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Sample records for postharvest gray mold

  1. Effect of Selenium on Control of Postharvest Gray Mold of Tomato Fruit and the Possible Mechanisms Involved

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhilin; Yin, Xuebin; Bañuelos, Gary S.; Lin, Zhi-Qing; Zhu, Zhu; Liu, Ying; Yuan, Linxi; Li, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Selenium (Se) has important benefits for crop growth and stress tolerance at low concentrations. However, there is very little information on antimicrobial effect of Se against the economically important fungus Botrytis cinerea. In the present study, using sodium selenite as Se source, we investigated the effect of Se salts on spore germination and mycelial growth of the fungal pathogen in vitro and gray mold control in harvested tomato fruit. Se treatment at 24 mg/L significantly inhibited spore germination of the fungal pathogen and effectively controlled gray mold in harvested tomato fruit. Se treatment at 24 mg/L seems to induce the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species in the fungal spores. The membrane integrity damage was observed with fluorescence microscopy following staining with propidium iodide after treatment of the spores with Se. These results suggest that Se has the potential for controlling gray mold rot of tomato fruits and might be useful in integrated control against gray mold disease of postharvest fruits and vegetables caused by B. cinerea. The mechanisms by which Se decreased gray mold decay of tomato fruit may be directly related to the severe damage to the conidia plasma membrane and loss of cytoplasmic materials from the hyphae. PMID:26779128

  2. Control of postharvest gray mold of table grapes in the San Joaquin Valley of California by fungicides applied during the growing season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicides applied in vineyards before harvest were evaluated to control postharvest gray mold of table grapes, caused by Botrytis cinerea. Under the arid growing conditions of the San Joaquin Valley of California, it causes vineyard bunch rot rarely, but it often causes substantial postharvest deca...

  3. Biocontrol of postharvest gray and blue mold decay of apples with Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Li, Renping; Zhang, Hongyin; Liu, Weimin; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2011-03-30

    The efficacy of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa against postharvest gray mold, blue mold and natural decay development of apples and the possible mechanisms involved were investigated. The decay incidence and lesion diameter of gray mold and blue mold of apples treated by R. mucilaginosa were significantly reduced compared with the control fruits, and the higher concentration of R. mucilaginosa, the better the efficacy of the biocontrol. R. mucilaginosa also significantly reduced the natural decay development of apples following storage at 20°C for 35 days or at 4°C for 45 days followed by 20°C for 15 days. Germination and survival of spores of Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea were markedly inhibited by R. mucilaginosa in an in vitro test. Rapid colonization of the yeast in apple wounds was observed whether stored at 20°C or 4°C. In apples, the activities of peroxidase (POD) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) were significantly induced and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) content) was highly inhibited by R. mucilaginosa treatment compared with those of the control fruits. All these results indicated that R. mucilaginosa has great potential for development of commercial formulations to control postharvest pathogens on fruits. Its modes of action were based on competition for space and nutrients with pathogens, inducement of activities of defense-related enzymes such as POD, PPO and inhibition of lipid peroxidation (MDA content) of apples, so as to enhance the resistance and delay the ripening and senescence of apples.

  4. Continuous ozone concentrations during cold storage to control postharvest gray mold in grapes, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray mold, caused by B. cinerea, causes severe losses since it spreads easily among berries during cold storage. Currently, it is controlled by fumigation with SO2 or SO2 emitting sheets within boxes. Alternative methods, such as storage in ozone atmospheres, are needed because SO2 is banned in orga...

  5. Recent advances on the use of natural and safe alternatives to conventional methods to control postharvest gray mold of table grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray mold, caused by Botrytis cinerea, is the main postharvest decay of table grapes. It can develop in the vineyard and spread rapidly among berries after harvest, during long distant transport, cold storage and shelf life. In conventional agriculture, bunches are sprayed with fungicides after flow...

  6. Evaluation of alternatives to fungicide to control postharvest gray mold alone or with ozone storage in grapes, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray mold, caused by B. cinerea, causes severe losses since it spreads easily among berries during cold storage. Currently, it is controlled by fumigation with SO2 or SO2 emitting sheets within boxes. Alternative methods, such as storage in ozone atmospheres, are needed because SO2 is banned in orga...

  7. Efficacy of heat treatments with water and fludioxonil for postharvest control of blue and gray molds on inoculated pears and fludioxonil residues in fruit.

