Surgeon members of the Dutch Spine Society were questioned on their surgical treatment strategy for chronic low back pain. Primary and secondary outcome measures The surgeons' opinion on the use of prognostic patient factors and predictive tests for patient selection were addressed on Likert scales, and the degree of uniformity was assessed. In addition, the influence of surgeon-specific factors, such as clinical experience and training, on decision making was determined. Results The comments from 62 surgeons (70% response rate) were analysed. Forty-four surgeons (71%) had extensive clinical experience. There was a statistically significant lack of uniformity of opinion in seven of the 11 items on prognostic factors and eight of the 11 items on predictive tests, respectively. Imaging was valued much higher than predictive tests, psychological screening or patient preferences (all p<0.01). Apart from the use of discography and long multisegment fusions, differences in training or clinical experience did not appear to be of significant influence on treatment strategy. Conclusions The present survey showed a lack of consensus among spine surgeons on the appreciation and use of predictive tests. Prognostic patient factors were not consistently incorporated in their treatment strategy either. Clinical decision making for spinal fusion to treat chronic low back pain does not have a uniform evidence base in practice. Future research should focus on identifying subgroups of patients for whom spinal fusion is an effective treatment, as only a reliable prediction of surgical outcome, combined with the implementation of individual patient factors, may enable the instalment of consensus guidelines for surgical decision

  20. Clinical decision making in spinal fusion for chronic low back pain. Results of a nationwide survey among spine surgeons

    PubMed Central

    de Bie, Rob; Öner, Cumhur; Castelein, René; de Kleuver, Marinus

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the use of prognostic patient factors and predictive tests in clinical decision making for spinal fusion in patients with chronic low back pain. Design and setting Nationwide survey among spine surgeons in the Netherlands. Participants Surgeon members of the Dutch Spine Society were questioned on their surgical treatment strategy for chronic low back pain. Primary and secondary outcome measures The surgeons' opinion on the use of prognostic patient factors and predictive tests for patient selection were addressed on Likert scales, and the degree of uniformity was assessed. In addition, the influence of surgeon-specific factors, such as clinical experience and training, on decision making was determined. Results The comments from 62 surgeons (70% response rate) were analysed. Forty-four surgeons (71%) had extensive clinical experience. There was a statistically significant lack of uniformity of opinion in seven of the 11 items on prognostic factors and eight of the 11 items on predictive tests, respectively. Imaging was valued much higher than predictive tests, psychological screening or patient preferences (all p<0.01). Apart from the use of discography and long multisegment fusions, differences in training or clinical experience did not appear to be of significant influence on treatment strategy. Conclusions The present survey showed a lack of consensus among spine surgeons on the appreciation and use of predictive tests. Prognostic patient factors were not consistently incorporated in their treatment strategy either. Clinical decision making for spinal fusion to treat chronic low back pain does not have a uniform evidence base in practice. Future research should focus on identifying subgroups of patients for whom spinal fusion is an effective treatment, as only a reliable prediction of surgical outcome, combined with the implementation of individual patient factors, may enable the instalment of consensus guidelines for surgical decision

  1. Central Sensitization Inventory as a Predictor of Worse Quality of Life Measures and Increased Length of Stay Following Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Bennett, E Emily; Walsh, Kevin M; Thompson, Nicolas R; Krishnaney, Ajit A

    2017-08-01

    Central sensitization is abnormal and intense enhancement of pain mechanism by the central nervous system. Patients with central sensitization may be at higher risk of poor outcomes after spinal fusion. The Central Sensitivity Inventory (CSI) was developed to identify and quantify key symptoms related to central sensitization. In 664 patients who underwent thoracic and/or lumbar fusion, we evaluated retrospectively pretreatment CSI as a predictor of postoperative quality of life measures, length of stay, and discharge status. Preoperative Pain Disability Questionnaire scores, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 scores, and EuroQol-5 Dimensions index scores were significantly worse in patients with preoperative CSI ≥40 compared with patients with preoperative CSI <40 (P < 0.0001 for all). After adjusting for demographic variables, operation duration, and preoperative health status, preoperative CSI was significantly associated with higher postoperative Pain Disability Questionnaire total score (unadjusted P < 0.001, adjusted P = 0.009), higher postoperative Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score (unadjusted P < 0.001, adjusted P = 0.001), and lower postoperative EuroQol-5 Dimensions index (unadjusted P < 0.001, adjusted P = 0.001). For each 10-unit increase in CSI, average length of stay increased by 6.4% (95% confidence interval 0.4%-12.6%, P = 0.035). The odds of being discharged home after adjusting for confounders was not statistically related to preoperative CSI (P = 0.0709). Preoperative CSI was associated with worse quality of life outcomes and increased length of stay after spinal fusions. CSI may be an additional measure in evaluating patients preoperatively to better predict successful spinal fusion outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of Amicar in same-day anterior and posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, George H; Florentino-Pineda, Ivan; Poe-Kochert, Connie; Armstrong, Douglas G; Son-Hing, Jochen P

    2008-09-15

    A retrospective study of the effectiveness of Amicar (epsilon aminocaproic acid). Evaluate the effectiveness of Amicar in decreasing perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in same-day anterior (ASF) and posterior spinal fusion (PSF) with segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI) for idiopathic scoliosis. Preliminary prospective, prospective randomized double-blind, and fibrinogen studies have demonstrated Amicar to be effective in decreasing perioperative blood loss in patients with idiopathic scoliosis undergoing PSF with SSI. Increased fibrinogen secretion is a possible explanation. There were 73 consecutive patients divided into 3 study groups based on the administration of Amicar: Group 1 (n = 16), no Amicar; Group 2 (n = 18), Amicar for the PSF with SSI only; and Group 3 (n = 39), Amicar for both ASF and PSF with SSI. All patients were managed using the same general anesthesia technique, intraoperative procedure, postoperative care path, and indications for transfusion (hemoglobin <7 g/dL). Total perioperative blood loss (estimated intraoperative blood loss for both procedures and measured postoperative chest tube and PSF wound suction drainage) and total transfusion requirements between groups were compared using one-way ANOVA. There were statistically significant decreases in mean estimated intraoperative PSF with SSI, total perioperative blood loss, and transfusion requirements in the 2 Amicar groups. However, Amicar had no significant effect on estimated intraoperative ASF blood loss, chest tube drainage, or PSF wound suction drainage. Total perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements (cell saver, autologous, directed, and allogeneic blood) were: 3442.8 +/- 1344.0 mL and 1537.1 +/- 905.1 mL in Group 1; 2089.8 +/- 684.0 mL and 485.2 +/- 349.8 mL in Group 2; and 2184.1 +/- 1163.7 mL and 531.5 +/- 510.5 mL in Group 3. There were no Amicar related complications. Amicar was highly effective in decreasing total perioperative blood loss and

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Neuromonitoring for Identification of New Neurologic Deficits in Pediatric Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Neira, Victor M; Ghaffari, Kamyar; Bulusu, Srinivas; Moroz, Paul J; Jarvis, James G; Barrowman, Nicholas; Splinter, William

    2016-12-01

    Intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) modalities, transcranial motor-evoked potentials (TcMEPs), and somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) are accepted methods to identify impending spinal cord injury during spinal fusion surgery. Debate exists over sensitivity and specificity of these modalities. Our purpose was to measure the incidence of new neurologic deficits (NNDs) and estimate sensitivity and specificity of IONM modalities. Institutional Ethics Board approval was obtained to review charts of patients younger than 22 years undergoing scoliosis surgery from 2007 to 2014 retrospectively. The definition of true-positive patients included two subgroups: (1) patients with an IONM alert, which did not resolve despite the interventions and had a NND postoperatively; or (2) patients with an IONM alert triggering interventions and the alert resolved with no NND postoperatively. Subgroup 2 of the definition is debatable; thus, we performed a multiple sensitivity analysis with three assumptions. Assumption 1: without interventions, all such patients would have experienced NNDs (assumption used in previous studies); Assumption 2: without intervention, half of these patients would have experienced NNDs; Assumption 3: without intervention, none of these of patients would have experienced NNDs. We included 296 patients. Patients with incomplete charts (n = 3), no IONM monitoring (n = 11), and inadequate baseline IONM (n = 7) were excluded. The incidence of NND was 3.7% (95% confidence interval, 2.1%-6.5%). Successful IONM in at least one modality was obtained in 275 patients (92.9%), of whom 268 (97.5%) and 259 (94.2%) had successful baseline TcMEP or SSEP signals, respectively. Fifty-one (17%) patients had IONM alerts, 41 were only TcMEP, 5 were only SSEP, and 5 were in both modalities. After interventions, 42 (82%) patients recovered, 41 had no NND (true-positive under Assumption (1), but one developed a NND (false-negative). Of the 9 patients with no alert recovery, 6

  4. Optimal aspiration volume of vertebral bone marrow for use in spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Hustedt, Joshua W; Jegede, Kola A; Badrinath, Raghav; Bohl, Daniel D; Blizzard, Daniel J; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2013-10-01

    Bone marrow aspirate (BMA) has shown promise as a bone graft option in spinal fusion. The vertebral body is a convenient source for marrow aspirate as it is accessed in routine course of pedicle screw instrumentation. Studies have relied on data from the iliac crest to determine optimal aspiration volume from the vertebral body. This study is designed to determine the optimal aspiration volume for BMA taken from the vertebral body. Prospective clinical study. Data are drawn from 18 pedicles and 180 aspirations. The average age of the subjects was 50.3 years, and the subject pool comprised five men and seven women. Nucleated cell count and alkaline phosphatase staining colony forming units. Ten 1 mL aliquots of BMA were incrementally aspirated through a cannulated pedicle tap for each instrumented vertebral body. The numbers of nucleated cells per mL of BMA were analyzed with a hemocytometer, and the percentage of osteoprogenitor cells per mL aspirate were estimated by an alk phos production assay. The study was funded through departmental funds, and none of the authors have any conflicts of interest to report related to the study. Nucleated cell count decreased with increasing aspirate number (p<.001). The average cell count for the first mL was 45.8 million cells. Cell counts did not differ by age or sex (p=.943 and p=.685, respectively). Likewise, osteoprogenitor cell percentage decreased with increasing aspirate number (p<.001). The 2 mL aspirate volume has been defined as ideal for the iliac crest, but there has been no analogous assessment of the effect of aspiration volume for other sources such as the vertebral body. This information is important for the clinical implementation of vertebral body aspirations if volume, cells, and presumably performance, of this potential bone graft option are to be optimized for spine cases. Our data show a direct relationship between increasing aspiration number and decreasing osteoprogenitor cellular concentration, with a

  5. Postoperative continuous paravertebral anesthetic infusion for pain control in lumbar spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Elder, James B; Hoh, Daniel J; Wang, Michael Y

    2008-01-15

    A retrospective, case-control study was conducted to analyze postoperative outcomes in patients who received local anesthetic infusion pumps after lumbar spinal fusion procedures. Data were collected prospectively via nursing protocol and third party assessment, and analyzed retrospectively. To review the safety and efficacy of continuous infusion of local anesthetic into the subfascial aspects of the wound after lumbar fusion surgery for treatment of postoperative pain, and to determine whether other outcome measures such as postoperative nausea and vomiting, ambulation and length of hospitalization were affected by the presence of the device. Patients who undergo lumbar spine fusion procedures frequently experience significant, debilitating pain related to their surgery. This pain may delay postoperative mobilization, increase length of hospitalization, and require prolonged use of high doses of narcotics. Use of a local anesthetic continuous-infusion pump after surgery may lead to improvements in these outcome variables. After posterior lumbar spine fusion procedures, 26 consecutive patients received the ON-Q PainBuster, which infused 0.5% marcaine via an elastomeric pump into the subfascial aspects of the wound. Retrospective analysis compared each of these patients with a case-matched control patient. Data included pain scores and opiate use during the first 5 postoperative days (PODs), length of hospital stay, and complications. Variables such as age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status, and surgical procedure were similar between matched cases. One patient was excluded because of active heroine abuse. Patients with the ON-Q PainBuster used 41.2% less narcotics on POD 1, 50.1% less on day 2, and 47.1% less on day 3 compared with the control patients. Differences in opiate usage were not statistically significant on POD 4 (45.5% less) and 5 (50.3% less). A lower average pain score was observed among patients with the ON-Q PainBuster on

  6. SPECT-CT Assessment of Pseudarthrosis after Spinal Fusion: Diagnostic Pitfall due to a Broken Screw

    PubMed Central

    Rager, Olivier; Amzalag, Gaël; Varoquaux, Arthur; Schaller, Karl; Ratib, Osman; Tessitore, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old drug addicted female was referred for a L5-S1 posterolateral in situ fixation with autologous graft because of an L5/S1 severe discopathy with listhesis. After six months, low back pain recurred. A Tc-99m HDP SPECT-CT diagnosed a pseudarthrosis with intense uptake of the L5-S1 endplates and a fracture of the right S1 screw just outside the metal-bone interface without any uptake or bone resorption around the screw. The absence of uptake around a broken screw is a pitfall that the physician should be aware of. PMID:24159394

  7. A retrospective review to assess whether spinal fusion and scoliosis correction improved activity and participation for children with Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sewell, Mathew David; Wallace, Charles; Gibson, Alex; Noordeen, Hilali; Tucker, Stewart; Molloy, Sean; Lehovsky, Jan

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates outcome of scoliosis treatment for 11 children with Angelman syndrome (AS), with particular focus on activity, participation and the musculoskeletal factors that may affect these outcomes. Retrospective review of medical records, radiographs and questionnaires administered to caregivers of 11 children (8M:3F) with AS and scoliosis. Six underwent observational treatment during childhood and five underwent spinal fusion. The Activities Scale for Kids (ASKp) questionnaire was used to measure activity and participation. Questionnaire and radiographic data were recorded over a 2 year period. In the observational group, scoliosis increased from 31° to 46°. Mean ASKp decreased from 13.8 to 11.9 (p = 0.06). In the operative group, scoliosis decreased from 68° to 29°. Mean ASKp increased from 11.4 to 15.9 (p < 0.01). There was also a reduction in spinal-related pain and mean number of hospital admissions for chest infection. However, there was a 60% major complication rate. There was no difference in mobility, GMFCS level, feeding or communication in either group before or after treatment. In children with significant scoliosis and AS, spinal fusion was associated with a small improvement in activity and participation, reduction in pain and a decrease in frequency of severe chest infections. Non-operative treatment resulted in progression of scoliosis during childhood and decrease in activity.

  8. Predicting excessive hemorrhage in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients undergoing posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mark E; Kohring, Jessica M; McFann, Kim; McNair, Bryan; Hansen, Jennifer K; Miller, Nancy H

    2014-08-01

    Blood loss in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) who are undergoing posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion (PSIF) varies greatly. The reason for this wide range is not clear. There are reports of unexpected massive hemorrhage during these surgeries. Many studies reflect authors' preferences for describing blood loss in terms of levels fused, weight, or percent blood volume. We sought to define excessive blood loss clinically, determine its incidence in our study population, and identify associated variables. Results are intended to inform perioperative preparation for these cases. Results may be used to inform prospective study designs. This was a retrospective uncontrolled case series. A total of 311 consecutive AIS PSIF cases during the years 2005-2010 performed at Children's Hospital Colorado were studied. We measured estimated blood loss (EBL) and its association with multiple patient, surgical, and anesthetic variables. Thirty-one variables potentially related to blood loss were collected retrospectively from electronic medical records for analysis. When no cases of clearly excessive blood loss were identified on the basis of visual examination of EBL distribution, we chose to use the top 10% of blood loss cases as an arbitrary determinant of excessive blood loss. Three cut-off strategies captured the top 10% of EBL cases with little variation in who was selected: 1) >1,700 mL of EBL, 2) >50% EBL/estimated blood volume, and 3) >150 mL/level fused EBL. Variables were compared with the χ(2) test, Fisher exact, or t-tests, when appropriate. A generalized linear mixed logistic model was used to determine the probability of excessive blood loss based on the number of levels fused. The average EBL was 89.17 mL/level fused (range, 45-133 mL). EBL fit a progressively wider distribution as surgical complexity (number of levels fused) increased. Number of levels fused (p<.0001), operative time (p=.0139), number of screws (p<.0001), and maximal

  9. Radiological assessment of shoulder balance following posterior spinal fusion for thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Takashi; Matsumura, Akira; Kato, Minori; Hayashi, Kazunori; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate shoulder balance following posterior spinal fusion for thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Twenty-four patients (22 females) with thoracic AIS who had undergone posterior fusion with segmental pedicle screws were retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up duration was 29 (range, 24-55) months. Fifteen patients had type 1 curves, seven had type 2 curves, and two had type 3 curves according to the Lenke classification. The proximal thoracic (PT) and main thoracic (MT) Cobb angles, percent correction of PT (PTC) and MT (MTC) curves, T1 tilt, and shoulder asymmetry according to radiographic shoulder height (RSH) were measured on preoperative, immediately postoperative, and final follow-up radiographs. The preoperative PT and MT curve side-bending percent correction (PTBC and MTBC) were also measured. The PTC:MTC ratio was employed as an index of PTC and MTC matching. Patients were divided into two groups according to radiographic findings immediately postoperatively: the balanced group (|RSH| <20 mm) and imbalanced group (|RSH| ≥20 mm). The preoperative indices (RSH, PTBC, MTBC, PTC, and MTC), preoperative and postoperative T1 tilt, and PTC:MTC ratio were compared between the two groups. The mean PT and MT were 33.0° and 64.2° preoperatively, 16.1° (50.5%) and 16.8° (74.0%) immediately postoperatively, and 16.9° (49.0%) and 19.2° (70.3%) at final follow-up, respectively. The mean preoperative RSH of -12.3 mm changed to +11.1 mm immediately postoperatively and improved to +5.7 mm at final follow-up. Seventeen patients were "balanced" and seven were "imbalanced" immediately postoperatively. There were significant differences in the PTC (p=0.04), postoperative T1 tilt (p=0.04), and PTC:MTC ratio (p=0.02) between the two groups (Wilcoxon rank-sum test). Only one patient had an imbalanced shoulder at the final follow-up. She had marked shoulder imbalance immediately postoperatively (RSH: +40 mm). Sufficient

  10. Minimally Invasive Robotic Versus Open Fluoroscopic-guided Spinal Instrumented Fusions: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2017-03-15

    A prospective randomized clinical trial. To compare the impact of robotic guidance in a minimally invasive spine surgery (MIS) to a fluoroscopy-guided open approach in lumbar fusions. MIS requires a protracted learning curve and excessively exposes the patient and surgical team to harmful radiation. Robotic-guidance has been shown to improve accuracy and radiation in most studies, but there is conflicting prospective data. Patients indicated to undergo a 1 or 2 level spinal fusion were randomized between robotic-guided MIS (RO) and fluoroscopic-guided open surgery (FA). Patient demographics and outcomes were recorded. Thirty patients were recruited to each arm. Average age was 66.7 years, 71.5% were females, and average body mass index was 25.2. Thirty-five levels were instrumented with 130 pedicle screws in RO versus 40 levels with 140 screws in FA, or 4.3 and 4.7 screws per surgery, respectively. Use of fluoroscopy was 3.5 versus 13.3 seconds in the RO and FA respectively (P < 0.001). C-arm output in mSv was 0.13 versus 0.27 in the RO and FA respectively (P = 0.015). By thermoluminescent dosimeters, the average per-screw radiation in the RO arm was 37.5% of that in the FA arm, demonstrating a mean reduction of 62.5% in use of radiation. There was no difference in the improvement in Visual Analog Scale scores for back and leg or the Oswestry Disability Index. All screws were accurate in RO whereas two screws breached (>2 mm and >4 mm) in FA (P = 0.500). One proximal facet violation occurred in the study, it was in FA (P = 1.000). The average distance from the proximal facets was 5.8 versus 4.6 mm in the RO and FA respectively (P < 0.001). The average length of stay was 6.8 versus 9.4 days in RO compared with FA (P = 0.020). MIS using robotic-guidance significantly reduced radiation exposure and length of stay. Patient outcomes were not affected by the surgical technique. 1.

  11. Biomechanical Comparison of Spinal Fusion Methods Using Interspinous Process Compressor and Pedicle Screw Fixation System Based on Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jisoo; Kim, Sohee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biomechanical effects of a newly proposed Interspinous Process Compressor (IPC) and compare with pedicle screw fixation at surgical and adjacent levels of lumbar spine. Methods A three dimensional finite element model of intact lumbar spine was constructed and two spinal fusion models using pedicle screw fixation system and a new type of interspinous devices, IPC, were developed. The biomechanical effects such as range of motion (ROM) and facet contact force were analyzed at surgical level (L3/4) and adjacent levels (L2/3, L4/5). In addition, the stress in adjacent intervertebral discs (D2, D4) was investigated. Results The entire results show biomechanical parameters such as ROM, facet contact force, and stress in adjacent intervertebral discs were similar between PLIF and IPC models in all motions based on the assumption that the implants were perfectly fused with the spine. Conclusion The newly proposed fusion device, IPC, had similar fusion effect at surgical level, and biomechanical effects at adjacent levels were also similar with those of pedicle screw fixation system. However, for clinical applications, real fusion effect between spinous process and hooks, duration of fusion, and influence on spinous process need to be investigated through clinical study. PMID:26962413

  12. [Influence of pedicle screws with different insertion depth on neighboring uninfused segments in a goat lumbar spinal fusion model].

    PubMed

    Gu, Jun; Wang, Yi-Jin; Duanmu, Qun-Li; Wu, Jun-Song; Han, Gui-He; Wu, Yong-Fang; Wei, Wei

    2010-11-01

    To observe the influences of pedicle screws in various insertion depth on the adjacent segment disc degeneration following lumbar spinal fusion. To explore the relationship between the internal fixation rigidity and incidence of adjacent segment disease. Sixteen hybrid male Bohr goats of 10 months old, weighting between 25 and 30 kg, were randomly devided into a control group (N group), and 3 experimental groups, each group had 4 goats. The L4 vertebra of each goat in the experimental groups was fractured, L3-L5 segments were internal fixed with pedicle screws followed by intervertebral joint fusion by a posterior approach. Three experimental groups were devided according to the length of pedicle screws applied, vertebras of goats in L group were internal fixed by the screws at the length of 25 mm, for M group and S group, 20 mm and 15 mm, accordingly. The goats in the control group were treated without any operation. Biomechanical changes and MRI index of upper unfused segment (L2) were measured 24 weeks after operation, and histological changes were observed as well. The pressure and straining of L2 vertebral body and intervertebral disc of L group increased more than N group (P < 0.05), and degenerated cell counting in nucleus pulposus increased as well (P < 0.05). However, MRI index remain unchanged (P > 0.05). Rigid internal fixation increases the pressure and straining of vertebral body and intervertebral disc of upper adjacent segment, accelerating the degeneration process following lumbar spinal fusion in goats.

  13. Posterior Vertebral Column Resection for Severe and Rigid Spinal Deformity Associated With Neurological Deficit After Implant Removal Following Posterior Instrumented Fusion: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tao, Youping; Wu, Jigong; Ma, Huasong; Zhang, Lele; Shao, Shuilin; Si, Zebing; Gao, Bo; Ji, Yong; Li, Haixia; Tao, Feifei

    2015-07-01

    Case report. To investigate the safety and efficacy of posterior vertebral column resection for severe and rigid spinal deformity associated with neurological deficit after implant removal following posterior instrumented fusion. Loss of correction after implant removal in patients with posterior instrumented fusion has been previously reported. However, to our knowledge, posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR) for severe and rigid spinal deformity associated with neurological deficit after implant removal following posterior instrumented fusion has not been reported. An 18-year-old female with severe and rigid spinal deformity associated with neurological deficit was classified as Frankel C, according to the Frankel grading system. She underwent posterior spinal fusion with pedicle screw fixation at 16 years, and her implants were removed after 1 year due to back pain. Seven months after removal of the implants, she began to experience weakness in her lower limbs but did not seek any treatment. She was unable to stand and had to use a wheelchair. The patient successfully underwent PVCR and posterior reinstrumentation. Within 3 months, her neurological status improved to Frankel E. The patient had no neurological deterioration and infections. There was no instrumentation failure and loosening correction at the 32 months follow-up. Our results suggest that PVCR and pedicle screw fixation is a safe and efficacious option for severe and rigid spinal deformity associated with neurological deficit after implant removal following posterior instrumented fusion. N/A.

