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Sample records for postgraduate surgical training

  1. The development of postgraduate surgical training in Guyana

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Brian H.; Rambaran, Madan; Sharma, Deen P.; Taylor, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Like many developing countries, Guyana has a severe shortage of surgeons. Rather than rely on overseas training, Guyana developed its own Diploma in Surgery and asked for assistance from the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS). This paper reviews the initial results of Guyana’s first postgraduate training program. Methods We assisted with program prerequisites, including needs assessment, proposed curriculum, University of Guyana and Ministry of Health approval, external partnership and funding. We determined the outputs and outcomes of the program after 2 years, and we evaluated the impact of the program through a quantitative/qualitative questionnaire administered to all program participants. Results Five residents successfully completed the 2-year program and are working in regional hospitals. Another 9 residents are in the training program. Twenty-four modules or short courses have been facilitated, alternating Guyanese with visiting Canadian surgical faculty members coordinated through CAGS. A postgraduate structure, including an Institute for Health Sciences Education and Surgical Postgraduate Education Committee, has been developed at the Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation (GPHC). An examination structure similar to Canada’s has been established. Hospital staff morale is greater, surgical care is more standardized and academic opportunities have been enhanced at GPHC. Four regional hospitals have welcomed the new graduates, and surgical services have already improved. Canadian surgeons have a greater understanding of and commitment to surgical development in low-income countries. Conclusion Guyana has proven that, with visiting faculty assistance, it can mount its own postgraduate training suitable to national needs and will provide a career path to encourage its own doctors to remain and serve their country. PMID:20100407

  2. The Development of an Electronic Portfolio for Postgraduate Surgical Training in Flanders.

    PubMed

    Peeraer, G; Van Humbeeck, B; De Leyn, P; Delvaux, G; Hubens, G; Pattyn, P; De Win, G

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary surgical postgraduate training is characterized by clear outcomes for the profession and an assessment program that shows that trainees master these outcomes. The tool used to collect assessment and feedback instruments is the portfolio, nowadays used in many countries worldwide. The four Flemish surgical coordinators, together with experts from different universities, devised an electronic portfolio. This portfolio holds both the logbook, as imposed by the evaluation committee and assessment instruments used for the Master in Specialized Medicine. The e-portfolio is now used by a number of surgical trainees and has been approved by the evaluation committee. In 1015, all Flemish surgical trainees will be using one and the same e-portfolio. Although the e-portfolio for surgical training has now been devised and accepted by all major parties involved, a lot of work has to be done to implement the instrument. As resident duty hours show no improvement on education in surgery (but rather a perception of worsened education) surgery training is fazing huge challenges.

  3. The Development of an Electronic Portfolio for Postgraduate Surgical Training in Flanders.

    PubMed

    Peeraer, G; Van Humbeeck, B; De Leyn, P; Delvaux, G; Hubens, G; Pattyn, P; De Win, G

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary surgical postgraduate training is characterized by clear outcomes for the profession and an assessment program that shows that trainees master these outcomes. The tool used to collect assessment and feedback instruments is the portfolio, nowadays used in many countries worldwide. The four Flemish surgical coordinators, together with experts from different universities, devised an electronic portfolio. This portfolio holds both the logbook, as imposed by the evaluation committee and assessment instruments used for the Master in Specialized Medicine. The e-portfolio is now used by a number of surgical trainees and has been approved by the evaluation committee. In 2015, all Flemish surgical trainees will be using one and the same e-portfolio. Although the e-portfolio for surgical training has now been devised and accepted by all major parties involved, a lot of work has to be done to implement the instrument. As resident duty hours show no improvement on education in surgery (but rather a perception of worsened education) surgery training is fazing huge challenges. Copyright© Acta Chirurgica Belgica.

  4. Postgraduate surgical education and training in Canada and Australia: each may benefit from the other's experiences.

    PubMed

    Pollett, William G; Waxman, Bruce P

    2012-09-01

    Canada and Australia share similar cultural origins and current multicultural societies and demographics but there are differences in climate and sporting pursuits. Surgeons and surgeon teachers similarly share many of the same challenges, but the health care and health-care education systems differ in significant ways. The objective of this review is to detail the different postgraduate surgical training programs with a focus on general surgery and how the programs of each country may benefit from appreciating the experiences of the other. The major differences relate to entry requirements, the role of universities in governance of training, mandatory skills courses in early training, the accreditation process, remuneration for surgical teachers and the impact of private practice. Many of the differences are culturally entrenched in their respective medical systems and unlikely to change substantially. Direct entry into specialty training without an internship per se is now firmly established in Canada just as delayed entry after internship is mandated by the Australian Medical Board. Both recognize the importance of establishing goals and objectives, modular curricular and the emerging role of online educational resources and how these may impact on assessments. The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons is unlikely to cede much responsibility to the universities but alternative academic models are emerging. Private health care in the two countries differs, but there are increasing opportunities for training in the private sector in Australia. In spite of the differences, both provide excellent health care and surgical training opportunities in an environment with significant fiscal, technological and societal challenges. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  5. Systematic Review of Postgraduate Surgical Education in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    Surgical care is recognized as an important component of public health, however, many low- and middle- income countries (LMICs) are faced with a shortage of trained personnel. In response to this unmet need, many countries have developed local postgraduate training programs in surgery. This study aims to characterize general surgery postgraduate education in LMICs. PubMed, EMBASE, and Global Index Medicus databases were searched for articles related to postgraduate general surgery education in LMICs. Studies in other surgical specialties and those published prior to 1990 were excluded. Data were collected on the characteristics of postgraduate training programs. Sixty-four articles discussed postgraduate surgical education in LMICs. Programs in 34 different countries and 6 different regions were represented. Nine countries were low-income, 12 were low-middle-income, and 13 were upper-middle-income countries. Sixty-four articles described aspects of the local postgraduate training program. Prior to postgraduate training, residents complete an undergraduate medical degree with 19 programs describing a pre-training experience such as internship. Surgical curricula were broad-based to prepare trainees to work in low-resource settings. At the completion of postgraduate training, examination formats varied including oral, written, and clinical exams. Postgraduate general surgery programs ranged from 2.5 to 7 years. Postgraduate surgical education is one mechanism to increase surgical capacity in LMICs. Different strategies have been employed to improve surgical education in LMICs and learning from these programs can optimize surgical education across teaching sites.

  6. The future of postgraduate training.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Improvements to postgraduate training have included newly designed postgraduate curricula, new forms of delivery of learning, more valid and reliable assessments, and more rigorous evaluation of training programmes. All these changes have been necessary and have now started to settle in. Now therefore is an appropriate time to look to the future of postgraduate training. Predicting the future is difficult in any course of life-however an examination of recent trends is often a good place to start. In this regard the recent trend to start to produce more doctors and healthcare professionals of the type that the population needs is likely to continue for some time to come. Medical education will also need to be more flexible in the future. The more flexible that training programmes are, the more likely that we will have experts that are sufficiently flexible to meet a range of different challenges throughout the rest of their careers. Medical education will also become more seamless in the future (at present there are probably too many major milestones and transitions in medical education). In the future educators will make much more use of technology enhanced learning, e-learning and simulation in postgraduate medical education. There will also be more pressure on postgraduate training programmes to offer value for money and to be able to demonstrate such value for money. Postgraduate medical education of the future will also be a more personalised and adaptive experience. It will be far more based on learners' individual needs and will be more responsive to those needs. Lastly postgraduate education will be much more closely supervised than it has been in the past. A common theme running through these changes will be patient centredness. This will mean safer training programmes that produce the type of doctors that patients and populations need.

  7. Postgraduate psychiatric training in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ratta-Apha, Woraphat; Sitdhiraksa, Nantawat; Saisavoey, Nattha; Lortrakul, Manote; Udomratn, Pichet

    2009-01-01

    In Thailand, after medical students graduated from medical schools, the general practitioners have to work for the government for at least three years. Then, they can enroll in postgraduate training program. Postgraduate training usually takes three to four years. All of the psychiatric training programs are supervised and monitored by the board of education of the Royal College of Psychiatrists of Thailand (RCPsychT). One of the missions of all training institutes is to prepare residents to be the high qualified psychiatrists to serve the mental well-being of Thai people. Additionally, they should teach the learners to be the leaders in academic and research fields in psychiatry. Currently, there are nine psychiatric training institutions in Thailand, most of which are running by university programs. The training program core curriculum composes of the compulsory rotations such as general psychiatry, child and adolescent psychiatry, neurology, consultation-liaison psychiatry, mental hospital psychiatry and addiction psychiatry. Moreover, the residents also have three months for elective in each program. The learning process includes practicing in an out-patient and in-patient unit under psychiatric staff supervision, individual and group supervision, case conference, journal club, book club and grand round etc. Research in field of psychiatry and social sciences is also compulsory for board examination. The RCPsychT approved two Certificate Diplomas including Diploma of Thai Board of Psychiatry, and Diploma of Thai Board of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. There are only nine psychiatric training institutes and only thirty to forty residents enrolled in these programs in each year. The compact and collaboration of all training institutes bring about the benefits in efficiency programs management by regular meeting of representatives from each institute. They keep the standard of training program to progress in the same vision and direction. Furthermore, residents

  8. [A new form of postgraduate medical training: evaluating the status of operationalised postgraduate training].

    PubMed

    Beer, André-Michael; Fey, Stefan; Siebolds, Marcus; Kiwitt, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Following structured forms of postgraduate training, which are already in use internationally, there are more and more reports on operationalised procedures of postgraduate training in Germany as well. The transparency, which is required by law in order to make medical postgraduate training demonstrable in terms of Sect. 8 of the new regulation on postgraduate training, creates a demand for evaluations. However, only 10 to 20% of the participants in postgraduate training use these evaluations to demonstrate their results scientifically. The aim of the present paper was to show that--with regard to content--the conceptual integration of operationalised programmes for postgraduate training is able to compensate for the given limited time frames and formally tightened structures of postgraduate training in the sense of the quality assurance required by the legislator. The evaluation showed that this can be made possible through ensuring the participants' satisfaction and achieving the goals of postgraduate training.

  9. Evaluation of the educational environment of postgraduate surgical teaching.

    PubMed

    Khan, Junaid Sarfraz

    2008-01-01

    Medical Education is becoming increasingly community-oriented, student-centred, self-learning and self & peer-assessing process especially in the undergraduate years. This is happening because of increasing patient awareness of their rights in our new healthcare world of increased consultant responsibility; and implementation in the U.K. health institutions of the 'European Working Time Directive' and 'Modernization of Medical Careers'. The study was conducted to determine the change if any in the education environment of postgraduate surgical teaching in a leading teaching hospital in London when a teacher-centred, old-fashioned postgraduate teaching approach was replaced with a student-centred, self-assessment, portfolio-based approach. Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM). Twenty postgraduate trainees filled in the questionnaire before and after the change in their learning/teaching pattern. The response rate was 100%. No statistically significant difference in the overall score for the two teaching environments (p = 0.8024, 95% CI = -5.549273 to 4.349273) was found, because the loss of on-call rooms, trainee's mess and catering services statistically significantly deteriorated the social support subscale of the PHEEM scale (p < 0.0001, 95% CI = 6.66752 to 13.03248) to counteract any statistically significant improvement in the teaching role perception subscale of the instrument (p = 0.001, 95% CI= -12.443896 to -4.856104). There was no statistically significant difference in the role autonomy perception subscale in the two methods (p = 0.3663, 95% CI = -5.870437 to 2.270437). A student-centred approach to postgraduate teaching is better than a teacher-centred approach. However, further studies will be needed to evaluate both postgraduate teaching and training environment.

  10. Postgraduate training in psychiatry in India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shridhar

    2010-01-01

    This review traces the evolution of modern medical education in India on the one hand and the formation of the Indian Psychiatric Society and the progress of postgraduate psychiatric education on the other hand, all in the context of Indian psychiatry. The topic is covered under the headings standard of psychiatric education, the goals, competencies required, impact of psychiatric disorders, relation of medicine to psychiatry, and the directions for the future of postgraduate psychiatric training. PMID:21836724

  11. Postgraduate Training in Student Learning and Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpay, E.; Mendes-Tatsis, M. A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an experiential postgraduate training program for student learning and supervision involving laboratory and pilot plant supervisions in the chemical engineering field. The program addresses some of the current concerns about non-technical training and the further development of the broad science and engineering knowledge of postgraduate…

  12. IT in Post-Graduate Teacher Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellar, Harvey; Jackson, A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a survey of teachers enrolling in postgraduate courses in Great Britain that was conducted to determine prior information technology experience and what the students perceived as information technology training needs. Highlights include differences between primary and secondary teachers, gender issues, age, and computer ownership. (16…

  13. Postgraduate training in orthodontics in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Anwar Ali; Sandler, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This article briefly describes the postgraduate pathways in orthodontics in the United Kingdom. It is hoped that this will assist potential trainees who want to pursue postgraduate training to understand the different career pathways available to them. It may also add to the knowledge of some senior colleagues who can explain these career opportunities to their students, as not all potential trainees will have the opportunity to read this article. In the following pages we will discuss the different pathways leading to specialist qualification in orthodontics, in the United Kingdom. PMID:23960517

  14. Postgraduate Research Training: Some Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calma, Angelito

    2011-01-01

    This three-year study of research training policy and practice involved government and university executives, and university academics from the Philippines. A total of 53 participants were involved: two officials from the Commission on Higher Education, six directors of research centres, 28 university executives and 17 academic staff. Seven public…

  15. Postgraduate Research Training: Some Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calma, Angelito

    2011-01-01

    This three-year study of research training policy and practice involved government and university executives, and university academics from the Philippines. A total of 53 participants were involved: two officials from the Commission on Higher Education, six directors of research centres, 28 university executives and 17 academic staff. Seven public…

  16. [Postgraduate neurology training in new clinical training system].

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Toshihide

    2004-11-01

    Postgraduate neurology training in new clinical training system in Oita University Hospital was presented. Clinical intern training for first 2 years are performed according to programs proposed by Clinical Training Institute for Interns in Oita University Hospital. This program includes neurology for at least 1 month. Interns will get in clinical management for common and main neurological disorders such as convulsion, unconsciousness, stroke, Parkinson disease and intractable neurological disorders in addition to standard medical skills. Neurology resident training for specialist begins after clinical intern training and is performed in own program proposed by our department. However, the level of educational and training quality is not always high, because of the lack of teaching staff, and insufficient curriculums without rotation system to neuropathology and neuroradiology. To improve this educational program, we need to alter own well-established postgraduate educational programs. The quality of programs must to be approved by Japanese Society of Neurology.

  17. The motivation to learn: efficacy and relevance of the Oswestry postgraduate orthopaedic training programme.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Jones, R. L.; Wade, R.; Richardson, J. B.

    1998-01-01

    The efficacy and relevance of medical education has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. The shortening of basic surgical training and the introduction of 'seamless' higher surgical training has placed greater emphasis on the quality of education provided/facilitated by trainers. Additionally, study leave budgets are under increasing pressure from trainees wishing to attend courses or conferences, and regional postgraduate deans who wish to see a proportionally greater amount of training on an 'in-house' basis. Against this background we have reviewed the learning opportunities available on the Oswestry postgraduate programme to see if these opportunities provide adequate motivation to learn for the trainee. PMID:9771229

  18. Postgraduate medical education and specialist training in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chew, C H; Chee, Y C

    2005-07-01

    The Singapore Medical School celebrates its Centenary in 2005. This historical review is presented on Singapore's postgraduate medical education and specialist training programmes. The special informal role of the Alumni Association and its members during the early years and soon after World War II is highlighted. Postgraduate education and specialist training was more formalised only during the challenging years when Singapore became more autonomous and politically independent with the establishment of the Academy of Medicine, the School's postgraduate medical studies, the Singapore Medical Association, specialist societies and, more recently, the College of Family Physicians. Specialist training programmes and the process of specialist accreditation are also outlined. While Singapore has gone far towards developing a comprehensive programme of postgraduate medical education and specialist training, the process is still evolving and can be improved upon. As long as we keep pace with relevant and realistic strategies, the future for postgraduate medical training and specialist training should be assured.

  19. Implementing portfolio in postgraduate general practice training. Benefits and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Fawaz S

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a review to explore the literature focusing on portfolio in postgraduate general practice (GP) training, and to examine the impact of implementation of portfolio on learning process, as well as proposing recommendations for its implementation in postgraduate GP training. An electronic search was carried out on several databases for studies addressing portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Six articles were included to address specifically the effectiveness of portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Five of them described successful experiences of portfolio-based learning implementation. Only one article addressed portfolio-based assessment in postgraduate GP training. The existing evidence provides various benefits of professional portfolio-based learning. It does appear to have advantages of stimulating reflective learning, promoting proactive learning, and bridging the hospital experiences of the learners to GP. Moreover, the challenges to implementation of portfolio-based learning are often based on orientation and training of stakeholders.

  20. Postgraduate training and assessment in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Liang, Raymond H S

    2011-03-01

    The Hong Kong Academy of Medicine, established in 1993, is the only statutory body in Hong Kong to train, assess and accredit medical and dental specialists. According to the law in Hong Kong, a doctor or dentist who wishes to have his name included in the Specialist Register of Medical Council or Dental Council must either be a Fellow of the Academy or be assessed and certified by the Academy to have qualifications and training comparable to that required of an Academy Fellow. Once a doctor or dentist is on the Specialist Register, he must fulfil the continuing medical education requirements as determined by the Academy to maintain his specialist status. The Hospital Authority of Hong Kong has implemented the Doctor Work Reform (DWR) since 2006 which involves reduction of doctors' work hours and may affect training. The long-term strategy of the Academy with regards to the issue of DWR is to modernise postgraduate medical education and closely monitor the process to ensure that the quality of training would not be affected.

  1. Accreditation and implications of clinical postgraduate PA training programs.

    PubMed

    Hussaini, Sobia S; Bushardt, Reamer L; Gonsalves, Wanda C; Hilton, Virginia O; Hornberger, Brad J; Labagnara, Frank A; OʼHara, Kevin M; Sasek, Cody; Smith, Benjamin J; Williams, Jennifer S

    2016-05-01

    No consensus definition exists for postgraduate physician assistant (PA) training. This report from the AAPA Task Force on Accreditation of Postgraduate PA Training Programs describes the types of clinical training programs and their effects on hiring and compensation of PAs. Although completing a postgraduate program appears to have no effect on compensation, PAs who complete these programs may be favored in the hiring process and frequently report greater confidence in their skills. More research is needed and program accreditation is key to monitoring the effectiveness of these programs.

  2. [Education in postgraduate surgical schools: the role of the surgical tutor as supervisor in the operating room].

    PubMed

    Alloni, Rossana; Binetti, Paola; Coppola, Roberto; Arullani, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    The Postgraduate Surgical education is in an era of transition, in order to create physicians with skills and attitudes needed by modern health care. Many studies have examined the impact of surgical tutoring in surgical residency programs in USA Medical Schools, while few experiences are reported from European Universities. The new Italian guidelines for post-graduate education require a structured clinical learning with the supervision of a tutor ("attending surgeon" for surgical residency); it is a challenge to describe the role of this teacher and educator, and to implement an effective evaluation of operating room teachers. Confidential survey was administered to 14 surgical residents of the Authors' University. Questions were related to their surgical activity and their perception of educational role of tutors in operating room and tutors' teaching behaviors. Residents pointed out five behaviors they perceive as signs of tutor excellence in clinical and operating room setting. According with studies from other Universities, residents need a tutor with competency but also with good teaching skills and a mature self-perception as educator. Faculty would provide training programs for surgeons in order to improve their teaching skills and behaviors.

  3. Practical training for postgraduate year 1 surgery residents.

    PubMed

    Marshall, R L; Gorman, P J; Verne, D; Culina-Gula, S; Murray, W B; Haluck, R S; Krummel, T M

    2000-03-01

    Surgical interns accept significant patient care responsibilities with minimal orientation. We have developed a multifaceted training program for incoming surgical interns in which learning in a simulated environment plays a key role. The purpose of this study was to evaluate resident perceptions of simulated clinical calls as an educational modality and to measure the effect on self-ratings of confidence. A multidisciplinary team compiled 15 clinical scenarios. Simulated nurse-to-resident clinical call sessions were held on 3 separate days. Daily course evaluation surveys and identical precourse and postcourse confidence surveys were completed. The resident confidence measure increased significantly postcourse (6.73 versus 8.35, P <0.03). The evaluation survey score averaged 4.35 out of 5. Simulated clinical call sessions were well received and resulted in a significant increase in resident confidence levels. Based on this modality's apparent efficacy and ease of implementation, we offer it as a useful educational tool for incoming postgraduate year-1 surgical residents.

  4. Performance on a Surgical In-Training Examination Varies by Training Year and Pathway.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Jason; Levin, L Scott; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Few studies in surgery have addressed medical knowledge competency training as defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. As in-training examinations are ubiquitous educational tools for surgical residents in the United States, insights into examination performance may help fill this void. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between In-Service Examination performance and training characteristics in plastic surgery. This retrospective cohort study reviewed performance data for the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Examination for the years 2012 to 2015. Comparisons were made both within and between training pathways by means of Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Data were available for 1367 independent (37.9 percent) and 2240 integrated residents (62.1 percent). Among integrated residents, performance increased with additional years of training (p < 0.001), but no difference existed between postgraduate year-5 and postgraduate year-6 residents (p > 0.05). Similarly, independent resident examination performance increased by year of training (p < 0.001), with no difference between postgraduate year-2 and postgraduate year-3 residents (p > 0.05). At each level of training (postgraduate years 4 to 6), integrated residents outperformed their independent resident colleagues (postgraduate years 1 to 3) (p < 0.001). Performance on the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Examination increases during residency, with integrated residents outperforming independent residents. These findings may have implications for medical knowledge competency training as defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education.

  5. Massive open online courses are relevant for postgraduate medical training.

    PubMed

    Subhi, Yousif; Andresen, Kristoffer; Rolskov Bojsen, Signe; Mørkeberg Nilsson, Philip; Konge, Lars

    2014-10-01

    The CanMEDS framework describes seven roles in postgraduate training, but training and courses relevant to these roles can be limited. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) - free online courses in which anyone can participate, anywhere - may improve course participation. This study investigates the relevance of MOOCs for postgraduate medical training within the CanMEDS framework. We extracted a list of all courses posted by the two largest MOOC providers, Coursera and EdX, and reviewed all course descriptions and categorised each course into one of three categories--"relevant," "possibly relevant" or "not relevant"--reflecting the degree of relevance to each of the seven CanMEDS roles. We also noted course workload, duration and the name of the educational institution. We agreed the most on the role of health advocate (Cronbach's α = 0.85) and the least on the role of collaborator (Cronbach's α = 0.46). After a consensus-building process, 165 courses were found to be relevant or possibly relevant, mostly to the roles as scholar (n = 75) and medical expert (n = 57). The courses had a median duration of seven weeks and a median weekly workload of 4.5 hours, and were predominantly from North American universities. A large number of MOOCs are relevant for postgraduate medical training. A weekly workload of 4.5 hours may enable course participation even for busy clinicians. Physicians should consider these free and universally available courses as relevant and potentially effective means of education. not relevant. not relevant.

  6. [Modular postgraduate training in surgery - a national concept with future].

    PubMed

    Kadmon, M; Busemann, A; Euteneier, A; Gawad, K; Gröne, J; Berberat, P

    2012-04-01

    The quality of postgraduate training is an important motivating factor for the career decisions of young doctors and has an impact on the satisfaction of postgraduate trainees. In Germany, we still lack a postgraduate training programme in surgery that defines the competency profile at the time of certification. This article describes the development of a national modular competency-based core curriculum for postgraduate surgery training as well as first experience and evaluation data from the initial period of implementation. The curriculum was developed in a group of highly motivated surgeons according to the "Kern-cycle", a conceptual framework for curriculum development in medicine, and includs considerations from the "CanMEDS"-competency framework for physicians. The curriculum follows a "blended learning" concept with modular attendance courses and associated preparatory online courses. The didactics follows the principles of adult learning and are characterised by learner-centred, self-directed learning processes in small groups with feedback. The initial implementation phase was accompanied by a detailed evaluation of the general concept as well as the quality of content and didactics of the attendance courses. Seven of the planned 12 attendance courses have been designed, 6 courses have been implemented2q1. Altogether 562 participants from hospitals of all levels of patient care took part in the attendance courses, some of them in several courses. The gender distribution was almost balanced with a slight female surplus. The majority of participants were supported by their clinics through exemption from clinical work or financial sponsoring. 80 % of the participants completed the evaluation of the attendance courses. The data show a high degree of participant satisfaction with the content and didactic concept of the courses, as well as with the surrounding conditions and the commitment of the trainers. The evaluation data on the attendance courses

  7. Mentoring in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Prem; Narra, Maruthi; Woo, Henry

    2015-04-01

    Surgical mentors have helped trainees develop fulfilling and academically productive careers, while supervisors are formally assigned to impart skills and oversee training. This paper reviews the comparative roles of the supervisor and mentor and how they overlap, while exploring the impact of the 'unknown' mentor. While the supervisor's role in directing the student is formally recognized, the mentee will personally select a mentor who successfully models the career and life balance to which the mentee aspires. The unknown mentor is known only to the mentee. The mentee's commitment to communicating with both mentor and supervisor is crucial to success. Better processes can be used to guide the mentor relationship. Confusion between the two roles - mentor and supervisor - is due to their complementary nature as well as an overlap in roles. Both remain essential to the growth and development of the surgical trainee. The unknown mentor could give detached advice and guidance to the student, while acting as a positive role model.

  8. Sources of information on postgraduate medical training programs - 2004 update.

    PubMed

    Brazin, Lillian R

    2004-01-01

    This is the biennial update listing directories, journal articles, Web sites, and general books that aid the librarian, house officer, or medical student in finding information on medical residency and fellowship programs. The World Wide Web provides the most current and complete source of information about postgraduate training programs and specialties. This update goes beyond postgraduate training resources to include selected Web sites and books on resume writing, practice management, personal financial issues, the "Match," exam preparation, job hunting, and the DEA license application process. Print resources are included if they provide information not on the Internet or have features that are particularly useful. The Internet continues to be a major marketing tool for hospitals seeking to recruit the best and brightest for their residency and fellowship programs. Even the smallest community hospital usually has a presence on the 'Net.

  9. Mobile surgical skills education unit: a new concept in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Faisal M; Hseino, Hazem; Hill, Arnold D K; Kavanagh, Eamon; Traynor, Oscar

    2011-08-01

    Basic surgical skills are an integral part of surgical training. Simulation-based surgical training offers an opportunity both to trainees and trainers to learn and teach surgical skills outside the operating room in a nonpatient, nonstressed environment. However, widespread adoption of simulation technology especially in medical education is prohibited by its inherent higher cost, limited space, and interruptions to clinical duties. Mobile skills laboratory has been proposed as a means to address some of these limitations. A new program is designed by the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), in an approach to teach its postgraduate basic surgical trainees the necessary surgical skills, by making the use of mobile innovative simulation technology in their own hospital settings. In this article, authors describe the program and students response to the mobile surgical skills being delivered in the region of their training hospitals and by their own regional consultant trainers.

  10. Paving the road for a European postgraduate training curriculum.

    PubMed

    van der Aa, Jessica E; Goverde, Angelique J; Teunissen, Pim W; Scheele, Fedde

    2016-08-01

    The 'Project for Achieving Consensus in Training' has been initiated by the European Board & College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology to harmonise training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology throughout Europe. In this project called the EBCOG-PACT, a state of the art pan-European training curriculum will be developed. Implementation of a pan-European curriculum will enhance harmonisation of both quality standards of women's healthcare practice and standards of postgraduate training. Secondly, it will assure equal quality of training of gynaecologists, promoting mobility throughout Europe. Thirdly, it will enhance cooperation and exchange of best practices between medical specialists and hospitals within Europe. The project is expecting to deliver (1) a description of the core and electives of the curriculum based on previously defined standards of care, (2) a societally responsive competency framework based on input from societal stakeholders and (3) strategies for education and assessment based on the current literature. Also, the project focuses on implementation and sustainability of the curriculum by delivering (4) a SWOT-analysis for the implementation based on insights into transcultural differences, (5) recommendations for implementation, change management and sustainability based on the SWOT analysis (6) and finally a handbook for other specialties initiating European curriculum development. The development and the implementation of this modern pan-European curriculum in Obstetrics and Gynaecology aims to serve as an example for the harmonisation of postgraduate training in Europe. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Teamwork of clinical teachers in postgraduate medical training.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Irene Arida

    2016-08-01

    Teamwork among clinical teachers is essential for continuous improvement of postgraduate medical training. This thesis deconstructs teamwork in four studies, mostly based on qualitative research approaches and one study utilizes mixed methods. We found that clinical teachers do train residents, but individually rather than as a team. The programme directors as leaders focus more on teaching activities than on the collective ambition and mutual engagement of clinical teachers. During the teaching meetings, mistakes and conflicts are mainly discussed in a general sense and are often neither directed at the individual, nor result-oriented. A valid evaluation instrument is constructed to improve teamwork.

  12. Psychoanalytic training experience and postgraduate professional development - Part II.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jorge; Wilkerson, Douglas; Solomon, Brenda; Perlman, Caryle; Duval, Denise; Shelby, Dennis; Witten, Molly

    2017-03-02

    This exploratory study looks at the training and postgraduate experience of the 2008-2014 graduates of the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis. It follows our former study of all living graduates through the year 2007 (Schneider et al., 2014). The survey developed and used in the first study, with a few additional questions added to increase our understanding of the training experience, was sent to 38 graduates with a return rate of 58%. As with the first survey, graduates were invited to assess, among other training experiences, their training analysis, classroom work, and supervision, and to tell of their post-graduation involvement in teaching, supervising, study groups and other professional endeavors. They were also asked to rate their satisfaction with themselves as psychoanalysts and with their analytic career. The questions added to the previous survey related to the graduates' theoretical orientation, the influence on their training experiences of the change in gender distribution, and of the diversity of professions now represented in the analytic training program. They were also encouraged to provide spontaneous narrative data. The data from our second survey showed important differences when compared with our first. In the first survey male respondents were in the majority; in the second, women held the majority. Of the professions represented in the training program, psychiatry was the majority in the first survey, psychology and social work held the majority in the second. Most respondents claimed an object-relation theoretical orientation. Analytic immersion continues to decrease, with most respondents having two patients at the time of graduation and one at the time of the survey.

  13. Modernising the higher surgical training in trauma and orthopaedic surgery in Ireland: taking the middle path approach.

    PubMed

    Sayana, M K; Ashraf, M; O'Byrne, J

    2009-12-01

    Traditionally, the UK and Ireland have followed the same postgraduate surgical training of orthopaedic surgeons. Modernising medical careers (MMC) and European Working Time Directive (EWTD) have radically changed the way surgical training is delivered in the UK. In Ireland, however, the traditional structure of surgical training system continues with an emphasis to modernise the training with more objective assessment tools. The aim of this review is to highlight the current differences in the higher surgical training in Orthopaedics in the UK and Ireland.

  14. Design, implementation, and evaluation of a postgraduate Diploma in Surgical Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Mark D; Lyall, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    After careful planning, a postgraduate Diploma in Surgical Anatomy was launched in 2009. This report describes the structure of the program, the challenges encountered in implementing and running the course, and results of evaluations. The qualification is targeted at junior doctors intending to become surgeons or radiologists and aims to equip them with a sound understanding of regional anatomy relevant to common diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, together with an understanding of common/important anatomical variations. The course is delivered by: (1) 24 weeks' distance learning, comprising selected readings, podcasts, multiple choice questions (MCQs), and research informed essays; and (2) two separate two-week periods of intensive campus-based learning and whole body dissection (four students per cadaver) assessed by oral examination, a class presentation of an anatomical variation, and formal MCQ examination. Campus-based instruction is delivered by two surgical anatomists with additional input from a broad range of specialist surgeons and radiologists. Anonymous student evaluations over three successive courses show that all components of the course were highly rated. The success of the program may relate to several factors: an emphasis on clinically relevant anatomy, clear learning objectives, personalized student feedback, a low student to cadaver ratio, restricted class size, a wide range of supportive material, a dedicated team of surgical/radiological instructors, efficient course administration, and endorsement by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. Establishing a Diploma in Surgical Anatomy program requires a dedicated team of individuals, the setting and maintenance of appropriate educational standards, and collaboration with the professional body regulating the training of surgeons.

  15. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Postgraduate Diploma in Surgical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer, Mark D.; Lyall, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    After careful planning, a postgraduate Diploma in Surgical Anatomy was launched in 2009. This report describes the structure of the program, the challenges encountered in implementing and running the course, and results of evaluations. The qualification is targeted at junior doctors intending to become surgeons or radiologists and aims to equip…

  16. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Postgraduate Diploma in Surgical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer, Mark D.; Lyall, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    After careful planning, a postgraduate Diploma in Surgical Anatomy was launched in 2009. This report describes the structure of the program, the challenges encountered in implementing and running the course, and results of evaluations. The qualification is targeted at junior doctors intending to become surgeons or radiologists and aims to equip…

  17. Training of breast surgical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Teshome, Mediget; Kuerer, Henry M

    2016-06-01

    Breast surgical oncology is a defined sub-specialty of general surgery with focus on the surgical management of breast disease and malignancy within a multidisciplinary context. Much of the training of breast surgical oncologists in the United States exists within a fellowship training structure with oversight and approval by the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO). Rapid continuous changes in breast oncology practice have further substantiated dedicated expertise in breast surgical oncology. Training programs are structured to develop proficiency in fellows for advanced surgical techniques and clinical decision-making as well as exposure to the multidisciplinary aspects of breast cancer management. Components of a successful program include an intense multidisciplinary curriculum, engagement in clinical research and attention to strong mentorship. National curriculum and training requirements as well as supplemental resources assist in standardizing the fellowship experience. As surgical training and the field of breast oncology continues to evolve, so do fellowship training programs to ensure high quality breast surgical oncologists equipped to deliver high quality evidence based patient care while continuing to drive future research and trainee education.

  18. Unison or cacophony: postgraduate training in pathology in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bosman, Fred T; van den Tweel, Jan G

    2009-05-01

    With the free movement of people in the European Union, medical mobility has increased significantly. This is notably the case for disciplines for which shortage of well-trained staff has occurred. Pathology is among those specialties and effectively the discipline is confronted with a striking increase in mobility among trainees and qualified specialists. The presumption underlying unlimited mobility is that the competencies of the medical specialists in the European countries are more or less equal, including significant similarities in the postgraduate training programs. In order to assess whether reality corresponds with this presumption, we conducted a survey of the content and practice requirements of the curricula in the EU and affiliated countries. The results indicate a striking heterogeneity in the training program content and practice requirements. To name a few elements: duration of the training program varied between 4 and 6 years; the number of autopsies required varied between none at all and 300; the number of biopsies required varied between none at all and 15,000. We conclude that harmonization of training outcomes in Europe is a goal that needs to be pursued. This will be difficult to reach through harmonization of training programs, as these are co-determined by political, cultural, and administrative factors, difficult to influence. Harmonization might be attained by defining the general and specific competencies at the end of training and subsequent testing them through a test to which all trainees in Europe are subjected.

  19. Training Standards Statements of Family Medicine Postgraduate Training – A Review of Existing Documents Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Sarah; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Marquard, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For the effective and safe management of complex care needs for patients in community settings, high quality family medicine (FM) training programmes are needed. In less primary care oriented countries, training standards statements for FM postgraduate training are less commonly found. The aim of this study was to review international training standards statements in FM postgraduate training and to catalogue these statements to be used as a best practice standard guide for FM training programs in Germany. Materials and Methods A structured three-tiered search was performed: a systematic literature search in MEDLINE®; a search of international indicator databases; and a search in grey literature, consisting of a survey of international experts and a search in “Google (Scholar)”. From all identified documents, training standards statements were extracted, translated and summarized into categories referring to the same quality aspect. Results The search strategy revealed 25 relevant documents (MEDLINE® n = 15, databases n = 2, experts n = 7, “Google” n = 1), containing 337 training standards statements. These were summarized into 80 statements. They covered structure quality (n = 35); process quality (n = 43); and two training standards statements referred to outcome quality (n = 2). Conclusion A broad range of internationally sourced training standards statements for FM postgraduate training could be identified from countries with well-established primary care systems. Only few statements internationally referred to outcome quality, expressing the difficulty in assessing outcome. The resulting inventory of training standards statements for FM postgraduate training can serve as a resource for institutions seeking to formalise and systematise FM training at regional or national levels. PMID:27459714

  20. Evolution of surgical skills training.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kurt-E; Bell, Robert-L; Duffy, Andrew-J

    2006-05-28

    Surgical training is changing: one hundred years of tradition is being challenged by legal and ethical concerns for patient safety, work hours restrictions, the cost of operating room time, and complications. Surgical simulation and skills training offers an opportunity to teach and practice advanced skills outside of the operating room environment before attempting them on living patients. Simulation training can be as straight forward as using real instruments and video equipment to manipulate simulated "tissue" in a box trainer. More advanced, virtual reality simulators are now available and ready for widespread use. Early systems have demonstrated their effectiveness and discriminative ability. Newer systems enable the development of comprehensive curricula and full procedural simulations. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME) has mandated the development of novel methods of training and evaluation. Surgical organizations are calling for methods to ensure the maintenance of skills, advance surgical training, and to credential surgeons as technically competent. Simulators in their current form have been demonstrated to improve the operating room performance of surgical residents. Development of standardized training curricula remains an urgent and important agenda, particularly for minimal invasive surgery. An innovative and progressive approach, borrowing experiences from the field of aviation, can provide the foundation for the next century of surgical training, ensuring the quality of the product. As the technology develops, the way we practice will continue to evolve, to the benefit of physicians and patients.

  1. Evolution of surgical skills training

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kurt E; Bell, Robert L; Duffy, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Surgical training is changing: one hundred years of tradition is being challenged by legal and ethical concerns for patient safety, work hours restrictions, the cost of operating room time, and complications. Surgical simulation and skills training offers an opportunity to teach and practice advanced skills outside of the operating room environment before attempting them on living patients. Simulation training can be as straight forward as using real instruments and video equipment to manipulate simulated “tissue” in a box trainer. More advanced, virtual reality simulators are now available and ready for widespread use. Early systems have demonstrated their effectiveness and discriminative ability. Newer systems enable the development of comprehensive curricula and full procedural simulations. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education’s (ACGME) has mandated the development of novel methods of training and evaluation. Surgical organizations are calling for methods to ensure the maintenance of skills, advance surgical training, and to credential surgeons as technically competent. Simulators in their current form have been demonstrated to improve the operating room performance of surgical residents. Development of standardized training curricula remains an urgent and important agenda, particularly for minimal invasive surgery. An innovative and progressive approach, borrowing experiences from the field of aviation, can provide the foundation for the next century of surgical training, ensuring the quality of the product. As the technology develops, the way we practice will continue to evolve, to the benefit of physicians and patients. PMID:16718842

  2. Changes in postgraduate medical education and training in clinical radiology

    PubMed Central

    Lindsell, D

    2008-01-01

    Postgraduate medical education and training in many specialties, including Clinical Radiology, is undergoing major changes. In part this is to ensure that shorter training periods maximise the learning opportunities but it is also to bring medical education in line with broader educational theory. Learning outcomes need to be defined so that there is no doubt what knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours are expected of those in training. Curricula should be developed into competency or outcome based models and should state the aims, objectives, content, outcomes and processes of a training programme. They should include a description of the methods of learning, teaching, feedback and supervision. Assessment systems must be matched to the curriculum and must be fair, reliable and valid. Workplace based assessments including the use of multisource feedback need to be developed and validated for use during radiology training. These should be used in a formative and developmental way, although the overall results from a series of such assessments can be used in a more summative way to determine progress to the next phase of training. Formal standard setting processes need to be established for ‘high stakes’ summative assessments such as examinations. In addition the unique skills required of a radiologist in terms of image interpretation, pattern recognition, deduction and diagnosis need to be evaluated in robust, reliable and valid ways. Through a combination of these methods we can be assured that decisions about trainees’ progression through training is fair and standardised and that we are protecting patients by establishing national standards for training, curricula and assessment methods. PMID:21614310

  3. Integrated flexible endoscopy training during surgical residency.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mario P; Mancini, Gregory J; Miedema, Brent W; Rangnekar, Nitin J; Koivunen, Debra G; Ramshaw, Bruce J; Eubanks, W Stephen; Stephenson, Hugh E

    2008-09-01

    New advances in endoscopic surgery make it imperative that future gastrointestinal surgeons obtain adequate endoscopy skills. An evaluation of the 2001-02 general surgery residency endoscopy experience at the University of Missouri revealed that chief residents were graduating with an average of 43 endoscopic cases. This met American Board of Surgery (ABS) and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements but is inadequate preparation for carrying out advanced endoscopic surgery. Our aim was to determine if endoscopy volume could be improved by dedicating specific staff surgeon time to a gastrointestinal diagnostic center at an affiliated Veterans Administration Hospital. During the academic years 2002-05, two general surgeons who routinely perform endoscopy staffed the gastrointestinal endoscopy center at the Harry S. Truman Hospital two days per week. A minimum of one categorical surgical resident participated during these endoscopy training days while on the Veterans Hospital surgical service. A retrospective observational review of ACGME surgery resident case logs from 2001 to 2005 was conducted to document the changes in resident endoscopy experience. The cases were compiled by postgraduate year (PGY). Resident endoscopy case volume increased 850% from 2001 to 2005. Graduating residents completed an average of 161 endoscopies. Endoscopic experience was attained at all levels of training: 26, 21, 34, 23, and 26 mean endoscopies/year for PGY-1 to PGY-5, respectively. Having specific endoscopy training days at a VA Hospital under the guidance of a dedicated staff surgeon is a successful method to improve surgical resident endoscopy case volume. An integrated endoscopy training curriculum results in early skills acquisition, continued proficiency throughout residency, and is an efficient way to obtain endoscopic skills. In addition, the foundation of flexible endoscopic skill and experience has allowed early integration of surgery

  4. In-training assessment developments in postgraduate education in Europe.

    PubMed

    van der Vleuten, Cees; Verhoeven, Bas

    2013-06-01

    This paper reviews changes that are underway in postgraduate medical education in various European countries. Training in the workplace is a very effective way of learning, but it has many imperfections. Changes in in-training assessment are proposed to remedy some of these. The focus is on a set of assessment tools for performance in authentic work-based contexts. These tools include direct performance measures of single clinical events (mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise, Direct Observation of Practical Skills, Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills, Case-based Discussion, Mini-Peer Assessment Tool) and performance measures over a period of time (Multi-Source Feedback), based on judgement by one or more knowledgeable assessors (supervisor, other healthcare professional, patient, trainee himself/herself). Quantitative and qualitative information from single assessments is first and foremost used to promote learning, but also aggregated across a large sample of contexts and assessors in order to obtain an overall picture of a trainee's progress. Aggregating instruments, such as the portfolio, can be used to collect, support and assess outcomes in terms of competencies achieved. We will describe this set of instruments and provide theoretical background as well as our own practical experiences. A central message is that the utility of assessment methods lies very much in the (understanding of) the users. Therefore, our concern is more with the actual implementation of change than with the assessment technology per se. If we fail in our efforts to implement real change, postgraduate education may be at risk for bureaucratization and trivialization. We nevertheless are excited to see change happening in the right direction, but remain patient, not expecting very quick wins. © 2013 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  5. The role of student surgical interest groups and surgical Olympiads in anatomical and surgical undergraduate training in Russia.

    PubMed

    Dydykin, Sergey; Kapitonova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Traditional department-based surgical interest groups in Russian medical schools are useful tools for student-based selection of specialty training. They also form a nucleus for initiating research activities among undergraduate students. In Russia, the Departments of Topographical Anatomy and Operative Surgery play an important role in initiating student-led research and providing learners with advanced, practical surgical skills. In tandem with department-led activities, student surgical interest groups prepare learners through surgical competitions, known as "Surgical Olympiads," which have been conducted in many Russian centers on a regular basis since 1988. Surgical Olympiads stimulate student interest in the development of surgical skills before graduation and encourage students to choose surgery as their postgraduate specialty. Many of the participants in these surgical Olympiads have become highly qualified specialists in general surgery, orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, urology, gynecology, and emergency medicine. The present article emphasizes the role of student interest groups and surgical Olympiads in clinical anatomical and surgical undergraduate training in Russia. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  6. Simulation in Canadian postgraduate emergency medicine training - a national survey.

    PubMed

    Russell, Evan; Hall, Andrew Koch; Hagel, Carly; Petrosoniak, Andrew; Dagnone, Jeffrey Damon; Howes, Daniel

    2017-05-17

    Simulation-based education (SBE) is an important training strategy in emergency medicine (EM) postgraduate programs. This study sought to characterize the use of simulation in FRCPC-EM residency programs across Canada. A national survey was administered to residents and knowledgeable program representatives (PRs) at all Canadian FRCPC-EM programs. Survey question themes included simulation program characteristics, the frequency of resident participation, the location and administration of SBE, institutional barriers, interprofessional involvement, content, assessment strategies, and attitudes about SBE. Resident and PR response rates were 63% (203/321) and 100% (16/16), respectively. Residents reported a median of 20 (range 0-150) hours of annual simulation training, with 52% of residents indicating that the time dedicated to simulation training met their needs. PRs reported the frequency of SBE sessions ranging from weekly to every 6 months, with 15 (94%) programs having an established simulation curriculum. Two (13%) of the programs used simulation for resident assessment, although 15 (94%) of PRs indicated that they would be comfortable with simulation-based assessment. The most common PR-identified barriers to administering simulation were a lack of protected faculty time (75%) and a lack of faculty experience with simulation (56%). Interprofessional involvement in simulation was strongly valued by both residents and PRs. SBE is frequently used by Canadian FRCPC-EM residency programs. However, there exists considerable variability in the structure, frequency, and timing of simulation-based activities. As programs transition to competency-based medical education, national organizations and collaborations should consider the variability in how SBE is administered.

  7. Coordinated Multiple Cadaver Use for Minimally Invasive Surgical Training

    PubMed Central

    Blaschko, Sarah D.; Brooks, H. Mark; Dhuy, S. Michael; Charest-Shell, Cynthia; Clayman, Ralph V.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The human cadaver remains the gold standard for anatomic training and is highly useful when incorporated into minimally invasive surgical training programs. However, this valuable resource is often not used to its full potential due to a lack of multidisciplinary cooperation. Herein, we propose the coordinated multiple use of individual cadavers to better utilize anatomical resources and potentiate the availability of cadaver training. Methods: Twenty-two postgraduate surgeons participated in a robot-assisted surgical training course that utilized shared cadavers. All participants completed a Likert 4-scale satisfaction questionnaire after their training session. Cadaveric tissue quality and the quality of the training session related to this material were assessed. Results: Nine participants rated the quality of the cadaveric tissue as excellent, 7 as good, 5 as unsatisfactory, and 1 as poor. Overall, 72% of participants who operated on a previously used cadaver were satisfied with their training experience and did not perceive the previous use deleterious to their training. Conclusion: The coordinated use of cadavers, which allows for multiple cadaver use for different teaching sessions, is an excellent training method that increases availability of human anatomical material for minimally invasive surgical training. PMID:18237501

  8. [Virtual microscopy in pathology teaching and postgraduate training (continuing education)].

    PubMed

    Sinn, H P; Andrulis, M; Mogler, C; Schirmacher, P

    2008-11-01

    As with conventional microscopy, virtual microscopy permits histological tissue sections to be viewed on a computer screen with a free choice of viewing areas and a wide range of magnifications. This, combined with the possibility of linking virtual microscopy to E-Learning courses, make virtual microscopy an ideal tool for teaching and postgraduate training in pathology. Uses of virtual microscopy in pathology teaching include blended learning with the presentation of digital teaching slides in the internet parallel to presentation in the histology lab, extending student access to histology slides beyond the lab. Other uses are student self-learning in the Internet, as well as the presentation of virtual slides in the classroom with or without replacing real microscopes. Successful integration of virtual microscopy depends on its embedding in the virtual classroom and the creation of interactive E-learning content. Applications derived from this include the use of virtual microscopy in video clips, podcasts, SCORM modules and the presentation of virtual microscopy using interactive whiteboards in the classroom.

  9. A mandibular surgical training model.

    PubMed

    Leser, Casey P; Jepsen, Shawn A

    2008-01-01

    Performing surgical procedures on the mandible can present many challenges due to the anatomy and the limited access available to the various areas of the mandibular arch. The experience of the surgeon and the complexity of the surgery must be considered before attempting treatment. A static mandibular training model provides dentists with the opportunity to practice multiple surgical procedures to develop the skills that are necessary to treat patients competently and comprehensively. The mandible's unique anatomy presents a number of challenges when performing surgical procedures. A surgical model that makes it possible to practice multiple techniques benefits the surgeon by building the confidence to attempt more complex surgical procedures and thus provide patients with additional treatment options. This mandibular surgical model serves as a learning tool and provides an avenue for learning different surgical techniques that may be performed in various areas of the mandible. A number of procedures can be performed on the model, including the extraction of third molars, incision and drainage of a vestibular/buccal swelling, excisional biopsy of intrabony lesions, tori removal, initial implant alignment procedures, and suturing/flap designs. A number of these procedures can be performed on one model.

  10. Surgical training in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Borel-Rinkes, Inne H M; Gouma, Dirk J; Hamming, Jaap F

    2008-10-01

    Surgical training in the Netherlands has traditionally been characterized by learning on the job under the classic master-trainee doctrine. Over the past decades, it has become regionally organized with intensive structural training courses, and a peer-based quality control system. Recently, the nationwide programme has been modernized further and now involves a systematic, competency-based education with structural training courses, formalized assessment and room for reflection by residents under the supervision of surgical teaching groups. To this end, a uniform web-based digital portfolio is being introduced to facilitate monitoring of the individual resident's progress. Though requiring inspirational leadership, commitment, and determination, this modernization has sparked enthusiasm among trainees and teachers.

  11. [The training of medical and scientific manpower in the system of postgraduate medical education].

    PubMed

    Kabanova, S A; Lozhkevich, I Iu

    2010-01-01

    The research was held within Petrovsky National surgery center and revealed certain regularities and trends testifying the necessity of further strategic and tactic development of training of graduated specialists through the innovative optimization of effectiveness of post-graduate training of medical personnel. The inclusion of social psychological monitoring of educational process is obligatory. The implementation of sociological monitoring in any institution providing post-graduate training has to be a powerful tool for enhancing quality and efficiency of training of medical professionals. This approach presupposes modernization of training programs accounting the innovations and research data.

  12. A short postgraduate anatomy course may improve the junior surgical residents' anatomy knowledge for the nerves of the inguinal region.

    PubMed

    Ergül, Z; Kulaçoğlu, H; Sen, T; Esmer, A F; Güller, M; Güneri, G; Elhan, A

    2011-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common operations in a junior surgical resident's postgraduate training. Short recall courses can improve junior residents' anatomy knowledge and results in better surgical outcomes. We aimed to investigate the effect of a short course on anatomical competency during inguinal hernia repairs. During the first 25 inguinal hernia repairs, two junior residents were asked to identify iliohypogastric, ilioinguinal, and genital branch of genitofemoral nerves. Then, the residents were given a short recall course by anatomists. Afterwards, the participants were taken into an in-vivo anatomy test again. The same parameters were recorded in another 25 inguinal hernia repairs. In addition to the nerve identification records, case characteristics [body mass index (BMI < or = 25 vs. >25), hernia type (indirect vs. direct), and anesthesia used (general or regional vs. local)] were recorded. Anatomy education had a clear impact on the correct identification rates for the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves. The rates increased from 70% to 90% and above. Correct identification rate for the three nerves together significantly increased from 16 to 52% following anatomy education (P = 0.006). All three nerves were identified with significantly higher success rates after anatomy education. The increase in the success rate for identification of the genital branch of genitofemoral nerve was 4-fold. Short anatomy courses in specific subjects for junior surgical residents given by formal anatomists may be effective during postgraduate education. The benefit obtained in the present study for the inguinal region nerves may be expanded to more important anatomical structures, such as the recurrent laryngeal nerve in a thyroidectomy, or more complex subjects.

  13. Thresholds of Principle and Preference: Exploring Procedural Variation in Postgraduate Surgical Education.

    PubMed

    Apramian, Tavis; Cristancho, Sayra; Watling, Chris; Ott, Michael; Lingard, Lorelei

    2015-11-01

    Expert physicians develop their own ways of doing things. The influence of such practice variation in clinical learning is insufficiently understood. Our grounded theory study explored how residents make sense of, and behave in relation to, the procedural variations of faculty surgeons. We sampled senior postgraduate surgical residents to construct a theoretical framework for how residents make sense of procedural variations. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, we used marginal participant observation in the operating room across 56 surgical cases (146 hours), field interviews (38), and formal interviews (6) to develop a theoretical framework for residents' ways of dealing with procedural variations. Data analysis used constant comparison to iteratively refine the framework and data collection until theoretical saturation was reached. The core category of the constructed theory was called thresholds of principle and preference and it captured how faculty members position some procedural variations as negotiable and others not. The term thresholding was coined to describe residents' daily experiences of spotting, mapping, and negotiating their faculty members' thresholds and defending their own emerging thresholds. Thresholds of principle and preference play a key role in workplace-based medical education. Postgraduate medical learners are occupied on a day-to-day level with thresholding and attempting to make sense of the procedural variations of faculty. Workplace-based teaching and assessment should include an understanding of the integral role of thresholding in shaping learners' development. Future research should explore the nature and impact of thresholding in workplace-based learning beyond the surgical context.

  14. Lesson plans in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Lester, S E; Robson, A K R

    2007-06-01

    Lesson plans in surgery enable trainers and trainees to agree on goals that balance training needs with service commitments. Lesson plans are individualised to the trainee and encourage ownership of learning. They are based on SMART criteria and therefore have a sound educational footing. Most of the work in creating a lesson plan falls to the trainee. The total time for creation of each plan is approximately 20 min. Our use of lesson plans for surgical training has been met with favourable response from both trainer and trainees.

  15. Does mandatory postgraduate clinical training worsen geographic distribution of dentists in Japan?

    PubMed

    Hirata, SoIchiro; Okawa, Yoshikazu; Sugito, Hiroki; Mataki, Shiro; Sakayori, Takaharu; Maki, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Takuo

    2013-01-01

    Postgraduate clinical training for dentists has been mandatory in Japan since 2006. Hirata et al. reported that the geographic distribution of postgraduate dental trainees by prefecture in 2006 was worse than that of practicing dentists. This suggests that the postgraduate clinical training system could intensify the problem of distribution of dentists. In this study, therefore, we reviewed the geographic distribution of postgraduate dental trainees and practicing dentists between 2006 and 2010 in detail by city, ward, town and village by using the Lorenz curve and Gini coefficient. The results showed that while there was no significant worsening of geographic distribution of postgraduate dental trainees, the distribution of practicing dentists continued to deteriorate. A number of reasons may explain these findings: the clinical training system is based on a one-year employment contract, and dentists subsequently relocate as driven by the market; and geographic distribution among cities, towns and villages has worsened as a result of the merger of municipalities. The geographic distribution of practicing dentists is expected to deteriorate further if the number of dentists takes a downward turn in the future. Therefore, it is necessary to continuously review the distribution of postgraduate dental trainees.

  16. The training and utilization of surgical physician assistants. A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Brandt, L B; Beinfield, M S; Laffaye, H A; Baue, A E

    1989-03-01

    A community hospital's search for qualified surgical house staff in 1975 led to the development of a postgraduate residency program in surgery for physician assistants. Eleven years after its inception, the program's purpose and structure were reviewed, and its alumni, goals, and contributions were evaluated. A 1987 alumni survey provided data to assess the value of residency training to current employment and job satisfaction.

  17. Relationship Between Grit with Academic Performance and Attainment of Postgraduate Training in Pharmacy Students

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Rae R.; Ho, Jackie; Perry, Paul J.; Tang, Terrill T.; Ip, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To determine if Grit-S scores correlate with academic success in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program, as well as the pursuit and attainment of pharmacy postgraduate (residency or fellowship) training. Methods. A 28-item survey was administered to third- and fourth-year (P3 and P4) pharmacy students. Variables queried included Grit-S score, demographics, pharmacy experience prior to the PharmD program, and factors that may affect academic performance during didactic coursework. Didactic coursework GPA was used as a surrogate for academic success. Information about pursuit and attainment of a postgraduate training position was also documented and used in the analyses. Results. There was no significant correlation between Grit-S scores and variables related to academic success. However, students were more likely to pursue postgraduate training with higher academic success and higher Grit-S. Lastly, students with higher Grit-S were also more likely to obtain a postgraduate training position. Conclusion. Grit-S scores correlated with the pursuit and successful attainment of postgraduate training, but not with academic success during the didactic years of a PharmD program. PMID:28630508

  18. Vertical integration in medical school: effect on the transition to postgraduate training.

    PubMed

    Wijnen-Meijer, Marjo; ten Cate, Olle Th J; van der Schaaf, Marieke; Borleffs, Jan C C

    2010-03-01

    Recently, many medical schools' curricula have been revised so that they represent vertically integrated (VI) curricula. Important changes include: the provision of earlier clinical experience; longer clerkships, and the fostering of increasing levels of responsibility. One of the aims of vertical integration is to facilitate the transition to postgraduate training. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether a VI curriculum at medical school affects the transition to postgraduate training in a positive way. We carried out a questionnaire study among graduates of six medical schools in the Netherlands, who had followed either a VI or a non-VI curriculum. Items in the questionnaire focused on preparedness for work and postgraduate training, the time and number of applications required to be admitted to residency, and the process of making career choices. In comparison with those who have followed non-VI programmes, graduates of VI curricula appear to make definitive career choices earlier, need less time and fewer applications to obtain residency positions and feel more prepared for work and postgraduate training. The curriculum at medical school affects the transition to postgraduate training. Additional research is required to determine which components of the curriculum cause this effect and to specify under which conditions this effect occurs.

  19. A Postgraduate Dental Training Program for Treatment of Persons with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiefel, Doris J.; Truelove, Edmond L.

    1985-01-01

    A five-year project of postgraduate training in dentistry for patients with severe disabilities resulted in significant cognitive and confidence gains for the participating dentists, dental hygienists, and assistants. Over 75 percent of the graduates were found to actively apply their training, especially in academic dentistry. (MSE)

  20. Building family medicine postgraduate training in Jamaica: overcoming challenges in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Standard-Goldson, A; Williams-Green, P; Smith, K; Segree, W; James, K; Eldemire-Shearer, D

    2015-01-01

    This paper recounts the development of family medicine postgraduate training in Jamaica, the challenges faced and lessons learned. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by past trainees exploring the perceived usefulness, strengths and weaknesses of the programme. The results of this study helped guide the strengthening of family medicine training in a resource-limited setting.

  1. A Postgraduate Dental Training Program for Treatment of Persons with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiefel, Doris J.; Truelove, Edmond L.

    1985-01-01

    A five-year project of postgraduate training in dentistry for patients with severe disabilities resulted in significant cognitive and confidence gains for the participating dentists, dental hygienists, and assistants. Over 75 percent of the graduates were found to actively apply their training, especially in academic dentistry. (MSE)

  2. Thresholds of Principle and Preference: Exploring Procedural Variation in Postgraduate Surgical Education

    PubMed Central

    Apramian, Tavis; Cristancho, Sayra; Watling, Chris; Ott, Michael; Lingard, Lorelei

    2017-01-01

    Background Expert physicians develop their own ways of doing things. The influence of such practice variation in clinical learning is insufficiently understood. Our grounded theory study explored how residents make sense of, and behave in relation to, the procedural variations of faculty surgeons. Method We sampled senior postgraduate surgical residents to construct a theoretical framework for how residents make sense of procedural variations. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, we used marginal participant observation in the operating room across 56 surgical cases (146 hours), field interviews (38), and formal interviews (6) to develop a theoretical framework for residents’ ways of dealing with procedural variations. Data analysis used constant comparison to iteratively refine the framework and data collection until theoretical saturation was reached. Results The core category of the constructed theory was called thresholds of principle and preference and it captured how faculty members position some procedural variations as negotiable and others not. The term thresholding was coined to describe residents’ daily experiences of spotting, mapping, and negotiating their faculty members’ thresholds and defending their own emerging thresholds. Conclusions Thresholds of principle and preference play a key role in workplace-based medical education. Postgraduate medical learners are occupied on a day-to-day level with thresholding and attempting to make sense of the procedural variations of faculty. Workplace-based teaching and assessment should include an understanding of the integral role of thresholding in shaping learners’ development. Future research should explore the nature and impact of thresholding in workplace-based learning beyond the surgical context. PMID:26505105

  3. [Financing and control of surgical training].

    PubMed

    Schröder, W; Welcker, K

    2010-01-01

    The present analyses of different surgical training systems show that training of surgical residents significantly contributes to hospital costs. These are predominantly caused by prolonged operation times of residents with increased work load for other staff members in the operating room. In addition, the productivity of surgical residents is less compared to experienced surgeons. On the other hand, hospital managements save money by the lower standard wages paid to the residents. The amount of educational costs is difficult to determine because surgical training takes place as on the job training. Therefore, from an economic point of view, the two products patient care and surgical training are difficult to separate. There are no reliable cost analyses available for the German training system. At present surgical training is indirectly financed by the DRG (diagnosis-related groups) flat rates of the health insurance. Possible options of financing the surgical training are additional funding from the health department or redistribution with supplemental payment for those surgical departments which contribute significantly more to the residents' training. Statements of medical associations, health departments and health insurances demonstrate the difficulty to come to an agreement concerning the finances of the training system. Despite this controversial discussion it should be taken into consideration that there is no alternative to a high quality surgical training as this is the basis for an effective health system.

  4. Learning Basic Surgical Skills through Simulator Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvennoinen, Minna; Helfenstein, Sacha; Ruoranen, Minna; Saariluoma, Pertti

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based surgical training simulators are instrumental in skill-based training and performance measurement. However, to date, the educational employment of these tools lacks empirically founded insights and effective practical guidelines. This study examined surgical residents during computer-based simulator training of basic laparoscopic…

  5. Learning Basic Surgical Skills through Simulator Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvennoinen, Minna; Helfenstein, Sacha; Ruoranen, Minna; Saariluoma, Pertti

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based surgical training simulators are instrumental in skill-based training and performance measurement. However, to date, the educational employment of these tools lacks empirically founded insights and effective practical guidelines. This study examined surgical residents during computer-based simulator training of basic laparoscopic…

  6. Postgraduate family medicine training in Singapore--a new way forward.

    PubMed

    Wong, Teck Yee; Chong, Phui Nah; Chng, Shih Kiat; Tay, Ee Guan

    2012-05-01

    Postgraduate Family Medicine (FM) training is important to train future primary care doctors to provide accessible and cost effective healthcare. In Singapore, a structured postgraduate FM training programme has been available for 20 years. This programme is characterised by involvement of both FM and non-FM doctors, well written modules and a rigorous assessment process. However, challenges faced by both the current healthcare system and training structure underlie the need to review the training structure to ensure its relevancy for future Family Physicians (FPs) to manage the needs of their patients. A workgroup was formed to review the current FM postgraduate programme and to explore the possibility of using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) framework to enhance our current system. The workgroup felt that broad-based training and comprehensive coverage of topics are areas that are important to retain in any new FM residency programme. Weaknesses identified included a lack of early FM exposure and the need to strengthen formative assessments. New organisational structures such as Family Medicine Centres (FMC) need to be established and the involvement of the private sector in any FM residency progammes could be enhanced. The implementation of the FM Residency Programme in 2011 presented a unique opportunity to realign FM postgraduate education in line with the national objectives and to equip FPs with the necessary knowledge and skills for managing the future healthcare needs of Singaporeans.