    PubMed

    Schirra, Mario; D'Aquino, Salvatore; Mulas, Maurizio; Melis, Rita Anna Maria; Giobbe, Sara; Migheli, Quirico; Garau, Anna; Angioni, Alberto; Cabras, Paolo

    2008-05-01

    The residue levels of fludioxonil (FLU) were determined in pear cultivars Precoce di Fiorano, Coscia, and Spadona estiva after a 2-min dip in an aqueous mixture of FLU containing 300 or 100 mg/liter of active ingredient at 20 or 50 degrees C and after 12 days at 17 degrees C and 80% relative humidity (simulated shelf life conditions). The accumulation trend of FLU residues was determined in 'Precoce di Fiorano' pears after treatments with 25, 50, 100, or 200 mg/liter of active ingredient at 20 or 50 degrees C for 2 min or at 60 degrees C for 1 min. The efficacy of heat treatments with water and FLU was investigated on artificially inoculated 'Precoce di Fiorano', 'Coscia', and 'Spadona estiva' pears for the control of postharvest blue mold and gray mold caused by Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea, respectively. Treatment with 300 mg/liter FLU at 20 degrees C resulted in residue levels similar to those from treatment with 100 mg/liter FLU at 50 degrees C in 'Coscia' fruit but in significantly lower residues in 'Precoce di Fiorano' and 'Spadona estiva' pears. Post-shelf life residues decreased in all cultivars, especially in 'Spadona estiva' pears treated with 300 mg/liter FLU at 20 degrees C. Residue levels of FLU in 'Precoce di Fiorano' pears treated at 20, 50, or 60 degrees C were correlated with fungicide dosage. When an equal rate was used, treatment at 50 degrees C resulted in a higher and a notably higher FLU deposition than that found under treatment at 60 and 20 degrees C, respectively. The in vitro tests showed that both pathogens were very sensitive to FLU, with MICs averaging 0.05 and 0.1 mg/liter for B. cinerea and P. expansum isolates, respectively. The 50% effective concentration ranged between 0.01 and 0.05 mg/liter for B. cinerea and between 0.05 and 0.1 mg/liter for P. expansum. In the in vivo trials, hot water treatment effectively reduced the incidence of both diseases during the first 4 to 8 days, depending on cultivar, dip temperature

  8. Fungicide resistance profiling in Botrytis cinerea populations from blueberries in California and Washington and their impact on control of gray mold

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is a major postharvest disease of blueberries grown in the Central Valley of California (CA) and western Washington State (WA). Sensitivities to boscalid, cyprodinil, fenhexamid, fludioxonil, and pyraclostrobin, representing five different fungicide classes, were...

  9. INTERIOR VIEW, GRAY IRON MOLDING MACHINE WITH MOLDER, R. L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, GRAY IRON MOLDING MACHINE WITH MOLDER, R. L. BRANDY MOLDING A RAIL CASTING (LAWLER NO. 1337, A 16' x 35' MOLD WITH A 5' COPE AND A 4' DRAG). DRAG IS FILLED WITH SAND. - Lawler Machine & Foundry Company, Molding Area, 760 North Forty-fourth Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Performance evaluation of volatile organic compounds by antagonistic yeasts immobilized on hydrogel spheres against gray, green and blue postharvest decays.

    PubMed

    Parafati, Lucia; Vitale, Alessandro; Restuccia, Cristina; Cirvilleri, Gabriella

    2017-05-01

    Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Aureobasidium pullulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts were tested for their ability to survive and synthesize antifungal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both in vitro and in vivo conditions when immobilized on commercial hydrogel spheres. The results showed a good survival of all yeasts on hydrogel spheres up to 10 days of incubation. Moreover, VOCs produced in vitro by tested yeasts inhibited Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium digitatum and P. italicum radial growth and conidial germination, with the highest antagonistic activity reported for W. anomalus and A. pullulans strains. Experimental in vivo trials performed on strawberry and mandarin fruits proved the ability of VOCs to reduce significantly postharvest decays on artificially wounded tissues. Comprehensively, the best efficacy was detected for W. anomalus, which totally inhibited gray mold decay on strawberry fruits and significantly reduced green mold infections on mandarin fruits. On the other hand, blue mold decay on mandarin fruits was more effectively managed by A. pullulans VOCs. Accordingly, hydrogel spheres used as a support for VOC-generating yeasts could open a new way for the employment of this polymeric material as a bio-emitter in postharvest packaging.