  14. Spinal cord fusion with PEG-GNRs (TexasPEG): Neurophysiological recovery in 24 hours in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C-Yoon; Sikkema, William K. A.; Hwang, In-Kyu; Oh, Hanseul; Kim, Un Jeng; Lee, Bae Hwan; Tour, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The GEMINI spinal cord fusion protocol has been developed to achieve a successful cephalosomatic anastomosis. Here, for the first time, we report the effects of locally applied water-soluble, conductive PEG(polyethylene glycol)ylated graphene nanoribbons (PEG-GNRs) on neurophysiologic conduction after sharp cervical cord transection in rats. PEG-GNRs were produced by the polymerization of ethylene oxide from anion-edged graphene nanoribbons. These combine the fusogenic potential of PEG with the electrical conducting properties of the graphene nanoribbons. Methods: Laminectomy and transection of cervical spinal cord (C5) was performed on Female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. After applying PEG-GNR on the severed part, electrophysiological recovery of the reconstructed cervical spinal cord was confirmed by somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) at 24 h after surgery. Results: While no SSEPs were detected in the control group, PEG-GNR treated group showed fast recovery of SSEPs at 24 h after the surgery. Conclusion: In this preliminary dataset, for the first time, we report the effect of a novel form of PEG with the goal of rapid reconstruction of a sharply severed spinal cord. PMID:27656326

  15. Plate augmentation in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with cage for degenerative cervical spinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyung-Jin; Taghavi, Cyrus E.; Hsu, Margaret S.; Kim, Gyu-Hyung; Song, Ji-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with cage alone (ACDF-C) is associated with a significant incidence of subsidence, local kyphosis, and migration. The use of concurrent plate augmentation may decrease the incidence of these complications while improving the fusion rate. The purpose of the study is to present our results with ACDF with cage and plate augmentation (ACDF-CPA) and to compare these results to previous reports of outcomes following ACDF-C. We evaluated the radiologic and clinical parameters of 83 patients (266 fusion sites) who had an ACDF-CPA between March 2002 and May 2006. Radiologic parameters included fusion rate, fusion time, fusion type, site of pseudoarthrosis and rate and degree of subsidence. Clinical parameters included complications and overall outcomes assessed with Robinson’s criteria; 79 of 83 patients showed bony fusion (95.1%) at last follow-up postoperatively, and there was no significant difference in fusion rate between the number of fusion levels. Type I (pseudoarthrosis) was noticed in 9 patients (12 fusion sites), type II in 14 (19 fusion sites), and type III in 60 (235 fusion sites). Five type I and all type II fusions converged into type III by the last follow-up; 76 of 83 patients (91.6%) experienced good clinical outcomes. Pseudoarthrosis occurred more commonly in more proximal locations, and the subsidence rate was significantly greater in two-level fusions when compared with single-level fusions (P = 0.046). There were four metal-related complications. Plate augmentation in one- or two-level anterior cervical fusions for degenerative cervical spine disorders may improve fusion rates and reduce subsidence and complication rates, resulting in improved clinical outcomes. PMID:20376680

  16. Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage During Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion and Its Effect on Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Elder, Benjamin D; Theodros, Debebe; Sankey, Eric W; Bydon, Mohamad; Goodwin, C Rory; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Sciubba, Daniel M; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy F

    2016-05-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a commonly performed procedure. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, although uncommon, may occur and can be a potentially serious complication. Little is known regarding the fusion rate after durotomy in ACDF. This study sought to investigate the clinical outcomes and fusion rates of patients with CSF leak after ACDF. In this single-institution retrospective review, 14 patients who experienced CSF leak after ACDF between 1995 and September 2014 were identified. The median follow-up was 13.1 months. The diagnoses included spondylosis/degenerative disc disease (n = 10), disc herniation with radiculopathy (n = 3), and kyphotic deformity (n = 1). Of ACDFs, 7 were 1-level, 5 were 2-level, and 2 were 3-level procedures. The posterior longitudinal ligament was intentionally opened in all cases, and the microscope was used in 9 cases. Durotomy was discovered intraoperatively in all cases and was generally repaired with a combination of fibrin glue and synthetic dural replacement. Lumbar drainage was used in 5 patients, and 3 patients reported orthostatic headaches, which resolved within 1 month. Two patients reported hoarseness, and 8 patients reported dysphagia; all cases were transient. Follow-up imaging for fusion assessment was available for 12 patients, and a 100% fusion rate was achieved with no postoperative infections. ACDFs with CSF leak had a 100% fusion rate in this series, with generally excellent clinical outcomes, although it is difficult to conclude definitively that there is no effect on fusion rates because of the small sample size. However, given the relative rarity of this complication, this study provides important data in the clinical literature regarding outcomes after CSF leak in ACDFs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Safe transcranial electric stimulation motor evoked potential monitoring during posterior spinal fusion in two patients with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Yellin, Joseph L; Wiggins, Cheryl R; Franco, Alier J; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2016-08-01

    Transcranial electric stimulation (TES) motor evoked potentials (MEPs) have become a regular part of intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring (IONM) for posterior spinal fusion (PSF) surgery. Almost all of the relative contraindications to TES have come and gone. One exception is in the case of patients with a cochlear implant (CI). Herein we illustrate two cases of pediatric patients with CIs who underwent PSF using TES MEPs as part of IONM. In both instances the patients displayed no untoward effects from TES, and post-operatively both CIs were intact and functioning as they were prior to surgery.

  18. Is fusion necessary for thoracolumbar burst fracture treated with spinal fixation? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Juliete M; Botelho, Ricardo V

    2017-08-04

    OBJECTIVE Thoracolumbar fractures account for 90% of spinal fractures, with the burst subtype corresponding to 20% of this total. Controversy regarding the best treatment for this condition remains. The traditional surgical approach, when indicated, involves spinal fixation and arthrodesis. Newer studies have brought the need for fusion associated with internal fixation into question. Not performing arthrodesis could reduce surgical time and intraoperative bleeding without affecting clinical and radiological outcomes. With this study, the authors aimed to assess the effect of fusion, adjuvant to internal fixation, on surgically treated thoracolumbar burst fractures. METHODS A search of the Medline and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases was performed to identify randomized trials that compared the use and nonuse of arthrodesis in association with internal fixation for the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures. The search encompassed all data in these databases up to February 28, 2016. RESULTS Five randomized/quasi-randomized trials, which involved a total of 220 patients and an average follow-up time of 69.1 months, were included in this review. No significant difference between groups in the final scores of the visual analog pain scale or Low Back Outcome Scale was detected. Surgical time and blood loss were significantly lower in the group of patients who did not undergo fusion (p < 0.05). Among the evaluated radiological outcomes, greater mobility in the affected segment was found in the group of those who did not undergo fusion. No significant difference between groups in the degree of kyphosis correction, loss of kyphosis correction, or final angle of kyphosis was observed. CONCLUSIONS The data reviewed in this study suggest that the use of arthrodesis did not improve clinical outcomes, but it was associated with increased surgical time and higher intraoperative bleeding and did not promote significant improvement in radiological

  19. A Comparison of Radiostereometric Analysis and Computed Tomography for the Assessment of Lumbar Spinal Fusion in a Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Humadi, Ali; Freeman, Brian J. C.; Moore, Rob J.; Callary, Stuart; Halldin, Klas; David, Vikram; Maclaurin, William; Tauro, Paul; Schoenwaelder, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Prospective animal study. Objective The aim of this animal study is to evaluate the accuracy of radiostereometric analysis (RSA) compared with computed tomographic (CT) scan in the assessment of spinal fusion after anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) using histology as a gold standard. Methods Three non-adjacent ALIFs (L1–L2, L3–L4, and L5–L6) were performed in nine sheep. The sheep were divided into three groups of three sheep. All the animals were humanely killed immediately after having the last scheduled RSA. The lumbar spine was removed and in vitro fine cut CT and histopathology were performed. Results Using histological assessment as the gold standard for assessing fusion, RSA demonstrated better results (100% sensitivity and 66.7% specificity; positive predictive value [PPV] = 27.3%, negative predictive value [NPV] =100.0%) compared with CT (66.7% sensitivity and 60.0% specificity [PPV = 16.7%, NPV = 93.8%]). Conclusions RSA demonstrated higher sensitivity and specificity when compared with CT. Furthermore, RSA has the advantage of much lower radiation exposure compared with fine cut CT. Further studies are required to see if RSA remains superior to CT scan for the assessment spinal fusion in the clinical setting. Assessment of Class of Evidence (CoE) for individual studies of diagnostic test evaluation Methodological principle Study design  Prospective cohort design X  Retrospective cohort design  Case–control design Broad spectrum of patients with expected condition a Appropriate reference standard used X Adequate description of test and reference for replication X Blinded comparison with appropriate reference X Reference standard performed independently of test X Evidence level II Note: Blank box indicates criterion not met, could not be determined, or information not reported by author or was not reported. aThis study contained nine animal subjects. PMID:24436705

  20. Irreducible posterolateral elbow dislocation: a rare injury.

    PubMed

    Fenelon, Christopher; Zafar, Muhammed M; Sheridan, Gerard Anthony; Kearns, Stephen

    2016-12-30

    Posterolateral dislocation of the elbow is an injury commonly treated in the emergency department by closed reduction. Very rarely it can be irreducible and require open reduction. Only four cases of irreducible posterolateral elbow dislocation have been described in the literature over the past 50 years. We report the case of a 20-year-old man who sustained such an injury. Open reduction was performed and revealed the radial head protruding or 'buttonholing' through the lateral collateral ligament complex. This case highlights that continued closed reduction of the elbow should not be attempted, as a mechanical block to reduction can occur making reduction impossible.

  1. Effect of daily parathyroid hormone (1-34) on lumbar fusion in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, James P; Ennis, Frank; White, Andrew P; Magit, David; Polzhofer, Gert; Drespe, Inneke; Troiano, Nancy W; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2006-01-01

    Despite numerous studies evaluating the anabolic effects of intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on bone, there are no published studies examining its effect on spinal fusion outcomes. To determine the effect of daily injection of human recombinant PTH(1-34) on posterolateral lumbar fusions in a rat model. Prospective, case-controlled, preclinical animal study. Manual palpation and serum osteocalcin. Single-level, intertransverse process spinal fusions were performed with iliac crest autograft in 56 Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals received daily injections of placebo or PTH(1-34). At 6 weeks, fusion masses were assessed by manual palpation. Serum osteocalcin levels were assessed in a subset of the animals. Manual palpation revealed the control group to have a fusion rate of 37% (10/27) and the PTH(1-34)-treated group to have a fusion rate of 52% (15/29). Mean serum osteocalcin levels were 59.8 and 88.6 ng/L for the control and PTH(1-34) groups, respectively. There was a trend towards greater fusion rate in the PTH(1-34) group as compared with the placebo group. Further, PTH(1-34) administration was associated with a significant increase in osteocalcin levels. Certainly, further investigations are warranted, as an injectable agent capable of increasing fusion rates would be of great clinical value.

  2. Risk factors for delayed infections after spinal fusion and instrumentation in patients with scoliosis. Clinical article.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianxiong; Liang, Jinqian; Yu, Haiquan; Qiu, Guixing; Xue, Xuhong; Li, Zheng

    2014-10-01

    There are limited published data about the risk factors for the development of delayed infections after spinal fusion and instrumentation in the population with scoliosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive factors of development of delayed infections in patients with scoliosis who underwent surgical treatment. A total of 17 patients with scoliosis and delayed infections were identified from 3463 patients with scoliosis who received surgical treatment. The control group was composed of 85 patients with scoliosis without infections, matched for sex, age, approximate date of surgery, and diagnosis. These 2 groups were compared for demographic distribution and clinical data to investigate the predictive factors of delayed infections. The overall incidence rate of delayed infections was 0.49%. The variables of age, body mass index, and number of levels fused were similar between the 2 groups. The average primary curve magnitude for the delayed infection and control (uninfected) groups was 80.4° ± 27.0° (range 47°-135°) and 66.3° ± 11.6° (range 42°-95°), respectively (p = 0.001). Operation time in the group with delayed infections was 384.7 ± 115.9 minutes versus 254.4 ± 79.2 minutes in the control group (p = 0.000), and estimated blood loss was 1342.2 ± 707.2 ml versus 833.9 ± 235.6 ml (p = 0.000) in these 2 groups, respectively. The perioperative mean red blood cell transfusion requirement in the delayed infection group was significantly higher than that found in patients without infections (2.8 ± 2.3 units/patient versus 1.1 ± 1.6 units/patient, respectively; p = 0.000). Logistic regression analysis showed that operation time and allogenic blood transfusion were the 2 independent predictors of delayed infections (odds ratio [OR] 1.021, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.010-1.033, and OR 1.546, 95% CI 1.048-2.278, respectively). The occurrence of a delayed infection in patients with scoliosis who undergo surgical treatment is most

  3. Intra-trunk Coordination During High-Effort Treadmill Running in Individuals With Spinal Fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yumeng; Kakar, Rumit S; Walker, Marika A; Fu, Yang-Chieh; Oswald, Timothy S; Brown, Cathleen N; Simpson, Kathy J

    2017-06-28

    The purpose of the study was to determine if the intra-trunk coordination of axial rotation exhibited by individuals with spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (SF-AIS) during running varies from healthy individuals and how the coordination differs among adjacent trunk-segment pairs. Axial rotations of trunk segments (upper, middle, lower trunk) and pelvis were collected for 11 SF-AIS participants and 11 matched controls during running. Cross-correlation determined the phase lag between the adjacent segment motions. The coupling angle was generated using the vector coding method and classified into one of the four major, modified coordination patterns: in-phase, anti-phase, superior and inferior phase. Two-way, mixed-model ANCOVA was employed to test phase lag, cross-correlation r and time spent in each major coordination pattern. A significantly lower phase lag for SF-AIS was observed compared with controls. Qualitatively, there was a tendency that SF-AIS participants spent less time in anti-phase for middle-lower trunk and lower trunk-pelvis coordinations compared to controls. Phase lag and anti-phase time was significantly increased from cephalic to caudal segment pairs, regardless of group. In conclusion, SF-AIS participants and controls displayed similar patterns of intra-trunk coordination; however, the spinal fusion hindered decoupling of intra-trunk motions particularly between the lower trunk-pelvic motion.

  4. Bioactive glass as a bone substitute for spinal fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a comparative study with iliac crest autograft.

    PubMed

    Ilharreborde, Brice; Morel, Etienne; Fitoussi, Franck; Presedo, Ana; Souchet, Philippe; Penneçot, Georges-François; Mazda, Keyvan

    2008-01-01

    Iliac crest autograft is currently the gold standard material for spinal fusion. However, its use is limited by additional operative time, increased blood loss, and morbidity. Recently, a synthetic osteoconductive bone graft material composed of bioactive glass has been described, with high effectiveness in animal models. Its ability to achieve spinal fusion in human has never been reported. The aim of this study was to compare bioactive glass and iliac crest autograft as bone substitutes in the treatment thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Eighty-eight consecutive patients underwent posterior spinal fusion for progressive thoracic AIS. There were 2 study groups based on the type of bone graft used: iliac crest autograft (n = 40) or bioglass (n = 48). A minimum 2-year follow-up was required. Medical data and radiographs were retrospectively analyzed and compared using unpaired t test and Mann-Whitney U test. Mean follow-up was 40 months in the autograft group and 38 months in the bioglass group. In the autograft group, there were 2 infections (5%) and 3 mechanical failures (7.5%). One infection (2%) and 1 early mechanical failure (2%) occurred in the bioglass group. Loss of correction of the main thoracic curve between immediate postoperative and latest follow-up averaged 15.5% for autograft group and 11% for the bioglass group (P = 0.025). The mean (+/-SD) gain of frontal balance between immediate postoperative latest follow-up was 0.8 (+/-9.3) mm in the autograft group and 8.1 (+/-12) mm for the bioglass group (P = 0.005). Results of this retrospective study suggest that bioglass is as effective as iliac crest graft to achieve fusion and maintain correction in AIS. Less complications were seen in the bioactive glass group, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. Bioactive glass can be proposed in the treatment of AIS, avoiding the morbidity of iliac crest harvesting. However, clinical and radiological outcomes need to be confirmed

  5. Results of Single-Staged Posterior Decompression and Circumferential Fusion Using a Transpedicular Approach to Correct a Kyphotic Deformity due to Thoracolumbar Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Jayprakash; Soman, Shardul; Patel, Harshil; Dhanani, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This is a prospective study. Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the results of single-staged posterior decompression and circumferential fusion using a transpedicular approach to correct a kyphotic deformity due to thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis. Overview of Literature Surgical management is frequently an imperative choice to achieve spinal decompression and deformity correction due to tuberculosis to relieve pain, improve neurology, and reconstruct the spine stability. Since the time anterior radical debridement and noninstrumented fusion was described, it has become apparent that even anterior debridement and bone grafting was often unsatisfactory in correcting or preventing the progression of kyphosis deformity. With the advent of modern segmental spinal instrumentation systems, isolated posterior instrumentation; combined anterior and posterior fusion; and single-staged posterior decompression and circumferential fusion have been described by many authors for correcting angular deformity and stabilizing the spine; however, there is a lack of consensus regarding the most effective means of correcting the deformity due to thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis. Methods This is a prospective study of 20 patients with thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis who underwent surgery at our institute. Results Twenty patients who were started on antituberculosis treatment underwent surgery using a single-staged posterior approach involving fixation, decompression, and kyphosis correction. Preoperatively, all patients had varying degrees of neurological deficit and a 27.45° average kyphotic angle, which improved. At the 1-year follow-up, correction was maintained at 6.9°, and 55% of patients showed neurological improvement. None of the patients experienced neurological deterioration. Two patients with lumbar spine tuberculosis underwent revision surgery because of nonunion. Conclusions The procedure of posterior decompression, fixation, and

  6. Economics of less invasive spinal surgery: an analysis of hospital cost differences between open and minimally invasive instrumented spinal fusion procedures during the perioperative period.

    PubMed

    Lucio, John C; Vanconia, R Brent; Deluzio, Kevin J; Lehmen, Jeffrey A; Rodgers, Jody A; Rodgers, Wb

    2012-01-01

    There is great debate about the costs and benefits of technology-driven medical interventions such as instrumented lumbar fusion. With most analyses using charge data, the actual costs incurred by medical institutions performing these procedures are not well understood. The object of the current study was to examine the differences in hospital operating costs between open and minimally invasive spine surgery (MIS) during the perioperative period. Data were collected in the form of a prospective registry from a community hospital after specific Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. The analysis included consecutive adult patients being surgically treated for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine, with either an MIS or open approach for two-level instrumented lumbar fusion. Patient outcomes and costs were collected for the perioperative period. Hospital operating costs were grouped by hospitalization/operative procedure, transfusions, reoperations, and residual events (health care interactions). One hundred and one open posterior lumbar interbody fusion (Open group) and 109 MIS patients were treated primarily for stenosis coupled with instability (39.6% and 59.6%, respectively). Mean total hospital costs were $27,055.53 for the Open group and $24,320.16 for the MIS group. This represents a statistically significant cost savings of $2,825.37 (10.4% [95% confidence interval: $522.51-$5,128.23]) when utilizing MIS over traditional Open techniques. Additionally, residual events, complications, and blood transfusions were significantly more frequent in the Open group, compared to the MIS group. Utilizing minimally invasive techniques for instrumented spinal fusion results in decreased hospital operating costs compared to similar open procedures in the early perioperative period. Additionally, patient benefits of minimally invasive techniques include significantly less blood loss, shorter hospital stays, lower complication rate, and a lower number of

  7. Economics of less invasive spinal surgery: an analysis of hospital cost differences between open and minimally invasive instrumented spinal fusion procedures during the perioperative period

    PubMed Central

    Lucio, John C; VanConia, R Brent; DeLuzio, Kevin J; Lehmen, Jeffrey A; Rodgers, Jody A; Rodgers, WB

    2012-01-01

    Background There is great debate about the costs and benefits of technology-driven medical interventions such as instrumented lumbar fusion. With most analyses using charge data, the actual costs incurred by medical institutions performing these procedures are not well understood. The object of the current study was to examine the differences in hospital operating costs between open and minimally invasive spine surgery (MIS) during the perioperative period. Methods Data were collected in the form of a prospective registry from a community hospital after specific Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. The analysis included consecutive adult patients being surgically treated for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine, with either an MIS or open approach for two-level instrumented lumbar fusion. Patient outcomes and costs were collected for the perioperative period. Hospital operating costs were grouped by hospitalization/operative procedure, transfusions, reoperations, and residual events (health care interactions). Results One hundred and one open posterior lumbar interbody fusion (Open group) and 109 MIS patients were treated primarily for stenosis coupled with instability (39.6% and 59.6%, respectively). Mean total hospital costs were $27,055.53 for the Open group and $24,320.16 for the MIS group. This represents a statistically significant cost savings of $2,825.37 (10.4% [95% confidence interval: $522.51–$5,128.23]) when utilizing MIS over traditional Open techniques. Additionally, residual events, complications, and blood transfusions were significantly more frequent in the Open group, compared to the MIS group. Conclusions/level of evidence Utilizing minimally invasive techniques for instrumented spinal fusion results in decreased hospital operating costs compared to similar open procedures in the early perioperative period. Additionally, patient benefits of minimally invasive techniques include significantly less blood loss, shorter hospital

  8. Posterolateral approach to ruptured median and paramedian cervical disk.

    PubMed

    Fager, C A

    1983-12-01

    The trend toward anterior diskectomy for median and paramedian cervical disk rupture has tended to obscure progressive development of the posterolateral approach to these lesions. Modifications of surgical technique from the classic posterior approach have allowed direct access to these lesions, provided for satisfactory decompression of the spinal cord, especially when there is associated spondylosis, and avoided all of the disadvantages of anterior disk surgery. Of 28 patients operated on since 1950, 26 have had significant preoperative myelopathy or myeloradiculopathy. Two patients with obvious spinal cord compression and massive myelographic defects had no neurologic deficit. Improvement has been observed in every patient; 16 patients have had full recovery, and 8 others have had minor residual symptoms and asymptomatic signs. Although four patients have been lost to follow-up, they were all seen at least once after operation. No instance of increased deficit has been seen postoperatively, in contrast to the author's experience with spondylotic myelopathy. Postoperative contrast studies, which have now been performed on eight patients, confirm satisfactory excision of these lesions and decompression.

  9. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure's semi-structured interview: its applicability to lumbar spinal fusion patients. A prospective randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Oestergaard, Lisa Gregersen; Maribo, Thomas; Bünger, Cody Erik; Christensen, Finn Bjarke

    2012-01-01

    Although lumbar spinal fusion has been performed for more than 70 years, few studies have examined rehabilitation strategies for spinal fusion patients, and there is only sparse information about the patient's activity level after surgery. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) is a standardized semi-structured interview, developed to identify patients' problems in relation to activities of daily living (ADL). The COPM has neither been examined in a randomised clinical study nor employed in relation to lumbar spinal fusion patients. We aimed to examine whether or not the use of the semi-structured interview COPM during in-hospital rehabilitation could: (1) identify more ADL-related problems of importance to the patients after discharge from the hospital, (2) enhance the patients' ADL performance after discharge from hospital Eighty-seven patients undergoing a lumbar spinal fusion caused by degenerative diseases were randomly assigned to either use of the COPM or to standard treatment. Use of the COPM during hospitalization helped in identifying more ADL problems encountered by patients during the first 3 months post-discharge period as COPM served to identify more treatment goals and plans of action. Use of the COPM had no impact on the patients' ADL performance, and the difference is so small that COPM may be of little clinical consequence.

  10. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. The mean follow-up was 36.9 months (range: 24-62 months). The kyphotic angle ranged from 15.2-35.1° preoperatively, with an average measurement of 27.8°. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score system was used to evaluate the neurological deficits and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) used to judge the activity of TB. Spinal TB was completely cured in all 17 patients. There was no recurrent TB infection. The postoperative kyphotic angle was 6.6-10.2°, 8.1° in average, and there was no significant loss of the correction at final follow-up. Solid fusion was achieved in all cases. Neurological condition in all patients was improved after surgery. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation can be a feasible and effective method the in treatment of single-segment lumbar spinal TB.

  11. Intrathecal Morphine Versus Extended-Release Epidural Morphine for Postoperative Pain Control in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Posterior Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mindy; Zuk, Jeannie; McKay, Nancy; Erickson, Mark; Pan, Zhaoxing; Galinkin, Jeffrey

    2017-06-01

    Posterior spinal fusion for scoliosis is one of the most painful elective pediatric surgeries. Good postoperative pain control allows early ambulation and return of ability to tolerate oral intake. Options for analgesia in this patient population are suboptimal. We hypothesized that extended-release epidural morphine (EREM) would provide better pain control and less adverse effects compared to intrathecal (IT) morphine. The primary outcome was total IV morphine consumption during 0-48 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes included time until first patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) demand, pain scores, and adverse opioid effects. After institutional review board approval, 71 subjects undergoing posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis completed the study. The subjects were randomly allocated to 7.5 μg/kg IT morphine or 150 μg/kg EREM. The final IT morphine and EREM groups contained 37 and 34 subjects, respectively. Postoperative pain was treated with morphine PCA, ketorolac, oral oxycodone, and acetaminophen. Morphine consumption, pain scores, nausea and vomiting, pruritus, and respiratory depression were measured every 4 hours. Parents completed a caregiver questionnaire about their child's pain control regimen after the first postoperative day. There was no difference in total morphine consumption over the first 48 hours between subjects in the EREM and IT morphine groups: median (range) 42.2 (5.5-123.0) and 34.0 (4.5-128.8) mg, respectively (P = .27). EREM and IT morphine groups had no difference in time until first PCA demand. Pain scores were no different between the groups from 8 to 24 hours after surgery. Compared to IT morphine, EREM subjects had lower pain scores from 28 to 36 hours after surgery. The reported incidence of pruritus was lower in the EREM subjects. There was no difference in total morphine consumption or time until first PCA demand between the EREM and IT morphine groups. EREM provides a longer duration of analgesia after

  12. Predictors of allogeneic blood transfusion in spinal fusion for pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis in the United States, 2004-2009.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Hiroyuki; Yoneoka, Daisuke

    2014-10-15

    Analysis of population-based National Hospital Discharge Survey data collected for the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. To examine the predictors of allogeneic blood transfusion (ALBT) in spinal fusion for pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis. Spinal fusion for pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis is associated with major blood loss and often necessitates ALBT. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to identify pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent spinal fusion from 2004 to 2009, using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Then, patients who received ALBT were identified using the appropriate International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code. Patient demographics, surgical variables, and hospital characteristics were retrieved. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictors of ALBT in spinal fusion for pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis. The odds ratio (OR) increased with increasing Elixhauser Comorbidity Score (score 1: OR, 1.55; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.23-1.97; score 2: OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.69-2.93; score 3: OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.6-4.66; score≥4: OR, 4.18; 95% CI, 1.93-9.06). Patients who underwent posterior approach or anterior and posterior approach surgical procedures were more likely to receive ALBT compared with those who underwent anterior approach surgery (posterior: OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.22-4.08; anterior and posterior: OR, 3.35; 95% CI, 1.69-6.63). Patients with a spinal fusion of 9 or more levels were more likely to receive ALBT compared with those with a spinal fusion of 4 to 8 levels (OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.05-1.85). There was no difference between patients with or without autologous-related blood transfusion (OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.59-1.43). This study identified significant predictors of ALBT in spinal fusion for pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis. These factors need to

  13. Results of a modified posterolateral approach for the isolated posterolateral tibial plateau fracture

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guan-Yi; Xiao, Bai-Ping; Luo, Cong-Feng; Zhuang, Yun-Qiang; Xu, Rong-Ming; Ma, Wei-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are few posterolateral approaches that do not require the common peroneal nerve (CPN) dissection. With the nerve exposure, it would pose a great challenge and sometimes iatrogenic damage over the surgical course. The purpose was to present a case series of patients with posterolateral tibial plateau fractures treated by direct exposure and plate fixation through a modified posterolateral approach without exposing the common peroneal nerve (CPN). Materials and Methods: 9 consecutive cases of isolated posterior fractures of the posterolateral tibial plateau were operated by open reduction and plate fixation through the modified posterolateral approach without exposing the CPN between June 2009 and January 2012. Articular reduction quality was assessment according to the immediate postoperative radiographs. At 24 month followup, all patients had radiographs and were asked to complete a validated outcome measure and the modified Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) Knee Scale. Results: All patients were followedup, with a mean period of 29 months (range 25–40 months). Bony union was achieved in all patients. In six cases, the reduction was graded as best and in three cases the reduction was graded as middle according to the immediate postoperative radiographs by the rank order system. The average range of motion arc was 127° (range 110°–134°) and the mean postoperative HSS was 93 (range 85–97) at 24 months followup. None of the patients sustained neurovascular complication. Conclusions: The modified posterolateral approach through a long skin incision without exposing the CPN could help to expand the surgical options for an optimal treatment of this kind of fracture, and plating of posterolateral tibial plateau fractures would result in restoration and maintenance of alignment. This approach demands precise knowledge of the anatomic structures of this region. PMID:27053799

  14. Incremental Hospital Cost and Length-of-Stay Associated With Treating Adverse Events Among Medicare Beneficiaries Undergoing Lumbar Spinal Fusion During Fiscal Year 2013.