  7. Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology. Report on a WHO Working Group (The Hague, The Netherlands, December 6-8, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The 1978 report of the Working Group of Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe in collaboration with the government of The Netherlands, is presented. The groups analyzed models of postgraduate training in clinical oncology and evaluated their suitability in relation to…

  8. Growth of Self-Perceived Clinical Competence in Postgraduate Training for General Practice and Its Relation to Potentially Influencing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, A. W. M.; Zuithoff, P.; Jansen, J. J. M.; Tan, L. H. C.; Grol, R. P. T. M.; van der Vleuten, C. P. M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the increase in self-perceived clinical competence during a three-year postgraduate training in general practice and to explore the relation between the growth of self-perceived competence and several background variables. Design: Cohort, 1995-1998. Setting: Three-year Postgraduate Training for General practice in the…

  9. Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology. Report on a WHO Working Group (The Hague, The Netherlands, December 6-8, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The 1978 report of the Working Group of Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe in collaboration with the government of The Netherlands, is presented. The groups analyzed models of postgraduate training in clinical oncology and evaluated their suitability in relation to…

  10. Impact of Modernising Medical Careers on basic surgical training and experience of oral and maxillofacial higher surgical trainees.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, Jagtar; Opie, Niel; Webster, Keith; Tanday, Ajit; Mumtaz, Shadaab; Visram, Semina

    2011-01-01

    Modernising Medical Careers (MMC) is a programme for change that aims to improve the quality of patients' care through improvement in postgraduate medical education and training. Its introduction had far reaching affects and many shortcoming due to its failure to take into account the craft specialties. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the impact of MMC on oral and maxillofacial surgical (OMFS) training. An online questionnaire was distributed to OMFS trainees, and data were gathered about current position, year of training, duration and specialties worked during basic surgical training, stage of completion of examinations and courses, and overall satisfaction with training. Comparisons were made between those who had been trained before and after MMC was introduced. Ninety-five trainees (68%) responded. Of these 66 (69%) had basic surgical training before the introduction of MMC and 29 (31%) afterwards. MMC shortened overall time spent on basic surgical training of OMFS trainees by half, to only 1 year. There were similarities between the two groups in terms of the range of specialties experienced. MMC also resulted in more trainees starting higher surgical training without their Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons. There was greater satisfaction with BST for the pre-MMC group than the post-MMC group. It is hoped that the recent changes to training that were implemented after this study will address some of the shortcomings that we have identified. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. University of Tennessee Postgraduate Training Program for Science Librarians: A Six-Year Review

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jess A.

    1973-01-01

    The interview and questionnaire responses of twenty-five graduate trainees, fifteen scientist advisors, and present employers are incorporated in this six-year review of the Postgraduate Training Program for Science Librarians at the University of Tennessee Medical Units. The program was supported by the National Library of Medicine. PMID:4800292

  12. Realisation of Post-Graduate Training for Teachers of Informatics of Rural Secondary Schools via Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavendels, Jurijs; Shitikov, Vjacheslav; Klints, Daile

    2007-01-01

    The Curriculum combining both traditional classrooms and Internet-based activities for regular post-graduate training for the teachers in informatics is developed, approved by the Ministry of Education and Science and implemented in Latvian Republic. The Curriculum is anticipated for teachers from rural schools, excludes embarrassing overnight…

  13. Learning in the working place: the educational potential of a multihead microscope in pathology postgraduate training.

    PubMed

    Sandmeier, Dominique; Bosman, Fred; Fiche, Maryse

    2009-03-01

    Training future pathologists is an important mission of many hospital anatomic pathology departments. Apprenticeship--a process in which learning and teaching tightly intertwine with daily work, is one of the main educational methods in use in postgraduate medical training. However, patient care, including pathological diagnosis, often comes first, diagnostic priorities prevailing over educational ones. Recognition of the unique educational opportunities is a prerequisite for enhancing the postgraduate learning experience. The aim of this paper is to draw attention of senior pathologists with a role as supervisor in postgraduate training on the potential educational value of a multihead microscope, a common setting in pathology departments. After reporting on an informal observation of senior and junior pathologists' meetings around the multihead microscope in our department, we review the literature on current theories of learning to provide support to the high potential educational value of these meetings for postgraduate training in pathology. We also draw from the literature on learner-centered teaching some recommendations to better support learning in this particular context. Finally, we propose clues for further studies and effective instruction during meetings around a multihead microscope.

  14. The International Research Training Group (GRK532): Practicing Cross-Border Postgraduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehses, Markus; Veith, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In 1999, the International Research Training Group "GRK532" was founded as a pilot project for cross-border European postgraduate education along the German/French/Luxembourg borders. The project consists of an interdisciplinary research programme on synthesis, isolation and characterization of new materials accompanied by an ambitious…

  15. The International Research Training Group (GRK532): Practicing Cross-Border Postgraduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehses, Markus; Veith, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In 1999, the International Research Training Group "GRK532" was founded as a pilot project for cross-border European postgraduate education along the German/French/Luxembourg borders. The project consists of an interdisciplinary research programme on synthesis, isolation and characterization of new materials accompanied by an ambitious…

  16. A novel method of assessing quality of postgraduate psychiatry training: experiences from a large training programme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most assessments of the quality of postgraduate training are based on anonymised questionnaires of trainees. We report a comprehensive assessment of the quality of training at a large postgraduate psychiatry training institute using non-anonymised face-to-face interviews with trainees and their trainers. Methods Two consultant psychiatrists interviewed 99 trainees and 109 trainers. Scoring of interview responses was determined by using a pre-defined criteria. Additional comments were recorded as free text. Interviews covered 13 domains, including: Clinical, teaching, research and management opportunities, clinical environment, clinical supervision, adequacy of job description, absence of bullying and job satisfaction. Multiple interview domain scores were combined, generating a ‘Combined’ score for each post. Results The interview response rate was 97% for trainers 88% for trainees. There was a significant correlation between trainee and trainer scores for the same interview domains (Pearson’s r = 0.968, p< 0.001). Overall scores were significantly higher for specialist psychiatry posts as compared to general adult psychiatry posts (Two tailed t-test, p < 0.001, 95% CI: -0.398 to −0.132), and significantly higher for liaison psychiatry as compared to other specialist psychiatry posts (t-test: p = 0.038, 95% CI: -0.3901, -0.0118). Job satisfaction scores of year 1 to year 3 core trainees showed a significant increase with increasing seniority (Linear regression coefficient = 0.273, 95% CI: 0.033 to 0.513, ANOVA p= 0.026). Conclusions This in-depth examination of the quality of training on a large psychiatry training programme successfully elicited strengths and weakness of our programme. Such an interview scheme could be easily implemented in smaller schemes and may well provide important information to allow for targeted improvement of training. Additionally, trends in quality of training and job satisfaction amongst various psychiatric

  17. Postgraduate fellowship education and training for nurses: the NET SMART experience.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Anne W Wojner; Brethour, Mary; Cudlip, Fern; Swatzell, Victoria; Biby, Sharon; Reiner, Dana; Kiernan, Terri-Ellen; Handler, Diane; Tocco, Susan; Yang, Joanna

    2009-12-01

    The Neurovascular Education and Training in Stroke Management and Acute Reperfusion Therapy (NET SMART) program for advanced practice nursing (APN) offers a first-of-its-kind, academic, postgraduate, fellowship program for APNs that is modeled after physician academic fellowship programs but supported by a flexible Internet-based platform. This article details the rationale, methods, and preliminary results of the NET SMART APN experience, which serves as a unique template for the development of academic postgraduate nursing fellowship programs across a variety of specialty practices.

  18. Educating vocationally trained family physicians: a survey of graduates from a postgraduate medical education programme.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Wayne K; Dovey, Susan M

    2016-06-01

    INTRODUCTION Since 1991 the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand has offered postgraduate qualifications specifically designed to educate general practitioners (GPs) about their unique work environment. AIM To determine motivations and impacts of postgraduate education for practising GPs. METHODS Survey of the 100 graduates of the University of Otago, Dunedin postgraduate general practice programme. Ninety five living graduates were approached and 70 (73.7%) responded. Quantitative data about disposition of respondents before enrolling and after completion of the programme were analysed using chi-square and paired t-tests. Free text responses about motivations, impacts and outcomes of the program were thematically analysed. RESULTS 64 GPs graduated with a postgraduate diploma and 36 with a masters degree in general practice. Although the mean number of graduates was 3.5 and 2.0 (respectively), annual enrolments averaged 25.1. Most graduates (60.9%) were aged in their 40s when they started studying and most (94.3%) had a spouse and/or children at home. DISCUSSION This voluntary postgraduate medical education complements traditional medical training but has low external value despite personal, practising and professional benefits. Graduates valued engagement above completion of a qualification. KEYWORDS Medical education; general practitioners; scholarship; professionalism.

  19. Delivering surgical training in the People's Republic of China: are current mechanisms adequate?

    PubMed

    Wan, Yizhou Carl; Wan, Yize Isalina

    2008-12-01

    The need for comprehensive surgical care for China's vast population is evident in improving patient treatment outcomes. Rapid economic development has meant that China has become a developing country with a unique opportunity to formulate and strategise training of its surgeons to build a firm foundation for the advancement of clinical surgery and the surgical sciences. Currently deployed within the three-tiered health care system, surgical training in China is complex. Medical school education is variable in duration from 3-8 years yet the possibility of surgical training is not open to all graduates. Postgraduate training, known as Standard Surgical Training (SST) lasts for approximately five years and is separated into two phases by the central government, however there is no central regulation of the training progression and certification is organised at a local level. Academic requirements are high and research output is mandatory at higher level training, with doctorates able to fast-track through surgical training. There are major concerns with equality and disparity in training resources and opportunities as well as actually addressing clinical needs of local patient populations. Despite this, surgical training in China is undergoing constant development and its future will prove important observations of international medical education strategies.

  20. Evaluating Postgraduate Public Health and Biomedical Training Program Outcomes: Lost Opportunities and Renewed Interest

    PubMed Central

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica; Nelson, David E.; Marcus, Stephen; Kudura, Aisha; Nghiem, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    To identify recent studies in the scientific literature that evaluated structured postgraduate public health and biomedical training programs and reported career outcomes among individual trainees. A comprehensive search of several databases was conducted to identify published studies in English between January 1995–January 2012 that evaluated career outcomes for trainees completing full-time public health or biomedical training programs of at least 12 months duration, with structured training offered on-site. Of the over 600 articles identified, only 13 met the inclusion criteria. Six studies evaluated U.S. federal agency programs and six were of university-based programs. Seven programs were solely or predominantly of physicians, with only one consisting mainly of PhDs. Most studies used a cohort or cross-sectional design. The studies were mainly descriptive, with only four containing statistical data. Type of employment was the most common outcome measure (n=12) and number of scientific publications (n=6) was second. The lack of outcomes evaluation data from postgraduate public health and biomedical training programs in the published literature is a lost opportunity for understanding the career paths of trainees and the potential impact of training programs. Suggestions for increasing interest in conducting and reporting evaluation studies of these structured postgraduate training programs are provided. PMID:23225110

  1. Evaluating postgraduate public health and biomedical training program outcomes: : lost opportunities and renewed interest.

    PubMed

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica; Nelson, David E; Marcus, Stephen; Kudura, Aisha; Nghiem, Elaine

    2013-03-01

    To identify recent studies in the scientific literature that evaluated structured postgraduate public health and biomedical training programs and reported career outcomes among individual trainees, a comprehensive search of several databases was conducted to identify published studies in English between January 1995 and January 2012. Studies of interest included those that evaluated career outcomes for trainees completing full-time public health or biomedical training programs of at least 12 months duration, with structured training offered on-site. Of the over 600 articles identified, only 13 met the inclusion criteria. Six studies evaluated US federal agency programs and six were of university-based programs. Seven programs were solely or predominantly of physicians, with only one consisting mainly of PhDs. Most studies used a cohort or cross-sectional design. The studies were mainly descriptive, with only four containing statistical data. Type of employment was the most common outcome measure (n = 12) and number of scientific publications (n = 6) was second. The lack of outcomes evaluation data from postgraduate public health and biomedical training programs in the published literature is a lost opportunity for understanding the career paths of trainees and the potential impact of training programs. Suggestions for increasing interest in conducting and reporting evaluation studies of these structured postgraduate training programs are provided.

  2. Improved education after implementation of the Danish postgraduate medical training reform.

    PubMed

    Kodal, Troels; Kjær, Niels Kristian; Qvesel, Dorte

    2012-03-01

    A reform of educational postgraduate medical training was launched in Denmark in 2004. The reform was based on a report by the Danish Medical Specialist Commission and consisted of a number of initiatives that were all aimed at improving the quality of medical training. Since 1998, all junior doctors in Denmark have been requested to rate the quality of their training on a Danish standardized questionnaire (DSQ) comprising 24 questions. In this study, we examined how junior doctors in hospitals rated their postgraduate medical training before and six years after the reform was implemented. This study is a cross-sectional register study of DSQ ratings of the postgraduate training in the region of Southern Denmark in 2002-2004 and in 2010. The ratings were extracted from the official database: www.evaluer.dk. For comparison, a total of 1,028 ratings from before the reform and 686 ratings from after the reform were extracted. 70% of junior doctors filled in a DSQ in 2010. The doctors' perceptions of the training improved from 2002-2004 to 2010 as far as educational outcome and the department's educational effort were concerned. However, no change was evident in several questions targeting educational management. Based on the junior doctors' DSQ ratings, the quality of postgraduate training has improved in several areas from 2002-2004 to 2010. But there is still room for improvement. Developing a new, validated questionnaire should be considered in order to ensure a high credibility in future work on quality.o. not relevant. not relevant.

  3. Acceptability and feasibility of mini-clinical evaluation exercise as a formative assessment tool for workplace-based assessment for surgical postgraduate students.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M K; Singh, T; Badyal, D K

    2017-01-01

    Despite an increasing emphasis on workplace-based assessment (WPBA) during medical training, the existing assessment system largely relies on summative assessment while formative assessment is less valued. Various tools have been described for WPBA, mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) being one of them. Mini-CEX is well accepted in Western countries, however, reports of its use in India are scarce. We conducted this study to assess acceptability and feasibility of mini-CEX as a formative assessment tool for WPBA of surgical postgraduate students in an Indian setting. Faculty members and 2nd year surgical residents were sensitized toward mini-CEX and requisite numbers of exercises were conducted. The difficulties during conduction of these exercises were identified, recorded, and appropriate measures were taken to address them. At the conclusion, the opinion of residents and faculty members regarding their experience with mini-CEX was taken using a questionnaire. The results were analyzed using simple statistical tools. Nine faculty members out of 11 approached participated in the study (81.8%). All 16 2nd year postgraduate surgical residents participated (100%). Sixty mini-CEX were conducted over 7 months. Each resident underwent 3-5 encounters. The mean time taken by the assessor for observation was 12.3 min (8-30 min) while the mean feedback time was 4.2 min (3-10 min). The faculty reported good overall satisfaction with mini-CEX and found it acceptable as a formative assessment tool. Three faculty members (33.3%) reported mini-CEX as more time-consuming while 2 (22.2%) found it difficult to carry the exercises often. All residents accepted mini-CEX and most of them reported good to high satisfaction with the exercises conducted. Mini-CEX is well accepted by residents and faculty as a formative assessment tool. It is feasible to utilize mini-CEX for WPBA of postgraduate students of surgery.

  4. Education, postgraduate training, board certification, and experience requirements in advertisements for clinical faculty positions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, John E; Hawkey, Lisa

    2010-05-12

    To compare requirements for pharmacy practice faculty positions in advertisements from 2002 through 2006 to those reported from 1990 through 1994. Positions advertised from January 2002 through December 2006 in 3 newsletters and journals were evaluated for required or preferred degree, completion of residencies and/or fellowships, years of work experience, board certification, and other postgraduate training and education. Advertisements were separated by tenure-eligibility and rank. Of 426 advertisements for faculty members, 77% required additional training, including residencies and fellowships or their equivalent in experience. Board certification was required in only 0.9% but preferred in 11%. Advertisements for tenure-eligible positions did not have more extensive requirements than nontenured, nor did upper vs. lower rank. Compared to 1996, the number of advertisements requiring postgraduate training to secure a faculty position almost doubled. Whether the qualifications of faculty members recruited match the requirements is unknown.

  5. [Status of the clinical laboratory in the mandatory postgraduate medical training system: introduction].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Tohru

    2006-06-01

    To understand the role of the clinical laboratory in the era of mandatory postgraduate medical training, I carried out a questionnaire survey in April 2005 among both university hospitals and clinical teaching hospitals located in the Kinki area. As a result, eleven (84.6%) of the 13 responding laboratories participated in clinical laboratory medical education with an obligatory training program (5 laboratories), with an elective program (3 labs) or both (3 labs). Among the 8 laboratories with an obligatory program, educational lecture subjects included reversed clinicopathological conference (7 labs), blood transfusion (4 labs), laboratory microbiology (4 labs), and blood gas analysis (BGA) (3 labs). On the other hand, in the elective training programs among 6 laboratories, laboratory microbiology including infection control was most frequently held (4 labs) followed by blood transfusion, laboratory hematology and urinalysis (3 labs respectively). Concerning 4 areas, namely, blood transfusion, 12-lead electrocardiography at rest, BGA and ultrasonography, which have been defined as obligatory laboratory techniques for all trainees in mandatory postgraduate medical training, the majority (84.6%) of the responders in this survey replied that they were not sufficient, whereas, Gram's staining was most frequently (69.2%) recommended as an additional obligatory technique in mandatory postgraduate medical training.

  6. European Psychiatric Association (EPA) guidance on post-graduate psychiatric training in Europe.

    PubMed

    Mayer, S; van der Gaag, R J; Dom, G; Wassermann, D; Gaebel, W; Falkai, P; Schüle, C

    2014-02-01

    The European Union Free Movement Directive gives professionals the opportunity to work and live within the European Union, but does not give specific requirements regarding how the specialists in medicine have to be trained, with the exception of a required minimum of 4 years of education. Efforts have been undertaken to harmonize post-graduate training in psychiatry in Europe since the Treaty of Rome 1957, with the founding of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) and establishment of a charter outlining how psychiatrists should be trained. However, the different curricula for post-graduate training were only compared by surveys, never through a systematic review of the official national requirements. The published survey data still shows great differences between European countries and unlike other UEMS Boards, the Board of Psychiatry did not introduce a certification for specialists willing to practice in a foreign country within Europe. Such a European certification could help to keep a high qualification level for post-graduate training in psychiatry all over Europe. Moreover, it would make it easier for employers to assess the educational level of European psychiatrists applying for a job in their field.

  7. The use and effectiveness of cadaveric workshops in higher surgical training: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gilbody, J; Prasthofer, A W; Ho, K; Costa, M L

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to describe the use of cadavers in postgraduate surgical training, to determine the effect of cadaveric training sessions on surgical trainees' technical skills performance and to determine how trainees perceive the use of cadaveric workshops as a training tool. An electronic literature search was performed, restricted to the English language, of MEDLINE(®), Embase™, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL(®)), Centre for Agricultural Bioscience (CAB) Abstracts, the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC™) database, the British Education Index, the Australian Education Index, the Cochrane Library and the Best Evidence in Medical Education website. Studies that were eligible for review included primary studies evaluating the use of human cadaveric surgical workshops for surgical skills training in postgraduate surgical trainees and those that included a formal assessment of skills performance or trainee satisfaction after the training session. Eight studies were identified as satisfying the eligibility criteria. One study showed a benefit from cadaveric workshop training with regard to the ability of trainees to perform relatively simple emergency procedures and one showed weak evidence of a benefit in performing more complex surgical procedures. Three studies showed that trainees valued the experience of cadaveric training. Evidence for the effectiveness of cadaveric workshops in surgical training is currently limited. In particular, there is little research into how these workshops improve the performance of surgical trainees during subsequent live surgery. However, both trainees and assessors hold them in high regard and feel they help to improve operative skills. Further research into the role of cadaveric workshops is required.

  8. E-learning in surgical education and training.

    PubMed

    Larvin, Mike

    2009-03-01

    For most surgeons and surgical educators, e-learning is relatively new and confusing. This article attempts to explain the key concepts behind e-learning, as well as its benefits and risks. E-learning has become a fixed feature within Higher and Professional Education and has been prioritized by Universities around the world, as well as all six Surgical Royal Colleges. Trainees have grown up with virtual learning environments and expect similar provision for their postgraduate studies, but have a greater need for basic science learning. Dispersal of trainees across duty rotas and geographically makes e-learning more attractive, but preserving peer and trainer communication is as important as content. Recent changes in surgical education and training have also made electronic and distance learning more attractive than previously. Initial work by the Colleges is now being evaluated and important lessons have emerged. The UK Department of Health has made medical e-learning a priority and it is now the largest e-learning provider in Europe. Changes in the World Wide Web, with a shift to more social-networking activity in education and to web-based delivery to small, ubiquitous portable devices will increase opportunities for surgical e-learning.

  9. Postgraduate radiology training in sub-Saharan Africa: a review of current educational resources.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Deborah A; Pretorius, E Scott

    2005-02-01

    Postgraduate training programs in radiology exist in several African nations. The ability of these programs to train radiologists is necessarily affected by local availability of educational resources, including clinical case volume, radiology equipment and maintenance, number of teaching faculty, and library and computer facilities. We sought to determine the current resources of a sample of African radiology education programs. Site visits were conducted at three separate radiology training programs, one in Ghana and two in South Africa. At each site, the investigator conducted a technology census, assessed library resources, observed daily trainee activities, and interviewed trainees, faculty, and statisticians. African radiology trainees receive considerable training in fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and plain film radiography, but receive considerably less training in nuclear medicine, mammography, magnetic resonance imaging, and interventional radiology. A large amount of equipment in African teaching hospitals is inoperative because of lack of maintenance programs. Faculty to resident ratios in African teaching hospitals are much lower than in American hospitals. Needs of training programs vary greatly from hospital to hospital, and from country to country. Radiologists, radiology organizations, and radiology vendors from high-income nations are in a unique position to help Africa's postgraduate radiology training programs fulfill their mission of training Africa's next generation of radiologists. It is desirable that long-term commitments be made to teaching hospitals so that scarce donated resources may be put to the best possible use.

  10. [Practical games as one of the forms for optimizing the academic process in physician postgraduate training].

    PubMed

    Bobrov, V A; Davydova, I V; Bilinskiĭ, E A; Beziuk, N N; Shlykova, N A; Zaĭtseva, V I; Kozlovskiĭ, V I; Aleksandrova, L A

    1998-05-01

    Described in the article is one of the forms of optimization of the instructional process in the postgraduation physician training--"business-like games". Highly skilled, competent position of the teacher who conducts a business-like game secures an active participation in learning of students, helps in opening the mind, broadening the outlook on the problem under consideration, gives much incentive to further independent work on the discussed issues.

  11. The role of simulation in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Torkington, J; Smith, S G; Rees, B I; Darzi, A

    2000-03-01

    Surgical training has undergone many changes in the last decade. One outcome of these changes is the interest that has been generated in the possibility of training surgical skills outside the operating theatre. Simulation of surgical procedures and human tissue, if perfect, would allow complete transfer of techniques learnt in a skills laboratory directly to the operating theatre. Several techniques of simulation are available including artificial tissues, animal models and virtual reality computer simulation. Each is discussed in this article and their advantages and disadvantages considered.

  12. Surgical fellowship training in Canada: what is its current status and is improvement required?

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Markku T; Latter, David A; Backstein, David; Webster, Fiona; Harris, Kenneth A

    2012-02-01

    This paper examines current issues concerning surgical fellowship training in Canada. Other than information from a few studies of fellowship training in North America, there are scant data on this subject in the literature. Little is known about the demographic characteristics of those who pursue fellowship training in Canada, what the experiences and expectations are of fellows and their supervisors with respect to the strengths and weaknesses of this level of training, or how this level of education fits in with Canadian undergraduate and postgraduate medical training. We summarize current knowledge about fellowship training in Canada as it pertains to demographic characteristics, finances, work hours, residency training, preparation for clinical and research work and satisfaction with training. Most information on surgical fellowship training comes from the United States. As such, we used information from American studies to supplement the Canadian data. Because a surgical fellowship experience in Canada may be different from that in the United States, we propose that Canadian surgical fellows and their supervisors should be surveyed to gain an understanding of such information. This knowledge could be used to improve surgical fellowship training in Canada.

  13. Surgical fellowship training in Canada: What is its current status and is improvement required?

    PubMed Central

    Nousiainen, Markku T.; Latter, David A.; Backstein, David; Webster, Fiona; Harris, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines current issues concerning surgical fellowship training in Canada. Other than information from a few studies of fellowship training in North America, there are scant data on this subject in the literature. Little is known about the demographic characteristics of those who pursue fellowship training in Canada, what the experiences and expectations are of fellows and their supervisors with respect to the strengths and weaknesses of this level of training, or how this level of education fits in with Canadian undergraduate and postgraduate medical training. We summarize current knowledge about fellowship training in Canada as it pertains to demographic characteristics, finances, work hours, residency training, preparation for clinical and research work and satisfaction with training. Most information on surgical fellowship training comes from the United States. As such, we used information from American studies to supplement the Canadian data. Because a surgical fellowship experience in Canada may be different from that in the United States, we propose that Canadian surgical fellows and their supervisors should be surveyed to gain an understanding of such information. This knowledge could be used to improve surgical fellowship training in Canada. PMID:22269304

  14. Postgraduate research training: the PhD and MD thesis.

    PubMed

    Higginson, I; Corner, J

    1996-04-01

    Higher research degrees, such as the PhD, MPhil and MD, have existed within universities for 80 years or more, although the differences between the MD and PhD remain confused. A higher research degree training provides individuals with greater research knowledge and skills, and benefits the specialty. Concern exists about the levels of supervision sometimes provided, failure to complete degrees, and the variable levels of research knowledge and skills attained. We propose that higher research degrees in palliative care have four functions: extending personal scholarship, generating knowledge, training for the individual and contributing to the growth of the specialty. Such an approach may include: a formalised first year with taught components such as in research MSc programmes, formal supervision and progress assessment. In palliative care, clinical and academic approaches need greater integration. Multiprofessional learning is essential. To allow individuals to undertake higher research degree programmes, fellowships or specific funding are needed.

  15. Evolving Educational Techniques in Surgical Training.

    PubMed

    Evans, Charity H; Schenarts, Kimberly D

    2016-02-01

    Training competent and professional surgeons efficiently and effectively requires innovation and modernization of educational methods. Today's medical learner is quite adept at using multiple platforms to gain information, providing surgical educators with numerous innovative avenues to promote learning. With the growth of technology, and the restriction of work hours in surgical education, there has been an increase in use of simulation, including virtual reality, robotics, telemedicine, and gaming. The use of simulation has shifted the learning of basic surgical skills to the laboratory, reserving limited time in the operating room for the acquisition of complex surgical skills".

  16. Advanced training for primary care and general practice nurses: enablers and outcomes of postgraduate education.

    PubMed

    Hallinan, Christine M; Hegarty, Kelsey L

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to understand enablers to participation in postgraduate education for primary care nurses (PCNs), and to explore how postgraduate education has advanced their nursing practice. Cross-sectional questionnaires were mailed out in April 2012 to current and past students undertaking postgraduate studies in primary care nursing at The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Questionnaires were returned by 100 out of 243 nurses (response rate 41%). Ninety-one per cent (91/100) of the respondents were first registered as nurses in Australia. Fifty-seven per cent were hospital trained and 43% were university educated to attain their initial nurse qualification. The respondents reported opportunities to expand scope of practice (99%; 97/98), improve clinical practice (98%; 97/99), increase work satisfaction (93%; 91/98) and increase practice autonomy (92%; 89/97) as factors that most influenced participation in postgraduate education in primary care nursing. Major enablers for postgraduate studies were scholarship access (75%; 71/95) and access to distance education (74%; 72/98). Many respondents reported an increased scope of practice (98%; 95/97) and increased job satisfaction (71%; 70/98) as an education outcome. Only 29% (28/97) cited an increase in pay-rate as an outcome. Of the 73 PCNs currently working in general practice, many anticipated an increase in time spent on the preparation of chronic disease management plans (63%; 45/72), multidisciplinary care plans (56%; 40/72) and adult health checks (56%; 40/72) in the preceding 12 months. Recommendations emerging from findings include: (1) increased access to scholarships for nurses undertaking postgraduate education in primary care nursing is imperative; (2) alternative modes of course delivery need to be embedded in primary care nursing education; (3) the development of Australian primary care policy, including policy on funding models, needs to more accurately reflect the

  17. Training surgical residents: the current Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Geoffrion, Roxana; Choi, Jae Won; Lentz, Gretchen M

    2011-01-01

    Numerous constraints may limit the practical experience of surgical residents. Current research supports a need for structured curricula, skills acquisition, and feedback outside the operating room (OR) and formal assessment of technical skills. We examined the current state of surgical skill teaching and evaluation for Canadian residents across surgical specialties. One hundred twenty-three surveys were mailed to surgical residency program directors of all 17 Canadian medical schools. Nine surgical specialties were identified. Program demographics, details of surgical skill teaching methods, and several surgical skill assessment modalities used from admission to graduation were surveyed. Obstetrics and Gynecology (ObGyn) survey results were compared with other surgical specialties. Seventy surveys (57%) from 15 medical schools (88%) were returned. All specialties were represented in responses. ObGyn residents had fewer surgical training months per year than other residents (4.9 versus 8.5 months; p = 0.001). The most common teaching method was didactic lectures (86%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 75%-93%) for all programs. Inanimate and/or animate skills laboratories and didactic lectures were equally used by 90% (95% CI, 55%-100%) of ObGyn programs. Virtual reality simulators for procedure-specific surgical skills ranked low at 30% (95% CI, 7%-65%) use in ObGyn programs. Most programs had a dedicated space to teach and practice skills outside the OR. Assessment, feedback, and determination of surgical competence were most commonly performed via subjective evaluation by surgical mentors. Forty percent of ObGyn programs versus 76% of other programs used a local program-specific surgical training curriculum (p = 0.054). Most program directors who did not have access to a standard training curriculum wished to have one implemented. Lectures and subjective evaluations are the most common educational tools in Canadian surgical residencies. Despite the availability of

  18. Survey on professional training in three Italian. Post-Graduate Schools of Public Health.

    PubMed

    Taietti, D; Tirani, M; Shahi, E; Garavelli, E; Nobile, M; Cereda, D; Lanzoni, M; Biganzoli, E; Castaldi, S

    2015-01-01

    In 2005 the European Union (EU) recognized the equivalence within its member states of qualifications conferred by post-graduate schools (PGS) in public health. In Italy, ministerial decree no. 176 of 1st August 2005 defined the training goals and the related training programmes (Training Activities) leading to conferral of the qualification of specialist in Public Health and Preventive Medicine (PHPM). This study aimed to develop and validate an assessment tool for professional training programmes. The purpose has been to identify and evaluate their typical features and, at the same time, to enable comparison between Italian PGSs in PHPMs. In the first phase, a multiple-choice questionnaire was created, using a Likert scale with scores from 1 to 6. This was prepared by post-graduates attending the Milan PGS. This tool was validated by applying it to a pilot sample of post-graduates attending the Milan PGS in PHPM. Following this, a second round of discussion and validation of the model took place, involving 61 post-graduates attending PGSs in PHPM at the Universities of Palermo, Pisa and Turin. A web platform was used that enabled the survey to be created and managed by defining and managing pre-set interview templates. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: Section A - Twenty-eight percent of post-graduates attended their training programme in a university or research centre, 29.8% in a hospital and 35.1% in a Local Health Unit. This training program lasted more than 12 months in 37% of the cases. Section B - The answers were all above pass-level (3 to 4 = satisfactory) except as regards the level of empowerment and the workload, which was judged to be unsatisfactory overall.The skills of the staff present in the facility attended were judged favourably (3.5). Section C - Section C investigates the duration and autonomy of the activities performed during the training programmes aimed at meeting the training requirements set out in ministerial decree no

  19. Surgical simulation in orthopaedic skills training.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Mabrey, Jay D; Jazrawi, Laith M; Egol, Kenneth A

    2012-07-01

    Mastering rapidly evolving orthopaedic surgical techniques requires a lengthy period of training. Current work-hour restrictions and cost pressures force trainees to face the challenge of acquiring more complex surgical skills in a shorter amount of time. As a result, alternative methods to improve the surgical skills of orthopaedic trainees outside the operating room have been developed. These methods include hands-on training in a laboratory setting using synthetic bones or cadaver models as well as software tools and computerized simulators that enable trainees to plan and simulate orthopaedic operations in a three-dimensional virtual environment. Laboratory-based training offers potential benefits in the development of basic surgical skills, such as using surgical tools and implants appropriately, achieving competency in procedures that have a steep learning curve, and assessing already acquired skills while minimizing concerns for patient safety, operating room time, and financial constraints. Current evidence supporting the educational advantages of surgical simulation in orthopaedic skills training is limited. Despite this, positive effects on the overall education of orthopaedic residents, and on maintaining the proficiency of practicing orthopaedic surgeons, are anticipated.

  20. Preferences and Outcomes for Chemotherapy Teaching in a Postgraduate Obstetrics and Gynecology Training Program.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew L; Ogunwale, Abayomi; Clark, Brian A; Kilpatrick, Charlie C; Mach, Claire M

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether chemotherapy teaching is a desired component of postgraduate training programs in obstetrics and gynecology and assess its effect on practicing clinicians. After obtaining institutional review board approval, 99 individuals who completed postgraduate training at a single academic medical center between 2005 and 2013 were invited to complete an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize responses. Of the 99 individuals, 68 (68%) completed the survey. Respondents included physicians currently practicing in both academic medicine (n = 36, 52.9%) and private practice (n = 24, 35.2%). Most respondents (n = 60, 88.2%) indicated that chemotherapy teaching was a desired feature of their training and expressed a preference for both formal didactics and direct clinical involvement (n = 55, 80.2%). Benefits identified by respondents included improved insight into the management of symptoms commonly associated with chemotherapy (n = 55, 82.1%) and an enhanced ability to counsel patients referred for oncology care (n = 48, 70.5%). All respondents who pursued training in gynecologic oncology following residency (n = 6) indicated that chemotherapy teaching favorably affected their fellowship experience. Of the 6 gynecologic oncologists, 3 (50%) who responded also indicated that chemotherapy teaching during residency improved their performance in fellowship interviews. Chemotherapy teaching was a desired feature of postgraduate training in general obstetrics and gynecology at the institution studied. Consideration should be given to creating curricula that incorporate the principles and practice of chemotherapy and address the needs of obstetrics and gynecology trainees who intend to pursue both general and subspecialty practice. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. EC4 European Syllabus for Post-Graduate Training in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: version 3 - 2005.

    PubMed

    Zerah, Simone; McMurray, Janet; Bousquet, Bernard; Baum, Hannsjorg; Beastall, Graham H; Blaton, Vic; Cals, Marie-Josèphe; Duchassaing, Danielle; Gaudeau-Toussaint, Marie-Françoise; Harmoinen, Aimo; Hoffmann, Hans; Jansen, Rob T; Kenny, Desmond; Kohse, Klaus P; Köller, Ursula; Gobert, Jean-Gérard; Linget, Christine; Lund, Erik; Nubile, Giuseppe; Opp, Matthias; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinon, Georges; Queralto, José M; Reguengo, Henrique; Rizos, Demetrios; Szekeres, Thomas; Vidaud, Michel; Wallinder, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The EC4 Syllabus for Postgraduate Training is the basis for the European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The syllabus: Indicates the level of requirements in postgraduate training to harmonise the postgraduate education in the European Union (EU); Indicates the level of content of national training programmes to obtain adequate knowledge and experience; Is approved by all EU societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. The syllabus is not primarily meant to be a training guide, but on the basis of the overview given (common minimal programme), national societies should formulate programmes that indicate where knowledge and experience is needed. The main points of this programme are: Indicates the level of requirements in postgraduate training to harmonise the postgraduate education in the European Union (EU); Indicates the level of content of national training programmes to obtain adequate knowledge and experience; Is approved by all EU societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. Knowledge in biochemistry, haematology, immunology, etc.; Pre-analytical conditions; Evaluation of results; Interpretations (post-analytical phase); Laboratory management; and Quality insurance management. The aim of this version of the syllabus is to be in accordance with the Directive of Professional Qualifications published on 30 September 2005. To prepare the common platforms planned in this directive, the disciplines are divided into four categories: Indicates the level of requirements in postgraduate training to harmonise the postgraduate education in the European Union (EU); Indicates the level of content of national training programmes to obtain adequate knowledge and experience; Is approved by all EU societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. Knowledge in biochemistry, haematology, immunology, etc.; Pre-analytical conditions; Evaluation of results; Interpretations (post-analytical phase); Laboratory

  2. Robotic Surgical Training in an Academic Institution

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, W. Randolph; Nifong, L. Wiley; Chapman, William H. H.; Felger, Jason E.; Bailey, B. Marcus; Ballint, Tara; Mendleson, Kim G.; Kim, Victor B.; Young, James A.; Albrecht, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To detail robotic procedure development and clinical applications for mitral valve, biliary, and gastric reflux operations, and to implement a multispecialty robotic surgery training curriculum for both surgeons and surgical teams. Summary Background Data Remote, accurate telemanipulation of intracavitary instruments by general and cardiac surgeons is now possible. Complex technologic advancements in surgical robotics require well-designed training programs. Moreover, efficient robotic surgical procedures must be developed methodically and safely implemented clinically. Methods Advanced training on robotic systems provides surgeon confidence when operating in tiny intracavitary spaces. Three-dimensional vision and articulated instrument control are essential. The authors’ two da Vinci robotic systems have been dedicated to procedure development, clinical surgery, and training of surgical specialists. Their center has been the first United States site to train surgeons formally in clinical robotics. Results Established surgeons and residents have been trained using a defined robotic surgical educational curriculum. Also, 30 multispecialty teams have been trained in robotic mechanics and electronics. Initially, robotic procedures were developed experimentally and are described. In the past year the authors have performed 52 robotic-assisted clinical operations: 18 mitral valve repairs, 20 cholecystectomies, and 14 Nissen fundoplications. These respective operations required 108, 28, and 73 minutes of robotic telemanipulation to complete. Procedure times for the last half of the abdominal operations decreased significantly, as did the knot-tying time in mitral operations. There have been no deaths and few complications. One mitral patient had postoperative bleeding. Conclusion Robotic surgery can be performed safely with excellent results. The authors have developed an effective curriculum for training teams in robotic surgery. After training, surgeons

  3. Robotic surgical training in an academic institution.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, W R; Nifong, L W; Chapman, W H; Felger, J E; Bailey, B M; Ballint, T; Mendleson, K G; Kim, V B; Young, J A; Albrecht, R A

    2001-10-01

    To detail robotic procedure development and clinical applications for mitral valve, biliary, and gastric reflux operations, and to implement a multispecialty robotic surgery training curriculum for both surgeons and surgical teams. Remote, accurate telemanipulation of intracavitary instruments by general and cardiac surgeons is now possible. Complex technologic advancements in surgical robotics require well-designed training programs. Moreover, efficient robotic surgical procedures must be developed methodically and safely implemented clinically. Advanced training on robotic systems provides surgeon confidence when operating in tiny intracavitary spaces. Three-dimensional vision and articulated instrument control are essential. The authors' two da Vinci robotic systems have been dedicated to procedure development, clinical surgery, and training of surgical specialists. Their center has been the first United States site to train surgeons formally in clinical robotics. Established surgeons and residents have been trained using a defined robotic surgical educational curriculum. Also, 30 multispecialty teams have been trained in robotic mechanics and electronics. Initially, robotic procedures were developed experimentally and are described. In the past year the authors have performed 52 robotic-assisted clinical operations: 18 mitral valve repairs, 20 cholecystectomies, and 14 Nissen fundoplications. These respective operations required 108, 28, and 73 minutes of robotic telemanipulation to complete. Procedure times for the last half of the abdominal operations decreased significantly, as did the knot-tying time in mitral operations. There have been no deaths and few complications. One mitral patient had postoperative bleeding. Robotic surgery can be performed safely with excellent results. The authors have developed an effective curriculum for training teams in robotic surgery. After training, surgeons have applied these methods effectively and safely.

  4. Use of extramural ambulatory care curricula in postgraduate medical training.

    PubMed

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S; Satcher, D'Juanna; Turner, Teri L; Sisson, Stephen D; Fenick, Ada M

    2015-04-01

    Extramural curricula developed for the purpose of sharing with other institutions have been designed to improve education on important topics in ambulatory care. We sought to assess the usage rates of these curricula among paediatric, internal medicine, and combined medicine-paediatrics residency programmes in the United States. Surveys on aspects of trainee continuity clinic were sent to paediatric and medicine-paediatrics programme directors in 2012. Surveys contained an item asking respondents about their use of extramural ambulatory care curricula. Since no similar recent data were available for internal medicine, and to verify the accuracy of the paediatric survey data, we queried the editors of four widely used curricula for subscription information. Descriptive and inferential statistics were calculated. Responses from paediatric programmes indicated that 48 of 111 (43 %) were using an extramural curriculum, compared with 39 of 60 (65 %) medicine-paediatrics programmes (p = 0.007). Editor query revealed a collective subscription rate of internal medicine programmes (300 of 402, 75 %), which was greater than the subscription rate of paediatric programmes (90 of 201, 45 %) (p < 0.001). Training programmes in paediatrics, internal medicine, and combined medicine-paediatrics utilize extramural curricula to guide education in ambulatory care, but internal medicine and medicine-paediatrics programmes employ these curricula at greater rates than paediatric programmes.

  5. Is Post-Graduate Training Essential for Practice Readiness?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Daniel; Speedie, Marilyn

    2015-12-01

    Few things are more fundamental to the purpose of health professions training than to prepare practice-ready health professionals. The Accreditation Council of Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards 2016 address graduate readiness to 1) provide direct patient care in a variety of health care settings (practice-ready) and 2) contribute as a member of an interprofessional collaborative patient care team (team-ready). ACPE Standards 2007 states that graduates should be prepared to deliver direct patient care. This includes the ability to design, implement, monitor, evaluate, and adjust pharmacy care plans that are patient specific and to function effectively as a member of an interprofessional team. Yet, controversy remains within the profession regarding the practice-readiness of PharmD graduates, which has been further fueled by the recent ACCP White Paper on Collaborative Drug Therapy Management and Comprehensive Medication Management - 2015. This commentary makes the case that PharmD graduates are practice-ready and it offers a solution that may settle this lingering controversy.

  6. Sawbones laboratory in orthopedic surgical training

    PubMed Central

    Hetaimish, Bandar M.

    2016-01-01

    Sawbones are artificial bones designed to simulate the bone architecture, as well as the bone’s physical properties. The incorporation of sawbones simulation laboratories in many orthopedic training programs has provided the residents with flexibility in learning and scheduling that align with their working hour limitations. This review paper deliberates the organization of sawbones simulation in orthopedic surgical training to enhance trainee’s future learning. In addition, it explores the implications of sawbones simulation in orthopedic surgical teaching and evaluation. It scrutinizes the suitability of practicing on sawbones at the simulation laboratory to improve orthopedic trainee’s learning. This will be followed with recommendations for future enhancement of sawbones simulation-based learning in orthopedic surgical training. PMID:27052276

  7. Comparing the outcomes of different postgraduate year training programs in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Peng-Wei; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Fu, Ren-Huei; Huang, Jing-Long; Liao, Mei-Chen; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2015-12-01

    Postgraduate year training programs play an important role in the development of a comprehensive medical education. The goal of these training programs is to inculcate in physicians the expected level of skill in patient care. After the initiation of such programs in the USA, Europe, and Japan, studies were conducted in Taiwan to investigate relevant training methods, and a training system was established in 2003. Beginning with 3-month programs, followed by 6-month programs, the programs were constantly modified and enhanced by the establishment of the 1-year training program in 2011. This year was the transition period from the 6-month programs to the 1-year programs. We used a 50-item multiple choice question (MCQ) test and six 10-min stations for objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), which was composed of four stations relating to standardized patients and two stations concerning the clinical skill evaluation, to evaluate the learning results of the trainees. The trainees were divided into four groups according to the training program. There was no significant difference between the performance of the 6 months and 1-year groups. The p values were 0.424 in the MCQ test and 0.082 in the OSCE evaluation. A well-designed postgraduate training program should develop trainees' competencies. The results of this study may provide useful insight for ways to improve the design of training programs. Further investigation to better understand the impact of different programs is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Communication skills training in postgraduate medicine: the development of a new course.

    PubMed

    Dacre, J; Richardson, J; Noble, L; Stephens, K; Parker, N

    2004-12-01

    It has long been accepted that communication is of central importance in healthcare, and a core aspect of clinical competence. Many educational institutions and Royal Colleges now reflect this and consider communication skills a priority in postgraduate examination. The new examination "Practical Assessment of Clinical and Examination Skills" has replaced the Royal College of Physicians MRCP part 2 clinical and oral examination. This examination now consists of five clinical stations, two of which focus on communication skills. A short course for postgraduate trainees has been designed to address the communication skills requirements of the part 2 clinical examination. The aims, development, and content of the course are described. Emphasis is placed on candidates practising skills with patients and receiving feedback during the course. Evidence suggests that practice with feedback is an essential ingredient of communication skills courses, and is more effective than other methods such as observing experts or video examples, or simply discussing issues in communication. Results of a preliminary evaluation indicate that the course was perceived as valuable by candidates and that the aims, format, and content were appropriate. Although the preliminary evaluation was largely positive, it could be argued that the acid test of the effectiveness of a course is an objective evaluation of skills, observed before and after the course, a development that is being considered for future evaluation of the course. Recommendations for applying this type of training to postgraduate trainees in any branch of medicine are given.

  9. The future of surgical training in the context of the 'Shape of Training' Review: Consensus recommendations by the Association of Surgeons in Training.

    PubMed

    Harries, Rhiannon L; Williams, Adam P; Ferguson, Henry J M; Mohan, Helen M; Beamish, Andrew J; Gokani, Vimal J

    2016-11-01

    ASiT has long maintained that in order to provide the best quality care to patients in the UK and Republic of Ireland, it is critical that surgeons are trained to the highest standards. In addition, it is imperative that surgery remains an attractive career choice, with opportunities for career progression and job satisfaction to attract and retain the best candidates. In 2013, the Shape of Training review report set out recommendations for the structure and delivery of postgraduate training in light of an ever increasingly poly-morbid and ageing population. This consensus statement outlines ASIT's position regarding recommendations for improving surgical training and aims to help guide discussions with regard to future proposed changes to surgical training.

  10. Sources of information on postgraduate medical training programs and medical specialty career resources-2006 update.

    PubMed

    Brazin, Lillian R

    2006-01-01

    This is the final biennial update listing directories, journal articles, Web sites, and general books that aid the librarian, house officer, or medical student in finding information on medical residency and fellowship programs. The World Wide Web provides the most complete and up-to-date source of information about postgraduate training programs and specialties. This update continues to go beyond postgraduate training resources to include selected Web sites and books on curriculum vitae writing, practice management, personal finances, the "Match," certification and licensure examination preparation, lifestyle issues, job hunting, and the DEA license application process. Print resources are included if they provide information not on the Internet, have features that are particularly useful, or cover too many relevant topics in depth to be covered in a journal article or on a Web site. The Internet is a major marketing tool for hospitals seeking to recruit the best and brightest physicians for their training programs. Even the smallest community hospital has a Web site.

  11. [Surgical training using simulator. Virtual reality].

    PubMed

    Maschuw, K; Hassan, I; Bartsch, D K

    2010-01-01

    Learning of laparoscopic operative skills is often complex and time consuming resulting in a learning curve especially for novices in surgery. Virtual reality (VR) simulation was developed as an alternative to conventional training, such as active assistance and conventional laparoscopic training with artificially perfused organs (Pop-Trainer). VR simulation enables a wide range of repeatable laparoscopic techniques in variable virtual scenarios. For abdominal surgery four different simulation systems (MIST-VR(R), LapSim, Simsurgery, Lap-Mentor) are currently available and the modules allow simulation of abstract exercises to more advanced laparoscopic procedures, such as laparoscopic sigmoid resection. The effect of VR training on laparoscopic performance and its impact on non-technical skills was evaluated using the simulator LapSim after a constructive validity study. Novices benefited most from VR training and performance in the operating room improved significantly after VR training. Good spatial perception and positive stress coping strategies also enhanced laparoscopic performance. VR simulation provides a tool to shift the laparoscopic learning curve outside the operating room and thus contributes to patient safety. It would be worthwhile to include VR training in the surgical curriculum. For economic reasons regional training centers seem to be an effective way to realize a broad implementation of VR simulation in surgical training. Application and development of VR simulators should be professionally promoted just as flight simulators in aviation.

  12. Investigating Post-Graduate Athletic Training Education Student Perceptions Following a Purposefully-Implemented Peer-Assisted Learning Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Dana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate graduates' perceptions of a purposefully-implemented Peer-Assisted Learning (PAL) pedagogy in their undergraduate athletic training education and the impact of that experience in their first job post-graduation. This was the first research in athletic training education that…

  13. Investigating Post-Graduate Athletic Training Education Student Perceptions Following a Purposefully-Implemented Peer-Assisted Learning Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Dana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate graduates' perceptions of a purposefully-implemented Peer-Assisted Learning (PAL) pedagogy in their undergraduate athletic training education and the impact of that experience in their first job post-graduation. This was the first research in athletic training education that…

  14. Anatomical pediatric model for craniosynostosis surgical training.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Giselle; Warf, Benjamin; Lyra, Marcos; Zanon, Nelci

    2014-12-01

    Several surgical training simulators have been created to improve the learning curve of residents in neurosurgery and plastic surgery. Laboratory training is fundamental for acquiring familiarity with the techniques of surgery and the skill in handling instruments. The aim of this study is to present a novel simulator for training in the technique of craniosynostectomy, specifically for the scaphocephaly type. This realistic simulator was built with a synthetic thermo-retractile and thermo-sensible rubber which, when combined with different polymers, produces more than 30 different formulas. These formulas present textures, consistencies, and mechanical resistance similar to many human tissues. Fiberglass molds in the shape of the skull constitute the basic structure of the craniosynostectomy training module. It has been possible to perform computerized tomography images due to the radiopacity of this simulator and to compare the pre- and postoperative images. The authors present a training model to practice the biparietal remodeling used in scaphocephaly correction. All aspects of the procedure are simulated: the skin incision, the subcutaneous and subperiosteal dissection, the osteotomies, and finally, the skull remodeling with absorbable microplates. The presence of superior sagittal sinus can simulate emergency situations with bleeding. The authors conclude that this training model can represent a fairly useful method to accustom trainees to the required surgical techniques and simulates well the steps of standard surgery for scaphocephaly. This training provides an alternative to the use of human cadavers and animal models. Furthermore, it can represent the anatomical alteration precisely as well as intraoperative emergency situations.

  15. [Realistic surgical training. The Aachen model].

    PubMed

    Krones, C J; Binnebösel, M; Stumpf, M; Schumpelick, V

    2010-01-01

    The Aachen model is a practical mode in teaching and advanced training, which is closely geared to the areas of academic acquisition and training. During medical education optional student courses with constitutive curricula offer practical points of contact to the surgical department at all times. Besides improvement of manual training the aims are enhancing interests and acquisition of talents. This guided structure will be intensified with progression into advanced education. Next to the formal guidelines of the curriculum, education logbook and progression conversations, quality, transparency and reliability are particularly emphasized. An evaluation of both the reforms and the surgical trainers is still to be made. In addition procurement of an affirmative occupational image is essential.

  16. Perceived causes of differential attainment in UK postgraduate medical training: a national qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Viney, Rowena; Needleman, Sarah; Griffin, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Explore trainee doctors’ experiences of postgraduate training and perceptions of fairness in relation to ethnicity and country of primary medical qualification. Design Qualitative semistructured focus group and interview study. Setting Postgraduate training in England (London, Yorkshire and Humber, Kent Surrey and Sussex) and Wales. Participants 137 participants (96 trainees, 41 trainers) were purposively sampled from a framework comprising: doctors from all stages of training in general practice, medicine, obstetrics and gynaecology, psychiatry, radiology, surgery or foundation, in 4 geographical areas, from white and black and minority ethnic (BME) backgrounds, who qualified in the UK and abroad. Results Most trainees described difficult experiences, but BME UK graduates (UKGs) and international medical graduates (IMGs) could face additional difficulties that affected their learning and performance. Relationships with senior doctors were crucial to learning but bias was perceived to make these relationships more problematic for BME UKGs and IMGs. IMGs also had to deal with cultural differences and lack of trust from seniors, often looking to IMG peers for support instead. Workplace-based assessment and recruitment were considered vulnerable to bias whereas examinations were typically considered more rigorous. In a system where success in recruitment and assessments determines where in the country you can get a job, and where work–life balance is often poor, UK BME and international graduates in our sample were more likely to face separation from family and support outside of work, and reported more stress, anxiety or burnout that hindered their learning and performance. A culture in which difficulties are a sign of weakness made seeking support and additional training stigmatising. Conclusions BME UKGs and IMGs can face additional difficulties in training which may impede learning and performance. Non-stigmatising interventions should focus on

  17. Perceived causes of differential attainment in UK postgraduate medical training: a national qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Katherine; Rich, Antonia; Viney, Rowena; Needleman, Sarah; Griffin, Ann

    2016-11-25

    Explore trainee doctors' experiences of postgraduate training and perceptions of fairness in relation to ethnicity and country of primary medical qualification. Qualitative semistructured focus group and interview study. Postgraduate training in England (London, Yorkshire and Humber, Kent Surrey and Sussex) and Wales. 137 participants (96 trainees, 41 trainers) were purposively sampled from a framework comprising: doctors from all stages of training in general practice, medicine, obstetrics and gynaecology, psychiatry, radiology, surgery or foundation, in 4 geographical areas, from white and black and minority ethnic (BME) backgrounds, who qualified in the UK and abroad. Most trainees described difficult experiences, but BME UK graduates (UKGs) and international medical graduates (IMGs) could face additional difficulties that affected their learning and performance. Relationships with senior doctors were crucial to learning but bias was perceived to make these relationships more problematic for BME UKGs and IMGs. IMGs also had to deal with cultural differences and lack of trust from seniors, often looking to IMG peers for support instead. Workplace-based assessment and recruitment were considered vulnerable to bias whereas examinations were typically considered more rigorous. In a system where success in recruitment and assessments determines where in the country you can get a job, and where work-life balance is often poor, UK BME and international graduates in our sample were more likely to face separation from family and support outside of work, and reported more stress, anxiety or burnout that hindered their learning and performance. A culture in which difficulties are a sign of weakness made seeking support and additional training stigmatising. BME UKGs and IMGs can face additional difficulties in training which may impede learning and performance. Non-stigmatising interventions should focus on trainee-trainer relationships at work and organisational changes to

  18. Postgraduate Emergency Medicine Training in India: An Educational Partnership with the Private Sector.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Katherine; Pousson, Amelia; Gidwani, Shweta; Smith, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) is a recently recognized specialty in India, still in its infancy. Local training programs are developing, but remain very limited. Private, for-profit hospitals are an important provider of graduate medical education (GME) in India, and are partnering with United States (US) universities in EM to expand training opportunities. Our aim was to describe current private-sector programs affiliated with a US university providing postgraduate EM training in India, the evolution and structure of these programs, and successes and challenges of program implementation. Programs have been established in seven cities in India in partnership with a US academic institution. Full-time trainees have required didactics, clinical rotations, research, and annual examinations. Faculty members affiliated with the US institution visit each program monthly. Regular evaluations have informed program modifications, and a local faculty development program has been implemented. Currently, 240 trainees are enrolled in the EM postgraduate program, and 141 physicians have graduated. A pilot survey conducted in 2012 revealed that 93% of graduates are currently practicing EM, 82% of those in India; 71% are involved in teaching, and 32% in research. Further investigation into programmatic impacts is necessary. Challenges include issues of formal program recognition both in India and abroad. This unique partnership is playing a major early role in EM GME in India. Future steps include official program recognition, expanded numbers of training sites, and a gradual transition of training and education to local faculty. Similar partnership programs may be effective in other settings outside of India. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. European veterinary public health specialization: post-graduate training and expectations of potential employers.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Silvia; Dürr, Salome; Fahrion, Anna; Harisberger, Myriam; Papadopoulou, Christina; Zimmerli, Urs

    2013-01-01

    Residents of the European College of Veterinary Public Health (ECVPH) carried out a survey to explore the expectations and needs of potential employers of ECVPH diplomates and to assess the extent to which the ECVPH post-graduate training program meets those requirements. An online questionnaire was sent to 707 individuals working for universities, government organizations, and private companies active in the field of public health in 16 countries. Details on the structure and activities of the participants' organizations, their current knowledge of the ECVPH, and potential interest in employing veterinary public health (VPH) experts or hosting internships were collected. Participants were requested to rate 22 relevant competencies according to their importance for VPH professionals exiting the ECVPH training. A total of 138 completed questionnaires were included in the analysis. While generic skills such as "problem solving" and "broad horizon and inter-/multidisciplinary thinking" were consistently given high grades by all participants, the importance ascribed to more specialized skills was less homogeneous. The current ECVPH training more closely complies with the profile sought in academia, which may partly explain the lower employment rate of residents and diplomates within government and industry sectors. The study revealed a lack of awareness of the ECVPH among public health institutions and demonstrated the need for greater promotion of this veterinary specialization within Europe, both in terms of its training capacity and the professional skill-set of its diplomates. This study provides input for a critical revision of the ECVPH curriculum and the design of post-graduate training programs in VPH.

  20. Neurology expertise and postgraduate training programmes in the Arab world: a survey.

    PubMed

    Benamer, Hani T S

    2010-01-01

    Neurological disorders are increasingly recognised as a major public health problem, especially in the developing world. Having adequate neurology expertise to tackle this issue is essential. A 17-item survey was conducted to gather information about the number, training and location of neurologists and supportive facilities available to them in the 16 middle- and high-income Arab countries. Data about the availability of postgraduate training programmes was collected. Surveys were returned from all targeted countries. The population per neurologist ranges from 35,000 to just over two million, and the most neurologists are based in large cities. Most of the practising neurologists had received extensive training in neurology and/or passed specialty exams. The majority had all or part of their training abroad. Neuro-radiological and neuro-physiological investigations are generally available in most surveyed countries but neuro-genetics and neuro-immunology services are lacking. Neurology training programmes are available in ten Arab countries with a total of 504-524 trainees. The availability of neurologists, supportive services and training programmes varies between Arab countries. Further development of neurology expertise and local training programmes are needed.

  1. Postgraduate Cancer Education and Training in Lithuania: Harmonization According to the EU Rules.

    PubMed

    Samalavicius, Narimantas Evaldas; Mineikyte, Ramune; Janulionis, Ernestas; Liutkeviciute-Navickiene, Jurgita; Atkocius, Vydmantas

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss Lithuanian postgraduate cancer education according to the data of 2013. In Lithuania, a specialization in an area called clinical oncology is absent; as independent specialities in oncology, there are both medical oncologists and radiation oncologists. These types of oncologists complete rigorous residency training in the clinics. Separate courses are provided in different residency programmes. Currently, there are two medical oncology and radiation oncology programmes for 3rd-, 4th- and 5th-year residents, one at the National Cancer Institute and another at the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences and Kaunas Clinics. Today, there are only 45 radiation oncologists and 56 medical oncologists licensed in Lithuania. This means that each radiation oncologist and medical oncologist is providing for 397 and 319 new cancer cases per year, respectively, or there are 0.3 practising in the major specialties of oncology per 10,000 population. Most other medical residency programmes expose their trainees to oncology for only 1 month either in the 1st or the 2nd year of residency. Due to the growing number of new cancer cases worldwide, these programmes have to be extended, especially for family and internal medicine residents. Lithuanian postgraduate cancer education and training is in the process of harmonization according to the EU rules. All the Lithuanian residency programmes are certificated by an independent public agency and are recognized by a number of countries, including all the countries of the EU.

  2. To improve postgraduate training: medical residents' input in residency quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Eymann, Alfredo; Durante, Eduardo; Carrió, Silvia; Figari, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The "Open Space Technology" (OST) is an innovative group process introduced by Harrison Owen in 1997. There is some evidence for its effectiveness in education quality improvement. However, its application in higher education has not been reported. Our objective was to apply a modified OST as a quality improvement tool in a postgraduate training quality improvement program at a university hospital in Argentina. OST is a method in which a program's participants propose and discuss topics of their interest with an aim that had been defined for them by coordinators. After proposing and writing down themes important to improving the quality of their postgraduate training, residents were divided into small groups to discuss the suggested topics for 90 minutes. They then reconvened in the large group and presented the conclusions of their small group discussions. Thirty-six percent of residents (75/208) participated in one of the two OST sessions. Topics suggested by participants were similar in both sessions: (1) work hours, (2) work conditions, (3) residency curriculum, (4) residents' duties, (5) salaries, (6) professional burnout, (7) patient care load, and (8) interdisciplinary activities. In only four hours, residents were able to share their concerns and proposals for improving the quality of their residencies with their faculty. Most of the topics they suggested were subsequently included in the program's quality improvement agenda.

  3. Protocol for a realist review of workplace learning in postgraduate medical education and training.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Anel; Kilty, Caroline; Bergin, Colm; Flood, Patrick; Fu, Na; Horgan, Mary; Higgins, Agnes; Maher, Bridget; O'Kane, Grainne; Prihodova, Lucia; Slattery, Dubhfeasa; Bennett, Deirdre

    2017-01-19

    Postgraduate medical education and training (PGMET) is a complex social process which happens predominantly during the delivery of patient care. The clinical learning environment (CLE), the context for PGMET, shapes the development of the doctors who learn and work within it, ultimately impacting the quality and safety of patient care. Clinical workplaces are complex, dynamic systems in which learning emerges from non-linear interactions within a network of related factors and activities. Those tasked with the design and delivery of postgraduate medical education and training need to understand the relationship between the processes of medical workplace learning and these contextual elements in order to optimise conditions for learning. We propose to conduct a realist synthesis of the literature to address the overarching questions; how, why and in what circumstances do doctors learn in clinical environments? This review is part of a funded projected with the overall aim of producing guidelines and recommendations for the design of high quality clinical learning environments for postgraduate medical education and training. We have chosen realist synthesis as a methodology because of its suitability for researching complexity and producing answers useful to policymakers and practitioners. This realist synthesis will follow the steps and procedures outlined by Wong et al. in the RAMESES Publication Standards for Realist Synthesis and the Realist Synthesis RAMESES Training Materials. The core research team is a multi-disciplinary group of researchers, clinicians and health professions educators. The wider research group includes experts in organisational behaviour and human resources management as well as the key stakeholders; doctors in training, patient representatives and providers of PGMET. This study will draw from the published literature and programme, and substantive, theories of workplace learning, to describe context, mechanism and outcome configurations for

  4. Quality assurance in postgraduate pathology training the Dutch way: regular assessment, monitoring of training programs but no end of training examination.

    PubMed

    van der Valk, Paul

    2016-01-01

    It might seem self-evident that in the transition from a supervised trainee to an independent professional who is no longer supervised, formal assessment of whether the trainee knows his/her trade well enough to function independently is necessary. This would then constitute an end of training examination. Such examinations are practiced in several countries but a rather heterogeneous situation exists in the EU countries. In the Netherlands, the training program is not concluded by a summative examination and reasons behind this situation are discussed. Quality assurance of postgraduate medical training in the Netherlands has been developed along two tracks: (1) not a single testing moment but continuous evaluation of the performance of the trainee in 'real time' situations and (2) monitoring of the quality of the offered training program through regular site-visits. Regular (monthly and/or yearly) evaluations should be part of every self-respecting training program. In the Netherlands, these evaluations are formative only: their intention is to provide the trainee a tool by which he or she can see whether they are on track with their training schedule. In the system in the Netherlands, regular site-visits to training programs constitute a crucial element of quality assurance of postgraduate training. During the site-visit, the position and perceptions of the trainee are key elements. The perception by the trainee of the training program, the institution (or department) offering the training program, and the professionals involved in the training program is explicitly solicited and systematically assessed. With this two-tiered approach high-quality postgraduate training is assured without the need for an end of training examination.