  11. Effect of Cinnamic Acid for Controlling Gray Mold on Table Grape and Its Possible Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanquan; Qin, Guozheng; Li, Boqiang; Tian, Shiping

    2015-09-01

    Cinnamic acid (CA) is an organic acid and is widely used in food industry as a common food additive. Previous studies showed that CA has the antimicrobial activity in vitro, but little is known about the effect of CA on controlling the fruit decay in vivo. In present study, we showed that application of CA was significantly effective on controlling the gray mold of table grape caused by Botrytis cinerea. CA can directly inhibit the mycelial growth of B. cinerea on potato dextrose agar plates. The mechanisms by which CA inhibited fungal growth were assayed by staining the spores with fluorescent dyes propidium iodide and 7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, respectively. The results indicated that CA can damage the integrity of plasma membrane and induce the intracellular reactive oxygen species level of B. cinerea which were responsible for the reduction of growth rate. Meanwhile, CA treatment significantly stimulated the activities of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase which were closely related to the resistance of plant. Taken together, this study suggested that CA was effective on controlling the gray mold of table grape in postharvest period by inhibiting the growth of pathogen and inducing the resistance of host.

  12. First report of Botrytis pseudocinerea causing gray mold on blueberry in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botrytis cinerea has been shown to consist of two sibling species, referred to Group I and Group II, and the two groups can be differentiated by a PCR-RFLP on the Bc-hch gene (vegetative incompatibility locus). Group I has recently been described as a new species B. pseudocinerea. Gray mold caused b...

  13. Synergistic effect of the combined treatment with gamma irradiation and sodium dichloroisocyanurate to control gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) on paprika

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Minchul; Jung, Koo; Lee, Kwang-Youll; Jeong, Je-Yong; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Hae-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) is one of the most major fungal pathogens in paprika. Generally, gamma irradiation over 1 kGy is effective for the control of fungal pathogens; however, a significant change in fruit quality (physical properties) on paprika was shown from gamma irradiation at over 0.6 kGy (p<0.05). Therefore, in this study, the synergistic disinfection effect of the combined treatment with gamma irradiation and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) was investigated to reduce the gamma irradiation dose. In an artificial inoculation experiment of B. cinerea isolated from naturally-infected postharvest paprika, fungal symptoms were observed in the stem and exocarp of paprika after conidial inoculation. From the sensitivity of gamma irradiation and NaDCC, B. cinerea conidia were fully inactivated by 4 kGy of gamma irradiation (D10 value 0.99 kGy), and were fully inactivated by 50 ppm NaDCC treatment. The fungal symptoms were not detected by the dose-dependent gamma irradiation (>4 kGy) and NaDCC (>50 ppm). As a result of the combined treatment of gamma irradiation and NaDCC, the D10 value was significantly reduced by 1.06, 0.88, 0.77, and 0.58 kGy (p<0.05). Moreover, fungal symptoms were more significantly reduced in combined treatment groups (gamma irradiation and NaDCC) than single treatment groups (gamma irradiation or NaDCC). These results suggest that combined treatment with irradiation and NaDCC treatment can be applied to preserve quality of postharvest paprika or other fruits.

  14. Control of postharvest blue mold of Nanfeng mandarin by application of strain YS-1 Paenibacillus brasilensis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qihong; Chen, Jinyin; Guo, Juanhua

    2013-06-01

    In order to study its commercial value, antagonistic spectrum and storage application of YS-1 Paenibacillus brasilensis were investigated in this paper. YS-1 P. brasilensis showed obvious antifungal activity to 5 different fruit pathogens, which was of broad antagonistic spectrum. Effect and application of YS-1 P. brasilensis fermentation liquid on Nanfeng mandarin at different storage temperatures were also investigated with the puncture inoculation method. Results showed that lesion diameter and disease incidence at 25 °C were higher than those at 5 °C after end of the storage, and there was significant difference between them. P. brasilensis fermentation liquid was effective for control of Penicillium italicum on Nanfeng mandarin stored at 5 °C for 25 d or 25 °C for 20 d. Preharvest treatment combined with postharvest treatment significantly reduced the decay rate of Nanfeng mandarin by 5.8% more than the control, particularly in the 1st 2 mo of storage. Fruits treated with P. brasilensis fermentation liquid in preharvest and postharvest period tended to have higher total sugar content, titratable acidity, ascorbic acid (AsA) content, and soluble solids content than those in the control group, and there was significant difference between the 2 groups. A delay was observed in the drop in AsA content. In this article, strain YS-1 is reported for the 1st time as a biocontrol agent against blue mold of Nanfeng mandarin. The research will provide an application reference for preservation of citrus.