    PubMed

    Culler, Steven D; Jevsevar, David S; Shea, Kevin G; McGuire, Kevin J; Schlosser, Michael; Wright, Kimberly K; Simon, April W

    2016-10-15

    A retrospective study. To report the incremental hospital resource consumption associated with treating selected adverse events experienced by Medicare beneficiaries undergoing a two- or three-level lumbar spinal fusion. Hospitals are increasingly at financial risk for the incremental resources consumed in treating patients experiencing adverse events because of public and private third-party payers' efforts to base hospital reimbursement on "pay for performance" measures. However, little is known about average incremental resources consumed in treating patients experiencing adverse events following lumbar spinal fusions. The 2013 fiscal year Medicare Provider Analysis and Review file was used to identify 83,658 Medicare beneficiaries who underwent two- or three vertebrae-level lumbar spinal fusion. International Classification of Diseases-9th-Clinical Modification diagnostic and procedure codes were used to identify the frequencies of nine adverse events. This study estimated both the observed and risk-adjusted incremental hospital resources consumed (cost and length of stay [LOS]) in treating Medicare beneficiaries experiencing each adverse event. Overall, 17.7% of Medicare beneficiaries undergoing lumbar spinal fusion experienced at least one of the study's adverse events. Medicare beneficiaries experiencing any complication consumed significantly more hospital resources (incremental cost of $8911) and had longer LOS (incremental stays of 5.7 days). After adjusting for patient demographics and comorbid conditions, incremental cost of treating adverse events ranged from a high of $32,049 (infection) to a low of $9976 (transfusion). Adverse events frequently occur and add substantially to the hospital resource costs of patients undergoing spinal fusion. Shared decision-making instruments should clearly provide these risk estimates to the patient before surgical consideration. Investment in activities that have been shown to reduce specific adverse events is

  15. The Incremental Hospital Cost and Length-of-Stay Associated with Treating Adverse Events Among Medicare Beneficiaries Undergoing Cervical Spinal Fusion during Fiscal Year 2013 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Culler, Steven D; McGuire, Kevin J; Little, Kenneth M; Jevsevar, David; Shea, Kevin; Schlosser, Michael; Ambrose, Karen E; Simon, April W

    2017-06-06

    A retrospective study. To report the incremental hospital resources consumed with treating adverse events experienced by Medicare beneficiaries undergoing a two or three vertebrae level cervical spinal fusion. Hospitals are increasingly at financial risk for patients experiencing adverse events due "pay for performance". Little is known about incremental resources consumed when treating patients who experienced an adverse event following cervical spinal fusions. Fiscal years 2013 and 2014 Medicare Provider Analysis and Review file was used to identify 86,265 beneficiaries who underwent 2 or 3 vertebrae level cervical spinal fusion. International Classification of Diseases-9-Clinical Modification diagnostic and procedure codes were used to identify ten adverse events. This study estimated both the observed and risk-adjusted incremental hospital resources consumed (cost (2014 US $) and length-of-stay [LOS]) in treating beneficiaries experiencing each adverse event. Overall, 6.2% of beneficiaries undergoing cervical spinal fusion experienced at least one of the study's adverse events. Beneficiaries experiencing any complication consumed significantly more hospital resources (incremental cost of $28,638) and had longer LOS (incremental stays of 9.1 days). After adjusting for patient demographics and comorbid conditions, incremental cost of treating adverse events ranged from a high of $42,358 (infection) to a low of $10,100 (dural tear). Adverse events frequently occur and add substantially to the hospital costs of patients undergoing cervical spinal fusion. Shared decision-making instruments should clearly provide these risk estimates to the patient prior to surgical consideration. Investment in activities that have been shown to reduce specific adverse events is warranted, and this study may allow health systems to prioritize performance improvement areas. 3.

  16. Kinematic evaluation of one- and two-level Maverick lumbar total disc replacement caudal to a long thoracolumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingan; Itshayek, Eyal; Jones, Claire F; Schwab, Timothy; Larson, Chadwick R; Lenke, Lawrence G; Cripton, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    Adjacent level degeneration that occurs above and/or below long fusion constructs is a documented clinical problem that is widely believed to be associated with the considerable change in stiffness caused by the fusion. Some researchers have suggested that early degeneration at spinal joints adjacent to a fusion could be treated by implanting total disc replacements at these levels. It is thought that further degeneration could be prevented through the disc replacement's design aims to reproduce normal disc heights, kinematics and tissue loading. For this reason, there is a clinical need to evaluate if a total disc replacement can maintain both the quantity of motion (i.e. range) and the quality of motion (i.e. center of rotation and coupling) at segments adjacent to a long spinal fusion. The purpose of this study was to experimentally evaluate range of motion (ROM-the intervertebral motion measured) and helical axis of motion (HAM) changes due to one- and two-level Maverick total disc replacement (TDR) adjacent to a long spinal fusion. Seven spine specimens (T8-S1) were used in this study (66 ± 19 years old, 3F/4 M). A continuous pure moment of ±5.0 Nm was applied to the specimen in flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB) and axial rotation (AR), with a compressive follower preload of 400 N. The 5.0 Nm data were analyzed to evaluate the operated segment biomechanics at the level of the disc replacements. The data were also analyzed at lower moments using a modified version of Panjabi's proposed "hybrid" method to evaluate adjacent segment kinematics (intervertebral motion at the segments adjacent to the fusion) under identical overall (T8-S1) specimen rotations. The motion of each vertebra was monitored with an optoelectronic camera system. The biomechanical test was completed for (1) the intact condition and repeated after each surgical technique was applied to the specimen, (2) capsulotomy at L4-L5 and L5-S1, (3) T8-L4 fusion and capsulotomy at L4

  17. Reliability of clinical measurement for assessing spinal fusion: an experimental sheep study.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Sadahiro; Wullschleger, Martin; Wilson, Kathleen; Williams, Richard; Goss, Ben

    2012-04-20

    A sheep study designed to compare the accuracy of static radiographs, dynamic radiographs, and computed tomographic (CT) scans for the assessment of thoracolumbar facet joint fusion as determined by micro-CT scanning. To determine the accuracy and reliability of conventional imaging techniques in identifying the status of thoracolumbar (T13-L1) facet joint fusion in a sheep model. Plain radiographs are commonly used to determine the integrity of surgical arthrodesis of the thoracolumbar spine. Many previous studies of fusion success have relied solely on postoperative assessment of plain radiographs, a technique lacking sensitivity for pseudarthrosis. CT may be a more reliable technique, but is less well characterized. Eleven adult sheep were randomized to either attempted arthrodesis using autogenous bone graft and internal fixation (n = 3) or intentional pseudarthrosis (IP) using oxidized cellulose and internal fixation (n = 8). After 6 months, facet joint fusion was assessed by independent observers, using (1) plain static radiography alone, (2) additional dynamic radiographs, and (3) additional reconstructed spiral CT imaging. These assessments were correlated with high-resolution micro-CT imaging to predict the utility of the conventional imaging techniques in the estimation of fusion success. The capacity of plain radiography alone to correctly predict fusion or pseudarthrosis was 43% and was not improved using plain radiography and dynamic radiography with also a 43% accuracy. Adding assessment by reformatted CT imaging to the plain radiography techniques increased the capacity to predict fusion outcome to 86% correctly. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of static radiography were 0.33, 0.55, and 0.43, respectively, those of dynamic radiography were 0.46, 0.40, and 0.43, respectively, and those of radiography plus CT were 0.88, 0.85, and 0.86, respectively. CT-based evaluation correlated most closely with high-resolution micro-CT imaging. Neither

  18. Four-Point Bending as a Method for Quantitatively Evaluating Spinal Arthrodesis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel T; Svet, Mark T; Kanim, Linda A; Metzger, Melodie F

    2015-01-01

    The most common method of evaluating the success (or failure) of rat spinal fusion procedures is manual palpation testing. Whereas manual palpation provides only a subjective binary answer (fused or not fused) regarding the success of a fusion surgery, mechanical testing can provide more quantitative data by assessing variations in strength among treatment groups. We here describe a mechanical testing method to quantitatively assess single-level spinal fusion in a rat model, to improve on the binary and subjective nature of manual palpation as an end point for fusion-related studies. We tested explanted lumbar segments from Sprague–Dawley rat spines after single-level posterolateral fusion procedures at L4–L5. Segments were classified as ‘not fused,’ ‘restricted motion,’ or ‘fused’ by using manual palpation testing. After thorough dissection and potting of the spine, 4-point bending in flexion then was applied to the L4–L5 motion segment, and stiffness was measured as the slope of the moment–displacement curve. Results demonstrated statistically significant differences in stiffness among all groups, which were consistent with preliminary grading according to manual palpation. In addition, the 4-point bending results provided quantitative information regarding the quality of the bony union formed and therefore enabled the comparison of fused specimens. Our results demonstrate that 4-point bending is a simple, reliable, and effective way to describe and compare results among rat spines after fusion surgery. PMID:25730756

  19. Multiple-hook fixation in revision spinal deformity surgery for patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass: technical note and preliminary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Wood, Kirkham B

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE A previous multilevel fusion mass encountered during revision spinal deformity surgery may obscure anatomical landmarks, making instrumentation unworkable or incurring substantial blood loss and operative time. This study introduced a surgical technique of multiple-hook fixation for fixating previous multilevel fusion masses in revision spinal deformity surgeries and then evaluated its outcomes. METHODS Patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass who underwent revision corrective surgery down to the lumbosacral junction were retrospectively studied. Multiple hooks were used to fixate the fusion mass and linked to distal pedicle screws in the lumbosacral-pelvic complex. Radiological and clinical outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS The charts of 8 consecutive patients with spinal deformity were retrospectively reviewed (7 women, 1 man; mean age 56 years). The primary diagnoses included flat-back deformity (6 cases), thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis (1 case), and lumbar spondylosis secondary to a previous scoliosis fusion (1 case). The mean follow-up duration was 30.1 months. Operations were performed at T3/4-ilium (4 cases), T7-ilium (1 case), T6-S1 (1 case), T12-S1 (1 case), and T9-L5 (1 case). Of 8 patients, 7 had sagittal imbalance preoperatively, and their mean C-7 plumb line improved from 10.8 ± 2.9 cm preoperatively to 5.3 ± 3.6 cm at final follow-up (p = 0.003). The mean lumbar lordosis of these patients at final follow-up was significantly greater than that preoperatively (35.2° ± 12.6° vs 16.8° ± 11.8°, respectively; p = 0.005). Two perioperative complications included osteotomy-related leg weakness in 1 patient and a stitch abscess in another. CONCLUSIONS The multiple-hook technique provides a viable alternative option for fixating a previous multilevel fusion mass in revision spinal deformity surgery.

  20. Subscapularis Transthoracic Versus Posterolateral Approaches in the Surgical Management of Upper Thoracic Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; Shi, Ji-Sheng; Zhang, Hai-Shen; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Bi; Guo, Zhi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical, radiological, and functional outcomes of a subscapularis transthoracic surgical approach and a posterolateral surgical approach with debridement, bone graft fusion, and internal fixation for the treatment of upper thoracic tuberculosis. There is currently debate over the best surgical approach for the treatment of upper thoracic tuberculosis. Traditionally, the subscapularis transthoracic approach has been preferred; however, the posterolateral approach has gained popularity in the past few years. A prospective, consecutive cohort of 43 upper thoracic tuberculosis patients with a mean age of 39 years (range: 20–52 years) was followed up for a minimum of 12 months (range: 12–60 months). Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group A (n = 21) was treated by the subscapularis transthoracic approach and group B (n = 22) was treated by the posterolateral approach. All cases were evaluated for clinical, radiological, and functional outcomes. Intraoperative blood loss, operative duration, intraoperative and postoperative complications, hospital stay, the cure rate, fusion time, and the Frankel scale were used for clinical and functional evaluation, whereas the kyphosis angle was used for radiological evaluation. Grafted bones were fused by 10 months in all cases. There was no statistically significant difference between groups before surgery in terms of gender, age, segmental tuberculosis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), Frankel scale, or Cobb's angle (P > 0.05). The average operative duration for Group B was lower than that of Group A. There were no significant differences in intraoperative blood loss, intraoperative and postoperative complications, hospital stay, grafted bone fusion time, or cure rate between groups (P > 0.05). The Cobb's angle correction rate for group B (68.5%) was significantly better than that of group A (30.9%). The neurological score showed

  1. Extreme lateral interbody fusion relieves symptoms of spinal stenosis and low-grade spondylolisthesis by indirect decompression in complex patients.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Farwana, Mohammad; Lam, Khai S

    2017-01-01

    Spinal stenosis and low-grade spondylolisthesis produce symptoms of neural compression that can be treated with extreme lateral lumbar interbody fusion (XLIF) via indirect decompression. This study aimed to investigate whether the restoration of disc dimensions would relieve symptoms of radiculopathy, claudication and back pain. In this retrospective study, patients undergoing XLIF surgery for relief of radicular symptoms or degenerative disc disease were included. Radiologically proven changes were used to assess the modes of degeneration. Objective measures such as the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for back and legs and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used. Complications were collated post-operatively from clinical notes and outpatient appointments. Twenty-three consecutive patients were included, of whom 91% had spinal stenosis. The cohort presented with multiple comorbidities and 35% of the cohort had undergone previous lumbar surgery. There was a 61% improvement of coronal Cobb angle and an 11% correction of the lordosis sustained 1year after surgery. Clinical outcomes at 1year showed 39%, 50% and 60% improvements in the ODI, back and leg VAS scores respectively. 48% of patients had reduced sensation related to lumbosacral plexus manipulation and one retroperitoneal haematoma was conservatively managed. Minimally invasive spinal (MIS) XLIF resulted in effective restoration of disc dimensions via indirect decompression, providing good relief of clinical symptoms evidenced by significant improvement in clinical outcome scores. XLIF corrected scoliosis and improved lumbar lordosis significantly. Several plexopathies did not hinder long-term recovery. XLIF is highly suited to treating complex patients with multiple comorbidities and degenerative disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Recalibration via a postero-lateral approach in recent traumatic stenosis of the dorsal and lumbar spine. Modalities and results apropos of 31 cases].

    PubMed

    Richaud, J; Bousquet, P; Ealet, G; Clamens, J; Beltchika, K; Lazorthes, Y

    1990-01-01

    The authors present 31 cases of spinal trauma affecting thoraco lumbar level with severe spinal canal stenosis secondary to compressive trauma of the anterior disco-corpereal region. Associated neurological disorders were of varying severity. 23 cases were investigated by computed tomography. In all cases, the surgical procedure involved rectification of spinal deformities, with initially a unilateral postero-lateral approach permitting anterior spinal canal recalibration, either by impaction of protrusive fragments or ablation of free disc fragments. The stabilization was usually achieved by complementary bilateral plates using Roy-Camille or Privat material in 22 cases, associated with postero-lateral arthrodesis by grafting with reconstruction of the articulo-pedicular structure in 19 cases. Emergency operation was done in 14 cases; in 5 cases operation was done on the 2nd or 3rd day and in 11 cases after the 3rd day. The functional spinal result was excellent, and recalibration was verified by tomography in all cases. In those cases showing neurological deficiency, good and early recovery was attributable to the suppression of spinal canal stenosis, and a consequently neurological improvement was always obtained, even for the most serious of lesions except those at the thoracis level superior to T10. The application of this postero-lateral approach for severe spinal trauma seems to represent, in all cases of recent lesions, an alternative to the anterior or combined methods. We do not share the opinion that delay in decompression does not influence the neurological prognosis and emergency operation is advisable.

  3. Comparison of Outcomes of Anterior, Posterior, and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery at a Single Lumbar Level with Degenerative Spinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yi, Seong; Ha, Yoon; Shin, Dong Ah; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Keun Su

    2017-05-01

    The fusion rate in spinal surgery may vary in relation to the technique, and it remains unknown which surgical technique provides the best fusion rate and surgical outcome. We aimed to compare radiologic and surgical results between 3 surgical techniques used for lumbar interbody fusion. Participants included 77 patients diagnosed with degenerative spinal stenosis including spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to surgical technique: anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF, n = 26), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF, n = 21), and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF, n = 30). Various radiologic parameters were measured, including fusion rates. Significant changes after surgery were observed in the ALIF group for the percentage of vertebral body slippage, anterior disk height, posterior disk height, and segmental range of movement (ROM). The fusion rate on computed tomography (CT) scan at the final follow-up was 69.2% in the ALIF group, 72.7% in the TLIF group, and 64.3% in the PLIF group. The cage subsidence rate 2 years after surgery was 15.4% in the ALIF group, 38.1% in the TLIF group, and 10% in the PLIF group. ALIF was associated with better restoration of segmental lordosis. The fusion rate on CT scan and with segmental ROM did not differ between the 3 groups. TLIF was associated with a better postoperative visual analog scale. PLIF showed the lowest cage subsidence rate. Therefore, it is difficult to know which surgical technique is better among the 3 groups because each surgical method has its own advantages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Posterior-only spinal fusion without rib head resection for treating type I neurofibromatosis with intra-canal rib head dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dong; Dai, Fei; Liu, Yao Yao; Xu, Jian-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with Type I neurofibromatosis scoliosis with intra-canal rib head protrusion are extremely rare. Current knowledge regarding the diagnosis and treatment for this situation are insufficient. The purpose of this study is to share our experience in the diagnosis and surgical treatments for such unique deformities. METHODS: Six patients with Type I neurofibromatosis scoliosis with rib head dislocation into the spinal canal were diagnosed at our institution. Posterior instrumentation and spinal fusion without intra-canal rib head resection via a posterior-only approach was performed for deformity correction and rib head extraction. The efficacy and outcomes of the surgery were evaluated by measurements before, immediately and 24 months after the surgery using the following parameters: coronal spinal Cobb angle, apex rotation and kyphosis of the spine and the intra-canal rib head position. Post-operative complications, surgery time and blood loss were also evaluated. RESULTS: Patients were followed up for at least 24 months post-operatively. The three dimensional spinal deformity was significantly improved and the intra-canal rib head was significantly extracted from the canal immediately after the surgery. At follow-up 24 months after surgery, solid fusions were achieved along the fusion segments, and the deformity corrections and rib head positions were well maintained. There were no surgery-related complications any time after the surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Systematic examinations are needed to identify patients with Type I neurofibromatosis scoliosis with rib head dislocation into the canal who can be treated by posterior-only spinal fusion without rib head resection. PMID:24473510

  5. Description and design considerations of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of a multidisciplinary cognitive-behavioural intervention for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The ideal rehabilitation strategy following lumbar spinal fusion surgery has not yet been established. This paper is a study protocol, describing the rationale behind and the details of a cognitive-behavioural rehabilitation intervention for lumbar spinal fusion patients based on the best available evidence. Predictors of poor outcome following spine surgery have been identified to provide targets for the intervention, and the components of the intervention were structured in accordance with the cognitive-behavioural model. The study aims to compare the clinical and economical effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioural rehabilitation strategy to that of usual care for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Methods/Design The study is a randomized clinical trial including 96 patients scheduled for lumbar spinal fusion surgery due to degenerative disease or spondylolisthesis. Patients were recruited in the period October 2011 to July 2013, and the follow-up period is one year from date of surgery. Patients are allocated on a 1:2 ratio (control: intervention) to either treatment as usual (control group), which implies surgery and the standard postoperative rehabilitation, or in addition to this, a patient education focusing on pain behaviour and pain coping (intervention group). It takes place in a hospital setting, and consists of six group-based sessions, managed by a multidisciplinary team of health professionals. The primary outcomes are disability (Oswestry Disability Index) and sick leave, while secondary outcomes include coping (Coping Strategies Questionnaire), fear-avoidance belief (Fear Avoidance Belief Questionnaire), pain (Low Back Pain Rating Scale, pain index), mobility during hospitalization (Cumulated Ambulation Score), generic health-related quality of life (EQ-5D) and resource use. Outcomes are measured using self report questionnaires, medical records and national registers. Discussion It is expected that the intervention can

  6. Solitary osteochondroma of the cervical spine causing spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Cagatay; Tezer, Mehmet; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2007-02-01

    Osteochondromas are common benign tumours of bone that often occur in the metaphysodiaphyseal parts of long bones. They rarely occur in the spine. We present a case of solitary osteochondroma arising from the C-1 vertebral lamina, causing neurological symptoms. A 46-year-old man presented to our institution, complaining of pain and numbness originating from his neck and extending down to his left arm. Radiographs, CT and MRI showed a solitary benign appearing expansile bone tumour arising from the left vertebral lamina of C-1, spreading to C-2, exerting an eccentric posterolateral compression on the spinal cord in the left part of the spinal canal and causing stenosis of the left neural foramen between C-1 and C-2. The lesion was surgically explored through a posterior longitudinal incision. Leaving the left lateral mass of C-1 intact, a left hemilaminectomy was performed. The lesion and the part spreading to C-2 were excised, completely clearing the spinal cord compression. For posterior stabilisation, lateral mass screws were inserted bilaterally in C-1 and pedicle screws and a rod system were used in C-2. The interlaminar region between C-1 and C-2 was fused using cancellous allograft chips. Follow-up controls with radiological examination revealed that the decompression had been adequate and fusion was achieved. Excision of the lesions is necessary to relieve neurological compression in such cases. In order to avoid complications associated with instability following extensive laminectomy, posterior stabilisation and fusion should also be performed.

  7. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  8. Fusion in degenerative spondylolisthesis: comparison of osteoconductive and osteoinductive bone graft substitutes.

    PubMed

    Kurd, Mark; Cohick, Sarah; Park, Andrew; Ahmadinia, Kasra; Lee, Joseph; An, Howard

    2015-05-01

    growing market for OI and OC materials commonly used in lumbar spinal fusions, the options for surgical treatment for degenerative spondylolisthesis are ever expanding. No significant difference was found when comparing fusion rates between the two types of materials in this retrospective analysis. Interestingly, TLIF procedures provided lower fusion rates than posterolateral fusion procedures. This may be due to a small sample size but the association with a minimally invasive technique warrants investigation. Due to the substantial difference in price between the OI and OC materials and the lack of evidence supporting higher fusion rates with more expensive OI agents, it is incumbent on the spine community to consider and reassess the products that are routinely used.

  9. Evaluation of autologous platelet concentrate for intertransverse process lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Paul M; Miranda, Jose J; Kadiyala, Sudha; Patel, Tushar Ch; Panjabi, Manohar; Troiano, Nancy; Friedlaender, Gary E

    2008-04-01

    Data on the role of platelet concentrate (PC) in spinal fusion are limited. Using the New Zealand white rabbit model, we compared fusion rates at L5-L6 using 2 different volumes (1.5 cm(3), 3.0 cm(3)) of iliac crest autograft with and without PC (4 groups total, 10 animals in each). PC was collected from donor rabbits and adjusted to a concentration of 1 x 10(6) platelets/mL. Bone growth and fusion were evaluated using biomechanical, radiographic, and histologic testing. At 1.5 cm(3), autograft alone had a 29% fusion rate, compared with autograft plus PC, which had a 57% fusion rate (P = .06). At 3.0 cm(3), the fusion rate approached 90% in both groups. Radiologic fusion had a 70% correlation with biomechanical test results. Huo/Friedlaender scores were 4.3 (SD, 2.9) for 1.5-cm(3) autograft alone; 5.0 (SD, 3.5) for 1.5-cm(3) autograft plus PC; 4.7 (SD, 2.5) for 3.0-cm(3) autograft alone; and 7.7 (SD, 0.6) for 3.0-cm(3) autograft plus PC. For 1.5-cm(3) autograft, a trend toward improvement in biomechanically defined fusion was found when PC was added, which suggests that, when the amount of bone graft is limited, PC may function as a graft extender in posterolateral fusion. At higher volumes of bone graft, no appreciable difference was noted between groups. Although radiography revealed fusion masses, the technique was not useful in identifying pseudarthrosis. On histologic analysis, adding PC seemed to result in more mature bone at both volumes, with the most mature bone in the group with 3.0-cm(3) autograft plus PC.

  10. Difficulty of diagnosing the origin of lower leg pain in patients with both lumbar spinal stenosis and hip joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Junya; Ohtori, Seiji; Kishida, Shunji; Nakamura, Junichi; Takeshita, Munenori; Shigemura, Tomonori; Takazawa, Makoto; Eguchi, Yawara; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Takaso, Masashi; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Arai, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-12-01

    Case series. To present the difficulty of diagnosing the origin of lower leg pain in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and hip joint arthritis. Pain arising from a degenerated hip joint is sometimes localized to the lower leg. Patients with lumbar spinal disease may also show radicular pain corresponding to the lower leg area. If patients present with both conditions and only pain at the lower leg, it is difficult to determine the origin of the pain. We reviewed 420 patients who had leg pain with lumbar spinal stenosis diagnosed by myelography, computed tomography after myelography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Pain only at the ipsilateral lateral aspect of the lower leg but slight low back pain or pain around the hip joint was shown in 4 patients who had lumbar spinal stenosis and hip osteoarthritis. The symptoms resolved after L5 spinal nerve block, but remained after lidocaine infiltration into the hip joint. We performed decompression and posterolateral fusion surgery for these 4 patients. Leg pain did not resolve after lumbar surgery in all patients. Conservative treatment was not effective from 6 to 12 months, so ultimately we performed ipsilateral total hip replacement for all patients and they became symptom-free. It is difficult to determine the origin of lower leg pain by spinal nerve block and hip joint block in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and hip osteoarthritis. We take this into consideration before surgery.

  11. Luciferase labeling for multipotent stromal cell tracking in spinal fusion versus ectopic bone tissue engineering in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Geuze, Ruth E; Prins, Henk-Jan; Öner, F Cumhur; van der Helm, Yvonne J M; Schuijff, Leontine S; Martens, Anton C; Kruyt, Moyo C; Alblas, Jacqueline; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2010-11-01

    Tissue engineering of bone, by combining multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) with osteoconductive scaffolds, has not yet yielded any clinically useful applications so far. The fate and contribution of the seeded cells are not sufficiently clarified, especially at clinically relevant locations. Therefore, we investigated cell proliferation around the spine and at ectopic sites using noninvasive in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in relation to new bone formation. Goat MSCs were lentivirally transduced to express luciferase. After showing both correlation between MSC viability and BLI signal as well as survival and osteogenic capacity of these cells ectopically in mice, they were seeded on ceramic scaffolds and implanted in immunodeficient rats at two levels in the spine for spinal fusion as well as subcutaneously. Nontransduced MSCs were used as a control group. All rats were monitored at day 1 and after that weekly until termination at week 7. In mice a BLI signal was observed during the whole observation period, indicating survival of the seeded MSCs, which was accompanied by osteogenic differentiation in vivo. However, these same MSCs showed a different response in the rat model, where the BLI signal was present until day 14, both in the spine and ectopically, indicating that MSCs were able to survive at least 2 weeks of implantation. Only when the signal was still present after the total implantation period ectopically, which only occurred in one rat, new bone was formed extensively and the implanted MSCs were responsible for this bone formation. Ectopically, neither a reduced proliferative group (irradiated) nor a group in which the cells were devitalized by liquid nitrogen and the produced extracellular matrix remained (matrix group) resulted in bone formation. This suggests that the release of soluble factors or the presence of an extracellular matrix is not enough to induce bone formation. For the spinal location, the question remains whether the implanted

  12. Migration of titanium cable into spinal cord and spontaneous C2 and C3 fusion: Case report of possible causes of fatigue failure after posterior atlantoaxial fixation.