  5. What evidence is there for the use of workplace-based assessment in surgical training?

    PubMed

    Shalhoub, Joseph; Vesey, Alex Thomas; Fitzgerald, James Edward Frankland

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen broad changes in postgraduate training with a move toward structured formative and summative evaluation of trainees' competencies using workplace-based assessment (WBA) tools. The fitness for purpose of these instruments in surgery has been much debated. The aim of this study is to explore the evidence underlying the introduction and ongoing use of WBAs in surgical training. A critical literature review was conducted to identify studies evaluating the use of WBAs in postgraduate surgical training. The search was conducted using the electronic databases PubMed for full-text articles in English. Additional critical evaluations of the curriculum relating to WBAs were included. The articles were synthesized in a narrative review. The implementation of WBA requirements in surgical training has occurred despite a relative dearth of direct evidence of their efficacy and benefit. Studies and critical reviews are being regularly undertaken to ensure that supporting evidence is accrued and the drive for improvement and refinement is maintained. It is emerging that WBAs are (contrary to their current nomenclature) formative tools for feedback and hence learning. They can facilitate the progression toward expert practice at the center of the zone of proximal development and the higher levels of Miller's pyramid, but fall short--owing to their focus on competence--of guiding surgical trainees to the higher levels of Maslow's hierarchy. Limited evidence has potentially undermined the introduction of WBAs in surgical training to date. There are misunderstandings regarding their use as either summative or formative educational tools. These shortcomings are an opportunity for further work in examining WBAs in their current or modified form. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgical simulators in cataract surgery training.

    PubMed

    Sikder, Shameema; Tuwairqi, Khaled; Al-Kahtani, Eman; Myers, William G; Banerjee, Pat

    2014-02-01

    Virtual simulators have been widely implemented in medical and surgical training, including ophthalmology. The increasing number of published articles in this field mandates a review of the available results to assess current technology and explore future opportunities. A PubMed search was conducted and a total of 10 articles were reviewed. Virtual simulators have shown construct validity in many modules, successfully differentiating user experience levels during simulated phacoemulsification surgery. Simulators have also shown improvements in wet-lab performance. The implementation of simulators in the residency training has been associated with a decrease in cataract surgery complication rates. Virtual reality simulators are an effective tool in measuring performance and differentiating trainee skill level. Additionally, they may be useful in improving surgical skill and patient outcomes in cataract surgery. Future opportunities rely on taking advantage of technical improvements in simulators for education and research.

  7. Feedback of final year ophthalmology postgraduates about their residency ophthalmology training in South India.

    PubMed

    Ajay, K; Krishnaprasad, R

    2014-07-01

    This study documents a survey of final-year ophthalmology postgraduate students on the subject of their residency training. A similar survey conducted 7 years ago published in IJO had concluded that the residency program was not up to expectations in many centers. Our study aimed to see if ophthalmology training and student perceptions differed since then. For our study, we added a few questions to the same questionnaire used in the article "which is the best method to learn ophthalmology? Resident doctors' perspective of ophthalmology training" published in IJO, Vol. 56 (5). Forty-nine students (62.02%) returned completed forms. Most students desired an orientation program on entering residency, and wished to undergo diagnostic training initially. Case-presentation with demonstration and Wet-lab learning were most preferred. There was a big difference between the number of surgeries students actually performed and the number they felt would have been ideal. On the whole, the students still felt the need for improved training across all aspects of ophthalmology.

  8. Are Postgraduate Medical Residency Training Positions in Atlantic Canada Evenly Distributed?

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Mike; MacKay, Jacqueline; Fraser, Jacqueline; Ross, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background The distribution of postgraduate medical training (residency) positions in Canada is administered by medical schools and universities in conjunction with individual provinces. In Atlantic Canada, the Maritime provinces are considered a single unit under Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia (NS), although distributed medical undergraduate education through Dalhousie and Sherbrooke has enabled medical students to complete their entire course of study in New Brunswick (NB). It is unclear if postgraduate medical education has been distributed in a similar fashion in Atlantic Canada, particularly in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island (PE). Methods Data on the number of R1 residency positions was obtained from the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) database. The distribution of R1 positions was described and compared nationally and through the Atlantic provinces. The analysis was completed using MS Excel and Prism. Results Rates of R1 positions per million persons varied widely; the national median rate was 97 positions per million persons, with a range of 34 to 138. The combined Maritime provinces rate of R1 positions was 71 per million persons and the rate in Newfoundland (NL) was 138 positions per million. The NS rate was 106 positions per million while the NB rate was 54 per million and the PE rate 34 per million. Sixty-four percent of all residency training positions in Atlantic Canada were based in the two most urban areas of Halifax, NS or St John’s, NL. Royal College (specialty) positions were more likely to be based at the main university campus city than family medicine training positions (97 vs. 3%; 33 vs. 67%, respectively). Conclusion There is a high level of variation in available residency positions among the individual provinces, especially in Atlantic Canada. The lower prevalence of opportunities in NB and PE may influence the ability of these provinces to recruit and retain new physicians. PMID:27200227

  9. Medical teacher and his pedagogical training (experience with Bratislavian system of training the assistants for pedagogical activity in postgraduate education of physicians and pharmacists).

    PubMed

    Badalík, L; Paniaková, M

    1984-01-01

    System of training the medical teachers for pedagogical activity, used in the Institute for Postgraduate Education of Physicians and Pharmacists (IPEPP) in Bratislava, have not had long tradition as yet. We do not want this training to be understood as universal instruction to prepare the assistants for pedagogical activity, which is in a final consequence always dependent on the concrete conditions and social needs. It should serve as information on one of the possibilities to secure the systematic training of medical teachers for pedagogical activity in postgraduate education of physicians and pharmacists.

  10. Postgraduate training programs in veterinary clinical pathology in the United States and Canada (1998 to 2002).

    PubMed

    Christopher, Mary M; Schultze, A Eric; Bird, Karyn E

    2003-01-01

    Residency and graduate programs in veterinary clinical pathology provide specialized training for board certification and are important pathways to careers in clinical pathology diagnostics, teaching, and research. Information about training opportunities is useful for assessing disciplinary needs, outcomes, and changes, garnering program support, and providing objective data for program evaluation by faculty, trainees, and prospective applicants. The goals of this study were to 1) compile detailed information on the number and types of postgraduate training programs in veterinary clinical pathology in the United States and Canada, 2) describe the goals, activities, strengths, and weaknesses of the programs, 3) assess the desirability of program accreditation and program standards, 4) identify supplemental training opportunities, and 5) evaluate changes in programs, trainees, and faculty 4 years later. In July 1998, the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology Education Committee sent a survey to representatives at the 31 schools and colleges of veterinary medicine in the United States and Canada and 31 diagnostic laboratories, private hospitals, and pharmaceutical companies. Survey data were compared with updated information obtained from training program coordinators in November 2002. Survey response rate was 94% for universities, 39% for nonuniversity institutions, and 66% overall. In 1998, there were 20 clinical pathology training programs, including residencies (n=10) and graduate programs combined with residency training (n=10), with 36 total training positions. In 2002, there were 25 training programs (14 residencies, 11 combined), with 52 total positions. The median faculty:trainee ratio was 2.0 in both years. Of 67 faculty members involved in training in 1998, 57 (85.1%) were board-certified in clinical pathology and 53 (79.1%) had DVM/PhD degrees. Net faculty numbers increased by 17 (25.4%) but the median per institution remained at 3.0. Primary

  11. Junior pharmacy faculty members' perceptions of their exposure to postgraduate training and academic careers during pharmacy school.

    PubMed

    Hagemeier, Nicholas E; Murawski, Matthew M

    2012-04-10

    To determine the perceptions of junior pharmacy faculty members with US doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degrees regarding their exposure to residency, fellowship, and graduate school training options in pharmacy school. Perceptions of exposure to career options and research were also sought. A mixed-mode survey instrument was developed and sent to assistant professors at US colleges and schools of pharmacy. Usable responses were received from 735 pharmacy faculty members. Faculty members perceived decreased exposure to and awareness of fellowship and graduate education training as compared to residency training. Awareness of and exposure to academic careers and research-related fields was low from a faculty recruitment perspective. Ensuring adequate exposure of pharmacy students to career paths and postgraduate training opportunities could increase the number of PharmD graduates who choose academic careers or other pharmacy careers resulting from postgraduate training.

  12. [Problems in the further development of postgraduate training in industrial sanitary chemistry for the laboratory physicians of epidemiological health stations].

    PubMed

    Makeeva, E P; Soldatenkova, N A

    1991-01-01

    The article narrates on the domain of the sanitary inspection medical laboratory workers' supervision in the field of industrial chemistry and their experience in handling different physical and chemical analysis techniques. It is indicated that sanitary inspection medical laboratory personnel requires constant postgraduate training. Proposed is the respective training programme adopted at the Institute for Postgraduate Training of Physicians, Moscow, which includes samples' selection, physical and chemical analysis testing and application in specific conditions, statistical assessment of the results obtained. The programme also includes the hygienic aspects, e. i. current sanitary control, labour hygiene in different gas discharge-related conditions. Practical training is performed in small groups of 2 or 3 persons, thus facilitating adoption of skills in using various analysis techniques. Initial, current and intermediate control, tests and situational analysis are used in the training process.

  13. Actor training for surgical team simulations.

    PubMed

    Kassab, Eva S; King, Dominic; Hull, Louise M; Arora, Sonal; Sevdalis, Nick; Kneebone, Roger L; Nestel, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Immersive simulations can enable surgeons to learn complex sets of skills required for safe surgical practice without risk to patients. However, recruiting healthcare professionals to support surgeons training as members of an operating theatre (OT) team is challenging and resource intensive. We developed a training programme for actors to take on the role of an OT team to support validation studies in a simulated environment. This article describes the evaluation of the programme. The programme comprised of written materials, video discussion and experiential activities. Evaluation methods consisted of post-simulation interviews and questionnaires with actors and surgeons. Participants were recruited by convenience sampling. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and interviews were analysed using thematic extraction. Three actors participated in the programme. Twelve surgeons completed simulations. All data suggest that the training was successful. Actors were perceived as realistic. Suggestions were made to improve training. After a brief training, actors can realistically portray members of an OT team in simulations designed to support surgeon training. This article highlights factors that contributed to success and suggests improvements. Although there are limitations with the study, its findings have relevance to training and assessment that focuses on individual clinician's functioning as a member of an OT team.

  14. [Application of problem-based learning in pre-job training of postgraduate students in department of endodontics].

    PubMed

    Shao, Li-na; Wang, Xue-mei; Qiu, Li-hong; Zhan, Fu-liang; Xue, Ming

    2013-08-01

    To apply problem-based learning (PBL) in pre-job training of postgraduate students in department of endodontics. Thirty master degree postgraduate students of China Medical University were randomly divided into 2 groups, there were 15 students in each group. One group were taught with PBL method while the other group with lecture-based learning (LBL) method. The teaching effect was measured with examination and questionnaire survey. The data were analyzed by student's t-test using SPSS 11.5 software package. There was no significant difference in basic knowledge, medical records writing, oral examination between the two groups (P>0.05). There were significant differences in case analysis, dental operation, theory examination, practical examination and total scores between the two groups (P<0.05). The PBL method was welcomed by master degree postgraduate students. The abilities of postgraduate students can be developed by PBL method in different aspects. PBL achieves satisfactory teaching effect, and can be applied in pre-job training of postgraduate students.

  15. Postgraduate training for family medicine in a rural district hospital in South Africa: Appropriateness and sufficiency of theatre procedures as a sentinel indicator.

    PubMed

    Du Plessis, Dawie; Kapp, Paul Alfred; Jenkins, Louis S; Giddy, Laurel

    2016-06-30

    Since 2007, the postgraduate training of family physicians for South African district hospitals has been formalised. This training differs from European and North American programmes as up to 30% of the skills needed rely on district hospital surgical, obstetrics and anaesthetics procedures, particularly in rural areas, as outlined in the national unit standards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness and sufficiency of learning opportunities for these skills in a rural district hospital. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was undertaken of the number and type of procedures performed in theatre for a 1-year period and compared with the required procedural skills stipulated in the national unit standards. Descriptive statistical analyses were used to analyse categorical data. Three thousand seven hundred and forty-one procedures were performed during the study period. Anaesthesia was the most common procedure, followed by Caesarean section. There were adequate opportunities for teaching most core skills. Sufficient and appropriate learning opportunities exist for postgraduate family medicine training in all the core skills performed in a theatre according to the national unit standards.

  16. Postgraduate training for family medicine in a rural district hospital in South Africa: Appropriateness and sufficiency of theatre procedures as a sentinel indicator

    PubMed Central

    Plessis, Dawie Du; Alfred Kapp, Paul; Giddy, Laurel

    2016-01-01

    Background Since 2007, the postgraduate training of family physicians for South African district hospitals has been formalised. This training differs from European and North American programmes as up to 30% of the skills needed rely on district hospital surgical, obstetrics and anaesthetics procedures, particularly in rural areas, as outlined in the national unit standards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness and sufficiency of learning opportunities for these skills in a rural district hospital. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional study was undertaken of the number and type of procedures performed in theatre for a 1-year period and compared with the required procedural skills stipulated in the national unit standards. Descriptive statistical analyses were used to analyse categorical data. Results Three thousand seven hundred and forty-one procedures were performed during the study period. Anaesthesia was the most common procedure, followed by Caesarean section. There were adequate opportunities for teaching most core skills. Conclusions Sufficient and appropriate learning opportunities exist for postgraduate family medicine training in all the core skills performed in a theatre according to the national unit standards. PMID:27380781

  17. [Working hour preferences of female and male residents : Developments over 4 years of postgraduate medical training in Germany].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Stine; Krause-Solberg, Lea; Scherer, Martin; van den Bussche, Hendrik

    2017-08-15

    This article addresses developments regarding working hours and working hour preferences of residents undergoing postgraduate training in Germany and analyses if, and for what reasons, full-time or part-time working models are preferred. The source of data is the KarMed study, which is based on yearly postal surveys carried out among graduates of the year 2008/2009 from seven medical faculties in Germany. The interviews took place during the entire postgraduate training period. Response rates were 48% in the first year, with subsequent rates of above 85%. For analysis, descriptive statistics and regression models were applied. There is a considerable discrepancy between the actual and the preferred working hours of residents undergoing postgraduate training. Postgraduate training is mostly linked to full-time contracts, usually with additional overtime, even though a considerable proportion of doctors prefer a part-time position. More female residents want to work part-time than male doctors. The same applies for the period after medical specialism: in particular, female doctors with children, female doctors trained in former Western Germany states, and those seeking an occupation in outpatient care request part-time contracts for their professional future. A similar trend has been increasingly observed over the years for male doctors. Despite the huge number of residents requesting part-time contracts - during postgraduate training and afterward - the reality is still far behind this model. It is apparent that measures should be taken for both genders. Those measures should facilitate the implementation of the favored working-time model.

  18. Assessment of CanMEDS roles in postgraduate training: the validation of the Compass.

    PubMed

    Tromp, Fred; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Grol, Richard; Kramer, Anneke; Bottema, Ben

    2012-10-01

    In medical education the focus has shifted from gaining knowledge to developing competencies. To effectively monitor performance in practice throughout the entire training, a new approach of assessment is needed. This study aimed to evaluate an instrument that monitors the development of competencies during postgraduate training in the setting of training of general practice: the Competency Assessment List (Compass). The distribution of scores, reliability, validity, responsiveness and feasibility of the Compass were evaluated. Scores of the Compass ranged from 1 to 9 on a 10-point scale, showing excellent internal consistency ranging from .89 to .94. Most trainees showed improving ratings during training. Medium to large effect sizes (.31-1.41) were demonstrated when we compared mean scores of three consecutive periods. Content validity of the Compass was supported by the results of a qualitative study using the RAND modified Delphi Method. The feasibility of the Compass was demonstrated. The Compass is a competency based instrument that shows in a reliable and valid way trainees' progress towards the standard of performance. The programmatic approach of the Compass could be applied in other specialties provided that the instrument is tailored to specific needs of that specialism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Feedback of final year ophthalmology postgraduates about their residency ophthalmology training in South India

    PubMed Central

    Ajay, K.; Krishnaprasad, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: This study documents a survey of final-year ophthalmology postgraduate students on the subject of their residency training. A similar survey conducted 7 years ago published in IJO had concluded that the residency program was not up to expectations in many centers. Our study aimed to see if ophthalmology training and student perceptions differed since then. Materials and Methods: For our study, we added a few questions to the same questionnaire used in the article “which is the best method to learn ophthalmology? Resident doctors’ perspective of ophthalmology training” published in IJO, Vol. 56 (5). Results: Forty-nine students (62.02%) returned completed forms. Most students desired an orientation program on entering residency, and wished to undergo diagnostic training initially. Case-presentation with demonstration and Wet-lab learning were most preferred. There was a big difference between the number of surgeries students actually performed and the number they felt would have been ideal. Conclusion: On the whole, the students still felt the need for improved training across all aspects of ophthalmology. PMID:25116778

  20. Training and use of lasers in postgraduate orthodontic programs in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Dansie, Chase O; Park, Jae Hyun; Makin, Inder Raj S

    2013-06-01

    This study was designed to determine if orthodontic residents are being trained to use lasers in the postgraduate orthodontic residency programs of the United States and Canada. An anonymous electronic survey was sent to the program director/chair of each of the seventy orthodontic residency programs, and thirty-seven (53 percent) of the programs responded. Of these thirty-seven programs, twenty-eight (76 percent) reported providing patient treatment with lasers in the orthodontic graduate program, eight (22 percent) said they do not provide treatment in the orthodontic graduate program, and one program (3 percent) reported providing laser training but not using lasers on patients. Gingivectomy and canine exposure were reported as the most common procedures that residents perform with a laser, while debonding of orthodontic brackets was the least common procedure performed with a laser. A diode laser was the most common type of laser used. Of the eight programs (22 percent) not offering laser training, four indicated having no plans to begin using lasers or training on their use. The other four indicated that they have plans to incorporate laser use in the future.

  1. OSCEs in Japanese postgraduate clinical training Hiroshima experience 2000-2009.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, N; Ogawa, T

    2010-11-01

    Hiroshima University Hospital used the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) as a formative and summative assessment tool to evaluate trainees' competence. To reflect on Hiroshima University Hospital experience of OSCEs in postgraduate training in terms of OSCE structure and trainees' perception of the OSCE they attended. A total 27 OSCEs implemented in Hiroshima University Hospital from 2000 to 2009 were examined. The OSCE in postgraduate training, Hiroshima University Hospital, was influenced by many factors from organisational and pedagogical perspectives, and changed to meet social and curriculum needs. At each OSCE, all examinees were required to answer an anonymous questionnaire, which consisted of ten checklists, just after their experience of OSCE. Five hundred and forty trainees who attended each OSCE were required to answer a questionnaire and 510 were returned (94.4%). In the comparison between formative and summative OSCEs, the number of trainees who answered "the OSCE is meaningful" in formative OSCE was significantly higher than that in summative OSCE (P < 0.001). In the comparison between before and after the 2006/2007 academic year, trainees who indicated that OSCEs were meaningful increased after 2006/2007 (P < 0.05), and trainees who felt they were evaluated appropriately by these OSCEs increased after 2006/2007 (P < 0.01). Trainees viewed OSCEs positively and appreciated their effectiveness from a pedagogical perspective, and OSCE positively affected the trainees' approach to learning. A ten-year process of OSCE change has helped with educational reforms because of its adaptability. Flexible attitudes to change are necessary for stakeholders to achieve the desired reforms. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Reliability testing of a portfolio assessment tool for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob; Derese, Anselme

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Competency-based education and the validity and reliability of workplace-based assessment of postgraduate trainees have received increasing attention worldwide. Family medicine was recognised as a speciality in South Africa six years ago and a satisfactory portfolio of learning is a prerequisite to sit the national exit exam. A massive scaling up of the number of family physicians is needed in order to meet the health needs of the country. Aim The aim of this study was to develop a reliable, robust and feasible portfolio assessment tool (PAT) for South Africa. Methods Six raters each rated nine portfolios from the Stellenbosch University programme, using the PAT, to test for inter-rater reliability. This rating was repeated three months later to determine test–retest reliability. Following initial analysis and feedback the PAT was modified and the inter-rater reliability again assessed on nine new portfolios. An acceptable intra-class correlation was considered to be > 0.80. Results The total score was found to be reliable, with a coefficient of 0.92. For test–retest reliability, the difference in mean total score was 1.7%, which was not statistically significant. Amongst the subsections, only assessment of the educational meetings and the logbook showed reliability coefficients > 0.80. Conclusion This was the first attempt to develop a reliable, robust and feasible national portfolio assessment tool to assess postgraduate family medicine training in the South African context. The tool was reliable for the total score, but the low reliability of several sections in the PAT helped us to develop 12 recommendations regarding the use of the portfolio, the design of the PAT and the training of raters.

  3. Laparoscopic and robotic surgical training in urology.

    PubMed

    Hoznek, András; Katz, Ran; Gettman, Matthew; Salomon, Laurent; Antiphon, Patrick; de la Taille, Alexandre; Yiou, René; Chopin, Dominique; Abbou, Clément-Claude

    2003-04-01

    The most important change in urology during the past decade was the development of minimally invasive surgery, particularly laparoscopy. However, the main drawback of laparoscopy is a steep learning curve, which results from the significant changes in the surgical environment. Although laparoscopy can provide important advantages for the patient, including decreased length of hospitalization, decreased analgesic requirement, and a shortened postoperative convalescence, one concern has been whether laparoscopic techniques should be learned solely in the operating room. For example, sports, music, and aviation are practiced before an actual performance is ever undertaken. In this review, the advantages and limitations of all available training modalities in minimally invasive surgery are described. Testing basic laparoscopic skills on inanimate models, becoming familiar with the principles of dissection and hemostasis on living animals, and studying surgical anatomy on cadavers should be considered as indispensable and complementary elements for laparoscopic training in the future. In addition, telementoring with the help of modern image processing and virtual reality eventually may become the basis of tomorrow's surgical instruction.

  4. Surgical Crisis Management Skills Training and Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Krishna; Munz, Yaron; Forrest, Damien; Pandey, Vikas; Undre, Shabnam; Vincent, Charles; Darzi, Ara

    2006-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative surgical crisis management is learned in an unstructured manner. In aviation, simulation training allows aircrews to coordinate and standardize recovery strategies. Our aim was to develop a surgical crisis simulation and evaluate its feasibility, realism, and validity of the measures used to assess performance. Methods: Surgical trainees were exposed to a bleeding crisis in a simulated operating theater. Assessment of performance consisted of a trainee’s technical ability to control the bleeding and of their team/human factors skills. This assessment was performed in a blinded manner by 2 surgeons and one human factors expert. Other measures consisted of time measures such as time to diagnose the bleeding (TD), inform team members (TT), achieve control (TC), and close the laceration (TL). Blood loss was used as a surrogate outcome measures. Results: There were considerable variations within both senior (n = 10) and junior (n = 10) trainees for technical and team skills. However, while the senior trainees scored higher than the juniors for technical skills (P = 0.001), there were no differences in human factors skills. There were also significant differences between the 2 groups for TD (P = 0.01), TC (P = 0.001), and TL (0.001). The blood loss was higher in the junior group. Conclusions: We have described the development of a novel simulated setting for the training of crisis management skills and the variability in performance both in between and within the 2 groups. PMID:16794399

  5. Surgical training and the European Working Time Directive: The role of informal workplace learning.

    PubMed

    Giles, James A

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of European Working Time Directive, limiting doctors' working hours to 48 per week, has caused recent controversy within the profession. The Royal College of Surgeons of England in particular has been one of the loudest critics of the legislation. One of the main concerns is regarding the negative impact on training hours for those embarking on surgical careers. Simulation technology has been suggested as a method to overcome this reduction in hospital training hours, and research suggests that this is a good substitute for operative training in a theatre. However, modern educational theory emphasises the power of informal workplace learning in postgraduate education, and the essential role of experience in training future surgeons.

  6. Health Education England, Local Education and Training Boards (LETBs) and reform of healthcare education: implications for surgical training.

    PubMed

    Wild, Jonathan R L; Fitzgerald, J Edward F; Beamish, Andrew J

    2015-01-15

    National Health Service (NHS) reforms have changed the structure of postgraduate healthcare education and training. With a Government mandate that promotes multi-professional education and training aligned with policy driven initiatives, this article highlights concerns over the impact that these changes may have on surgical training. The creation of Health Education England (HEE) and its local education and training boards (LETBs), which are dominated by NHS healthcare providers, should result in greater accountability of employers in workforce planning, enhanced local responsibility and increased transparency of funding allocation. However, these changes may also create a potential poacher-turned-gamekeeper role of employers, who now have responsibility for junior doctors' training. Analysis of LETB membership reveals a dearth of representation of surgeons, who comprise only 2% of board members, with the input of trainees also seemingly overlooked. A lack of engagement with the LETBs by the independent sector is a concern with increasing numbers of training opportunities potentially being lost as a result.The new system also needs to recognise the specific training needs required by the craft specialties given the demands of technical skill acquisition, in particular regarding the provision of simulation training facilities and trainer recognition. However, training budget cuts may result in a disproportionate reduction of funding for surgical training. Surgical training posts will also be endangered, opportunities for out-of-programme experience and research may also decline and further costs are likely to be passed onto the trainee. Although there are several facets to the recent reforms of the healthcare education and training system that have potential to improve surgical training, concerns need to be addressed. Engagement from the independent sector and further clarification on how the LETBs will be aligned with commissioning services are also required

  7. Surgical training 2.0: How contemporary developments in information technology can augment surgical training.

    PubMed

    Blackmur, James P; Clement, Rhys G E; Brady, Richard R W; Oliver, Christopher W

    2013-04-01

    The current surgical trainee is faced with reduced training time compared to predecessors as a result of changes in working practices. The past decade has seen marked developments in the information technology sector. This editorial will review how modern technological innovations could augment current surgical training. We review the literature and summarize important developments in information technology that could assist the modern surgical trainee. We also look at some of the challenges faced by use of this technology. Developments in mobile internet connectivity will improve access to online resources for the surgical trainee. Web 2.0 will revolutionise the way trainees interact with textbooks, journals, webpages and each other. Simulators could help to fill gaps created by reduced operating hours. To maximize the effectiveness of these resources they need to be accessible and incorporated into training in a structured way, ensuring patient safety and accuracy of information. Contemporary developments in technology offer benefits to the surgical trainee and could fill gaps left by reduced operating times. In order to ensure efficient use of technology and patient safety, bodies such as the Royal Colleges and Training Programmes must embrace these developments. Copyright © 2012 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A landscape analysis of leadership training in postgraduate medical education training programs at the University of Ottawa

    PubMed Central

    Danilewitz, Marlon; McLean, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    Background There is growing recognition of the importance of physician leadership in healthcare. At the same time, becoming an effective leader requires significant training. While educational opportunities for practicing physicians exist to develop their leadership skills, there is a paucity of leadership opportunities for post graduate trainees. In response to this gap, both the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada have recommended that leadership training be considered a focus in Post Graduate Medical Education (PGME). However, post-graduate leadership curricula and opportunities in PGME training programs in Canada are not well described. The goal of this study was to determine the motivation for PGME leadership training, the opportunities available, and educational barriers experienced by PGME programs at the University of Ottawa. Methods An electronic survey was distributed to all 70 PGME Program Directors (PDs) at the University of Ottawa. Two PDs were selected, based on strong leadership programs, for individual interviews. Results The survey response rate was 55.7%. Seventy-seven percent of responding PDs reported resident participation in leadership training as being “important,” while only 37.8% of programs incorporated assessment of resident leadership knowledge and/or skills into their PGME program. Similarly, only 29.7% of responding residency programs offered chief resident leadership training. Conclusions While there is strong recognition of the importance of training future physician leaders, the nature and design of PGME leadership training is highly variable. These data can be used to potentially inform future PGME leadership training curricula. PMID:28344692

  9. Workplace based assessment: a step to promote competency based postgraduate training.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tejinder; Modi, Jyoti Nath

    2013-06-08

    There has been an increasing emphasis on defining outcomes of medical education in terms of performance of trainees. This is a step beyond the description of outcomes in terms of competence that encompasses mostly potential abilities rather than the actual performance. The contextual adaptations and behavior judgments of the trainees are best assessed by a program of in-training assessment. Workplace based assessment (WPBA) is one of the modalities, which assesses the trainee in authentic settings. Though Postgraduate (PG) medical training in India is said to be competency-based, most institutions do not have any formative or in-training assessment program for the same. The two cardinal elements of WPBA are direct observation and conducted in work place in addition to provision of feedback to the trainee. The WPBA conforms to the highest (Level 4: Does) of Millers pyramid and also has the potential to assess at all four levels. Some of the tools used for WPBA are: Logbooks, Clinical Encounter Cards (CEC), mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise (mini-CEX), Case based discussions, Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS), Multisource feedback (peers, co-workers, seniors, patients) etc. These can be documented in the form of a portfolio that provides a longitudinal view of experiences and progress of the trainee. The WPBA scores high on validity and educational impact by virtue of being based on direct observation in real situation and contextual feedback. The feasibility and acceptability is enhanced by making appropriate choices of tools, advance planning, building of mutual trust, and training of assessors. Given the established benefits of WPBA in shaping clinical learning, there is an imminent need for including this mode of assessment in our clinical training programs especially PG training.

  10. [Geriatric post-graduate training: Current recommendations and opinion of the trainees].

    PubMed

    Mateos-Nozal, Jesús; Guardado Fuentes, Lara; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, José; Ribera Casado, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the level of compliance with the official curriculum residence programme by geriatrics trainees, and to analyse their level of satisfaction. A questionnaire was developed including these sections: trainee filiation, and questions related to their clinical training, academic formation, research training, satisfaction, and other comments. The survey was performed in Survey Monkey and sent to a geriatric trainee per hospital in March 2014. The results were collected between March and April of 2014. Responses were received from 41% of the trainees of 23 Geriatric Teaching Units. Rates of over 95% were observed as regards clinical rotations in the basic period, while in the specific period these percentages varied between 34% and 69%, probably because some of the trainees had not yet arrived at the period in which these rotations are programmed. An external rotation could be performed by 83% of the trainees, and 90% do the recommended number of shifts. The mean number of instruction sessions per week was 2.3, and the number of meetings with the tutor was 2.5 times per year. The median number of presentations in congresses was 3.7 per trainee, with 0.2 publications during training. Each trainee attended 1.2 national meetings, 0.3 European meetings, and 0.1 American. Most of the trainees (85%) were satisfied or very satisfied with their training. Geriatrics curricula for trainees are followed in the basic aspects, but not so much in the specific ones. The average level satisfaction of the trainees is very high. The recommended training activities within the specific department (sessions, etc.) are not always fulfilled. The research activity, evaluated by publications and presentations at meetings, is low. Following these data, reflection and the establishment of improvements are required in Geriatrics training at post-graduate level. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Postgraduate Education in Quality Improvement Methods: Initial Results of the Fellows' Applied Quality Training (FAQT) Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Winchester, David E; Burkart, Thomas A; Choi, Calvin Y; McKillop, Matthew S; Beyth, Rebecca J; Dahm, Phillipp

    2016-06-01

    Training in quality improvement (QI) is a pillar of the next accreditation system of the Accreditation Committee on Graduate Medical Education and a growing expectation of physicians for maintenance of certification. Despite this, many postgraduate medical trainees are not receiving training in QI methods. We created the Fellows Applied Quality Training (FAQT) curriculum for cardiology fellows using both didactic and applied components with the goal of increasing confidence to participate in future QI projects. Fellows completed didactic training from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Open School and then designed and completed a project to improve quality of care or patient safety. Self-assessments were completed by the fellows before, during, and after the first year of the curriculum. The primary outcome for our curriculum was the median score reported by the fellows regarding their self-confidence to complete QI activities. Self-assessments were completed by 23 fellows. The majority of fellows (15 of 23, 65.2%) reported no prior formal QI training. Median score on baseline self-assessment was 3.0 (range, 1.85-4), which was significantly increased to 3.27 (range, 2.23-4; P = 0.004) on the final assessment. The distribution of scores reported by the fellows indicates that 30% were slightly confident at conducting QI activities on their own, which was reduced to 5% after completing the FAQT curriculum. An interim assessment was conducted after the fellows completed didactic training only; median scores were not different from the baseline (mean, 3.0; P = 0.51). After completion of the FAQT, cardiology fellows reported higher self-confidence to complete QI activities. The increase in self-confidence seemed to be limited to the applied component of the curriculum, with no significant change after the didactic component.

  12. The Impact of Postgraduate Health Technology Innovation Training: Outcomes of the Stanford Biodesign Fellowship.

    PubMed

    Wall, James; Hellman, Eva; Denend, Lyn; Rait, Douglas; Venook, Ross; Lucian, Linda; Azagury, Dan; Yock, Paul G; Brinton, Todd J

    2016-12-21

    Stanford Biodesign launched its Innovation Fellowship in 2001 as a first-of-its kind postgraduate training experience for teaching biomedical technology innovators a need-driven process for developing medical technologies and delivering them to patients. Since then, many design-oriented educational programs have been initiated, yet the impact of this type of training remains poorly understood. This study measures the career focus, leadership trajectory, and productivity of 114 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship alumni based on survey data and public career information. It also compares alumni on certain publicly available metrics to finalists interviewed but not selected. Overall, 60% of alumni are employed in health technology in contrast to 35% of finalists interviewed but not selected. On leadership, 72% of alumni hold managerial or higher positions compared to 48% of the finalist group. A total of 67% of alumni reported that the fellowship had been "extremely beneficial" on their careers. As a measure of technology translation, more than 440,000 patients have been reached with technologies developed directly out of the Biodesign Innovation Fellowship, with another 1,000,000+ aided by solutions initiated by alumni after their training. This study suggests a positive impact of the fellowship program on the career focus, leadership, and productivity of its alumni.

  13. Role models play the greatest role - a qualitative study on reasons for choosing postgraduate training at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Stahn, Bonnie; Harendza, Sigrid

    2014-01-01

    Why physicians choose a certain specialty at a university hospital for their postgraduate training is incompletely understood. Our aim was to identify factors that led physicians from different generations to opt for postgraduate training in a specialty with high or low patient contact at a university hospital. We conducted 14 semi-structured interviews with residents and attending physicians from the departments of Internal Medicine (high patient contact) and Laboratory Medicine (low patient contact) at the University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany. We used template analysis to code the interview transcripts and iteratively reduced and displayed the data. Initial codes and concepts were shaped into categories until agreement on the final template was reached. We identified five main categories of factors that influenced postgraduate specialty selection. Role models with a civilized code of behavior and expertise in their specialty had had the greatest influence on participants' choice of a specialty across generations. Electives and a doctoral thesis project had also influenced participants' decisions, mainly because of meeting a role model in their supervisor. Patient contact and intellectual challenges were identified as contributing factors in the selection of a specialty with high patient contact. As reasons for selecting a university hospital for postgraduate education four categories were identified: the possibility to participate in scientific research, a broad spectrum of activities, personal contacts and future career opportunities. The professional attitudes of teachers as role models were identified as having the greatest influence on postgraduate education choices. Besides other actions to attract students to certain specialties for their postgraduate education, the aspect of being perceived as a role model while teaching requires particular attention when preparing medical faculty for undergraduate medical teaching.

  14. Role models play the greatest role – a qualitative study on reasons for choosing postgraduate training at a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Stahn, Bonnie; Harendza, Sigrid

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Why physicians choose a certain specialty at a university hospital for their postgraduate training is incompletely understood. Our aim was to identify factors that led physicians from different generations to opt for postgraduate training in a specialty with high or low patient contact at a university hospital. Methods: We conducted 14 semi-structured interviews with residents and attending physicians from the departments of Internal Medicine (high patient contact) and Laboratory Medicine (low patient contact) at the University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany. We used template analysis to code the interview transcripts and iteratively reduced and displayed the data. Initial codes and concepts were shaped into categories until agreement on the final template was reached. Results: We identified five main categories of factors that influenced postgraduate specialty selection. Role models with a civilized code of behavior and expertise in their specialty had had the greatest influence on participants’ choice of a specialty across generations. Electives and a doctoral thesis project had also influenced participants’ decisions, mainly because of meeting a role model in their supervisor. Patient contact and intellectual challenges were identified as contributing factors in the selection of a specialty with high patient contact. As reasons for selecting a university hospital for postgraduate education four categories were identified: the possibility to participate in scientific research, a broad spectrum of activities, personal contacts and future career opportunities. Conclusions: The professional attitudes of teachers as role models were identified as having the greatest influence on postgraduate education choices. Besides other actions to attract students to certain specialties for their postgraduate education, the aspect of being perceived as a role model while teaching requires particular attention when preparing medical faculty for undergraduate

  15. The UEMS section/board of pathology, chapter 6: requirement for recognition of postgraduate training in pathology: a presentation of the paris document.

    PubMed

    Tötsch, M; Cuvelier, C; Vass, L; Fassina, A

    2012-10-01

    After more than five years discussion the UEMS Section/Board of Pathology agreed a specification of requirements for recognition of post-graduate training in pathology, which is the key to the future of our discipline. The document published here, subject to ratification by UEMS Council, was voted on and accepted by the Pathology Board at the UEMS Paris meeting of 9 June 2012. Cytopathology is regarded as integral part of pathology: in general, training in pathology takes five years and maintains a common trunk of four (minimum three) years where surgical pathology, autopsy pathology and basic knowledge of neuropathology, dermatopathology and cytopathology are adequately trained and assessed. Training in so-called 'areas of interests' covers the remaining 12-24 months. Certificates of 'advanced level of competence' remain within the authority of national boards. As senior members of its Executive Board, we believe that the European Federation of Cytology Societies (EFCS) should take responsibility for establishing 1) standards in the quality of cytopathology training, 2) training guidelines and qualification for advanced levels of competence in cytopathology, 3) manpower planning, 4) tutorials for pathologists and cytotechnologists and 4) standards of cytotechnologist training.

  16. Perceptions, training experiences, and preferences of surgical residents toward laparoscopic simulation training: a resident survey.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Shohan; Zevin, Boris; Grantcharov, Teodor P; Roberts, Kurt E; Duffy, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Simulation training for surgical residents can shorten learning curves, improve technical skills, and expedite competency. Several studies have shown that skills learned in the simulated environment are transferable to the operating room. Residency programs are trying to incorporate simulation into the resident training curriculum to supplement the hands-on experience gained in the operating room. Despite the availability and proven utility of surgical simulators and simulation laboratories, they are still widely underutilized by surgical trainees. Studies have shown that voluntary use leads to minimal participation in a training curriculum. Although there are several simulation tools, there is no clear evidence of the superiority of one tool over the other in skill acquisition. The purpose of this study was to explore resident perceptions, training experiences, and preferences regarding laparoscopic simulation training. Our goal was to profile resident participation in surgical skills simulation, recognize potential barriers to voluntary simulator use, and identify simulation tools and tasks preferred by residents. Furthermore, this study may help to inform whether mandatory/protected training time, as part of the residents' curriculum is essential to enhance participation in the simulation laboratory. A cross-sectional study on general surgery residents (postgraduate years 1-5) at Yale University School of Medicine and the University of Toronto via an online questionnaire was conducted. Overall, 67 residents completed the survey. The institutional review board approved the methods of the study. Overall, 95.5% of the participants believed that simulation training improved their laparoscopic skills. Most respondents (92.5%) perceived that skills learned during simulation training were transferrable to the operating room. Overall, 56.7% of participants agreed that proficiency in a simulation curriculum should be mandatory before operating room experience. The

  17. Evaluating the effect of Japan's 2004 postgraduate training programme on the spatial distribution of physicians.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Rie; Tamura, Hiroshi; Goto, Rei; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-01-24

    In 2004, the Japanese government permitted medical graduates for the first time to choose their training location directly through a national matching system. While the reform has had a major impact on physicians' placement, research on the impact of the new system on physician distribution in Japan has been limited. In this study, we sought to examine the determinants of physicians' practice location choice, as well as factors influencing their geographic distribution before and after the launch of Japan's 2004 postgraduate medical training programme. We analyzed secondary data. The dependent variable was the change in physician supply at the secondary tier of medical care in Japan, a level which is roughly comparable to a Hospital Service Area in the US. Physicians were categorized into two groups according to the institutions where they practiced; specifically, hospitals and clinics. We considered the following predictors of physician supply: ratio of physicians per 1,000 population (physician density), age-adjusted mortality, as well as measures of residential quality. Ordinary least-squares regression models were used to estimate the associations. A coefficient equality test was performed to examine differences in predictors before and after 2004. Baseline physician density showed a positive association with the change in physician supply after the launch of the 2004 programme (P-value < .001), whereas no such effect was found before 2004. Urban locations were inversely associated with the change in physician supply before 2004 (P-value = .026), whereas a positive association was found after 2004 (P-value < .001). Urban location and area-level socioeconomic status were positively correlated with the change in hospital physician supply after 2004 (P-values < .001 for urban centre, and .025 for area-level socioeconomic status), even though in the period prior to the 2004 training scheme, urban location was inversely associated with the change in physician supply

  18. [Active participation in research and teaching during post-graduate GP training: perspectives of future general practitioners].

    PubMed

    Haumann, Hannah; Flum, Elisabeth; Joos, Stefanie

    2016-12-01

    Academic institutions of general practice at German medical faculties have grown during the past years. This leads to an increase in the need of qualified young researchers and teachers in general practice (GP). Little is known about the interest in research and teaching skills and their training among general practice trainees and young GPs. This cross-sectional survey among GP trainees and young GPs examined 1. if there is an interest in the training in research and teaching skills during post-graduate GP training, 2. which fostering and hindering factors have an effect on this interest and 3. which roles are attributed to academic institutions of general practice. A web-based cross-sectional study was performed among members of "Verbundweiterbildung(plus"), a network of GP trainees, as well as "Junge Allgemeinmedizin Deutschland", the German network of young GPs. Descriptive analysis was conducted. 148 GP trainees and young GPs participated in the study, 76% (n=109) of them were GP trainees. There was interest in a position in research and teaching during post-graduate GP training among 55% (n=78). Factors associated with the interest in a position in research and teaching during post-graduate GP training were (MV 5-point Likert scale ± SD): compatibility of clinical work and research/teaching and of family and career (4.4±0.8; 4.7±0.6 respectively). The roles of academic institutions of general practice were attributed to training of medical students (4.6±0.6), post-graduate GP training (4.5±0.7) and research (4.5±0.7). GP trainees assessed the importance of training in research and teaching skills during post-graduate GP training and of the compatibility of family and career differently from young GPs (3.7±1.0 vs. 4.1±0.8 p=0.027; 4.8±0.5 vs. 4.3±0.9, p=0.016). Those interested in a position in research and teaching during post-graduate GP training showed a stronger interest in specific training in research skills (3.7±1.1 vs. 2.8±1.1, p<0.001), a

  19. Physicians in Postgraduate Training Characteristics and Support of Palliative Sedation for Existential Distress.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Larry D; Perkins, Susan M; Cottingham, Ann; Tong, Yan; Kozak, Mary Ann; Mehta, Rakesh

    2017-09-01

    Palliative sedation for refractory existential distress (PS-ED) is ethically troubling but potentially critical to quality end-of-life (EOL) care. Physicians' in postgraduate training support toward PS-ED is unknown nor is it known how empathy, hope, optimism, or intrinsic religious motivation (IRM) affect their support. These knowledge gaps hinder efforts to support physicians who struggle with patients' EOL care preferences. One hundred thirty-four postgraduate physicians rated their support of PS for refractory physical pain (PS-PP) or PS-ED, ranked the importance of patient preferences in ethically challenging situations, and completed measures of empathy, hope, optimism, and IRM. Predictors of PS-ED and PS-PP support were examined using binary and multinomial logistic regression. Only 22.7% of residents were very supportive of PS-ED, and 82.0% were very supportive of PS-PP. Support for PS-PP or PS-ED did not correlate with levels of empathy, hope, optimism, or IRM; however, for residents with lower IRM, greater optimism was associated with greater PS-ED support. In contrast, among residents with higher IRM, optimism was not associated with PS-ED support. Comparing current results to published surveys, a similar proportion of residents and practicing physicians support PS-ED and PS-PP. In contrast to practicing physicians, however, IRM does not directly influence residents' supportiveness. The interaction between optimism and IRM suggests residents' beliefs and characteristics are salient to their EOL decisions. End-of-life curricula should provide physicians opportunities to reflect on the personal and ethical factors that influence their support for PS-ED.

  20. The educational environment: comparisons of the British and American postgraduate psychiatry training programmes in an Asian setting.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, Rathi; Broekman, Birit; Wong, John C M; Lai, Yew Min; Kua, Ee Heok

    2013-11-01

    An American styled residency programme for postgraduate psychiatry training introduced in parallel with an existing British-styled programme in Singapore has proved challenging at various levels. This study determined the educational environment of both programmes using the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) questionnaire. All residents and trainees were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study with a self-administered PHEEM questionnaire. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 16. Trainees and residents perceived training as "more positive than negative with room for improvement." The subscale score for Teaching was lowest. Residents were dissatisfied with their new structured programme. Perceptions of clinical teachers were low in both training programmes. The existence of two programmes impacts the educational environment. Those involved in introducing revisions to educational programmes and curricula must attend to change management.

  1. Outcomes from a postgraduate biomedical technology innovation training program: the first 12 years of Stanford Biodesign.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Todd J; Kurihara, Christine Q; Camarillo, David B; Pietzsch, Jan B; Gorodsky, Julian; Zenios, Stefanos A; Doshi, Rajiv; Shen, Christopher; Kumar, Uday N; Mairal, Anurag; Watkins, Jay; Popp, Richard L; Wang, Paul J; Makower, Josh; Krummel, Thomas M; Yock, Paul G

    2013-09-01

    The Stanford Biodesign Program began in 2001 with a mission of helping to train leaders in biomedical technology innovation. A key feature of the program is a full-time postgraduate fellowship where multidisciplinary teams undergo a process of sourcing clinical needs, inventing solutions and planning for implementation of a business strategy. The program places a priority on needs identification, a formal process of selecting, researching and characterizing needs before beginning the process of inventing. Fellows and students from the program have gone on to careers that emphasize technology innovation across industry and academia. Biodesign trainees have started 26 companies within the program that have raised over $200 million and led to the creation of over 500 new jobs. More importantly, although most of these technologies are still at a very early stage, several projects have received regulatory approval and so far more than 150,000 patients have been treated by technologies invented by our trainees. This paper reviews the initial outcomes of the program and discusses lessons learned and future directions in terms of training priorities.

  2. Outcomes from a postgraduate biomedical technology innovation training program: the first 12 years of Stanford Biodesign

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Todd J.; Kurihara, Christine Q.; Camarillo, David B.; Pietzsch, Jan B.; Gorodsky, Julian; Zenios, Stefanos A.; Doshi, Rajiv; Shen, Christopher; Kumar, Uday N.; Mairal, Anurag; Watkins, Jay; Popp, Richard L.; Wang, Paul J.; Makower, Josh; Krummel, Thomas M.; Yock, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    The Stanford Biodesign Program began in 2001 with a mission of helping to train leaders in biomedical technology innovation. A key feature of the program is a full-time postgraduate fellowship where multidisciplinary teams undergo a process of sourcing clinical needs, inventing solutions and planning for implementation of a business strategy. The program places a priority on needs identification, a formal process of selecting, researching and characterizing needs before beginning the process of inventing. Fellows and students from the program have gone on to careers that emphasize technology innovation across industry and academia. Biodesign trainees have started 26 companies within the program that have raised over $200 Million and led to the creation of over 500 new jobs. More importantly, although most of these technologies are still at a very early stage, several projects have received regulatory approval and so far more than 150,000 patients have been treated by technologies invented by our trainees. This paper reviews the initial outcomes of the program and discusses lessons learned and future directions in terms of training priorities. PMID:23404074

  3. Evaluation of safe and effective administration of nitrous oxide after a postgraduate training course

    PubMed Central

    Collado, Valérie; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Faulks, Denise; Tardieu, Corinne; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Droz, Dominique; Onody, Peter; Hennequin, Martine

    2008-01-01

    Background Conscious sedation is used in dentistry to improve access and quality of care in patients who have difficulty coping with treatment. The aim of this prospective study was to describe a postgraduate training course in conscious sedation for dentists, with specific evaluation of the safe and effective administration of a 50% nitrous oxide in oxygen premix. Methods 45 practitioners were trained between 2002 and 2004. They carried out 826 sessions of inhalation sedation in 662 patients. The clinical competency of this group was compared with an expert group. Results There was no difference between trainees and experts in ability to complete the planned dental treatment under sedation (89.6% vs 93.2%). Trainees were less successful than experts for patients with intellectual disability (87.4% vs 94.2%, p < 0.01). For both groups, the degree of cooperation improved between initial induction and each perioperative step (Wilcoxon test, p < 0.01). However, for trainees, Venham behaviour scores varied with the type of patient (Kruskal Wallis test, p < 0.001). No major adverse effects were recorded. Trainees reported more minor adverse effects than experts (13% vs. 5.3% respectively, Fisher exact test, p < 0.001) Conclusion The trainee practitioners provided effective and safe inhalation sedation. This challenges the current French restriction of the 50% nitrous oxide in oxygen premix to the hospital setting. Further emphasis is required on the teaching of behaviour management skills for patients with intellectual disability. PMID:18547418

  4. Competency-based postgraduate training: can we bridge the gap between theory and clinical practice?

    PubMed

    ten Cate, Olle; Scheele, Fedde

    2007-06-01

    The introduction of competency-based postgraduate medical training, as recently stimulated by national governing bodies in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, The Netherlands, and other countries, is a major advancement, but at the same time it evokes critical issues of curricular implementation. A source of concern is the translation of general competencies into the practice of clinical teaching. The authors observe confusion around the term competency, which may have adverse effects when a teaching and assessment program is to be designed. This article aims to clarify the competency terminology. To connect the ideas behind a competency framework with the work environment of patient care, the authors propose to analyze the critical activities of professional practice and relate these to predetermined competencies. The use of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) and statements of awarded responsibility (STARs) may bridge a potential gap between the theory of competency-based education and clinical practice. EPAs reflect those activities that together constitute the profession. Carrying out most of these EPAs requires the possession of several competencies. The authors propose not to go to great lengths to assess competencies as such, in the way they are abstractly defined in competency frameworks but, instead, to focus on the observation of concrete critical clinical activities and to infer the presence of multiple competencies from several observed activities. Residents may then be awarded responsibility for EPAs. This can serve to move toward competency-based training, in which a flexible length of training is possible and the outcome of training becomes more important than its length.

  5. Education and training among Italian postgraduate medical schools in public health: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Garavelli, E; Marcantoni, C; Costantino, C; Tedesco, D; Burrai, V; Giraldi, G; D'Andrea, E

    2014-01-01

    The postgraduate medical Schools in Public Health (locally known as School of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine) should ensure adequate scientific and technical knowledge and professional skills in preventive medicine, health promotion and healthcare planning as provided by Ministerial Decree 285/2005. The Italian Committee of Medical Residents in Hygiene, Preventive Medicine and Public Health of the Italian Society of Hygiene, Public Health and Preventive Medicine - S.It.I. (Consulta Nazionale dei medici in formazione specialistica S.It.I.) has always been engaged in monitoring activities on public health teaching, guaranteeing the homogeneity of educational proposals among all national Schools in Public Health. The purpose of this study is to provide a 'snapshot' of public health education and training in Italy and to identify the improvement actions needed for implementing an innovative and homogeneous public health training. A cross-sectional study was carried out over a period of three months (March to May 2013). A self-administered questionnaire was e-mailed to local Committee's delegates of all 32 postgraduate medical Schools in Public Health in Italy. The questionnaire was structured in four sections: general information, University education and training, extra-University training, interdisciplinary activities. The majority of local Committee's delegates have agreed to be enrolled in the survey. A total of 28 questionnaires were returned (88% response rate). The number of residents in each Italian School in Public Health ranged from 7 to 31. The distribution of professors in relation to residents is not similar for each University Schools. The ratio professors/residents spanning from 0.2 to 2. About teaching, only 4 University Schools offered all courses requested by Ministerial Decree 285/2005. Most of them offered at least 75% of the requested courses, but there were Schools in which the courses were less than 50%. The vast majority of schools held more

  6. The predictive validity of selection for entry into postgraduate training in general practice: evidence from three longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Fiona; Lievens, Filip; Kerrin, Máire; Munro, Neil; Irish, Bill

    2013-11-01

    The selection methodology for UK general practice is designed to accommodate several thousand applicants per year and targets six core attributes identified in a multi-method job-analysis study To evaluate the predictive validity of selection methods for entry into postgraduate training, comprising a clinical problem-solving test, a situational judgement test, and a selection centre. A three-part longitudinal predictive validity study of selection into training for UK general practice. In sample 1, participants were junior doctors applying for training in general practice (n = 6824). In sample 2, participants were GP registrars 1 year into training (n = 196). In sample 3, participants were GP registrars sitting the licensing examination after 3 years, at the end of training (n = 2292). The outcome measures include: assessor ratings of performance in a selection centre comprising job simulation exercises (sample 1); supervisor ratings of trainee job performance 1 year into training (sample 2); and licensing examination results, including an applied knowledge examination and a 12-station clinical skills objective structured clinical examination (OSCE; sample 3). Performance ratings at selection predicted subsequent supervisor ratings of job performance 1 year later. Selection results also significantly predicted performance on both the clinical skills OSCE and applied knowledge examination for licensing at the end of training. In combination, these longitudinal findings provide good evidence of the predictive validity of the selection methods, and are the first reported for entry into postgraduate training. Results show that the best predictor of work performance and training outcomes is a combination of a clinical problem-solving test, a situational judgement test, and a selection centre. Implications for selection methods for all postgraduate specialties are considered.

  7. Career paths in physicians' postgraduate training - an eight-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Klaghofer, Richard

    2010-10-06

    To date, there are hardly any studies on the choice of career path in medical school graduates. The present study aimed to investigate what career paths can be identified in the course of postgraduate training of physicians; what factors have an influence on the choice of a career path; and in what way the career paths are correlated with career-related factors as well as with work-life balance aspirations. The data reported originates from five questionnaire surveys of the prospective SwissMedCareer Study, beginning in 2001 (T1, last year of medical school). The study sample consisted of 358 physicians (197 females, 55%; 161 males, 45%) participating at each assessment from T2 (2003, first year of residency) to T5 (2009, seventh year of residency), answering the question: What career do you aspire to have? Furthermore, personal characteristics, chosen specialty, career motivation, mentoring experience, work-life balance as well as workload, career success and career satisfaction were assessed. Career paths were analysed with cluster analysis, and differences between clusters analysed with multivariate methods. The cluster analysis revealed four career clusters which discriminated distinctly between each other: (1) career in practice, (2) hospital career, (3) academic career, and (4) changing career goal. From T3 (third year of residency) to T5, respondents in Cluster 1-3 were rather stable in terms of their career path aspirations, while those assigned to Cluster 4 showed a high fluctuation in their career plans. Physicians in Cluster 1 showed high values in extraprofessional concerns and often consider part-time work. Cluster 2 and 3 were characterised by high instrumentality, intrinsic and extrinsic career motivation, career orientation and high career success. No cluster differences were seen in career satisfaction. In Cluster 1 and 4, females were overrepresented. Trainees should be supported to stay on the career path that best suits his/her personal and

  8. Chemistry Post-Graduate Student Training from an Open Distance Learning Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mphahlele, M. J.; Tafesse, F.

    2015-01-01

    The University of South Africa's (UNISA) College of Science, Engineering and Technology (CSET) stands unique in the world by offering laboratory-based disciplines through Open Distance Learning (ODL) at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Lack of postgraduate programmes in chemistry at the very few ODL institutions offering undergraduate…

  9. Chemistry Post-Graduate Student Training from an Open Distance Learning Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mphahlele, M. J.; Tafesse, F.

    2015-01-01

    The University of South Africa's (UNISA) College of Science, Engineering and Technology (CSET) stands unique in the world by offering laboratory-based disciplines through Open Distance Learning (ODL) at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Lack of postgraduate programmes in chemistry at the very few ODL institutions offering undergraduate…

  10. Pilot study for an orthopedic surgical training laboratory for basic motor skills.

    PubMed

    Christy, Jonathan M; Kolovich, Gregory P; Beal, Matthew D; Mayerson, Joel L

    2014-11-01

    The most effective way to teach and assess a resident's knowledge of musculoskeletal medicine, including orthopedic-specific surgical skills, remains unclear. We designed a surgical skills training session to educate junior-level orthopedic residents in 4 core areas: comfort with basic power equipment, casting/splinting, suturing, and surgical instrument identification. As part of the study reported here, 11 orthopedic residents (postgraduate year 1-3) completed a skills session and were evaluated with written examinations and an ankle fracture model before and after the session. Four other junior residents were unable to attend the session because of clinical responsibilities. For the group of 11 residents who completed the written examination, mean (SD) presession percentile was 87.3 (10.4), mean (SD) postsession percentile was 92 (8.4), median was 96, and mode was 96. There was a significant pre-post difference among all test takers, regardless of training level (P < .05). In the ankle fracture model, for the entire group, mean (SD) overall presession percentile was 68.6 (13.9), and mean (SD) overall postsession percentile was 95.2 (5.2). There was a significant pre-post difference among all test takers, regardless of training level (P = .03). An intensive laboratory has the potential to improve junior-level residents' basic surgical skills and knowledge.

  11. [Stability of long-term professional objectives of young physicians during postgraduate training. Results of a multicenter cohort study].

    PubMed

    Birck, S; Gedrose, B; Robra, B-P; Schmidt, A; Schultz, J-H; Stosch, C; Wagner, R; Janßen, N; Scherer, M; van den Bussche, H

    2014-10-01

    We investigated persistences and changes of career preferences of medical residents in Germany after two years of postgraduate training with regard to future working place and position. The results are compared with those forwarded at graduation from medical school in a gender comparative perspective. The study is based on a standardized postal survey among the participants in the "KarMed" study, originally based on 1012 graduates of the medical faculties of Erlangen, Giessen, Hamburg, Heidelberg, Cologne, Leipzig and Magdeburg in 2009. 2107 persons were contacted. The return rate at baseline was 48 %, and the two surveys after the baseline reached return rates of 87 % and 89 % respectively. In all samples 2/3 were women as in actual medical undergraduate education. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were performed. After 2 years of residency, residents after 2 years of postgraduate training still preferred the hospital over private practice as their final workplace after postgraduate training. The attractiveness of leading positions in the hospital declined among men, whereas it was already low for women at graduation. A large proportion of those physicians preferring the ambulatory sector, especially women, wishes to work as employee instead of private practice. At the personal level, almost 60 % forwarded the same preferences as those at graduation. Gender, parenthood and region of study (East vs. West Germany) did not influence stability or change of preferences. The results demonstrate the persistence of professional preferences regarding future sector and position of medical work during postgraduate training. These preferences do neither match with principles of gender equality nor with future workforce needs (e. g. in primary care). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Neurosurgical Postgraduate Training in China: Moving Toward a National Training Standard.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Evins, Alexander I; Lin, Ning; Chang, Jun; Hu, Guohan; Hou, Lijun; Chen, Juxiang; Bernardo, Antonio; Mao, Ying; Stieg, Philip E

    2016-12-01

    China currently has the most populous and rapidly aging nation in the world. In the next few decades, China will have to increase the throughput, quality, and scope of its neurosurgical training programs to meet forecasted demand. Until recently, China lacked national education standards in neurosurgery that fostered imbalances in medical and pedagogical resources, quality of care, and education between different regions and introduced significant heterogeneity in neurosurgical competency. In 2010, Shanghai implemented the first new standards-based comprehensive neurosurgery training program, which spans 7 years broken down into 2 blocks. This model was selected subsequently for nationwide adoption by the Chinese Congress of Neurological Surgeons, with initial implementation in 2015 and full nationwide adoption by 2020. Establishment of a national standardized training system represents a significant milestone in the development and evolution of neurosurgery in China and establishes a comprehensive standards-based system that will help reduce nationwide diversity in neurosurgical training. Although this program is still in its infancy and will not see its first graduating class until 2017 in Shanghai, it represents an essential step toward meeting China's growing demand for quality and consistent neurosurgical care. We review the history of neurosurgical training in Mainland China and describe the new Neurosurgical Specialist Standardized Training Program. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. What is wrong with assessment in postgraduate training? Lessons from clinical practice and educational research.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Erik; Scheele, Fedde

    2013-07-01

    Workplace-based assessment is more commonly given a lukewarm than a warm welcome by its prospective users. In this article, we summarise the workplace-based assessment literature as well as our own experiences with workplace-based assessment to derive lessons that can facilitate acceptance of workplace-based assessment in postgraduate specialty training. We propose to shift the emphasis in workplace-based assessment from assessment of trainee performance to the learning of trainees. Workplace-based assessment should focus on supporting supervisors in taking entrustment decisions by complementing their "gut feeling" with information from assessments and focus less on assessment and testability. One of the most stubborn problems with workplace-based assessment is the absence of observation of trainees and the lack of feedback based on observations. Non-standardised observations are used to organise feedback. To make these assessments meaningful for learning, it is essential that they are not perceived as summative by their users, that they provide narrative feedback for the learner and that there is a form of facilitation that helps to integrate the feedback in trainees' self-assessments.

  14. [Certified clinical pathologists and the program of postgraduate training in clinical pathology].

    PubMed

    Ueda, K

    1994-05-01

    Clinical chemistry is one of the core subjects required to master for doctors willing to be certified as a specialist in clinical pathology or laboratory medicine. For the past several decades, clinical chemistry has developed so rapidly and widely into many disciplines, such as microchemistry, electrochemistry, immunochemistry, molecular biology and robotics, that it is no more easy even for specialists to understand details in its whole scope nor to utilize the variety of principles, techniques, and equipment. In fact, clinical chemistry today covers such a wide range of laboratory tests as immunoassays, drug monitoring, toxicology, pregnancy tests, and gene diagnosis, in addition to chemical or enzymatic quantification of thousands of substances. Under such enormous circumstances, the program of postgraduate training, particularly in clinical chemistry, should be aimed at raising the capability to fulfill current requirements in medical practice, scientific research, consultative education and laboratory management, as well as to pursue lifelong self-disciplinary education. This capability must be obtained not only in knowledge or skills but also in attitude.