  15. Alternatives to conventional fungicides for the control of citrus postharvest green and blue molds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Literature review for electronic review journal “Stewart Postharvest Review” on the subject of alternatives to the fungicides for postharvest use on citrus fruit. This review contributes to the development of practical technologies to reduce postharvest fruit losses without the use of synthetic fung...

  16. Evaluation of sulfur dioxide-generating pads and modified atmosphere packaging for control of postharvest diseases in blueberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postharvest diseases are a limiting factor of storage and shelf life of blueberries. Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important postharvest diseases in blueberries grown in California. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sulfur dioxide (SO2)-generating pads (designated ...

  17. Analysis of Clonostachys rosea-induced resistance to tomato gray mold disease in tomato leaves.

    PubMed

    Mouekouba, Liana Dalcantara Ongouya; Zhang, Lili; Guan, Xin; Chen, Xiuling; Chen, Hongyu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Junfeng; Li, Jingfu; Yang, Yijun; Wang, Aoxue

    2014-01-01

    Tomato gray mold disease, caused by Botrytis cinerea, is a serious disease in tomato. Clonostachys rosea is an antagonistic microorganism to B. cinerea. To investigate the induced resistance mechanism of C. rosea, we examined the effects of these microorganisms on tomato leaves, along with changes in the activities of three defense enzymes (PAL, PPO, GST), second messengers (NO, H2O2, O2(-)) and phytohormones (IAA, ABA, GA3, ZT, MeJA, SA and C2H4). Compared to the control, all treatments induced higher levels of PAL, PPO and GST activity in tomato leaves and increased NO, SA and GA3 levels. The expression of WRKY and MAPK, two important transcription factors in plant disease resistance, was upregulated in C. rosea- and C. rosea plus B. cinerea-treated samples. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis showed that two abundant proteins were present in the C. rosea plus B. cinerea-treated samples but not in the other samples. These proteins were determined (by mass spectrum analysis) to be LEXYL2 (β-xylosidase) and ATP synthase CF1 alpha subunit. Therefore, C. rosea plus B. cinerea treatment induces gray mold resistance in tomato. This study provides a basis for elucidating the mechanism of C. rosea as a biocontrol agent.

  18. Analysis of Clonostachys rosea-Induced Resistance to Tomato Gray Mold Disease in Tomato Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xin; Chen, Xiuling; Chen, Hongyu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Junfeng; Li, Jingfu; Yang, Yijun; Wang, Aoxue

    2014-01-01

    Tomato gray mold disease, caused by Botrytis cinerea, is a serious disease in tomato. Clonostachys rosea is an antagonistic microorganism to B. cinerea. To investigate the induced resistance mechanism of C. rosea, we examined the effects of these microorganisms on tomato leaves, along with changes in the activities of three defense enzymes (PAL, PPO, GST), second messengers (NO, H2O2, O2−) and phytohormones (IAA, ABA, GA3, ZT, MeJA, SA and C2H4). Compared to the control, all treatments induced higher levels of PAL, PPO and GST activity in tomato leaves and increased NO, SA and GA3 levels. The expression of WRKY and MAPK, two important transcription factors in plant disease resistance, was upregulated in C. rosea- and C. rosea plus B. cinerea-treated samples. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis showed that two abundant proteins were present in the C. rosea plus B. cinerea-treated samples but not in the other samples. These proteins were determined (by mass spectrum analysis) to be LEXYL2 (β-xylosidase) and ATP synthase CF1 alpha subunit. Therefore, C. rosea plus B. cinerea treatment induces gray mold resistance in tomato. This study provides a basis for elucidating the mechanism of C. rosea as a biocontrol agent. PMID:25061981