    PubMed

    Li, Huibo; Lou, Jigang; Liu, Hao

    2016-12-01

    Atlantoaxial instability is a common and serious injury of the upper cervical spine. Brooks' procedure is widely used to reconstruct the unstable atlantoaxial joint. The migration into spinal cord of titanium cable and spontaneous fusion between C2 and C3 has been little reported and the management of such a patient is difficult. We describe an unusual case of fatigue failure of posterior titanium atlantoaxial cable fixation with migration into the spinal cord and spontaneous fusion between C2 and C3. A 16-year-old girl complained of cervico-occipital pain with numbness and weakness of extremities 3 months ago. The girl underwent posterior C1-C2 arthrodesis with titanium cables and autogenous iliac crest bone grafting when she was 6 years old. When presented to our emergency department, imaging revealed the cracked titanium atlantoaxial cable and the spontaneous fusion between C2 and C3. Computed tomography demonstrated a broken wire with anterior migration of the cable into the spinal cord. The patient underwent posterior approach cervical spinal surgery to remove the broken cables. She remains neurologically intact a year following the posterior approach cervical spine surgery. Brooks' posterior stabilization could not effectively control rotation at the atlantoaxial articulation, so surgeons must be aware of the potential of fatigue failure of cables as well as the possibility of its migration into the spinal cord when using Brooks' posterior stabilization. Bilateral C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw fixation or transarticular screw fixation are recommended by the authors in the event of rotatory instability.

  13. Comparing parecoxib and ketorolac as preemptive analgesia in patients undergoing posterior lumbar spinal fusion: a prospective randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Siribumrungwong, Koopong; Cheewakidakarn, Julin; Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin; Nimmaanrat, Sasikaan

    2015-03-18

    Poor postoperative pain control is frequently associated with complications and delayed discharge from a hospital. Preemptive analgesia is one of the methods suggested for reducing postoperative pain. Opioids are effective for pain control, but there known addictive properties make physicians cautious about using them. Parecoxib and ketorolac are potent non-opioid NSAIDs that are attractive alternative drugs to opioids to avoid opioid-related side effects. However, there are no good head-to-head comparisons between these two drugs in the aspect of preemptive analgesic effects in lumbar spinal fusion surgery. This study aimed to compare the efficacy in terms of postoperative pain control and safety of parecoxib with ketorolac as preemptive analgesia in posterior lumbar spinal fusion patients. A prospective, double-blinded randomized controlled trial was carried out in patients undergoing posterior lumbar spinal fusion, who were randomized into 3 groups (n = 32). Parecoxib, ketorolac or a placebo was given to each patient via injection around 30 minutes prior to incision. The efficacy of postoperative pain control was assessed by a verbal numerical rating score (0-10). And various postoperative things were monitored for analysis, such as total opioid consumption, complications, and estimated blood loss. Both the ketorolac and parecoxib groups showed significantly better early postoperative pain reduction at the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) than the control group (p < 0.05). There were no differences between the pain scores of ketorolac and parecoxib at any time points. Complications and bleeding were not significantly different between all three groups. Preemptive analgesia using both ketorolac and parecoxib showed a significantly better early postoperative pain control in the PACU than the control group in patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01859585. Registered 15 May 2013.

  14. Seasonal Variations in the Risk of Reoperation for Surgical Site Infection Following Elective Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Retrospective Study Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination Database.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Oichi, Takeshi; Kato, So; Matsui, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Sakae; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2017-07-15

    A retrospective study of data abstracted from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) database, a national representative database in Japan. The aim of this study was to examine seasonal variations in the risk of reoperation for surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal fusion surgery. Although higher rates of infection in the summer than in other seasons were thought to be caused by increasing inexperience of new staff, high temperature, and high humidity, no studies have examined seasonal variations in the risk of SSI following spinal fusion surgery in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in summer season. In Japan, medical staff rotation starts in April. We retrospectively extracted the data of patients who were admitted between July 2010 and March 2013 from the DPC database. Patients were included if they were aged 20 years or older and underwent elective spinal fusion surgery. The primary outcome was reoperation for SSI during hospitalization. We performed multivariate analysis to clarify the risk factors of primary outcome with adjustment for patient background characteristics. We identified 47,252 eligible patients (23,659 male, 23,593 female). The mean age of the patients was 65.4 years (range, 20-101 yrs). Overall, reoperation for SSI occurred in 0.93% of the patients during hospitalization. The risk of reoperation for SSI was significantly higher in April (vs. February; odds ratio, 1.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.43, P = 0.03) as well as other known risk factors. In subgroup analysis with stratification for type of hospital, month of surgery was identified as an independent risk factor of reoperation for SSI among cases in an academic hospital, although there was no seasonal variation among those in a nonacademic hospital. This study showed that month of surgery is a risk factor of reoperation for SSI following elective spinal fusion surgery, nevertheless, in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in

  15. Anterolateral Radical Debridement and Interbody Bone Grafting Combined With Transpedicle Fixation in the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhaohui; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Qixin; Wu, Yongchao; Guo, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes of radical anterolateral debridement and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting with transpedicle fixation for the treatment of thoracolumbar tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis operation aims to remove the lesions and necrotic tissues, remove spinal cord compression, and reconstruct spinal stability. However, traditional operation methods cannot effectively correct cyrtosis or stabilize the spine. In addition, the patient needs to stay in bed for a long time and may have many complications. So far, the best surgical method and fixation method for spinal tuberculosis remain controversial. There were a total of 43 patients, 16 involving spinal cord injury, from January 2004 to January 2011. The patients were surgically treated for radical anterolateral debridement via posterolateral incision and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting and single-stage transpedicle fixation. All the patients were followed up to determine the stages of intervertebral bone fusion and the corrections of spinal kyphosis with the restoration of neurological deficit. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of these patients decreased to normal levels for a mean of 2.8 months. The function of feeling, motion, and sphincter in 16 paraplegia cases gradually recovered after 1 week to 3 months postoperatively, and the American Spinal Injury Association scores significantly increased at the final follow-up. Intervertebral bone fusions were all achieved postoperatively. No internal fixation devices were loose, extracted, or broken. There was no correction degree loss during the follow-up. The method of radical anterolateral debridement and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting and single-stage transpedicle fixation was effective for the treatment of thoracolumbar tuberculosis, correcting kyphotic deformity, and reconstructing

  16. Infection Related Never Events in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Spinal Fusion Procedures in United States: Prevalence and Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Nalliah, Romesh P.; Rampa, Sankeerth; Lee, Min Kyeong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the prevalence and predictors of infection related never events (NE) associated with spinal fusion procedures (SFP) in children (age < = 18 years) in the United States. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the years 2004 to 2008. All pediatric hospitalizations that underwent SFP were selected for analysis. The main outcomes measures include occurrence of certain NE’s. The association between the occurrence of a NE and factors (patient & hospital related) were examined using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Of 56,465 hospitalizations, 61.7% occurred among females. The average age was 13.7 y and two-thirds were whites. The major insurance payer was private insurance (67.4%). About 82% of all hospitalizations occurred on an elective basis. Teaching hospitals accounted for a majority of hospitalizations (87.9%). Two-thirds were posterior fusion techniques, 52.3% had underlying musculoskeletal deformities, and the most frequently present co-morbid conditions (CMC) included paralysis (10.9%), chronic pulmonary disease (9.7%), and fluid/electrolyte disorders (7.6%). Overall rate of occurrence of a NE was 4.8%. Post-operative pneumonia was the most frequently occurring NE (2.9%). Female gender (OR = 0.78) and elective admissions (OR = 0.66) were associated with lower risk of NE occurrence. Medicaid coverage (OR = 1.46), primary diagnosis of other acquired deformities (OR = 1.82), spinal cord injury (OR = 6.94), other nervous system disorders (OR = 2.84) were associated with higher risk of NE occurrence. Among CMC, those with chronic blood loss anemia (OR = 2.57), coagulopathy (OR = 1.97), depression (OR = 2), drug abuse (OR = 3.71), fluid/electrolyte disorders (OR = 2.62), neurological disorders (OR = 1.72), paralysis (OR = 1.75), renal failure (OR = 5.45), and weight loss (OR = 4.61) were risk factors for higher odds of

  17. Radiologic comparison of posterior release, internal distraction, final PSO and spinal fusion with one-stage posterior vertebral column resection for multi-level severe congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shichang; Zhang, Nannan; Song, Yueming; Song, Zongrang; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Jijun; Xie, En; Wu, Qining; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-06-20

    To compare radiologic results of posterior release, internal distraction, and final pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) and spinal fusionwith one-stage posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR) in treating multi-level severe congenital scoliosis. Forty-onesevere congenital scoliosis patients were used in the study. Group A comprised 24 patients who underwent one-stage PVCR. Group B comprised 17 patients who underwent posterior release with internal distraction, followed by final posterior fusion and instrumentation. The average preoperative main curve was 110.4° (95-130°) in group A and 109.4° (range 90°-126°) in group B. Postoperative follow-up time was ≥2 years (2.0-4.5 years) to analyze the radiographic and clinical outcomes. A comparison of posterior release, internal distraction, and final spinal fusion with PVCR showed no significant differences in postoperative main curve and compensatory caudal curve correction, coronal and sagittal imbalance. However, significant differences were found between the 2 groups in compensatory cranial curve correction. Posterior release, internal distraction, and final spinal fusion produce better corrective results in compensatory cranial curve correction than PVCR in treating severe multi-level congenital scoliosis.

  18. Anterior spinal fusion for thoracolumbar scoliosis: comprehensive assessment of radiographic, clinical, and pulmonary outcomes on 2-years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Verma, Kushagra; Auerbach, Joshua D; Kean, Kristin E; Chamas, Firas; Vorsanger, Matthew; Lonner, Baron S

    2010-01-01

    There is a continued role for anterior spinal fusion (ASF) in the treatment of thoracolumbar scoliosis. Despite numerous previous reports of ASF in the treatment of thoracolumbar scoliosis, no single study has simultaneously evaluated clinical, radiographic, and pulmonary function outcomes. Retrospective review of 31 consecutive thoracolumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients (Lenke type 5) who underwent ASF by a single surgeon. Patient records were comprehensively assessed for Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22 score, apical trunk rotation, radiographic changes, and pulmonary function before surgery and at 2-years follow-up. Thoracolumbar/lumbar curve correction averaged from 45 to 11 degrees (74%) and spontaneous correction of thoracic curves averaged from 26 to 15 degrees (42%). Instrumented segment lordosis increased by 11 degrees, whereas proximal junction kyphosis increased by 3 degrees. No significant changes were noted in T2-T12 kyphosis, distal junctional kyphosis, T12-S1 lumbar lordosis, or coronal balance. Thoracolumbar apical trunk rotation improved from 12 to 3 degrees. Average SRS scores significantly improved from 3.9 to 4.4. SRS assessments of self-image and pain also improved significantly from 3.6 to 4.5 and from 4.1 to 4.6, respectively. Absolute and percent predicted forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were unchanged. Two patients suffered mild intercostal neuralgia postthoracotomy. There were no other complications. The thoracoabdominal anterior approach for thoracolumbar scoliosis facilitates excellent clinical and radiographic outcomes, minimal blood loss, powerful apical trunk rotation correction, relative maintenance of lordosis, relatively short fusion constructs, and improved SRS-22 performance, without significant pulmonary function impairment at 2 years. It continues to be an efficacious treatment for thoracolumbar scoliosis. Level IV.

  19. 90-day Readmission after Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery in New York State between 2005 and 2014-A 10-year Analysis of a Statewide Cohort.

    PubMed

    Baaj, Ali A; Lang, Gernot; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Avila, Mauricio J; Mao, Jialin; Sedrakyan, Art

    2017-04-24

    Retrospective cohort study. To assess 90-day readmission and evaluate risk factors associated with readmission after lumbar fusion in New York State. Readmission is becoming an important metric for quality and efficiency of healthcare. Readmission and its predictors following spine surgery are overall poorly understood and limited evidence is available specifically in lumbar fusion. The New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPACRS) was utilized to capture patients undergoing lumbar fusion from 2005-2014. Temporal trend of 90-day readmission was assessed using Cochran-Armitage test. Logistic regression was used to examine predictors associated with 90-day readmission. There were 86,869 patients included in this cohort study. The overall 90-day readmission rate was 24.8%. On a multivariable analysis model, age (OR comparing ≥75 versus <35 years: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.13-1.35), sex (OR female to male: 1.19 (1.15-1.23)), race (OR African American to white: 1.60 (1.52-1.69)), insurance (OR Medicaid to Medicare: 1.42 (1.33-1.53)), procedure (OR comparing thoracolumbar fusion, combined (ICD-9: 81.04) to posterior lumbar interbody fusion / transforaminal lumbar spinal fusion (ICD-9: 81.08): 2.10 (1.49-2.97)), number of operated spinal levels (OR comparing 4-8 vertebrae to 2-3 vertebrae: 2.39 (2.07-2.77)), health service area ((HSA); OR comparing PA to Finger Lakes: 0.67 (0.61-0.73)), and comorbidity, i.e. coronary artery disease (OR: 1.26 (1.19-1.33)) were significantly associated with 90-day readmission. Direction of the odds ratios for these factors were consistent after stratification by procedure type. Age, sex, race, insurance, procedure, number of operated spinal levels, HSA, and comorbidities are major risk factors for 90-day readmission. Our study allows risk calculation to determine high risk patients before undergoing spinal fusion surgery in order to prevent early readmission, improve quality of care and reduce health care expenditures. 3.

  20. Loss of lumbar lordosis. A complication of spinal fusion for scoliosis.

    PubMed

    La Grone, M O

    1988-04-01

    Symptomatic loss of lumbar lordosis is a disabling complication of scoliosis surgery. This so-called "flat-back syndrome" is characterized by an inability to stand erect and by upper back pain. Distraction instrumentation extending into the lower lumbar spine or sacrum is the most frequently identified etiologic factor responsible for loss of lordosis. The more distal the level of instrumentation, the severer the loss of lumbar lordosis. Other factors that may aggravate the loss of lordosis include thoracolumbar kyphosis, fixed thoracic kyphosis, hip flexion contractures, and pseudoarthrosis. Because of the wide range of values for kyphosis and lordosis in normal individuals, there is no absolute value that can be considered "normal." It is the overall sagittal plane balance that is most important. The most useful radiographic measurement to evaluate this sagittal plane balance is the full-length standing lateral radiograph with the knees extended. On this view, the C7-S1 measurement should fall within 2 cm of the anterior aspect of the sacrum. Surgical treatment for symptomatic loss of lumbar lordosis consists of closing wedge osteotomies through the fusion mass. This should generally be preceded by an anterior release and interbody fusion. Correction should be obtained at the site of the deformity with particular attention paid to the thoracolumbar junction. The surgery is difficult and the risk of complication is high. The most important aspect of this postural disorder is prevention. Avoid distraction instrumentation that extends into the lumbar spine if possible. When distraction instrumentation is used, the techniques described will help preserve lumbar lordosis. When performing a fusion to the sacrum, distraction instrumentation should not be used.

  1. The Memory Metal Spinal System in a Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF) Procedure: A Prospective, Non-Comparative Study to Evaluate the Safety and Performance.

    PubMed

    Kok, D; Grevitt, M; Wapstra, Fh; Veldhuizen, Ag

    2012-01-01

    A prospective, non-comparative study of 27 patients to evaluate the safety and performance of the Memory Metal Spinal System used in a PLIF procedure in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD). To evaluate the clinical performance, radiological outcome and safety of the Memory Metal Spinal System, used in a PLIF procedure, in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease in human subjects. Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylosis or degenerative disc disease, use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices. The Memory Metal Spinal System consists of a single square spinal rod made from a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) used in conjunction with connection devices. Nitinol is characterized by its shape memory effect and is a more flexible material than either stainless steel or titanium. With current systems there is loss of achieved reposition due to the elastic properties of the spine. By using a memory metal in this new system the expectation was that this loss of reposition would be overcome due to the metal's inherent shape memory properties. Furthermore, we expect a higher fusion rate because of the elastic properties of the memory metal. Twenty-seven subjects with primary diagnosis of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD) were treated with the Memory Metal Spinal System in conjunction with the Brantigan IF® Cage in two consecutive years. Clinical performance of the device was evaluated over 2 years using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. Safety was studied by collection of adverse events intra-operative and during the followup. Interbody fusion status was

  2. The Memory Metal Spinal System in a Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF) Procedure: A Prospective, Non-Comparative Study to Evaluate the Safety and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kok, D; Grevitt, M; Wapstra, FH; Veldhuizen, AG

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: A prospective, non-comparative study of 27 patients to evaluate the safety and performance of the Memory Metal Spinal System used in a PLIF procedure in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD). Objective: To evaluate the clinical performance, radiological outcome and safety of the Memory Metal Spinal System, used in a PLIF procedure, in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease in human subjects. Summary of Background Data: Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylosis or degenerative disc disease, use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices. The Memory Metal Spinal System consists of a single square spinal rod made from a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) used in conjunction with connection devices. Nitinol is characterized by its shape memory effect and is a more flexible material than either stainless steel or titanium. With current systems there is loss of achieved reposition due to the elastic properties of the spine. By using a memory metal in this new system the expectation was that this loss of reposition would be overcome due to the metal’s inherent shape memory properties. Furthermore, we expect a higher fusion rate because of the elastic properties of the memory metal. Methods: Twenty-seven subjects with primary diagnosis of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD) were treated with the Memory Metal Spinal System in conjunction with the Brantigan IF® Cage in two consecutive years. Clinical performance of the device was evaluated over 2 years using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. Safety was studied by collection of adverse events intra

  3. Postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis and posterior spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Florian; Mutlak, Haitham; Tizi, Karima; Senft, Christian; Setzer, Matthias; Seifert, Volker; Weise, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The value of postoperative epidural analgesia after major spinal surgery is well established. Thus far, the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been denied to patients undergoing debridement and instrumentation in spondylodiscitis, with the risk of increased postoperative pain resulting in prolonged recovery. The value of PCEA with special regard to infectious complications remains to be clarified. The present study examined the value of postoperative PCEA in comparison with intravenous analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis undergoing posterior spinal surgery. METHODS Thirty-two patients treated surgically for spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine were prospectively included in a database and retrospectively reviewed for this study. Postoperative antibiotic treatment, functional capacity, pain levels, side effects, and complications were documented. Sixteen patients were given patient-demanded intravenous analgesia (PIA) followed by 16 patients assigned to PCEA. If PCEA was applied, the insertion of an epidural catheter was performed under the direct visual guidance of the surgeon at the end of the surgery. RESULTS Three patients intended for PCEA treatment were excluded due to predefined exclusion criteria. Postoperative pain was significantly lower in the PCEA group during the first 48 hours after surgery (p = 0.03). As determined by the trunk control test conducted at 8 (p < 0.001), 24 (p = 0.004), 48 (p = 0.015), 72 (p = 0.0031), and 96 hours (p < 0.001), patients in the PCEA treatment group displayed significantly increased mobilization capacity compared with those of the PIA group. Time until normal accomplishment of all mobilization maneuvers was reduced in the PCEA group compared with that in the PIA group (p = 0.04). No differences in complication rates were observed between the 2 groups (p = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS PCEA may reduce postoperative pain and lead to earlier achievement of functional capacity at a low

  4. [Application of bispectral index (BIS) monitoring to anesthetic management of posterior spinal fusion in a patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Abe, Maiko; Hayashi, Hideaki; Hayashi, Yukio; Mashimo, Takashi

    2002-07-01

    A 12-year-old boy with Duchenne muscular dystrophy underwent posterior spinal fusion for progressive scoliosis. Preoperative evaluation was focused on respiratory function as well as cardiac function, which revealed markedly reduced respiratory reserve (FVC 0.77 l, %FVC 25.9%, FEV1.0 0.48 l, %FEV1.0 62%) and well-preserved biventricular function. A possible association between malignant hyperthermia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy has been documented. Thus anesthesia was administered without triggering agents. Propofol and fentanyl were used for induction and maintenance of anesthesia, and the patient was ventilated with O2-nitrous oxide mixture. The anesthesia machine, prepared by using a disposable circuit and fresh CO2-absorbent and disconnecting the vaporizers, was flushed with O2 at a rate of 10 l.min-1 for 20 minutes before use. A small dose of vecuronium was administered while monitoring the train-of-four ratio. The bispectral index (BIS) was utilized to optimize the depth of anesthesia so that the wake-up test could be performed promptly on surgeon's request while avoiding the intraoperative awareness. The BIS was helpful in continuously assessing the wakening process. BIS increased from 40's to 80's in 15 minutes after discontinuation of propofol and nitrous oxide during the test. The patient was kept under close observation postoperatively without any sign of malignant hyperthermia.

  5. Efficacy of Combined Magnetic Field Treatment on Spinal Fusion: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mark; Drew, Brian; Sprague, Sheila; Aleem, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral fractures place significant burdens on patients, caregivers, and the healthcare system at large. Nonunion is a frequent complication following vertebral fracture treatment, often resulting in significant patient pain and morbidity. Bone growth stimulators are an adjunct treatment modality proposed to increase rates of fracture healing. Combined magnetic field (CMF) bone growth stimulators have specifically been shown to increase union rates in patients with vertebral fractures. Certain populations, such as the elderly, postmenopausal women, and smokers, have demonstrated a preferentially greater response to CMF treatment. The present review focuses on the mechanism of action, efficacy, cost effectiveness, indications, contraindications, and safety of CMF treatment as an adjunct treatment for vertebral fractures. Future large high-quality investigations of adjunct CMF treatment for spine fusion patients focusing on patient-important outcomes are warranted.

  6. Predictive parameters for the antecedent development of hip pathology associated with long segment fusions to the pelvis for the treatment of adult spinal deformity

    PubMed Central

    Kinon, Merritt D.; Nasser, Rani; Nakhla, Jonathan P.; Adogwa, Owoicho; Moreno, Jessica R.; Harowicz, Michael; Verla, Terence; Yassari, Reza; Bagley, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The surgical treatment of adult scoliosis frequently involves long segment fusions across the lumbosacral joints that redistribute tremendous amounts of force to the remaining mobile spinal segments as well as to the pelvis and hip joints. Whether or not these forces increase the risk of femoral bone pathology remains unknown. The aim of this study is to determine the correlation between long segment spinal fusions to the pelvis and the antecedent development of degenerative hip pathologies as well as what predictive patient characteristics, if any, correlate with their development. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all long segment fusions to the pelvis for adult degenerative deformity operated on by the senior author at the Duke Spine Center from February 2008 to March 2014 was undertaken. Enrolment criteria included all available demographic, surgical, and clinical outcome data as well as pre and postoperative hip pathology assessment. All patients had prospectively collected outcome measures and a minimum 2-year follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed comparing the incidence of preoperative hip pain and antecedent postoperative hip pain as a function of age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and number of spinal levels fused. Results: In total, 194 patients were enrolled in this study. Of those, 116 patients (60%) reported no hip pain prior to surgery. Eighty-three patients (71.6%) remained hip pain free, whereas 33 patients (28.5%) developed new postoperative hip pain. Age, gender, and BMI were not significant among those who went on to develop hip pain postoperatively (P < 0.0651, 0.3491, and 0.1021, respectively). Of the 78 patients with preoperative hip pain, 20 patients (25.6%) continued to have hip pain postoperatively, whereas 58 patients reported improvement in the hip pain after long segment fusion for correction of their deformity, a 74.4% rate of reduction. Age, gender, and BMI were not significant among

  7. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Minimally Invasive versus Open Surgery Techniques for Lumbar Spinal Fusion in Italy and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Vertuani, Simona; Nilsson, Jonas; Borgman, Benny; Buseghin, Giorgio; Leonard, Catherine; Assietti, Roberto; Quraishi, Nasir A

    2015-09-01

    Evaluate the cost-effectiveness of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) compared with open surgery (OS) techniques for one- or two-level lumbar spinal fusion in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal conditions in the United Kingdom and Italy. A health economic model was developed on the basis of results from a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to determine the cost-effectiveness of MIS compared with OS for lumbar spinal fusion. The analysis was conducted from a health care payer perspective. Parameters included in the model were surgery, blood loss, duration of hospitalization, postoperative complications, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Cost-effectiveness was determined by the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained. MIS was the dominant strategy compared with OS (i.e., yielding both cost savings and improved HRQOL). Cost savings were driven mainly by shorter length of hospital stay, reduced blood loss, and fewer complications such as surgical site infection. The total cost saving per procedure was €973 for Italy and €1666 for the United Kingdom, with an improvement of 0.04 quality-adjusted life-year over 2 years in HRQOL. One-way sensitivity analyses and predefined scenario(s) analyses confirmed the robustness of the model. MIS is a less expensive and a more effective treatment compared with OS for spinal lumbar fusion in both Italy and the United Kingdom. Lower downstream costs and increased HRQOL in the MIS group compensate for potential higher upfront costs of MIS implants and surgery equipment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Decision making in surgical treatment of chronic low back pain: the performance of prognostic tests to select patients for lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Willems, Paul

    2013-02-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the main causes of disability in the western world with a huge economic burden to society. As yet, no specific underlying anatomic cause has been identified for CLBP. Imaging often reveals degenerative findings of the disc or facet joints of one or more lumbar motion segments. These findings, however, can also be observed in asymptomatic people. It has been suggested that pain in degenerated discs may be caused by the ingrowth of nerve fibers into tears or clefts of the annulus fibrosus or nucleus pulposus, and by reported high levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. As this so-called discogenic pain is often exacerbated by mechanical loading, the concept of relieving pain by spinal fusion to stabilise a painful spinal segment, has been developed. For some patients lumbar spinal fusion indeed is beneficial, but its results are highly variable and hard to predict for the individual patient. To identify those CLBP patients who will benefit from fusion, many surgeons rely on tests that are assumed to predict the outcome of spinal fusion. The three most commonly used prognostic tests in daily practice are immobilization in a lumbosacral orthosis, provocative discography and trial immobilization by temporary external transpedicular fixation. Aiming for consensus on the indications for lumbar fusion and in order to improve its results by better patient selection, it is essential to know the role and value of these prognostic tests for CLBP patients in clinical practice. The overall aims of the present thesis were: 1) to evaluate whether there is consensus among spine surgeons regarding the use and appreciation of prognostic tests for lumbar spinal fusion; 2) to verify whether a thoracolumbosacral orthosisis (TLSO) truly minimises lumbosacral motion; 3) to verify whether a TLSO can predict the clinical outcome of fusion for CLBP; 4) to assess whether provocative discography of adjacent segments actually predicts the long-term clinical

  9. Injuries of the posterolateral corner of the knee.

    PubMed

    Covey, D C

    2001-01-01

    The complex anatomy of the posterolateral corner of the knee is due largely to the evolutionary changes in the anatomic relationships of the fibular head, the popliteus tendon, and the biceps femoris muscle. Recent research has improved our understanding of the popliteus complex, particularly the role of the popliteofibular ligament. Biomechanical studies provide a scientific basis for clinical examination of the knee with suspected injury of the posterolateral corner. All grade-I and most moderate grade-II injuries of the posterolateral structures can be treated nonoperatively, but residual laxity may remain, especially in knees with grade-II injury. Acute grade-III isolated or combined injury of the posterolateral corner is best treated early, by direct repair, if possible, or else by augmentation or reconstruction of all injured ligaments. Chronic injury of the posterolateral corner, whether isolated or combined, is probably best treated by reconstruction of the posterolateral corner along with reconstruction of any coexisting cruciate ligament injury. Failure to diagnose and treat an injury of the posterolateral corner in a patient who has a known tear of the anterior or posterior cruciate ligament can result in failure of the reconstructed cruciate ligament.