  15. A Validated Orthopaedic Surgical Simulation Model for Training and Evaluation of Basic Arthroscopic Skills.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Ryan P; Pauyo, Thierry; Sutton, J Carl; Coughlin, Larry P; Bergeron, Stephane G

    2015-09-02

    To our knowledge, there is currently no validated educational model to evaluate and teach basic arthroscopic skills that is widely accessible to orthopaedic residency training programs. The primary objective was to design and to validate a surgical simulation model by demonstrating that subjects with increasing level of training perform better on basic arthroscopic simulation tasks. The secondary objective was to evaluate inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of the model. Prospectively recruited participants were divided by level of training into four groups. Subjects performed six basic arthroscopic tasks using a box model: (1) probing, (2) grasping, (3) tissue resection, (4) shaving, (5) tissue liberation and suture-passing, and (6) knot-tying. A score was calculated according to time required to complete each task and deductions for technical errors. A priori total global score, of a possible 100 points, was calculated by averaging scores from all six tasks using equal weights. A total of forty-nine participants were recruited for this study. Participants were grouped by level of training: Group 1 (novice: fifteen medical students and interns), Group 2 (junior residents: twelve postgraduate year-2 or postgraduate year-3 residents), Group 3 (senior residents: sixteen postgraduate year-4 or postgraduate year-5 residents), and Group 4 (six arthroscopic surgeons). The mean total global score (and standard deviation) differed significantly between groups (p < 0.001): 29.0 ± 13.6 points for Group 1, 40.3 ± 12.1 points for Group 2, 57.6 ± 7.4 points for Group 3, and 72.4 ± 3.0 points for Group 4. Pairwise comparison with Tukey correction confirmed construct validity by showing significant improvement in overall performance by increasing level of training between all groups (p < 0.05). The model proved to be highly reliable with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 for both inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. A simulation model was successfully

  16. Orthopedic surgery postgraduate year 1 intern curriculum improves initial orthopedic in-training examination performance.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Craig S; Nyland, John; Broome, Brandon

    2012-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of an educational curriculum designed for orthopedic surgery postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) interns to improve initial Orthopedic In-Training Examination (OITE) performance. A retrospective cohort study was performed that evaluated the PGY-1 intern OITE performance of one residency training program (n = 55) during 7-year periods before (1996-2002) and after structured curriculum implementation (2003-2009). Linear regression analysis revealed insignificant changes in median PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank during the precurriculum period (R = 0.08, P = 0.53). Postcurriculum period comparisons revealed significantly improving PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank (R = 0.46, P = 0.048). Pre- and postcurriculum median US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step I scores did not display statistically significant differences (218.2 ± 6.6 vs 229.1 ± 13.8, Mann-Whitney U test, z = -1.5, P = 0.10). Spearman rho correlations revealed a moderate relation (r = 0.61) between postcurriculum PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank and USMLE Step I score, but not during the precurriculum period. A moderate relation (r = 0.50) also was observed between postcurriculum USMLE Step I score and average OITE percentile rank during the 5-year residency program, but not during the precurriculum period. PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank improved significantly with the addition of a specially designed educational curriculum. The stronger USMLE Step I score and PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank relation observed during the postcurriculum period suggests that interns who participated in the educational curriculum were better prepared to translate general medical and patient care knowledge into orthopedic surgery knowledge.

  17. Ophthalmic surgical training in Karnataka and Southern India: Present status and future interests from a survey of final-year residents

    PubMed Central

    Ajay, K; Krishnaprasad, R; Divya, D S

    2015-01-01

    Settings and Design: This study documents a survey of final-year ophthalmology postgraduates on the subject of their surgical training and their future plans after residency. Purpose: This survey aimed to answer the question, What is the present status of surgical training in ophthalmic training centers? by obtaining information from students about (1) various methods used in surgical training (2) numbers and types of surgeries performed by them in the training centers (3) their plans after residency. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire containing 21 questions was distributed to 155 students attending an intensive 4-day teaching program. The questions related to orientation training, wet lab training, facilities for training, free surgical camps and detailed information about numbers and types of surgeries observed and performed. Completed questionnaires were collected, and responses analyzed. Results: One hundred and seven completed responses were analyzed. The majority had not received formal orientation training. More than half had undergone wet lab training. Most residents performed their first ophthalmic surgery during the 1st year of residency and went to the operation theatre multiple times a week. Most of the students planned to undergo further training after residency. More than half of the students found their surgical training to be fair or satisfactory. Conclusions: The number and frequency of ophthalmic surgeries done by residents appear satisfactory, but further efforts from trainers on enhancing the quality and range of surgical training would benefit students and improve their satisfaction. PMID:26044468

  18. Virtual reality training for surgical trainees in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Palanivelu, Latha; Davidson, Brian R

    2009-01-21

    Surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is time consuming, costly, and of variable effectiveness. Training using a virtual reality simulator is an option to supplement standard training. To determine whether virtual reality training can supplement or replace conventional laparoscopic surgical training (apprenticeship) in surgical trainees with limited or no prior laparoscopic experience. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and grey literature until March 2008. We included all randomised clinical trials comparing virtual reality training versus other forms of training including video trainer training, no training, or standard laparoscopic training in surgical trainees with little or no prior laparoscopic experience. We also included trials comparing different methods of virtual reality training. We collected the data on the characteristics of the trial, methodological quality of the trials, mortality, morbidity, conversion rate, operating time, and hospital stay. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using RevMan Analysis. For each outcome we calculated the standardised mean difference with 95% confidence intervals based on intention-to-treat analysis. We included 23 trials with 612 participants. Four trials compared virtual reality versus video trainer training. Twelve trials compared virtual reality versus no training or standard laparoscopic training. Four trials compared virtual reality, video trainer training and no training, or standard laparoscopic training. Three trials compared different methods of virtual reality training. Most of the trials were of high risk of bias. In trainees without prior surgical experience, virtual

  19. Weekly working hours for Norwegian hospital doctors since 1994 with special attention to postgraduate training, work-home balance and the European working time directive: a panel study.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Judith; Aasland, Olaf G

    2014-10-13

    To examine the weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors from 1994 to 2012 with special emphasis on the quality of postgraduate training and work-home balance, and in relation to the requirements of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD). Panel study based on postal questionnaires. Norway. Unbalanced cohort of 1300-1600 doctors in 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. Self-reported total weekly working hours and whether 45 weekly working hours are too short, sufficient, or too long to meet the quality requirements of obligatory postgraduate training for junior doctors. From 1994 to 2012, the number of weekly working hours was stable for senior (46-47 h) and junior (45-46 h) hospital doctors. In 2012, significantly more senior (27-35%) than junior (11-20%) doctors reported suboptimal work-home balance, defined as working more than 48 h a week. The majority perceived the present situation with an average of 45 h per week for juniors as sufficient for obligatory postgraduate specialist training, but doctors of higher age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08), senior doctors (1.07, 1.04 to 1.11) and doctors working in surgical specialties (OR 1 vs laboratory medicine 0.03, 0.01 to 0.25, internal medicine 0.31, 0.17 to 0.58, psychiatry 0.12, 0.04 to 0.36, paediatrics 0.36, 0.12 to 1.07, anaesthesiology 0.08, 0.02 to 0.39, gynaecology 0.07, 0.01 to 0.56 and others 0.39, 0.04 to 3.56) were more likely to want the work-week to be longer. The weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors were always below the EWTD requirements. A significant growth of hospital doctor density over the past two decades, national regulations and cultural values might be important factors. Specialty differences in perception of sufficient training time may call for more flexibility in working time regulations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Weekly working hours for Norwegian hospital doctors since 1994 with special attention to postgraduate training, work–home balance and the European Working Time Directive: a panel study

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Judith; Aasland, Olaf G

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors from 1994 to 2012 with special emphasis on the quality of postgraduate training and work–home balance, and in relation to the requirements of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD). Design Panel study based on postal questionnaires. Setting Norway. Participants Unbalanced cohort of 1300–1600 doctors in 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. Outcome measures Self-reported total weekly working hours and whether 45 weekly working hours are too short, sufficient, or too long to meet the quality requirements of obligatory postgraduate training for junior doctors. Results From 1994 to 2012, the number of weekly working hours was stable for senior (46–47 h) and junior (45–46 h) hospital doctors. In 2012, significantly more senior (27–35%) than junior (11–20%) doctors reported suboptimal work–home balance, defined as working more than 48 h a week. The majority perceived the present situation with an average of 45 h per week for juniors as sufficient for obligatory postgraduate specialist training, but doctors of higher age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08), senior doctors (1.07, 1.04 to 1.11) and doctors working in surgical specialties (OR 1 vs laboratory medicine 0.03, 0.01 to 0.25, internal medicine 0.31, 0.17 to 0.58, psychiatry 0.12, 0.04 to 0.36, paediatrics 0.36, 0.12 to 1.07, anaesthesiology 0.08, 0.02 to 0.39, gynaecology 0.07, 0.01 to 0.56 and others 0.39, 0.04 to 3.56) were more likely to want the work-week to be longer. Conclusions The weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors were always below the EWTD requirements. A significant growth of hospital doctor density over the past two decades, national regulations and cultural values might be important factors. Specialty differences in perception of sufficient training time may call for more flexibility in working time regulations. PMID:25311038

  1. Improving core surgical training in a major trauma centre.

    PubMed

    Morris, Daniel L J; Bryson, David J; Ollivere, Ben J; Forward, Daren P

    2016-06-01

    English Major Trauma Centres (MTCs) were established in April 2012. Increased case volume and complexity has influenced trauma and orthopaedic (T&O) core surgical training in these centres. To determine if T&O core surgical training in MTCs meets Joint Committee on Surgical Training (JCST) quality indicators including performance of T&O operative procedures and consultant supervised session attendance. An audit cycle assessing the impact of a weekly departmental core surgical trainee rota. The rota included allocated timetabled sessions that optimised clinical and surgical learning opportunities. Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme (ISCP) records for T&O core surgical trainees at a single MTC were analysed for 8 months pre and post rota introduction. Outcome measures were electronic surgical logbook evidence of leading T&O operative procedures and consultant validated work-based assessments (WBAs). Nine core surgical trainees completed a 4 month MTC placement pre and post introduction of the core surgical trainee rota. Introduction of core surgical trainee rota significantly increased the mean number of T&O operative procedures led by a core surgical trainee during a 4 month MTC placement from 20.2 to 34.0 (p<0.05). The mean number of hip hemiarthroplasty procedures led by a core surgical trainee during a 4 month MTC placement was significantly increased (0.3 vs 2.4 [p=0.04]). Those of dynamic hip screw fixation (2.3 vs 3.6) and ankle fracture fixation (0.7 vs 1.6) were not. Introduction of a core surgical trainee rota significantly increased the mean number of consultant validated WBAs completed by a core surgical trainee during a 4 month MTC placement from 1.7 to 6.6 (p<0.0001). Introduction of a departmental core surgical trainee rota utilising a 'problem-based' model can significantly improve T&O core surgical training in MTCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Incorporating simulation into gynecologic surgical training.

    PubMed

    Wohlrab, Kyle; Jelovsek, J Eric; Myers, Deborah

    2017-05-13

    Today's educational environment has made it more difficult to rely on the Halstedian model of "see one, do one, teach one" in gynecologic surgical training. There is decreased surgical volume, but an increased number of surgical modalities. Fortunately, surgical simulation has evolved to fill the educational void. Whether it is through skill generalization or skill transfer, surgical simulation has shifted learning from the operating room back to the classroom. This article explores the principles of surgical education and ways to introduce simulation as an adjunct to residency training. We review high- and low-fidelity surgical simulators, discuss the progression of surgical skills, and provide options for skills competency assessment. Time and money are major hurdles when designing a simulation curriculum, but low-fidelity models, intradepartmental cost sharing, and utilizing local experts for simulation proctoring can aid in developing a simulation program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of Canadian and Swiss Surgical Training Curricula: Moving on Toward Competency-Based Surgical Education.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Henry; Oertli, Daniel; Mechera, Robert; Dell-Kuster, Salome; Rosenthal, Rachel; Reznick, Richard; MacDonald, Hugh

    Quality of surgical training in the era of resident duty-hour restrictions (RDHR) is part of an ongoing debate. Most training elements are provided during surgical service. As exposure to surgical procedures is important but time-consuming, RDHR may affect quality of surgical training. Providing structured training elements may help to compensate for this shortcoming. This binational anonymous questionnaire-based study evaluates frequency, time, and structure of surgical training programs at 2 typical academic teaching hospitals with different RDHR. Departments of Surgery of University of Basel (Basel, Switzerland) and the Queen's University (Kingston, Ontario, Canada). Surgical consultants and residents of the Queen's University Hospital (Kingston, Ontario, Canada) and the University Hospital Basel (Basel, Switzerland) were eligible for this study. Questionnaire response rate was 37% (105/284). Queen's residents work 80 hours per week, receiving 7 hours of formal training (8.8% of workweek). Basel residents work 60 hours per week, including 1 hour of formal training (1.7% of working time). Queen's faculty and residents rated their program as "structured" or "rather structured" in contrast to Basel faculty and residents who rated their programs as "neutral" in structure or "unstructured." Respondents identified specific structured training elements more frequently at Queen's than in Basel. Two-thirds of residents responded that they seek out additional surgical experiences through voluntary extra work. Basel participants articulated a stronger need for improvement of current surgical training. Although Basel residents and consultants in both institutions fear negative influence of RDHR on the training program, this was not the case in Queen's residents. Providing more structured surgical training elements may be advantageous in providing optimal-quality surgical education in an era of work-hour restrictions. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in

  4. Postgraduate training in global health: ensuring UK doctors can contribute to health in resource-poor countries.

    PubMed

    Brown, Colin; Martineau, Fred; Spry, Emily; Yudkin, John S

    2011-10-01

    The UK has recognised the important role its health professionals play in achieving the Millennium Development Goals. For doctors to contribute to these efforts without detracting from domestic service and training commitments presents a challenge. Moreover, doctors need suitable education in order to make appropriate and effective contributions in resource-poor settings. In this article it is argued that, while mechanisms exist within current UK postgraduate training that permit a degree of flexibility to training pathways, they are not structured in a way that facilitates work in low and middle income countries. Furthermore, the knowledge and skills required to make contributions to global health are not sufficiently served by existing training. A model for a national curriculum and tiered qualifications in global health is proposed, based on rigorous appraisal and mentoring to complement the training pathways for UK specialisation, allowing doctors to add global health skills at a level appropriate for their career plans.

  5. Ensuring vascular surgical training is on the right track.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Erica L; Arora, Sonal; Moneta, Gregory L

    2011-02-01

    Approval of the primary certificate in vascular surgery eliminated the requirement for certification in general surgery before vascular surgery certification. New training paradigms for training in vascular surgery have emerged driven by the desire to offer greater flexibility of training and to shorten the length of training. Many of these changes are based upon "expert opinion," promise, and "logic" without objective evaluation of the residents or the training programs themselves. To be on the forefront of surgical education, vascular surgery will need to adopt methods of curriculum development firmly grounded in educational principles and use modern assessment tools for the evaluation of competence and performance. This report presents the evolution and challenges to the current vascular surgical training model and then argues for a more rigorous and scientific approach to training in vascular surgery. It presents an analysis of potential avenues for placing education and training in vascular surgery on the forefront of modern surgical education.

  6. Three-Dimensional Printing of a Hemorrhagic Cervical Cancer Model for Postgraduate Gynecological Training

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Stephen; Doucet, Gregory; Murphy, Deanna; Turner, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A realistic hemorrhagic cervical cancer model was three-dimensionally (3D) printed and used in a postgraduate medical simulation training session. Materials and methods Computer-assisted design (CAD) software was the platform of choice to create and refine the cervical model. Once the prototype was finalized, another software allowed for the addition of a neoplastic mass, which included openings for bleeding from the neoplasm and cervical os. 3D printing was done using two desktop printers and three different materials. An emergency medicine simulation case was presented to obstetrics and gynecology residents who were at varying stages of their training. The scenario included history taking and physical examination of a standardized patient. This was a hybrid simulation; a synthetic pelvic task trainer that allowed the placement of the cervical model was connected to the standardized patient. The task trainer was placed under a drape and appeared to extend from the standardized patient’s body. At various points in the simulation, the standardized patient controlled the cervical bleeding through a peripheral venous line. Feedback forms were completed, and the models were discussed and evaluated with staff. Results A final cervical model was created and successfully printed. Overall, the models were reported to be similar to a real cervix. The models bled well. Most models were not sutured during the scenarios, but overall, the value of the printed cervical models was reported to be high. Discussion The models were well received, but it was suggested that more colors be integrated into the cervix in order to better emphasize the intended pathology. The model design requires further improvement, such as the addition of a locking mechanism, in order to ensure that the cervix stays inside the task trainer throughout the simulation. Adjustments to the simulated blood product would allow the bleeding to flow more vigorously. Additionally

  7. Three-Dimensional Printing of a Hemorrhagic Cervical Cancer Model for Postgraduate Gynecological Training.

    PubMed

    Bartellas, Michael; Ryan, Stephen; Doucet, Gregory; Murphy, Deanna; Turner, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    A realistic hemorrhagic cervical cancer model was three-dimensionally (3D) printed and used in a postgraduate medical simulation training session. Computer-assisted design (CAD) software was the platform of choice to create and refine the cervical model. Once the prototype was finalized, another software allowed for the addition of a neoplastic mass, which included openings for bleeding from the neoplasm and cervical os. 3D printing was done using two desktop printers and three different materials. An emergency medicine simulation case was presented to obstetrics and gynecology residents who were at varying stages of their training. The scenario included history taking and physical examination of a standardized patient. This was a hybrid simulation; a synthetic pelvic task trainer that allowed the placement of the cervical model was connected to the standardized patient. The task trainer was placed under a drape and appeared to extend from the standardized patient's body. At various points in the simulation, the standardized patient controlled the cervical bleeding through a peripheral venous line. Feedback forms were completed, and the models were discussed and evaluated with staff. A final cervical model was created and successfully printed. Overall, the models were reported to be similar to a real cervix. The models bled well. Most models were not sutured during the scenarios, but overall, the value of the printed cervical models was reported to be high. The models were well received, but it was suggested that more colors be integrated into the cervix in order to better emphasize the intended pathology. The model design requires further improvement, such as the addition of a locking mechanism, in order to ensure that the cervix stays inside the task trainer throughout the simulation. Adjustments to the simulated blood product would allow the bleeding to flow more vigorously. Additionally, a different simulation scenario might be more suitable to

  8. Mental practice in postgraduate training: a randomized controlled trial in mastoidectomy skills.

    PubMed

    Conlin, Anne; Lea, Jane; Bance, Manohar; Chadha, Neil; Kilty, Shaun; Kozak, Frederick; Savage, Julian; Sidhu, Ravindar; Chen, Joseph; Westerberg, Brian D

    2016-09-15

    Mental practice, the cognitive rehearsal of a task in the absence of overt physical movement, has been successfully used in teaching complex psychomotor tasks including sports and music, and recently, surgical skills. The objectives of this study were, 1) To develop and evaluate a mental practice protocol for mastoidectomy 2) To assess the immediate impact of mental practice on a mastoidectomy surgical task among senior Otolaryngology─Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) residents. Three expert surgeons were interviewed using verbal protocol analysis to develop a mastoidectomy mental practice script. Twelve senior Residents from Canadian training programs were randomized into two groups. All Residents were video-recorded performing a baseline mastoidectomy in a temporal bone lab. The intervention group received mental practice training, while the control group undertook self-directed textbook study. All subjects were then video-recorded performing a second mastoidectomy. Changes in pre- and post-test scores using validated expert ratings, the Task Specific Evaluation of Mastoidectomy and the Global Evaluation of Mastoidectomy, were statistically analyzed. A mental practice script was successfully developed based on interviews of three expert surgeon-educators. Task Specific Evaluation and Global Evaluation scores increased in both the mental practice and textbook study groups; there was no significant difference between the two groups in the change in scores post-intervention. There was a high and statistically signficant correlation between evaluators on the outcome measures. We were not able to demonstrate a significant difference for the benefits of mental practice in mastoidectomy, possibly due to the sample size. However, mental practice is a surgical education tool which is portable, accessible, inexpensive and safe.

  9. Military general surgical training opportunities on operations in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Adam J; Ramasamy, Arul; Hinsley, David; Midwinter, Mark

    2009-07-01

    In the UK, general surgical specialist trainees have limited exposure to general surgical trauma. Previous work has shown that trainees are involved in only two blunt and one penetrating trauma laparotomies per annum. During their training, nearly half of trainees will not be involved in the surgical management of liver injury, 20% will not undertake a trauma splenectomy and only a quarter will see a trauma thoracotomy. Military general surgical trainees require training in, and exposure to, the surgical management of trauma and specifically military wounding patterns that is not available in the UK. The objective of this study was to determine whether operative workload in the sole British surgical unit in Helmand Province, Afghanistan (Operation HERRICK) would provide a training opportunity for military general surgical trainees. A retrospective theatre log-book review of all surgical cases performed at the Role 2 (Enhanced) treatment facility at Camp Bastion, Helmand Province on Operation HERRICK between October 2006 and October 2007, inclusive. Operative cases were analysed for general surgical trauma, laparotomy, thoracotomy, vascular trauma and specific organ injury management where available. A total of 968 operative cases were performed during the study period. General surgical procedures included 51 laparotomies, 17 thoracotomies and 11 vascular repairs. There were a further 70 debridements of general surgical wounds. Specific organ management included five cases of liver packing for trauma, five trauma splenectomies and four nephrectomies. A training opportunity currently exists on Operation HERRICK for military general surgical specialist trainees. If the tempo of the last 12 months is maintained, a 2-month deployment would essentially provide trainees with the equivalent trauma surgery experience to the whole of their surgical training in the UK NHS. Trainees would gain experience in military trauma as well as specific organ injury management.

  10. [Postgraduate training for specialists in psychiatry and psychotherapy. Problem-based learning - evaluation of a pilot project].

    PubMed

    Rufer, M; Schnyder, U; Schirlo, C; Wengle, H; Gerke, W

    2011-05-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) emphasizes the student's individual needs, their ability to solve complex clinical problems, and a professional attitude that facilitates communication among colleagues. Thus, PBL appears to provide a perfectly suitable didactic format for postgraduate training of medical specialties. To date, it is only rarely used in this area though. In a pilot project, we implemented PBL into the curriculum of postgraduate training in psychiatry and psychotherapy, and evaluated the program over a period of 12 months, using structured questionnaires. A total of 41 PBL courses were held, with 447 residents participating. Participants as well as tutors assessed 19 of 21 aspects as good or very good (5-point Likert scale, mean value >4). Overall, PBL was rated as highly suitable for advanced training (participants: 4.5±0.8; tutors: 5.0±0.2). The results of this pilot project suggest that PBL might be a useful element of multifaceted advanced training programs, strengthening their practical component and the applicability of knowledge in the daily clinical routine.

  11. A structured strategy to combine education for advanced MIS training in surgical oncology training programs.

    PubMed

    Brar, S S; Wright, F; Okrainec, A; Smith, A J

    2011-09-01

    Changing realities in surgery and surgical technique have heightened the need for agile adaptation in training programs. Current guidelines reflect the growing acceptance and adoption of the use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in oncology. North American general surgery residents are often not adequately skilled in advanced laparoscopic surgery skills at the completion of their residency. Presently, advanced laparoscopic surgery training during surgical oncology fellowship training occurs on an ad-hoc basis in many surgical oncology programs. We present a rational and template for a structured training in advanced minimally invasive surgical techniques during surgical oncology fellowship training. The structure of the program seeks to incorporate evidence-based strategies in MIS training from a comprehensive review of the literature, while maintaining essential elements of rigorous surgical oncology training. Fellows in this stream will train and certify in the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) course. Fellows will participate in the didactic oncology seminar series continuously throughout the 27 months training period. Fellows will complete one full year of dedicated MIS training, followed by 15 months of surgical oncology training. Minimal standards for case volume will be expected for MIS cases and training will be tailored to meet the career goals of the fellows. We propose that a formalized MIS-Surgical Oncology Fellowship will allow trainees to benefit from an effective training curriculum and furthermore, that will allow for graduates to lead in a cancer surgery milieu increasingly focused on minimally invasive approaches. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Does the site of postgraduate family medicine training predict performance on summative examinations? A comparison of urban and remote programs.

    PubMed

    McKendry, R J; Busing, N; Dauphinee, D W; Brailovsky, C A; Boulais, A P

    2000-09-19

    The location of postgraduate medical training is shifting from teaching hospitals in urban centres to community practice in rural and remote settings. We were interested in knowing whether learning, as measured by summative examinations, was comparable between graduates who trained in urban centres and those who trained in remote and rural settings. Family medicine training programs in Ontario were selected as a model of postgraduate medical training. The results of the 2 summative examinations--the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination (MCCQE) Part II and the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) certification examination--for graduates of the programs at Ontario's 5 medical schools were compared with the results for graduates of the programs in Sudbury and Thunder Bay from 1994 to 1997. The comparability of these 2 cohorts at entry into training was evaluated using the results of their MCCQE Part I, completed just before the family medicine training. Between 1994 and 1997, 1013 graduates of family medicine programs (922 at the medical schools and 91 at the remote sites) completed the CFPC certification examination; a subset of 663 completed both the MCCQE Part I and the MCCQE Part II. The MCCQE Part I results for graduates in the remote programs did not differ significantly from those for graduates entering the programs in the medical schools (mean score 531.3 [standard deviation (SD) 69.8] and 521.8 [SD 74.4] respectively, p = 0.33). The MCCQE Part II results did not differ significantly between the 2 groups either (mean score 555.1 [SD 71.7] and 545.0 [SD 76.4] respectively, p = 0.32). Similarly, there were no consistent, significant differences in the results of the CFPC certification examination between the 2 groups. In this model of postgraduate medical training, learning was comparable between trainees in urban family medicine programs and those in rural, community-based programs. The reasons why this outcome might be unexpected and the

  13. Does the site of postgraduate family medicine training predict performance on summative examinations? A comparison of urban and remote programs

    PubMed Central

    McKendry, Robert J.; Busing, Nick; Dauphinee, Dale W.; Brailovsky, A.; Boulais, André-Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Background The location of postgraduate medical training is shifting from teaching hospitals in urban centres to community practice in rural and remote settings. We were interested in knowing whether learning, as measured by summative examinations, was comparable between graduates who trained in urban centres and those who trained in remote and rural settings. Methods Family medicine training programs in Ontario were selected as a model of postgraduate medical training. The results of the 2 summative examinations — the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination (MCCQE) Part II and the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) certification examination — for graduates of the programs at Ontario‚s 5 medical schools were compared with the results for graduates of the programs in Sudbury and Thunder Bay from 1994 to 1997. The comparability of these 2 cohorts at entry into training was evaluated using the results of their MCCQE Part I, completed just before the family medicine training. Results Between 1994 and 1997, 1013 graduates of family medicine programs (922 at the medical schools and 91 at the remote sites) completed the CFPC certification examination; a subset of 663 completed both the MCCQE Part I and the MCCQE Part II. The MCCQE Part I results for graduates in the remote programs did not differ significantly from those for graduates entering the programs in the medical schools (mean score 531.3 [standard deviation (SD) 69.8] and 521.8 [SD 74.4] respectively, p = 0.33). The MCCQE Part II results did not differ significantly between the 2 groups either (mean score 555.1 [SD 71.7] and 545.0 [SD 76.4] respectively, p = 0.32). Similarly, there were no consistent, significant differences in the results of the CFPC certification examination between the 2 groups. Interpretation In this model of postgraduate medical training, learning was comparable between trainees in urban family medicine programs and those in rural, community-based programs. The

  14. A postgraduation follow-up of social work students trained in "SBIRT": Rates of usage and perceptions of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Senreich, Evan; Ogden, Lydia P; Greenberg, Joy Pastan

    2017-01-01

    Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is an evidence-based modality that can help social workers work with substance-using clients as part of an integrated health care approach. This study reports the findings of a post-graduation one-year follow-up survey of 193 master's and bachelor's social work students trained in SBIRT in practice courses at a Northeast urban college. Forty-three percent of the trainees who were practicing social work after graduation were using SBIRT. A content analysis of participants' comments found that the vast majority found SBIRT to be a valuable practice modality, with barriers to utilization of SBIRT identified.

  15. 'Why do an MPH?' Motivations and intentions of physicians undertaking postgraduate public health training at the University of Cape Town.

    PubMed

    Zweigenthal, Virginia E M; Marquez, Emma; London, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Background Public health (PH) approaches underpin the management and transformation of health systems in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the Master of Public Health (MPH) rarely being a prerequisite for health service employment in South Africa, many physicians pursue MPH qualifications. Objectives This study identifies their motivations and career intentions and explored MPH programme strengths and gaps in under- and post-graduate PH training. Design A cross-sectional study using an online questionnaire was completed by physicians graduating with an MPH between 2000 and 2009 and those enrolled in the programme in 2010 at the University of Cape Town. Results Nearly a quarter of MPH students were physicians. Of the 65 contactable physicians, 48% responded. They were mid-career physicians who wished to obtain research training (55%), who wished to gain broader perspectives on health (32%), and who used the MPH to advance careers (90%) as researchers, policy-makers, or managers. The MPH widened professional opportunities, with 62% changing jobs. They believed that inadequate undergraduate exposure should be remedied by applying PH approaches to clinical problems in community settings, which would increase the attractiveness of postgraduate PH training. Conclusions The MPH allows physicians to transition from pure clinical to research, policy and/or management work, preparing them to innovate changes for effective health systems, responsive to the health needs of populations. Limited local job options and incentives are important constraining factors. Advocacy for positions requiring qualifications and benchmarking exit competencies of programmes nationally may promote enrolment.

  16. 'Why do an MPH?' Motivations and intentions of physicians undertaking postgraduate public health training at the University of Cape Town.

    PubMed

    Zweigenthal, Virginia E M; Marquez, Emma; London, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Public health (PH) approaches underpin the management and transformation of health systems in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the Master of Public Health (MPH) rarely being a prerequisite for health service employment in South Africa, many physicians pursue MPH qualifications. This study identifies their motivations and career intentions and explored MPH programme strengths and gaps in under- and post-graduate PH training. A cross-sectional study using an online questionnaire was completed by physicians graduating with an MPH between 2000 and 2009 and those enrolled in the programme in 2010 at the University of Cape Town. Nearly a quarter of MPH students were physicians. Of the 65 contactable physicians, 48% responded. They were mid-career physicians who wished to obtain research training (55%), who wished to gain broader perspectives on health (32%), and who used the MPH to advance careers (90%) as researchers, policy-makers, or managers. The MPH widened professional opportunities, with 62% changing jobs. They believed that inadequate undergraduate exposure should be remedied by applying PH approaches to clinical problems in community settings, which would increase the attractiveness of postgraduate PH training. The MPH allows physicians to transition from pure clinical to research, policy and/or management work, preparing them to innovate changes for effective health systems, responsive to the health needs of populations. Limited local job options and incentives are important constraining factors. Advocacy for positions requiring qualifications and benchmarking exit competencies of programmes nationally may promote enrolment.

  17. Predictive validity of a written knowledge test of skills for an OSCE in postgraduate training for general practice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, A W M; Jansen, J J M; Zuithoff, P; Düsman, H; Tan, L H C; Grol, R P T M; van der Vleuten, C P M

    2002-09-01

    To examine the validity of a written knowledge test of skills for performance on an OSCE in postgraduate training for general practice. A randomly-selected sample of 47 trainees in general practice took a knowledge test of skills, a general knowledge test and an OSCE. The OSCE included technical stations and stations including complete patient encounters. Each station was checklist rated and global rated. The knowledge test of skills was better correlated to the OSCE than the general knowledge test. Technical stations were better correlated to the knowledge test of skills than stations including complete patient encounters. For the technical stations the rating system had no influence on the correlation. For the stations including complete patient encounters the checklist rating correlated better to the knowledge test of skills than the global rating. The results of this study support the predictive validity of the knowledge test of skills. In postgraduate training for general practice a written knowledge test of skills can be used as an instrument to estimate the level of clinical skills, especially for group evaluation, such as in studies examining the efficacy of a training programme or as a screening instrument for deciding about courses to be offered. This estimation is more accurate when the content of the test matches the skills under study. However, written testing of skills cannot replace direct observation of performance of skills.

  18. Cost-effective framework for basic surgical skills training.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Deng-Jin; Wen, Chan; Yang, Ai-Jun; Zhu, Zhi-Li; Lei, Yan; Lan, Yang-Jun; Huang, Qing-Yuan; Hou, Xiao-Yu

    2013-06-01

    The importance of basic surgical skills is entirely agreed among surgical educators. However, restricted by ethical issues, finance etc, the basic surgical skills training is increasingly challenged. Increasing cost gives an impetus to the development of cost-effective training models to meet the trainees' acquisition of basic surgical skills. In this situation, a cost-effective training framework was formed in our department and introduced here. Each five students were assigned to a 'training unit'. The training was implemented weekly for 18 weeks. The framework consisted of an early, a transitional, an integrative stage and a surgical skills competition. Corresponding training modules were selected and assembled scientifically at each stage. The modules comprised campus intranet databases, sponge benchtop, nonliving animal tissue, local dissection specimens and simulating reality operations. The training outcomes used direct observation of procedural skills as an assessment tool. The training data of 50 trainees who were randomly selected in each year from 2006 to 2011 year, were retrospectively analysed. An excellent and good rate of the surgical skills is from 82 to 88%, but there is no significant difference among 6 years (P > 0.05). The skills scores of the contestants are markedly higher than those of non-contestants (P < 0.05). The average training cost per trainee is about $21.85-34.08. The present training framework is reliable, feasible, repeatable and cost-effective. The skills competition can promote to improve the surgical skills level of trainees. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  19. The impact of mentoring during postgraduate training on doctors' career success.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara

    2011-05-01

    Although mentoring is perceived as key to a successful and satisfying career in medicine, there is a lack of methodologically sound studies to support this view. This study made use of a longitudinal design to investigate the impact of mentoring during postgraduate specialist training on the career success of doctors. We analysed data pertaining to 326 doctors (172 women, 52.8%; 154 men, 47.2%) from a cohort of medical school graduates participating in the prospective SwissMedCareer Study, assessing personal characteristics, the possession of a mentor, mentoring support provided by the development network, and career success. The impact of personal characteristics on having a mentor was investigated using multiple linear regression analysis. The impacts of having a mentor and of having development network mentoring support on career success were analysed using hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Up to 50% of doctors reported having a mentor. A significant gender difference was found, with fewer female than male doctors having a mentor (40.7% versus 60.4% at the fifth assessment; p ≤ 0.001). Apart from gender, significant predictors of having a mentor were instrumentality (β = 0.24, p ≤ 0.01) and extraprofessional concerns (β = -0.15, p ≤ 0.05). Both having a mentor and having career support from the development network were significant predictors of both objective (β = 0.15, p ≤ 0.01; β = 0.17, p ≤ 0.01) and subjective (β = 0.17, p ≤ 0.01; β = 0.14, p ≤ 0.05) career success, but not of career satisfaction. This study confirmed the positive impact of mentoring on career success in a cohort of Swiss doctors in a longitudinal design. However, female doctors, who are mentored less frequently than male doctors, appear to be disadvantaged in this respect. Formal mentoring programmes could reduce barriers to mentorship and promote the career advancement of female doctors in particular. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  20. Postgraduate Research Students and Academic Integrity: "It's about Good Research Training"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmud, Saadia; Bretag, Tracey

    2013-01-01

    Findings from a study on academic integrity at Australian universities challenge the presumption that postgraduate research students have prior knowledge of academic integrity. A review of online academic integrity policy in 39 Australian universities found that one in five policies had no mention of higher degree by research (HDR) students.…

  1. Postgraduate Research Students and Academic Integrity: "It's about Good Research Training"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmud, Saadia; Bretag, Tracey

    2013-01-01

    Findings from a study on academic integrity at Australian universities challenge the presumption that postgraduate research students have prior knowledge of academic integrity. A review of online academic integrity policy in 39 Australian universities found that one in five policies had no mention of higher degree by research (HDR) students.…

  2. [Simulation-based robot-assisted surgical training].

    PubMed

    Kolontarev, K B; Govorov, A V; Rasner, P I; Sheptunov, S A; Prilepskaya, E A; Maltsev, E G; Pushkar, D Yu

    2015-12-01

    Since the first use of robotic surgical system in 2000, the robot-assisted technology has gained wide popularity throughout the world. Robot-assisted surgical training is a complex issue that requires significant efforts from students and teacher. During the last two decades, simulation-based training had received active development due to wide-spread occurrence and popularization of laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgical techniques. We performed a systematic review to identify the currently available simulators for robot-assisted surgery. We searched the Medline and Pubmed, English sources of literature data, using the following key words and phrases: "robotics", "robotic surgery", "computer assisted surgery", "simulation", "computer simulation", "virtual reality", "surgical training", and "surgical education". There were identified 565 publications, which meet the key words and phrases; 19 publications were selected for the final analysis. It was established that simulation-based training is the most promising teaching tool that can be used in the training of the next generation robotic surgeons. Today the use of simulators to train surgeons is validated. Price of devices is an obvious barrier for inclusion in the program for training of robotic surgeons, but the lack of this tool will result in a sharp increase in the duration of specialists training.

  3. Results of a psychosomatic training program in China, Vietnam and Laos: successful cross-cultural transfer of a postgraduate training program for medical doctors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With the “ASIA-LINK” program, the European Community has supported the development and implementation of a curriculum of postgraduate psychosomatic training for medical doctors in China, Vietnam and Laos. Currently, these three countries are undergoing great social, economic and cultural changes. The associated psychosocial stress has led to increases in psychological and psychosomatic problems, as well as disorders for which no adequate medical or psychological care is available, even in cities. Health care in these three countries is characterized by the coexistence of Western medicine and traditional medicine. Psychological and psychosomatic disorders and problems are insufficiently recognized and treated, and there is a need for biopsychosocially orientated medical care. Little is known about the transferability of Western-oriented psychosomatic training programs in the Southeast Asian cultural context. Methods The curriculum was developed and implemented in three steps: 1) an experimental phase to build a future teacher group; 2) a joint training program for future teachers and German teachers; and 3) training by Asian trainers that was supervised by German teachers. The didactic elements included live patient interviews, lectures, communication skills training and Balint groups. The training was evaluated using questionnaires for the participants and interviews of the German teachers and the future teachers. Results Regional training centers were formed in China (Shanghai), Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh City and Hue) and Laos (Vientiane). A total of 200 physicians completed the training, and 30 physicians acquired the status of future teacher. The acceptance of the training was high, and feelings of competence increased during the courses. The interactive training methods were greatly appreciated, with the skills training and self-experience ranked as the most important topics. Adaptations to the cultural background of the participants were necessary

  4. Scaling up specialist training in developing countries: lessons learned from the first 12 years of regional postgraduate training in Fiji – a case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In 1997, regional specialist training was established in Fiji, consisting of one-year Postgraduate Diplomas followed by three-year master’s degree programs in anesthesia, internal medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics and surgery. The evolution of these programs during the first 12 years is presented. Case description A case study utilizing mixed methods was carried out, including a prospective collection of enrolment and employment data, supplemented by semi-structured interviews. Between 1997 and 2009, 207 doctors (113 from Fiji and 94 from 13 other countries or territories in the Pacific) trained to at least the Postgraduate Diploma level. For Fiji graduates, 29.2% migrated permanently to developed countries, compared to only 8.5% for regional graduates (P <0.001). Early years of the program were characterized by large intakes and enthusiasm, but also uncertainty. Many resignations took place following a coup d’etat in 2000. By 2005, interviews suggested a dynamic of political instability initially leading to resignations, leading to even heavier workloads, compounded by academic studies that seemed unlikely to lead to career benefit. This was associated with loss of hope and downward spirals of further resignations. After 2006, however, Master’s graduates generally returned from overseas placements, had variable success in career progression, and were able to engage in limited private practice. Enrolments and retention stabilized and increased. Discussion and evaluation Over time, all specialties have had years when the viability and future of the programs were in question, but all have recovered to varying degrees, and the programs continue to evolve and strengthen. Prospective clarification of expected career outcomes for graduates, establishment of career pathways for diploma-only graduates, and balancing desires for academic excellence with workloads that trainees were able to bear may have lessened ongoing losses of trainees and

  5. Role of simulation in surgical education and training.

    PubMed

    Windsor, John A

    2009-03-01

    There are several challenges facing surgical education and training that simulation may help to address. A conceptual framework is required to allow the appropriate application of simulation to a given level and type of surgical skill and this should be driven by educational imperatives and not by technological innovation. Simple simulation is required for core skills training. Cognitive simulation is introduced as a way in which procedural skills training can be achieved. Virtual world simulation opens up significant opportunities for team skills training. A role for simulation in surgical education and training appears assured, but its success will be determined by the extent to which it is integral to high quality curricula, its importance determined by its contribution to both learning and assessment, and its sustainability determined by evidence of its advantages and cost-effectiveness.

  6. Cognitive training: How can it be adapted for surgical education?

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lauren; Raison, Nicholas; Ghumman, Faisal; Moran, Aidan; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2017-08-01

    There is a need for new approaches to surgical training in order to cope with the increasing time pressures, ethical constraints, and legal limitations being placed on trainees. One of the most interesting of these new approaches is "cognitive training" or the use of psychological processes to enhance performance of skilled behaviour. Its ability to effectively improve motor skills in sport has raised the question as to whether it could also be used to improve surgical performance. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current evidence on the use of cognitive training within surgery, and evaluate the potential role it can play in surgical education. Scientific database searches were conducted to identify studies that investigated the use of cognitive training in surgery. The key studies were selected and grouped according to the type of cognitive training they examined. Available research demonstrated that cognitive training interventions resulted in greater performance benefits when compared to control training. In particular, cognitive training was found to improve surgical motor skills, as well as a number of non-technical outcomes. Unfortunately, key limitations restricting the generalizability of these findings include small sample size and conceptual issues arising from differing definitions of the term 'cognitive training'. When used appropriately, cognitive training can be a highly effective supplementary training tool in the development of technical skills in surgery. Although further studies are needed to refine our understanding, cognitive training should certainly play an important role in future surgical education. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A survey of ENT experience in South West Peninsula general practitioner trainees: how can post-graduate ENT training be improved?

    PubMed

    Easto, R H; Reddy, V

    2016-10-01

    To assess how much ENT experience regional general practitioner trainees received, both in their undergraduate and post-graduate training, and to establish if trainees felt they required further ENT training to manage ENT complaints. An online survey was emailed to general practitioner trainees in Cornwall and Devon. Of 200 general practitioner trainees, 121 (60.5 per cent) responded to the survey. Of these respondents, 95.9 per cent felt ENT experience was important as a general practitioner; however, 59.5 per cent had no ENT experience in their post-graduate training. Sixty-five per cent of trainees had not had any formal ENT teaching since leaving medical school; however, 93.4 per cent would attend a 1-day course if offered the opportunity locally. Finally, 75.8 per cent of trainees would have liked an ENT post during their post-graduate training. Further ENT training is required for doctors in general practitioner training schemes to aid improvement of patient care. The most logical way to enhance ENT training in a post-graduate setting is through up-to-date courses held locally with a faculty made up of experts working within the specialty.

  8. Mentoring during surgical training: consensus recommendations for mentoring programmes from the Association of Surgeons in Training.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, P; Fitzgerald, J E F; McDermott, F D; Derbyshire, L; Shalhoub, J

    2014-11-01

    Mentoring has been present within surgical training for many years, albeit in different forms. There is evidence that formal mentoring can improve patient outcomes and facilitate learning and personal growth in the mentee. The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) is an independent educational charity working to promote excellence in surgical training. This document recommends the introduction of a structured mentoring programme, which is readily accessible to all surgical trainees. A review of the available evidence--including an ASiT-led survey of its membership--highlights the desire of surgical trainees to have a mentor, whilst the majority do not have access to one. There is also limited training for those in mentoring roles. In response, ASiT have implemented a pilot mentoring scheme, with surgical trainees acting both as mentors and mentees. Based on the existing literature, survey data and pilot experience, ASiT formalises in this document consensus recommendations for mentoring in surgical training.

  9. What European gynaecologists need to master: Consensus on medical expertise outcomes of pan-European postgraduate training in obstetrics & gynaecology.

    PubMed

    van der Aa, Jessica E; Tancredi, Annalisa; Goverde, Angelique J; Velebil, Petr; Feyereisl, Jaroslav; Benedetto, Chiara; Teunissen, Pim W; Scheele, Fedde

    2017-09-01

    European harmonisation of training standards in postgraduate medical education in Obstetrics and Gynaecology is needed because of the increasing mobility of medical specialists. Harmonisation of training will provide quality assurance of training and promote high quality care throughout Europe. Pan-European training standards should describe medical expertise outcomes that are required from the European gynaecologist. This paper reports on consensus development on the medical expertise outcomes of pan-European training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. A Delphi procedure was performed amongst European gynaecologists and trainees in Obstetrics & Gynaecology, to develop consensus on outcomes of training. The consensus procedure consisted of two questionnaire rounds, followed by a consensus meeting. To ensure reasonability and feasibility for implementation of the training standards in Europe, implications of the outcomes were considered in a working group thereafter. We invited 142 gynaecologists and trainees in Obstetrics & Gynaecology for participation representing a wide range of European countries. They were selected through the European Board & College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and the European Network of Trainees in Obstetrics & Gynaecology. Sixty people participated in round 1 and 2 of the consensus procedure, 38 (63.3%) of whom were gynaecologists and 22 (36.7%) were trainees in Obstetrics & Gynaecology. Twenty-eight European countries were represented in this response. Round 3 of the consensus procedure was performed in a consensus meeting with six experts. Implications of the training outcomes were discussed in a working group meeting, to ensure reasonability and feasibility of the material for implementation in Europe. The entire consensus procedure resulted in a core content of training standards of 188 outcomes, categorised in ten topics. European consensus was developed regarding the medical expertise outcomes of pan-European training in Obstetrics and

  10. The Impact of Japan's 2004 Postgraduate Training Program on Intra-Prefectural Distribution of Pediatricians in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Rie; Wang, Wei; Yamaguchi, Norihiro; Tamura, Hiroshi; Goto, Rei; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Objective Inequity in physician distribution poses a challenge to many health systems. In Japan, a new postgraduate training program for all new medical graduates was introduced in 2004, and researchers have argued that this program has increased inequalities in physician distribution. We examined the trends in the geographic distribution of pediatricians as well as all physicians from 1996 to 2010 to identify the impact of the launch of the new training program. Methods The Gini coefficient was calculated using municipalities as the study unit within each prefecture to assess whether there were significant changes in the intra-prefectural distribution of all physicians and pediatricians before and after the launch of the new training program. The effect of the new program was quantified by estimating the difference in the slope in the time trend of the Gini coefficients before and after 2004 using a linear change-point regression design. We categorized 47 prefectures in Japan into two groups: 1) predominantly urban and 2) others by the definition from OECD to conduct stratified analyses by urban-rural status. Results The trends in physician distribution worsened after 2004 for all physicians (p value<.0001) and pediatricians (p value = 0.0057). For all physicians, the trends worsened after 2004 both in predominantly urban prefectures (p value = 0.0012) and others (p value<0.0001), whereas, for pediatricians, the distribution worsened in others (p value = 0.0343), but not in predominantly urban prefectures (p value = 0.0584). Conclusion The intra-prefectural distribution of physicians worsened after the launch of the new training program, which may reflect the impact of the new postgraduate program. In pediatrics, changes in the Gini trend differed significantly before and after the launch of the new training program in others, but not in predominantly urban prefectures. Further observation is needed to explore how this difference in trends affects

  11. General surgery residents' perception of robot-assisted procedures during surgical training.

    PubMed

    Farivar, Behzad S; Flannagan, Molly; Leitman, I Michael

    2015-01-01

    With the continued expansion of robotically assisted procedures, general surgery residents continue to receive more exposure to this new technology as part of their training. There are currently no guidelines or standardized training requirements for robot-assisted procedures during general surgical residency. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of this new technology on general surgery training from the residents' perspective. An anonymous, national, web-based survey was conducted on residents enrolled in general surgery training in 2013. The survey was sent to 240 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved general surgery training programs. Overall, 64% of the responding residents were men and had an average age of 29 years. Half of the responses were from postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and PGY2 residents, and the remainder was from the PGY3 level and above. Overall, 50% of the responses were from university training programs, 32% from university-affiliated programs, and 18% from community-based programs. More than 96% of residents noted the availability of the surgical robot system at their training institution. Overall, 63% of residents indicated that they had participated in robotic surgical cases. Most responded that they had assisted in 10 or fewer robotic cases with the most frequent activities being assisting with robotic trocar placement and docking and undocking the robot. Only 18% reported experience with operating the robotic console. More senior residents (PGY3 and above) were involved in robotic cases compared with junior residents (78% vs 48%, p < 0.001). Overall, 60% of residents indicated that they received no prior education or training before their first robotic case. Approximately 64% of residents reported that formal training in robotic surgery was important in residency training and 46% of residents indicated that robotic-assisted cases interfered with resident learning. Only 11% felt that robotic-assisted cases

  12. Unsupervised Trajectory Segmentation for Surgical Gesture Recognition in Robotic Training.

    PubMed

    Despinoy, Fabien; Bouget, David; Forestier, Germain; Penet, Cedric; Zemiti, Nabil; Poignet, Philippe; Jannin, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Dexterity and procedural knowledge are two critical skills that surgeons need to master to perform accurate and safe surgical interventions. However, current training systems do not allow us to provide an in-depth analysis of surgical gestures to precisely assess these skills. Our objective is to develop a method for the automatic and quantitative assessment of surgical gestures. To reach this goal, we propose a new unsupervised algorithm that can automatically segment kinematic data from robotic training sessions. Without relying on any prior information or model, this algorithm detects critical points in the kinematic data that define relevant spatio-temporal segments. Based on the association of these segments, we obtain an accurate recognition of the gestures involved in the surgical training task. We, then, perform an advanced analysis and assess our algorithm using datasets recorded during real expert training sessions. After comparing our approach with the manual annotations of the surgical gestures, we observe 97.4% accuracy for the learning purpose and an average matching score of 81.9% for the fully automated gesture recognition process. Our results show that trainees workflow can be followed and surgical gestures may be automatically evaluated according to an expert database. This approach tends toward improving training efficiency by minimizing the learning curve.

  13. Bench surgical training with lyophilized esophageal segments.

    PubMed

    Sotres-Vega, Avelina; Osorio-Necoechea, María Elba; Salas-Galindo, Gabriela; González-Ramón, Soemi Careli; Guadarrama-Sánchez, Isabel; Villalba-Caloca, Jaime; Santibáñez-Salgado, José Alfredo

    2013-08-01

    To present lyophilized esophageal segments that can be used to learn surgical skills. Four esophagus were harvested from four non-esophagus related research dogs at the moment of euthanasia. Each esophagus was trimmed in 3 cm long segments. They were lyophilized and stored during 30 days. The day programmed for surgical skills practice, they were rehydrated. Sixteen segments have been used. After rehydrating, all the segments kept their normal anatomic shape and structural integrity. One incision was made on every esophageal segment and sutured with running stitches of 3-0 polyglactin 910. There were no complications, such as tissue tears, nor esophageal hardening. The lyophilized esophagus is a high fidelity, practical, reproducible, portable, low-cost bench model. It allows general surgery apprentices to learn how to handle an esophagus, as well as to perfect their surgical and suture abilities before applying them on real patient's esophagus.

  14. Undergraduate educational environment, perceived preparedness for postgraduate clinical training, and pass rate on the National Medical Licensure Examination in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Yasuharu; Goto, Eiji; Otaki, Junji; Jacobs, Joshua; Omata, Fumio; Obara, Haruo; Shapiro, Mina; Soejima, Kumiko; Ishida, Yasushi; Ohde, Sachiko; Takahashi, Osamu; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2010-05-20

    We investigated the views of newly graduating physicians on their preparedness for postgraduate clinical training, and evaluated the relationship of preparedness with the educational environment and the pass rate on the National Medical Licensure Examination (NMLE). Data were obtained from 2429 PGY-1 physicians-in-training (response rate, 36%) using a mailed cross-sectional survey. The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) inventory was used to assess the learning environment at 80 Japanese medical schools. Preparedness was assessed based on 6 clinical areas related to the Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire. Only 17% of the physicians-in-training felt prepared in the area of general clinical skills, 29% in basic knowledge of diagnosis and management of common conditions, 48% in communication skills, 19% in skills associated with evidence-based medicine, 54% in professionalism, and 37% in basic skills required for a physical examination. There were substantial differences among the medical schools in the perceived preparedness of their graduates. Significant positive correlations were found between preparedness for all clinical areas and a better educational environment (all p < 0.01), but there were no significant associations between the pass rate on the NMLE and perceived preparedness for any clinical area, as well as pass rate and educational environment (all p > 0.05). Different educational environments among universities may be partly responsible for the differences in perceived preparedness of medical students for postgraduate clinical training. This study also highlights the poor correlation between self-assessed preparedness for practice and the NMLE.

  15. Undergraduate educational environment, perceived preparedness for postgraduate clinical training, and pass rate on the National Medical Licensure Examination in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We investigated the views of newly graduating physicians on their preparedness for postgraduate clinical training, and evaluated the relationship of preparedness with the educational environment and the pass rate on the National Medical Licensure Examination (NMLE). Methods Data were obtained from 2429 PGY-1 physicians-in-training (response rate, 36%) using a mailed cross-sectional survey. The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) inventory was used to assess the learning environment at 80 Japanese medical schools. Preparedness was assessed based on 6 clinical areas related to the Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire. Results Only 17% of the physicians-in-training felt prepared in the area of general clinical skills, 29% in basic knowledge of diagnosis and management of common conditions, 48% in communication skills, 19% in skills associated with evidence-based medicine, 54% in professionalism, and 37% in basic skills required for a physical examination. There were substantial differences among the medical schools in the perceived preparedness of their graduates. Significant positive correlations were found between preparedness for all clinical areas and a better educational environment (all p < 0.01), but there were no significant associations between the pass rate on the NMLE and perceived preparedness for any clinical area, as well as pass rate and educational environment (all p > 0.05). Conclusion Different educational environments among universities may be partly responsible for the differences in perceived preparedness of medical students for postgraduate clinical training. This study also highlights the poor correlation between self-assessed preparedness for practice and the NMLE. PMID:20487536

  16. Progress in virtual reality simulators for surgical training and certification.

    PubMed

    de Visser, Hans; Watson, Marcus O; Salvado, Olivier; Passenger, Joshua D

    2011-02-21

    There is increasing evidence that educating trainee surgeons by simulation is preferable to traditional operating-room training methods with actual patients. Apart from reducing costs and risks to patients, training by simulation can provide some unique benefits, such as greater control over the training procedure and more easily defined metrics for assessing proficiency. Virtual reality (VR) simulators are now playing an increasing role in surgical training. However, currently available VR simulators lack the fidelity to teach trainees past the novice-to-intermediate skills level. Recent technological developments in other industries using simulation, such as the games and entertainment and aviation industries, suggest that the next generation of VR simulators should be suitable for training, maintenance and certification of advanced surgical skills. To be effective as an advanced surgical training and assessment tool, VR simulation needs to provide adequate and relevant levels of physical realism, case complexity and performance assessment. Proper validation of VR simulators and an increased appreciation of their value by the medical profession are crucial for them to be accepted into surgical training curricula.

  17. Outcomes following a dedicated period of research during surgical training.

    PubMed

    Stutchfield, B M; Harrison, E M; Wigmore, S J; Parks, R W; Garden, O J

    2011-11-01

    With recent 'working-time'-related changes to surgical training structure, the value of dedicated research during surgical training has been questioned. Online survey examining career and academic outcomes following a period of surgically related dedicated research at a Scottish University between 1972 and 2007. Of 58 individuals identified, contact details were available for 49 and 43 (88%) responded. Ninety-five percent (n = 41) of respondents continue to pursue a career in surgery and 41% (n = 17) are currently in academic positions. Ninety-one percent (n = 39) had published one or more first-author peer-reviewed articles directly related to their research, with 53% (n = 23) publishing three or more. Respondents with a clinical component to their research published significantly more papers than those with purely laboratory-based research (P = 0.04). Eighty-one percent (n = 35) thought that research was necessary for career progression, but only 42% (n = 18) felt research should be integral to training. In conclusion, the majority of surgical trainees completing a dedicated research period, published papers and continued to pursue a surgical career with a research interest. A period of dedicated research was thought necessary for career progression, but few thought dedicated research should be integral to surgical training.

  18. Measuring Surgical Skills in Simulation-based Training.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Satava, Richard M; Marsh, J Lawrence; Hurwitz, Shepard R

    2017-10-01

    Simulation-based surgical skills training addresses several concerns associated with the traditional apprenticeship model, including patient safety, efficient acquisition of complex skills, and cost. The surgical specialties already recognize the advantages of surgical training using simulation, and simulation-based methods are appearing in surgical education and assessment for board certification. The necessity of simulation-based methods in surgical education along with valid, objective, standardized techniques for measuring learned skills using simulators has become apparent. The most commonly used surgical skill measurement techniques in simulation-based training include questionnaires and post-training surveys, objective structured assessment of technical skills and global rating scale of performance scoring systems, structured assessments using video recording, and motion tracking software. The literature shows that the application of many of these techniques varies based on investigator preference and the convenience of the technique. As simulators become more accepted as a teaching tool, techniques to measure skill proficiencies will need to be standardized nationally and internationally.

  19. Integration of Surgical Residency Training With US Military Humanitarian Missions.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Shane; Tadlock, Matthew D; Douglas, Trent; Provencher, Matthew; Ignacio, Romeo C

    2015-01-01

    To describe how the US Navy integrates surgical resident training during hospital ship-based humanitarian activities and discuss the potential operative and educational benefits during these missions. Retrospective review of predeployment surgical plans, operative case logs, and after-action reports from United States Naval Ship (USNS) Mercy humanitarian deployments from 2006 to 2012. The USNS Mercy hospital ship. We enrolled 24 surgical residents from different surgical specialties including general surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, urology, otolaryngology, and ophthalmology. During 4 planned deployments (2006-2012), 2887 surgical procedures were performed during 20 humanitarian missions conducted by the USNS Mercy in 9 different Southeast Asian countries. Of all the general surgery eligible procedures performed, 1483 (79%) were defined categories under the current general surgery Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education guidelines, including abdominal (31%); skin, soft tissue, and breast (21%); ear, nose, and throat (20.5%); plastic surgery (15.5%); and pediatric (12%) cases. The number of surgical cases completed by each resident ranged from 30 to 67 cases over a period of 4 to 6 weeks during the overseas humanitarian rotation. The US Navy's humanitarian experience provides a unique educational opportunity for young military surgeons to experience various global health systems, diverse cultures, and complex logistical planning without sacrificing the breadth and depth of surgical training. This model may provide a framework to develop future international electives for other general surgery training programs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Training forward surgical teams for deployment: the US Army Trauma Training Center.

    PubMed

    Valdiri, Linda A; Andrews-Arce, Virginia E; Seery, Jason M

    2015-04-01

    Since the late 1980s, the US Army has been deploying forward surgical teams to the most intense areas of conflict to care for personnel injured in combat. The forward surgical team is a 20-person medical team that is highly mobile, extremely agile, and has relatively little need of outside support to perform its surgical mission. In order to perform this mission, however, team training and trauma training are required. The large majority of these teams do not routinely train together to provide patient care, and that training currently takes place at the US Army Trauma Training Center (ATTC). The training staff of the ATTC is a specially selected 10-person team made up of active duty personnel from the Army Medical Department assigned to the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital Ryder Trauma Center in Miami, Florida. The ATTC team of instructors trains as many as 11 forward surgical teams in 2-week rotations per year so that the teams are ready to perform their mission in a deployed setting. Since the first forward surgical team was trained at the ATTC in January 2002, more than 112 forward surgical teams and other similar-sized Department of Defense forward resuscitative and surgical units have rotated through trauma training at the Ryder Trauma Center in preparation for deployment overseas.

  1. Mental training in surgical education: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Davison, Sara; Raison, Nicholas; Khan, Muhammad S; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2017-08-29

    Pressures on surgical education from restricted working hours and increasing scrutiny of outcomes have been compounded by the development of highly technical surgical procedures requiring additional specialist training. Mental training (MT), the act of performing motor tasks in the 'mind's eye', offers the potential for training outside the operating room. However, the technique is yet to be formally incorporated in surgical curricula. This study aims to review the available literature to determine the role of MT in surgical education. EMBASE and Medline databases were searched. The primary outcome measure was surgical proficiency following training. Secondary analyses examined training duration, forms of MT and trainees level of experience. Study quality was assessed using Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials scores or Quality Assessment Tool for Before-After (Pre-Post) Studies with No Control Group. Fourteen trials with 618 participants met the inclusion criteria, of which 11 were randomized and three longitudinal. Ten studies found MT to be beneficial. Mental rehearsal was the most commonly used form of training. No significant correlation was found between the length of MT and outcomes. MT benefitted expert surgeons more than medical students or novice surgeons. The majority studies demonstrate MT to be beneficial in surgical education especially amongst more experienced surgeons within a well-structured MT programme. However, overall studies were low quality, lacked sufficient methodology and suffered from small sample sizes. For these reasons, further research is required to determine optimal role of MT as a supplementary educational tool within the surgical curriculum. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. Proficiency training on a virtual reality robotic surgical skills curriculum.

    PubMed

    Bric, Justin; Connolly, Michael; Kastenmeier, Andrew; Goldblatt, Matthew; Gould, Jon C

    2014-12-01

    The clinical application of robotic surgery is increasing. The skills necessary to perform robotic surgery are unique from those required in open and laparoscopic surgery. A validated laparoscopic surgical skills curriculum (Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery or FLS™) has transformed the way surgeons acquire laparoscopic skills. There is a need for a similar skills training and assessment tool for robotic surgery. Our research group previously developed and validated a robotic training curriculum in a virtual reality (VR) simulator. We hypothesized that novice robotic surgeons could achieve proficiency levels defined by more experienced robotic surgeons on the VR robotic curriculum, and that this would result in improved performance on the actual daVinci Surgical System™. 25 medical students with no prior robotic surgery experience were recruited. Prior to VR training, subjects performed 2 FLS tasks 3 times each (Peg Transfer, Intracorporeal Knot Tying) using the daVinci Surgical System™ docked to a video trainer box. Task performance for the FLS tasks was scored objectively. Subjects then practiced on the VR simulator (daVinci Skills Simulator) until proficiency levels on all 5 tasks were achieved before completing a post-training assessment of the 2 FLS tasks on the daVinci Surgical System™ in the video trainer box. All subjects to complete the study (1 dropped out) reached proficiency levels on all VR tasks in an average of 71 (± 21.7) attempts, accumulating 164.3 (± 55.7) minutes of console training time. There was a significant improvement in performance on the robotic FLS tasks following completion of the VR training curriculum. Novice robotic surgeons are able to attain proficiency levels on a VR simulator. This leads to improved performance in the daVinci surgical platform on simulated tasks. Training to proficiency on a VR robotic surgery simulator is an efficient and viable method for acquiring robotic surgical skills.

  3. Fellowship training as a modifier of the surgical learning curve

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, FJ; Cronin, AM; Klein, EA; Pontes, JE; Scardino, PT; Vickers, AJ

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of fellowship training on the learning curve for cancer control after open radical prostatectomy. Methods The study cohort included 7765 prostate cancer patients who were treated with radical prostatectomy by one of 72 surgeons at four major U.S. academic medical centers between 1987 and 2003. Multivariable models were used to determine the learning curves for biochemical recurrence and surgical margins, separately for surgeons with and without fellowship training, with adjustment for standard prognostic variables. Results Initial results of fellowship and non-fellowship trained surgeons were similar (5-year probability of recurrence for first case 19.4% vs 18.3%, respectively; absolute difference −1.1%; 95% CI −5.5% to 3.0%; p=0.7). However, the rate of learning was faster among fellowship trained surgeons (p=0.006), resulting in superior cancer control overall for fellowship trained surgeons (p=0.001; difference 4.7%; 95% CI 2.6% to 7.4%). In contrast, fellowship trained surgeons started off with superior positive margin rates (p=0.005; 36% vs 42%; absolute difference 6%; 95% CI 1% to 10%), but there was no obvious difference in the subsequent learning curve (p=0.9). Conclusions The learning curve for biochemical recurrence depends on surgical training, whereas the learning curve for surgical margins does not. This suggests that improvements in margin rates result from reflection on specific aspects of surgical procedure, while improvements in biochemical recurrence occur by some general process of improved surgical technique. Further research into the mechanisms of surgical learning is warranted. PMID:20520043

  4. Surgical education and training in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Collins, John P; Civil, Ian D; Sugrue, Michael; Balogh, Zsolt; Chehade, Mellick J

    2008-10-01

    Surgical education for medical students in Australia and New Zealand is provided by 19 universities in Australia and 2 in New Zealand. One surgical college is responsible for managing the education, training, assessment, and professional development programs for surgeons throughout both countries. The specialist surgical associations and societies act as agents of the college in the delivery of these programs, the extent of which varies among specialties. Historically, surgical training was divided into basic and specialist components with selection required for each part. In response to a number of factors, a new surgical education and training program has been developed. The new program incorporates a single merit-based national selection directly into the candidate's specialty of choice. The existing curriculum for each of the nine specialties has been remodeled to a competence-based format in line with the competence required to undertake the essential roles of a surgeon. New standards and criteria have been produced for accreditation of health care facilities used for training. A new basic surgical skills education and training course has been developed, with simulation playing an increasing role in all courses. Trainees' progress is assessed by workplace-based assessment and formal examinations, including an exit examination. The sustained production of sufficient competent surgeons to meet societal needs encompasses many challenges including the recruitment of appropriate graduates and the availability of adequate educational and clinical resources to train them. Competence-based training is an attractive educational philosophy, but its implementation has brought its own set of issues, many of which have yet to be resolved.