  19. Systemic resistance to gray mold induced in tomato by benzothiadiazole and Trichoderma harzianum T39.

    PubMed

    Harel, Yael Meller; Mehari, Zeraye Haile; Rav-David, Dalia; Elad, Yigal

    2014-02-01

    Gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) is an important disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). This study examined defense-related gene expression involved in the resistance to B. cinerea that is induced in tomato plants by benzothiadiazole and Trichoderma harzianum T39 soil drench. In whole plants, transcriptional changes related to salicylic acid and ethylene were induced by the application of a 0.01% benzothiadiazole solution, whereas changes related to jasmonic acid were induced by the application of a 0.4% T39 suspension. On detached leaves, soil treatment by T39 led to enhanced resistance to B. cinerea infection that was proportional to the concentration of the T39 suspension. By 5 days after pathogen inoculation, the plants that had received the 0.04% T39 drench exhibited 62% less severe disease than the untreated plants. The 0.4% T39 drench led to an 84% reduction in disease severity. Observations of B. cinerea infection in leaves harvested from plants grown in the treated soils revealed that drenching with a T39 suspension induces systemic resistance against B. cinerea and primes salicylic acid- and ethylene-related gene expression in a manner proportional to the concentration of the biocontrol agent. Benzothiadiazole treatment induced resistance to gray mold independently of salicylic acid and led to strong priming of two genes known to be involved in defense against B. cinerea, Pti5 and PI2.

  20. Preventive and curative activity of combined treatments of sodium carbonates and Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 to control postharvest green mold of citrus fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preventive and curative activity of 2 min dips in 3% sodium carbonate (SC) or sodium bicarbonate (SBC) aqueous solutions heated to 40ºC, alone of followed by the application of 2 x 108 CFU/ml of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 (BA), in the control of postharvest green mold, caused by ...

  1. Bacillus sp. BS061 Suppresses Gray Mold and Powdery Mildew through the Secretion of Different Bioactive Substances.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Sook; Song, Ja-Gyeong; Lee, In-Kyoung; Yeo, Woon-Hyung; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2013-09-01

    A Bacillus sp. BS061 significantly reduced disease incidence of gray mold and powdery mildew. To identify the active principle, the culture filtrate was partitioned between butanol and water. The antifungal activity against B. cinerea was evident in the butanol-soluble portion, and active substances were identified as cyclic lipopeptides, iturin A series, by nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) and mass analysis. Interestingly, antifungal activity against powdery mildew was observed in the water-soluble portion, suggesting that cyclic lipopeptides have no responsibility to suppress powdery mildew. This finding reveals that biocontrol agents of Bacillus origin suppress gray mold and powdery mildew through the secretion of different bioactive substances.

  2. Botrytis californica, a new cryptic species in the B. cinerea species complex causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botrytis cinerea consists of two cryptic species, referred to as Group I and Group II based on Bc-hch gene RFLP haplotyping, and Group I has been described as a new cryptic species B. pseudocinerea. During a survey for Botrytis spp. causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes in the Central Va...

  3. Thyme essential oil as a defense inducer of tomato against gray mold and Fusarium wilt.

    PubMed

    Ben-Jabeur, Maissa; Ghabri, Emna; Myriam, Machraoui; Hamada, Walid

    2015-09-01

    The potential of thyme essential oil in controlling gray mold and Fusarium wilt and inducing systemic acquired resistance in tomato seedlings and tomato grown in hydroponic system was evaluated. Thyme oil highly reduced 64% of Botrytis cinerea colonization on pretreated detached leaves compared to untreated control. Also, it played a significant decrease in Fusarium wilt severity especially at7 days post treatment when it was reduced to 30.76%. To explore the plant pathways triggered in response to thyme oil, phenolic compounds accumulation and peroxidase activity was investigated. Plant response was observed either after foliar spray or root feeding in hydroponics which was mostly attributed to peroxidases accumulation rather than phenolic compounds accumulation, and thyme oil seems to be more effective when applied to the roots.

  4. Molds

    MedlinePlus

    ... touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions or asthma attacks in sensitive people. Molds can cause fungal infections. In addition, mold exposure may irritate your eyes, skin, nose, ...