  10. The effect of aging on posterior intertransverse lumbar fusion: a New Zealand white rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Daubs, Michael D; Tyser, Andy; Lawrence, Brandon D; Sinclair, Sarina K; Patel, Alpesh A; Adams, Jacob; Brodke, Darrel S

    2015-03-01

    In vivo assessment of lumbar spinal fusion between a younger and older cohort of New Zealand white rabbits. Directly compare fusion within young and aged New Zealand white rabbits to establish an aged spinal fusion model translational research. Prior studies have utilized skeletally mature young rabbits (6-12 mo old) that may not be appropriate as an analog for studying the aging human spine. Ten aged (>36 mo old) and 10 young (12 mo old) New Zealand white rabbits underwent a single-level, bilateral, L5-6 posterolateral intertransverse fusion using autogenous iliac crest bone graft. The animals were killed at 6 weeks postoperatively, and the specimens were then evaluated with quantitative microcomputerized tomography and manual palpation by 6 orthopedic surgeons. The fusions were graded as either fused or not fused by each examiner. The spines were then embedded in poly(methyl methacrylate) and cut into 2-mm-thick sections for histologic analysis. A higher percentage of young rabbits were determined to be successfully fused through manual palpation testing compared with the aged rabbits. Micro-computed tomography (CT) analysis revealed a significantly greater fusion mass volume in the younger rabbits than in the older cohort. In addition, the fusion density of the younger rabbits was found to be significantly lower than that of the older rabbits when normalized to the bone density in the nonfused portion of the spine. Histologic analysis showed that the quality of the bone within the fusion mass was consistent between the young and old rabbits. A greater number of young animals had bilateral continuous bone graft compared with the aged animals. The aged (>36 mo) New Zealand white rabbit model appears to be a valid model to evaluate the effect of aging on lumbar fusion and has the potential to more accurately model conditions that are present in the older human spine.

  11. Posterolateral rotatory instability of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Anakwenze, Oke A; Kancherla, Vamsi K; Iyengar, Jaicharan; Ahmad, Christopher S; Levine, William N

    2014-02-01

    Symptomatic posterolateral rotatory instability (PLRI) results from a lateral collateral ligament complex injury and presents with pain, clicking, and subluxation within the flexion and extension arcs of elbow motion. Often, symptoms and examination characteristics are subtle and can be easily misdiagnosed. Therefore, a thorough history and provocative physical examination maneuvers are important to correctly establish the diagnosis. Patients frequently have a history of elbow trauma such as an episode(s) of elbow dislocation, prior surgery, or previous cortisone injections. Radiographs and advanced imaging can aid in the diagnosis, and examination under anesthesia, manipulation with arthroscopic visualization, and/or stress radiographs can be confirmatory. Symptomatic cases of PLRI can be effectively treated with a repair or isometric ligament reconstruction.

  12. Posterolateral Corner of the Knee: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the posterolateral corner (PLC) comprise a significant portion of knee ligament injuries. A high index of suspicion is necessary when evaluating the injured knee to detect these sometimes occult injuries. Moreover, a thorough physical examination and a comprehensive review of radiographic studies are necessary to identify these injuries. In this sense, stress radiographs can help to objectively determine the extent of these lesions. Non-operative and operative treatment options have been reported depending on the extent of the injury. Complete PLC lesions rarely heal with non-operative treatment, and are therefore most often treated surgically. The purpose of this article was to review the anatomy and clinically relevant biomechanics, diagnosis algorithms, treatment and rehabilitation protocols for PLC injuries. PMID:27200384

  13. Cervical lordotic alignment following posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: reciprocal changes and risk factors for malalignment.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Terai, Hidetomi; Suzuki, Akinobu; Hoshino, Masatoshi; Tamai, Koji; Ohyama, Shoichiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Numerous reports have been published on the effectiveness and safety of correction of the coronal Cobb angle and thoracolumbar sagittal alignment in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Suboptimal sagittal alignment, such as decreased thoracic kyphosis (TK), after corrective surgery, is a possible cause of lumbar or cervical spinal degeneration and junctional malalignment; however, few reports are available on reciprocal changes outside of the fused segments, such as the cervical lordotic angle (CLA). This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the perioperative CLA and other radiographic factors or clinical results in AIS, and to identify independent risk factors of postoperative cervical hyperkyphosis. METHODS A total of 51 AIS patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion with the placement of pedicle screw (PS) constructs at thoracic levels were included in the study. Clinical and radiographic follow-up of patients was conducted for a minimum of 2 years, and the postoperative course was evaluated. The authors measured and identified the changes in the CLA and other radiographic parameters using whole-spine radiography, with the patient in the standing position, performed immediately before surgery, 2 weeks after surgery, and 2 years after surgery. The postoperative cervical hyperkyphosis group included patients whose CLA at 2-year follow-up was smaller than -10°. The reciprocal changes of the CLA and other parameters were also investigated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to determine the associated risk factors for postoperative cervical hyperkyphosis. RESULTS This study comprised 48 females and 3 males (mean age 16.0 years). The mean follow-up period was 47 months (range 24-90 months). The main coronal thoracic curve was corrected from 54.6° to 16.4°, and the mean correction rate was 69.8% at 2 years. The CLA significantly increased from the mean preoperative measurement (-5.4° ± 14°) to the 2

  14. Flap Reconstruction for Esophageal Perforation Complicating Anterior Cervical Spinal Fusion: An 18-year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Hanwright, Philip J.; Purnell, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Esophageal injury following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) poses a significant reconstructive challenge. Buttressing flap repairs have proven beneficial; however, there remains a paucity of evidence to guide optimal flap selection. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed for patients who presented to the senior author with esophageal perforations after ACDF from 1995 until present. Demographic, clinical, and postoperative details were collected. Outcomes of omental flap reconstructions were compared against other flap reconstructions. Results: A total of 13 flap reconstructions were performed in 11 patients with the following distribution: 7 free omental, 1 anterolateral thigh, 1 osteomuscular fibula, 2 radial forearm, and 2 pedicled pectoralis flaps. Patients receiving omental flap reconstructions demonstrated a significantly faster resolution of leak on contrast swallow imaging and earlier return to oral feeding compared with all other flap reconstructions (22.5 versus 268 days, respectively; P < 0.05). This relationship remained evident even when calculations excluded an outlying patient from the nonomental cohort (22.5 versus 111 days, respectively; P < 0.05). Length of hospital stay, complications, and success rates were also more favorable in the omental cohort but failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Esophageal perforation after ACDF is an uncommon but devastating complication. The use of free omentum flap reconstruction is associated with a more rapid functional recovery and may prove beneficial in the management of these challenging cases. PMID:26090290

  15. Recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2-enhanced anterior spine fusion without bone encroachment into the spinal canal: a histomorphometric study in a thoracoscopically instrumented porcine model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Sucato, Daniel J; Welch, Robert D

    2005-03-01

    A thoracoscopically assisted 5-level anterior spinal fusion and instrumentation model analyzing new bone formation when using recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) with a collagen hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) composite sponge carrier. To determine whether new bone formation extends beyond the posterior confines of the vertebral body encroaching into the spinal canal when rhBMP-2 is used to enhance anterior fusion. A possible concern regarding the use of rhBMP-2 to enhance spinal fusion is the risk of unwanted bone formation leading to inadvertent fusion of adjacent levels or compression of neural elements. The safety of rhBMP-2 in one spinal application does not ensure similar results in other applications. Therefore, the expanded use of rhBMP-2 should occur only after carefully monitored preclinical and clinical studies for each new application. Eighteen pigs underwent thoracoscopically-assisted instrumentation and fusion of 5 contiguous levels (T5-T10) and randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups: group 1 (n = 6): rh-BMP-2 on a HA/TCP-collagen sponge (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN); group 2 (n = 4): iliac crest autograft; group 3 (n = 4): empty; group 4 (n = 4): HA/TCP-collagen sponge (Medtronic Sofamor Danek) only. In groups 1 and 4, the HA/TCP collagen sponge was morselized into small granules and pushed through a bone delivery funnel for implantation into the disc. At 4 months after surgery, spines were sectioned longitudinally through the midsagittal plane and underwent undecalcified processing. Bone formation extending beyond the margins of the original discectomy and the confines of vertebral body were evaluated histomorphometrically at each operative level. Recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 on a HA/TCP-collagen sponge induced significant new bone formation extending anterior to the confines of the vertebral body compared with the other treatment groups (P < 0.05). In addition, rhBMP-2 on a HA

  16. Safety and effectiveness of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for spinal fusion: a meta-analysis of individual-participant data.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Mark C; Brown, Jennifer V E; Heirs, Morag K; Higgins, Julian P T; Mannion, Richard J; Rodgers, Mark A; Stewart, Lesley A

    2013-06-18

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is widely used to promote fusion in spinal surgery, but its safety has been questioned. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of rhBMP-2. Individual-participant data obtained from the sponsor or investigators and data extracted from study publications identified by systematic bibliographic searches through June 2012. Randomized, controlled trials of rhBMP-2 versus iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) in spinal fusion surgery for degenerative disc disease and related conditions and observational studies in similar populations for investigation of adverse events. Individual-participant data from 11 eligible of 17 provided trials sponsored by Medtronic (Minneapolis, Minnesota) (n = 1302) and 1 of 2 other eligible trials (n = 106) were included. Additional aggregate adverse event data were extracted from 35 published observational studies. Primary outcomes were pain (assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index [ODI] or Short Form-36), fusion, and adverse events. At 24 months, ODI scores were 3.5% lower (better) with rhBMP-2 than with ICBG (95% CI, 0.5% to 6.5%) and radiographic fusion was 12% higher (CI, 2% to 23%). At or shortly after surgery, pain was more common with rhBMP-2 (odds ratio, 1.78 [CI, 1.06 to 2.95]). Cancer was more common after rhBMP-2 (relative risk, 1.98 [CI, 0.86 to 4.54]), but the small number of events precluded definite conclusions. The observational studies were diverse and at risk of bias. At 24 months, rhBMP-2 increases fusion rates, reduces pain by a clinically insignificant amount, and increases early postsurgical pain compared with ICBG. Evidence of increased cancer incidence is inconclusive. Yale University Open Data Access Project.

  17. Can Intraoperative Text Messages Reduce Parental Anxiety of Children Undergoing Posterior Spinal Fusion Surgery for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis?

    PubMed

    Kwan, Mun Keong; Chiu, Chee Kidd; Gan, Chiao Chin; Chan, Chris Yin Wei

    2016-02-01

    A prospective, nonrandomized study. To evaluate the effectiveness of periodic intraoperative text messages (SMS) in reducing parental anxiety level during posterior spinal fusion (PSF) surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. No studies have reported the use of intraoperative SMS to reduce level of anxiety in parents of patients who are undergoing AIS corrective surgery. Parents of 50 AIS patients were studied at two centers. Group 1 did not receive any SMS whereas those in Group 2 received periodic SMS. Parents' anxiety were assessed using a validated Visual Analog Scale for anxiety (VAS-A) and the anxiety component of the Hospital Anxiety Depression Score (HADS). The assessment was carried out at five different periods: (P1) 6 hours before the surgery; (P2) at separation in the operation theatre; (P3) 1 hour after commencement of surgery; (P4) immediately after completion of surgery; (P5) 1 day postsurgery. A total of 96 parents (47 fathers, 49 mothers) were involved in this study. Both groups were comparable in terms of demographics and education level. The mean VAS for Group 1 peaked at P2 and the HADS scores peaked at P3. The anxiety level of Group 1 remained high at P2, P3, and P4. There was a steady decline in parental anxiety in Group 2 from P1 to P5. There were significantly lower mean VAS score and HADS score for both father and mother in Group 2 during P3 and P4. The mean HADS scores for parents in Group 1 at P2 and P3 were higher than 8, which indicate abnormal anxiety. The anxiety levels of parents receiving the SMS were significantly lower than parents who did not receive any messages. Thus, intraoperative SMS is an effective intervention to decrease parental anxiety of AIS patients undergoing PSF surgery. 3.

  18. The effect of timing of rehabilitation on physical performance after lumbar spinal fusion: a randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Oestergaard, Lisa G; Nielsen, Claus V; Bünger, Cody E; Svidt, Karen; Christensen, Finn B

    2013-08-01

    The number of patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion procedures (LSF) has risen in recent years, but only few studies have examined different rehabilitation strategies for this patient group. To evaluate the impact of initiating rehabilitation either 6 or 12 weeks after a LSF based on the patients' physical performance using the 6-min walking test (6MWT) and the Åstrand Fitness test (AF-test) as measurement. A multicentre RCT including 82 patients with degenerative disc diseases undergoing LSF randomly assigned to initiate rehabilitation either 6 or 12 weeks after surgery. Both groups received the same group-based rehabilitation. The main outcome measures were the 6MWT and the AF-test, secondarily questionnaire-based measures. Follow-up at baseline as well as at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Comparing the two groups no statistically significant difference was found in walking distance or fitness over time. In both groups, the patients achieved an overall increase in walking distance (p < 0.01), but no improvement in fitness. The 6MWT showed significant correlation (-0.37 to -0.59) with the questionnaire-based outcome measures (p < 0.01). The AF-test did not correlate to either the 6MWT or any of the questionnaire-based outcome measures. No difference was found in the effect of initiating rehabilitation either 6 or 12 weeks after LSF on the patients' physical performance in terms of fitness and walking distance. The 6MWT showed fair to moderate correlation to the questionnaire-based outcome measures. The AF-test showed no significant independent value, and we question its use in LSF patients.

  19. Pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch predisposes to adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Mueller, Daniel A; Rothenfluh, Esin; Min, Kan

    2015-06-01

    to predispose to adjacent segment disease. Patients with such pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch exhibit a 10-times higher risk for undergoing revision surgery than controls if sagittal malalignment is maintained after lumbar fusion surgery.

  20. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis.

  1. Acute vertebral fracture after spinal fusion: a case report illustrating the added value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography to magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with spinal Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, M; Putzier, M; Pumberger, M; Hermann, K G; Diekhoff, T

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is degraded by metal-implant-induced artifacts when used for the diagnostic assessment of vertebral compression fractures in patients with instrumented spinal fusion. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) offers a promising supplementary imaging tool in these patients. This case report describes an 85-year-old woman who presented with a suspected acute vertebral fracture after long posterior lumbar interbody fusion. This is the first report of a vertebral fracture that showed bone marrow edema on DECT; however, edema was missed by an MRI STIR sequence owing to metal artifacts. Bone marrow assessment using DECT is less susceptible to metal artifacts than MRI, resulting in improved visualization of vertebral edema in the vicinity of fused vertebral bodies.

  2. Comparison of outcomes after posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic and neuromuscular scoliosis: does the surgical first assistant's level of training matter?

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Michael J; Seehausen, Derek A; Andras, Lindsay M; Skaggs, David L

    2014-04-15

    This was a retrospective review of posterior spinal fusion surgical procedures in patients diagnosed with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) or neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS). The purpose was to determine if the first assistant's training experience is associated with outcomes in AIS and NMS surgical procedures. A previous study found that patients with AIS undergoing posterior spinal fusion with 2 attendings had similar operating times, blood loss, and complication rates compared with those with a resident or fellow first assistant. NMS cases are more complex than AIS cases, but to our knowledge, no previous studies have examined the impact of the first assistant's level of training on NMS outcomes. This was a single-center retrospective review of 200 patients, 120 with AIS and 80 with NMS, undergoing primary posterior spinal fusion. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. For each diagnosis group, cases assisted by junior orthopedic residents were compared with those assisted by orthopedic fellows. NMS cases were more complex and had higher complication rates than AIS cases (P < 0.05). AIS and NMS cases were similarly distributed among the fellow and junior resident groups (P = 0.63). AIS cases in the fellow and junior resident groups had similar operating times, estimated blood loss (EBL), complications, lengths of stay, and reoperation rates (P > 0.05). In NMS cases, the fellow group had shorter operating times (320 ± 73 min vs. 367 ± 104 min, P = 0.035) and greater percent correction at initial and 2-year follow-up (58 ± 15% vs. 42 ± 19%, P < 0.001). EBL, complications, lengths of stay, and reoperation rates were similar between the assistant groups in NMS cases (P > 0.05). NMS surgical procedures in which fellows serve as the first assistants were associated with shorter operating times and greater percent correction than surgical procedures with junior resident first assistants. 3.

  3. Gelatine matrix with human thrombin decreases blood loss in adolescents undergoing posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis: a multicentre, randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Helenius, I; Keskinen, H; Syvänen, J; Lukkarinen, H; Mattila, M; Välipakka, J; Pajulo, O

    2016-03-01

    In a multicentre, randomised study of adolescents undergoing posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis, we investigated the effect of adding gelatine matrix with human thrombin to the standard surgical methods of controlling blood loss. Patients in the intervention group (n = 30) were randomised to receive a minimum of two and a maximum of four units of gelatine matrix with thrombin in addition to conventional surgical methods of achieving haemostasis. Only conventional surgical methods were used in the control group (n = 30). We measured the intra-operative and total blood loss (intra-operative blood loss plus post-operative drain output). Each additional hour of operating time increased the intra-operative blood loss by 356.9 ml (p < 0.001) and the total blood loss by 430.5 ml (p < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the intervention significantly decreased the intra-operative (-171 ml, p = 0.025) and total blood loss (-177 ml, p = 0.027). The decrease in haemoglobin concentration from the day before the operation to the second post-operative day was significantly smaller in the intervention group (-6 g/l, p = 0.013) than in the control group. The addition of gelatine matrix with human thrombin to conventional methods of achieving haemostasis reduces both the intra-operative blood loss and the decrease in haemoglobin concentration post-operatively in adolescents undergoing posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis. A randomised clinical trial showed that gelatine matrix with human thrombin decreases intra-operative blood loss by 30% when added to traditional surgical haemostatic methods in adolescents undergoing posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  4. Lateral Femoral Epicondylar Osteotomy: An Extensile Posterolateral Knee Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Andrea L.

    2008-01-01

    Open exposure of the posterolateral corner of the knee is challenged by limitations of posterolateral ligamentous tissues and posterior neurovascular structures. We have used a modification of a lateral femoral epicondyle osteotomy, described historically for surgical management of posterolateral rotatory instability, as an approach to the posterolateral intraarticular structures. The historic technique for ligamentous reconstruction has been abandoned because its nonanatomic fixation does not restore ligamentous isometry. In this report, osteotomy of a bone block from the lateral femoral epicondyle is used to access the joint space. The lateral collateral ligament is reflected distally and posteriorly through traction on the block. Once the intraarticular disorder has been addressed, the lateral femoral epicondyle is secured in its native, anatomic position, thereby restoring isometry and normal joint mechanics after surgery. This technique has been used successfully to address posterolateral articular disorders on femoral and tibial sides. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging verified restoration of lateral collateral ligament anatomy. Physical examination at 0° and 30° knee flexion showed clinical stability at all postoperative evaluations through 6 and 10 months followup. Using this technique, intraarticular disorders at the posterolateral corner may be addressed in an open manner with anatomic reduction and preserved postoperative function of the lateral collateral ligament. Level of Evidence: Level V, expert opinion. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18373126

  5. Metallic artefact reduction with monoenergetic dual-energy CT: systematic ex vivo evaluation of posterior spinal fusion implants from various vendors and different spine levels.

    PubMed

    Guggenberger, R; Winklhofer, S; Osterhoff, G; Wanner, G A; Fortunati, M; Andreisek, G; Alkadhi, H; Stolzmann, P

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate optimal monoenergetic dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) settings for artefact reduction of posterior spinal fusion implants of various vendors and spine levels. Posterior spinal fusion implants of five vendors for cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine were examined ex vivo with single-energy (SE) CT (120 kVp) and DECT (140/100 kVp). Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimised image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. Two independent radiologists assessed quantitative and qualitative image parameters for each device and spine level. Inter-reader agreements of quantitative and qualitative parameters were high (ICC = 0.81-1.00, κ = 0.54-0.77). HU values of spinal fusion implants were significantly different among vendors (P < 0.001), spine levels (P < 0.01) and among SECT, monoenergetic DECT of 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and OPTkeV (P < 0.01). Image quality was significantly (P < 0.001) different between datasets and improved with higher monoenergies of DECT compared with SECT (V = 0.58, P < 0.001). Artefacts decreased significantly (V = 0.51, P < 0.001) at higher monoenergies. OPTkeV values ranged from 123-141 keV. OPTkeV according to vendor and spine level are presented herein. Monoenergetic DECT provides significantly better image quality and less metallic artefacts from implants than SECT. Use of individual keV values for vendor and spine level is recommended. • Artefacts pose problems for CT following posterior spinal fusion implants. • CT images are interpreted better with monoenergetic extrapolation using dual-energy (DE) CT. • DECT extrapolation improves image quality and reduces metallic artefacts over SECT. • There were considerable differences in monoenergy values among vendors and spine levels. • Use of individualised monoenergy values is indicated for different metallic hardware devices.

  6. Healos and bone marrow aspirate used for lumbar spine fusion: a case controlled study comparing healos with autograft.

    PubMed

    Neen, Daniel; Noyes, David; Shaw, Matthew; Gwilym, Stephen; Fairlie, Neil; Birch, Nicholas

    2006-08-15

    A prospective case controlled study to compare the clinical and radiographic performance of Healos soaked in bone marrow aspirate (BMA) to iliac crest autograft when used in lumbar spinal fusion. To evaluate the null hypothesis: Healos used with BMA is not an effective alternative to iliac crest autograft in lumbar spine fusions. Healos (a Type 1 collagen/hydroxyapatite matrix) is osteoconductive and when soaked for at least 20 minutes in BMA becomes osteoinductive. It is nontoxic and straightforward to use, avoiding the morbidity of autograft harvest. Animal studies and early clinical series in humans have suggested that Healos and BMA are an effective substitute for autograft in certain circumstances. From July 2000, Healos and BMA were used as the graft material, instead of autograft harvested from the iliac crest, in all patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion. Clinical outcome measures used were the Low Back Outcome Score (LBOS), a Patient Satisfaction Score, and the Prolo Economic Score (after Schnee). Standing anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were taken at 12- and 24-month follow-up visits. The first 50 cases in this consecutive series were age, sex, and operative intervention matched to historical controls who underwent surgery between 1997 and 2000 and in whom autograft from the iliac crest had been used as the graft material. Surgical outcome data in these patients had also been gathered prospectively. An independent radiologist, blinded to the graft material, using standard plain radiograph criteria for fusion, examined all the radiographs. An independent surgeon assessed clinical outcomes. For posterolateral lumbar fusions, there were equivalent radiologic fusion rates for the 2 groups with no significant difference in the subjective and objective clinical outcomes. The radiologic fusions rate was significantly lower when Healos had been used for lumbar interbody fusions. Clinical outcomes for both groups were similar. There were no lasting

  7. Counting the Cost of Failed Spinal Fusion for Relief of Low Back Pain: Does Primary Fusion With Bone Morphogenetic Protein Make Economic Sense From a Primary Payer Perspective?

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Adam P

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective cohort study. To investigate the unknown direct costs of failed instrumented lumbar fusion using iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) and subsequent reoperation utilizing recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) from a primary payer perspective. Recent evidence has demonstrated increased rates of instrumented lumbar fusion and utilization of rhBMP-2 to treat a range of conditions causing lower back pain. For health care providers with finite financial resources, there is an increasing demand to evaluate economic costs of available treatment modalities. The high cost of rhBMP-2 has often been cited as a leading reason for delaying its universal acceptance as a preferred substitute to ICBG. It has been hypothesized that rhBMP-2 may demonstrate cost-effectiveness if pseudarthrosis and reoperation rates are decreased, thus avoiding subsequent expenditure. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent instrumented lumbar fusions utilizing rhBMP-2. Hospital finance records were used to calculate direct total expenditure incurred by the primary payer for the procedure using rhBMP-2. For patients who received rhBMP-2 in a secondary lumbar fusion, additional total expenditure related to the patients' failed primary instrumented fusion with ICBG was also sought. The mean total costs associated with failed instrumented lumbar fusion using ICBG and reoperation using rhBMP-2 totaled £47,734 per patient. The total direct costs of a policy of primary instrumented lumbar fusion with rhBMP-2 were less at £26,923 per patient; however, this was not significant. To date, this is the first study to report the costs of failed primary instrumented lumbar fusions using ICBG and subsequent secondary fusions using rhBMP-2 from a primary payer perspective. On the basis of this evidence, a policy of using rhBMP-2 in all patients undergoing a primary instrumented lumbar fusion cannot be recommended.