  5. Evaluation of surgical training in the era of simulation

    PubMed Central

    Shaharan, Shazrinizam; Neary, Paul

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess where we currently stand in relation to simulator-based training within modern surgical training curricula. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed database using keywords “simulation”, “skills assessment” and “surgery”. The studies retrieved were examined according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Time period reviewed was 2000 to 2013. The methodology of skills assessment was examined. RESULTS: Five hundred and fifteen articles focussed upon simulator based skills assessment. Fifty-two articles were identified that dealt with technical skills assessment in general surgery. Five articles assessed open skills, 37 assessed laparoscopic skills, 4 articles assessed both open and laparoscopic skills and 6 assessed endoscopic skills. Only 12 articles were found to be integrating simulators in the surgical training curricula. Observational assessment tools, in the form of Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) dominated the literature. CONCLUSION: Observational tools such as OSATS remain the top assessment instrument in surgical training especially in open technical skills. Unlike the aviation industry, simulation based assessment has only now begun to cross the threshold of incorporation into mainstream skills training. Over the next decade we expect the promise of simulator-based training to finally take flight and begin an exciting voyage of discovery for surgical trainees. PMID:25228946

  6. Surgical Safety Training of World Health Organization Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher R; Bates, Anthony S; Toll, Edward C; Cole, Matthew; Smith, Frank C T; Stark, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate training in surgical safety is essential to maximize patient safety. This national review quantified undergraduate surgical safety training. Training of 2 international safety initiatives was quantified: (1) World Health Organization (WHO) "Guidelines for Safe Surgery" and (2) Department of Health (DoH) "Principles of the Productive Operating Theatre." Also, 13 additional safety skills were quantified. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. In all, 23 universities entered the study (71.9% response). Safety skills from WHO and DoH documents were formally taught in 4 UK medical schools (17.4%). Individual components of the documents were taught more frequently (47.6%). Half (50.9%) of the additional safety skills identified were taught. Surgical societies supplemented safety training, although the total amount of training provided was less than that in university curricula (P < .0001). Surgical safety training is inadequate in UK medical schools. To protect patients and maximize safety, a national undergraduate safety curriculum is recommended.

  7. Evaluation of surgical training in the era of simulation.

    PubMed

    Shaharan, Shazrinizam; Neary, Paul

    2014-09-16

    To assess where we currently stand in relation to simulator-based training within modern surgical training curricula. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed database using keywords "simulation", "skills assessment" and "surgery". The studies retrieved were examined according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Time period reviewed was 2000 to 2013. The methodology of skills assessment was examined. Five hundred and fifteen articles focussed upon simulator based skills assessment. Fifty-two articles were identified that dealt with technical skills assessment in general surgery. Five articles assessed open skills, 37 assessed laparoscopic skills, 4 articles assessed both open and laparoscopic skills and 6 assessed endoscopic skills. Only 12 articles were found to be integrating simulators in the surgical training curricula. Observational assessment tools, in the form of Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) dominated the literature. Observational tools such as OSATS remain the top assessment instrument in surgical training especially in open technical skills. Unlike the aviation industry, simulation based assessment has only now begun to cross the threshold of incorporation into mainstream skills training. Over the next decade we expect the promise of simulator-based training to finally take flight and begin an exciting voyage of discovery for surgical trainees.

  8. An evaluation of prototype VR medical training environment: applied surgical anatomy training for malignant breast disease.

    PubMed

    Ward, B M; Charissis, V; Rowley, D; Anderson, P; Brady, L

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an enquiry into the suitability of Virtual Reality (VR) technology as the principal training method for applied surgical anatomy. In this work we present the development of a prototype VR medical training environment and the evaluation results of preliminary trials aiming to identify the effectiveness of the system in the subject domains of anatomy teaching and surgical rehearsal, whilst acknowledging current training requirements.

  9. The surgical ensemble: choreography as a simulation and training tool.

    PubMed

    Satava, Richard M; Hunter, Anne Marie

    2011-09-01

    Team training and interprofessional training have recently emerged as critical new simulations that enhance performance by coordinating communication, leadership, professional, and, to a certain extent, technical skills. In describing these new training tools, the term choreography has been loosely used, but no critical appraisal of the role of the science of choreography has been applied to a surgical procedure. By analogy, the surgical team, including anesthetists, surgeons, nurses, and technicians, constitutes a complete ensemble, whose physical actions and interactions constitute the "performance of surgery." There are very specific "elements" (tools) that are basic to choreography, such as space, timing, rhythm, energy, cues, transitions, and especially rehearsal. This review explores whether such a metaphor is appropriate and the possibility of applying the science of choreography to the surgical team in the operating theater.

  10. Alternative Considerations for Surgical Training and Funding.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ronald F

    2016-02-01

    Since the late 1880s surgical residency programs have existed in forms that are similar to our current models. Many important variations have been introduced over time. On aggregate this system has worked remarkably well; though as economic, demographic, and cultural changes continue to evolve, one must wonder if we were to change our models how might we do that and what reasoning could we use. This article's focus is to take a stratospheric view of what could be done, particularly in the United States, rather than characterize what happens in other countries with other health economic systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Informatics Approach to Improving Surgical Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Gazi

    2013-01-01

    Surgery as a profession requires significant training to improve both clinical decision making and psychomotor proficiency. In the medical knowledge domain, tools have been developed, validated, and accepted for evaluation of surgeons' competencies. However, assessment of the psychomotor skills still relies on the Halstedian model of…

  12. Informatics Approach to Improving Surgical Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Gazi

    2013-01-01

    Surgery as a profession requires significant training to improve both clinical decision making and psychomotor proficiency. In the medical knowledge domain, tools have been developed, validated, and accepted for evaluation of surgeons' competencies. However, assessment of the psychomotor skills still relies on the Halstedian model of…

  13. Learning the surgical craft: a review of skills training options.

    PubMed

    Cosman, Peter; Hemli, Jonathan M; Ellis, Andrew M; Hugh, Thomas J

    2007-10-01

    Surgical practice is undergoing fundamental changes, and this is having a significant effect on the training of surgeons. Learning the craft of surgery is threatened by reduced elective operative exposure and general service cuts within public teaching hospitals, safer working hour legislation and pressures to accelerate the training of young surgeons. Rapid technological changes mean that 'old dogs' have to teach 'young dogs' many new tricks in a relatively adverse environment. This review outlines the great variety of resources available for skills-based training outside the operating room. These resources are ready to be used as a necessary adjunct to the training of competent surgeons in Australasia.

  14. Postgraduate Education and Training in Public Health. Report of a WHO Expert Committee. World Health Organization Technical Report Series No. 533.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    A World Health Organization expert committee on Postgraduate Education and Training in Public Health met in Geneva from 25 April to 1 May 1973. It was vital to take a fresh look at the situation because of the far reaching changes that have occurred since 1960. There have been extensive revisions of undergraudate medical education. Major…

  15. [A Perspective on Innovation for Efficient Medical Practice in View of Undergraduate and Postgraduate Education and Training in Laboratory Medicine].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Tadashi

    2015-10-01

    Continuous advances in medical laboratory technology have driven major changes in the practice of laboratory medicine over the past two decades. The importance of the overall quality of a medical laboratory has been ever-increasing in order to improve and ensure the quality and safety of clinical practice by physicians in any type of medical facility. Laboratory physicians and professional staff should challenge themselves more than ever in various ways to cooperate and contribute with practicing physicians for the appropriate utilization of laboratory testing. This will certainly lead to a decrease in inappropriate or unnecessary laboratory testing, resulting in reducing medical costs. In addition, not only postgraduate, but also undergraduate medical education/training systems must be markedly innovated, considering recent rapid progress in electronic information and communication technologies.

  16. Identifying critical success factors for designing selection processes into postgraduate specialty training: the case of UK general practice.

    PubMed

    Plint, Simon; Patterson, Fiona

    2010-06-01

    The UK national recruitment process into general practice training has been developed over several years, with incremental introduction of stages which have been piloted and validated. Previously independent processes, which encouraged multiple applications and produced inconsistent outcomes, have been replaced by a robust national process which has high reliability and predictive validity, and is perceived to be fair by candidates and allocates applicants equitably across the country. Best selection practice involves a job analysis which identifies required competencies, then designs reliable assessment methods to measure them, and over the long term ensures that the process has predictive validity against future performance. The general practitioner recruitment process introduced machine markable short listing assessments for the first time in the UK postgraduate recruitment context, and also adopted selection centre workplace simulations. The key success factors have been identified as corporate commitment to the goal of a national process, with gradual convergence maintaining locus of control rather than the imposition of change without perceived legitimate authority.

  17. [Conceptual and methodological rationales for the use of innovational and traditional educational technologies for the postgraduate training of physicians in the area of anesthesiology and reanimatology].

    PubMed

    Buniatian, A A; Vyzhigina, M A; Sizova, Zh M

    2008-01-01

    Implementation of an innovational educational space program by the I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy envisages for the specialty "Anesthesiology and Reanimatology "first of all the development of a new-generation state educational standard, that considers the underlying principles of the Bologna Declaration, its introduction into educational process practice, and the maintenance of the high competence of a physician throughout his/her professional activity. The subject of the study was a system for controlling the educational process of continuous postgraduate training of anesthetists-resuscitation experts, by developing a model of the state educational standard taking into account the European educational traditions that adequately unified in form and content and the specific features of the Russian national school of higher medical postgraduate education. The object of the study was to modernize approaches to transforming the continuous postgraduate educational system for physicians in the area of anesthesiology and reanimatology, which had been laid down and vested in the new-generation state educational standard taking into account the new forms and technologies of an educational process in accordance with the principles of the European educational system. The aim of the study was to provide conceptual and methodological rationales for the use of innovational and traditional educational technologies for the postgraduate training of physicians in the area of anesthesiology and reanimatology according to the measure schedule within the general plan "Development of draft new state standards projects, including the state certification in the specialties "Internal Medicine", "Pharmacy", "Nursing", "Medical and Preventive Science", "Dentistry", "Pedagogics", etc., to elaborate plans of training and subjects, a range of specialties, as well as qualification characteristics in a specialty, etc." within the innovational educational space program by the I. M

  18. Effect of a rotation training system on the mental health status of postgraduate dental trainees at Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Tohru; Asada, Tetsunosuke; Sumi, Yoshihisa; Higuchi, Yoshinori

    2014-02-01

    In Japan, the increasing frequency of mental health problems in postgraduate dental trainees has recently become apparent. To our knowledge, there has been no previous research to investigate the influence of the type of training program on the mental health of dental residents during one year of postgraduate clinical training. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mental health of two groups of dental trainees at Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan: those who undertook a rotation training program and those who trained solely in one department (the control group). Study subjects in both groups completed the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) at five intervals throughout the postgraduate training year. Analysis of the questionnaire responses were performed by Student's t-test, analysis of variance, Bonferroni's test, and the chi-square test. Statistical tests showed differences in the mean scores of POMS-30 subscales and GHQ-28. The mood of anger was the factor that seemed to best describe the trainees' response to stress. The study results led to the conclusion that dental trainees' mental health is influenced by the type of training program and that dental trainees in rotation training programs may need more mental health support.

  19. Part-time general surgical training in South Australia: its success and future implications (or: pinnacles, pitfalls and lessons for the future).

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Susan; Igras, Emma; Fosh, Beverley; Benson, Sarah

    2012-12-01

    Flexible training options are sought by an increasing number of Australasian surgical trainees. Reasons include increased participation of women in the surgical workforce, postgraduate training and changing attitudes to family responsibilities. Despite endorsement of flexible training by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and Board in General Surgery, part-time (PT) training in General Surgery in Australia and New Zealand is not well established. A permanent 'stand-alone' PT training position was established at the Royal Adelaide Hospital in 2007 under the Surgical Education and Training Program. This position offered 12 months of General Surgical training on a 0.5 full-time (FT) equivalent basis with pro rata emergency and on-call commitments and was accredited for 6 months of General Surgical training. This paper reviews the PT training experience in South Australia. De-identified logbook data were obtained from the South Australian Regional Subcommittee of the Board in General Surgery with consent of each of the trainees. Totals of operative cases were compared against matched FT trainees working on the same unit. Overall, PT trainees achieved comparable operative caseloads compared with their FT colleagues. All trainees included in this review have subsequently passed the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Fellowship Examination in General Surgery and returned to FT workforce positions. This paper presents two validated models of PT training. Training, resource and regulatory requirements and individual and institutional barriers to flexible training are substantial. Successful PT models offer positive and beneficial training alternatives for General Surgical trainees and contribute to workforce flexibility. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  20. Expanding the use of simulation in open vascular surgical training.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vikas A; Wolfe, John H N

    2012-09-01

    Simulation technology has a well-defined role in nonmedical professions such as aviation and over the last two decades has permeated medical training. The most successful surgical simulation is in the fields of laparoscopic and endovascular surgery. These two-dimensional scenarios, as in the aviation industry, lend themselves to simulation. Open simulators have been met with more resistance than their laparoscopic counterparts because of the difficulties in simulating the three-dimensional field. Engaging in persistent practice is what makes the expert and all trainees should aspire to this. Without knowing, all surgical trainees have engaged in deliberate practice when first learning to tie surgical knots. This deliberate practice should be used in all aspects of vascular surgical practice, and it is no longer acceptable to perform procedures such as arterial anastomoses for the first time on patients. Simulators exist for all aspects of vascular surgical training and vary in complexity and price. Some of these simulators are suitable for use at home or in a skills laboratory whereas others are more suitable for use in a specialized skills center. Training on these simulators can be offered at a local level or at a regional level in the skills center. Where surgical procedures are not commonly performed or expertise is required for a new innovation, it is more appropriate to have national or internationally based workshops under the auspices of surgical boards or societies. Simulation of crisis management, well known in aviation, has also been applied to vascular surgical practice and can offer benefit to senior trainees even when their performance on a noncrisis simulator has reached a plateau. This article identifies the areas where simulation in open vascular surgery can benefit the trainee. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  1. [Military postgraduate courses at the Military Medical Academy: history, current state and prospects].

    PubMed

    Kotiv, B N; Ivchenko, E V; Zubenko, A I; Ovchinnikov, D V

    2013-12-01

    Training of scientific and scientific-pedagogical staff is one of the most important tasks of any high school. The problem of staff training arose in the Kirov Military Medical (Medical Surgical) Academy before its official foundation. In 1741 first scholars were sent abroad for the preparation of theses. The scholars were supposed to return to the hospital schools for teaching activity. Since 1802 scholars have defended their theses in the Academy. In 1858 special medical institute, the prototype of the Institute for postgraduate military studies was established. Many outstanding scientists studied in the Academy and brought name of the Academy into repute. At the present time, the Institute of postgraduate military studies (postgraduate) of the Kirov Military Medical Academy continues to train scientific staff. The Institute of postgraduate military studies remains one of the most successful institutes in Russia.

  2. [Simulation training in surgical education - application of virtual reality laparoscopic simulators in a surgical skills course].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, K S; Gröne, J; Lauscher, J C; Ritz, J-P; Holmer, C; Pohlen, U; Buhr, H-J

    2012-04-01

    Training and simulation are gaining importance in surgical education. Today, virtual reality surgery simulators provide sophisticated laparoscopic training scenarios and offer detailed assessment methods. This also makes simulators interesting for the application in surgical skills courses. The aim of the current study was to assess the suitability of a virtual surgery simulator for training and assessment in an established surgical training course. The study was conducted during the annual "Practical Course for Visceral Surgery" (Warnemuende, Germany). 36 of 108 course participants were assigned at random for the study. Training was conducted in 15 sessions over 5 days with 4 identical virtual surgery simulators (LapSim) and 2 standardised training tasks. The simulator measured 16 individual parameters and calculated 2 scores. Questionnaires were used to assess the test persons' laparoscopic experience, their training situation and the acceptance of the simulator training. Data were analysed with non-parametric tests. A subgroup analysis for laparoscopic experience was conducted in order to assess the simulator's construct validity and assessment capabilities. Median age was 32 (27 - 41) years; median professional experience was 3 (1 - 11) years. Typical laparoscopic learning curves with initial significant improvements and a subsequent plateau phase were measured over 5 days. The individual training sessions exhibited a rhythmic variability in the training results. A shorter night's sleep led to a marked drop in performance. The participants' different experience levels could clearly be discriminated ( ≤ 20 vs. > 20 laparoscopic operations; p ≤ 0.001). The questionnaire showed that the majority of the participants had limited training opportunities in their hospitals. The simulator training was very well accepted. However, the participants severely misjudged the real costs of the simulators that were used. The learning curve on the

  3. Four years of teaching principles in clinical trials--a continuous evaluation of the postgraduate workshop for surgical investigators at the study center of the German Surgical Society.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Lars; Bruckner, Thomas; Diener, Markus K; Kadmon, Martina; Wente, Moritz N; Sauerland, Stephan; Seiler, Christoph M

    2009-01-01

    Only a small part of the daily work in the field of surgery is based on high-level evidence. To improve the rate of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in surgery, more surgical, randomized controlled trials have been advocated. In addition, it has been recognized that educational issues that concern methods and techniques of clinical research are of similar importance. Therefore, a clinical investigator course focusing particularly on the issues of surgical trials was initiated in 2005. The structure of this course is demonstrated here as well as the results of its evaluation over the last 4 years. All participants were invited to rate both the lecture and the teachers with the help of a standardized evaluation questionnaires (rating scale from 1 = excellent to 6 = insufficient). Lectures were evaluated via questions on content, comprehension, and learning effect. Teachers were evaluated in terms of rhetorical abilities, content, and presentation technique, respectively. Assessment of personal long-term learning effects was evaluated by an e-mail survey. Seventy-three participants were trained in a total of 4 courses. Participants in each course completed the evaluation questionnaires. In 2005, 20 of 21 (95.2%) participants completed the questionnaire; in 2006, 11 of 11 participants completed it (100%); in 2007, 19 of 22 (86.4%) participants completed it; and in 2008, 16 of 19 (84.2%) participants completed it. The overall evaluation of the course was graded 1.52 for content and 1.72 for clarity, and the learning effect was assessed at 1.60. The 16 lecturers came from different institutions involved in clinical research and evidence-based surgery. Besides classic lecturing, the current assembly of the course consists of 6 lectures designed as hands-on sessions. A survey (48.5% response rate) with a mean follow-up of 1.72 years (range, 6 months to 3 years) revealed that the enduring learning effect was rated 2.09, and 70.4% of former participants actually participated in

  4. The Role of Student Surgical Interest Groups and Surgical Olympiads in Anatomical and Surgical Undergraduate Training in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dydykin, Sergey; Kapitonova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Traditional department-based surgical interest groups in Russian medical schools are useful tools for student-based selection of specialty training. They also form a nucleus for initiating research activities among undergraduate students. In Russia, the Departments of Topographical Anatomy and Operative Surgery play an important role in initiating…

  5. The Role of Student Surgical Interest Groups and Surgical Olympiads in Anatomical and Surgical Undergraduate Training in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dydykin, Sergey; Kapitonova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Traditional department-based surgical interest groups in Russian medical schools are useful tools for student-based selection of specialty training. They also form a nucleus for initiating research activities among undergraduate students. In Russia, the Departments of Topographical Anatomy and Operative Surgery play an important role in initiating…

  6. Imagining a Continuing Interprofessional Education Program (CIPE) within Surgical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon C.; Gruen, Russell L.; Smith, Julian A.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years increasing attention has been paid to issues of professionalism in surgery and the content and structure of continuing professional development for surgeons; however, little attention has been paid to interprofessional education (IPE) in surgical training. Imagining the form(s) of IPE and/or continuing interprofessional education…

  7. Mentoring and Surgical Training: A Time for Reflection!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memon, Breda; Memon, Muhammed Ashraf

    2010-01-01

    Effective mentoring has an invaluable role in the development of surgeons at various levels and is frequently perceived vital in achieving career success. Its role therefore is only second to credentialing. However, the formal role of mentoring and learner support in surgical training remains non-existent. This is reflected in a paucity of…

  8. Imagining a Continuing Interprofessional Education Program (CIPE) within Surgical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon C.; Gruen, Russell L.; Smith, Julian A.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years increasing attention has been paid to issues of professionalism in surgery and the content and structure of continuing professional development for surgeons; however, little attention has been paid to interprofessional education (IPE) in surgical training. Imagining the form(s) of IPE and/or continuing interprofessional education…

  9. Virtual reality training for surgical trainees in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nagendran, Myura; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Loizidou, Marilena; Davidson, Brian R

    2013-08-27

    Standard surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is time-consuming, costly, and of variable effectiveness. Training using a virtual reality simulator is an option to supplement standard training. Virtual reality training improves the technical skills of surgical trainees such as decreased time for suturing and improved accuracy. The clinical impact of virtual reality training is not known. To assess the benefits (increased surgical proficiency and improved patient outcomes) and harms (potentially worse patient outcomes) of supplementary virtual reality training of surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Science Citation Index Expanded until July 2012. We included all randomised clinical trials comparing virtual reality training versus other forms of training including box-trainer training, no training, or standard laparoscopic training in surgical trainees with little laparoscopic experience. We also planned to include trials comparing different methods of virtual reality training. We included only trials that assessed the outcomes in people undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Two authors independently identified trials and collected data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using Review Manager 5 analysis. For each outcome we calculated the mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals based on intention-to-treat analysis. We included eight trials covering 109 surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience. Of the eight trials, six compared virtual reality versus no supplementary training. One trial compared virtual reality training versus box-trainer training and versus no supplementary training, and one trial compared

  10. Does dental undergraduate education and postgraduate training enable intention to provide inhalation sedation in primary dental care? A path analytical exploration.

    PubMed

    Yuan, S; J Carson, S; Rooksby, M; McKerrow, J; Lush, C; Humphris, G; Freeman, R

    2017-08-01

    To examine how quality standards of dental undergraduate education, postgraduate training and qualifications together with confidence and barriers could be utilised to predict intention to provide inhalation sedation. All 202 dentists working within primary dental care in NHS Highland were invited to participate. The measures in the questionnaire survey included demographic information, undergraduate education and postgraduate qualifications, current provision and access to sedation service, attitudes towards confidence, barriers and intention to provide inhalation sedation. A path analytical approach was employed to investigate the fit of collected data to the proposed mediational model. One hundred and nine dentists who completed the entire questionnaire participated (response rate of 54%). Seventy-six per cent of dentists reported receiving lectures in conscious sedation during their undergraduate education. Statistically significantly more Public Dental Service dentists compared with General Dental Service (GDS) dentists had postgraduate qualification and Continuing Professional Development training experience in conscious sedation. Only twenty-four per cent of the participants stated that they provided inhalation sedation to their patients. The findings indicated that PDS dentists had higher attitudinal scores towards inhalation sedation than GDS practitioners. The proposed model showed an excellent level of fit. A multigroup comparison test confirmed that the level of association between confidence in providing inhalation sedation and intention varied by group (GDS vs. PDS respondents). Public Dental Service respondents who showed extensive postgraduate training experience in inhalation sedation were more confident and likely to provide this service. The quality standards of dental undergraduate education, postgraduate qualifications and training together with improved confidence predicted primary care dentists' intention to provide inhalation sedation.

  11. Changes in surgical training opportunities in Britain and South Africa.

    PubMed

    Greensmith, Martin; Cho, Jun; Hargest, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    There have been substantial changes in the provision of surgical services and in surgical training over the last twenty years. Consultants now have a much greater role in delivery of care, but concerns have been raised over surgical trainees' lack of experience, particularly with trauma and emergency cases. The logbooks of surgical trainees undertaking 6 month posts during 1992-3 and 2009-12 in both the United Kingdom (UK) and South Africa (RSA) were analysed. There was a 50% reduction in total hours worked between the UK posts in 1992-3 and 2011-12. The trainee post in RSA 2009-10 completed 15% more hours than the equivalent UK trainee post. Elective cases predominated in both UK posts (70-83%) whilst in RSA the number of trauma cases was substantial (21-26%). The UK 2011/12 trainee was rarely the primary operator (30%) compared with all other training periods (72-82%). This was due to a combination of relatively less minor and more major elective surgical cases in the recent UK post compared with the historical UK post or either RSA post. RSA has consistently offered more exposure to emergency, and especially trauma, surgery than the UK as well as more opportunity to act as primary operator. Re-introduction of "minor operations" lists for junior surgical trainees, acceptance of the importance for trainees to act as the primary operator, maintenance of the traditional "firm" structure and support for trainees who wish to spend a period of time abroad may help to improve clinical training and experience for UK surgical trainees. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The cutting-edge training modalities and educational platforms for accredited surgical training: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Forgione, Antonello; Guraya, Salman Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Historically, operating room (OR) has always been considered as a stand-alone trusted platform for surgical education and training. However, concerns about financial constraints, quality control, and patient safety have urged the surgical educators to develop more cost-effective, surgical educational platforms that can be employed outside the OR. Furthermore, trained surgeons need to regularly update their surgical skills to keep abreast with the emerging surgical technologies. This research aimed to explore the value of currently available modern surgical tools that can be used outside the OR and also elaborates the existing laparoscopic surgical training programs in world-class centers across the globe with a view to formulate a blended and unified structured surgical training program. Materials and Methods: Several data sources were searched using MeSH terms “Laparoscopic surgery” and “Surgical training” and “Surgical curriculum” and “fundamentals of endoscopic surgery” and “fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery” and “Telementoring” and “Box trainer.” The eligibility criteria used in data extraction searched for original and review articles and by excluding the editorial articles, short communications, conference proceedings, personal view, and commentaries. Data synthesis and data analysis were done by reviewing the initially retrieved 211 articles. Irrelevant and duplicate and redundant articles were excluded from the study. Results: Finally, 12 articles were selected for this systematic review. Data results showed that a myriad of cutting-edge technical innovations have provided modern surgical training tools such as the simulation-based mechanical and virtual reality simulators, animal and cadaveric labs, telementoring, telerobotic-assisted surgery, and video games. Surgical simulators allow the trainees to acquire surgical skills in a tension-free environment without supervision or time constraints. Conclusion: The

  13. Surgical training in your hands: organising a skills course.

    PubMed

    Burnand, Henry; Mutimer, Jon

    2012-12-01

    The advent of simulated surgical skills courses has brought dynamic changes to the traditional approach to acquiring practical skills in surgery. Teaching is a core part of the surgical profession, and any trainee can be involved in the organisation of skills training courses. This paper outlines the importance of organising surgical skills courses for trainees, and provides a practical guide on how to do so within busy clinical environments. The paper examines how to plan a course, how to design the programme, and provides tips on faculty staff requirements, venue, finance and participants, with additional suggestions for assessment and evaluation. We recommend the organisation of skills courses to any trainee. By following key ground rules, the surgical trainee can enable the acquisition of advanced learning opportunities and the ability to demonstrate valuable organisational skills. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  14. A Pause for Reflection: Incorporating Reflection into Surgical Training

    PubMed Central

    McGlinn, Evan P.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Reflection is an important learning technique for surgeons during their training and is a valuable tool for life-long learning and maintenance of certification to assure competency. Reflection helps individuals to evaluate their performance in the interest of improving their ability to deal with similar experiences in the future. Additionally, reflection can be helpful for established surgeons to continue to improve upon their performance and hone their craft. This article outlines the theoretical role of reflection in the learning process. We will discuss methods for incorporating reflection into training programs, and review the evidence for implementing reflection in surgical training. PMID:25003410

  15. Surgical residency training and international volunteerism: a national survey of residents from 2 surgical specialties.

    PubMed

    Matar, Wadih Y; Trottier, Daniel C; Balaa, Fady; Fairful-Smith, Robin; Moroz, Paul

    2012-08-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) lack basic surgical resources, resulting in avoidable disability and mortality. Recently, residents in surgical training programs have shown increasing interest in overseas elective experiences to assist surgical programs in LMICs. The purpose of this study was to survey Canadian surgical residents about their interest in international volunteerism. We sent a web-based survey to all general and orthopedic surgery residents enrolled in surgical training programs in Canada. The survey assessed residents' interests, attitudes and motivations, and perceived barriers and aids with respect to international volunteerism. In all, 361 residents completed the survey for a response rate of 38.0%. Half of the respondents indicated that the availability of an international surgery elective would have positively influenced their selection of a residency program. Excluding the 18 residents who had volunteered during residency, 63.8% of the remaining residents confirmed an interest in international volunteering with "contributing to an important cause," "teaching" and "tourism/cultural enhancement" as the leading reasons for their interest. Perceived barriers included "lack of financial support" and "lack of available organized opportunities." All (100%) respondents who had done an international elective during residency confirmed that they would pursue such work in the future. Administrators of Canadian surgical programs should be aware of strong resident interest in global health care and accordingly develop opportunities by encouraging faculty mentorships and resources for global health teaching.

  16. Surgical residency training and international volunteerism: a national survey of residents from 2 surgical specialties

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Wadih Y.; Trottier, Daniel C.; Balaa, Fady; Fairful-Smith, Robin; Moroz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) lack basic surgical resources, resulting in avoidable disability and mortality. Recently, residents in surgical training programs have shown increasing interest in overseas elective experiences to assist surgical programs in LMICs. The purpose of this study was to survey Canadian surgical residents about their interest in international volunteerism. Methods We sent a web-based survey to all general and orthopedic surgery residents enrolled in surgical training programs in Canada. The survey assessed residents’ interests, attitudes and motivations, and perceived barriers and aids with respect to international volunteerism. Results In all, 361 residents completed the survey for a response rate of 38.0%. Half of the respondents indicated that the availability of an international surgery elective would have positively influenced their selection of a residency program. Excluding the 18 residents who had volunteered during residency, 63.8% of the remaining residents confirmed an interest in international volunteering with “contributing to an important cause,” “teaching” and “tourism/cultural enhancement” as the leading reasons for their interest. Perceived barriers included “lack of financial support” and “lack of available organized opportunities.” All (100%) respondents who had done an international elective during residency confirmed that they would pursue such work in the future. Conclusion Administrators of Canadian surgical programs should be aware of strong resident interest in global health care and accordingly develop opportunities by encouraging faculty mentorships and resources for global health teaching. PMID:22854155

  17. Training in surgical oncology - the role of VR simulation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T M; Aggarwal, R; Rajaretnam, N; Grantcharov, T P; Darzi, A

    2011-09-01

    There have been dramatic changes in surgical training over the past two decades which have resulted in a number of concerns for the development of future surgeons. Changes in the structure of cancer services, working hour restrictions and a commitment to patient safety has led to a reduction in training opportunities that are available to the surgeon in training. Simulation and in particular virtual reality (VR) simulation has been heralded as an effective adjunct to surgical training. Advances in VR simulation has allowed trainees to practice realistic full length procedures in a safe and controlled environment, where mistakes are permitted and can be used as learning points. There is considerable evidence to demonstrate that the VR simulation can be used to enhance technical skills and improve operating room performance. Future work should focus on the cost effectiveness and predictive validity of VR simulation, which in turn would increase the uptake of simulation and enhance surgical training. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Subspecialist training in surgical gynecologic oncology in the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B; Auranen, Annika; Salvarsdottir, Anna; Høgdall, Claus

    2011-08-01

    To survey the centers that can provide subspecialty surgical training and education in gynecological oncology in the Nordic countries, we developed an online questionnaire in co-operation with the Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology. The link to the survey was mailed to 22 Scandinavian gynecological centers in charge of surgical treatment of cancer patients. Twenty (91%) centers participated. Four centers reported to be accredited European subspecialty training centers, a further six were interested in being accredited, and 11 centers were accredited by the respective National Board. Fourteen (74%) centers were interested in being listed for exchange of fellows. Our data show a large Nordic potential and interest in improving the gynecologic oncology standards and can be used to enhance the awareness of gynecologic oncology training in Scandinavia and to facilitate the exchange of fellows between Nordic countries. © 2011 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2011 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Multidisciplinary crisis simulations: the way forward for training surgical teams.

    PubMed

    Undre, Shabnam; Koutantji, Maria; Sevdalis, Nick; Gautama, Sanjay; Selvapatt, Nowlan; Williams, Samantha; Sains, Parvinderpal; McCulloch, Peter; Darzi, Ara; Vincent, Charles

    2007-09-01

    High-reliability organizations have stressed the importance of non-technical skills for safety and of regularly providing such training to their teams. Recently safety skills training has been applied in the practice of medicine. In this study, we developed and piloted a module using multidisciplinary crisis scenarios in a simulated operating theatre to train entire surgical teams. Twenty teams participated (n = 80); each consisted of a trainee surgeon, anesthetist, operating department practitioner (ODP), and scrub nurse. Crisis scenarios such as difficult intubation, hemorrhage, or cardiac arrest were simulated. Technical and non-technical skills (leadership, communication, team skills, decision making, and vigilance), were assessed by clinical experts and by two psychologists using relevant technical and human factors rating scales. Participants received technical and non-technical feedback, and the whole team received feedback on teamwork. Trainees assessed the training favorably. For technical skills there were no differences between surgical trainees' assessment scores and the assessment scores of the trainers. However, nurses overrated their technical skill. Regarding non-technical skills, leadership and decision making were scored lower than the other three non-technical skills (communication, team skills, and vigilance). Surgeons scored lower than nurses on communication and teamwork skills. Surgeons and anesthetists scored lower than nurses on leadership. Multidisciplinary simulation-based team training is feasible and well received by surgical teams. Non-technical skills can be assessed alongside technical skills, and differences in performance indicate where there is a need for further training. Future work should focus on developing team performance measures for training and on the development and evaluation of systematic training for technical and non-technical skills to enhance team performance and safety in surgery.

  20. Surgical training and certification in the United kingdom.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew J; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Warren, Oliver J; Paraskeva, Paraskevas

    2009-02-01

    Training in surgical disciplines in the United Kingdom has undergone tremendous change over the past two decades. The introduction of specialist training programmes, working time directives, quality ratings and a drive toward ambulatory and minimal access surgery have led to challenges with respect to training and service commitments of healthcare professionals. A structured and centralised training system was introduced, with the concept of core followed by specialty-specific progression, in an openly competitive manner. Within this system is the need to commence training on simulation models, and to demonstrate proficiency prior to performance of tasks on patients. This should be underpinned by objective measures such as video or dexterity-based tools. There is also a clear need to provide personal, professional and leadership development in the form of mentorship and appraisal systems. Though continuing to develop, the profession must be mindful of current and future advances to ensure the delivery of surgeons for the future who aspire toward excellence.

  1. 3-D Imaging and Simulation for Nephron Sparing Surgical Training.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Hamed; Liu, Jen-Jane

    2016-08-01

    Minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (MIPN) is now considered the procedure of choice for small renal masses largely based on functional advantages over traditional open surgery. Lack of haptic feedback, the need for spatial understanding of tumor borders, and advanced operative techniques to minimize ischemia time or achieve zero-ischemia PN are among factors that make MIPN a technically demanding operation with a steep learning curve for inexperienced surgeons. Surgical simulation has emerged as a useful training adjunct in residency programs to facilitate the acquisition of these complex operative skills in the setting of restricted work hours and limited operating room time and autonomy. However, the majority of available surgical simulators focus on basic surgical skills, and procedure-specific simulation is needed for optimal surgical training. Advances in 3-dimensional (3-D) imaging have also enhanced the surgeon's ability to localize tumors intraoperatively. This article focuses on recent procedure-specific simulation models for laparoscopic and robotic-assisted PN and advanced 3-D imaging techniques as part of pre- and some cases, intraoperative surgical planning.

  2. Selection for Surgical Training: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Schaverien, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    The predictive relationship between candidate selection criteria for surgical training programs and future performance during and at the completion of training has been investigated for several surgical specialties, however there is no interspecialty agreement regarding which selection criteria should be used. Better understanding the predictive reliability between factors at selection and future performance may help to optimize the process and lead to greater standardization of the surgical selection process. PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE databases were searched. Over 560 potentially relevant publications were identified using the search strategy and screened using the Cochrane Collaboration Data Extraction and Assessment Template. 57 studies met the inclusion criteria. Several selection criteria used in the traditional selection demonstrated inconsistent correlation with subsequent performance during and at the end of surgical training. The following selection criteria, however, demonstrated good predictive relationships with subsequent resident performance: USMLE examination scores, Letters of Recommendation (LOR) including the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE), academic performance during clinical clerkships, the interview process, displaying excellence in extracurricular activities, and the use of unadjusted rank lists. This systematic review supports that the current selection process needs to be further evaluated and improved. Multicenter studies using standardized outcome measures of success are now required to improve the reliability of the selection process to select the best trainees. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. The role of humanitarian missions in modern surgical training.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Alex; Sherman, Randy; Magee, William P

    2010-07-01

    Surgical trainees have participated in international missions for decades and are now seeking out these experiences in record numbers. Resident participation in humanitarian service has been highly controversial in the academic plastic surgery community, and little evidence exists elucidating the value of these experiences. This report examines the impact of international volunteerism on surgical training. Twenty-one resident physicians who participated in the inaugural Operation Smile Regan Fellowship were surveyed 1 year after their experiences. One hundred percent responded that participation in an international surgical mission had an overall positive impact on their lives, and 94.7 percent reported that they had achieved marked personal growth. Results demonstrate significant education in each of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies and insights into global health and cultural competency. One hundred percent "strongly agreed" that the Regan Fellowship was a quality educational experience, and 94.7 percent deemed the experience a valuable part of their residency training. Resident physicians are calling for more international health opportunities, and they should be generously supported. A properly structured and proctored experience for surgical residents in international volunteerism is an effective instruction tool in the modern competency-based residency curriculum. These endeavors provide a unique understanding of the global burden of surgical disease, a deeper appreciation for global public health issues, and increased cultural sensitivity. Plastic surgery training programs can contribute mightily to global health and improved resident education by embracing and fostering the development of international humanitarian opportunities. A surgical mission experience should be widely available to plastic surgery residents.

  4. The EC4 European syllabus for post-graduate training in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine: version 4--2012.

    PubMed

    Wieringa, Gijsbert; Zerah, Simone; Jansen, Rob; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Queralto, José; Solnica, Bogdan; Gruson, Damien; Tomberg, Karel; Riittinen, Leena; Baum, Hannsjörg; Brochet, Jean-Philippe; Buhagiar, Gerald; Charilaou, Charis; Grigore, Camelia; Johnsen, Anders H; Kappelmayer, Janos; Majkic-Singh, Nada; Nubile, Giuseppe; O'Mullane, John; Opp, Matthias; Pupure, Silvija; Racek, Jaroslav; Reguengo, Henrique; Rizos, Demetrios; Rogic, Dunja; Špaňár, Július; Štrakl, Greta; Szekeres, Thomas; Tzatchev, Kamen; Vitkus, Dalius; Wallemacq, Pierre; Wallinder, Hans

    2012-08-01

    Laboratory medicine's practitioners across the European community include medical, scientific and pharmacy trained specialists whose contributions to health and healthcare is in the application of diagnostic tests for screening and early detection of disease, differential diagnosis, monitoring, management and treatment of patients, and their prognostic assessment. In submitting a revised common syllabus for post-graduate education and training across the 27 member states an expectation is set for harmonised, high quality, safe practice. In this regard an extended 'Core knowledge, skills and competencies' division embracing all laboratory medicine disciplines is described. For the first time the syllabus identifies the competencies required to meet clinical leadership demands for defining, directing and assuring the efficiency and effectiveness of laboratory services as well as expectations in translating knowledge and skills into ability to practice. In a 'Specialist knowledge' division, the expectations from the individual disciplines of Clinical Chemistry/Immunology, Haematology/Blood Transfusion, Microbiology/ Virology, Genetics and In Vitro Fertilisation are described. Beyond providing a common platform of knowledge, skills and competency, the syllabus supports the aims of the European Commission in providing safeguards to increasing professional mobility across European borders at a time when demand for highly qualified professionals is increasing and the labour force is declining. It continues to act as a guide for the formulation of national programmes supplemented by the needs of individual country priorities.

  5. An explanation of workplace-based assessments in postgraduate dental training and a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, H K; Kalsi, J S; Fisher, N L

    2013-11-01

    Workplace-based assessments (WBAs) are trainee-led formative assessments that measure the highest level of competence of the ability to do a task. So far WBAs are the only available assessment tools to measure performance integrated into practice. Over the years, WBAs have become an integral part of dental foundation and specialty training. The numerous WBAs available can be broadly categorised into three types. The first type involves observation of clinical encounters, for example mini-clinical evaluation exercises; direct observation of procedural skills; and dental evaluation of performance and procedure-based assessments. The second type involves discussion of clinical cases, such as case-based discussions. Finally, the third type includes the mini-peer assessment tool, team assessment of behaviour, 360° assessments and multi-source feedback, and all involve receiving feedback from a combination of colleagues, staff and patients. This article describes the WBAs currently used in postgraduate dental training and explores their strengths, weaknesses, perceived value by trainees and trainers and how these tools can be used in a reliable and valid way.

  6. Digital Environment for Movement Control in Surgical Skill Training.

    PubMed

    Juanes, Juan A; Gómez, Juan J; Peguero, Pedro D; Ruisoto, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    Intelligent environments are increasingly becoming useful scenarios for handling computers. Technological devices are practical tools for learning and acquiring clinical skills as part of the medical training process. Within the framework of the advanced user interface, we present a technological application using Leap Motion, to enhance interaction with the user in the process of a laparoscopic surgical intervention and integrate the navigation through augmented reality images using manual gestures. Thus, we intend to achieve a more natural interaction with the objects that participate in a surgical intervention, which are augmented and related to the user's hand movements.

  7. BCI-based user training in surgical robotics.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Emidio; Barresi, Giacinto; Mattos, Leonardo S

    2015-08-01

    Human error is a critical risk in surgery, so an important aim of surgical robotic systems is to improve the performance and the safety of surgical operations. Such systems can be potentially enhanced by a brain-computer interface (BCI) able to monitor the user's mental focus and use this information to improve the level of safety of the procedures. In order to evaluate such potential usage of BCIs, this paper describes a novel framework for training the user to regulate his/her own mental state while performing surgery-like tasks using a robotic system. This self-regulation is based on augmented reality (AR) feedback representing the BCI-monitored mental state, which helps the user's effort in maintaining a high level of mental focus during the task. A comparison between a BCI-based training and a training without a BCI highlighted a reduction of post-training trial times as a result of the enhanced training setup, without any loss in performance or in user experience. Such finding allows the identification of further improvements and novel potential applications of this training and interaction paradigm.

  8. Assessment of Multiple Physician Competencies in Postgraduate Training: Utility of the Structured Oral Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferies, Ann; Simmons, Brian; Ng, Eugene; Skidmore, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Competency based medical education involves assessing physicians-in-training in multiple roles. Training programs are challenged by the need to introduce appropriate yet feasible assessment methods. We therefore examined the utility of a structured oral examination (SOE) in the assessment of the 7 CanMEDS roles (Medical Expert, Communicator,…

  9. Assessment of Multiple Physician Competencies in Postgraduate Training: Utility of the Structured Oral Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferies, Ann; Simmons, Brian; Ng, Eugene; Skidmore, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Competency based medical education involves assessing physicians-in-training in multiple roles. Training programs are challenged by the need to introduce appropriate yet feasible assessment methods. We therefore examined the utility of a structured oral examination (SOE) in the assessment of the 7 CanMEDS roles (Medical Expert, Communicator,…

  10. Systematic review of e-learning for surgical training.

    PubMed

    Maertens, H; Madani, A; Landry, T; Vermassen, F; Van Herzeele, I; Aggarwal, R

    2016-10-01

    Internet and software-based platforms (e-learning) have gained popularity as teaching tools in medical education. Despite widespread use, there is limited evidence to support their effectiveness for surgical training. This study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of e-learning as a teaching tool compared with no intervention and other methods of surgical training. A systematic literature search of bibliographical databases was performed up to August 2015. Studies were included if they were RCTs assessing the effectiveness of an e-learning platform for teaching any surgical skill, compared with no intervention or another method of training. From 4704 studies screened, 87 were included with 7871 participants enrolled, comprising medical students (52 studies), trainees (51 studies), qualified surgeons (2 studies) and nurses (6 studies). E-learning tools were used for teaching cognitive (71 studies), psychomotor (36 studies) and non-technical (8 studies) skills. Tool features included multimedia (84 studies), interactive learning (60 studies), feedback (27 studies), assessment (26 studies), virtual patients (22 studies), virtual reality environment (11 studies), spaced education (7 studies), community discussions (2 studies) and gaming (2 studies). Overall, e-learning showed either greater or similar effectiveness compared with both no intervention (29 and 4 studies respectively) and non-e-learning interventions (29 and 22 studies respectively). Despite significant heterogeneity amongst platforms, e-learning is at least as effective as other methods of training. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Surgical education and training in an outer metropolitan hospital: a qualitative study of surgical trainers and trainees.

    PubMed

    Nestel, Debra; Harlim, Jennifer; Bryant, Melanie; Rampersad, Rajay; Hunter-Smith, David; Spychal, Bob

    2017-08-01

    The landscape of surgical training is changing. The anticipated increase in the numbers of surgical trainees and the shift to competency-based surgical training places pressures on an already stretched health service. With these pressures in mind, we explored trainers' and trainees' experiences of surgical training in a less traditional rotation, an outer metropolitan hospital. We considered practice-based learning theories to make meaning of surgical training in this setting, in particular Actor-network theory. We adopted a qualitative approach and purposively sampled surgical trainers and trainees to participate in individual interviews and focus groups respectively. Transcripts were made and thematically analysed. Institutional human research ethics approval was obtained. Four surgical trainers and fourteen trainees participated. Almost without exception, participants' report training needs to be well met. Emergent inter-related themes were: learning as social activity; learning and programmatic factors; learning and physical infrastructure; and, learning and organizational structure. This outer metropolitan hospital is suited to the provision of surgical training with the current rotational system for trainees. The setting offers experiences that enable consolidation of learning providing a rich and varied overall surgical training program. Although relational elements of learning were paramount they occurred within a complex environment. Actor-network theory was used to give meaning to emergent themes acknowledging that actors (both people and objects) and their interactions combine to influence training quality, shifting the focus of responsibility for learning away from individuals to the complex interactions in which they work and learn.

  12. A survey of undergraduate orthodontic teaching and factors affecting pursuit of postgraduate training.

    PubMed

    Jauhar, P; Mossey, P A; Popat, H; Seehra, J; Fleming, P S

    2016-10-21

    Background Undergraduate orthodontic teaching has been focused on developing an understanding of occlusal development in an effort to equip practitioners to make appropriate referrals for specialist-delivered care. However, there is a growing interest among general dentists in delivering more specialised treatments, including short-term orthodontic alignment. This study aimed to assess the levels of knowledge of occlusal problems among final year undergraduate dental students, as well as their interest in various orthodontics techniques and training.Methods A 36-item electronic questionnaire was sent to all final year undergraduate students in four dental institutes in the UK (Barts and the London, Kings College London, Cardiff and Dundee). The questionnaire explored satisfaction with undergraduate orthodontic teaching; students' perception of knowledge, based on General Dental Council learning outcomes; perceptions of the need for specialist involvement in the management of dental problems; interest in further training in orthodontics; and potential barriers to undertaking specialist training.Results The overall response rate was 66% (239/362). The majority of students (84.1%) were aware of GDC guidance in terms of undergraduate teaching. Students reported a preference for case-based and practical teaching sessions in orthodontics, with less interest in lectures or problem-based learning approaches. A high percentage were interested in further teaching in interceptive orthodontics (60.3%) and fixed appliance therapy (55.7%). Further training including specialist orthodontic training (36.4%), Invisalign (59%) and Six Month Smiles (41%) courses appealed to undergraduates. Levels of student debt, course fees and geographical issues were seen as potential barriers to formal, specialist training pathways.Conclusions Satisfaction with undergraduate orthodontic teaching is high and interest in further training, including specialist training pathways, continues to be high

  13. New regulations regarding Postgraduate Medical Training in Spain: perception of the tutor's role in the Murcia Region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently introduced regulatory changes have expanded the Tutor role to include their primary responsibility for Postgraduate Medical Training (PMT). However, accreditation and recognition of that role has been devolved to the autonomic regions. The opinions of the RT may be relevant to future decisions; Methods A comprehensive questionnaire, including demographic characteristics, academic and research achievement and personal views about their role, was sent to 201 RTs in the Murcia Region of Spain. The responses are described using median and interquartile ranges (IQR); Results There were 147 replies (response rate 73%), 69% male, mean age 45 ± 7 yrs. RTs perception of the residents' initial knowledge and commitment throughout the program was 5 (IQR 4-6) and 7 (IQR 5-8), respectively. As regards their impact on the PMT program, RTs considered that their own contribution was similar to that of senior residents. RTs perception of how their role was recognised was 5 (IQR 3-6). Only 16% did not encounter difficulties in accessing specific RT training programs. Regarding the RTs view of their various duties, supervision of patient care was accorded the greatest importance (64%) while the satisfactory completion of the PMT program and supervision of day-to-day activities were also considered important (61% and 59% respectively). The main RT requirements were: a greater professional recognition (97%), protected time (95%), specific RT training programs (95%) and financial recognition (86%); Conclusions This comprehensive study, reflecting the feelings of our RTs, provides a useful insight into the reality of their work and the findings ought to be taken into consideration in the imminent definitive regulatory document on PMT. PMID:20540814

  14. Development of a portfolio of learning for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Within the 52 health districts in South Africa, the family physician is seen as the clinical leader within a multi-professional district health team. Family physicians must be competent to meet 90% of the health needs of the communities in their districts. The eight university departments of Family Medicine have identified five unit standards, broken down into 85 training outcomes, for postgraduate training. The family medicine registrar must prove at the end of training that all the required training outcomes have been attained. District health managers must be assured that the family physician is competent to deliver the expected service. The Colleges of Medicine of South Africa (CMSA) require a portfolio to be submitted as part of the uniform assessment of all registrars applying to write the national fellowship examinations. This study aimed to achieve a consensus on the contents and principles of the first national portfolio for use in family medicine training in South Africa. Methods A workshop held at the WONCA Africa Regional Conference in 2009 explored the purpose and broad contents of the portfolio. The 85 training outcomes, ideas from the WONCA workshop, the literature, and existing portfolios in the various universities were used to develop a questionnaire that was tested for content validity by a panel of 31 experts in family medicine in South Africa, via the Delphi technique in four rounds. Eighty five content items (national learning outcomes) and 27 principles were tested. Consensus was defined as 70% agreement. For those items that the panel thought should be included, they were also asked how to provide evidence for the specific item in the portfolio, and how to assess that evidence. Results Consensus was reached on 61 of the 85 national learning outcomes. The panel recommended that 50 be assessed by the portfolio and 11 should not be. No consensus could be reached on the remaining 24 outcomes and these were also omitted from the

  15. Development of a portfolio of learning for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Louis; Mash, Bob; Derese, Anselme

    2012-03-03

    Within the 52 health districts in South Africa, the family physician is seen as the clinical leader within a multi-professional district health team. Family physicians must be competent to meet 90% of the health needs of the communities in their districts. The eight university departments of Family Medicine have identified five unit standards, broken down into 85 training outcomes, for postgraduate training. The family medicine registrar must prove at the end of training that all the required training outcomes have been attained. District health managers must be assured that the family physician is competent to deliver the expected service. The Colleges of Medicine of South Africa (CMSA) require a portfolio to be submitted as part of the uniform assessment of all registrars applying to write the national fellowship examinations. This study aimed to achieve a consensus on the contents and principles of the first national portfolio for use in family medicine training in South Africa. A workshop held at the WONCA Africa Regional Conference in 2009 explored the purpose and broad contents of the portfolio. The 85 training outcomes, ideas from the WONCA workshop, the literature, and existing portfolios in the various universities were used to develop a questionnaire that was tested for content validity by a panel of 31 experts in family medicine in South Africa, via the Delphi technique in four rounds. Eighty five content items (national learning outcomes) and 27 principles were tested. Consensus was defined as 70% agreement. For those items that the panel thought should be included, they were also asked how to provide evidence for the specific item in the portfolio, and how to assess that evidence. Consensus was reached on 61 of the 85 national learning outcomes. The panel recommended that 50 be assessed by the portfolio and 11 should not be. No consensus could be reached on the remaining 24 outcomes and these were also omitted from the portfolio. The panel recommended

  16. "Reflection-Before-Practice" Improves Self-Assessment and End-Performance in Laparoscopic Surgical Skills Training.

    PubMed

    Ganni, Sandeep; Botden, Sanne M B I; Schaap, Dennis P; Verhoeven, Bas H; Goossens, Richard H M; Jakimowicz, Jack J

    2017-08-16

    To establish whether a systematized approach to self-assessment in a laparoscopic surgical skills course improves accordance between expert- and self-assessment. A systematic training course in self-assessment using Competency Assessment Tool was introduced into the normal course of evaluation within a Laparoscopic Surgical Skills training course for the test group (n = 30). Differences between these and a control group (n = 30) who did not receive the additional training were assessed. Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, The Netherlands (n = 27), and GSL Medical College, Rajahmundry, India (n = 33). Sixty postgraduate year 2 and 3 surgical residents who attended the 2-day Laparoscopic Surgical Skills grade 1 level 1 curriculum were invited to participate. The test group (n = 30) showed better accordance between expert- and self-assessment (difference of 1.5, standard deviation [SD] = 0.2 versus 3.83, SD = 0.6, p = 0.009) as well as half the number (7 versus 14) of cases of overreporting. Furthermore, the test group also showed higher overall mean performance (mean = 38.1, SD = 0.7 versus mean = 31.8, SD = 1.0, p < 0.001) than the control group (n = 30). The systematic approach to self-assessment can be viewed as responsible for this and can be seen as "reflection-before-practice" within the framework of reflective practice as defined by Donald Schon. Our results suggest that "reflection-before-practice" in implementing self-assessment is an important step in the development of surgical skills, yielding both better understanding of one's strengths and weaknesses and also improving overall performance. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in SurgeryThe Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the learning environment of urology residency training using the postgraduate hospital educational environment measure inventory.

    PubMed

    Binsaleh, Saleh; Babaeer, Abdulrahman; Alkhayal, Abdullah; Madbouly, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    The educational environment plays a crucial role in the learning process. We aimed to evaluate the educational-environment perceptions of Saudi urology residents using the postgraduate hospital educational environment measure (PHEEM) inventory, and to investigate associations of their perception with stages of residency program, regions of Saudi Arabia, and main sectors of the health care system. We used PHEEM to measure the educational environment of Saudi urology residents. Respondents' perception was compared regarding different levels of residency training, regions of Saudi Arabia, and sectors of the health care system. Internal reliability of the inventory was assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Out of 72 registered residents, 38 (53%) completed the questionnaire. The residents did not perceive their environment positively (77.7±16.5). No significant differences in perception were found among residents of different program stages or Saudi regions. Residents from different health care sectors differed significantly regarding the total PHEEM score (P=0.024) and the teaching subscale (P=0.017). The inventory showed a high internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha of 0.892. Saudi urology residents perceived the educational environment as less than satisfactory. Perception of the educational environment did not change significantly among different stages of the program or different regions of Saudi Arabia. However, some sectors of the health care system are doing better than others.

  18. Effect of 2011 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Duty-Hour Regulations on Objective Measures of Surgical Training.

    PubMed

    Condren, Audree B; Divino, Celia M

    2015-01-01

    In July 2011, new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hour regulations were implemented in surgical residency programs. We examined whether differences in objective measures of surgical training exist at our institution since implementation. Retrospective reviews of the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination performance and surgical case volume were collected for 5 academic years. Data were separated into 2 groups, Period 1: July 2008 through June 2011 and Period 2: July 2011 through June 2013. Single-institution study conducted at the Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, a tertiary-care academic center. All general surgery residents, levels postgraduate year 1 through 5, from July 2008 through June 2013. No significant differences in the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination total correct score or overall test percentile were noted between periods for any levels. Intern case volume increased significantly in Period 2 (90 vs 77, p = 0.036). For chief residents graduating in Period 2, there was a significant increase in total major cases (1062 vs 945, p = 0.002) and total chief cases (305 vs 267, p = 0.02). The duty-hour regulations did not negatively affect objective measures of surgical training in our program. Compliance with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hour regulations correlated with an increase in case volume. Adaptations made by our institution, such as maximizing daytime duty hours and increasing physician extenders, likely contributed to our findings. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 25 CFR 163.41 - Postgraduation recruitment, continuing education and training programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forestry Education, Education Assistance, Recruitment and... Indian and Alaska Native graduate foresters and trained forestry technicians into the Bureau of Indian Affairs forestry program or forestry programs conducted by a tribe, tribal forest enterprise or ANCSA...

  20. 25 CFR 163.41 - Postgraduation recruitment, continuing education and training programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forestry Education, Education Assistance, Recruitment and... Indian and Alaska Native graduate foresters and trained forestry technicians into the Bureau of Indian Affairs forestry program or forestry programs conducted by a tribe, tribal forest enterprise or ANCSA...

  1. 25 CFR 163.41 - Postgraduation recruitment, continuing education and training programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forestry Education, Education Assistance, Recruitment and... Indian and Alaska Native graduate foresters and trained forestry technicians into the Bureau of Indian Affairs forestry program or forestry programs conducted by a tribe, tribal forest enterprise or ANCSA...

  2. 25 CFR 163.41 - Postgraduation recruitment, continuing education and training programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forestry Education, Education Assistance, Recruitment and... Indian and Alaska Native graduate foresters and trained forestry technicians into the Bureau of Indian Affairs forestry program or forestry programs conducted by a tribe, tribal forest enterprise or ANCSA...

  3. 25 CFR 163.41 - Postgraduation recruitment, continuing education and training programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forestry Education, Education Assistance, Recruitment and... Indian and Alaska Native graduate foresters and trained forestry technicians into the Bureau of Indian Affairs forestry program or forestry programs conducted by a tribe, tribal forest enterprise or ANCSA...

  4. Surgical skills simulation in trauma and orthopaedic training.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Euan R B; Lewis, Thomas L; Ferran, Nicholas A

    2014-12-19

    Changing patterns of health care delivery and the rapid evolution of orthopaedic surgical techniques have made it increasingly difficult for trainees to develop expertise in their craft. Working hour restrictions and a drive towards senior led care demands that proficiency be gained in a shorter period of time whilst requiring a greater skill set than that in the past. The resulting conflict between service provision and training has necessitated the development of alternative methods in order to compensate for the reduction in 'hands-on' experience. Simulation training provides the opportunity to develop surgical skills in a controlled environment whilst minimising risks to patient safety, operating theatre usage and financial expenditure. Many options for simulation exist within orthopaedics from cadaveric or prosthetic models, to arthroscopic simulators, to advanced virtual reality and three-dimensional software tools. There are limitations to this form of training, but it has significant potential for trainees to achieve competence in procedures prior to real-life practice. The evidence for its direct transferability to operating theatre performance is limited but there are clear benefits such as increasing trainee confidence and familiarity with equipment. With progressively improving methods of simulation available, it is likely to become more important in the ongoing and future training and assessment of orthopaedic surgeons.

  5. Is there a role for mentoring in Surgical Specialty training?

    PubMed

    Macafee, D A L

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, there have been considerable advances in the field of medical education and great strides in education research. Although all trainees should nowadays have educational supervisors there remains a focus on assessment which may detract from global support for personal and professional growth. Mentoring has been shown to help mentees overcome difficulties, discuss problems and fulfill goals and is flourishing in many areas of the private and public sectors. Within medicine, there have been such dramatic changes in training recently that additional support may be needed if the new generation of trainees are to maximise their learning and professional development over ever shorter training periods. Having a mentor; a confidential ear and sounding board who is independent from their assessment may encourage more open discussion and provide better support than is currently available. This article focuses on the needs of the surgical trainee but the concept of mentoring should not be limited to this group, and the techniques described in this paper could equally apply to any other medical speciality. The article reviews the current role of mentoring in medicine, outlines the current structure of surgical training in the UK, considers why mentoring might be beneficial in surgery, what forms it might take, how mentors would be trained and how the programme could become established.

  6. Physicians as managers of health care delivery and the implications for postgraduate medical training: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Busari, Jamiu O; Berkenbosch, Lizanne; Brouns, Judith W

    2011-04-01

    As increasing demands on health care services are posing new challenges to practicing physicians worldwide, physicians have to extend existing and develop new competencies in various domains of their profession. Management and leadership is one of these domains, and relevant competencies have been incorporated in many new competency-based (postgraduate) training programs. Among trainee physicians and clinical educators, however, good understanding remains scant in relation to the definition and content of the physician's competency as manager. One objective of this article is to identify the specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for the development of managerial competencies in physicians. The article also establishes both the extent to which competency-based curricula are successful in equipping medical trainees with managerial competencies and the availability of programs specifically designed to develop these competencies. We reviewed publications retrieved through a PubMed search using relevant keywords, combined with the "related articles" function and a manual search of the references of the retrieved articles. Forty relevant articles were selected. They addressed residents' needs for management education and described the design, implementation, and evaluation of management education curricula. Most of the studies were conducted in North America and within the family medicine specialty. The most commonly taught topics were financial and management concepts and quality assurance. In all studies, training resulted in improved knowledge about management issues. All curricula were evaluated positively despite the use of different educational methods. Management education in health care appears to be generally considered essential and necessary. There is, however, no clear consensus as to when in the medical education continuum, how, and for how long management education should be provided.

  7. A competency based selection procedure for Dutch postgraduate GP training: a pilot study on validity and reliability.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Margit I; Tromp, Fred; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P A; Pieters, Ron H M; Damoiseaux, Roger A M J; Kuyvenhoven, Marijke M

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Background: Historically, semi-structured interviews (SSI) have been the core of the Dutch selection for postgraduate general practice (GP) training. This paper describes a pilot study on a newly designed competency-based selection procedure that assesses whether candidates have the competencies that are required to complete GP training. The objective was to explore reliability and validity aspects of the instruments developed. The new selection procedure comprising the National GP Knowledge Test (LHK), a situational judgement tests (SJT), a patterned behaviour descriptive interview (PBDI) and a simulated encounter (SIM) was piloted alongside the current procedure. Forty-seven candidates volunteered in both procedures. Admission decision was based on the results of the current procedure. Study participants did hardly differ from the other candidates. The mean scores of the candidates on the LHK and SJT were 21.9 % (SD 8.7) and 83.8% (SD 3.1), respectively. The mean self-reported competency scores (PBDI) were higher than the observed competencies (SIM): 3.7(SD 0.5) and 2.9(SD 0.6), respectively. Content-related competencies showed low correlations with one another when measured with different instruments, whereas more diverse competencies measured by a single instrument showed strong to moderate correlations. Moreover, a moderate correlation between LHK and SJT was found. The internal consistencies (intraclass correlation, ICC) of LHK and SJT were poor while the ICC of PBDI and SIM showed acceptable levels of reliability. Findings on content validity and reliability of these new instruments are promising to realize a competency based procedure. Further development of the instruments and research on predictive validity should be pursued.