  5. Factors affecting the synergy of thiabendazole, sodium bicarbonate, and heat to control postharvest green mold of citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Schirra, Mario; D'Aquino, Salvatore; Palma, Amedeo; Angioni, Alberto; Cabras, Paolo

    2008-11-26

    The efficacy of thiabendazole (TBZ) to control postharvest decay caused by Penicillium digitatum of citrus fruit can be enhanced by co-application with sodium bicarbonate (SBC) and/or heat treatment. The impact of these treatments was investigated in citrus fruit, as a function of TBZ and SBC concentration and temperature, and were related to the amount of TBZ residues in fruit (total residues), in fruit surface, in the cuticular wax, and in the inner fruit. The residue levels of TBZ were determined in 'Valencia' oranges following a 1 min dip in an aqueous mixture of SBC at 0.5, 1, or 2 wt %/vol and TBZ at 600 or 400 mg/L (active ingredient, a.i.) at 20 or 40 degrees C and after 0 and 20 days at 17 degrees C and 90% relative humidity. The influence of SBC and heat on the TBZ residue concentration on the fruit surface, in cuticular wax, and on the inner cuticle tissue was determined in 'Salustiana' oranges after a 1 or 3 min dip in TBZ alone at 600 mg/L and 20 or 50 degrees C or for 1 min in TBZ at 600 mg/L and SBC at 2% and 20 degrees C. The efficacy of heat treatments with water, SBC, and TBZ, applied separately or in combination, was investigated on artificially inoculated 'Nova' mandarins and 'Valencia' oranges for the control of postharvest green mold caused by a TBZ-sensitive (TBZ-s) or TBZ-resistant (TBZ-r) isolate of P. digitatum. The residue levels of TBZ in fruit, evaluated as total residues, were not affected by the co-application of SBC in most samples. While TBZ residues in the fruit surface were not significantly affected by the dip temperature or by co-application of SBC, the rates of diffusion and penetration of TBZ into cuticular wax markedly increased in the presence of SBC or when TBZ was applied in combination with heat. TBZ residues in the inner tissue of fruits treated at 20 degrees C were not dependent upon the dip time or by the presence of SBC and were similar to those found in fruit treated with TBZ at 50 degrees C for 1 min, whereas

  6. Control of postharvest green and blue molds of lemons with potassium phosphite and hydrogen peroxide, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant losses can occur after the harvest during the storage and marketing of citrus fruit in California due to green and blue molds, caused by P. digitatum and P. italicum, respectively. Currently, both diseases are controlled by application of the fungicides imazalil, sodium ortho-phenyl phen...

  7. Ecofriendly hot water treatment reduces postharvest decay and elicits defense response in kiwifruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hot water treatment (HWT) of fruit is an effective approach for managing postharvest decay of fruits and vegetables. In the present study, the effects of HWT (45 degrees C for 10 min) on the growth of Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum in vitro, and gray (B. cinerea) and blue mold (P. expans...

  8. Botrytis fragariae, a new species causing gray mold on strawberries, shows high frequencies of specific and efflux-based fungicide resistance.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Sabrina; Plesken, Cecilia; Rumsey, Sibylle; Dowling, Madeline; Schnabel, Guido; Weber, Roland W S; Hahn, Matthias

    2017-02-24

    Botrytis cinerea causes pre- and postharvest decay of many fruit and vegetable crops. A survey in German strawberry fields revealed Botrytis strains that differed from B. cinerea in diagnostic PCR markers and growth appearance. Phylogenetic analyses showed these strains to belong to an undescribed species in Botrytis clade 2, named Botrytis fragariae sp. nov. Isolates of B. fragariae were detected in strawberry fields throughout Germany, sometimes at similar frequencies as B. cinerea, and in the Southeastern United States. B. fragariae was isolated from overwintering strawberry tissue, but not from freshly infected fruit. B. fragariae invaded strawberry tissues with similar or lower efficiency than B. cinerea but showed poor colonization of inoculated non-host plant tissues. These data and its exclusive occurrence on strawberry indicate that B. fragariae is host-specific and has a different tissue preference than B. cinerea Various fungicide resistance patterns were observed in B. fragariae populations. Many B. fragariae strains showed resistance to one or several chemical classes of fungicides, and an efflux-based multidrug resistance (MDR1) phenotype previously described for B. cinerea Resistance-related mutations in B. fragariae were identical or similar to those of B. cinerea for carbendazim (E198A mutation in tubA), azoxystrobin (G143A in cytB), iprodione (G367A+V368F in bos1) and MDR1 (gain-of-function mutations in the transcription factor mrr1 gene, and overexpression of the drug efflux transporter gene atrB). The widespread occurrence of B. fragariae indicates that this species is adapted to fungicide-treated strawberry fields and may be of local importance as a gray mold pathogen alongside B. cinereaImportance Gray mold is the most important fruit rot on strawberries worldwide, and requires fungicide treatments for control. For a long time it was believed to be caused only by Botrytis cinerea, a ubiquitous pathogen with broad host range which quickly