  8. Gel Scaffolds of BMP-2-binding Peptide Amphiphile Nanofibers for Spinal Arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Marco; Ghodasra, Jason; Nickoli, Michael S.; Ashtekar, Amruta; Polavarapu, Mahesh; Babu, Jacob; Riaz, Rehan M.; Nicolas, Joseph D.; Nelson, David; Hashmi, Sohaib Z.; Kaltz, Start R.; Earhart, Jeffrey S.; Merk, Bradley R.; McKee, Jeff S.; Bairstow, Shawn F.; Shah, Ramille N.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers formed by self-assembly can be customized for specific applications in regenerative medicine through the use of molecules that display bioactive signals on their surfaces. We report here on the use of PA nanofibers with binding affinity for the bone promoting growth factor BMP-2 to create a gel scaffold for osteogenesis. With the objective of reducing the amount of BMP-2 used clinically for successful arthrodesis in the spine, we used amounts of growth factor incorporated in the scaffolds that are 10 to 100 times lower than that those used clinically in collagen scaffolds. The efficacy of the bioactive PA system to promote BMP-2-induced osteogenesis in vivo was investigated in a rat posterolateral lumbar intertransverse spinal fusion model. PA nanofiber gels displaying BMP-2-binding segments exhibited superior spinal fusion rates relative to controls, effectively decreasing the required therapeutic dose of BMP-2 by ten-fold. Interestingly, a 42% fusion rate was observed for gels containing the bioactive nanofibers without the use of exogenous BMP-2, suggesting the ability of the nanofiber to recruit endogenous growth factor. Results obtained here demonstrate that bioactive biomaterials with capacity to bind specific growth factors by design are great targets for regenerative medicine. PMID:24753455

  9. The development of whole blood titanium levels after instrumented spinal fusion – Is there a correlation between the number of fused segments and titanium levels?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most modern spinal implants contain titanium and remain in the patient’s body permanently. Local and systemic effects such as tissue necrosis, osteolysis and malignant cell transformation caused by implants have been described. Increasing tissue concentration and whole blood levels of ions are necessary before a disease caused by a contaminant develops. The aim of the present study was the measurement of whole blood titanium levels and the evaluation of a possible correlation between these changes and the number of fused segments. Methods A prospective study was designed to determine changes in whole blood titanium levels after spinal fusion and to analyze the correlation to the number of pedicle screws, cross connectors and interbody devices implanted. Blood samples were taken preoperatively in group I (n = 15), on the first, second and 10th day postoperatively, as well as 3 and 12 months after surgery. Group II (n = 16) served as a control group of volunteers who did not have any metal implants in the body. Blood samples were taken once in this group. The number of screw-rod-connections and the length of the spinal fusion were determined using radiographic pictures. This study was checked and approved by the ethical committee of the University of Tuebingen. Results The mean age in group I was 47 ± 22 years (range 16 - 85 years). There were three male (20%) and twelve female (80%) patients. The median number of fused segments was 5 (range 1 to 11 segments). No statistically significant increase in the titanium level was seen 12 months after surgery (mean difference: -7.2 μg/l, 95% CI: -26.9 to 12.5 μg/l, p = 0.446). By observing the individual titanium levels, 4 out of 15 patients demonstrated an increase in titanium levels 12 months after surgery. No statistically significant correlation between fused segments (r = -0.188, p = 0.503) length of instrumentation (r = -0.329, p = 0.231), number of

  10. Minimally Invasive Scoliosis Surgery with Oblique Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Single Surgeon Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Hamid; Miller, Lynn; Abbasi, Ali; Orandi, Vali; Khaghany, Kamran

    2017-06-25

    Degenerative deformities of the spine have traditionally been treated with extensive open surgeries. However, these open procedures are associated with a high degree of surgical morbidity. In this study, we explore whether clinical improvement in patients with spinal deformities can be achieved using a new minimally invasive surgery (MIS) called oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion (OLLIF). OLLIF is a MIS single surgeon procedure in which the disc is approached through Kambin's triangle. OLLIF can achieve correction of spinal deformities through careful cage placement. The purpose of this study is to establish the safety and efficacy of using OLLIF to correct spinal deformities and to collect early outcome data. Collected data includes perioperative outcomes, patient reported outcomes, and radiographic outcomes. This study is a retrospective review of 37 OLLIF surgeries in 36 patients with symptomatic degenerative spinal deformity. Collected perioperative data included surgery time, blood loss, and hospital stay. Follow-up was conducted at least 150 days post surgery. We recorded complications and patient reported outcomes such as Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and pain scale. Imaging was conducted pre- and post-surgery. Fusion rates and changes in Cobb angle were also measured. A total of 37 surgeries that treated 100 vertebral levels were performed. For two and three level procedures, respectively, the mean blood loss was 83 and 178 ml, the average surgery time was 74 and 158 minutes and the average hospital stay was 2.6 and 3.3 days. The patients ambulated within 24 hours in all but two cases. The patients reported pain improvements on the ten-point pain scale from 8.3 to 3.7 (p<0.001) and on the ODI from 53% to 32%. Cobb angles decreased from 16° to 9.3° (p<0.001), amounting to 2.5° of correction per level of surgery. Detailed imaging was reviewed by independent radiologists for 24 cases and 100% interbody fusion was achieved along with 71% right

  11. Minimally Invasive Scoliosis Surgery with Oblique Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Single Surgeon Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Hamid; Miller, Lynn; Orandi, Vali; Khaghany, Kamran

    2017-01-01

    Background Degenerative deformities of the spine have traditionally been treated with extensive open surgeries. However, these open procedures are associated with a high degree of surgical morbidity. In this study, we explore whether clinical improvement in patients with spinal deformities can be achieved using a new minimally invasive surgery (MIS) called oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion (OLLIF). OLLIF is a MIS single surgeon procedure in which the disc is approached through Kambin’s triangle. OLLIF can achieve correction of spinal deformities through careful cage placement. Purpose The purpose of this study is to establish the safety and efficacy of using OLLIF to correct spinal deformities and to collect early outcome data. Collected data includes perioperative outcomes, patient reported outcomes, and radiographic outcomes. Study design/setting This study is a retrospective review of 37 OLLIF surgeries in 36 patients with symptomatic degenerative spinal deformity. Collected perioperative data included surgery time, blood loss, and hospital stay. Follow-up was conducted at least 150 days post surgery. We recorded complications and patient reported outcomes such as Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and pain scale. Imaging was conducted pre- and post-surgery. Fusion rates and changes in Cobb angle were also measured. Results A total of 37 surgeries that treated 100 vertebral levels were performed. For two and three level procedures, respectively, the mean blood loss was 83 and 178 ml, the average surgery time was 74 and 158 minutes and the average hospital stay was 2.6 and 3.3 days. The patients ambulated within 24 hours in all but two cases. The patients reported pain improvements on the ten-point pain scale from 8.3 to 3.7 (p<0.001) and on the ODI from 53% to 32%. Cobb angles decreased from 16° to 9.3° (p<0.001), amounting to 2.5° of correction per level of surgery. Detailed imaging was reviewed by independent radiologists for 24 cases and 100

  12. Lumbar Interspinous Process Fixation and Fusion with Stand-Alone Interlaminar Lumbar Instrumented Fusion Implant in Patients with Degenerative Spondylolisthesis Undergoing Decompression for Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Postacchini, Franco; Menchetti, Pier Paolo Maria; Sessa, Pasquale; Paolino, Michela; Cinotti, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To assess the ability of a stand-alone lumbar interspinous implant (interspinous/interlaminar lumbar instrumented fusion, ILIF) associated with bone grafting to promote posterior spine fusion in degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) with vertebral instability. Overview of Literature A few studies, using bilateral laminotomy (BL) or bilateral decompression by unilateral laminotomy (BDUL), found satisfactory results in stenotic patients with decompression alone, but others reported increased olisthesis, or subsequent need for fusion in DS with or without dynamic instability. Methods Twenty-five patients with Grade I DS, leg pain and chronic low back pain underwent BL or BDUL and ILIF implant. Olisthesis was 13% to 21%. Follow-up evaluations were performed at 4 to 12 months up to 25 to 44 months (mean, 34.4). Outcome measures were numerical rating scale (NRS) for back and leg pain, Oswestry disability index (ODI) and short-form 36 health survey (SF-36) of body pain and function. Results Fusion occurred in 21 patients (84%). None had increased olisthesis or instability postoperatively. Four types of fusion were identified. In Type I, the posterior part of the spinous processes were fused. In Type II, fusion extended to the base of the processes. In Type III, bone was present also around the polyetheretherketone plate of ILIF. In Type IV, even the facet joints were fused. The mean NRS score for back and leg pain decreased by 64% and 80%, respectively. The mean ODI score was decreased by 52%. SF-36 bodily pain and physical function mean scores increased by 53% and 58%, respectively. Computed tomography revealed failed fusion in four patients, all of whom still had vertebral instability postoperatively. Conclusions Stand-alone ILIF with interspinous bone grafting promotes vertebral fusion in most patients with lumbar stenosis and unstable Grade I DS undergoing BL or BDUL. PMID:26949455

  13. Bipolar Sealer Device Reduces Blood Loss and Transfusion Requirements in Posterior Spinal Fusion for Degenerative Lumbar Scoliosis: A Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuesong; Sun, Gang; Sun, Ruifu; Ba, Chenglei; Gong, Xiaojin; Liu, Weibo; Zhai, Rui

    2016-03-01

    A prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study. To determine the efficacy of bipolar sealer device in reducing perioperative blood loss and transfusions in degenerative lumbar scoliosis patients undergoing primary posterior spinal fusion. It has recently been used successfully in pediatric spine surgery, particularly in idiopathic and neuromuscular deformities. However, there is a dearth of literature on prospective study of the efficacy of bipolar sealer device in reducing perioperative blood loss and transfusions in patients undergoing degenerative lumbar scoliosis surgery. A total of 100 consecutive degenerative lumbar scoliosis patients who had undergone primary decompression and posterior spinal fusion with segmental spinal instrumentation between June 2010 and June 2012 were prospectively randomized into 1 of 2 groups according to whether bipolar sealer device for intraoperative/postoperative blood management was used or not. Demographic distribution, perioperative blood loss, blood transfusion rate, the length of stay, and postoperative complications were analyzed. The operation time was significantly shorter in the study group than in the control group, 223.4 versus 248.9 minutes (P=0.026). There was significantly lower intraoperative estimated blood loss in the bipolar sealer group, 407 versus 696 mL (P=0.000). Of the patients with the use of bipolar sealer device, the mean red blood cell transfusion requirement during hospitalization was significantly less than the control group, 0.4 versus 1.1 U/patient (P=0.003). Furthermore, significant difference existed in allogenic blood transfusion rate between the 2 cohorts. Within the study group (with the use of bipolar sealer device), the entire perioperative allogenic blood transfusion rate was 18.0% compared with 40.0% of the control group (P=0.015). There were no complications related directly to the use of the bipolar sealer. Utilization of a bipolar sealer during correction of lumbar degenerative

  14. Use of Allogenic Mesenchymal Cellular Bone Matrix in Anterior and Posterior Cervical Spinal Fusion: A Case Series of 21 Patients.

    PubMed

    Divi, Srikanth Naga; Mikhael, Mark M

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective case series. To report our early experience using allogenic mesenchymal cellular bone matrix (CBM) products in cervical spine fusion. Multi-level cervical fusions have historically yielded lower fusion rates than single level fusions, especially in patients with high risk medical comorbidities. At this time, significant literature in cervical fusion outcomes with this cellular allograft technology is lacking. Twenty-one patients underwent either multilevel (3 or 4 level) anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, or posterior cervical fusion. ViviGen (DePuy Synthes Spine, Raynham, MA, USA), an allogenic bone matrix product, was used in addition to standard instrumentation. Radiographic evaluation was performed at 2 weeks, 12 weeks, 24 weeks and 1 year postoperative. Visual analog scale (VAS) and neck disability index (NDI) scores along with return to work and leisure activity were recorded. At 6 months postoperative, all patients had radiographic evidence of bone fusion regardless of age or medical comorbidities. All patients reported subjective improvement with a mean decrease in VAS from 8.3 to 1.5 and a mean decrease in NDI from 40.3% to 6.0% at 1 year. All patients also returned to work and/or regular leisure activity within 3 months. Twenty-one patients undergoing high-risk anterior and posterior cervical spine fusion, with the use of a commercially available mesenchymal CBM product, went on to radiographic fusion and all had improvement in subjective outcomes. While further effort and research is needed to validate its widespread use, this study shows favorable use of CBM in cervical fusion for high-risk cases.

  15. [Comparison of clinical efficacies of single segment transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with cage versus autogenous morselized bone for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a prospective randomized controlled study].

    PubMed

    Liu, Peisheng; Liu, Xiaozhen; Qiao, Xuejing; Du, Wennan; Luo, Dawei; Zheng, Xiujun

    2014-09-23

    To compare the clinical efficacies of single segment transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with cage versus autogenous morselized bone for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. A total of 87 patients undergoing single segment TLIF were randomly divided into 2 groups. A cage was implanted into intervertebral space in group A patients while autogenous morselized bone in group B patients. Operative duration, blood loss, length of stay and cost of hospitalization of two groups were recorded. They were followed up at 1 week, 12, 24 months post-operation. Oswestry disability index (ODI), visual analogue scale (VAS) fusion rates, intervertebral space and foramen height restoration, lumbar lordosis and postoperative complications were compared between two groups. No significant inter-group difference existed in operative duration, blood loss or length of stay. However, the average hospitalization cost in group A were 18% higher than that of group B (P < 0.05). Both groups achieved excellent clinical outcomes within 2 years. ODI, VAS score improvement rates and postoperative complication rates were not statistically different. Lumbar fusion rate was 86.7% in group A versus 85.7% in group B after 2 years. And there was no significant difference (P > 0.05). The heights of intervertebral space and foramen in group A achieved a better recovery than those of group B. Both groups had similar improvements of lumbar lordosis. For degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, usage of interbody cage is more effective in terms of recovery of intervertebral space and foraminal height compared with usage of bone graft. However it brings no better clinical efficacy while the usage of autogenous morselized bone is more cost-effective. Two grafting methods yield similar overall clinical outcomes.

  16. The role of single-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion with titanium mesh cages and short-segment instrumentation in thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiongjie; Liu, Hongzhe; Wang, Guoping; Pang, Xiaoyang; Luo, Chengke; Zeng, Hao; Xu, Zhengquan; Liu, Xiangyang; Wang, Xiyang

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to retrospectively analyze the clinical efficacy and feasibility of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis treated by single-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion with titanium mesh cages (TMC), and combined short-segment instrumentation. Fifteen patients with no more than two vertebral bodies involving thoracic and lumbar tuberculosis were collected from January 2006 to January 2010, performed by single-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion with TMC and posterior short-segment fixation. The clinical efficacy was evaluated based on the data of the 10-point Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), neurological status, kyphosis angle, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein, which were collected at a certain time. The average duration of surgery was 135 minutes. All the patients were followed up for a period ranging from 18 to 48 months (mean 28.9±6.44 months). The VAS score was improved from 8.47±1.13 (range 7-10) before surgery to 2.1±1.7 (range 0-2) after surgery. Correction of segmental kyphotic deformity was 24.2±6.59°. Neither the postoperative change of the position of titanium mesh cage nor any posterior instrumentation failure was recorded. The situation of 13 patients with incomplete neurologic lesions before surgery was improved after surgery. Patients with thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis can be successfully treated by posterior debridement, interbody fusion with TMC combining short-segment instrumentation. The presence of the TMC anteriorly at the site of tubercular spondylitis has no negative influence on the course of infection healing, and additionally they stabilize the affected segment maintaining sufficient sagittal profile.

  17. Posterolateral dislocation of the knee: Recognizing an uncommon entity

    PubMed Central

    Woon, Colin YL; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Posterolateral dislocations of the knee are rare injuries. Early recognition and emergent open reduction is crucial. A 48-year-old Caucasian male presented with right knee pain and limb swelling 3 d after sustaining a twisting injury in the bathroom. Examination revealed the pathognomonic anteromedial “pucker” sign. Ankle-brachial indices were greater than 1.0 and symmetrical. Radiographs showed a posterolateral dislocation of the right knee. He underwent emergency open reduction without an attempt at closed reduction. Attempts at closed reduction of posterolateral dislocations of the knee are usually impossible because of incarceration of medial soft tissue in the intercondylar notch and may only to delay surgical management and increase the risk of skin necrosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is not crucial in the preoperative period and can lead to delays of up to 24 h. Instead, open reduction should be performed once vascular compromise is excluded. PMID:27335816

  18. Preservation or Restoration of Segmental and Regional Spinal Lordosis Using Minimally Invasive Interbody Fusion Techniques in Degenerative Lumbar Conditions: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Juan S; Myhre, Sue Lynn; Youssef, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    A literature review. The purpose of this study was to review lumbar segmental and regional alignment changes following treatment with a variety of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) interbody fusion procedures for short-segment, degenerative conditions. An increasing number of lumbar fusions are being performed with minimally invasive exposures, despite a perception that minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion procedures are unable to affect segmental and regional lordosis. Through a MEDLINE and Google Scholar search, a total of 23 articles were identified that reported alignment following minimally invasive lumbar fusion for degenerative (nondeformity) lumbar spinal conditions to examine aggregate changes in postoperative alignment. Of the 23 studies identified, 28 study cohorts were included in the analysis. Procedural cohorts included MIS ALIF (two), extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) (16), and MIS posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (P/TLIF) (11). Across 19 study cohorts and 720 patients, weighted average of lumbar lordosis preoperatively for all procedures was 43.5° (range 28.4°-52.5°) and increased 3.4° (9%) (range -2° to 7.4°) postoperatively (P < 0.001). Segmental lordosis increased, on average, by 4° from a weighted average of 8.3° preoperatively (range -0.8° to 15.8°) to 11.2° at postoperative time points (range -0.2° to 22.8°) (P < 0.001) in 1182 patient from 24 study cohorts. Simple linear regression revealed a significant relationship between preoperative lumbar lordosis and change in lumbar lordosis (r = 0.413; P = 0.003), wherein lower preoperative lumbar lordosis predicted a greater increase in postoperative lumbar lordosis. Significant gains in both weighted average lumbar lordosis and segmental lordosis were seen following MIS interbody fusion. None of the segmental lordosis cohorts and only two of the 19 lumbar lordosis cohorts showed decreases in lordosis postoperatively. These results suggest that

  19. Transient long thoracic nerve injury during posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Al-Hourani, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    We present the transient long thoracic nerve (LTN) injury during instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The suspected mechanism of injury, postoperative course and final outcome is discussed. The LTN is susceptible to injury due to its long and relatively superficial course across the thoracic wall through direct trauma or tension. Radical mastectomies with resection of axillary lymph nodes, first rib resection to treat thoracic outlet syndrome and cardiac surgery can be complicated with LTN injury. LTN injury producing scapular winging has not been reported in association with spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed the medical notes and spinal radiographs of two adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed LTN neuropraxia. Scoliosis surgery was uneventful and intraoperative spinal cord monitoring was stable throughout the procedure. Postoperative neurological examination was otherwise normal, but both patients developed winging of the scapula at 4 and 6 days after spinal arthrodesis, which did not affect shoulder function. Both patients made a good recovery and the scapular winging resolved spontaneously 8 and 11 months following surgery with no residual morbidity. We believe that this LTN was due to positioning of our patients with their head flexed, tilted and rotated toward the contralateral side while the arm was abducted and extended. The use of heavy retractors may have also applied compression or tension to the nerve in one of our patients contributing to the development of neuropraxia. This is an important consideration during spinal deformity surgery to prevent potentially permanent injury to the nerve, which can produce severe shoulder dysfunction and persistent pain. PMID:24379470

  20. Transient long thoracic nerve injury during posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Al-Hourani, Khalid

    2013-11-01

    We present the transient long thoracic nerve (LTN) injury during instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The suspected mechanism of injury, postoperative course and final outcome is discussed. The LTN is susceptible to injury due to its long and relatively superficial course across the thoracic wall through direct trauma or tension. Radical mastectomies with resection of axillary lymph nodes, first rib resection to treat thoracic outlet syndrome and cardiac surgery can be complicated with LTN injury. LTN injury producing scapular winging has not been reported in association with spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed the medical notes and spinal radiographs of two adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed LTN neuropraxia. Scoliosis surgery was uneventful and intraoperative spinal cord monitoring was stable throughout the procedure. Postoperative neurological examination was otherwise normal, but both patients developed winging of the scapula at 4 and 6 days after spinal arthrodesis, which did not affect shoulder function. Both patients made a good recovery and the scapular winging resolved spontaneously 8 and 11 months following surgery with no residual morbidity. We believe that this LTN was due to positioning of our patients with their head flexed, tilted and rotated toward the contralateral side while the arm was abducted and extended. The use of heavy retractors may have also applied compression or tension to the nerve in one of our patients contributing to the development of neuropraxia. This is an important consideration during spinal deformity surgery to prevent potentially permanent injury to the nerve, which can produce severe shoulder dysfunction and persistent pain.

  1. The effect of vancomycin powder on bone healing in a rat spinal rhBMP-2 model.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Marco C; Sonn, Kevin A; Kannan, Abhishek S; Bellary, Sharath S; Mitchell, Sean M; Singh, Gurmit; Park, Christian; Yun, Chawon; Stock, Stuart R; Hsu, Erin L; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aims to quantify the impact of vancomycin powder application on new bone formation and spine fusion rates in a rat posterolateral arthrodesis model. METHODS Thirty-six female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion (PLF) at the L-4 and L-5 vertebrae. Fusion was elicited via implantation of an absorbable collagen sponge containing 3 µg rhBMP-2. Rats were divided into 3 groups: no vancomycin (control), standard-dose vancomycin, and high-dose vancomycin, based on what was applied to the fusion bed. Clinical studies typically describe the application of 1 g vancomycin into the surgical wound. Presuming an average individual patient weight of 70 kg, a weight-based equivalent dose of vancomycin powder was applied subfascially in the PLF model constituting a "standard-dose" treatment group (14.3 mg/kg, n = 12). To determine whether there is a critical threshold beyond which vancomycin increases the risk of pseudarthrosis, a 10-fold higher dose was administered to a "high-dose" treatment group (143 mg/kg, n = 12). No vancomycin powder was applied to the surgical site in the control group (n = 12). Fusion was evaluated with plain radiographs at 4 and 8 weeks after surgery. The spines were harvested after the 8-week radiographs were obtained and evaluated using manual palpation, microCT analysis, and histological analysis. RESULTS Radiographs demonstrated equivalent bridging bone formation in all groups. No significant differences in fusion scores were seen in the standard-dose (mean 2.25) or high-dose (2.13) treatment groups relative to untreated control animals (1.78). Similarly, fusion rates did not differ significantly different between vancomycin-treated animals (100% for both groups) and control animals (92%). Quantification of new bone formation via microCT imaging revealed no significant between-groups differences in the volume of newly regenerated bone (control vs standard-dose vancomycin, p = 0.57; control vs high

  2. Treatment of neuromuscular scoliosis with posterior spinal fusion using the Galveston procedure: retrospective of eight years of experience with unit rod instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Fredrick O'Neal; Zhou, Haitao; Bertrand, Styles Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Posterior spinal fusion with instrumentation to the pelvis (the Galveston Procedure) is widely accepted as an effective treatment for neuromuscular scoliosis. Unit rod instrumentation is commonly used in these cases, but it is not universally accepted as superior to separate Luque rods. This study is a retrospective review of 115 consecutive cases in which the unit rod was used. The following statistics were collected from the records of these patients: operative time, estimated blood loss, PICU stay, hospital stay, transfusion rate, complication rate, scoliosis correction, and correction of pelvic obliquity . Results at 2-year follow-up were compared to those reported in the literature and to results previously reported from the same facility in which separate Luque rods were used. The unit rod provides excellent control of pelvic obliquity and superior scoliosis correction compared with separate Luque rods. Improvements were also found in reduced operative times, lower blood loss, a lower complication rate, and shorter hospital stay.

  3. The role of spinal fusion in the treatment of cervical synovial cysts: a series of 17 cases and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bydon, Mohamad; Lin, Joseph A; de la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Sciubba, Daniel M; Wolinsky, Jean Paul; Witham, Timothy F; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali

    2014-12-01

    between the groups, and the rate of cyst recurrence was found to be 0%. In this study, patients with CSCs had similar outcomes regardless of cyst location and regardless of whether they underwent decompression only or fusion. In the authors' institutional experience, 16 of 17 patients underwent fusion due to underlying spinal instability. While there were no reports of cyst recurrence in their series or in the literature in patients who only received decompression, this is likely due to the limited follow-up time available for the study population. Longer follow-up and prospective and biomechanical studies are needed to corroborate these findings.

  4. Changes in bone mineral density in the intertransverse fusion mass after instrumented single-level lumbar fusion: a prospective 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hagenmaier, Femke; Kok, Dennis; Hol, Annemiek; Rijnders, Ton; Oner, F Cumhur; van Susante, Job L C

    2013-04-15

    Prospective cohort. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in the intertransverse fusion mass as representative for the process of bone remodeling after spinal fusion. Intertransverse bone graft is frequently applied to facilitate bony fusion between 2 spinal levels. The biological process of bone graft remodeling leading to eventual fusion is, however, poorly understood. In 20 patients with a single-level instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion for low-grade spondylolisthesis, radiographs, and clinical outcome scores (visual analogue scale for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, Short Form-36) were obtained. Locally harvested laminectomy bone was used as intertransverse bone graft. The BMD in selected "regions of interest" at both intertransverse fusion areas was assessed on days 4 and 3, after a period of 6 and 12 months after surgery using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans. Eventual fusion status was assessed on computed tomographic scan at 12 months. All clinical outcome scores significantly improved at the final follow-up (P < 0.05). Baseline BMD in both paraspinal fusion areas was expressed as 100%, which significantly decreased from 81% to 75% and 77% to 70% at 3 and 6 months, for regions of interest 1 and 2, respectively (P < 0.001). From 6 to 12 months, there was an increase in BMD from 90% to 80%, for regions of interest 1 and 2 (P = 0.296). On computed tomography scan a complete fusion was noticed in 70% of the patients. Repeated dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was able to elucidate the biological process of bone graft remodeling in the intertransverse fusion mass. An active bone remodeling process was quantified with profound resorption or demineralization of the graft during the first 6 months, followed by subsequent bone apposition and restoration of BMD at the final follow-up. No difference in trend in BMD change between patients with and without fusion could be established; however, no firm

  5. Multi level lumbosacral spinal fusion including lumbo-Sacral (L5-S1) junction fixation in adult deformity surgery; is postero- lateral fusion at (L5-S1) alone adequate?

    PubMed

    Khalique, Ahmed Bilal; Pasha, Ibrahim Farooq; Sultan, Akmal; Afzal, Waseem; Qureshi, Muhammad Asad

    2015-11-01

    To assess the revision rate at L5-S1 when only posterior fixation with pedicle screws is done with multi-level spinal fixation. The Retrospective quasi experimental study was conducted at the Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpinidi and comprised data from 2009 to 2014 of patients in whom multi-level posterior decompression including lumbosacral junction (L5-S1) with laminectomy and posterior fixation with pedicle screws was done till L3 and higher. Those with known cause of implant failure like osteoporosis, osteomalacia and infection were excluded. Patients were followed up and need for revision at L5-S1 level was assessed. Of the 22 cases, 5(23%) were males and 17(77%) were females with an overall mean age of 64±10.38 years (range 48-84 years). Mean number of levels fixed was 5.22±1.15 the highest level of fixation being T11. Mean follow-up was 08±3.22 months and focused only at the failure of fixation at L5-S1. Two (9%) cases showed implant loosening and required revision at L5-S1 because of screw cut out. Properly placed pedicle screws were adequate with fusion for multilevel spinal fixations.