  8. Portfolio careers for medical graduates: implications for postgraduate training and workforce planning.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Harris A; Mitchell, Rob D; Milford, Will; Vaswani, Nitin; Moylan, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Portfolio careers in medicine can be defined as significant involvement in one or more portfolios of activity beyond a practitioner's primary clinical role, either concurrently or in sequence. Portfolio occupations may include medical education, research, administration, legal medicine, the arts, engineering, business and consulting, leadership, politics and entrepreneurship. Despite significant interest among junior doctors, portfolios are poorly integrated with prevocational and speciality training programs in Australia. The present paper seeks to explore this issue. More formal systems for portfolio careers in Australia have the potential to increase job satisfaction, flexibility and retention, as well as diversify trainee skill sets. Although there are numerous benefits from involvement in portfolio careers, there are also risks to the trainee, employing health service and workforce modelling. Formalising pathways to portfolio careers relies on assessing stakeholder interest, enhancing flexibility in training programs, developing support programs, mentorship and coaching schemes and improving support structures in health services.

  9. Integration of simulation in postgraduate studies in Saudi Arabia: The current practice in anesthesia training program

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Abeer; Alatassi, Abdulaleem; Alattas, Elias; Alzoraigi, Usamah; AlZaher, Zaki; Ahmad, Abdulaziz; Albabtain, Hesham; Boker, Abdulaziz

    2017-01-01

    The educational programs in the Saudi Commission for Health Specialties are developing rapidly in the fields of technical development. Such development is witnessed, particularly in the scientific areas related to what is commonly known as evidence-based medicine. This review highlights the critical need and importance of integrating simulation into anesthesia training and assessment. Furthermore, it describes the current utilization of simulation in anesthesia and critical care assessment process. PMID:28442961

  10. Preferences of program directors for evaluation of candidates for postgraduate training.

    PubMed Central

    Provan, J L; Cuttress, L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the preferences of program directors for various grading systems and other criteria in selecting students for residency training positions through the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS). DESIGN: Questionnaire survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 110 directors of residency training programs in Ontario. SETTING: Ontario medical schools. OUTCOME MEASURES: Weighting of importance of different screening tools (e.g., grading systems, personal interview, dean's letter) used during undergraduate training. RESULTS: Of the 110 directors 96 (87%) responded. Of the 92 who rated the various grading practices 35 (38%) preferred a numeric grading system, 26 (28%) a letter grading system, 23 (25%) an honours/pass/fail system and 8 (9%) a pass/fail system. Most of the respondents from each school favoured a grading system that was more discriminating than the one used at their location. The personal interview was regarded as the most important screening tool by 80 (83%) of the respondents; the dean's letter was considered to be very useful by only 16 (17%). CONCLUSIONS: More value was placed by program directors on a numeric or other more discriminating grading system than on the pass/fail system. Although the grading system provides only one type of screening mechanism it raises the question of whether there should be a policy for uniform grading practices for all Canadian students. PMID:7553493

  11. The new era of postgraduate certified general practice training in Japan.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Akiteru

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the background to, and the recent evolution of general practice as a recognised medical specialism in Japan (2015), and the evolution of a system of training to support this development. We, the general practitioners (GPs) in Japan have not been recognised as one body of medical specialists and have been training in our own way. A new certified training system will commence in 2018, authorised by a new third organisation, the Japanese Medical Specialty Board. An effective educational system has been developed for medical graduates that have a career intention in general practice that is distinct from other basic medical fields, but collaborates with them. A challenge exists to provide clarity to the Japanese population about what the specialty of general practice is, and what professionals in general practice can do for them. Japan currently has approximately 500 certified GPs and it is unclear at present what numbers will eventually be required. This paper reviews some of the challenges facing the development of general practice from the perspective of the Japan Primary Care Association.

  12. The Shrinking of Formalized Nutrition Education in Health Professions Curricula and Postgraduate Training.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Gordon S

    2017-02-01

    The quantity of formalized nutrition education is shrinking in curricula of health professions, such as physicians, nurses, dietitians, and pharmacists. The current nutrition education being taught in U.S. schools of healthcare professionals does not appropriately prepare students for identification of patients at nutrition risk or management of undernourished hospitalized patients with specialized nutrition therapies. In U.S. schools of pharmacy, parenteral nutrition is considered a highly specialized and advanced practice so little time is devoted to this area and more attention is focused on chronic disease state management (ie, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and congestive heart failure). Nutrition support fellowships for physicians and nutrition support residency programs for pharmacists have dwindled in number over the years so that only a handful of these healthcare professionals are produced each year from the remaining formalized programs. Physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and dietitians can positively affect patient care, but each profession must first determine how best to integrate basic and applied nutrition concepts into their professional curricula and training programs. There must also be consensus among the healthcare professions as to the depth of nutrition education and the stage of training at which these integrations should occur. Only by having these crucial conversations among all disciplines will we be able to develop new strategies to expand nutrition education in the training of future medical practitioners.

  13. FESCC survey on accreditation and post-graduate training in clinical chemistry in European countries. Federation of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rossier, M; Blaton, V; Franzini, C; Queralto, J M; Palicka, V

    2000-04-01

    Promotion of the professional growth and development of specialists in the field of clinical chemistry in European countries, and harmonisation of quality assessment and accreditation procedures are listed among the main goals and activities of Federation of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry (FESCC), according to its 1999-2000 strategic plan. The European countries that are members of the European Union are in the process of establishing the "European Register for Clinical Chemists", based on minimum standards of education, training and experience as defined by the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemists (EC4). Many other European countries would like to adapt their system of professional education to this model. Data on post-graduate training in EC4 FESCC members have already been gathered in 1998. However, at the present time, there is no detailed knowledge of pre- and post-graduate professional education of specialists in clinical chemistry in the non-EC4 European countries. FESCC launched a survey in July 1998 in order to gather this information with the hope to start a database about existing systems. All FESCC members received the same questionnaire on accreditation (seven questions) and non-EC4 FESCC members received an additional questionnaire with 11 questions related to post-graduate training in clinical chemistry. The response rate of the 35 FESCC member countries was 93% from the 15 EC4 members (14 responses/15 countries) and 80% from the 20-non-EC4 (16 responses/20 countries). The heterogeneity of the data on post-graduate training in clinical chemistry indicates that a great effort will be needed before harmonisation is reached. These results, however, will provide an interesting basis for further discussion and promotion of post-graduate training in clinical chemistry. The data provided on accreditation show that the total number of accredited laboratories was relatively low in EC4 countries and even lower in non-EC4 members

  14. The Telematics Surgical Training Logbook in Belgium: dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Joris, M

    2015-01-01

    The French Chamber of the Recognition Commission for General Surgery decided to launch the Telematics Surgical Logbook for the academic period 2012-2013 which replaced the previous excel version logbook of surgery. The aim of this article is to describe the process of development, the possibilities and the configuration of this program. In this telematics logbook, statistical feedback is interactive and allows surgeons candidates, supervisors and members of the Commission to follow training in real time. Utilities were developed to make the correlation with the previous logbook allowing all levels trainees to be recruited. Quotas of operations, fixed as 38% of the standard deviation, less than average values, are computed for the different surgical common trunks (after 2, 4 and 6 years). The trainee's autonomy can be estimated by a "corrected fraction" of activity taking into account the heaviness of operations. Until October 2014, 218 surgeons in specialization and 32 supervisors were registered. We counted around 118.000 surgical procedures of which 52.600 were included in comparative statistics. At the end of October 2014 the first 29 annual logbooks, including 4 agreements, were analyzed and closed by the Commission. This telematics tool, able to work on computers, tablets and Smartphones, facilitates the mission of the surgical Commission and gives the cartography of the traineeship organization. Copyright© Acta Chirurgica Belgica.

  15. Implementing clinical ethics in German hospitals: content, didactics and evaluation of a nationwide postgraduate training programme.

    PubMed

    Dörries, Andrea; Simon, Alfred; Neitzke, Gerald; Vollmann, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    The Hannover qualifying programme 'ethics consultation in hospitals', conducted by a four-institution cooperation partnership, is an interdisciplinary, scientifically based programme for healthcare professionals interested in ethics consultation services and is widely acknowledged by hospital managements and healthcare professionals. It is unique concerning its content, scope and teaching format. With its basic and advanced modules it has provided training and education for 367 healthcare professionals with 570 participations since 2003 (until February 2010). One characteristic feature is its attractiveness for health professionals from different backgrounds. Internationally, the Hannover programme is one of the few schedules with both academics and non-academics as target groups and a high participation rate of physicians. The concept of the Hannover programme is in great demand, and its schedule is continuously optimised through evaluation. The goals of enabling healthcare professionals from different professional backgrounds to define and reflect ethical problems, to facilitate and support the process of decision-making and to work out structures for their own institutions seem to have been achieved. However, in order to obtain effective and sustainable results, participation in the programme should be supplemented regularly by in-house training sessions or individual expert consultations. Future challenges include new thematic courses and providing a network for former participants, especially when they come from non-academic hospitals. The network is a reasonable platform to discuss participants' experiences, successes and pitfalls. A further task will be research on how the programme's concept can support the sustainability of ethics structures in the various institutions.

  16. Getting lost in translation? Workplace based assessments in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Ali, Jason M

    2013-10-01

    Workplace based assessments (WBA) are integral to the competence-based surgical training curriculum that currently exists in the UK. The GMC emphasise the value of WBA's as assessments for learning (formative), rather than as assessments of learning (summative). Current implementation of WBA's in the workplace though, is at odds with their intended use, with the formative functions often being overlooked in favour of the summative, as exemplified by the recent announcement that trainees are required to complete a minimum of 40 WBA's a year, an increase from 24. Even before this increase, trainees viewed WBA's as tick-box exercises that negatively impact upon training opportunities. As a result, the tools are commonly misused, often because both trainees and trainers lack understanding of the benefits of full engagement with the formative learning opportunities afforded by WBA's. To aid the transition in mind-set of trainees and trainers to the purpose of assessment in the workplace, the GMC propose the introduction of 'supervised learning events' and 'assessments of performance' to supersede 'WBA's'. The impact of this change and how these will be integrated into surgical training is yet to be seen, but is likely to be a step in the right direction.

  17. Fresh frozen cadaver workshops for advanced vascular surgical training.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Shirley; Cowie, Margaret; Linehan, John; Hamdorf, Jeffery M

    2014-11-01

    Reduction in working hours, streamlined training schemes and increasing use of endovascular techniques has meant a reduction in operative experience for newer vascular surgical trainees, especially those exposures which are not routinely performed such as thoracoabdominal, thoracotomy and retroperitoneal aortic, for example. This paper describes an Advanced Anatomy of Exposure course which was designed and convened at the Clinical Training & Evaluation Centre in Western Australia and uses fresh frozen cadavers. Feedback was obtained from the participants who attended over three courses by questionnaire. Feedback was strongly positive for the course meeting both its learning outcomes and personal learning objectives, and in addition, making a significant contribution to specialty skills. Most participants thought the fresh frozen cadaveric model significantly improved the learning objectives for training. The fresh frozen cadaver is an excellent teaching model highly representative of the living open surgical scenario where advanced trainees and newly qualified consultants can improve their operative confidence and consequently patient safety in vascular surgery. An efficient fresh frozen cadaver teaching programme can benefit many health professionals simultaneously maximizing the use of donated human tissue. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. Consultant outcomes publication and surgical training: Consensus recommendations by the association of surgeons in training.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Helen M; Gokani, Vimal J; Williams, Adam P; Harries, Rhiannon L

    2016-11-01

    Consultant Outcomes Publication (COP) has the longest history in cardiothoracic surgery, where it was introduced in 2005. Subsequently COP has been broadened to include all surgical specialties in NHS England in 2013-14. The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) fully supports efforts to improve patient care and trust in the profession and is keen to overcome potential unintended adverse effects of COP. Identification of these adverse effects is the first step in this process: Firstly, there is a risk that COP may lead to reluctance by consultants to provide trainees with the necessary appropriate primary operator experience to become skilled consultant surgeons for the future. Secondly, COP may lead to inappropriately cautious case selection. This adjusted case mix affects both patients who are denied operations, and also limits the complexity of the case mix to which surgical trainees are exposed. Thirdly, COP undermines efforts to train surgical trainees in non-technical skills and human factors, simply obliterating the critical role of the multidisciplinary team and organisational processes in determining outcomes. This tunnel vision masks opportunities to improve patient care and outcomes at a unit level. It also misinforms the public as to the root causes of adverse events by failing to identify care process deficiencies. Finally, for safe surgical care, graduate retention and morale is important - COP may lead to high calibre trainees opting out of surgical careers, or opting to work abroad. The negative effects of COP on surgical training and trainees must be addressed as high quality surgical training and retention of high calibre graduates is essential for excellent patient care.

  19. Measuring Nontechnical Aspects of Surgical Clinician Development in an Otolaryngology Residency Training Program.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jennifer J; Cunningham, Michael J; Emerick, Kevin G; Gray, Stacey T

    2016-05-01

    Surgical competency requires sound clinical judgment, a systematic diagnostic approach, and integration of a wide variety of nontechnical skills. This more complex aspect of clinician development has traditionally been difficult to measure through standard assessment methods. This study was conducted to use the Clinical Practice Instrument (CPI) to measure nontechnical diagnostic and management skills during otolaryngology residency training; to determine whether there is demonstrable change in these skills between residents who are in postgraduate years (PGYs) 2, 4, and 5; and to evaluate whether results vary according to subspecialty topic or method of administration. Prospective study using the CPI, an instrument with previously established internal consistency, reproducibility, interrater reliability, discriminant validity, and responsiveness to change, in an otolaryngology residency training program. The CPI was used to evaluate progression in residents' ability to evaluate, diagnose, and manage case-based clinical scenarios. A total of 248 evaluations were performed in 45 otolaryngology resident trainees at regular intervals. Analysis of variance with nesting and postestimation pairwise comparisons were used to evaluate total and domain scores according to training level, subspecialty topic, and method of administration. Longitudinal residency educational initiative. Assessment with the CPI during PGYs 2, 4, and 5 of residency. Among the 45 otolaryngology residents (248 CPI administrations), there were a mean (SD) of 5 (3) administrations (range, 1-4) during their training. Total scores were significantly different among PGY levels of training, with lower scores seen in the PGY-2 level (44 [16]) compared with the PGY-4 (64 [13]) or PGY-5 level (69 [13]) (P < .001). Domain scores related to information gathering and organizational skills were acquired earlier in training, while knowledge base and clinical judgment improved later in residency. Trainees

  20. Simulation-based training to teach open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair to surgical residents requires dedicated faculty instruction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, William P; Baril, Donald T; Taha, Odette; Schanzer, Andres; Larkin, Anne C; Bismuth, Jean; Mitchell, Erica L; Messina, Louis M

    2013-07-01

    We assessed the impact of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)-specific simulation training on resident performance in simulated open AAA repair (SOAAAR) and determined whether simulation training required dedicated faculty instruction. We randomized 18 residents (postgraduate years 3-5) to an AAA simulation course consisting of two mandatory practice sessions proctored either by a surgical skills lab coordinator (Group A, n = 8) or by a vascular surgery faculty instructor (Group B, n = 10). All residents received a detailed manual and video demonstrating the technique of open AAA repair. Using a validated tool, vascular faculty who were blinded to resident identity, level of training, and randomization status graded SOAAAR performance via videos that were recorded before and after the course. Characteristics and baseline scores between Groups A and B were not different. Postcourse, there was a no significant improvement in performance in Group A. Group B performance was improved significantly from baseline with regard to task-specific checklist scores (44.1 ± 6.3 vs 34.9 ± .5; P = .02), global rating scores (28.4 ± .6 vs 25.3 ± 5.0; P = .049), and overall assessment of operative competence (P = .02). Time to complete SOAAAR improved in both groups (P = .02). Baseline performance varied significantly with year of training as measured by task-specific checklist scores, global rating scores, final product analysis, time to complete repair, and overall operative competence. Improvement varied inversely with year of training (P < .05) and postcourse scores were equivalent for postgraduate year 3-5 residents. An AAA-specific simulation training course improved resident performance in simulated open AAA repair. Dedicated faculty instruction during the simulation training was required for significant improvement in resident performance. The impact of simulation training was greatest in more junior residents. Procedure-specific simulation training with dedicated faculty can

  1. [Post-graduate gerontology training in Spain: Number, characteristics, and contents taught in master courses].

    PubMed

    Villar, Feliciano; Giuliani, María Florencia; Serrat, Rodrigo

    Population aging raises the need for specialised professionals to address the needs of the elderly. The aim of this paper is to describe the number, characteristics, and contents of the Master degree courses that are currently offered in Spain. There were 32 Master degree courses offered in the 2014-15 academic year. These required at least 60 ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System). At least half of the course credits were based on contents directly related to old age, older people, or aging. An analysis was made that included, information on the institutional affiliation, official status, academic structure, and contents taught. A content analysis was performed on curriculum subjects, in order to classify the courses into multidisciplinary or specialised (with focus either on health, behavioural, or social sciences). Most of the courses required mandatory class attendance, and lasted one academic year (60 ECTS). They also included the completion of a final project and a practicum. The majority (59%) of Master degree courses were classified as multidisciplinary. Of the remaining ones, 19% were labelled as specialised in behavioural sciences, 16% in health sciences, and 2% in social sciences. The field of higher education in gerontology in Spain seems to be consolidated, taking into account indicators such as the number of courses offered, their territorial distribution, or the number of official Master degree courses. While the academic structure of the courses is quite similar, in contrast, their contents and nature are highly diverse, which responds to the different training needs. Copyright © 2016 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of postgraduate training on communication skills teaching: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Observation of performance followed by feedback is the key to good teaching of communication skills in clinical practice. The fact that it occurs rarely is probably due to clinical supervisors’ perceived lack of competence to identify communication skills and give effective feedback. We evaluated the impact of a faculty development programme on communication skills teaching on clinical supervisors’ ability to identify residents’ good and poor communication skills and to discuss them interactively during feedback. Methods We conducted a pre-post controlled study in which clinical supervisors took part to a faculty development program on teaching communication skills in clinical practice. Outcome measures were the number and type of residents’ communication skills identified by supervisors in three videotaped simulated resident-patient encounters and the number and type of communication skills discussed interactively with residents during three feedback sessions. Results 48 clinical supervisors (28 intervention group; 20 control group) participated. After the intervention, the number and type of communication skills identified did not differ between both groups. There was substantial heterogeneity in the number and type of communication skills identified. However, trained participants engaged in interactive discussions with residents on a significantly higher number of communication items (effect sizes 0.53 to 1.77); communication skills items discussed interactively included both structural and patient-centered elements that were considered important to be observed by expert teachers. Conclusions The faculty development programme did not increase the number of communication skills recognised by supervisors but was effective in increasing the number of communication issues discussed interactively in feedback sessions. Further research should explore the respective impact of accurate identification of communication skills and effective teaching

  3. Impact of postgraduate training on communication skills teaching: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Nendaz, Mathieu; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Sommer, Johanna; Gut, Anne; Cerutti, Bernard; van der Vleuten, Cees P; Dolmans, Diana

    2014-04-14

    Observation of performance followed by feedback is the key to good teaching of communication skills in clinical practice. The fact that it occurs rarely is probably due to clinical supervisors' perceived lack of competence to identify communication skills and give effective feedback. We evaluated the impact of a faculty development programme on communication skills teaching on clinical supervisors' ability to identify residents' good and poor communication skills and to discuss them interactively during feedback. We conducted a pre-post controlled study in which clinical supervisors took part to a faculty development program on teaching communication skills in clinical practice. Outcome measures were the number and type of residents' communication skills identified by supervisors in three videotaped simulated resident-patient encounters and the number and type of communication skills discussed interactively with residents during three feedback sessions. 48 clinical supervisors (28 intervention group; 20 control group) participated. After the intervention, the number and type of communication skills identified did not differ between both groups. There was substantial heterogeneity in the number and type of communication skills identified. However, trained participants engaged in interactive discussions with residents on a significantly higher number of communication items (effect sizes 0.53 to 1.77); communication skills items discussed interactively included both structural and patient-centered elements that were considered important to be observed by expert teachers. The faculty development programme did not increase the number of communication skills recognised by supervisors but was effective in increasing the number of communication issues discussed interactively in feedback sessions. Further research should explore the respective impact of accurate identification of communication skills and effective teaching skills on achieving more effective communication

  4. Traditional Versus Simulation Resident Surgical Laparoscopic Salpingectomy Training: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nima R; Makai, Gretchen E; Sloan, Nancy L; Della Badia, Carl R

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the porcine training model for obstetrics-gynecology (OB/GYN) residents in laparoscopic salpingectomy. Randomized, controlled single-blinded trial. Canadian Task Force Classification I. A large community-based teaching hospital. All postgraduate year 1 through year 4 OB/GYN residents were enrolled (n = 22). All participants underwent a preintervention objective skills assessment test (OSAT), in which the participant performed live human laparoscopic salpingectomy. Residents were randomly assigned (using a computer-generated randomization table, in blocks of 2, stratified by ranked baseline OSAT scores) to the intervention or control group. The intervention group consisted of 1 educational session with presession assigned reading, a 40-min didactic lecture, viewing of a procedural video, and simulation and practice of laparoscopic salpingectomy on a porcine cadaver. The control group received traditional training per routine residency rotations. Laparoscopic salpingectomy was performed on live patients by study participants pre- and postintervention. These procedures were video recorded, and then scored by a single blinded evaluator of the OSATs. Nine pre- and postintervention OSAT indicators, reflecting provider knowledge and skill, were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcomes were the changes in 10 subjective measures of comfort, assessed by a pre- and postintervention survey. The outcomes were assessed using 5-point Likert scales (for OSATs 1 = lowest score; for the subjective survey 1 = highest score). The control group OSAT scores did not change (pre: 26.6 ± 10.8, post: 26.2 ± 10.1; p = .65). There were significant improvements in 2-handed surgery (pre: 2.8 ± 1.6, post: 3.5 ± 1.3; p = .004) and use of energy (pre: 2.9 ± 1.3, post: 3.6 ± 1.0; p = .01) in the intervention group, contributing to an overall score change (pre: 26.7 ± 10.6, post: 29.9 ± 9.8; p ≤ .001). The control group had no change in comfort

  5. Communication effectiveness training improves surgical resident teaching ability.

    PubMed

    Barth, R J; Rowland-Morin, P A; Mott, L A; Burchard, K W

    1997-12-01

    An important educational objective of academic surgical programs is to train surgical teachers. Whether formal instruction of surgery residents in general principles of teaching has a role in the achievement of this objective is unproven. We tested whether the teaching ability of surgery residents could be improved by two different interventions: (A) a lecture on communication effectiveness plus home study of their own videotaped lectures and (B) a critical review of their own videotaped lectures with a teaching consultant. Each resident taught four sessions. There was no intervention between sessions 1 and 2; intervention A occurred between sessions 2 and 3; and intervention B, between sessions 3 and 4. Each of the four videotaped sessions was graded for communication effectiveness using a standardized scoring form. There were no significant differences between scores from lectures 1 and 2 (no intervention) or lectures 2 and 3 (intervention A). Intervention B (individualized feedback) resulted in significant improvement in all scores from session 4 compared with sessions 1 and 2: content 3.40 versus 2.98 (p = 0.01), language 3.43 versus 3.22 (p = 0.03), delivery 3.25 versus 2.87 (p = 0.002), and overall 3.43 versus 2.88 (p = 0.002). Surgical resident teaching ability can be improved by communication effectiveness teaching. Individualized feedback is more effective than a lecture combined with self-study.

  6. The Fellowship Council: a decade of impact on surgical training.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Dennis L; Hogle, Nancy J

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this project is to document the history of the Fellowship Council (FC) and report its current impact on surgical training. The need for advanced training in laparoscopic surgery resulted in the rapid development of fellowships for which there was no oversight. Fellowship program directors began meeting in the 1990s and formally created the FC in 2004 to provide that oversight. To obtain information with which to create a narrative of the history of the FC, the authors performed a detailed review of all available minutes from the meetings of the various iterations of the council and its committees between 2001 and 2012. Information about fellowships and meetings of the directors of fellowships prior to 2001 are based on information included in minutes of meetings after 2001. Minimally invasive surgery fellowship program directors in collaboration with surgical societies created the FC to bring order to the application process for residents and program directors. It has evolved into an organization with mature, reliable processes for application, matching, curriculum development, accreditation, and reporting. It now receives applications from more than 30 % of graduating chief residents in general surgery. It has 223 accredited fellowship positions in the following disciplines: Minimally invasive surgery, bariatric/metabolic surgery, Flexible endoscopy, hepato-pancreato-biliary Surgery, colorectal surgery, and Thoracic surgery. The FC provides a reliable, fair process for matching residents with fellowship programs and has successfully expanded its oversight of such programs with mature processes for accreditation, curriculum development, and reporting.

  7. Less than full-time training in surgery: a cross-sectional study evaluating the accessibility and experiences of flexible training in the surgical trainee workforce

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Rhiannon L; Gokani, Vimal J; Smitham, Peter; Fitzgerald, J Edward F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Generational changes in lifestyle expectations, working environments and the feminisation of the medical workforce have seen an increased demand in postgraduate less than full-time training (LTFT). Despite this, concerns remain regarding access to, and information about, flexible training for surgeons. This study aimed to assess the opinions and experiences of LTFT for surgical trainees. Design Prospective, questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. Setting/participants An electronic, self-administered questionnaire was distributed in the UK and Republic of Ireland through mailing lists via the Association of Surgeons in Training and British Orthopedic Trainee Association. Results Overall, 876 completed responses were received, representing all grades of trainee across all 10 surgical specialties. Median age was 33 years and 63.4% were female. Of those who had undertaken LTFT, 92.5% (148/160) were female. Most worked 60% of a full-time post (86/160, 53.8%). The reasons for either choosing or considering LTFT were childrearing (82.7%), caring for a dependent (12.6%) and sporting commitments (6.8%). Males were less likely to list childrearing than females (64.9% vs 87.6%; p<0.0001). Only 38% (60/160) found the application process easy and 53.8% (86/160) experienced undermining behaviour from workplace staff as a result of undertaking LTFT. Of all respondents, an additional 53.7% (385/716) would consider LTFT in future; 27.5% of which were male (106/385). Overall, only 9.9% of all respondents rated current LTFT information as adequate. Common sources of information were other trainees (47.3%), educational supervisors (20.6%) and local postgraduate school website (19.5%). Conclusions Over half of surgical trainees working LTFT have experienced undermining behaviour as a result of their LTFT. Despite a reported need for LTFT in both genders, this remains difficult to organise, access to useful information is poor and negative attitudes among staff remain

  8. The non-medical workforce and its role in surgical training: Consensus recommendations by the Association of Surgeons in Training.

    PubMed

    Gokani, Vimal J; Peckham-Cooper, Adam; Bunting, David; Beamish, Andrew J; Williams, Adam; Harries, Rhiannon L

    2016-11-01

    Changes in the delivery of the healthcare structure have led to the expansion of the non-medical workforce (NMW). The non-medical practitioner in surgery (a healthcare professional without a medical degree who undertakes specialist training) is a valuable addition to a surgical firm. However, there are a number of challenges regarding the successful widespread implementation of this role. This paper outlines a number of these concerns, and makes recommendations to aid the realisation of the non-medical practitioner as a normal part of the surgical team. In summary, the Association of Surgeons in Training welcomes the development of the non-medical workforce as part of the surgical team in order to promote enhanced patient care and improved surgical training opportunities. However, establishing a workforce of independent/semi-independent practitioners who compete for the same training opportunities as surgeons in training may threaten the UK surgical training system, and therefore the care of our future patients.

  9. The Surgical Simulation and Training Markup Language (SSTML): an XML-based language for medical simulation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, James; Tardella, Neil; Pratt, Janey; Hu, John; English, James

    2006-01-01

    Under contract with the Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC), Energid Technologies is developing a new XML-based language for describing surgical training exercises, the Surgical Simulation and Training Markup Language (SSTML). SSTML must represent everything from organ models (including tissue properties) to surgical procedures. SSTML is an open language (i.e., freely downloadable) that defines surgical training data through an XML schema. This article focuses on the data representation of the surgical procedures and organ modeling, as they highlight the need for a standard language and illustrate the features of SSTML. Integration of SSTML with software is also discussed.

  10. ‘Why do an MPH?’ Motivations and intentions of physicians undertaking postgraduate public health training at the University of Cape Town

    PubMed Central

    Zweigenthal, Virginia E.M.; Marquez, Emma; London, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Background Public health (PH) approaches underpin the management and transformation of health systems in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the Master of Public Health (MPH) rarely being a prerequisite for health service employment in South Africa, many physicians pursue MPH qualifications. Objectives This study identifies their motivations and career intentions and explored MPH programme strengths and gaps in under- and post-graduate PH training. Design A cross-sectional study using an online questionnaire was completed by physicians graduating with an MPH between 2000 and 2009 and those enrolled in the programme in 2010 at the University of Cape Town. Results Nearly a quarter of MPH students were physicians. Of the 65 contactable physicians, 48% responded. They were mid-career physicians who wished to obtain research training (55%), who wished to gain broader perspectives on health (32%), and who used the MPH to advance careers (90%) as researchers, policy-makers, or managers. The MPH widened professional opportunities, with 62% changing jobs. They believed that inadequate undergraduate exposure should be remedied by applying PH approaches to clinical problems in community settings, which would increase the attractiveness of postgraduate PH training. Conclusions The MPH allows physicians to transition from pure clinical to research, policy and/or management work, preparing them to innovate changes for effective health systems, responsive to the health needs of populations. Limited local job options and incentives are important constraining factors. Advocacy for positions requiring qualifications and benchmarking exit competencies of programmes nationally may promote enrolment. PMID:27741958

  11. [Board-certifying systems of the Japan Surgical Society and subspecialty surgical societies].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Satoshi

    2009-05-01

    In postgraduate training courses to develop superior surgeons with both general and subspecialty surgery competence, board-certifying systems play an important role as guideposts. The board-certified surgeon designation of the Japan Surgical Society as the first guidepost has provided the foundations for board-certified surgeon systems of subspecialty surgical societies as the second guidepost. A committee consisting of representatives from nine surgical societies has been working actively to make these board-certifying systems more reasonable and consistent.

  12. Training forward surgical teams: do military-civilian collaborations work?

    PubMed

    Schulman, Carl I; Graygo, Jill; Wilson, Katherine; Robinson, Donald B; Garcia, George; Augenstein, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The US Army and the Ryder Trauma Center (Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida) teamed up to provide a training environment (ie, the Army Trauma Training Center) in which forward surgical teams can attend to gain critical teamwork and trauma technical skills to prepare for deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. The purpose of this study was to gather trainee reactions to the military-civilian collaboration provided at ATTC after deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. Survey respondents were 135 US Army personnel (an approximately 50% response rate) who participated in the ATTC 2-week team training program between January 2005 and June 2007. The survey asked questions pertaining to their experience in the resuscitation unit and patient contact at the trauma center. Over 90% of participants agreed or strongly agreed that training in the resuscitation area was beneficial. A majority of participants also agreed or strongly agreed that the patient contact experience was sufficient (78.5%), was a good learning opportunity (90%), and that the experience was a good opportunity to apply what they had learned in their classroom training (over 80%). Areas of suggested improvement included the importance of clarifying roles between the ATTC trainees and the Ryder Trauma Center residents and interns. Trainees would have preferred an extension of the training as a whole, as they felt it was rushed in order to fit all training opportunities into the 2 weeks that they were in Miami. Finally, trainees noted the lack of injuries admitted to the trauma center which replicate injuries caused by blasts (ie, improvised explosive devices). The results of our efforts indicate that military-civilian collaborations do in fact work and are beneficial to both military and civilian medical providers. The opportunity to perform as a team in their respective roles, to respond to a variety of actual trauma patients, and access to civilian medical providers were beneficial. As mentioned, such

  13. [Methodical aspects of postgraduate education of family physicians in internship].

    PubMed

    Koshlia, V I; Dmitrieva, S N; Zelenskaia, L M; Puzik, S G; Shcheblykina, N K; Odrinskiĭ, V A

    2006-06-01

    The article presents some methodical issues on postgraduate education of physicians studying at Zaporozhye Institute for advanced physicians training, chair of family medicin. The authors showed the priority of programmed learning and modern educational technologies in postgraduate education of physicians.

  14. Primary Teachers' Professional Training in the System of Postgraduate Education in the Light of Differentiating Teaching: Irish Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotsuliak, Kateryna

    2015-01-01

    Different information sources, namely National Strategy for Higher Education to 2030 (Ireland), Introduction to Primary School Curriculum (1999), (Ireland), Primary Professional Development Service--Differentiation in Action, Ireland's official postgraduate study website, the Strategic Plan 2012-2016 of Mary Immaculate College, Limerick…

  15. Primary Teachers' Professional Training in the System of Postgraduate Education in the Light of Differentiating Teaching: Irish Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotsuliak, Kateryna

    2015-01-01

    Different information sources, namely National Strategy for Higher Education to 2030 (Ireland), Introduction to Primary School Curriculum (1999), (Ireland), Primary Professional Development Service--Differentiation in Action, Ireland's official postgraduate study website, the Strategic Plan 2012-2016 of Mary Immaculate College, Limerick…

  16. The Implementation of Modern Information and Documentation Systems and Services with Special Reference to Information Needs in Eastern Africa. Advanced Postgraduate Training Course (3rd, Great Britain and the Federal Republic of Germany, June 22-August 1, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    German Foundation for International Development, Bonn (West Germany).

    The 7-week Advanced Postgraduate Training Course for Information Specialists from Eastern and Southern Africa described in this document was part of a long term training program designed to provide senior librarians, documentalists, and archivists with information on recent developments in methodology and technology in their special field of work.…

  17. A Clinically Integrated Post-Graduate Training Programme in Evidence-Based Medicine versus ‘No Intervention’ for Improving Disability Evaluations: A Cluster Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Rob; Hoving, Jan L.; Smits, Paul B. A.; Ketelaar, Sarah M.; van Dijk, Frank J. H.; Verbeek, Jos H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although several studies have shown that teaching EBM is effective in improving knowledge, at present, there is no convincing evidence that teaching EBM also changes professional behaviour in practice. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinically integrated post-graduate training programme in EBM on evidence-based disability evaluation. Methods and Findings In a cluster randomised controlled trial, fifty-four case-based learning groups consisting of 132 physicians and 1680 patients were randomly assigned to the intervention or control groups. A clinically integrated, post-graduate, 5-day training programme in evidence-based medicine, consisting of (home) assignments, peer teaching, interactive training in searching databases, lectures and brainstorming sessions was provided to the intervention group. The control group received no training. The primary outcome was evidence-based disability evaluation, as indicated by the frequency in use of evidence of sufficient quality in disability evaluation reports. There are no general EBM behaviour outcome measures available. Therefore, we followed general guidelines for constructing performance indicators and defined an a priori cut-off for determination of sufficient quality as recommended for evaluating EB training. Physicians trained in EBM performed more evidence-based disability evaluations compared to physicians in the control group (difference in absolute proportion 9.7%, 95% CI 3.5 to 15.9). The primary outcome differences between groups remained significant after both cluster-adjusted analysis and additional sensitivity analyses accounting for subjects lost to follow-up. Conclusions A EBM programme successfully improved the use of evidence in a non-hospital based medical specialty. Our findings support the general recommendations to use multiple educational methods to change physician behaviour. In addition, it appeared important that the professional context

  18. Perioperative feedback in surgical training: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    McKendy, Katherine M; Watanabe, Yusuke; Lee, Lawrence; Bilgic, Elif; Enani, Ghada; Feldman, Liane S; Fried, Gerald M; Vassiliou, Melina C

    2017-07-01

    Changes in surgical training have raised concerns about residents' operative exposure and preparedness for independent practice. One way of addressing this concern is by optimizing teaching and feedback in the operating room (OR). The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review on perioperative teaching and feedback. A systematic literature search identified articles from 1994 to 2014 that addressed teaching, feedback, guidance, or debriefing in the perioperative period. Data was extracted according to ENTREQ guidelines, and a qualitative analysis was performed. Thematic analysis of the 26 included studies identified four major topics. Observation of teaching behaviors in the OR described current teaching practices. Identification of effective teaching strategies analyzed teaching behaviors, differentiating positive and negative teaching strategies. Perceptions of teaching behaviors described resident and attending satisfaction with teaching in the OR. Finally models for delivering structured feedback cited examples of feedback strategies and measured their effectiveness. This study provides an overview of perioperative teaching and feedback for surgical trainees and identifies a need for improved quality and quantity of structured feedback. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Current US military operations and implications for military surgical training.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Joshua A; Clive, Kevin S; White, Christopher E; Beekley, Alec C; Blackbourne, Lorne H

    2010-11-01

    Since 2001, US military surgeons have deployed frequently, with many surgeons deploying within 1 year of graduating residency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate readiness of recent graduates to manage combat-related injuries and to make recommendations for improvements in training military surgeons. We reviewed casualties treated at the 31st Combat Support Hospital in Baghdad from December 2003 to November 2004. We identified 3,426 wounded patients; of these, 2,648 (77.3%) required an operative procedure. There were 2,788 patients (81.4%) who sustained penetrating injuries. The most common procedures performed were debridement of wounds (39%), skeletal fixation (14.7%), and exploratory laparotomy (11.4%). Common procedures were compared with 15 case logs from the ACGME database for our institution from 2005 to 2009. Graduating residents averaged 973 cases during residency (range 867 to 1,293, median 921). This included experience with most procedures encountered except nephrectomy (1.5 procedures per resident [PPR]), craniotomy (1.1 PPRs), inferior vena cava injury (1.1 PPRs), bladder repair (0.87 PPR), and duodenal injury (0.6 PPR). Residents had minimal experience with skeletal fixation and external genital trauma. Recent surgical residency graduates are prepared for deployment in support of US military operations for the majority of injuries encountered. However, familiarization with procedures that fall outside the traditional general surgical curriculum would improve their ability to treat these injuries. To enhance experience with rare injuries, cadaver studies and animal models may serve as training tools before deployment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Improving comprehensive surgical resident training through use of the NEO Five-Factor Personality Inventory: results from a cohort-based trial.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Irwin B; Horwitz, Sujin K; Brunicardi, F Charles; Awad, Samir S

    2011-06-01

    This study uses the NEO-Five Factor Personality Inventory (NEO) to assess its value in identifying resident educational needs. A cohort of surgical residents (n = 65) were administered the NEO. Statistical analysis compared the results between previously determined national norms and between varying resident demographics. The resident scores of Extroversion, Openness, and Conscientiousness were significantly higher than those of the US population and Agreeableness was significantly lower. By gender, only Agreeableness was statistically higher for female residents. The mean Extroversion score for residents who were postgraduate years (PGYs) 3 to 5 was significantly higher than that of PGYs 1 to 2. Further subanalyses were conducted on each primary component. The NEO was valuable for identifying areas where training could be especially useful to augment Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies. The use of this test on resident populations could be of significant value for tailoring comprehensive surgical leadership education programs. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Accelerating surgical training and reducing the burden of surgical disease in Haiti before and after the earthquake.

    PubMed

    DeGennaro, Vincent A; DeGennaro, Vincent A; Kochhar, Amit; Nathan, Nirmal; Low, Christopher; Avashia, Yash J; Thaller, Seth R

    2012-11-01

    In general, university-based global health initiatives have tended to focus on expanding access to primary care. In the past, surgical programs may have been characterized by sporadic participation with little educational focus. However, there have been some notable exceptions with plastic surgery volunteer missions. We offer another model of regularly scheduled surgical trips to rural Haiti in plastic and general surgery. The goal of these trips is to reduce the burden of surgical disease and ultimately repair every cleft lip/palate in Haiti. Another principal objective is to accelerate the training of American residents through increased case load and personal interaction with attending surgeons in a concentrated period. Diversity of the case load and the overall number of surgeries performed by residents in a typical surgical trip outpaces the experiences available during a typical week in an American hospital setting. More importantly, we continue to provide ongoing training to Haitian nurses and surgeons in surgical techniques and postoperative care. Our postoperative complication rate has been relatively low. Our follow-up rates have been lower than 70% despite intensive attempts to maintain continued communication with our patients. Through our experiences in surgical care in rural Haiti, we were able to quickly ramp up our trauma and orthopedic surgical care immediately after the earthquake. Project Medishare and the University of Miami continue to operate a trauma and acute care hospital in Port au Prince. The hospital provides ongoing orthopedic, trauma, and neurosurgical expertise from the rotating teams of American surgeons and training of Haitian surgeons in modern surgical techniques. We believe that surgical residencies in the United States can improve their training programs and reduce global surgical burden of disease through consistent trips and working closely with country partners.

  2. The national portfolio for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a descriptive study of acceptability, educational impact, and usefulness for assessment.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Louis; Mash, Bob; Derese, Anselme

    2013-07-25

    Since 2007 a portfolio of learning has become a requirement for assessment of postgraduate family medicine training by the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa. A uniform portfolio of learning has been developed and content validity established among the eight postgraduate programmes. The aim of this study was to investigate the portfolio's acceptability, educational impact, and perceived usefulness for assessment of competence. Two structured questionnaires of 35 closed and open-ended questions were delivered to 53 family physician supervisors and 48 registrars who had used the portfolio. Categorical and nominal/ordinal data were analysed using simple descriptive statistics. The open-ended questions were analysed with ATLAS.ti software. Half of registrars did not find the portfolio clear, practical or feasible. Workshops on portfolio use, learning, and supervision were supported, and brief dedicated time daily for reflection and writing. Most supervisors felt the portfolio reflected an accurate picture of learning, but just over half of registrars agreed. While the portfolio helped with reflection on learning, participants were less convinced about how it helped them plan further learning. Supervisors graded most rotations, suggesting understanding the summative aspect, while only 61% of registrars reflected on rotations, suggesting the formative aspects are not yet optimally utilised. Poor feedback, the need for protected academic time, and pressure of service delivery impacting negatively on learning. This first introduction of a national portfolio for postgraduate training in family medicine in South Africa faces challenges similar to those in other countries. Acceptability of the portfolio relates to a clear purpose and guide, flexible format with tools available in the workplace, and appreciating the changing educational environment from university-based to national assessments. The role of the supervisor in direct observations of the registrar and dedicated

  3. The national portfolio for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a descriptive study of acceptability, educational impact, and usefulness for assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since 2007 a portfolio of learning has become a requirement for assessment of postgraduate family medicine training by the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa. A uniform portfolio of learning has been developed and content validity established among the eight postgraduate programmes. The aim of this study was to investigate the portfolio’s acceptability, educational impact, and perceived usefulness for assessment of competence. Methods Two structured questionnaires of 35 closed and open-ended questions were delivered to 53 family physician supervisors and 48 registrars who had used the portfolio. Categorical and nominal/ordinal data were analysed using simple descriptive statistics. The open-ended questions were analysed with ATLAS.ti software. Results Half of registrars did not find the portfolio clear, practical or feasible. Workshops on portfolio use, learning, and supervision were supported, and brief dedicated time daily for reflection and writing. Most supervisors felt the portfolio reflected an accurate picture of learning, but just over half of registrars agreed. While the portfolio helped with reflection on learning, participants were less convinced about how it helped them plan further learning. Supervisors graded most rotations, suggesting understanding the summative aspect, while only 61% of registrars reflected on rotations, suggesting the formative aspects are not yet optimally utilised. Poor feedback, the need for protected academic time, and pressure of service delivery impacting negatively on learning. Conclusion This first introduction of a national portfolio for postgraduate training in family medicine in South Africa faces challenges similar to those in other countries. Acceptability of the portfolio relates to a clear purpose and guide, flexible format with tools available in the workplace, and appreciating the changing educational environment from university-based to national assessments. The role of the supervisor in direct

  4. Improving the future of surgical training and education: consensus recommendations from the Association of Surgeons in Training.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J E F; Giddings, C E B; Khera, G; Marron, C D

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade surgical training in the United Kingdom (UK) has seen radical overhaul with the introduction of formal training curricula, competency based assessment, and a new Core Surgical Training programme. Despite this, and in common with many other countries, numerous threats remain to sustaining high-quality surgical training and education in the modern working environment. These include service delivery pressures and the reduction in working hours. There are numerous areas for potential improvement and dissemination of best training practice, from incentivising training within the National Health Service (NHS) through top-down government initiatives, to individualised information and feedback for trainees at the front-line. This document sets out the current structure of surgical training in the UK, and describes the contribution to the current debate by the Association of Surgeons in Training. Highlighting areas for improvement at national, regional, local and individual levels, the Association proposes 34 action points to enhance surgical training and education. Adoption of these will ensure future practice continues to improve on, and learn from, the longstanding history of training provided under the guidance of the Royal Surgical Colleges.

  5. Multimedia-based training on Internet platforms improves surgical performance: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pape-Koehler, Carolina; Immenroth, Marc; Sauerland, Stefan; Lefering, Rolf; Lindlohr, Cornelia; Toaspern, Jens; Heiss, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Surgical procedures are complex motion sequences that require a high level of preparation, training, and concentration. In recent years, Internet platforms providing surgical content have been established. Used as a surgical training method, the effect of multimedia-based training on practical surgical skills has not yet been evaluated. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of multimedia-based training on surgical performance. A 2 × 2 factorial, randomized controlled trial with a pre- and posttest design was used to test the effect of multimedia-based training in addition to or without practical training on 70 participants in four groups defined by the intervention used: multimedia-based training, practical training, and combination training (multimedia-based training + practical training) or no training (control group). The pre- and posttest consisted of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a Pelvi-Trainer and was video recorded, encoded, and saved on DVDs. These were evaluated by blinded raters using a modified objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS). The main evaluation criterion was the difference in OSATS score between the pre- and posttest (ΔOSATS) results in terms of a task-specific checklist (procedural steps scored as correct or incorrect). The groups were homogeneous in terms of demographic parameters, surgical experience, and pretest OSATS scores. The ΔOSATS results were highest in the multimedia-based training group (4.7 ± 3.3; p < 0.001). The practical training group achieved 2.5 ± 4.3 (p = 0.028), whereas the combination training group achieved 4.6 ± 3.5 (p < 0.001), and the control group achieved 0.8 ± 2.9 (p = 0.294). Multimedia-based training improved surgical performance significantly and thus could be considered a reasonable tool for inclusion in surgical curricula.

  6. Vascular Surgical Emergencies: How will Future Surgeons be Trained?

    PubMed Central

    Richards, T; Pittathankal, AA; Kahn, PY; Magee, TR; Lewis, MH; Galland, RB

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We wished to assess whether pattern and impact of emergency vascular surgical referrals has altered since a previous study in 1990. Following introduction of shift working patterns, we wished to assess how these changes may affect vascular training and vascular on-call cover. PATIENTS AND METHODS Prospective survey of emergency vascular referrals at two district general hospitals (DGH-R and DGH-L) in 2003. DGH-R received only regional referrals whereas DGH-L also received ‘next day’ referrals from a smaller hospital. Results were compared between centres and with a previous study undertaken at DGH-R in 1990. RESULTS From 1990 to 2003 emergency vascular referrals at DGH-R increased by 51% (53 to 80). The number seen at DGH-R and DGH-L were similar in 2003. There were significantly more out-of-hours referrals in DGH-R than DGH-L (59% versus 35%; P = 0.0123). Referrals were more likely to be seen initially by the vascular team at DGH-L than DGH-R (80% versus 47%, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Vascular emergency referrals have increased. A trainee was likely to see more emergency referrals at DGH-L than DGH-R. This may impact on future training. PMID:17132313

  7. Systematic video game training in surgical novices improves performance in virtual reality endoscopic surgical simulators: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Schlickum, Marcus Kolga; Hedman, Leif; Enochsson, Lars; Kjellin, Ann; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies have shown a correlation between previous video game experience and performance in minimally invasive surgical simulators. The hypothesis is that systematic video game training with high visual-spatial demands and visual similarity to endoscopy would show a transfer effect on performance in virtual reality endoscopic surgical simulation. A prospective randomized study was performed. Thirty surgical novices were matched and randomized to five weeks of systematic video game training in either a first-person shooter game (Half Life) with high visual-spatial demands and visual similarities to endoscopy or a video game with mainly cognitive demands (Chessmaster). A matched control group (n = 10) performed no video game training during five weeks. Performance in two virtual reality endoscopic surgical simulators (MIST-VR and GI Mentor II) was measured pre- and post-training. Before simulator training we also controlled for students' visual-spatial ability, visual working memory, age, and previous video game experience. The group training with Half Life showed significant improvement in two GI Mentor II variables and the MIST-VR task MD level medium. The group training with Chessmaster only showed an improvement in the MIST-VR task. No effect was observed in the control group. As recently shown in other studies, current and previous video game experience was important for simulator performance. Systematic video game training improved surgical performance in advanced virtual reality endoscopic simulators. The transfer effect increased when increasing visual similarity. The performance in intense, visual-spatially challenging video games might be a predictive factor for the outcome in surgical simulation.

  8. Society of Neurological Surgeons boot camp courses: knowledge retention and relevance of hands-on learning after 6 months of postgraduate year 1 training.

    PubMed

    Selden, Nathan R; Anderson, Valerie C; McCartney, Shirley; Origitano, Thomas C; Burchiel, Kim J; Barbaro, Nicholas M

    2013-09-01

    In July 2010, the Society of Neurological Surgeons (SNS) introduced regional courses to promote patient safety and teach fundamental skills and knowledge to all postgraduate Year 1 (PGY1) trainees entering Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited US neurosurgery residency programs. Data from these courses demonstrated significant didactic learning and high faculty and resident satisfaction with hands-on training. Here, the authors evaluated the durability of learning from and the relevance of participation in SNS PGY1 courses as measured midway through PGY1 training. Resident participants were resurveyed 6 months after boot camp course attendance to assess knowledge retention and course effectiveness. Exposure to relevant hands-on experiences during PGY1 training and the subjective value of pre-residency simulated training in the courses were assessed. Ninety-four percent of all residents entering US PGY1 neurosurgical training participated in the 2010 SNS boot camp courses. One hundred sixty-four (88%) of these resident participants responded to the survey. Six months after course completion, 99% of respondents believed the boot camp courses benefited beginning neurosurgery residents and imparted skills and knowledge that would improve patient care. The PGY1 residents' knowledge of information taught in the courses was retained 6 months after initial testing (p < 0.0001). The learning and other benefits of participation in a national curriculum for residents entering PGY1 neurosurgical training were maintained 6 months after the courses, halfway through the initial training year.

  9. Transfer of systematic computer game training in surgical novices on performance in virtual reality image guided surgical simulators.

    PubMed

    Kolga Schlickum, Marcus; Hedman, Leif; Enochsson, Lars; Kjellin, Ann; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2008-01-01

    We report on a pilot study that investigates the transfer effect of systematic computer game training on performance in image guided surgery. In a group of 22 surgical novices, subjects were matched and randomized into one group training with a 3-D first person shooter (FPS) game and one group training with a 2-D non-FPS game. We also included a control group. Subjects were tested pre- and post training in the MIST-VR and GI-Mentor surgical simulators. We found that subjects with past experience specific to FPS games were significantly better in performing the simulated endoscopy task, both regarding time and efficiency of screening, compared to subjects lacking FPS game experience. Furthermore subjects who underwent systematic FPS game training performed better in the MIST-VR than those training with a 2-D game. Our findings indicate a transfer effect and that experience of video games are important for training outcome in simulated surgical procedures. Video game training can become useful when designing future skills training curricula for surgeons.

  10. [Role of a credit system in the development of continuous postgraduate training of physicians within the framework of the innovation educational space formation program of the I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy].

    PubMed

    Vyzhigina, M A; Buniatian, A A; Sizova, Zh M; Protopopova, T A; Zaugol'nikova, T V; Zhukova, S G

    2007-01-01

    Russia 's joining the European higher educational space and an increase in the international competitive capacity of the European higher educational system envisage first of all that the European credit test system (ECTS) should be accepted and introduced into all national higher educational schools, which ensures both credit test and cumulative functions and guarantees the academic recognition of the education abroad. The issues of modernization of approaches to reforming the continuous postgraduate training of physicians, by using the credit test system, as well as new forms and technologies for an educational process in accordance with the European educational system principles are under discussion. The novelty of the proposed development is that the credit test system is first applied to the continuous postgraduate training of physicians within the framework of the Russian higher medical educational system. The Russian continuous postgraduate medical training pattern that is common in form and content is proposed in accordance with the Bologna declaration principles; approaches have been developed to incorporating the European educational traditions into the Russian national continuous postgraduate medical training system, by employing the credit test system; criteria have been elaborated for adapting the European credit test system at all stages of reformation of the Russian educational system; guidelines have been worked out for the conversion of academic load of various forms of the continuous postgraduate training of physicians to the credit test system; ways of introducing the new forms and technologies into an educational process have been proposed in accordance with the European education system principles, by taking into account the credit test system. The introduction of new technologies of an educational process, by using the credit test system will contribute to personality formation in a physician who has a high competence, a capacity for valuable

  11. Smart Dry Lab: An Augmented Reality (AR) Based Surgical Training Box.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Smart Dry Lab (SDL) is a low-cost, AR-based surgical training box, using the ARToolKit API. This is an add-on function for existing surgical training box, which enables quantitative evaluation of forceps maneuver and simulation of soft tissue deformation. In this paper we demonstrate functionality of our prototype system.

  12. A Job Survey of the Manpower, Personnel and Training Analysis Community in Relation to the Naval Postgraduate School Curriculum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    School AREA I WORK UNIT NUMIERS Monterey, California 93943-5100 II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE June 1985 Naval Postgraduate...considered specific areas of work, skills required to perform satisfactorily in the billets, the relation- ship of the Educational Skill Requirements of...V Secondary Officer Subspecialty Code .. ..... 31 VI Billet Code ................... 32 VII Number of Tours ................. 33 VIII Summary of Areas

  13. Financial impact of surgical training on hospital economics: an income analysis of 1184 out-patient clinic consultations.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J E F; Ravindra, P; Lepore, M; Armstrong, A; Bhangu, A; Maxwell-Armstrong, C A

    2013-01-01

    In many countries healthcare commissioning bodies (state or insurance-based) reimburse hospitals for their activity. The costs associated with post-graduate clinical training as part of this are poorly understood. This study quantified the financial revenue generated by surgical trainees in the out-patient clinic setting. A retrospective analysis of surgical out-patient ambulatory care appointments under 6 full-time equivalent Consultants (Attendings) in one hospital over 2 months. Clinic attendance lists were generated from the Patient Access System. Appointments were categorised as: 'new', 'review' or 'procedure' as per the Department of Health Payment by Results (PbR) Outpatient Tariff (Outpatient Treatment Function Code 104; Outpatient Procedure Code OPRSI1). During the study period 78 clinics offered 1184 appointments; 133 of these were not attended (11.2%). Of those attended 1029 had sufficient detail for analysis (98%). 261 (25.4%) patients were seen by a trainee. Applying PbR reimbursement criteria to these gave a projected annual income of £GBP 218,712 (€EU 266,527; $USD 353,657) generated by 6 surgical trainees (Residents). This is equivalent to approximately £GBP 36,452 (€EU 44,415; $USD 58,943) per trainee annually compared to £GBP 48,732 (€EU 59,378; $USD 78,800) per Consultant. This projected yearly income off-set 95% of the trainee's basic salary. Surgical trainees generated a quarter of the out-patient clinic activity related income in this study, with each trainee producing three-quarters of that generated by a Consultant. This offers considerable commercial value to hospitals. Although this must offset productivity differences and overall running costs, training bodies should ensure hospitals offer an appropriate return. In a competitive market hospitals could be invited to compete for trainees, with preference given to those providing excellence in training. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  14. Designing post-graduate Master's degree programs: the advanced training program in Dental Functional Analysis and Therapy as one example

    PubMed Central

    Ratzmann, Anja; Ruge, Sebastian; Ostendorf, Kristin; Kordaß, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The decision to consolidate European higher education was reached by the Bologna Conference. Based on the Anglo-American system, a two-cycle degree program (Bachelor and Master) has been introduced. Subjects culminating in a state examination, such as Medicine and Dentistry, were excluded from this reform. Since the state examination is already comparable in its caliber to a Master’s degree in Medicine or Dentistry, only advanced Master’s degree programs with post-graduate specializations come into consideration for these subjects. In the field of dentistry numerous post-graduate study programs are increasingly coming into existence. Many different models and approaches are being pursued. Method: Since the 2004-2005 winter semester, the University of Greifswald has offered the Master’s degree program in Dental Functional Analysis and Therapy. Two and a half years in duration, this program is structured to allow program participation while working and targets licensed dentists who wish to attain certified skills for the future in state-of-the-art functional analysis and therapy. Aim: The design of this post-graduate program and the initial results of the evaluation by alumni are presented here. Conclusion: Our experiences show that the conceptual idea of an advanced Master’s program has proved successful. The program covers a specialty which leads to increased confidence in handling challenging patient cases. The sharing of experiences among colleagues was evaluated as being especially important. PMID:24872853

  15. Participants’ Perceptions of a Multidisciplinary Training Program for Graduate and Postgraduate Students in Drug Use Management and Policy

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Patricia; Langille-Ingram, Ethel

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine graduate and postgraduate students’ perceptions of a drug use management and policy program that applied wide-ranging policy research skills to inform pharmaceutical decision-making. Design. Nine cohorts of graduate and postgraduate students from diverse academic and professional backgrounds were paired with health-system preceptors for 4 months, and supported by faculty advisors and administrators, to complete research projects that generated evidence to inform policy decisions. Assessment. A self-administered survey instrument was sent to all alumni of the program over the previous 10 years. The majority of respondents indicated: their prior academic coursework could be applied to everyday life; service-learning projects complemented university programs; participation led to greater awareness of decision-makers’ needs and appreciation of their tacit knowledge; and communication abilities were enhanced with decision-makers, and academics. Many also reported personal desire to fulfill healthcare-system research needs; personal belief in their ability to make a difference; and increased postgraduation marketability. Conclusion. A drug use management and policy program allowed graduate students from various disciplines to develop new skills and collaborate with experts to produce research evidence that was relevant to drug policy that addressed real-world problems. PMID:23788813

  16. Participants' perceptions of a multidisciplinary training program for graduate and postgraduate students in drug use management and policy.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Patricia; Sketris, Ingrid; Langille-Ingram, Ethel

    2013-06-12

    To determine graduate and postgraduate students' perceptions of a drug use management and policy program that applied wide-ranging policy research skills to inform pharmaceutical decision-making. Nine cohorts of graduate and postgraduate students from diverse academic and professional backgrounds were paired with health-system preceptors for 4 months, and supported by faculty advisors and administrators, to complete research projects that generated evidence to inform policy decisions. A self-administered survey instrument was sent to all alumni of the program over the previous 10 years. The majority of respondents indicated: their prior academic coursework could be applied to everyday life; service-learning projects complemented university programs; participation led to greater awareness of decision-makers' needs and appreciation of their tacit knowledge; and communication abilities were enhanced with decision-makers, and academics. Many also reported personal desire to fulfill healthcare-system research needs; personal belief in their ability to make a difference; and increased postgraduation marketability. A drug use management and policy program allowed graduate students from various disciplines to develop new skills and collaborate with experts to produce research evidence that was relevant to drug policy that addressed real-world problems.

  17. Supply versus demand: a review of application trends to Canadian surgical training programs.

    PubMed

    Austin, Ryan E; Wanzel, Kyle R

    2015-04-01

    Despite increases in medical school enrolment, applications to surgical residency programs in Canada have been in decline over the past decade, with an increasing number of unmatched surgical residency positions. We examined the current status of surgical residency in Canada and analyzed application trends (2002–2013) for surgical training programs across Canada. Our findings suggest that most undergraduate medical schools across Canada are having difficulty fostering interest in surgical careers. We propose that a lack of adequate early exposure to the surgical specialties during undergraduate training is a critical factor. Moving forward, we must examine how the best-performing institutions and surgical programs have maintained interest in pursuing surgical careers and adapt our recruitment methods to both maintain and grow future interest. As Mary Engelbreit said, "If you don't like something, change it; if you can't change it, change the way you think about it."

  18. Current and future use of surgical skills training laboratories in orthopaedic resident education: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Karam, Matthew D; Pedowitz, Robert A; Natividad, Hazel; Murray, Jayson; Marsh, J Lawrence

    2013-01-02

    Acquisition of surgical skills through laboratory-based training and simulation is appealing to surgical training programs. The purpose of this study was to provide baseline information on the current use of surgical skills training laboratories in orthopaedic resident education and to determine the interest in expansion of these facilities and training techniques. The creation of the survey was a collaborative effort between the authors and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Two online versions of the Surgical Skills Simulation survey were created, one (with twenty-three items) specifically for program directors and one (with fourteen items) for orthopaedic residents. The survey was sent via e-mail to 185 program directors and 4549 residents. Data were retrieved and analyzed by the AAOS Department of Research and Scientific Affairs. Eighty-six (46%) of the 185 surveys distributed to orthopaedic surgery residency directors and 687 (15%) of the 4549 distributed to orthopaedic surgery residents were completed. Seventy-six percent of the program directors reported having a surgical skills laboratory, and 46% of these reported having a structured surgical skills laboratory curriculum. Fifty-eight percent of program directors and 83% of residents believed that surgical skill improvement by orthopaedic residents was not being objectively measured. Both 80% of program directors and 86% of residents agreed that surgical skills simulations should become a required part of training, and 82% and 76% were interested in a standardized surgical skills curriculum. Eighty-seven percent of program directors identified a lack of available funding as the most substantial barrier to development of a formal surgical skills program at their institution. There was strong agreement among both program directors and residents that surgical skills laboratories and simulation technology should be a required component of orthopaedic resident training. At the present time, the

  19. Low cost silicone renal replicas for surgical training - technical note.

    PubMed

    Smektala, T; Goląb, A; Królikowski, M; Slojewski, M

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this brief report was to present and evaluate workflow of preparation of lowcost individual silicone replicas of kidneys for laparoscopic training and surgical simulation of difficult nephron sparing surgeries. The work flow consists of four steps: 1.Image segmentation; 2.Casting mould designing; 3.Manufacturing of casting mould; 4.Silicone replica casting. To evaluate the cost and time required to execute the presented method, authors prepared 5 silicone models for 5 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic kidney tumorectomy due to renal cell cancer. Average times of image segmentation, casting mould design, casting mould printing and pouring of silicon replicas were 94 min, 22 min, 14 h and 30 min, respectively. Average costs of casting mould printing and casting of silicon replica were 14.4$ and 7.4$ respectively. The presented technique is simple to perform and beyond basic 3D printer it does not require any other expensive equipment. The final silicone model reproduces shape and elasticity of the living organ and has similar mechanical strength. These properties of silicone replica in combination with the presented technique can be used to prepare other artificial organs, ready for a simulation of treatment.

  20. Recent Advances in Forward Surgical Team Training at the U.S. Army Trauma Training Department.

    PubMed

    Allen, Casey J; Straker, Richard J; Murray, Clark R; Hannay, William M; Hanna, Mena M; Meizoso, Jonathan P; Manning, Ronald J; Schulman, Carl I; Seery, Jason M; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2016-06-01

    U.S. Army Forward Surgical Teams (FSTs) are elite, multidisciplinary units that are highly mobile, and rapidly deployable. The mission of the FST is to provide resuscitative and damage control surgery for stabilization of life-threatening injuries in austere environments. The Army Trauma Training Center began in 2001 at the University of Miami Ryder Trauma Center under the direction of COL T. E. Knuth, MC USA (Ret.), as a multimodality combination of lectures, laboratory exercises, and clinical experiences that provided the only predeployment mass casualty and clinical trauma training center for all FSTs. Each of the subsequent five directors has restructured the training based on dynamic feedback from trainees, current military needs, and on the rapid advances in combat casualty care. We have highlighted these evolutionary changes at the Army Trauma Training Center in previous reviews. Under the current director, LTC J. M. Seery, MC USA, there are new team-building exercises, mobile learning modules and simulators, and other alternative methods in the mass casualty exercise. This report summarizes the latest updates to the state of the art training since the last review. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  1. [EXTERNAL QUALITY ASSESSMENT FOR THE LABORATORY IDENTIFICATION OF THE PATHOGENS OF PARASITIC DISEASES AS AN ELEMENT FOR IMPROVING THE POSTGRADUATE TRAINING OF SPECIALISTS].