  9. PCR assays for diagnosis of postharvest fruit rots and early detection of Phacidiopycnis washingtonensis and Sphaeropsis pyriputrescens in apple fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Speck rot caused by Phacidiopycnis washingtonensis and Sphaeropsis rot caused by Sphaeropsis pyriputrescens are two recently reported postharvest diseases of apple. Fruit infection by the pathogens occurs in the orchard, but symptoms develop after harvest and are similar to that of gray mold caused...

  10. PCR assays for diagnosis of postharvest fruit rots and early detection of Phacidiopycnis washingtonensis and Sphaeropsis pyriputrescens in apple fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Speck rot caused by Phacidiopycnis washingtonensis and Sphaeropsis rot caused by Sphaeropsis pyriputrescens are two recently reported postharvest diseases of apple. Infection of fruit by the pathogens occurs in the orchard, but symptoms develop after harvest and are similar to that of gray mold caus...

  11. Effects of pre- and post-harvest application of selenium on inducing disease resistance and selenium accumulation in fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botrytis cinerea, a ubiquitous fungal pathogen, causes severe damage (gray mold rot) on a large number of economically important fruits, vegetables, and ornamental crops at both pre- and post-harvest, which renders fruits unmarketable. Penicillium expansum is a widely spread fungal pathogen that cau...

  12. Effect of thymol and linalool fumigation on postharvest diseases of table grapes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mi Ho; Kim, Jin-Hee; Choi, Hyo-Won; Keum, Yoong Soo; Chun, Se Chul

    2014-09-01

    Several postharvest diseases of table grapes (Vitis vinifera) occur during storage, and gray mold rot is a particularly severe disease because the causal agent, Botrytis cinerea, grows at temperatures as low as 0℃. Other postharvest diseases, such as those caused by Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus spp., also often lead to deterioration in the quality of table grapes after harvest. The use of plant essential oils such as thymol and linalool, to reduce postharvest diseases in several kinds of fruits, including table grapes and oranges, has received much attention in European countries. However, to the best of our knowledge there has been no report of the use of thymol fumigation to control gray mold in table grapes in Korea. Thymol (30 µg/mL) and linalool (120 µg/mL) significantly inhibited mycelial growth and conidia germination of B. cinerea. The occurrence rate of gray mold rot of B. cinerea and other unknown fungi was significantly reduced by fumigation with 30 µg/mL thymol in several table grape cultivars, such as Campbell early, Muscat Bailey A, Sheridan, and Geobong. In this study, fumigation with 30 µg/mL thymol, had no influence on the sugar content and hardness of grapes, but reduced fungal infection significantly. This suggests that 30 µg/mL thymol could be utilized to reduce deterioration of grapes due to gray mold and other fungal infections during long-term storage.

  13. Effect of Thymol and Linalool Fumigation on Postharvest Diseases of Table Grapes

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi Ho; Kim, Jin-Hee; Choi, Hyo-Won; Keum, Yoong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Several postharvest diseases of table grapes (Vitis vinifera) occur during storage, and gray mold rot is a particularly severe disease because the causal agent, Botrytis cinerea, grows at temperatures as low as 0℃. Other postharvest diseases, such as those caused by Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus spp., also often lead to deterioration in the quality of table grapes after harvest. The use of plant essential oils such as thymol and linalool, to reduce postharvest diseases in several kinds of fruits, including table grapes and oranges, has received much attention in European countries. However, to the best of our knowledge there has been no report of the use of thymol fumigation to control gray mold in table grapes in Korea. Thymol (30 µg/mL) and linalool (120 µg/mL) significantly inhibited mycelial growth and conidia germination of B. cinerea. The occurrence rate of gray mold rot of B. cinerea and other unknown fungi was significantly reduced by fumigation with 30 µg/mL thymol in several table grape cultivars, such as Campbell early, Muscat Bailey A, Sheridan, and Geobong. In this study, fumigation with 30 µg/mL thymol, had no influence on the sugar content and hardness of grapes, but reduced fungal infection significantly. This suggests that 30 µg/mL thymol could be utilized to reduce deterioration of grapes due to gray mold and other fungal infections during long-term storage. PMID:25346603