  6. Surgical Management and Treatment of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament/Posterolateral Corner Injured Knee.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Nicholas I; LaPrade, Christopher M; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-01-01

    Posterolateral knee injuries occur more commonly than in the past. These injuries most commonly occur concurrent with cruciate ligament tears. The main stabilizers of the posterolateral knee are the fibular collateral ligament, the popliteus tendon, and the popliteofibular ligament. These static stabilizers function to prevent increased varus, external rotation, and coupled posterolateral rotation of the knee. The most important clinical tests to diagnose posterolateral knee injuries are the varus stress test, posterolateral drawer, and dial tests. Varus stress radiographs are key objective means to diagnose these injuries. Anatomic- based reconstructions have been validated to restore stability and improve outcomes.

  7. Computer navigation-assisted spinal fusion with segmental pedicle screw instrumentation for scoliosis with Rett syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masato; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Misawa, Haruo; Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Nishida, Keiichiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2009-12-01

    Scoliosis is a common clinical manifestation of Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder that almost exclusively affects females. The spinal curve in patients with Rett syndrome is typically a long C curve of a neuromuscular type. As the onset of the scoliosis is very early and shows rapid progression, early surgical intervention has been recommended to prevent a life-threatening collapsing spine syndrome. However, there are high perioperative risks in Rett syndrome patients who undergo spinal surgery, such as neurological compromise and respiratory dysfunction due to rigid spinal curve. We herein report the surgical result of treating severe rapid progressive thoracic scoliosis in a 16-year-old girl with Rett syndrome. Posterior segmental pedicle screw fixation was performed from T1 to L3 using a computer-assisted technique. Post-operative radiography demonstrated a good correction of the curve in both the sagittal and coronal alignment. There were no postoperative complications such as neurological compromise. The patient had maintained satisfactory spinal balance as of the 3-year follow-up examination.

  8. Use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 with local bone graft instead of iliac crest bone graft in posterolateral lumbar spine arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Daniel K; Kim, Sung S; Thakur, Nikhil; Boden, Scott D

    2013-05-20

    Prospective clinical study. Compare fusion rates between recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) with rhBMP-2 and local bone graft (LBG) (±bone graft extenders) in posterolateral fusion. Previous reports have shown higher fusion rates when adding rhBMP-2 to ICBG in lumbar posterolateral fusion, compared with ICBG alone. We compared the fusion success rates between rhBMP-2 delivered with ICBG versus that with LBG. Fusion rates were compared in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis (1-2 levels) with accompanying lumbar stenosis. RhBMP-2 (INFUSE, Medtronic) was delivered on an absorbable collagen sponge (6 mg/side at 1.5 mg/mL) with ICBG alone or with LBG wrapped inside the sponge. Thin slice computed tomographic scans were assessed at 6, 12, and 24 months. In a consecutive series, 16 patients (30 levels) received ICBG with rhBMP-2 and 35 patients (49 levels) received LBG with rhBMP-2. For the ICBG cohort, 80.0%, 93.4%, 96.7% of levels were fused at 6, 12, and 24 months. In contrast, for the local bone with rhBMP-2 cohort, 87.7%, 98.0%, and 98.0% were fused at 6, 12, and 24 months. There was no statistically significant difference in fusion success rates between the 2 groups at any time point. As for fusion quality, the fusion mass showed superior quality in ICBG group than in the local bone group at each time point. This study validates the high fusion success rates previously reported by adding rhBMP-2 to ICBG and shows that local bone may be safely substituted for ICBG in 1- to 2-level posterolateral fusion. The fusion rates were comparable. The avoidance of ICBG harvest has implications for operative time, blood loss, and morbidity. Lastly, this is the first study that directly compares the fusion success rate and quality using local bone with rhBMP-2 versus ICBG with rhBMP-2 at various times. 4.

  9. Acute epidural lipedema: a novel entity and potential complication of bone morphogenetic protein use in lumbar spine fusion.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Michael T; Hamilton, Kendall D; Russo, Scott S

    2013-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce osteogenesis, making them useful for decreasing time to union and increasing union rates. Although the advantages of BMP-2 as a substitute for iliac crest graft have been elucidated, less is known about the safety profile and adverse events linked to their use in spinal fusion. An accumulation of reactive edema in the epidural fat may lead to neural compression and significant morbidity after lumbar spinal fusion. Bone morphogenetic protein has never been implicated as a cause of spinal epidural lipedema. We report on a case of rapid accumulation of edematous adipose tissue in the epidural space after lumbar spine decompression and fusion with bone morphogenic protein. Case report. The patient was a 45-year-old woman with chronic back pain, worsening bilateral L5 radiculopathy, and degenerative disc disease. Surgery consisting of a one-level transpedicular decompression, transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, and posterolateral fusion was performed using BMP-2 as an adjunct for arthrodesis. Two days postoperatively, the patient developed progressive cauda equina syndrome. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed edematous epidural fat extending above the initial laminectomy, compromising the spinal canal, and compressing the thecal sac. Emergent laminectomies at L3, L4, and L5 were performed, and intraoperative pathology revealed edematous epidural adipose tissue. The patient's cauda equina syndrome resolved after spinal decompression and the removal of epidural fat. Final cultures were negative for infection, and histology report yielded an accumulation of edematous fibroadipose tissue. We present a case of rapid accumulation of edematous adipose tissue causing cauda equina syndrome after a lumbar decompression and fusion surgery. The acute nature and extensive development of the lipedema presented in this case indicate an intense inflammatory reaction. We hypothesize that there may be a link between the use of BMP-2

  10. A Multi-center Clinical Study of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with the Expandable Stand-alone Cage (Tyche® Cage) for Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Wook; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Oh, Seong Hoon; Roh, Sung Woo; Rim, Dae Cheol; Kim, Tae Sung

    2007-01-01

    Objective This multi-center clinical study was designed to determine the long-term results of patients who received a one-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion with expandable cage (Tyche® cage) for degenerative spinal diseases during the same period in each hospital. Methods Fifty-seven patients with low back pain who had a one-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion using a newly designed expandable cage were enrolled in this study at five centers from June 2003 to December 2004 and followed up for 24 months. Pain improvement was checked with a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and their disability was evaluated with the Oswestry Disability Index. Radiographs were obtained before and after surgery. At the final follow-up, dynamic stability, quality of bone fusion, interveretebral disc height, and lumbar lordosis were assessed. In some cases, a lumbar computed tomography scan was also obtained. Results The mean VAS score of back pain was improved from 6.44 points preoperatively to 0.44 at the final visit and the score of sciatica was reduced from 4.84 to 0.26. Also, the Oswestry Disability Index was improved from 32.62 points preoperatively to 18.25 at the final visit. The fusion rate was 92.5%. Intervertebral disc height, recorded as 9.94±2.69 mm before surgery was increased to 12.23±3.31 mm at postoperative 1 month and was stabilized at 11.43±2.23 mm on final visit. The segmental angle of lordosis was changed significantly from 3.54±3.70° before surgery to 6.37±3.97° by 24 months postoperative, and total lumbar lordosis was 20.37±11.30° preoperatively and 24.71±11.70° at 24 months postoperative. Conclusion There have been no special complications regarding the expandable cage during the follow-up period and the results of this study demonstrates a high fusion rate and clinical success. PMID:19096552

  11. Radiofrequency bipolar hemostatic sealer reduces blood loss, transfusion requirements, and cost for patients undergoing multilevel spinal fusion surgery: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven M; Wasey, Jack O; Dwyer, Ian M; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Ness, Paul M; Kebaish, Khaled M

    2014-07-05

    A relatively new method of electrocautery, the radiofrequency bipolar hemostatic sealer (RBHS), uses saline-cooled delivery of energy, which seals blood vessels rather than burning them. We assessed the benefits of RBHS as a blood conservation strategy in adult patients undergoing multilevel spinal fusion surgery. In a retrospective cohort study, we compared blood utilization in 36 patients undergoing multilevel spinal fusion surgery with RBHS (Aquamantys, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) to that of a historical control group (n = 38) matched for variables related to blood loss. Transfusion-related costs were calculated by two methods. Patient characteristics in the two groups were similar. Intraoperatively, blood loss was 55% less in the RBHS group than in the control group (810 ± 530 vs. 1,800 ± 1,600 mL; p = 0.002), and over the entire hospital stay, red cell utilization was 51% less (2.4 ± 3.4 vs. 4.9 ± 4.5 units/patient; p = 0.01) and plasma use was 56% less (1.1 ± 2.4 vs. 2.5 ± 3.4 units/patient; p = 0.03) in the RBHS group. Platelet use was 0.1 ± 0.5 and 0.3 ± 0.6 units/patient in the RBHS and control groups, respectively (p = 0.07). The perioperative decrease in hemoglobin was less in the RBHS group than in the control group (-2.0 ± 2.2 vs. -3.2 ± 2.1 g/dL; p = 0.04), and hemoglobin at discharge was higher in the RBHS group (10.5 ± 1.4 vs. 9.7 ± 0.9 g/dL; p = 0.01). The estimated transfusion-related cost savings were $745/case by acquisition cost and approximately 3- to 5-fold this amount by activity-based cost. The use of RBHS in patients undergoing multilevel spine fusion surgery can conserve blood, promote higher hemoglobin levels, and reduce transfusion-related costs.

  12. Reporting of industry funded study outcome data: comparison of confidential and published data on the safety and effectiveness of rhBMP-2 for spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Mark A; Brown, Jennifer V E; Heirs, Morag K; Higgins, Julian P T; Mannion, Richard J; Simmonds, Mark C; Stewart, Lesley A

    2013-06-20

    To investigate whether published results of industry funded trials of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) in spinal fusion match underlying trial data by comparing three different data sources: individual participant data, internal industry reports, and publicly available journal publications and conference abstracts. The manufacturer of rhBMP-2 products (Medtronic; Minneapolis, MN) provided complete individual participant data and internal reports for all its studies of rhMBP-2 in spinal fusion. We identified publications and conference abstracts through comprehensive literature searches. We compared outcomes provided in the individual participant data against outcomes reported in publications. For effectiveness outcomes, we compared meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials based on each of the three data sources. For adverse events, meta-analysis of the published aggregate data was not possible and we compared the number and type of adverse events reported between data sources. 32 publications reported outcomes from 11 of the 17 existing manufacturer sponsored studies. For individual randomised controlled trials, 56% (9/16) to 88% (15/17) of effectiveness outcomes known to have been collected were reported in the published literature. Meta-analyses of effectiveness data were almost identical for pain outcomes and similar for fusion across the three data sources. A minority of adverse event data known to have been collected were reported in the published literature. Several journal articles reported only "serious," "related," or "unanticipated" adverse events, without defining these terms. Others reported a small proportion of the collected adverse event categories. Around 23% (533/2302) of the total adverse events collected in published randomised controlled trials have been reported in the literature, with randomised controlled trials evaluating the licensed preparation (Infuse) reporting around 11% (122/1108) of collected adverse

  13. Multilevel anterior thoracic discectomies and anterior interbody fusion using a microsurgical thoracoscopic approach. Case report.

    PubMed

    Dickman, C A; Mican, C A

    1996-01-01

    A video-assisted thoracoscopic microsurgical approach was performed to treat a myelopathic patient with a severe kyphotic deformity caused by chronic nonunion of compression fractures of the T7-9 vertebrae. The kyphotic deformity was treated by combined operative procedures. First, an anterior release was performed using a thoracoscopic technique, sectioning the anterior longitudinal ligament and performing multilevel thoracic discectomies. Next, a posterior reduction and internal fixation of the deformity was achieved using hook-rod instrumentation. Finally, bone graft harvested during the posterior approach was used for interbody fusion via a thoracoscopic approach. Microsurgical thoracoscopic techniques potentially can be used in a variety of spinal surgeries. Compared to transthoracic and posterolateral approaches, this technique presents distinct advantages to treatment of anterior spinal pathology. The small incisions made into the intercostal spaces without retracting the ribs may reduce postoperative pain, shorten the length of hospitalization, and allow early return to activity. The operative techniques used in this case are described in detail. This report demonstrates that thoracoscopic discectomies and interbody fusion are technically feasible and can be effectively performed with acceptable results.

  14. A meta analysis of lumbar spinal fusion surgery using bone morphogenetic proteins and autologous iliac crest bone graft.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifei; Wang, Feng; Ding, Lin; Zhang, Zhiyu; Sun, Deri; Feng, Xinmin; An, Jiuli; Zhu, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMPs) as a substitute for iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) has been increasingly widely used in lumbar fusion. The purpose of this study is to systematically compare the effectiveness and safety of fusion with BMPs for the treatment of lumbar disease. Cochrane review methods were used to analyze all relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published up to nov 2013. 19 RCTs (1,852 patients) met the inclusion criteria. BMPs group significantly increased fusion rate (RR: 1.13; 95% CI 1.05-1.23, P = 0.001), while there was no statistical difference in overall success of clinical outcomes (RR: 1.04; 95% CI 0.95-1.13, P = 0.38) and complications (RR: 0.96; 95% CI 0.85-1.09, p = 0.54). A significant reduction of the reoperation rate was found in BMPs group (RR: 0.57; 95% CI 0.42-0.77, p = 0.0002). Significant difference was found in the operating time (MD-0.32; 95% CI-0.55, -0.08; P = 0.009), but no significant difference was found in the blood loss, the hospital stay, patient satisfaction, and work status. Compared with ICBG, BMPs in lumbar fusion can increase the fusion rate, while reduce the reoperation rate and operating time. However, it doesn't increase the complication rate, the amount of blood loss and hospital stay. No significant difference was found in the overall success of clinical outcome of the two groups.

  15. A Meta Analysis of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Using Bone Morphogenetic Proteins and Autologous Iliac Crest Bone Graft

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haifei; Wang, Feng; Ding, Lin; Zhang, Zhiyu; Sun, Deri; Feng, Xinmin; An, Jiuli; Zhu, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone morphogenetic protein (BMPs) as a substitute for iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) has been increasingly widely used in lumbar fusion. The purpose of this study is to systematically compare the effectiveness and safety of fusion with BMPs for the treatment of lumbar disease. Methods Cochrane review methods were used to analyze all relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published up to nov 2013. Results 19 RCTs (1,852 patients) met the inclusion criteria. BMPs group significantly increased fusion rate (RR: 1.13; 95% CI 1.05–1.23, P = 0.001), while there was no statistical difference in overall success of clinical outcomes (RR: 1.04; 95% CI 0.95–1.13, P = 0.38) and complications (RR: 0.96; 95% CI 0.85–1.09, p = 0.54). A significant reduction of the reoperation rate was found in BMPs group (RR: 0.57; 95% CI 0.42–0.77, p = 0.0002). Significant difference was found in the operating time (MD−0.32; 95% CI−0.55, −0.08; P = 0.009), but no significant difference was found in the blood loss, the hospital stay, patient satisfaction, and work status. Conclusion Compared with ICBG, BMPs in lumbar fusion can increase the fusion rate, while reduce the reoperation rate and operating time. However, it doesn’t increase the complication rate, the amount of blood loss and hospital stay. No significant difference was found in the overall success of clinical outcome of the two groups. PMID:24886911

  16. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with transpedicular screw/rod fixation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Hou, Tiesheng; Wang, Xinwei; Ma, Shengzhong

    2003-04-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using threaded cages has gained wide popularity for lumbosacral spinal disease. Our biomechanical tests showed that PLIF using a single diagonal cage with unilateral facetectomy does add a little to spinal stability and provides equal or even higher postoperative stability than PLIF using two posterior cages with bilateral facetectomy. Studies also demonstrated that cages placed using a posterior approach did not cause the same increase in spinal stiffness seen with pedicle screw instrumentation, and we concluded that cages should not be used posteriorly without other forms of fixation. On the other hand, placement of two cages using a posterior approach does have the disadvantage of risk to the bilateral nerve roots. We therefore performed a prospective study to determine whether PLIF can be accomplished by utilizing a single diagonal fusion cage with the application of supplemental transpedicular screw/rod instrumentation. Twenty-seven patients underwent a PLIF using one single fusion cage (BAK, Sulzer Spine-Tech, Minneapolis, MN, USA) inserted posterolaterally and oriented anteromedially on the symptomatic side with unilateral facetectomy and at the same level supplemental fixation with a transpedicular screw/rod system. The internal fixation systems included 12 SOCON spinal systems (Aesculap AG, Germany) and 15 TSRH spinal systems (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, USA). The inclusion criteria were grade 1 to 2 lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis, lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, and recurrent lumbar disc herniations with instability. Patients had at least 1 year of low back pain and/or unilateral sciatica and a severely restricted functional ability in individuals aged 28-55 years. Patients with more than grade 2 spondylolisthesis or adjacent-level degeneration were excluded from the study. Patients were clinically assessed prior to surgery by an independent assessor; they were then reassessed at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24

  17. Neck range of motion following cervical spinal fusion: A comparison of patient-centered and objective assessments.

    PubMed

    Kasliwal, Manish K; Witiw, Christopher D; Traynelis, Vincent C

    2016-12-01

    A common question posed by patients undergoing cervical fusion pertains to the likelihood of perceiving a postoperative limitation in neck mobility. The aim of this study was to assess the change in neck mobility after subaxial cervical fusion using an objective range of motion (ROM) measure and patient reported assessment. Patients older than 18 years of age, undergoing first-time anterior or posterior subaxial cervical arthrodesis for a symptomatic spondylotic process (radiculopathy, cervical spondylotic myelopathy or primary neck pain) at a single center were eligible. Assessment included: 1) neck pain on a numeric rating scale; 2) four-directional objective neck mobility using the validated cervical ROM goniometer; and 3) a novel Mobility Assessment Scale (MAS) for patient perceived neck mobility. Subjects were dichotomized by number of levels fused (1-2 levels and ≥3 levels). There were 25 patients with a mean of 2.7±1.5 levels fused. Neck pain was improved in both groups with mean change of -3.4 [95% CI -4.7,-2.1], p=0.004 for 1-2 levels and -3.5 [95% CI -5.4,-1.5], p=0.009 for ≥3 levels. MAS score improved significantly in group undergoing 1-2 level fusion (-1.8 [95% CI: -3.1,-0.4], p=0.016) but not in those with ≥3 levels fused. There was a significant positive correlation between MAS and neck pain in the 1-2 level fusion group (rs=0.667, p=0.012) but not in the ≥3 level group. Objective neck mobility did not changed significantly in either group. Patient reported neck mobility was significantly improved following 1-2 level cervical fusion. This change correlated significantly with patient reported improvement in neck pain. No significant difference in reported neck mobility was found in those undergoing fusion of ≥3 levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Posterolateral rotatory instability of elbow: An uncommon entity

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Md. Quamar; Iraqi, AA; Syed, Anjum; Abbas, M

    2008-01-01

    Posterolateral rotatory instability of elbow is an exceedingly uncommon entity, which results from injury to the lateral ligamentous complex. Failure of adequate healing of lateral collateral ligaments may necessitate its surgical repair or reconstruction. We describe here a boy 12 years of age who was initially treated as soft tissue injury and later presented with instability of the same elbow. He later required repair of lateral ulnar collateral ligament. PMID:19753166

  19. The posterolateral corner: surgical approach and technique overview.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Jonathan F; Kilcoyne, Kelly; Kluk, Matthew; Rue, John-Paul

    2011-09-01

    Injuries to the posterolateral corner (PLC) of the knee can lead to profound knee instability, especially when combined with anterior cruciate or posterior cruciate ligament injury. With increased recognition of this injury, as well as improved understanding of the pathoanatomy, surgical treatment of these injuries has evolved in favor of acute treatment including reconstructive techniques to minimize recurrent laxity and allow for early rehabilitation. This article describes the approach to the PLC and the technique for figure of 8 reconstruction.

  20. Importance of the different posterolateral knee static stabilizers: biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace; Marques de Almeida, Adriano; Serbino, José Wilson; da Mota Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative importance of the different static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee in cadavers. METHODS Tests were performed with the application of a varus and external rotation force to the knee in extension at 30 and 60 degrees of flexion using 10 cadaver knees. The forces were applied initially to an intact knee and then repeated after a selective sectioning of the ligaments into the following: section of the lateral collateral ligament; section of the lateral collateral ligament and the popliteofibular complex; and section of the lateral collateral ligament, the popliteofibular complex and the posterolateral capsule. The parameters studied were the angular deformity and stiffness when the knees were submitted to a 15 Newton-meter varus torque and a 6 Newton-meter external tibial torque. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and Tukey’s tests. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Our findings showed that the lateral collateral ligament was important in varus stability at 0, 30 and 60 degrees. The popliteofibular complex was the most important structure for external rotation stability at all angles of flexion and was also important for varus stability at 30 and 60 degrees. The posterolateral capsule was important for varus stability at 0 and 30 degrees and for external rotation stability in extension. Level of evidence: Level IV (cadaver study). PMID:20454502

  1. Neurosurgical procedures, spinal nerve roots - one stage removal of thoracic dumb-bell tumor: role of spinal evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Dharmendra Kumar; Singh, Deepak; Tiwari, Bhuwan Chandra; Awasthi, Namarata; Hussain, Nuzhat

    2014-02-01

    We report a rare case of benign thoracic dumb-bell tumor in the upper posterior mediastinum, which was successfully removed by posterolateral thoracotomy and foraminotomy, using intraoperative monitoring of spinal motor-evoked potentials. This technique has many advantages including minimal morbidity and mortality, a single incision, one-step complete resection with adequate exposure, spinal stabilization, avoidance of laminectomy, nerve root identification, and good predicted postoperative function.

  2. Timing and predictors of return to short-term functional activity in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis after posterior spinal fusion: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Roslyn C; OʼLoughlin, Padhraig F; Lynch, Sam; Queally, Joseph M; Sheeran, Padraig; Moore, David P; Kiely, Patrick J

    2014-08-15

    Prospective study. To assess the timing and predictors of return to short-term functional activity in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) after posterior spinal fusion (PSF). Few studies have examined the timing and rate of return to short-term functional activity in patients with AIS after PSF. No study has yet evaluated the timing and factors that predict a delayed return to school/college--a topic relevant to patients who have had or anticipate having spinal fusion, and their treating surgeons. Seventy-seven eligible subjects with AIS who underwent PSF and correction (January 2010 to April 2012) were followed up until return to the functional outcomes under analysis. Timing of return to school/college and physical activity, as per the patients' preoperative level or better, was assessed. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to determine predictors of delayed return to school/college full-time (>16 wk) and unrestricted physical activity (>32 wk) relative to sociodemographic, anthropometric, radiographical, clinical, and surgical factors. In the present study, a "delayed" return to all the functional outcomes recorded was defined as "greater than the 75th percentile" of the continuous distribution. Mean follow-up was 12.8 months (SD, 5.7). Mean age was 15.04 years (SD, 1.89). The median time to return to school/college full-time (n = 75) was 10 weeks; the majority returned by 16 weeks (77.3%). Preoperative curves greater than 70° (relative risk, 3.38; P = 0.008), postoperative weight loss greater than 5 kg (relative risk, 3.02; P = 0.012), and minor perioperative respiratory complication incidence (relative risk, 2.89; P = 0.024) independently predicted delayed return to school/college full-time. By 24 and 52 weeks, 51.4% and 88.5% of subjects, respectively, returned to unrestricted physical activity. At final follow-up, nonreturn to unrestricted physical activity was identified in only 3 subjects (4.3%) because of chronic back pain. The

  3. Maximizing bone formation in posterior spine fusion using rhBMP-2 and zoledronic acid in wild type and NF1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Bobyn, Justin; Rasch, Anton; Kathy, Mikulec; Little, David G; Schindeler, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    Spinal pseudarthrosis is a well described complication of spine fusion surgery in NF1 patients. Reduced bone formation and excessive resorption have been described in NF1 and anti-resorptive agents may be advantageous in these individuals. In this study, 16 wild type and 16 Nf1(+/-) mice were subjected to posterolateral fusion using collagen sponges containing 5 µg rhBMP-2 introduced bilaterally. Mice were dosed twice weekly with 0.02 mg/kg zoledronic acid (ZA) or sterile saline. The fusion mass was assessed for bone volume (BV) and bone mineral density (BMD) by microCT. Co-treatment using rhBMP-2 and ZA produced a significant increase (p < 0.01) in BV of the fusion mass compared to rhBMP-2 alone in both wild type mice (+229%) and Nf1(+/-) mice (+174%). Co-treatment also produced a significantly higher total BMD of the fusion mass compared to rhBMP-2 alone in both groups (p < 0.01). Despite these gains with anti-resorptive treatment, Nf1(+/-) deficient mice still generated less bone than wild type controls. TRAP staining on histological sections indicated an increased osteoclast surface/bone surface (Oc.S/BS) in Nf1(+/-) mice relative to wild type mice, and this was reduced with ZA treatment.

  4. Intraoperative ketamine reduces immediate postoperative opioid consumption after spinal fusion surgery in chronic pain patients with opioid dependency: a randomized, blinded trial.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Siegel, Hanna; Martusevicius, Robertas; Nikolajsen, Lone; Dahl, Jørgen Berg; Mathiesen, Ole

    2017-03-01

    Perioperative handling of surgical patients with opioid dependency represents an important clinical problem. Animal studies suggest that ketamine attenuates central sensitization and hyperalgesia and thereby reduces postoperative opioid tolerance. We hypothesized that intraoperative ketamine would reduce immediate postoperative opioid consumption compared with placebo in chronic pain patients with opioid dependency undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Primary outcome was morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were acute pain at rest and during mobilization 2 to 24 hours postoperatively (visual analogue scale), adverse events, and persistent pain 6 months postoperatively. One hundred fifty patients were randomly assigned to intraoperative S-ketamine bolus 0.5 mg/kg and infusion 0.25 mg·kg·h or placebo. Postoperatively, patients received their usual opioids, paracetamol and IV patient-controlled analgesia with morphine. In the final analyses, 147 patients were included. Patient-controlled analgesia IV morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours postoperatively was significantly reduced in the ketamine group compared with the placebo group: 79 (47) vs 121 (53) mg IV, mean difference 42 mg (95% confidence interval -59 to -25), P < 0.001. Sedation was significantly reduced in the ketamine group 6 and 24 hours postoperatively. There were no significant differences regarding acute pain, nausea, vomiting, hallucinations, or nightmares. Back pain at 6 months postoperatively compared with preoperative pain was significantly more improved in the ketamine group compared with the placebo group, P = 0.005. In conclusion, intraoperative ketamine significantly reduced morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours after lumbar fusion surgery in opioid-dependent patients. The trend regarding less persistent pain 6 months postoperatively needs further investigation.