    PubMed

    Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Yu; Malakhov, V N; Serdyuk, A P; Imamkuliev, K D; Gorbunova, Yu P; Pautova, E A; Prodeus, T V; Semenova, T A; Fedyanina, L V

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the Federal External Quality Assessment (EQA) System and in the context of postgraduate training improvement for health workers in 2010-2014, specialists from the laboratories of the therapeutic-prophylactic organizations and institutions of the Russian Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Welfare were examined for their professional competence in microscopically identifying the pathogens of parasitic diseases in feces. The virtual remote educational computer technology tools that included different combinations of 16 helminthic species, 5 intestinal protozoan species, and a number of artefacts, were used. The specialists from 984 laboratories of multidisciplinary therapeutic-prophylactic organizations and hygiene and epidemiology centers in all Federal Districts of the Russian Federation were covered. A total of 8245 replies were analyzed. The detection rate for helminths was 64.0%, including those by a taxonomic group (nematodes, 65.0%; cestodes, 72.0%; trematodes, 55.1%). There was a dynamic decrease in the above indicators. There were low detection rates for trematodes parasitizing the small intestine (Metagonimus, 10.2%; Nanophyetus, 26.2%) and hepatobiliary organs (Fasciola, 59.6%; Clonorchis, 34.9%). The similar trend was seen in the detection rates for the pathogens of geohelminthisms (ascariasis, trichocephaliasis, etc.) and contagious helminthisms (enterobiasis, hymenolepiasis). The level of competence in detecting and identifying intestinal protozoa was much lower than the similar rates for helminthism pathogens. EQA for the laboratory diagnosis of the pathogens of parasitic diseases, by using the virtual tools is a leading element of the postgraduate training system for laboratory specialists. The results of EQA for the laboratory diagnosis of the pathogens of parasitic diseases are a basic material for the development, and improvement of training modernization programs, by applying a modular

  2. [Postgraduates' training as laboratory physicians/clinical pathologists in Japan--board certification of JSLM as a mandatory requirement for chairpersons of laboratory medicine].

    PubMed

    Kumasaka, Kazunari

    2002-04-01

    The educational committee of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine(JSLM) proposed a revised laboratory medicine residency curriculum in 1999 and again in 2001. The committee believes that present undergraduate clinical training is insufficient and that Japanese medical graduates need clinical training for two years after graduation. This two years training should be a precondition for further postgraduate training in laboratory medicine and should include fundamental clinical skills(communication skills, physical examination and common laboratory procedures such as Gram's stain, Wright-Giemsa stain and urinalysis). After the two years training, the minimal training period of laboratory medicine should be three years, and should include: 1) Principles, instrumentation and techniques of each discipline including clinical chemistry, clinical hematology, clinical microbiology, clinical immunology, blood banking and other specific areas. 2) The use of laboratory information in a medical setting. 3) Interaction of the laboratory physician with laboratory staff, physicians and patients. With good on-the-job training and 24 hours on-call duties, laboratory physicians are expected to perform their tasks, including laboratory management, effectively. They should have appropriate educational background and should be well motivated. The background and duties of the laboratory physicians often reflect the institutional needs and personal philosophy of the chairperson of their department. At the moment, few senior physicians in Japan have qualifications in laboratory medicine and are unable, therefore, to provide the necessary guidance to help the laboratory physicians in their work. I therefore believe that the board certification of JSLM should be regarded as mandatory for chairpersons of laboratory medicine. Our on-call service system can enhance the training in laboratory medicine, and improve not only laboratory quality assurance but patients' care as well.

  3. Training or non-surgical factors-what determines a good surgical performance? A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lindlohr, Cornelia; Lefering, R; Saad, S; Heiss, M M; Pape-Köhler, C

    2017-06-01

    Acquiring laparoscopic skills is a necessity for every young surgeon. Whether it is a talent or a non-surgical skill that determines the surgical performance of an endoscopic operation has been discussed for years. In other disciplines aptitude testing has become the norm. Airlines, for example, have implemented assessments to test the natural aptitude of future pilots to predict their performance later on. In the medical field, especially surgery, there are no similar comparable tests implemented or even available. This study investigates the influence of potential factors that may predict the successful performance of a complex laparoscopic operation, such as the surgeon's age, gender or learning method. This study focussed 70 surgical trainees. It was designed as a secondary analysis of data derived from a 2 × 2 factorial randomised controlled trial of practical training and/or multimedia training (four groups) in an experimental exercise. Both before and then after the training sessions, the participating trainees performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a pelvitrainer. Surgical performance was then evaluated using a modified objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS). Participants were classified as 'Skilled' (high score in the pre-test), 'Good Learner' (increase from pre- to post-test) or 'Others' based on the OSATS results. Based on the results of the recorded performance, the training methods as well as non-surgical skills were eventually evaluated in a univariate and in a multivariate analysis. In the pre-training performance 11 candidates were categorised as 'Skilled' (15.7%), 35 participants as 'Good Learners' (50.0%) and 24 participants were classified as 'Others'. The univariate analysis showed that the age, a residency in visceral surgery, and participation in a multimedia training were significantly associated with this grouping. Multivariate analyses revealed that residency in visceral surgery was the most predictive factor

  4. Association of a Surgical Task During Training With Team Skill Acquisition Among Surgical Residents: The Missing Piece in Multidisciplinary Team Training.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Jessica L; Crouch, Dustin L; Sobba, Kathryn; Evans, Douglas; Zhang, Jing; Johnson, James E; Saunders, Ian; Thomas, John; Bodin, Sarah; Tonidandel, Ashley; Carter, Jeff; Westcott, Carl; Martin, R Shayn; Hildreth, Amy

    2017-09-01

    The human patient simulators that are currently used in multidisciplinary operating room team training scenarios cannot simulate surgical tasks because they lack a realistic surgical anatomy. Thus, they eliminate the surgeon's primary task in the operating room. The surgical trainee is presented with a significant barrier when he or she attempts to suspend disbelief and engage in the scenario. To develop and test a simulation-based operating room team training strategy that challenges the communication abilities and teamwork competencies of surgeons while they are engaged in realistic operative maneuvers. This pre-post educational intervention pilot study compared the gains in teamwork skills for midlevel surgical residents at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center after they participated in a standardized multidisciplinary team training scenario with 3 possible levels of surgical realism: (1) SimMan (Laerdal) (control group, no surgical anatomy); (2) "synthetic anatomy for surgical tasks" mannequin (medium-fidelity anatomy), and (3) a patient simulated by a deceased donor (high-fidelity anatomy). Participation in the simulation scenario and the subsequent debriefing. Teamwork competency was assessed using several instruments with extensive validity evidence, including the Nontechnical Skills assessment, the Trauma Management Skills scoring system, the Crisis Resource Management checklist, and a self-efficacy survey instrument. Participant satisfaction was assessed with a Likert-scale questionnaire. Scenario participants included midlevel surgical residents, anesthesia providers, scrub nurses, and circulating nurses. Statistical models showed that surgical residents exposed to medium-fidelity simulation (synthetic anatomy for surgical tasks) team training scenarios demonstrated greater gains in teamwork skills compared with control groups (SimMan) (Nontechnical Skills video score: 95% CI, 1.06-16.41; Trauma Management Skills video score: 95% CI, 0.61-2.90) and

  5. Perceived Motivating Factors and Barriers for the Completion of Postgraduate Training Among American Pharmacy Students Prior to Beginning Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Drayton A; Oyler, Douglas R; Devlin, John W; Painter, Jacob T; Bolesta, Scott; Swanson, Joseph M; Bailey, Brett J; Branan, Trisha; Barletta, Jeffrey F; Dunn, Brianne; Haney, Jason S; Juang, Paul; Kane-Gill, Sandra L; Kiser, Tyree H; Shafeeq, Hira; Skaar, Debra; Smithburger, Pamela; Taylor, Jodi

    2017-06-01

    Objective. To examine perceived motivating factors and barriers (MFB) to postgraduate training (PGT) pursuit among pharmacy students. Methods. Third-year pharmacy students at 13 schools of pharmacy provided demographics and their plan and perceived MFBs for pursuing PGT. Responses were characterized using descriptive statistics. Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-proportions rank tests determined if differences in perceived MFBs existed between students based on plan to pursue PGT. Results. Among 1218 (69.5%) respondents, 37.1% planned to pursue PGT (32.9% did not, 30% were undecided). Students introduced to PGT prior to beginning pharmacy school more frequently planned to pursue PGT. More students who planned to pursue PGT had hospital work experience. The primary PGT rationale was, "I desire to gain more knowledge and experience." Student debt was the most commonly cited barrier. Conclusion. Introducing pharmacy students early to PGT options and establishing work experiences in the hospital setting may increase students' desire to pursue PGT.

  6. Surgical skills training restructured for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael; Caskey, Robert; Mitchell, Marc; Sawaya, David

    2012-09-01

    Few if any medical schools have a comprehensive surgical skills program taking medical students from learning basic knot tying and surgical skills to performing these skills at a level adequate for function during a primary care, surgical, or subspecialty residency. We have designed and continue to refine a program, which consists of five workshops focused on basic surgical skills, which are applicable to all medical and surgical disciplines. During the first workshop students learn how to tie both one- and two-handed surgical knots. The second workshop involves teaching students differences in suture type and use, instrument handling, and suturing techniques. The third workshop is used to address problems and refine techniques previously learned in the first two sessions. The fourth workshop comprises a final examination to evaluate suture and knot tying skills. The fifth session is a voluntary knot tying and suturing competition with awards for speed, finesse, aesthetics, and the watertightness of a vascular surgical repair. Surgical faculty and house staff are present at each workshop to provide direction and constructive criticism. Fifty-seven third-year medical students have completed the surgical skills curriculum. Statistical analysis demonstrates significant improvement in both knot tying and suturing (P < 0.05) for these students. Forty-four percent of students have successfully sewn a watertight anastomosis. We hypothesize that this curriculum will produce medical students with basic surgical skills, appreciation of surgical technique, and the confidence to perform basic surgical skills at completion of the curriculum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Retained surgical item identification on imaging studies: a training module for radiology residents.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kristin Kelly; Bailey, Paul D; Woods, Ryan; Scott, William W; Johnson, Pamela T

    2015-11-01

    Many hospitals experience one or more retained surgical item events per year, with risk of patient morbidity and medicolegal consequences. We hypothesized that the confidence and performance of the radiologist would be enhanced by prior training in retained surgical item detection and by prior exposure to commonly employed surgical instruments and devices. A training module for radiology residents was created through literature review, expert consultation, and imaging of commonly employed surgical instruments and devices. A survey assessing resident command of background knowledge, policy, and image-based retained surgical item questions was created. Additionally resident confidence for hospital policy and retained surgical item identification was assessed. A pre-module survey and confidence questionnaire were administered to first- through fourth- year residents. For one month, the training module was available online for independent review. Subsequently, a post-module survey and confidence questionnaire were completed by participants. T tests were performed to evaluate pre- and posttest means for survey performance and confidence questions. Mean post-module survey performance significantly improved compared with pre-module performance. Mean confidence levels for ability to incidentally identify a retained surgical item on a radiograph obtained for another indication and current understanding of the institution's policy regarding retained surgical items were also significantly increased. The knowledge base, diagnostic performance, and confidence of radiology residents were significantly enhanced by online teaching module training in retained surgical item detection.

  8. Development and validation of trauma surgical skills metrics: Preliminary assessment of performance after training.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Stacy; Garofalo, Evan; Shalin, Valerie; Pugh, Kristy; Chen, Hegang; Pasley, Jason; Sarani, Babak; Henry, Sharon; Bowyer, Mark; Mackenzie, Colin F

    2015-07-01

    Maintaining trauma-specific surgical skills is an ongoing challenge for surgical training programs. An objective assessment of surgical skills is needed. We hypothesized that a validated surgical performance assessment tool could detect differences following a training intervention. We developed surgical performance assessment metrics based on discussion with expert trauma surgeons, video review of 10 experts and 10 novice surgeons performing three vascular exposure procedures and lower extremity fasciotomy on cadavers, and validated the metrics with interrater reliability testing by five reviewers blinded to level of expertise and a consensus conference. We tested these performance metrics in 12 surgical residents (Year 3-7) before and 2 weeks after vascular exposure skills training in the Advanced Surgical Skills for Exposure in Trauma (ASSET) course. Performance was assessed in three areas as follows: knowledge (anatomic, management), procedure steps, and technical skills. Time to completion of procedures was recorded, and these metrics were combined into a single performance score, the Trauma Readiness Index (TRI). Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test compared pretraining/posttraining effects. Mean time to complete procedures decreased by 4.3 minutes (from 13.4 minutes to 9.1 minutes). The performance component most improved by the 1-day skills training was procedure steps, completion of which increased by 21%. Technical skill scores improved by 12%. Overall knowledge improved by 3%, with 18% improvement in anatomic knowledge. TRI increased significantly from 50% to 64% with ASSET training. Interrater reliability of the surgical performance assessment metrics was validated with single intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.7 to 0.98. A trauma-relevant surgical performance assessment detected improvements in specific procedure steps and anatomic knowledge taught during a 1-day course, quantified by the TRI. ASSET training reduced time to complete vascular

  9. Challenges of training and delivery of pediatric surgical services in Africa.

    PubMed

    Chirdan, Lohfa B; Ameh, Emmanuel A; Abantanga, Francis A; Sidler, Daniel; Elhalaby, Essam A

    2010-03-01

    The practice of pediatric surgery in Africa presents multiple challenges. This report presents an overview of problems encountered in the training of pediatric surgeons as well as the delivery of pediatric surgical services in Africa. A returned structured self-administered questionnaire sent to pediatric surgeons practicing in Africa was reviewed and analyzed using SPSS version 11.5 (SPSS, Chicago, IL). Forty-nine (57%) of 86 questionnaires were returned from 8 countries. Great variability in the requirements and training of pediatric surgeons, even within the same country, was found. Many surgical colleges are responsible for standardization and board certification of pediatric surgeons across Africa. There were 6 (12%) centers that train middle level manpower. Twenty-six (53%) participants have 1 to 2 trainees, whereas 22 (45%) have irregular or no trainee. A pediatric surgical trainee needs 2 to 4 (median, 2) years of training in general surgery to be accepted for training in pediatric surgery, and it takes a trainee between 2 to 4 (median, 3) years to complete training as a pediatric surgeon in the countries surveyed. The number of pediatric surgeons per million populations is lowest in Malawi (0.06) and highest in Egypt (1.5). Problems facing adequate delivery of pediatric surgical services enumerated by participants included poor facilities, lack of support laboratory facilities, shortage of manpower, late presentation, and poverty. The training of pediatric surgical manpower in some African countries revealed great variability in training with multiple challenges. Delivery of pediatric surgical services in Africa presents problems like severe manpower shortage, high pediatric surgeon workload, and poor facilities. Standardization of pediatric surgery training across the continent is advocated, and the problems of delivery of pediatric surgical services need to be addressed urgently, not only by health care planners in Africa but by the international

  10. What is the impact of a national postgraduate medical specialist education reform on the daily clinical training 3.5 years after implementation? A questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many countries have recently reformed their postgraduate medical education (PGME). New pedagogic initiatives and blueprints have been introduced to improve quality and effectiveness of the education. Yet it is unknown whether these changes improved the daily clinical training. The purpose was to examine the impact of a national PGME reform on the daily clinical training practice. Methods The Danish reform included change of content and format of specialist education in line with outcome-based education using the CanMEDS framework. We performed a questionnaire survey among all hospital doctors in the North Denmark Region. The questionnaire included items on educational appraisal meetings, individual learning plans, incorporating training issues into work routines, supervision and feedback, and interpersonal acquaintance. Data were collected before start and 31/2 years later. Mean score values were compared, and response variables were analysed by multiple regression to explore the relation between the ratings and seniority, type of hospital, type of specialty, and effect of attendance to courses in learning and teaching among respondents. Results Response rates were 2105/2817 (75%) and 1888/3284 (58%), respectively. We found limited impact on clinical training practice and learning environment. Variances in ratings were hardly affected by type of hospital, whereas belonging to the laboratory specialities compared to other specialties was related to higher ratings concerning all aspects. Conclusions The impact on daily clinical training practice of a national PGME reform was limited after 31/2 years. Future initiatives must focus on changing the pedagogical competences of the doctors participating in daily clinical training and on implementation strategies for changing educational culture. PMID:20565832

  11. What is the impact of a national postgraduate medical specialist education reform on the daily clinical training 3.5 years after implementation? A questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Lene; Malling, Bente; Ringsted, Charlotte; Rubak, Sune

    2010-06-18

    Many countries have recently reformed their postgraduate medical education (PGME). New pedagogic initiatives and blueprints have been introduced to improve quality and effectiveness of the education. Yet it is unknown whether these changes improved the daily clinical training. The purpose was to examine the impact of a national PGME reform on the daily clinical training practice. The Danish reform included change of content and format of specialist education in line with outcome-based education using the CanMEDS framework. We performed a questionnaire survey among all hospital doctors in the North Denmark Region. The questionnaire included items on educational appraisal meetings, individual learning plans, incorporating training issues into work routines, supervision and feedback, and interpersonal acquaintance. Data were collected before start and 31/2 years later. Mean score values were compared, and response variables were analysed by multiple regression to explore the relation between the ratings and seniority, type of hospital, type of specialty, and effect of attendance to courses in learning and teaching among respondents. Response rates were 2105/2817 (75%) and 1888/3284 (58%), respectively. We found limited impact on clinical training practice and learning environment. Variances in ratings were hardly affected by type of hospital, whereas belonging to the laboratory specialities compared to other specialties was related to higher ratings concerning all aspects. The impact on daily clinical training practice of a national PGME reform was limited after 31/2 years. Future initiatives must focus on changing the pedagogical competences of the doctors participating in daily clinical training and on implementation strategies for changing educational culture.

  12. The use of live pigs in the surgical training of dermatology residents.

    PubMed

    Anders, K H; Goldstein, B G; Lesher, J L; Shimp, R G; Chalker, D K

    1989-07-01

    Refining of surgical skills requires instruction, manual repetition, and observation of results. This study demonstrates that while many dermatology residents use pig's feet or synthetic models of skin for practice, few use live animals. We describe the benefits and mechanics of utilizing anesthetized pigs for cutaneous surgical training.

  13. Training models in laparoscopy: a systematic review comparing their effectiveness in learning surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Willaert, W; Van De Putte, D; Van Renterghem, K; Van Nieuwenhove, Y; Ceelen, W; Pattyn, P

    2013-01-01

    Surgery has traditionally been learned on patients in the operating room, which is time-consuming, can have an impact on the patient outcomes, and is of variable effectiveness. As a result, surgical training models have been developed, which are compared in this systematic review. We searched Pubmed, CENTRAL, and Science Citation index expanded for randomised clinical trials and randomised cross-over studies comparing laparoscopic training models. Studies comparing one model with no training were also included. The reference list of identified trials was searched for further relevant studies. Fifty-eight trials evaluating several training forms and involving 1591 participants were included (four studies with a low risk of bias). Training (virtual reality (VR) or video trainer (VT)) versus no training improves surgical skills in the majority of trials. Both VR and VT are as effective in most studies. VR training is superior to traditional laparoscopic training in the operating room. Outcome results for VR robotic simulations versus robot training show no clear difference in effectiveness for either model. Only one trial included human cadavers and observed better results versus VR for one out of four scores. Contrasting results are observed when robotic technology is compared with manual laparoscopy. VR training and VT training are valid teaching models. Practicing on these models similarly improves surgical skills. A combination of both methods is recommended in a surgical curriculum. VR training is superior to unstructured traditional training in the operating room. The reciprocal effectiveness of the other models to learn surgical skills has not yet been established.

  14. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgical Simulation Training Curriculum: Transfer Reliability and Maintenance of Skill Over Time.

    PubMed

    Dunn, John C; Belmont, Philip J; Lanzi, Joseph; Martin, Kevin; Bader, Julia; Owens, Brett; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Surgical education is evolving as work hour constraints limit the exposure of residents to the operating room. Potential consequences may include erosion of resident education and decreased quality of patient care. Surgical simulation training has become a focus of study in an effort to counter these challenges. Previous studies have validated the use of arthroscopic surgical simulation programs both in vitro and in vivo. However, no study has examined if the gains made by residents after a simulation program are retained after a period away from training. In all, 17 orthopedic surgery residents were randomized into simulation or standard practice groups. All subjects were oriented to the arthroscopic simulator, a 14-point anatomic checklist, and Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET). The experimental group received 1 hour of simulation training whereas the control group had no additional training. All subjects performed a recorded, diagnostic arthroscopy intraoperatively. These videos were scored by 2 blinded, fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons and outcome measures were compared within and between the groups. After 1 year in which neither group had exposure to surgical simulation training, all residents were retested intraoperatively and scored in the exact same fashion. Individual surgical case logs were reviewed and surgical case volume was documented. There was no difference between the 2 groups after initial simulation testing and there was no correlation between case volume and initial scores. After training, the simulation group improved as compared with baseline in mean ASSET (p = 0.023) and mean time to completion (p = 0.01). After 1 year, there was no difference between the groups in any outcome measurements. Although individual technical skills can be cultivated with surgical simulation training, these advancements can be lost without continued education. It is imperative that residency programs implement a simulation curriculum and

  15. A Mode of Government-Enterprise-University-Institute-Employer Cooperation for Innovative Postgraduate Cultivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tu, Yaqing; Yang, Huiyue; Shu, Li; Tu, Wangshu; Chen, Baoxin

    2015-01-01

    Innovative talent training is an important task of postgraduate education. From the survey of innovative postgraduate training in China, we conclude that there is still much room for improvement in the innovative postgraduate cultivation. The survey shows that insufficient professional practice, simplex training mode and a mismatch between…

  16. Electromyographic correlates of learning during robotic surgical training in virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Suh, Irene H; Mukherjee, Mukul; Schrack, Ryan; Park, Shi-Hyun; Chien, Jung-Hung; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Ka-Chun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the muscle activation and the muscle frequency response of the dominant arm muscles (flexor carpi radialis and extensor digitorum) and hand muscles (abductor pollicis and first dorsal interosseous) during robotic surgical skills training in a virtual environment. The virtual surgical training tasks consisted of bimanual carrying, needle passing and mesh alignment. The experimental group (n=5) was trained by performing four blocks of the virtual surgical tasks using the da Vinci™ surgical robot. During the pre- and post-training tests, all subjects were tested by performing a suturing task on a "life-like" suture pad. The control group (n=5) performed only the suturing task without any virtual task training. Differences between pre- and post-training tests were significantly greater in the virtual reality group, as compared to the control group in the muscle activation of the hand muscle (abductor pollicis) for both the suture tying and the suture running (p<0.05). In conclusion, changes in electrographic activity shows that training in virtual reality leads to specific changes in neuromotor control of robotic surgical tasks.

  17. Appraisal of face and content validity of a serious game improving situational awareness in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Graafland, Maurits; Bemelman, Willem A; Schijven, Marlies P

    2015-01-01

    Equipment-related malfunctions during minimally invasive surgery (MIS) are common and threaten patient safety. As they occur in the periphery of the surgeon's vision, the surgical team requires a high level of situational awareness in order to intercept these errors timely. A serious game has been developed to train surgical residents to deal with equipment-related errors. This study investigates to what extent surgical educators and trainees would accept a serious game as a training method. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 45 surgeons, surgical residents, and medical students who played the serious game at a scientific convention. The questionnaire contained statements on perceived realism, usefulness, teaching capability, user experience and application toward surgical training. RESULTS were analyzed according to participants' MIS experience ("expert," "intermediate," and "novice"). The majority found that important medical constructs are represented realistically (64.4%-88.9%) and indicated the game to be particularly useful for training operating room nurses and surgical residents (75%-86%). Both educators and trainees found the game to be useful for surgical training (53%). Serious gaming was viewed as positive (78%) and challenging (60%), and 66% would play the game in their leisure time. Licensed surgeons perceived the game more frequently as boring than the intermediate-level and trainee groups (23.5% versus 6.7% and 8.3%; P=.045). This is the first study to show acceptance of a serious game as a training format in surgical training by educators and trainees. Future research should investigate whether the serious game indeed improves problem-solving and situational awareness in the operating room.

  18. Rationale, scope, and 20-year experience of vascular surgical training with lifelike pulsatile flow models.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Schmidli, Jürg; Schumacher, Hardy; Gürke, Lorenz; Klemm, Klaus; Duschek, Nikolaus; Meile, Toni; Assadian, Afshin

    2013-05-01

    Vascular surgical training currently has to cope with various challenges, including restrictions on work hours, significant reduction of open surgical training cases in many countries, an increasing diversity of open and endovascular procedures, and distinct expectations by trainees. Even more important, patients and the public no longer accept a "learning by doing" training philosophy that leaves the learning curve on the patient's side. The Vascular International (VI) Foundation and School aims to overcome these obstacles by training conventional vascular and endovascular techniques before they are applied on patients. To achieve largely realistic training conditions, lifelike pulsatile models with exchangeable synthetic arterial inlays were created to practice carotid endarterectomy and patch plasty, open abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery, and peripheral bypass surgery, as well as for endovascular procedures, including endovascular aneurysm repair, thoracic endovascular aortic repair, peripheral balloon dilatation, and stenting. All models are equipped with a small pressure pump inside to create pulsatile flow conditions with variable peak pressures of ~90 mm Hg. The VI course schedule consists of a series of 2-hour modules teaching different open or endovascular procedures step-by-step in a standardized fashion. Trainees practice in pairs with continuous supervision and intensive advice provided by highly experienced vascular surgical trainers (trainer-to-trainee ratio is 1:4). Several evaluations of these courses show that tutor-assisted training on lifelike models in an educational-centered and motivated environment is associated with a significant increase of general and specific vascular surgical technical competence within a short period of time. Future studies should evaluate whether these benefits positively influence the future learning curve of vascular surgical trainees and clarify to what extent sophisticated models are useful to assess the level of

  19. Surgical training and global health: initial results of a 5-year partnership with a surgical training program in a low-income country.

    PubMed

    Ozgediz, Doruk; Wang, Jennifer; Jayaraman, Sudha; Ayzengart, Alex; Jamshidi, Ramin; Lipnick, Michael; Mabweijano, Jacqueline; Kaggwa, Sam; Knudson, Margaret; Schecter, William; Farmer, Diana

    2008-09-01

    Surgical trainees in the United States have a growing interest in both clinical experiences and structured training opportunities in global health. Global health training and exposure can be integrated into a surgical residency program. The global health activities of surgical residents and faculty in 1 department were evaluated from January 1, 1998, to June 1, 2008, using a survey and personal interviews. From January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2002, 4 faculty members made more than 20 overseas volunteer medical expeditions, but only 1 resident participated in global health activities. In 2003, a relationship with a surgical training program in a developing country was established. Ten residents and 12 faculty members have made overseas trips during the last 5 years, and 1 international surgeon has visited the United States. During their research block, 4 residents completed 1- to 3-month clinical rotations and contributed to mentored research projects. Three residents completed a university-based Global Health Clinical Scholars Program, and 3 obtained master's degrees in public health. A joint conference in injury-trauma research was also conducted. A faculty member is based overseas with clinical and research responsibilities, and another is completing a master's degree in public health. Global health training and exposure for residents can be effectively integrated into an academic surgical residency program through relationships with training programs in low-income countries. Legitimate academic experiences improve the success of these programs. Reciprocity with collaborative partners must be ensured, and sustained commitment and funding remain a great challenge to such programs. The long-term effect on the development of global health careers is yet to be determined.

  20. A temporal bone surgery simulator with real-time feedback for surgical training.

    PubMed

    Wijewickrema, Sudanthi; Ioannou, Ioanna; Zhou, Yun; Piromchai, Patorn; Bailey, James; Kennedy, Gregor; O'Leary, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Timely feedback on surgical technique is an important aspect of surgical skill training in any learning environment, be it virtual or otherwise. Feedback on technique should be provided in real-time to allow trainees to recognize and amend their errors as they occur. Expert surgeons have typically carried out this task, but they have limited time available to spend with trainees. Virtual reality surgical simulators offer effective, repeatable training at relatively low cost, but their benefits may not be fully realized while they still require the presence of experts to provide feedback. We attempt to overcome this limitation by introducing a real-time feedback system for surgical technique within a temporal bone surgical simulator. Our evaluation study shows that this feedback system performs exceptionally well with respect to accuracy and effectiveness.

  1. Digital video recordings for training, assessment, and revalidation of surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Gambadauro, Pietro; Magos, Adam

    2010-10-01

    Surgical training is undergoing drastic changes, and new strategies should be adopted to keep quality standards. The authors review and advocate the use of surgical recordings as a useful complement to current training, assessment, and revalidation modalities. For trainees, such recordings would promote quality-based and competence-based surgical training and allow for self-evaluation. Video logbooks could be used to aid interaction between trainer and trainee, and facilitate formative assessment. Recordings of surgery could also be integrated into trainees' portfolios and regular assessments. Finally, such recordings could make surgeons' revalidation more sensible. The routine use of records of surgical procedures could become an integral component of the standard of care. This would have been an unattractive suggestion until recently, as analogue recording techniques are inconvenient, cumbersome, and time consuming. Today, however, with the advent of inexpensive digital technologies, such a concept is realistic and is likely to improve patient care.

  2. Supply and demand mismatch for flexible (part-time) surgical training in Australasia.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Rachel E; Jeeves, Amy E; Vasey, Carolyn E; Wright, Deborah M; O'Grady, Gregory

    2013-05-06

    To define current patterns of flexible (part-time) surgical training in Australasia, determine supply and demand for part-time positions, and identify work-related factors motivating interest in flexible training. All Royal Australasian College of Surgeons trainees (n = 1191) were surveyed in 2010. Questions assessed demographic characteristics and working patterns, interest in flexible training, work-related fatigue and work-life balance preferences. Interest in part-time training, and work-related factors motivating this interest. Of the 1191 trainees, 659 responded (response rate, 55.3%). Respondents were representative of all trainees in terms of specialty and sex. The median age of respondents was 32 2013s, and 187 (28.4%) were female. Most of the 659 respondents (627, 95.1%) were in full-time clinical training; only two (0.3%) were in part-time clinical training, and 30 (4.6%) were not in active clinical training. An interest in part-time training was reported by 208 respondents (31.6%; 54.3% of women v 25.9% of men; P < 0.001). Trainees expressing an interest in part-time training were more likely to report that fatigue impaired their performance at work and limited their social or family life, and that they had insufficient time in life for things outside surgical training, including study or research (P < 0.05). There is a striking mismatch between demand for flexible surgical training and the number of trainees currently in part-time training positions in Australia and New Zealand. Efforts are needed to facilitate part-time surgical training.

  3. Postgraduate and research programmes in Medicine and Public Health in Rwanda: an exciting experience about training of human resources for health in a limited resources country

    PubMed Central

    Kakoma, Jean Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    The area of Human Resources for Health (HRH) is the most critical challenge for the achievement of health related development goals in countries with limited resources. This is even exacerbated in a post conflict environment like Rwanda. The aim of this commentary is to report and share the genesis and outcomes of an exciting experience about training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health as well as setting - up of a research culture for the last nine years (2006 - 2014) in Rwanda. Many initiatives have been taken and concerned among others training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health. From 2006 to 2014, achievements were as follows: launching and organization of 8 Master of Medicine programmes (anesthesiology, family and community medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics & gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery) and 4 Master programmes in public health (MPH, MSc Epidemiology, MSc Field Epidemiology & Laboratory Management, and Master in Hospital and Healthcare Administration); training to completion of more than 120 specialists in medicine, and 200 MPH, MSc Epidemiology, and MSc Field Epidemiology holders; revival of the Rwanda Medical Journal; organization of graduate research training (MPhil and PhD); 3 Master programmes in the pipeline (Global Health, Health Financing, and Supply Chain Management); partnerships with research institutions of great renown, which contributed to the reinforcement of the institutional research capacity and visibility towards excellence in leadership, accountability, and self sustainability. Even though there is still more to be achieved, the Rwanda experience about postgraduate and research programmes is inspiring through close interactions between main stakeholders. This is a must and could allow Rwanda to become one of the rare examples to other more well-to-do Sub - Saharan countries, should Rwanda carry on doing that. PMID:27303587

  4. Postgraduate and research programmes in Medicine and Public Health in Rwanda: an exciting experience about training of human resources for health in a limited resources country.

    PubMed

    Kakoma, Jean Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    The area of Human Resources for Health (HRH) is the most critical challenge for the achievement of health related development goals in countries with limited resources. This is even exacerbated in a post conflict environment like Rwanda. The aim of this commentary is to report and share the genesis and outcomes of an exciting experience about training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health as well as setting - up of a research culture for the last nine years (2006 - 2014) in Rwanda. Many initiatives have been taken and concerned among others training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health. From 2006 to 2014, achievements were as follows: launching and organization of 8 Master of Medicine programmes (anesthesiology, family and community medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics & gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery) and 4 Master programmes in public health (MPH, MSc Epidemiology, MSc Field Epidemiology & Laboratory Management, and Master in Hospital and Healthcare Administration); training to completion of more than 120 specialists in medicine, and 200 MPH, MSc Epidemiology, and MSc Field Epidemiology holders; revival of the Rwanda Medical Journal; organization of graduate research training (MPhil and PhD); 3 Master programmes in the pipeline (Global Health, Health Financing, and Supply Chain Management); partnerships with research institutions of great renown, which contributed to the reinforcement of the institutional research capacity and visibility towards excellence in leadership, accountability, and self sustainability. Even though there is still more to be achieved, the Rwanda experience about postgraduate and research programmes is inspiring through close interactions between main stakeholders. This is a must and could allow Rwanda to become one of the rare examples to other more well-to-do Sub - Saharan countries, should Rwanda carry on doing that.

  5. Cognitive Task Analysis: Bringing Olympic Athlete Style Training to Surgical Education.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Laura R; Kulendran, Myutan; Chow, Andre; Nehme, Jean; Purkayastha, Sanjay

    2015-08-01

    Surgical training is changing and evolving as time, pressure, and legislative demands continue to mount on trainee surgeons. A paradigm change in the focus of training has resulted in experts examining the cognitive steps needed to perform complex and often highly pressurized surgical procedures. To provide an overview of the collective evidence on cognitive task analysis (CTA) as a surgical training method, and determine if CTA improves a surgeon's performance as measured by technical and nontechnical skills assessment, including precision, accuracy, and operative errors. A systematic literature review was performed. PubMed, Cochrane, and reference lists were analyzed for appropriate inclusion. A total of 595 surgical participants were identified through the literature review and a total of 13 articles were included. Of these articles, 6 studies focused on general surgery, 2 focused on practical procedures relevant to surgery (central venous catheterization placement), 2 studies focused on head and neck surgical procedures (cricothyroidotomy and percutaneous tracheostomy placement), 2 studies highlighted vascular procedures (endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and carotid artery stenting), and 1 detailed endovascular repair (abdominal aorta and thoracic aorta). Overall, 92.3% of studies showed that CTA improves surgical outcome parameters, including time, precision, accuracy, and error reduction in both simulated and real-world environments. CTA has been shown to be a more effective training tool when compared with traditional methods of surgical training. There is a need for the introduction of CTA into surgical curriculums as this can improve surgical skill and ultimately create better patient outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Establishing a surgical skills laboratory and dissection curriculum for neurosurgical residency training.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K C; Kshettry, Varun R; Recinos, Pablo F; Kamian, Kambiz; Schlenk, Richard P; Benzel, Edward C

    2015-11-01

    Surgical education has been forced to evolve from the principles of its initial inception, in part due to external pressures brought about through changes in modern health care. Despite these pressures that can limit the surgical training experience, training programs are being held to higher standards of education to demonstrate and document trainee competency through core competencies and milestones. One of the methods used to augment the surgical training experience and to demonstrate trainee proficiency in technical skills is through a surgical skills laboratory. The authors have established a surgical skills laboratory by acquiring equipment and funding from nondepartmental resources, through institutional and private educational grants, along with product donations from industry. A separate educational curriculum for junior- and senior-level residents was devised and incorporated into the neurosurgical residency curriculum. The initial dissection curriculum focused on cranial approaches, with spine and peripheral nerve approaches added in subsequent years. The dissections were scheduled to maximize the use of cadaveric specimens, experimenting with techniques to best preserve the tissue for repeated uses. A survey of residents who participated in at least 1 year of the curriculum indicated that participation in the surgical skills laboratory translated into improved understanding of anatomical relationships and the development of technical skills that can be applied in the operating room. In addition to supplementing the technical training of surgical residents, a surgical skills laboratory with a dissection curriculum may be able to help provide uniformity of education across different neurosurgical training programs, as well as provide a tool to assess the progression of skills in surgical trainees.

  7. [Empathy, inter-professional collaboration, and lifelong medical learning in Spanish and Latin-American physicians-in-training who start their postgraduate training in hospitals in Spain. Preliminary outcomes].

    PubMed

    San-Martín, Montserrat; Roig-Carrera, Helena; Villalonga-Vadell, Rosa M; Benito-Sevillano, Carmen; Torres-Salinas, Miquel; Claret-Teruel, Gemma; Robles, Bernabé; Sans-Boix, Antonia; Alcorta-Garza, Adelina; Vivanco, Luis

    2017-01-01

    To identify similarities and differences in empathy, abilities toward inter-professional collaboration, and lifelong medical learning, between Spanish and Latin-American physicians-in-training who start their posgraduate training in teaching hospitals in Spain. Observational study using self-administered questionnaires. Five teaching hospitals in the province of Barcelona, Spain. Spanish and Latin-American physicians-in-training who started their first year of post-graduate medical training. Empathy was measured using the Jefferson scale of empathy. Abilities for inter-professional collaboration were measured using the Jefferson scale attitudes towards nurse-physician collaboration. Learning was measured using the Jefferson scale of medical lifelong learning scale. From a sample of 156 physicians-in-training, 110 from Spain and 40 from Latin America, the Spanish group showed the highest empathy (p<.05). On the other hand, Latin-American physicians had the highest scores in lifelong learning abilities (p<.001). A positive relationship was found between empathy and inter-professional collaboration for the whole sample (r=+0.34; p<.05). These results confirm previous preliminary data and underline the positive influence of empathy in the development of inter-professional collaboration abilities. In Latin-American physicians who start posgraduate training programs, lifelong learning abilities have a positive influence on the development of other professional competencies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Some Observations on Veterinary Undergraduate Training in Surgical Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittick, William G.

    1978-01-01

    The undergraduate surgery course of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Universiti Pertanian Malaysia, is described with focus on its experential method of teaching surgical techniques. Also discussed are the benefits of veterinary school cooperation with a large city Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA). (JMD)

  9. Some Observations on Veterinary Undergraduate Training in Surgical Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittick, William G.

    1978-01-01

    The undergraduate surgery course of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Universiti Pertanian Malaysia, is described with focus on its experential method of teaching surgical techniques. Also discussed are the benefits of veterinary school cooperation with a large city Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA). (JMD)

  10. General surgery resident rotations in surgical critical care, trauma, and burns: what is optimal for residency training?

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Lena M; Biester, Thomas W; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Buyske, Jo; Malangoni, Mark A; Lewis, Frank R

    2016-10-01

    There are no specific Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education General Surgery Residency Program Requirements for rotations in surgical critical care (SCC), trauma, and burn. We sought to determine the experience of general surgery residents in SCC, trauma, and burn rotations. Data analysis of surgical rotations of American Board of Surgery general surgery resident applicants (n = 7,299) for the last 8 years (2006 to 2013, inclusive) was performed through electronic applications to the American Board of Surgery Qualifying Examination. Duration (months) spent in SCC, trauma, and burn rotations, and postgraduate year (PGY) level were examined. The total months in SCC, trauma and burn rotations was mean 10.2 and median 10.0 (SD 3.9 months), representing approximately 16.7% (10 of 60 months) of a general surgery resident's training. However, there was great variability (range 0 to 29 months). SCC rotation duration was mean 3.1 and median 3.0 months (SD 2, min to max: 0 to 15), trauma rotation duration was mean 6.3 and median 6.0 months (SD 3.5, min to max: 0 to 24), and burn rotation duration was mean 0.8 and median 1.0 months (SD 1.0, min to max: 0 to 6). Of the total mean 10.2 months duration, the longest exposure was 2 months as PGY-1, 3.4 months as PGY-2, 1.9 months as PGY-3, 2.2 months as PGY-4 and 1.1 months as PGY-5. PGY-5 residents spent a mean of 1 month in SCC, trauma, and burn rotations. PGY-4/5 residents spent the majority of this total time in trauma rotations, whereas junior residents (PGY-1 to 3) in SCC and trauma rotations. There is significant variability in total duration of SCC, trauma, and burn rotations and PGY level in US general surgery residency programs, which may result in significant variability in the fund of knowledge and clinical experience of the trainee completing general surgery residency training. As acute care surgery programs have begun to integrate emergency general surgery with SCC, trauma, and burn rotations

  11. Pediatricians' practice location choice-Evaluating the effect of Japan's 2004 postgraduate training program on the spatial distribution of pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Rie; Fink, Günther; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    To explore determinants of change in pediatrician supply in Japan, and examine impacts of a 2004 reform of postgraduate medical education on pediatricians' practice location choice. Data were compiled from secondary data sources. The dependent variable was the change in the number of pediatricians at the municipality ("secondary tier of medical care" [STM]) level. To analyze the determinants of pediatrician location choices, we considered the following predictors: initial ratio of pediatricians per 1000 children under five years of age (pediatrician density) and under-5 mortality as measures of local area need, as well as measures of residential quality. Ordinary least-squares regression models were used to estimate the associations. A coefficient equality test was performed to examine differences in predictors before and after 2004. Basic comparisons of pediatrician coverage in the top and bottom 10% of STMs were conducted to assess inequality in pediatrician supply. Increased supply was inversely associated with baseline pediatrician density both in the pre-period and post-period. Estimated impact of pediatrician density declined over time (P = 0.026), while opposite trends were observed for measures of residential quality. More specifically, urban centers and the SES composite index were positively associated with pediatrician supply for the post-period, but no such associations were found for the pre-period. Inequality in pediatrician distribution increased substantially after the reform, with the best-served 10% of communities benefitting from five times the pediatrician coverage compared to the least-served 10%. Residential quality increasingly became a function of location preference rather than public health needs after the reform. New placement schemes should be developed to achieve more equity in access to pediatric care.

  12. Development of laparoscopic skills in Medical students naive to surgical training

    PubMed Central

    Cavalini, Worens Luiz Pereira; Claus, Christiano Marlo Paggi; Dimbarre, Daniellson; Cury, Antonio Moris; Bonin, Eduardo Aimoré; Loureiro, Marcelo de Paula; Salvalaggio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the acquisition of basic laparoscopic skills of Medical students trained on a surgical simulator. Methods First- and second-year Medical students participated on a laparoscopic training program on simulators. None of the students had previous classes of surgical technique, exposure to surgical practice nor training prior to the enrollment in to the study. Students´ time were collected before and after the 150-minute training. Skill acquisition was measured comparing time and scores of students and senior instructors of laparoscopic surgery Results Sixty-eight students participated of the study, with a mean age of 20.4 years, with a predominance of first-year students (62%). All students improved performance in score and time, after training (p<0,001). Score improvement in the exercises ranged from 294.1 to 823%. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified that second-year Medical students have achieved higher performance after training. Conclusions Medical students who had never been exposed to surgical techniques can acquire basic laparoscopic skills after training in simulators. Second-year undergraduates had better performance than first-year students. PMID:25628198

  13. Residency Surgical Training at an Independent Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremiah; Sidwell, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Independent academic medical centers have been training surgeons for more than a century; this environment is distinct from university or military programs. There are several advantages to training at a community program, including a supportive learning environment with camaraderie between residents and faculty, early and broad operative experience, and improved graduate confidence. Community programs also face challenges, such as resident recruitment and faculty engagement. With the workforce needs for general surgeons, independent training programs will continue to play an integral role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Creating a Cadre of Fellowship-Trained Medical Educators, Part II: A Formal Needs Assessment to Structure Postgraduate Fellowships in Medical Education Scholarship and Leadership.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jaime; Yarris, Lalena M; Santen, Sally A; Guth, Todd A; Rougas, Steven; Runde, Daniel P; Coates, Wendy C

    2017-08-01

    Education leaders at the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference on education research proposed that dedicated postgraduate education scholarship fellowships (ESFs) might provide an effective model for developing future faculty as scholars. A formal needs assessment was performed to understand the training gap and inform the development of ESFs. A mixed-methods needs assessment was conducted of four emergency medicine national stakeholder groups in 2013: department chairs; faculty education/research leaders; existing education fellowship directors; and current education fellows/graduates. Descriptive statistics were reported for quantitative data. Qualitative data from semistructured interviews and free-text responses were analyzed using a thematic approach. Participants were 11/15 (73%) education fellowship directors, 13/20 (65%) fellows/graduates, 106/239 (44%) faculty education/research leaders, and a convenience sample of 26 department chairs. Department chairs expected new education faculty to design didactics (85%) and teach clinically (96%). Faculty education/research leaders thought new faculty were inadequately prepared for job tasks (83.7%) and that ESFs would improve the overall quality of education research (91.1%). Fellowship directors noted that ESFs provide skills, mentorship, and protected time for graduates to become productive academicians. Current fellows/graduates reported pursing an ESF to develop skills in teaching and research methodology. Stakeholder groups uniformly perceived a need for training in education theory, clinical teaching, and education research. These findings support dedicated, deliberate training in these areas. Establishment of a structure for scholarly pursuits prior to assuming a full-time position will effectively prepare new faculty. These findings may inform the development, implementation, and curricula of ESFs.

  15. Anatomical variations: How do surgical and radiology training programs teach and assess them in their training curricula?

    PubMed

    Raikos, Athanasios; Smith, Janie Dade

    2015-09-01

    Sound knowledge of anatomy and Anatomical variations plays an integral role in surgical and radiology specialties. This study investigated the current teaching and assessment trends on Anatomical variations in various surgical and radiology specialty training curricula in Canada and Australia. A survey was sent to 122 Program Directors and Chairs of specialty committees in Canada and Directors of Training/Education in Australia of selected surgical and radiology specialties. A total of 80.7% of respondents report that their training curricula include Anatomical variations. The highest rated classes of variations included in the curriculum are arterial (76%), venous (68%), followed by organs (64%). All trainees learn about Anatomical variations from surgeons and radiologists (100%) and via suggested textbooks of the specialty (87.1%). A total of 54.8% report that specialty training curricula do not suggest specific anatomical variation classifications for the trainees to learn, and 16.1% are uncertain if the colleges provide such kind of instruction. Trainees typically communicated findings of variations in case presentations and clinic's meetings. About 32.3% of respondents report that Anatomical variations are not assessed in their training curriculum. About 39.3% of experienced clinicians in the study report they encounter variations on a monthly basis and 25 and 21.4% on a weekly and daily basis, respectively. Surgical and radiology colleges need to investigate for hidden curriculum in their specialty training programs to ensure there are no gaps in knowledge and training related to Anatomical variations. Most educational leaders surveyed believe more teaching on Anatomical variations in the first 4 years of training would benefit resident doctors.

  16. Attrition from surgical residency training: perspectives from those who left.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, Tasce; Yeo, Heather; Sosa, Julie A; Yoo, Peter S; Long, Theodore; Rosenthal, Marjorie; Berg, David; Curry, Leslie; Nunez-Smith, Marcella

    2015-10-01

    High rates of attrition from general surgery residency may threaten the surgical workforce. We sought to gain further insight regarding resident motivations for leaving general surgery residency. We conducted in-depth interviews to generate rich narrative data that explored individual experiences. An interdisciplinary team used the constant comparative method to analyze the data. Four themes characterized experiences of our 19 interviewees who left their residency program. Participants (1) felt an informal contract was breached when clinical duties were prioritized over education, (2) characterized a culture in which there was no safe space to share personal and programmatic concerns, (3) expressed a scarcity of role models who demonstrated better work-life balance, and (4) reported negative interactions with authority resulting in a profound loss of commitment. As general surgery graduate education continues to evolve, our findings may inform interventions and policies regarding programmatic changes to boost retention in surgical residency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a surgical skills curriculum for the training and assessment of manual skills in orthopedic surgical residents.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Eric A; Brooks, Adam G; Leasure, Jeremi; Camisa, William; van Warmerdam, Jennifer; Kondrashov, Dimitriy; Montgomery, William; McGann, William

    2015-01-01

    To develop and conduct a pilot study of a curriculum of 4 surrogate bone training modules to assess and track progress in basic orthopedic manual skills outside the operating room. Four training modules were developed with faculty and resident input. The modules include (1) cortical drilling, (2) drill trajectory, (3) oscillating saw, and (4) pedicle probing. Orthopedic resident's performance was evaluated. Validity and reliability results were calculated using standard analysis of variance and multivariate regression analysis accounting for postgraduate year (PGY) level, number of attempts, and specific outcome target results specific to the simulation module. St. Mary's Medical Center in San Francisco, CA. These modules were tested on 15 orthopedic surgery residents ranging from PGY 1 to PGY 5 experience. The cortical drilling module had a mean success rate of 56% ± 5%. There was a statistically significant difference in performance according to the diameter of the drill used from 33% ± 7% with large diameter to 70% ± 6% with small diameter. The drill trajectory module had a success rate of 85% ± 3% with a trend toward improvement across PGY level. The oscillating saw module had a mean success rate of 25% ± 5% (trajectory) and 84% ± 6% (depth). We observed a significant improvement in trajectory performance during the second attempt. The pedicle probing module had a success rate of 46% ± 10%. The results of this pilot study on a small number of residents are promising. The modules were inexpensive and easy to administer. Conclusions of statistical significance include (1) residents who could easily detect changes in surrogate bone thickness with a smaller diameter drill than with a larger diameter drill and (2) residents who significantly improved saw trajectory with an additional attempt at the module. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Competency-Based Education in Low Resource Settings: Development of a Novel Surgical Training Program.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Meghan; Campbell, Alex; Siu, Armando; Durnwald, Libby; Kumar, Shubha; Magee, William P; Swanson, Jordan

    2017-09-06

    The unmet burden of surgical disease represents a major global health concern, and a lack of trained providers is a critical component of the inadequacy of surgical care worldwide. Competency-based training has been advanced in high-income countries, improving technical skills and decreasing training time, but it is poorly understood how this model might be applied to low- and middle-income countries. We describe the development of a competency-based program to accelerate specialty training of in-country providers in cleft surgery techniques. The program was designed and piloted among eight trainees at five international cleft lip and palate surgical mission sites in Latin America and Africa. A competency-based evaluation form, designed for the program, was utilized to grade general technical and procedure-specific competencies, and pre- and post-training scores were analyzed using a paired t test. Trainees demonstrated improvement in average procedure-specific competency scores for both lip repairs (60.4-71.0%, p < 0.01) and palate (50.6-66.0%, p < 0.01). General technical competency scores also improved (63.6-72.0%, p < 0.01). Among the procedural competencies assessed, surgical markings showed the greatest improvement (19.0 and 22.8% for lip and palate, respectively), followed by nasal floor/mucosal approximation (15.0%) and hard palate dissection (17.1%). Surgical delivery models in LMICs are varied, and trade-offs often exist between goals of case throughput, quality and training. Pilot program results show that procedure-specific and general technical competencies can be improved over a relatively short time and demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating such a training program into surgical outreach missions.

  19. Experience and opinions on post-graduate dementia training in the UK: a survey of selected consultant geriatricians.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Deborah J F; Allan, Louise; Reynish, Emma; MacLullich, Alasdair M J; Vardy, Emma Rachael Louise Cunningham

    2014-03-01

    people with dementia are more likely to come into contact with a geriatrician than any other hospital specialty. Whilst it is known that there are some geriatricians with a special interest in dementia, it is unclear how this group of clinicians gained experience, and what their opinions are on current training. we obtained a list of geriatricians known to have an interest in dementia care (known as dementia champions) from the British Geriatric Society Dementia and Similar Disorders Special Interest Group. We contacted 100 'dementia champions' with an invitation to respond to a questionnaire relating to their role, experience and opinions on current training in dementia within geriatric medicine. fifty-five geriatricians responded. Ninety-one per cent were consultant physicians, and 71% were not involved in outpatient diagnostic services. Fifty-six per cent reported that their experience was via clinical attachments with old age psychiatry, and 47% regarded themselves as 'self-taught'. The majority felt that current training was inadequate with a need for more structure and time spent on attachments, less geographical variation, more training at undergraduate level and throughout other specialties and better collaboration with psychiatry. this is the first survey of the views of geriatricians leading on dementia care in acute hospitals within the UK. It gives a useful insight into how they have gained their own experience, and their opinions on how training may be improved. Equipped with the right training and expertise in diagnosis and management of dementia perhaps geriatricians may feel more confident in taking a lead in dementia care.

  20. Perceived Motivating Factors and Barriers for the Completion of Postgraduate Training Among American Pharmacy Students Prior to Beginning Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Oyler, Douglas R.; Devlin, John W.; Painter, Jacob T.; Bolesta, Scott; Swanson, Joseph M.; Bailey, Brett J.; Branan, Trisha; Barletta, Jeffrey F.; Dunn, Brianne; Haney, Jason S.; Juang, Paul; Kane-Gill, Sandra L.; Kiser, Tyree H.; Shafeeq, Hira; Skaar, Debra; Smithburger, Pamela; Taylor, Jodi

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To examine perceived motivating factors and barriers (MFB) to postgraduate training (PGT) pursuit among pharmacy students. Methods. Third-year pharmacy students at 13 schools of pharmacy provided demographics and their plan and perceived MFBs for pursuing PGT. Responses were characterized using descriptive statistics. Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-proportions rank tests determined if differences in perceived MFBs existed between students based on plan to pursue PGT. Results. Among 1218 (69.5%) respondents, 37.1% planned to pursue PGT (32.9% did not, 30% were undecided). Students introduced to PGT prior to beginning pharmacy school more frequently planned to pursue PGT. More students who planned to pursue PGT had hospital work experience. The primary PGT rationale was, “I desire to gain more knowledge and experience.” Student debt was the most commonly cited barrier. Conclusion. Introducing pharmacy students early to PGT options and establishing work experiences in the hospital setting may increase students’ desire to pursue PGT. PMID:28720918

  1. Lessons that cross the surgical drapes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ming-Li; Saunders, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Modern medicine has created a need for innovative methods of training that create safe, proficient specialists with adequate experience, and who are fit for purpose in this new system. Patient safety and patient-focused care are central to current practice and promoted by the use of simulation, human factors, team-based, multidisciplinary and interspecialty training. An acknowledgement that postgraduate training occurs within the work environment underlies the need to create systems that support learning within the workplace. Supervision, protected time for adequate induction and the opportunity to be involved in workplace learning are the key. It is also important that robust mechanisms to assure the quality of postgraduate education are in place. Available reports were researched, and the particularities of anaesthetic training were outlined and summarised. Then, in a translational approach, we examined how to apply the lessons learned from anaesthesiological training to surgical training. The trend towards reducing the working hours of junior doctors, whilst still providing excellent training, creates a need for innovative, efficient, concentrated training programmes, where trainers and trainees are engaged in a seamless, constant educational endeavour. Within this review we offer the system of anaesthetic training in the UK, and some of its recent changes, as a template to highlight themes in postgraduate education that exemplify this innovation and are transferable not only to surgery but across different specialties.

  2. [Surgical Training Utilizing Swine Under General Anesthesia and Animal Ethics].

    PubMed

    Iki, Yuko; Noda, Masafumi; Kudoh, Katsuyoshi; Sueta, Teruko; Kanehira, Masahiko; Ito, Takuya; Matsuda, Yasushi; Okada, Yoshinori; Unno, Michiaki

    2017-05-01

    A cross-sectional study is conducted with primary residents attended wet labs at Tohoku University Hospital Advanced Medical Training Center in order to investigate the efficacy of the training, especially focused on the animal ethics. The 41 participants answered questionnaires in regard to non-technical skills, technical skills and ethics before and after the practice. To identify differences in each ethical question between 2 time points, Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used because the data was not normally distributed. As the result of it, all animal ethical questions showed significant differences(0.0016≤p≤0.0380, α=0.05 level of significance). Beside them, only 1 out of 5 general ethical questions showed it (p=0.0137). This outcome verified that the lecture of animal ethics and the observation of animal care in this center fixed in the training curriculum clearly induced participants' psychological movements.

  3. Application of See One, Do One, Teach One Concept in Surgical Training

    PubMed Central

    Kotsis, Sandra V.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The traditional method of teaching in Surgery is known as “See One, Do One, Teach One.” However, many have argued that this method is no longer applicable mainly because of concerns for patient safety. The purpose of this paper is to show that the basis of the traditional teaching method is still valid in surgical training if it is combined with various adult learning principles. Methods We reviewed literature regarding the history of the formation of the surgical residency program, adult learning principles, mentoring, and medical simulation. We provide examples for how these learning techniques can be incorporated into a surgical resident training program. Results The surgical residency program created by Dr. William Halsted remained virtually unchanged until recently with reductions in resident work hours and changes to a competency-based training system. Such changes have reduced the teaching time between attending physicians and residents. Learning principles such as “Experience, Observation, Thinking and Action” as well as deliberate practice can be used to train residents. Mentoring is also an important aspect in teaching surgical technique. We review the different types of simulators: standardized patients, virtual reality applications, and high-fidelity mannequin simulators and the advantages and disadvantages of using them. Conclusions The traditional teaching method of “see one, do one, teach one” in surgical residency programs is simple but still applicable. It needs to evolve with current changes in the medical system to adequately train surgical residents and also provide patients with safe, evidence-based care. PMID:23629100

  4. Relationship between Teachers' ICT Competency, Confidence Level, and Satisfaction toward ICT Training Programmes: A Case Study among Postgraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasir, Zaidatun; Abour, Khawla Mohammed El Amin; Halim, Noor Dayana Abd; Harun, Jamalludin

    2012-01-01

    There are three main variables that would make the integration of ICT tools as an easy process. Those three variables are teachers' ICT competency, teachers' confidence level in using ICT, and teachers' satisfaction on ICT training programmes. This study investigated the relationships among these three variables and measured the levels of the…

  5. Rising to the Challenge: Acute Stress Appraisals and Selection Centre Performance in Applicants to Postgraduate Specialty Training in Anaesthesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Martin J.; Gale, Thomas C. E.; McGrath, John S.; Wilson, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to work under pressure is a vital non-technical skill for doctors working in acute medical specialties. Individuals who evaluate potentially stressful situations as challenging rather than threatening may perform better under pressure and be more resilient to stress and burnout. Training programme recruitment processes provide an…

  6. Rising to the Challenge: Acute Stress Appraisals and Selection Centre Performance in Applicants to Postgraduate Specialty Training in Anaesthesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Martin J.; Gale, Thomas C. E.; McGrath, John S.; Wilson, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to work under pressure is a vital non-technical skill for doctors working in acute medical specialties. Individuals who evaluate potentially stressful situations as challenging rather than threatening may perform better under pressure and be more resilient to stress and burnout. Training programme recruitment processes provide an…

  7. [Surgical treatment of proximal femoral fractures--a training intervention?].

    PubMed

    Bliemel, C; Oberkircher, L; Eschbach, D-A; Struewer, J; Ruchholtz, S; Buecking, B

    2013-04-01

    Proximal femoral fractures are common in the elderly. Surgical and postoperative complications are of major importance in this population. Numerous factors affecting the treatment results could be identified so far. The effect of surgeons' experience in terms of educational status is not entirely clarified yet. The aim of the present study was to analyse the effect of surgeons' educational status on the outcome in proximal femoral fractures. Therefore treatment results were compared in terms of individual surgeons' experience. Furthermore, the surgical education concept of our department was evaluated. At a national trauma centre, patients of at least 60 years of age with proximal femoral fractures were prospectively screened. Patient-specific parameters like Barthel index, ASA score, Charlson score, patients' age and type of fracture were collected at the time of hospital admission. During the in-hospital stay type of fracture treatment, surgery time, number of blood transfusions, perioperative complications, duration of in-hospital stay as well as in-hospital mortality were recorded. Results were analysed for osteosynthesis and prosthesis depending on the surgeons' educational status. Four different groups of surgeons were distinguished (inexperienced senior house officer; experienced senior house officer; specialist in orthopaedics and accident surgery; specialist in orthopaedics and accident surgery with an additional qualification for special accident surgery). 402 patients with coxal femoral fractures could be included into the study. 160 patients (40 %) sustained complications of different severity. In-hospital mortality was shown to be 6.2 %. Separate consideration of osteosynthesis and prosthesis revealed no difference between the four groups of surgeons regarding mortality rate, number of blood transfusions and in-hospital stay. In terms of cutting/suture time consultants with a further specialisation in trauma surgery were significantly faster. Apart

  8. Effect of Process Changes in Surgical Training on Quantitative Outcomes From Surgery Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Dietl, Charles A; Russell, John C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the literature on process changes in surgical training programs and to evaluate their effect on the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Core Competencies, American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) scores, and American Board of Surgery (ABS) certification. A literature search was obtained from MEDLINE via PubMed.gov, ScienceDirect.com, Google Scholar on all peer-reviewed studies published since 2003 using the following search queries: surgery residency training, surgical education, competency-based surgical education, ACGME core competencies, ABSITE scores, and ABS pass rate. Our initial search list included 990 articles on surgery residency training models, 539 on competency-based surgical education, 78 on ABSITE scores, and 33 on ABS pass rate. Overall, 31 articles met inclusion criteria based on their effect on ACGME Core Competencies, ABSITE scores, and ABS certification. Systematic review showed that 5/31, 19/31, and 6/31 articles on process changes in surgical training programs had a positive effect on patient care, medical knowledge, and ABSITE scores, respectively. ABS certification was not analyzed. The other ACGME core competencies were addressed in only 6 studies. Several publications on process changes in surgical training programs have shown a positive effect on patient care, medical knowledge, and ABSITE scores. However, the effect on ABS certification, and other quantitative outcomes from residency programs, have not been addressed. Studies on education strategies showing evidence that residency program objectives are being achieved are still needed. This article addresses the 6 ACGME Core Competencies. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical Residency Training at a University-Based Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Rebecca L; Morris, Jon B; Kelz, Rachel R

    2016-02-01

    The past two decades have been witness to some of the most dynamic changes that have occurred in surgical education in all of its history. Political policies, social revolution, and the competing priorities of a new generation of surgical trainees are defining the needs of modern training paradigms. Although the university-based academic program's tripartite mission of clinical service, research, and education has remained steadfast, the mechanisms for achieving success in this mission necessitate adaptation and innovation. The resource-rich learning environment and the unique challenges that face university-based programs contribute to its ability to generate the future leaders of the surgical workforce.