  5. Radiological outcome of postoperative sagittal balance on standing radiographs in comparison to intraoperative radiographs in prone position when performing lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Greimel, Felix; Wolkerstorfer, Stefanie; Spörrer, Jan-Frederik; Zeman, Florian; Hoffstetter, Patrick; Grifka, Joachim; Benditz, Achim

    2017-07-11

    Aim of this study is to show the outcome of postoperatively measured lumbar lordosis in upright position in comparison to the intraoperatively estimated lumbar lordosis in prone position, as the lumbar lordosis is one of the most important factors for the clinical outcome after spinal fusion. Eighty-two patients, receiving lumbar fusion were included in this retrospective study. Intraoperative radiographs were scanned. Then radiographs of the whole spine pre- and postoperatively, as well as 1 year after surgery were measured by a spine surgeon and a radiologist. The visible segment lordosis angles were measured and compared (L2-S1, L3-S1, L4-S1, L5-S1). In addition, the pelvic parameters pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt and sacral slope were measured pre- and postoperatively. The intraobserver reliability was almost perfect. The mean lordosis angle L4-S1 was 32.6° ± 7.8° intraoperatively and 29° ± 10.8° postoperatively. A linear correlation of these two measurements can be seen. In mean, the postoperative lordosis is 4° smaller than intraoperatively. This trend can also be seen in the level L3-S1. In levels L2-S1 and L5-S1 the postoperative values were slightly higher than intraoperatively, but without any significance. Also, 1 year after surgery there were no significant changes in global lumbar lordosis. Measuring lordosis angles intraoperatively resulted in almost the same values as measurements in standing plane radiographs postoperatively, despite prone position. These findings could especially be shown for the level L4-S1. The intraobserver reliability was almost perfect for both, intra- and postoperative measurements. In conclusion, the intraoperative measurement of a lumbar lordosis angle can perfectly predict the postoperative result.

  6. Posterolateral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a rare, but clinically significant variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Perens, Gregory; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Posterolateral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare variant of HCM. Segmental HCM is seen in 12% of cases of HCM. Among the patterns of segmental HCM, posterolateral HCM is the least common type. Our case of an 18-year old male documents this unusual type of cardiomyopathy. In this form of HCM, left ventricular thickness and the extent of hypertrophy might be underestimated by 2-dimensional echocardiography. This case illustrates the echocardiographic and pathologic features of posterolateral HCM.

  7. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) Reduces Antibiotics Dose and Prevents Antibiotics-Caused Side Effects in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) Patients with Spinal Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yang; Xu, Jinyu; Zhou, Haohan; Dong, Rongpeng; Kang, Mingyang; Zhao, Jianwu

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotics are always considered for surgical site infection (SSI) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. However, the use of antibiotics often causes the antibiotic resistance of pathogens and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to explore natural products as drug candidates. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) has anti-inflammation and anti-bacteria functions. The effects of COS on surgical infection in AIS surgery were investigated. A total of 312 AIS patients were evenly and randomly assigned into control group (CG, each patient took one-gram alternative Azithromycin/Erythromycin/Cloxacillin/Aztreonam/Ceftazidime or combined daily), experiment group (EG, each patient took 20 mg COS and half-dose antibiotics daily), and placebo group (PG, each patient took 20 mg placebo and half-dose antibiotics daily). The average follow-up was one month, and infection severity and side effects were analyzed. The effects of COS on isolated pathogens were analyzed. SSI rates were 2%, 3% and 8% for spine wounds and 1%, 2% and 7% for iliac wound in CG, EG and PG (p < 0.05), respectively. COS reduces the side effects caused by antibiotics (p < 0.05). COS improved biochemical indexes and reduced the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha. COS reduced the antibiotics dose and antibiotics-caused side effects in AIS patients with spinal fusion surgery by improving antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. COS should be developed as potential adjuvant for antibiotics therapies. PMID:28335413

  8. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) Reduces Antibiotics Dose and Prevents Antibiotics-Caused Side Effects in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) Patients with Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yang; Xu, Jinyu; Zhou, Haohan; Dong, Rongpeng; Kang, Mingyang; Zhao, Jianwu

    2017-03-14

    Antibiotics are always considered for surgical site infection (SSI) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. However, the use of antibiotics often causes the antibiotic resistance of pathogens and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to explore natural products as drug candidates. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) has anti-inflammation and anti-bacteria functions. The effects of COS on surgical infection in AIS surgery were investigated. A total of 312 AIS patients were evenly and randomly assigned into control group (CG, each patient took one-gram alternative Azithromycin/Erythromycin/Cloxacillin/Aztreonam/Ceftazidime or combined daily), experiment group (EG, each patient took 20 mg COS and half-dose antibiotics daily), and placebo group (PG, each patient took 20 mg placebo and half-dose antibiotics daily). The average follow-up was one month, and infection severity and side effects were analyzed. The effects of COS on isolated pathogens were analyzed. SSI rates were 2%, 3% and 8% for spine wounds and 1%, 2% and 7% for iliac wound in CG, EG and PG (p < 0.05), respectively. COS reduces the side effects caused by antibiotics (p < 0.05). COS improved biochemical indexes and reduced the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha. COS reduced the antibiotics dose and antibiotics-caused side effects in AIS patients with spinal fusion surgery by improving antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. COS should be developed as potential adjuvant for antibiotics therapies.

  9. Financial incentives for lumbar surgery: a critical analysis of physician reimbursement for decompression and fusion procedures.

    PubMed

    Whang, Peter G; Lim, Moe R; Sasso, Rick C; Skelton, Alta; Brown, Zoe B; Greg Anderson, David; Albert, Todd J; Hilibrand, Alan S; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2008-08-01

    Retrospective case-control study/economic analysis. To determine the treatment times required for isolated lumbar decompressions and for combined decompression and instrumented fusion procedures to compare the relative reimbursements for each type of operation as a function of time expenditure by the surgeon. Under current Medicare fee schedules, the payment for a fusion procedure is higher than of an isolated decompression. It has been recently suggested in the lay press that the greater reimbursement for a lumbar arthrodesis may inappropriately influence the manner in which surgeons elect to treat lumbar degenerative conditions, resulting in what they believe to be a substantial number of unnecessary spinal fusions. A consecutive series of 50 single-level decompression cases performed by single surgeon were retrospectively analyzed and compared with an equivalent cohort of subjects who underwent single-level decompression and instrumented posterolateral fusion with autogenous iliac crest bone grafting. The operative reports, office charts, and billing records were reviewed to determine the total clinical time invested by the surgeon and the Medicare reimbursement for each surgery. Relative to the corresponding values of the decompression group, combined decompression and fusion procedures were associated with a longer mean surgical time (134.6 min vs. 47.3 min, P<0.0001), a greater number of postoperative visits (1.0 vs. 3.2, P<0.0001), a higher mean total clinical time expenditure (186.6 min vs. 62.2 min, P<0.0001), and a lower mean dollars received per minute of surgeon time ($12.51 vs. $15.51, P<0.001). These findings challenge the assertion that spine surgeons have an undue financial incentive to recommend a combined decompression and instrumented fusion procedure over an isolated decompression to patients with symptomatic lumbar degeneration, especially when considering the greater time, effort, and risk characteristic of this more complex operation.

  10. Lumbar lordosis restoration following single-level instrumented fusion comparing 4 commonly used techniques.

    PubMed

    Dimar, John R; Glassman, Steven D; Vemuri, Venu M; Esterberg, Justin L; Howard, Jennifer M; Carreon, Leah Y

    2011-11-09

    A major sequelae of lumbar fusion is acceleration of adjacent-level degeneration due to decreased lumbar lordosis. We evaluated the effectiveness of 4 common fusion techniques in restoring lordosis: instrumented posterolateral fusion, translumbar interbody fusion, anteroposterior fusion with posterior instrumentation, and anterior interbody fusion with lordotic threaded (LT) cages (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee). Radiographs were measured preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and a minimum of 6 months postoperatively. Parameters measured included anterior and posterior disk space height, lumbar lordosis from L3 to S1, and surgical level lordosis.No significant difference in demographics existed among the 4 groups. All preoperative parameters were similar among the 4 groups. Lumbar lordosis at final follow-up showed no difference between the anteroposterior fusion with posterior instrumentation, translumbar interbody fusion, and LT cage groups, although the posterolateral fusion group showed a significant loss of lordosis (-10°) (P<.001). Immediately postoperatively and at follow-up, the LT cage group had a significantly greater amount of lordosis and showed maintenance of anterior and posterior disk space height postoperatively compared with the other groups. Instrumented posterolateral fusion produces a greater loss of lordosis compared with anteroposterior fusion with posterior instrumentation, translumbar interbody fusion, and LT cages. Maintenance of lordosis and anterior and posterior disk space height is significantly better with anterior interbody fusion with LT cages. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Reporting of industry funded study outcome data: comparison of confidential and published data on the safety and effectiveness of rhBMP-2 for spinal fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Mark A; Brown, Jennifer V E; Heirs, Morag K; Higgins, Julian P T; Mannion, Richard J; Simmonds, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether published results of industry funded trials of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) in spinal fusion match underlying trial data by comparing three different data sources: individual participant data, internal industry reports, and publicly available journal publications and conference abstracts. Data collection and synthesis The manufacturer of rhBMP-2 products (Medtronic; Minneapolis, MN) provided complete individual participant data and internal reports for all its studies of rhMBP-2 in spinal fusion. We identified publications and conference abstracts through comprehensive literature searches. We compared outcomes provided in the individual participant data against outcomes reported in publications. For effectiveness outcomes, we compared meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials based on each of the three data sources. For adverse events, meta-analysis of the published aggregate data was not possible and we compared the number and type of adverse events reported between data sources. Results 32 publications reported outcomes from 11 of the 17 existing manufacturer sponsored studies. For individual randomised controlled trials, 56% (9/16) to 88% (15/17) of effectiveness outcomes known to have been collected were reported in the published literature. Meta-analyses of effectiveness data were almost identical for pain outcomes and similar for fusion across the three data sources. A minority of adverse event data known to have been collected were reported in the published literature. Several journal articles reported only “serious,” “related,” or “unanticipated” adverse events, without defining these terms. Others reported a small proportion of the collected adverse event categories. Around 23% (533/2302) of the total adverse events collected in published randomised controlled trials have been reported in the literature, with randomised controlled trials evaluating the licensed preparation (Infuse

  12. Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OSCS): review of the literature and case report demonstrating challenges of spinal fusion after trauma.

    PubMed

    Katsevman, Gennadiy A; Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Sedney, Cara L; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-06-01

    Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OSCS) is a rare but well-described pathology characterized by abnormalities in bone deposition in the axial and cranial skeleton as well as other abnormalities and associated deficits. These skeletal abnormalities can lead to significant intra-operative challenges for the surgeon and influence outcomes for the patient. In this report, we present a case of a patient with OSCS who was involved in a traumatic motor vehicle crash and underwent posterior cervico-thoracic fusion for a T4 chance fracture. Bony abnormalities in the cervico-thoracic spine presented a significant operative challenge due to alterations in bony anatomy and bone architecture. This case serves as an example of the challenges that the spine surgeon faces when dealing with OSCS, and highlights the differences between OSCS and commoner skeletal hyperplasias such as osteopetrosis.

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the posterolateral ligament complex.

    PubMed

    Rue, John-Paul; Kilcoyne, Kelly; Dickens, Jonathan; Kluk, Matthew

    2011-09-01

    Posterolateral corner (PLC) injuries are an often unrecognized and disabling injury that frequently accompanies other ligamentous disruptions. The spectrum of injury severity and heterogeneity of treatment options have made comparison of outcomes difficult. Several clinical studies and reviews have focused on the outcomes and treatment algorithms of knee dislocations or multiligamentous knee injuries. There is, however, a paucity of data in the literature analyzing the clinical outcomes and treatment recommendations of isolated PLC injuries or PLC injuries in combination with a single cruciate ligament tear. Furthermore, to our knowledge there is no review that analyzes the different repair or reconstructive techniques and assesses the clinical outcomes of these techniques.

  14. Posterolateral instability of the knee: evaluation, treatment, results.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce A; Stuart, Michael J; Whelan, Daniel B

    2010-12-01

    Injuries to the fibular collateral ligament and posterolateral corner are uncommon, and are usually associated with other ligamentous injuries-in particular, the anterior cruciate ligament and/or posterior cruciate ligament, leading to significant functional impairment. The most common mechanism of injury for this area of the knee involves a combined hyperextension and varus force that is frequently of high energy. As these injuries occur typically in the setting of a multiligament-injured knee, the diagnosis and surgical reconstruction can be extremely challenging. This chapter will discuss the diagnosis of these injuries, including physical examination and imaging techniques, surgical timing, technical considerations, current controversies in management, and postoperative rehabilitation.

  15. Results and complications after spinal fusion for neuromuscular scoliosis in cerebral palsy and static encephalopathy using luque galveston instrumentation: experience in 93 patients.

    PubMed

    Lonstein, John E; Koop, Steven E; Novachek, Tom F; Perra, Joseph H

    2012-04-01

    were minor, not requiring additional care or surgery. Seven patients had a pseudarthrosis (7.5%), presenting at an average of 30 months postoperatively. Eight patients underwent 9 procedures for late complications: 5 for repair of a pseudarthrosis, 3 for removal of a prominent iliac screw, and 1 for superior junctional kyphosis. All the pseudarthrosis repairs were solid at follow-up. Spinal fusion in neuromuscular scoliosis with Luque-Galveston technique is a safe and effective procedure. Any early complication increased the length of stay, with a low rate of reoperation during the hospitalization. The majority of late complications were minor, not requiring additional care. Pseudarthroses were detected late and were the main reason for additional surgery.

  16. Posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using a convex pedicle screw technique: a novel concept of deformity correction.

    PubMed

    Tsirikos, A I; Mataliotakis, G; Bounakis, N

    2017-08-01

    We present the results of correcting a double or triple curve adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using a convex segmental pedicle screw technique. We reviewed 191 patients with a mean age at surgery of 15 years (11 to 23.3). Pedicle screws were placed at the convexity of each curve. Concave screws were inserted at one or two cephalad levels and two caudal levels. The mean operating time was 183 minutes (132 to 276) and the mean blood loss 0.22% of the total blood volume (0.08% to 0.4%). Multimodal monitoring remained stable throughout the operation. The mean hospital stay was 6.8 days (5 to 15). The mean post-operative follow-up was 5.8 years (2.5 to 9.5). There were no neurological complications, deep wound infection, obvious nonunion or need for revision surgery. Upper thoracic scoliosis was corrected by a mean 68.2% (38% to 48%, p < 0.001). Main thoracic scoliosis was corrected by a mean 71% (43.5% to 8.9%, p < 0.001). Lumbar scoliosis was corrected by a mean 72.3% (41% to 90%, p < 0.001). No patient lost more than 3° of correction at follow-up. The thoracic kyphosis improved by 13.1° (-21° to 49°, p < 0.001); the lumbar lordosis remained unchanged (p = 0.58). Coronal imbalance was corrected by a mean 98% (0% to 100%, p < 0.001). Sagittal imbalance was corrected by a mean 96% (20% to 100%, p < 0.001). The Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire score improved from a mean 3.6 to 4.6 (2.4 to 4, p < 0.001); patient satisfaction was a mean 4.9 (4.8 to 5). This technique carries low neurological and vascular risks because the screws are placed in the pedicles of the convex side of the curve, away from the spinal cord, cauda equina and the aorta. A low implant density (pedicle screw density 1.2, when a density of 2 represents placement of pedicle screws bilaterally at every instrumented segment) achieved satisfactory correction of the scoliosis, an improved thoracic kyphosis and normal global sagittal balance. Both patient satisfaction and functional

  17. Estimation of the Ideal Lumbar Lordosis to Be Restored From Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Predictive Formula for Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Xu, Leilei; Qin, Xiaodong; Zhang, Wen; Qiao, Jun; Liu, Zhen; Zhu, Zezhang; Qiu, Yong; Qian, Bang-ping

    2015-07-01

    A prospective, cross-sectional study. To determine the independent variables associated with lumbar lordosis (LL) and to establish the predictive formula of ideal LL in Chinese population. Several formulas have been established in Caucasians to estimate the ideal LL to be restored for lumbar fusion surgery. However, there is still a lack of knowledge concerning the establishment of such predictive formula in Chinese population. A total of 296 asymptomatic Chinese adults were prospectively recruited. The relationships between LL and variables including pelvic incidence (PI), age, sex, and body mass index were investigated to determine the independent factors that could be used to establish the predictive formula. For the validation of the current formula, other 4 reported predictive formulas were included. The absolute value of the gap between the actual LL and the ideal LL yielded by these formulas was calculated and then compared between the 4 reported formulas and the current one to determine its reliability in predicting the ideal LL. The logistic regression analysis showed that there were significant associations of LL with PI and age (R = 0.508, P < 0.001 for PI; R = 0.088, P = 0.03 for age). The formula was, therefore, established as follows: LL = 0.508 × PI - 0.088 × Age + 28.6. When applying our formula to these subjects, the gap between the predicted ideal LL and the actual LL was averaged 3.9 ± 2.1°, which was significantly lower than that of the other 4 formulas. The calculation formula derived in this study can provide a more accurate prediction of the LL for the Chinese population, which could be used as a tool for decision making to restore the LL in lumbar corrective surgery. 3.

  18. A preliminary study of volatile agents or total intravenous anesthesia for neurophysiological monitoring during posterior spinal fusion in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Bhalla, Tarun; Thung, Arlyne; Rice, Julie; Beebe, Allan; Samora, Walter; Klamar, Jan; Tobias, Joseph D

    2014-10-15

    A prospective randomized controlled trial. The purpose of this study was to prospectively compare the efficacy of neurophysiological monitoring during general anesthesia with either a total intravenous technique or with the volatile anesthetic agent, desflurane. A total intravenous anesthetic technique is generally chosen when neurophysiological monitoring is used as it has been shown to facilitate such monitoring. Despite this, with prolonged infusions of propofol, prolonged awakening times may be seen, which may impact the time required for postoperative neurological assessment or more importantly result in significant delays, should a wake-up test become necessary. To date, there are no prospective trials comparing intravenous techniques with a volatile agent-based anesthetic technique and its effects on neurophysiological monitoring. This prospective study compares somatosensory evoked potential and motor evoked potential monitoring during posterior spinal fusion in 30 adolescents. The patients were randomized to receive a total intravenous technique with propofol-remifentanil or a volatile agent-based technique with desflurane-remifentanil. The groups were similar with regard to age, weight, height, body mass index, Cobb angle, and distribution of Lenke classifications. No differences were noted in anesthesia time, surgery time, intraoperative fluids, or estimated blood loss between the 2 groups. Time to eye opening, time to following commands, and time to tracheal extubation were shorter in the volatile anesthesia group than the total intravenous anesthesia group. No clinically significant difference was noted in the amplitude or latency of somatosensory evoked potential monitoring. Although statistically significantly greater voltage amplitude was required to generate a motor evoked potential, the voltage amount was within a clinically acceptable range. Our data demonstrate that a volatile agent-based anesthetic regimen is feasible even during

  19. Administrative database concerns: accuracy of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision coding is poor for preoperative anemia in patients undergoing spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Bohl, Daniel D; Basques, Bryce A; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-11-15

    Cross-sectional study. To objectively evaluate the ability of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes, which are used as the foundation for administratively coded national databases, to identify preoperative anemia in patients undergoing spinal fusion. National database research in spine surgery continues to rise. However, the validity of studies based on administratively coded data, such as the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, are dependent on the accuracy of ICD-9 coding. Such coding has previously been found to have poor sensitivity to conditions such as obesity and infection. A cross-sectional study was performed at an academic medical center. Hospital-reported anemia ICD-9 codes (those used for administratively coded databases) were directly compared with the chart-documented preoperative hematocrits (true laboratory values). A patient was deemed to have preoperative anemia if the preoperative hematocrit was less than the lower end of the normal range (36.0% for females and 41.0% for males). The study included 260 patients. Of these, 37 patients (14.2%) were anemic; however, only 10 patients (3.8%) received an "anemia" ICD-9 code. Of the 10 patients coded as anemic, 7 were anemic by definition, whereas 3 were not, and thus were miscoded. This equates to an ICD-9 code sensitivity of 0.19, with a specificity of 0.99, and positive and negative predictive values of 0.70 and 0.88, respectively. This study uses preoperative anemia to demonstrate the potential inaccuracies of ICD-9 coding. These results have implications for publications using databases that are compiled from ICD-9 coding data. Furthermore, the findings of the current investigation raise concerns regarding the accuracy of additional comorbidities. Although administrative databases are powerful resources that provide large sample sizes, it is crucial that we further consider the quality of the data source relative to its intended purpose.

  20. [Ankle arthrodesis with an posterolateral approach using a polyaxial angle stable Talarlock® plate].

    PubMed

    Gutteck, N; Lebek, S; Zeh, A; Gradl, G; Delank, K-S; Wohlrab, D

    2013-12-01

    Safe arthrodesis of the ankle as well as load carrying capacity free of pain. Painful arthritis of the ankle joint occurring idiopathic or posttraumatic, resulting from rheumatoid arthritis or neuromuscular diseases. Extensive bony defects in varus or valgus ankle deformities and after failed prosthesis. Complex hindfoot deformities in neurological disease, paralysis and instabilities. Joint destruction after infection. Active osteitis, extensive skin ulcers in the approach area, periphery artery occlusive disease. Posterolateral skin incision. Sparing cartilage resection. Penetrating sclerosis zones. Reorientating anatomic positioning of the talus thereby correcting axis deformities. Talarlock(®) plate positioning and tibiotalar arthrodesis. Full weight bearing in an arthodesis boot for 6 weeks. After bone grafting partial weight bearing (20 kg) in an arthrodesis boot for 8 weeks. Full weight bearing after 10weeks. Ten patients were operated on using this procedure. The follow-up time was 1 year. There were no complications requiring further surgical procedures. Ankle fusion and a good clinical outcome could be achieved in all cases.

  1. Prospective outcomes evaluation after decompression with or without instrumented fusion for lumbar stenosis and degenerative Grade I spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Ghogawala, Zoher; Benzel, Edward C; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Barker, Fred G; Harrington, J Fred; Magge, Subu N; Strugar, John; Coumans, Jean-Valéry C E; Borges, Lawrence F

    2004-10-01

    There is considerable debate among spine surgeons regarding whether fusion should be used to augment decompressive surgery in patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis involving Grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis. The authors prospectively evaluated the outcomes of patients treated between 2000 and 2002 at two institutions to determine whether fusion improves functional outcome 1 year after surgery. Patients ranged in age from 50 to 81 years. They presented with degenerative Grade I (3- to 14-mm) spondylolisthesis and lumbar stenosis without gross instability (< 3 mm of motion at the level of subluxation). Those in whom previous surgery had been performed at the level of subluxation were excluded. Each patient completed Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaires preoperatively and at 6 to 12 months postoperatively. Some patients underwent decompression alone (20 cases), whereas others underwent decompression and posterolateral instrumentation-assisted fusion (14 cases), at the treating surgeon's discretion. Baseline demographic data, radiographic features, and ODI and SF-36 scores were similar in both groups. The 1-year fusion rate was 93%. Both forms of surgery independently improved outcome compared with baseline status, based on ODI and SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) results (p < 0.001). Decompression combined with fusion led to an improvement in ODI scores of 27.5 points, whereas decompression alone was associated with a 13.6-point increase (p = 0.02). Analysis of the SF-36 PCS data also demonstrated a significant intergroup difference (p = 0.003). Surgery substantially improved 1-year outcomes based on established outcomes instruments in patients with Grade I spondylolisthesis and stenosis. Fusion was associated with greater functional improvement.

  2. Spinal anomalies in Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moore, M H; Lodge, M L; Clark, B E

    1995-05-01

    Review of the spinal radiographs of a consecutive series of 11 patients with Pfeiffer syndrome presenting to the Australian Craniofacial Unit was performed. The prevalence of cervical spine fusions was high, and the pattern of fusion complex. Isolated anomalies were evident at lower levels, including two cases of sacrococcygeal eversion. Spinal anomalies occur more frequently in the more severely involved cases of Pfeiffer syndrome emphasizing the generalized dysostotic nature of this condition.

  3. An Innovative Intra-articular Osteotomy in the Treatment of Posterolateral Tibial Plateau Fracture Malunion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yukai; Luo, Congfeng; Hu, Chengfang; Sun, Hui; Zhan, Yu

    2016-07-13

    Posterolateral tibial plateau fractures are not uncommon and the diagnosis can be easily missed. The treatment is technically demanding, which can easily lead to malunion of the posterolateral tibial plateau fracture. Here, we describe an innovative intra-articular osteotomy for the treatment of posterolateral tibial plateau fracture malunion. From 2010 through 2012, 13 patients with a posterolateral tibial plateau fracture malunion were treated in our trauma center. The patients were referred because of instability or knee pain. The instability was confirmed by physical examinations preoperatively. The depression malunion and lower limb alignment were evaluated on X-rays and computed tomography scans. All posterolateral tibial plateau fracture malunions were treated with an innovative intra-articular osteotomy via an extended anterolateral approach. The mean follow-up was 19.6 months (range, 14-28 months). The posterolateral osteotomy healed at an average of 15.1 weeks. The depression malunion was corrected in all patients, which was from 15.4 mm preoperatively to 3.3 mm at 12 months postoperatively. The average Lysholm, Knee Society Score, and visual analog scale scores were 91.7, 92.5, and 0.5, respectively. No loss of reduction, nonunion, or wound infection was observed. An innovative intra-articular osteotomy via an extended anterolateral approach is an effective treatment for posterolateral tibial plateau fracture malunion. The treatment achieved satisfactory functional results and knee stability restoration.

  4. Histological Evaluation of Hydroxyapatite Granules with and without Platelet-Rich Plasma versus an Autologous Bone Graft: Comparative study of biomaterials used for spinal fusion in a New Zealand white rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Zamzuri; Seman, Che N Z C; Buyong, Zunariah; Sharifudin, Mohd A; Zulkifly, Ahmad H; Khalid, Kamarul A

    2016-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has osteoconductive properties and is widely used as a bone graft substitute. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous product with osteoinductive effects. Hypothetically, a combination of both would augment the bone formation effect of HA and widen its application in spinal fusion surgeries. This study aimed to compare new bone formation with HA granules alone and in combination with PRP versus an autologous bone graft during a lumbar intertransverse process spinal fusion. A total of 16 adult New Zealand white rabbits underwent single-level bilateral intertransverse process fusion at the L5-L6 vertebrae. One side of the spine received either HA granules alone or a combination of HA granules