  10. Let our fellows go: a plea for allowing global surgery electives during pediatric surgical training.

    PubMed

    Emil, Sherif; O'Neill, James; Poenaru, Dan

    2017-09-05

    In the last 2 years, a coalescence of forces has brought the needs of surgical patients in low resource settings to the top of the international healthcare policy agenda. This same dynamic has propelled academic global surgery, and particularly education, to the forefront. The proportion of surgical trainees seeking global surgical experiences, and interested in incorporating global surgery into their clinical and academic career, has risen sharply. International surgical electives are now allowed in a number of surgical residency programs, if they meet strict criteria. However, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) currently does not allow international electives during pediatric surgical training. This decision has not been contested by the American Board of Surgery (ABS) or the Association of Pediatric Surgery Training Program Directors (APSTPD). Valid concerns exist regarding international pediatric surgical electives. In this article, the authors address these concerns and exhort the APSTPD, the ABS, and the ACGME to re-examine their position on the value of pediatric global surgery electives. 5. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of simulation in the development of technical competence during surgical training: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To establish the current state of knowledge on the effect of surgical simulation on the development of technical competence during surgical training. Methods Using a defined search strategy, the medical and educational literature was searched to identify empirical research that uses simulation as an educational intervention with surgical trainees. Included studies were analysed according to guidelines adapted from a Best Evidence in Medical Education review. Results A total of 32 studies were analysed, across 5 main categories of surgical simulation technique - use of bench models and box trainers (9 studies); Virtual Reality (14 studies); human cadavers (4 studies); animal models (2 studies) and robotics (3 studies). An improvement in technical skill was seen within the simulated environment across all five categories. This improvement was seen to transfer to the real patient in the operating room in all categories except the use of animals. Conclusions Based on current evidence, surgical trainees should be confident in the effects of using simulation, and should have access to formal, structured simulation as part of their training. Surgical simulation should incorporate the use of bench models and box trainers, with the use of Virtual Reality where resources allow. Alternatives to cadaveric and animal models should be considered due to the ethical and moral issues surrounding their use, and due to their equivalency with other simulation techniques. However, any use of surgical simulation must be tailored to the individual needs of trainees, and should be accompanied by feedback from expert tutors.

  12. Using a Peritoneal Dialysis Access Simulator in Surgical Training for Nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Tsutomu; Taki, Yasuhiro; Kojima, Shigeki; Oishi, Daisuke; Koitabashi, Kenichiro; Sueki, Shina; Kaneshiro, Nagayuki; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter insertion has been performed by both nephrologists and surgeons. However, nephrologists have fewer opportunities to train in the insertion procedure. We therefore used a PD access simulator to provide training in this operative technique for nephrologists. A PD access simulator developed by Terumo Medical Corporation was used for the training. The simulator uses a mannequin made of acrylic resin. The abdominal wall of a pig is attached to the abdominal area, and a plastic bag represents the abdominal cavity. The simulator enables the surgical procedure to be performed from skin incision to PD catheter insertion. Between October 2011 and December 2013, 3 supervising doctors used the simulator to guide 17 nephrologists with no experience through a PD catheter insertion. One-on-one training was provided in a single 2- or 3-hour session. In a questionnaire survey after the training, trainees gave high marks to the handling of surgical instruments, the environment of the operating room, and the surgical guidance during training. However, the supervising doctors required the ability to respond flexibly, because trainees had individual differences in skills. The PD access simulator might be useful for providing guided training in operative technique for PD catheter insertion.

  13. The "global surgeon": is it time for modifications in the American surgical training paradigm?

    PubMed

    Ginwalla, Rashna F; Rustin, Rudolph B

    2015-01-01

    "Global surgery" is becoming an increasingly popular concept not only for new trainees, but also for established surgeons. The need to provide surgical care in low-resource settings is laudable, but the American surgical training system currently does not impart the breadth of skills required to provide quality care. We propose one possible model for a surgical fellowship program that provides those trainees who desire to practice in these settings a comprehensive experience that encompasses not only broad technical skills but also the opportunity to engage in policy and programmatic development and implementation. This is a descriptive commentary based on personal experience and a review of the literature. The proposed model is 2 years long, and can either be done after general surgery training as an additional "global surgery" fellowship or as part of a 3 + 2 general surgery + global surgery system. It would incorporate training in general surgery as well as orthopedics, urology, obstetrics & gynecology, neurosurgery, plastics & reconstructive surgery, as well as dedicated time for health systems training. Incorporating such training in a low-resource setting would be a requirement of such a program, in order to obtain field experience. Global surgery is a key word these days in attracting young trainees to academic surgical residency programs, yet they are subsequently inadequately trained to provide the required surgical services in these low-resource settings. Dedicated programmatic changes are required to allow those who choose to practice in these settings to obtain the full breadth of training needed to become safe, competent surgeons in such environments. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The subjectively perceived quality of postgraduate medical training in integrative medicine within the public healthcare systems of Germany and Switzerland: the example of anthroposophic hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrative medicine (IM) integrates evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) with conventional medicine (CON). Medical schools offer basic CAM electives but in postgraduate medical training (PGMT) little has been done for the integration of CAM. An exception to this is anthroposophic medicine (AM), a western form of CAM based on CON, offering an individualized holistic IM approach. AM hospitals are part of the public healthcare systems in Germany and Switzerland and train AM in PGMT. We performed the first quality evaluation of the subjectively perceived quality of this PGMT. Methods An anonymous full survey of all 214 trainers (TR) and 240 trainees (TE) in all 15 AM hospitals in Germany and Switzerland, using the ETHZ questionnaire for annual national PGMT assessments in Switzerland (CH) and Germany (D), complemented by a module for AM. Data analysis included Cronbach’s alpha to assess internal consistency questionnaire scales, 2-tailed Pearson correlation of specific quality dimensions of PGMT and department size, 2-tailed Wilcoxon Matched-Pair test for dependent variables and 2-tailed Mann–Whitney U-test for independent variables to calculate group differences. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. Results Return rates were: D: TE 89/215 (41.39%), TR 78/184 (42.39%); CH: TE 19/25 (76%), TR 22/30 (73.33%). Cronbach’s alpha values for TE scales were >0.8 or >0.9, and >0.7 to >0.5 for TR scales. Swiss hospitals surpassed German ones significantly in Global Satisfaction with AM (TR and TE); Clinical Competency training in CON (TE) and AM (TE, TR), Error Management, Culture of Decision Making, Evidence-based Medicine, and Clinical Competency in internal medicine CON and AM (TE). When the comparison was restricted to departments of comparable size, differences remained significant for Clinical Competencies in AM (TE, TR), and Culture of Decision Making (TE). CON received better grades than AM in Global Satisfaction

  15. Telementoring for minimally invasive surgical training by wireless robot.

    PubMed

    Sereno, S; Mutter, D; Dallemagne, B; Smith, C D; Marescaux, Jacques

    2007-09-01

    Hands-on training courses with local mentoring are excellent educational tools in laparoscopic surgery; however, the need for the physical presence of specialized instructors represents a limitation because of costs, time, and geographic constraints. Remote robotic telementoring using a wireless videoconferencing mobile robot could represent an alternative to local instruction. The authors compare local active and passive mentoring with remote robotic telementoring using the wireless RP-6 Robot that worked through a WiFi 802.11b connection during a hands-on laparoscopic training session. Surgeons were mentored once in France from the United States. Robot mentoring was well received and appreciated (assessment score of 2.65; scale, 0 to 4). There was no statistical difference in the different mentoring sessions (active, passive, and remote). Mobile wireless robot is a valuable tool in laparoscopic telementoring. Robotic-assisted telementoring may not replace onsite mentoring, but it may enhance educational opportunities and the quality of hands-on training courses by implementing tutoring with expert assistance from remote locations.

  16. Hands-On Surgical Training Workshop: an Active Role-Playing Patient Education for Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wongkietkachorn, Apinut; Boonyawong, Pangpoom; Rhunsiri, Peera; Tantiphlachiva, Kasaya

    2016-01-20

    Most patient education involves passive learning. To improve patient education regarding surgery, an active learning workshop-based teaching method is proposed. The objective of this study was to assess level of patient surgical knowledge, achievement of workshop learning objectives, patient apprehension about future surgery, and participant workshop satisfaction after completing a surgical training workshop. A four-station workshop (surgical scrub, surgical suture, laparoscopic surgery, and robotic surgery) was developed to teach four important components of the surgical process. Healthy, surgery-naive adolescents were enrolled to attend this 1-h workshop-based training program. Training received by participants was technically and procedurally identical to training received by actual surgeons. Pre- and post-workshop questionnaires were used to assess learning outcomes. There were 1312 participants, with a mean age 15.9 ± 1.1 years and a gender breakdown of 303 males and 1009 females. For surgical knowledge, mean pre-workshop and post-workshop scores were 6.1 ± 1.5 and 7.5 ± 1.5 (out of 10 points), respectively (p < 0.001). Out of 5 possible points, achievement of learning objectives, decreased apprehension about future surgery, and overall workshop satisfaction scores were all higher than 4.5. Active, hands-on patient education is an effective way to improve understanding of surgery-related processes. This teaching method may also decrease apprehension that patients or potential patients harbor regarding a future surgical procedure.

  17. Role and feasibility of psychomotor and dexterity testing in selection for surgical training.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Anthony G; Leonard, Gerald; Traynor, Oscar J

    2009-03-01

    The practice of Surgery has undergone major changes in the past 20 years and this is likely to continue. Knowledge, judgement and good technical skills will no longer be enough to safely practice surgery and interventional procedures. Fundamental abilities (e.g. psychomotor skills, visuospatial ability and depth perception) are critically important for catheter-based interventions, NOTES, robotic surgery and other procedural interventions of the future. Not all individuals possess the same amount of these innate fundamental abilities and those less endowed are likely to struggle during surgical training and thereafter in surgical practice. In contrast to other high-skill professions/industries (e.g. aviation) we do not have a tradition of testing prospective surgical trainees for abilities/attributes that we now recognize as being important for surgical practice. Instead, we continue to rely on surrogate markers of future potential (e.g. academic record). However, many studies have shown that psychomotor ability is an important predictor of both learning rate and performance for complex laparoscopic tasks. Psychomotor skills, visuospatial ability and depth perception can all be tested objectively by validated tests. At the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, all short-listed candidates for Higher Surgical Training now undergo formal testing of both technical skills and fundamental abilities (psychomotor skills, visuospatial ability and depth perception). Reports on each candidate's performance are supplied to the interview committee. Furthermore, a prospective database is being kept for correlation with future surgical performance. We believe that selection into surgical training should take account of attributes that we know are important for safe and efficient surgical practice.

  18. Personal satisfaction and mentorship are critical factors for today's resident surgeons to seek surgical training.

    PubMed

    Lukish, Jeffrey; Cruess, David

    2005-11-01

    The specific aim of this study was to summarize the viewpoints of the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons (RAS-ACS) membership regarding current training and quality of life-related issues prior to implementation of the new duty-hour guidelines. The goal was to gain insight of the members that may be useful to recruit and guide the future training of surgical residents. An Internet-based survey was developed to evaluate the viewpoints of RAS-ACS. The survey was administered by Esurveymaker.com via the ACS Web page from 2000 to 2003. RAS-ACS member participation was voluntary and anonymous. Analyses were performed to determine the frequency of response for each survey item. Two hundred thirty-five members completed the survey representing 5 per cent of RAS-ACS. Eighty-four per cent were general surgery residents. Personal satisfaction (64%) and mentorship (49%) were top factors for respondents to pursue surgical training; discussion with colleagues and future income was less important. Forty-five per cent reported that job performance was their most important concern during residency. A rewarding surgical career and family life were ranked as the most important expectations. Eighty-six per cent reported that they were satisfied with their residency, and 66 per cent reported that work hours should be limited. Personal satisfaction and mentorship were critical factors for members of the RAS-ACS to seek surgical training. Although most of the members report that work hours should be limited, an overwhelming majority reports satisfaction with surgical training prior to institution of the new duty-hour guidelines. Further emphasis on mentorship and work-hour reform may be beneficial in recruiting medical students into surgical residencies.

  19. Rising to the challenge: acute stress appraisals and selection centre performance in applicants to postgraduate specialty training in anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Martin J; Gale, Thomas C E; McGrath, John S; Wilson, Mark R

    2016-05-01

    The ability to work under pressure is a vital non-technical skill for doctors working in acute medical specialties. Individuals who evaluate potentially stressful situations as challenging rather than threatening may perform better under pressure and be more resilient to stress and burnout. Training programme recruitment processes provide an important opportunity to examine applicants' reactions to acute stress. In the context of multi-station selection centres for recruitment to anaesthesia training programmes, we investigated the factors influencing candidates' pre-station challenge/threat evaluations and the extent to which their evaluations predicted subsequent station performance. Candidates evaluated the perceived stress of upcoming stations using a measure of challenge/threat evaluation-the cognitive appraisal ratio (CAR)-and consented to release their demographic details and station scores. Using regression analyses we determined which candidate and station factors predicted variation in the CAR and whether, after accounting for these factors, the CAR predicted candidate performance in the station. The CAR was affected by the nature of the station and candidate gender, but not age, ethnicity, country of training or clinical experience. Candidates perceived stations involving work related tasks as more threatening. After controlling for candidates' demographic and professional profiles, the CAR significantly predicted station performance: 'challenge' evaluations were associated with better performance, though the effect was weak. Our selection centre model can help recruit prospective anaesthetists who are able to rise to the challenge of performing in stressful situations but results do not support the direct use of challenge/threat data for recruitment decisions.

  20. The Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy Scripts: pharmacy school graduates continue training in postgraduate residency programs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Carolyn; Tokumaru, Sheri; Goo, Roy; Ciarleglio, Anita

    2015-05-01

    Residency training is designed to provide recent pharmacy school graduates who have the profession's terminal Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree with accelerated growth beyond entry-level professional competence. Placement into residency programs is highly competitive through an application and match process. These programs provide additional training in patient-centered care with advancement of skills in clinical judgment, pharmacy operations, clinical research, project management, and leadership. Approximately 20% of a pharmacy graduating class will apply for a residency. With increasing numbers of pharmacy schools across the country, the availability of residency programs is falling behind applicants. The establishment of the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP) has addressed the shortage of pharmacists within the state. In recent years, resident positions in Hawai'i have doubled to a total of ten first year residency (PGY1) and two second year (PGY2) specialty residencies. Given the limited availability of positions in Hawai'i, graduates continue to return to the continental US to seek positions, thus increasing the likelihood of them not returning to practice in Hawai'i. Establishing residency programs is essential to elevate the level of pharmacy practice toward innovation and adherence to best practices, academia/teaching and scholarly research. This descriptive paper will detail the general components and types of pharmacy practice residency, the unique components of the Hawai'i programs, the career placement of Hawai'i's programs graduates and future challenges.

  1. Existing and Future Educational Needs in Graduate and Postgraduate Education.

    PubMed

    Eardley, Ian; Reisman, Yacov; Goldstein, Sue; Kramer, Andrew; Dean, John; Coleman, Eli

    2017-04-01

    This review was designed to make recommendations on future educational needs, principles of curricular development, and how the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) should address the need to enhance and promote human sexuality education around the world. To explore the ways in which graduate and postgraduate medical education in human sexuality has evolved and is currently delivered. We reviewed existing literature concerning sexuality education, curriculum development, learning strategies, educational formats, evaluation of programs, evaluation of students, and faculty development. We reviewed literature relating to four main areas: (i) the current status of the international regulation of training in sexual medicine; (ii) the current delivery of education and training in sexual medicine; (iii) resident and postgraduate education in sexual medicine surgery; and (iv) education and training for allied health professionals. The main findings in these four areas are as follows. Sexual medicine has grown considerably as a specialty during the past 20 years, with many drivers being identified. However, the regulatory aspects of training, assessment, and certification are currently in the early stages of development and are in many ways lagging behind the scientific and clinical knowledge in the field. However, there are examples of the development of curricula with accompanying assessments that have attempted to set standards of education and training that might underlie the delivery of high-quality care to patients in sexual medicine. The development of competence assessment has been applied to surgical training in sexual medicine, and there is increasing interest in simulation as a means of enhancing technical skills training. Although the focus of curriculum development has largely been the medical profession, there is early interest in the development of standards for training and education of allied health professionals. Organizations of professionals

  2. Production and evaluation of stereoscopic video presentation in surgical training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgner, Justus; Kawai, Takashi; Westhofen, Martin; Shibata, Takashi

    2004-05-01

    Stereoscopic video teaching can facilitate understanding for current minimally-invasive operative techniques. This project was created to set up a digital stereoscopic teaching environment for training of ENT residents and medical students. We recorded three ENT operative procedures (tympanoplasty, paranasal sinus operation and laser chordectomy) at the University Hospital Aachen. The material was edited stereoscopically at the Waseda University and converted into a streaming 3-D video format, which does not depend on PAL or NTSC signal standards. Video clips were evaluated by 5 ENT specialists and 11 residents in single sessions on an LCD monitor (8) and a CRT monitor (8). Emphasis was laid on depth perception, visual fatigue and time to achieve stereoscopic impression. Qualitative results were recorded on a visual analogue scale, ranging from 1 (excellent) to 5 (bad). The overall impression was rated 2,06 to 3,13 in the LCD group and 2,0 to 2,62 in the CRT group. The depth impression was rated 1,63 to 2,88 (LCD) and 1,63 to 2,25 (CRT). Stereoscopic video teaching was regarded as useful in ENT training by all participants. Further points for evaluation will be the quantification of depth information as well as the information gain in teaching junior colleagues.

  3. A role for error training in surgical technical skill instruction and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rogers, David A; Regehr, Glenn; MacDonald, Jeannie

    2002-03-01

    During the evaluation of many instances of the same basic surgical skill, we observed that there were several errors that occurred frequently. Two studies were undertaken to examine the use of these errors for improving the instruction and evaluation of the skill. For both studies, two types of rater training videotapes were developed. One involved the use of examples of common errors (error) and the other demonstrated the skill being performed correctly (correct). A testing videotape was created consisting of 24 performances of the skill that ranged in quality of the performance. The first study was designed to assess the impact of error instruction on skill acquisition. In this study, a group of 30 senior medical students were randomly assigned to one of four different training groups: none, error only, correct only, and error+correct. Subjects were videotaped performing the skill before and after the training and three experts evaluated these performances independently using a 7-point rating scale. The second study was designed to assess the impact of error training on skill evaluation and was done using both novice and expert raters. The same group of 30 senior medical students used in the first study was used as novice raters. Following training in one of the four training groups, each subject rated the 24 performances on the testing videotape and interrater reliability was assessed for each group. Surgical faculty served as expert raters in this study and were randomly assigned to receive either error training or no training. Each subject viewed the testing videotape, rating the performances and giving "feedback" commentary. Interrater reliability was calculated for the two groups and the precision of the feedback was assessed. Significant improvement in posttest performance scores was seen only in the "error+correct" training group. Interrater reliability was somewhat lower for the "correct only" and "error only" training groups in both the student and

  4. Workplace-based assessment: assessing technical skill throughout the continuum of surgical training.

    PubMed

    Beard, Jonathan; Rowley, David; Bussey, Maria; Pitts, David

    2009-03-01

    The Royal Colleges of Surgeons and Surgical Specialty Associations in the UK have introduced competence-based syllabi and curricula for surgical training. The syllabi of the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme (ISCP) and Orthopaedic Curriculum and Assessment Programme (OCAP) define the core competencies, that is, the observable and measureable behaviours required of a surgical trainee. The curricula define when, where and how these will be assessed. Procedure-based assessment (PBA) has been adopted as the principal method of assessing surgical skills. It combines competencies specific to the procedure with generic competencies such as safe handling of instruments. It covers the entire procedure, including preoperative and postoperative planning. A global summary of the level at which the trainee performed the assessed elements of the procedure is also included. The form has been designed to be completed quickly by the assessor (clinical supervisor) and fed-back to the trainee between operations. PBA forms have been developed for all index procedures in all surgical specialties. The forms are intended to be used as frequently as possible when performing index procedures, as their primary aim is to aid learning. At the end of a training placement the aggregated PBA forms, together with the logbook, enable the Educational Supervisor and/or Programme Director to make a summary judgement about the competence of a trainee to perform index procedures to a given standard.

  5. Three-dimensional modeling of the temporal bone for surgical training.

    PubMed

    Bakhos, David; Velut, Stéphane; Robier, Alain; Al zahrani, Musaed; Lescanne, Emmanuel

    2010-02-01

    The anatomy of the temporal bone (TB) can only be mastered by repeated surgical and anatomic dissections, and surgical teaching initiative had a major effect on outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of an artificial TB model devoted to surgical training and education. A helical computed tomographic (CT) scan was used to acquire high-resolution data of cadaveric TB. Digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data were converted into.stl files after data processing. Cadaveric TBs were prototyped using stereolithography. The validation of the prototype needed several steps. First of all, we have studied on CT scan the positional relationship between the facial nerve and other structures of the cadaveric TBs and prototyped bones. Otoendoscopy of the middle ear and the internal acoustic canal and visualization of anatomic landmarks during TB drilling of the cadaveric TBs and prototyped bones were also performed. Seven normal CT scans of cadaveric TB were selected to make prototyped bone using stereolithography. Measurements of volume and distance showed no significant difference between prototypes and cadaver TBs. Classic mastoid surgical procedures were performed in the Anatomy Department: exposing sigmoid sinus, facial nerve, labyrinth, dura mater, jugular bulb, and internal carotid artery. Two simulations of implantable middle ear prosthesis were made successfully. These prototypes made using stereolithography seem to be a good anatomic model for surgical training. This model could also be interesting for surgical planning in congenital ear anomalies before middle ear prosthesis implantation.

  6. Surgical treatment of otosclerosis in medical residency training.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Vinicius Antunes; Becker, Celso Gonçalves; Guimarães, Roberto E S; Crosara, Paulo Fernando Tormin B; Morais, Gabriela Amélia Nassif; Moura, Marcelo

    2006-01-01

    The number of patients with stapes otosclerosis compared to the number of otorhinolaryngologists has declined over the past several years. As a result a controversy has arisen in the literature, whether or not stapes surgery should be included in residency programs. the objective of the present study is to evaluate the results and complications of estapedotomies performed by residents between January, 1997 and January, 2000, and consequently study the feasibility of including estapedotomies in residency programs. STUD DESIGN: retrospective review of prospectively collected audiometric data. fifty charts of patients that were submitted to a total of 51 primary stapedotomies were reviewed mainly for complications and audiological results. there was closure of the air-bone gap within 10 dB HL in 70.5% of ears and closure to within 20 dB HL in 86.3% of ears. There was one ear with total hearing loss (2%). From the results and complications seen in the present study, and analyzing papers from the literature, it is possible to conclude that stapedotomy is a procedure that can be included in residency programs, if there are surgical cases for the residents.

  7. Constraint-based soft tissue simulation for virtual surgical training.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen; Wan, Tao Ruan

    2014-11-01

    Most of surgical simulators employ a linear elastic model to simulate soft tissue material properties due to its computational efficiency and the simplicity. However, soft tissues often have elaborate nonlinear material characteristics. Most prominently, soft tissues are soft and compliant to small strains, but after initial deformations they are very resistant to further deformations even under large forces. Such material characteristic is referred as the nonlinear material incompliant which is computationally expensive and numerically difficult to simulate. This paper presents a constraint-based finite-element algorithm to simulate the nonlinear incompliant tissue materials efficiently for interactive simulation applications such as virtual surgery. Firstly, the proposed algorithm models the material stiffness behavior of soft tissues with a set of 3-D strain limit constraints on deformation strain tensors. By enforcing a large number of geometric constraints to achieve the material stiffness, the algorithm reduces the task of solving stiff equations of motion with a general numerical solver to iteratively resolving a set of constraints with a nonlinear Gauss-Seidel iterative process. Secondly, as a Gauss-Seidel method processes constraints individually, in order to speed up the global convergence of the large constrained system, a multiresolution hierarchy structure is also used to accelerate the computation significantly, making interactive simulations possible at a high level of details. Finally, this paper also presents a simple-to-build data acquisition system to validate simulation results with ex vivo tissue measurements. An interactive virtual reality-based simulation system is also demonstrated.

  8. Outcomes of dental implants placed in a surgical training programme.

    PubMed

    Smith, L P; Ng, M; Grubor, D; Chandu, A

    2009-12-01

    This study evaluates surgical outcomes and survival rates of implants placed in a multidisciplinary implant teaching programme. A retrospective review of all implant surgery performed over a 6-year period by accredited oral and maxillofacial surgery trainees at the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne was undertaken. Patients were reviewed for a minimum of 6 months post-implant placement. Implant survival was defined as those implants which were not removed, were clinically integrated as assessed by torque testing and in an appropriate position to receive a subsequent prosthesis. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess overall survival and univariate factors affecting survival. Multivariate analysis used Cox proportional hazards models. Over 6 years, 127 patients were treated. Follow-up data were present for 105 patients with 236 implants placed. Survival of implants at 1 and 5 years was 94 per cent and 92.8 per cent, respectively. The only univariate and multivariate factor which affected implant survival was perioperative bone grafting. All failed implants were single stage. Other factors such as patient age, smoking status, implant site, anaesthetic type, immediate or delayed placement, implant length and diameter, and medical comorbidities did not significantly affect implant survival. A satisfactory implant survival rate was found in a tertiary teaching centre. Perioperative bone grafting significantly increased the risk of implant failure.

  9. Verification of Accurate Technical Insight: A Prerequisite for Self-Directed Surgical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Yinin; Kim, Helen; Mahmutovic, Adela; Choi, Joanna; Le, Ivy; Rasmussen, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Simulation-based surgical skills training during preclinical education is a persistent challenge due to time constraints of trainees and instructors alike. Self-directed practice is resource-efficient and flexible; however, insight into technical proficiency among trainees is often lacking. The purpose of this study is to prospectively assess the…

  10. Verification of Accurate Technical Insight: A Prerequisite for Self-Directed Surgical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Yinin; Kim, Helen; Mahmutovic, Adela; Choi, Joanna; Le, Ivy; Rasmussen, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Simulation-based surgical skills training during preclinical education is a persistent challenge due to time constraints of trainees and instructors alike. Self-directed practice is resource-efficient and flexible; however, insight into technical proficiency among trainees is often lacking. The purpose of this study is to prospectively assess the…

  11. Two-part silicone mold. A new tool for flexible ureteroscopy surgical training

    PubMed Central

    Marroig, Bruno; Fortes, Marco Antonio Q. R.; Pereira-Sampaio, Marco; Sampaio, Francisco J. B.; Favorito, Luciano A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction and objectives: Flexible ureteroscopy is a common procedure nowadays. Most of the training programs use virtual reality simulators. The aim of this study was to standardize the building of a three-dimensional silicone mold (cavity) of the collecting system, on the basis of polyester resin endocasts, which can be used in surgical training programs. Materials and Methods: A yellow polyester resin was injected into the ureter to fill the collecting system of 24 cadaveric fresh human kidneys. After setting off the resin, the kidneys were immersed in hydrochloric acid until total corrosion of the organic matter was achieved and the collecting system endocasts obtained. The endocasts were used to prepare white color two-part silicone molds, which after endocasts withdrawn, enabled a ureteroscope insertion into the collecting system molds (cavities). Also, the minor calices were painted with different colors in order to map the access to the different caliceal groups. The cost of the materials used in the molds is $30.00 and two days are needed to build them. Results: Flexible ureteroscope could be inserted into all molds and the entire collecting system could be examined. Since some anatomical features, as infundular length, acute angle, and perpendicular minor calices may difficult the access to some minor calices, especially in the lower caliceal group, surgical training in models leads to better surgical results. Conclusions: The two-part silicone mold is feasible, cheap and allows its use for flexible ureteroscopy surgical training. PMID:27564302

  12. Preparing surgeons for rural Australia: the RACS Rural Surgical Training Program.

    PubMed

    Chong, Aaron; Kiroff, George

    2015-03-01

    The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons' Rural Surgical Training Program (RSTP) ran from 1996 to 2007. As a formal review of the RSTP had never occurred, it remained unknown whether the RSTP had achieved its objectives of training surgeons for and retaining them in practice in rural Australia. Sixty-six RSTP fellows and 67 general surgery fellows were asked to complete a survey evaluating factors influencing the decision to pursue a rural surgical career, the influence of the RSTP on subsequent career pathways and the adequacy of the RSTP in preparing its trainees for rural work. Fifty-one out of 66 RSTP fellows were noted to be in practice in metropolitan Australia, with only 15 in rural Australia. Responses obtained revealed rural surgical rotations during training as a major influence in the decision to perform rural work. Thirty out of 35 RSTP participants stated that the RSTP did not influence their subsequent careers. Six out of 15 RSTP respondents responded positively when asked about the adequacy of the RSTP in preparing its trainees for rural work. The RSTP largely succeeded in preparing its trainees for rural work, but did not succeed in retaining the majority of its trainees in practice in rural Australia. It appears that targeting doctors at the point of admission to surgical training, in the hope that this would translate into more rural surgeons, did not result in improved retention in rural areas. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  13. Avoiding Surgical Skill Decay: A Systematic Review on the Spacing of Training Sessions.

    PubMed

    Cecilio-Fernandes, Dario; Cnossen, Fokie; Jaarsma, Debbie A D C; Tio, René A

    2017-08-23

    Spreading training sessions over time instead of training in just 1 session leads to an improvement of long-term retention for factual knowledge. However, it is not clear whether this would also apply to surgical skills. Thus, we performed a systematic review to find out whether spacing training sessions would also improve long-term retention of surgical skills. We searched the Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, Eric, and Web of Science online databases. We only included articles that were randomized trials with a sample of medical trainees acquiring surgical motor skills in which the spacing effect was reported. The quality and bias of the articles were assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias assessment tool. With respect to the spacing effect, 1955 articles were retrieved. After removing duplicates and articles that did not meet the inclusion criteria, 11 articles remained. The overall quality of the experiments was "moderate." Trainees in the spaced condition scored higher in a retention test than students in the massed condition. Our systematic review showed evidence that spacing training sessions improves long-term surgical skills retention when compared to massed practice. However, the optimal gap between the re-study sessions is unclear. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hunter's legacy and surgical training and competence in the 21st century.

    PubMed Central

    Galasko, Charles S. B.

    2005-01-01

    John Hunter's many contributions to surgery include the development of the scientific approach and possibly the first use of evidence-based medicine. This oration, concentrates on two other areas ? first, some of his contributions to orthopaedics and secondly past, present and future surgical training and competence. PMID:16395820

  15. A gender-based analysis of work patterns, fatigue, and work/life balance among physicians in postgraduate training.

    PubMed

    Gander, Philippa; Briar, Celia; Garden, Alexander; Purnell, Heather; Woodward, Alistair

    2010-09-01

    To document fatigue in New Zealand junior doctors in hospital-based clinical training positions and identify work patterns associated with work/life balance difficulties. This workforce has had a duty limitation of 72 hours/week since 1985. The authors chose a gender-based analytical approach because of the increasing proportion of female medical graduates. The authors mailed a confidential questionnaire to all 2,154 eligible junior doctors in 2003. The 1,412 respondents were working > or = 40 hours/week (complete questionnaires from 1,366: response rate: 63%; 49% women). For each participant, the authors calculated a multidimensional fatigue risk score based on sleep and work patterns. Women were more likely to report never/rarely getting enough sleep (P < .05), never/rarely waking refreshed (P < .001), and excessive sleepiness (P < .05) and were less likely to live with children up to 12 years old (P < .001). Fatigue risk scores differed by specialty but not by gender.Fatigue risk scores in the highest tertile were an independent risk factor for reporting problems in social life (odds ratio: 3.83; 95% CI: 2.79-5.28), home life (3.37; 2.43-4.67), personal relationships (2.12; 1.57-2.86), and other commitments (3.06; 2.23-4.19).Qualitative analyses indicated a common desire among men and women for better work/life balance and for part-time work, particularly in relation to parenthood. Limitation of duty hours alone is insufficient to manage fatigue risk and difficulties in maintaining work/life balance. These findings have implications for schedule design, professional training, and workforce planning.

  16. Residents' perceptions of implant surgical training in advanced education in prosthodontic programs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Lee, Damian J; Knoernschild, Kent L; Campbell, Stephen D; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess residents' perspectives on their implant surgical training in Advanced Education in Prosthodontic programs in the United States. Questionnaires were distributed to all prosthodontic residents (N = 442). The 27 questions assessed the subjective and objective aspects of implant surgical training from the view of prosthodontic residents. The data were compiled and reported as frequencies. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. One hundred and ninety-eight responses (44.8%) were received and analyzed. Forty-seven percent (94) of the respondents felt that the philosophy of their programs regarding implant placement in prosthodontics was "optional but encouraged," whereas 30% (60) felt that it was "mandatory." The majority of the respondents (73%, 144) stated that their programs allowed them to place implants for their own patients. For those respondents who placed their own implants, 40% (58) of them indicated that the level of their clinical training was "competent." Almost half of the respondents expressed that they would like to have a proficient level of clinical training in implant surgery by the completion of their residency programs. Forty-four percent (87) of the respondents felt their residency training adequately prepared them for implant surgery, whereas the other 37% (73) did not. For those who did not, 74% (55) felt their residency programs should have prepared them for implant surgical training. The current generation of prosthodontic residents has an opportunity to place implants in their programs and would like to be trained in surgical aspects of implant dentistry at the level of competency or higher. © 2010 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Acquiring surgical skills: the history of surgical teaching at the University of Sydney 1883-2014.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kilian G M; Storey, Catherine E

    2016-06-01

    There have been at least 10 major revisions of the medical curriculum since the inauguration of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Sydney in 1883. This study traced the evolution of the teaching of surgery at our institution by examination of the set curriculum of each period; the expectations of student knowledge in the final examination as well as examining some of the insights provided by past students of their surgical experience through their writings. In the early years, medical graduates were qualified to perform operative surgery without any further training, whereas the modern postgraduate medical curriculum provides students with the basis for further surgical training.

  18. Impact of a short biostatistics course on knowledge and performance of postgraduate scholars: Implications for training of African doctors and biomedical researchers.

    PubMed

    Chima, S C; Nkwanyana, N M; Esterhuizen, T M

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the impact of a short biostatistics course on knowledge and performance of statistical analysis by biomedical researchers in Africa. It is recognized that knowledge of biostatistics is essential for understanding and interpretation of modern scientific literature and active participation in the global research enterprise. Unfortunately, it has been observed that basic education of African scholars may be deficient in applied mathematics including biostatistics. Forty university affiliated biomedical researchers from South Africa volunteered for a 4-day short-course where participants were exposed to lectures on descriptive and inferential biostatistics and practical training on using a statistical software package for data analysis. A quantitative questionnaire was used to evaluate participants' statistical knowledge and performance pre- and post-course. Changes in knowledge and performance were measured using objective and subjective criteria. Data from completed questionnaires were captured and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Participants' pre- and post-course data were compared using nonparametric Wilcoxon signed ranks tests for nonnormally distributed variables. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Baseline testing of statistical knowledge showed a median score of 0, with 75th percentile at 28.6%, and a maximum score of 71.4%. Postcourse evaluation revealed improvement in participants' core knowledge with the median score increasing to 28.5%; and the 75th percentile score to 85.7%; signifying improved understanding of statistical concepts and ability to carry out data analyses. This study just showed poor baseline knowledge of biostatistics among postgraduate scholars and health science researchers in this cohort and highlights the potential benefits of short-courses in biostatistics to improve the knowledge and skills of biomedical researchers and scholars in Africa.

  19. Development and validation of an instrument for measuring the quality of teamwork in teaching teams in postgraduate medical training (TeamQ).

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Irene A; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H; Boerebach, Benjamin C M; Heineman, Maas Jan; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork between clinical teachers is a challenge in postgraduate medical training. Although there are several instruments available for measuring teamwork in health care, none of them are appropriate for teaching teams. The aim of this study is to develop an instrument (TeamQ) for measuring teamwork, to investigate its psychometric properties and to explore how clinical teachers assess their teamwork. To select the items to be included in the TeamQ questionnaire, we conducted a content validation in 2011, using a Delphi procedure in which 40 experts were invited. Next, for pilot testing the preliminary tool, 1446 clinical teachers from 116 teaching teams were requested to complete the TeamQ questionnaire. For data analyses we used statistical strategies: principal component analysis, internal consistency reliability coefficient, and the number of evaluations needed to obtain reliable estimates. Lastly, the median TeamQ scores were calculated for teams to explore the levels of teamwork. In total, 31 experts participated in the Delphi study. In total, 114 teams participated in the TeamQ pilot. The median team response was 7 evaluations per team. The principal component analysis revealed 11 factors; 8 were included. The reliability coefficients of the TeamQ scales ranged from 0.75 to 0.93. The generalizability analysis revealed that 5 to 7 evaluations were needed to obtain internal reliability coefficients of 0.70. In terms of teamwork, the clinical teachers scored residents' empowerment as the highest TeamQ scale and feedback culture as the area that would most benefit from improvement. This study provides initial evidence of the validity of an instrument for measuring teamwork in teaching teams. The high response rates and the low number of evaluations needed for reliably measuring teamwork indicate that TeamQ is feasible for use by teaching teams. Future research could explore the effectiveness of feedback on teamwork in follow up measurements.

  20. Development and Validation of an Instrument for Measuring the Quality of Teamwork in Teaching Teams in Postgraduate Medical Training (TeamQ)

    PubMed Central

    Slootweg, Irene A.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Boerebach, Benjamin C. M.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Teamwork between clinical teachers is a challenge in postgraduate medical training. Although there are several instruments available for measuring teamwork in health care, none of them are appropriate for teaching teams. The aim of this study is to develop an instrument (TeamQ) for measuring teamwork, to investigate its psychometric properties and to explore how clinical teachers assess their teamwork. Method To select the items to be included in the TeamQ questionnaire, we conducted a content validation in 2011, using a Delphi procedure in which 40 experts were invited. Next, for pilot testing the preliminary tool, 1446 clinical teachers from 116 teaching teams were requested to complete the TeamQ questionnaire. For data analyses we used statistical strategies: principal component analysis, internal consistency reliability coefficient, and the number of evaluations needed to obtain reliable estimates. Lastly, the median TeamQ scores were calculated for teams to explore the levels of teamwork. Results In total, 31 experts participated in the Delphi study. In total, 114 teams participated in the TeamQ pilot. The median team response was 7 evaluations per team. The principal component analysis revealed 11 factors; 8 were included. The reliability coefficients of the TeamQ scales ranged from 0.75 to 0.93. The generalizability analysis revealed that 5 to 7 evaluations were needed to obtain internal reliability coefficients of 0.70. In terms of teamwork, the clinical teachers scored residents' empowerment as the highest TeamQ scale and feedback culture as the area that would most benefit from improvement. Conclusions This study provides initial evidence of the validity of an instrument for measuring teamwork in teaching teams. The high response rates and the low number of evaluations needed for reliably measuring teamwork indicate that TeamQ is feasible for use by teaching teams. Future research could explore the effectiveness of feedback on teamwork in

  1. Prospective evaluation of surgical palliative care immersion training for general surgery residents.

    PubMed

    Raoof, Mustafa; O'Neill, Lisa; Neumayer, Leigh; Fain, Mindy; Krouse, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Palliative care competencies in surgical training are recognized to improve the care of surgical patients with advanced or life-threatening illnesses. Formal programs to teach these competencies are lacking. The study aims to assess the feasibility and utility of a unique surgical palliative care immersion training program. A half-day Surgical Palliative Care Immersion Training (SPCIT) was developed using the American College of Surgeon's manual titled "Surgical Palliative Care: A Resident's Guide" as a framework. The training format was modeled after the highly successful University of Arizona Center on Aging's Interprofessional Chief Resident Immersion Training (IP-CRIT) Program to teach palliative care competencies to general surgery residents. Objective and self-assessments were performed at baseline, immediately post training and 5-months after training. For all pre-test, post-test comparisons on Likert scale, Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used. For aggregate scores a repeated-measures analysis of variance was used. Forty of the forty-eight residents (83%) completed the learner's needs assessment survey. Thirty-four (71%) of the forty-eight residents in the residency program participated in the SPCIT. Significant improvement was noted in objective assessment of post-test aggregate scores (Mean difference 2.15, 95% CI 0.52-3.77, p = 0.0083). There was a significant increase in proportion of residents who felt confident in discussing palliative care options (96.5% vs. 27.5%, p < 0.0001); end-of-life care (86.2% vs. 52.5%, p < 0.0065); code status (86% vs. 15%, p < 0.0001); prognosis (96% vs. 35%, p < 0.001); or withholding or withdrawing life support (79.2% vs. 45%, p = 0.0059) with patient/families after the SPCIT. The newly developed SPCIT program drastically improves knowledge, attitudes and perceived skills of general surgery residents. Similar training can be implemented in other surgical residency programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All

  2. A Descriptive Analysis of the Use of Workplace-Based Assessments in UK Surgical Training.

    PubMed

    Shalhoub, Joseph; Santos, Cristel; Bussey, Maria; Eardley, Ian; Allum, William

    2015-01-01

    Workplace-based assessments (WBAs) were introduced formally in the UK in 2007. The aim of the study was to describe the use of WBAs by UK surgical trainees and examine variations by training region, specialty, and level of training. The database of the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme was examined for WBAs between August 2007 and July 2013, with in-depth analysis of 2 periods: August 2011 to July 2012 and August 2012 to July 2013. The numbers of validated WBAs per trainee per year increased more than 7-fold, from median 6 per trainee in 2007 to 2008, to 39 in 2011 to 2012, and 44 in 2012 to 2013. In the period 2011 to 2012, 58.4% of core trainees completed the recommended 40 WBAs, with only 38.1% of specialty trainees achieving 40 validated WBAs. In the period 2012 to 2013, these proportions increased to 67.7% and 57.0% for core and specialty trainees, respectively. Core trainees completed more WBAs per year than specialty trainees in the same training region. London core trainees completed the highest numbers of WBAs in both the periods 2011 to 2012 (median 67) and 2012 to 2013 (median 74). There was a peak in WBAs completed by London specialty trainees in the period 2012 to 2013 (median 63). The most validated WBAs were completed by ST1/CT1 (specialty surgical training year, core surgical training year), with a gradual decrease in median WBAs to ST4, followed by a plateau; in the period 2012 to 2013, there was an increase in WBAs at ST8. Core surgical trainees complete ~50% "operative" (procedure-based assessment/direct observation of procedural skills) and ~50% "nonoperative" assessments (case-based discussion/clinical evaluation exercise). During specialty training, procedure-based assessments represented ~46% of WBAs, direct observation of procedural skills 11.2%, case-based discussion ~23%, and clinical evaluation exercise ~15%. UK surgical trainees are, on an average, undertaking 1 WBA per week. Variation exists in use of WBAs between training

  3. Students' perceptions of patient safety during the transition from undergraduate to postgraduate training: an activity theory analysis.

    PubMed

    de Feijter, Jeantine M; de Grave, Willem S; Dornan, Tim; Koopmans, Richard P; Scherpbier, Albert J J A

    2011-08-01

    Evidence that medical error can cause harm to patients has raised the attention of the health care community towards patient safety and influenced how and what medical students learn about it. Patient safety is best taught when students are participating in clinical practice where they actually encounter patients at risk. This type of learning is referred to as workplace learning, a complex system in which various factors influence what is being learned and how. A theory that can highlight potential difficulties in this complex learning system about patient safety is activity theory. Thirty-four final year undergraduate medical students participated in four focus groups about their experiences concerning patient safety. Using activity theory as analytical framework, we performed constant comparative thematic analysis of the focus group transcripts to identify important themes. We found eight general themes relating to two activities: learning to be a doctor and delivering safe patient care. Simultaneous occurrence of these two activities can cause contradictions. Our results illustrate the complexity of learning about patient safety at the workplace. Students encounter contradictions when learning about patient safety, especially during a transitional phase of their training. These contradictions create potential learning opportunities which should be used in education about patient safety. Insight into the complexities of patient safety is essential to improve education in this important area of medicine.

  4. Systematic review of live surgical demonstrations and their effectiveness on training.

    PubMed

    Brunckhorst, O; Challacombe, B; Abboudi, H; Khan, M S; Dasgupta, P; Ahmed, K

    2014-12-01

    Live surgical demonstrations are commonly performed for surgical conferences. These live procedures have recently come under scrutiny, in particular with issues pertaining to patient safety. This systematic review aimed to explore the evidence for live surgery as a training tool, and to investigate the safety of live surgical broadcasts. PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases were searched using a predefined search strategy from January 1980 to October 2013. Specialty Societies and primary Colleges of Surgeons were searched for guidelines or position statements on live surgical teaching. Educational value criteria demonstrated for live surgery included feasibility, acceptability, construct and concurrent validity. Complication rates during live procedures were not compromised in the majority of studies. Patient safety, however, may be affected during live procedures as success rates have been found to be lower in some studies. Only Cardiothoracic, Urology and Vascular Surgical Societies currently offer guidelines on conducting live surgical demonstrations. Little evidence exists on the safety and educational value of live surgery, with few studies of high quality conducted. Guidance on live procedures is scarce, with only three major surgical specialties offering any advice. More needs to be done to establish and promote evidence for the value of live surgery demonstrations. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Residency training program paradigms for teaching robotic surgical skills to urology residents.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sonal; Tan, Gerald Y; Srivastava, Abhishek; Leung, Robert A; Tewari, Ashutosh K

    2010-03-01

    The advent of laparoscopic and robotic techniques for management of urologic malignancies marked the beginning of an ever-expanding array of minimally invasive options available to cancer patients. With the popularity of these treatment modalities, there is a growing need for trained surgical oncologists who not only have a deep understanding of the disease process and adept surgical skills, but also show technical mastery in operating the equipment used to perform these techniques. Establishing a robotic prostatectomy program is a tremendous undertaking for any institution, as it involves a huge cost, especially in the purchasing and maintenance of the robot. Residency programs often face many challenges when trying to establish a balance between costs associated with robotic surgery and training of the urology residents, while maintaining an acceptable operative time. Herein we describe residency training program paradigms for teaching robotic surgical skills to urology residents. Our proposed paradigm outlines the approach to compensate for the cost involved in robotic training establishment without compromising the quality of education provided. With the potential advantages for both patients and surgeons, we contemplate that robotic-assisted surgery may become an integral component of residency training programs in the future.

  6. Surgical specialty procedures in rural surgery practices: implications for rural surgery training.

    PubMed

    Sticca, Robert P; Mullin, Brady C; Harris, Joel D; Hosford, Clint C

    2012-12-01

    Specialty procedures constitute one eighth of rural surgery practice. Currently, general surgeons intending to practice in rural hospitals may not get adequate training for specialty procedures, which they will be expected to perform. Better definition of these procedures will help guide rural surgery training. Current Procedural Terminology codes for all surgical procedures for 81% of North Dakota and South Dakota rural surgeons were entered into the Dakota Database for Rural Surgery. Specialty procedures were analyzed and compared with the Surgical Council on Resident Education curriculum to determine whether general surgery training is adequate preparation for rural surgery practice. The Dakota Database for Rural Surgery included 46,052 procedures, of which 5,666 (12.3%) were specialty procedures. Highest volume specialty categories included vascular, obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, cardiothoracic, urology, and otolaryngology. Common procedures in cardiothoracic and vascular surgery are taught in general surgical residency, while common procedures in obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, urology, and otolaryngology are usually not taught in general surgery training. Optimal training for rural surgery practice should include experience in specialty procedures in obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, urology, and otolaryngology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lost opportunity cost of surgical training in the Australian private sector.

    PubMed

    Aitken, R James

    2012-03-01

    To meet Australia's future demands, surgical training in the private sector will be required. The aim of this study was to estimate the time and lost opportunity cost of training in the private sector. A literature search identified studies that compared the operation time required by a supervised trainee with a consultant. This time was costed using a business model. In 22 studies (34 operations), the median operation duration of a supervised trainee was 34% longer than the consultant. To complete a private training list in the same time as a consultant list, one major case would have to be dropped. A consultant's average lost opportunity cost was $1186 per list ($106,698 per year). Training in rooms and administration requirements increased this to $155,618 per year. To train 400 trainees in the private sector to college standards would require 54,000 training lists per year. The consultants' national lost opportunity cost would be $137 million per year. The average lost hospital case payment was $5894 per list, or $330 million per year nationally. The total lost opportunity cost of surgical training in the private sector would be about $467 million per year. When trainee salaries, other specialties and indirect expenses are included, the total cost will be substantially greater. It is unlikely that surgeons or hospitals will be prepared to absorb these costs. There needs to be a public debate about the funding implications of surgical training in the private sector. © 2012 The Author. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  8. [Consequences drawn from the evaluation of logbook-based surgical training for final year students].

    PubMed

    Busemann, A; von Bernstorff, W; Heidecke, C-D

    2012-04-01

    The current training programme for final year medical students does not meet the requirements of surgery and is obviously not able to encourage young physicians to become surgeons. After finishing the surgical trimester, the motivation to become a doctor decreases considerably more strongly than after any other specialty during the final year programme. This emphasises the urgent need for a consequent redesign involving modern educational programmes. The present article represents a systematic analysis of 70 logbooks used by final year medical students, which accompanied them during the surgical trimester from August 2008 to December 2009 at the Department of Surgery at the University of Greifswald, Germany. This analysis was subsequently compared to an evaluation of the same students as to how valuable the logbook was for their surgical education by means of an anonymous questionnaire. The results indicate that the general quality of education during the surgical trimester was evaluated to be high, but that the use of a logbook in the current mode did not contribute to enhance medical/surgical training programmes. Although most of the requested examinations and procedures were carried out by at least 70 % of the students, less than half of them had the impression that the use of this specific logbook improved their education. The students ask for a more intense interaction with the tutor/mentor and request differentiated discussions about their personal stronger and weaker spots, as well as more bedside teaching, e. g., the terms of training ward rounds with the consultant surgeon. Besides, they demand more supervised practical skill training in contrast to the often commonly practiced "learning by doing". The logbook is a powerful and effective educational tool able to structure and examine medical training and skills. But the present evaluation of the surgical logbook indicates that there is a need to adapt the current version to student's and institution

  9. Surgical treatment compared with eccentric training for patellar tendinopathy (Jumper's Knee). A randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bahr, Roald; Fossan, Bjørn; Løken, Sverre; Engebretsen, Lars

    2006-08-01

    Although the surgical treatment of patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) is a common procedure, there have been no randomized, controlled trials comparing this treatment with forms of nonoperative treatment. The purpose of the present study was to compare the outcome of open patellar tenotomy with that of eccentric strength training in patients with patellar tendinopathy. Thirty-five patients (forty knees) who had been referred for the treatment of grade-IIIB patellar tendinopathy were randomized to surgical treatment (twenty knees) or eccentric strength training (twenty knees). The eccentric training group performed squats on a 25 degrees decline board as a home exercise program (with three sets of fifteen repetitions being performed twice daily) for a twelve-week intervention period. In the surgical treatment group, the abnormal tissue was removed by means of a wedge-shaped full-thickness excision, followed by a structured rehabilitation program with gradual progression to eccentric training. The primary outcome measure was the VISA (Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment) score (possible range, 0 to 100), which was calculated on the basis of answers to a symptom-based questionnaire that was developed specifically for patellar tendinopathy. The patients were evaluated after three, six, and twelve months of follow-up. There was no difference between the groups with regard to the VISA score during the twelve-month follow-up period, but both groups had improvement (p < 0.001). The mean combined VISA score for the two groups increased from 30 (95% confidence interval, 25 to 35) before the start of treatment to 49 (95% confidence interval, 42 to 55) at three months, 58 (95% confidence interval, 51 to 65) at six months, and 70 (95% confidence interval, 62 to 78) at twelve months. In the surgical treatment group, five knees had no symptoms, twelve had improvement but were still symptomatic, two were unchanged, and one was worse after twelve months (p = 0.49 compared

  10. A Qualitative Study of Postgraduate Students' Learning Experiences in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaur, Sarjit; Sidhu, Gurnam Kaur

    2009-01-01

    In Malaysia, postgraduate coursework and research training have expanded significantly in attracting both domestic and international students from Southeast Asia and the Middle East. The task of evaluating the student learning experience in postgraduate education can point out to researchers and university educators various mismatches that would…

  11. Post-Graduate Education in the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blume, S.; Amsterdamska, O.

    Major changes in postgraduate education since the 1970s in countries belonging to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) are examined. Postgraduate education refers to specialized or research training after the receipt of a university degree. The basis of analysis includes: analyses provided by authorities in Australia,…

  12. Time Trend in Interest and Satisfaction Towards Clinical Training and Academic Activities Among Early-Career Cardiologists - The Japanese Circulation Society Post-Graduate Training Survey.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Takashi; Kohsaka, Shun; Takei, Yasuyoshi; Fukuda, Keiichi; Ozaki, Yukio; Yamashina, Akira

    2017-09-07

    Satisfaction among early-career cardiologists is a key performance metric for cardiovascular (CV) educational programs. To assess the time trend in the interest and activities of early-career cardiologists regarding their training, we conducted web-based surveys in 2011 and 2015.Methods and Results:Early-career cardiologists were defined as physicians who planned to attend Japanese Circulation Society (JCS) annual meetings within 10 years of graduation. A total of 272 and 177 participants completed the survey for the years 2011 and 2015, respectively. Survey questions were designed to obtain core insights into the workplace, research interests, and demographic profile of respondents. Main outcome measures were satisfaction levels with their training program. The overall satisfaction rate for training was lower in 2015 than 2011; this was largely affected by decreases in the rates of satisfaction for valvular heart disease, ischemic heart disease, advanced heart failure, and congenital heart disease. Moreover, satisfaction with CV training was associated with the volume of invasive procedures such as coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions in 2011 but not 2015. Early-career cardiologists' satisfaction with their training decreased during the study period, especially in the field of evolving subspecialties (e.g., valvular heart disease or advanced heart failure), suggesting that prompt reevaluation of the current educational curriculum is needed to properly adapt to progress in cardiology.

  13. A proposal for the curriculum and evaluation for training rural family physicians in enhanced surgical skills

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Nadine; Iglesias, Stuart; Friesen, Randall; Berjat, Vanessa; Humber, Nancy; Falk, Ryan; Prins, Mark; Haines, Victoria Vogt; Geller, Brian; Janke, Fred; Woollard, Robert; Batchelor, Bret; Van Bussel, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Summary Rural western Canada relies heavily on family physicians with enhanced surgical skills (ESS) for surgical services. The recent decision by the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) to recognize ESS as a “community of practice” section offers a potential home akin to family practice anesthesia and emergency medicine. To our knowledge, however, a skill set for ESS in Canada has never been described formally. In this paper the Curriculum Committee of the National ESS Working Group proposes a generic curriculum for the training and evaluation of the ESS skill set. PMID:26574835

  14. Techniques for the preservation of enucleated animal eyes in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Rodriguez, P; Peña-Cuesta, R; Garcia-Cosio, J F; Quiroz-Mercado, H

    1990-11-01

    The main problem with using enucleated animal eyes in surgical training is that they remain fresh for such a short time. We describe a simple technique to preserve them by replacing the aqueous humor and part of the vitreous with another substance. We used 18 eyes of nine dogs (nine for the study and nine as controls), and three substances (2% methylcellulose, silicone oil, and gelatin). The methylcellulose group had the best results (including long-lasting mydriasis), preserving the eyes in which it was used in optimal surgical condition for up to 8 days, twice as long as the eyes in the control group (P less than .005).

  15. Systematic review of serious games for medical education and surgical skills training.

    PubMed

    Graafland, M; Schraagen, J M; Schijven, M P

    2012-10-01

    The application of digital games for training medical professionals is on the rise. So-called 'serious' games form training tools that provide a challenging simulated environment, ideal for future surgical training. Ultimately, serious games are directed at reducing medical error and subsequent healthcare costs. The aim was to review current serious games for training medical professionals and to evaluate the validity testing of such games. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PsychInfo and CINAHL were searched using predefined inclusion criteria for available studies up to April 2012. The primary endpoint was validation according to current criteria. A total of 25 articles were identified, describing a total of 30 serious games. The games were divided into two categories: those developed for specific educational purposes (17) and commercial games also useful for developing skills relevant to medical personnel (13). Pooling of data was not performed owing to the heterogeneity of study designs and serious games. Six serious games were identified that had a process of validation. Of these six, three games were developed for team training in critical care and triage, and three were commercially available games applied to train laparoscopic psychomotor skills. None of the serious games had completed a full validation process for the purpose of use. Blended and interactive learning by means of serious games may be applied to train both technical and non-technical skills relevant to the surgical field. Games developed or used for this purpose need validation before integration into surgical teaching curricula. Copyright © 2012 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Update on simulation-based surgical training and assessment in ophthalmology: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia S; Subhi, Yousif; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; la Cour, Morten; Konge, Lars

    2015-06-01

    This study reviews the evidence behind simulation-based surgical training of ophthalmologists to determine (1) the validity of the reported models and (2) the ability to transfer skills to the operating room. Simulation-based training is established widely within ophthalmology, although it often lacks a scientific basis for implementation. We conducted a systematic review of trials involving simulation-based training or assessment of ophthalmic surgical skills among health professionals. The search included 5 databases (PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science) and was completed on March 1, 2014. Overall, the included trials were divided into animal, cadaver, inanimate, and virtual-reality models. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Validity evidence was evaluated using a modern validity framework (Messick's). We screened 1368 reports for eligibility and included 118 trials. The most common surgery simulated was cataract surgery. Most validity trials investigated only 1 or 2 of 5 sources of validity (87%). Only 2 trials (48 participants) investigated transfer of skills to the operating room; 4 trials (65 participants) evaluated the effect of simulation-based training on patient-related outcomes. Because of heterogeneity of the studies, it was not possible to conduct a quantitative analysis. The methodologic rigor of trials investigating simulation-based surgical training in ophthalmology is inadequate. To ensure effective implementation of training models, evidence-based knowledge of validity and efficacy is needed. We provide a useful tool for implementation and evaluation of research in simulation-based training. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The future of patient safety: Surgical trainees accept virtual reality as a new training tool

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Rachel; Gantert, Walter A; Hamel, Christian; Metzger, Jürg; Kocher, Thomas; Vogelbach, Peter; Demartines, Nicolas; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Background The use of virtual reality (VR) has gained increasing interest to acquire laparoscopic skills outside the operating theatre and thus increasing patients' safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate trainees' acceptance of VR for assessment and training during a skills course and at their institution. Methods All 735 surgical trainees of the International Gastrointestinal Surgery Workshop 2006–2008, held in Davos, Switzerland, were given a minimum of 45 minutes for VR training during the course. Participants' opinion on VR was analyzed with a standardized questionnaire. Results Fivehundred-twenty-seven participants (72%) from 28 countries attended the VR sessions and answered the questionnaires. The possibility of using VR at the course was estimated as excellent or good in 68%, useful in 21%, reasonable in 9% and unsuitable or useless in 2%. If such VR simulators were available at their institution, most course participants would train at least one hour per week (46%), two or more hours (42%) and only 12% wouldn't use VR. Similarly, 63% of the participants would accept to operate on patients only after VR training and 55% to have VR as part of their assessment. Conclusion Residents accept and appreciate VR simulation for surgical assessment and training. The majority of the trainees are motivated to regularly spend time for VR training if accessible. PMID:18544173

  18. The future of patient safety: Surgical trainees accept virtual reality as a new training tool.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Rachel; Gantert, Walter A; Hamel, Christian; Metzger, Jürg; Kocher, Thomas; Vogelbach, Peter; Demartines, Nicolas; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2008-06-11

    The use of virtual reality (VR) has gained increasing interest to acquire laparoscopic skills outside the operating theatre and thus increasing patients' safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate trainees' acceptance of VR for assessment and training during a skills course and at their institution. All 735 surgical trainees of the International Gastrointestinal Surgery Workshop 2006-2008, held in Davos, Switzerland, were given a minimum of 45 minutes for VR training during the course. Participants' opinion on VR was analyzed with a standardized questionnaire. Fivehundred-twenty-seven participants (72%) from 28 countries attended the VR sessions and answered the questionnaires. The possibility of using VR at the course was estimated as excellent or good in 68%, useful in 21%, reasonable in 9% and unsuitable or useless in 2%. If such VR simulators were available at their institution, most course participants would train at least one hour per week (46%), two or more hours (42%) and only 12% wouldn't use VR. Similarly, 63% of the participants would accept to operate on patients only after VR training and 55% to have VR as part of their assessment. Residents accept and appreciate VR simulation for surgical assessment and training. The majority of the trainees are motivated to regularly spend time for VR training if accessible.

  19. Addressing Malawi's surgical workforce crisis: a sustainable paradigm for training and collaboration in Africa.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Javeria S; Young, Sven; Muyco, Arturo P; Borgstein, Eric; Charles, Anthony G; Mulwafu, Wakisa; Shores, Carol G; Banza, Leonard; Cairns, Bruce; Viste, Asgaut; Mkandawire, Nyengo

    2013-02-01

    The exodus of health professionals including surgeons from sub-Saharan Africa has been well documented, but few effective, long-term solutions have been described. There is an increasing burden of surgical diseases in Africa attributable to trauma (road traffic injuries), burns, and other noncommunicable diseases such as cancer, increasing the need for surgeons. We conducted a Descriptive analysis of surgical academic partnership between Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) Malawi, the University of Malawi-College of Medicine, the University of North Carolina in the United States, and Haukeland University Hospital, Norway, to locally train Malawian surgical residents in a College of Surgeons of East, Central and Southern Africa (COSECSA) approved program. The KCH Surgery Residency program began in 2009 with 3 residents, adding 3 general surgery and 2 orthopedic residents in 2010. The intention is to enroll ≥ 3 residents per year to fill the 5-year program and the training has been fully accredited by COSECSA. International partners have provided near-continuous presence of attending surgeons for direct training and support of the local staff surgeons, while providing monetary support in addition to the Malawi Ministry of Health salary. This collaborative, academic model of local surgery training is designed to limit brain drain by keeping future surgeons in their country of origin as they establish themselves professionally and personally, with ongoing collaboration with international colleagues. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The surgeon as educator: fundamentals of faculty training in surgical specialties.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nuzhath; Khan, Mohammed S; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    To explore faculty training in the field of surgical specialities with a focus on the educational aspect of faculty training. Teaching is an important commitment for academic surgeons alongside duties of patient care, research and continuing professional development. Educating surgical faculty in the skills of teaching is becoming increasingly important and the realisation that clinical expertise does not necessarily translate to teaching expertise has led to the notion that faculty members require formal training in teaching methods and educational theory to teach effectively. The aim of faculty training or development is to increase knowledge and skills in teaching, research and administration of faculty members. A range of resources, e.g. journal articles, books and online literature was reviewed to investigate faculty development programmes in surgery. Various issues were addressed, e.g. the need for faculty development, evaluating the various types of training programmes and their outcomes, and exploring barriers to faculty training. Recommendations were provided based on the findings. There is increased recognition that faculty members require basic training in educational theory and teaching skills to teach effectively. Most faculty training programmes are workshops and short courses, which use participant satisfaction as an outcome measure. However, there is growing consensus that longer term interventions, e.g. seminar series, longitudinal programmes and fellowships, produce more sustainable change in learning, behaviour and organisational culture. Barriers to faculty development include lack of protected time, reward and recognition for teaching. Recommendations are made including better documentation of faculty training interventions within surgery, further investigation into the effectiveness of long- vs short-term interventions, improved methodology, and increased recognition and reward for educational accomplishments. © 2012 BJU International.

  1. International experience, electives, and volunteerism in surgical training: a survey of resident interest.

    PubMed

    Powell, Anathea C; Mueller, Claudia; Kingham, Peter; Berman, Russell; Pachter, H Leon; Hopkins, Mary Ann

    2007-07-01

    Sustainable international surgery expertise is more frequently being discussed in the US surgical community. At the resident level, there is discussion about incorporating international experience into residency training, but current opportunities for residents are limited and often require personal funding and use of vacation time. This study analyzed resident interest in acquiring international experience. A structured questionnaire was administered anonymously to all New York University general surgery residents. The questionnaire elicited demographic information and information about interest in an international surgery elective and future volunteerism. Descriptive statistics and chi-square analyses were performed for the completed data. Fifty-two of 63 residents (82.5%) completed surveys. Fifty-one residents (98%) were interested in an international elective, and 38 residents (73%) would prioritize such an elective over all other electives. Twenty-three (44%) and 25 (48%) residents would be willing to use vacation and finance the elective, respectively. The most frequent expectations of international training were acquiring technical and clinical skills (94% of residents) and cultural skills (88%). Residents believed financial difficulties and scheduling conflicts were the most significant barriers to internat