  14. Coatings comprising chitosan and Mentha piperita L. or Mentha × villosa Huds essential oils to prevent common postharvest mold infections and maintain the quality of cherry tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Ingrid Conceição Dantas; de Oliveira, Priscila Dinah Lima; Pontes, Alline Lima de Souza; Lúcio, Ana Sílvia Suassuna Carneiro; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Madruga, Marta Suely; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-12-02

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of coatings comprising shrimp chitosan (CHI) and Mentha piperita L. (MPEO) or Mentha × villosa Huds (MVEO) essential oils to control mold infections caused by Aspergillus niger, Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum and Rhizopus stolonifer in cherry tomato fruits (Solanum lycopersicum L.) during storage at room temperature (25°C for 12 days) and low temperature (12°C for 24 days). The effects of the coatings on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of cherry tomato fruits during storage were also assessed. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of CHI against all test fungi was 8 mg/mL, whereas the MIC for both MPEO and MVEO was 5 μL/mL. Combinations of CHI at 4 mg/mL and MPEO or MVEO at 2.5 or 1.25 μL/mL strongly inhibited the mycelial growth and spore germination of target fungi. The coatings comprising CHI and MPEO or CHI and MVEO at the different tested concentrations delayed the growth of decay-causing fungi in artificially contaminated tomato fruit during storage at either room temperature or low temperature. The assayed coatings preserved the quality of cherry tomato fruit during storage, in terms of physicochemical and sensory attributes. These results indicate that coatings comprising CHI and MPEO or CHI and MVEO represent promising postharvest treatments to prevent common postharvest mold infections in cherry tomato fruit during storage without affecting the quality of the fruit.

  15. Botrytis californica, a new cryptic species in the B. cinerea species complex causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes.

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Margosan, D; Michailides, T J; Xiao, C L

    2016-01-01

    The Botrytis cinerea species complex comprises two cryptic species, originally referred to Group I and Group II based on Bc-hch gene RFLP haplotyping. Group I was described as a new cryptic species B. pseudocinerea During a survey of Botrytis spp. causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes in the Central Valley of California, six isolates, three from blueberries and three from table grapes, were placed in Group I but had a distinct morphological character with conidiophores significantly longer than those of B. cinerea and B. pseudocinerea We compared these with B. cinerea and B. pseudocinerea by examining morphological and physiological characters, sensitivity to fenhexamid and phylogenetic analysis inferred from sequences of three nuclear genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the three partial gene sequences encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), heat-shock protein 60 (HSP60) and DNA-dependent RNA polymerase subunit II (RPB2) supported the proposal of a new Botrytis species, B. californica, which is closely related genetically to B. cinerea, B. pseudocinerea and B. sinoviticola, all known as causal agents of gray mold of grapes. Botrytis californica caused decay on blueberry and table grape fruit inoculated with the fungus. This study suggests that B. californica is a cryptic species sympatric with B. cinerea on blueberries and table grapes in California.

  16. The ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde fungus’: noble rot versus gray mold symptoms of Botrytis cinerea on grapes

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Elisabeth; Gladieux, Pierre; Giraud, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Many cryptic species have recently been discovered in fungi, especially in fungal plant pathogens. Cryptic fungal species co-occurring in sympatry may occupy slightly different ecological niches, for example infecting the same crop plant but specialized on different organs or having different phenologies. Identifying cryptic species in fungal pathogens of crops and determining their ecological specialization are therefore crucial for disease management. Here, we addressed this question in the ascomycete Botrytis cinerea, the agent of gray mold on a wide range of plants. On grape, B. cinerea causes severe damage but is also responsible for noble rot used for processing sweet wines. We used microsatellite genotyping and clustering methods to elucidate whether isolates sampled on gray mold versus noble rot symptoms in three French regions belong to genetically differentiated populations. The inferred population structure matched geography rather than the type of symptom. Noble rot symptoms therefore do not seem to be caused by a specific B. cinerea population but instead seem to depend essentially on microclimatic conditions, which has applied consequences for the production of sweet wines. PMID:24062804

  17. Control of citrus postharvest green mold and sour rot by potassium sorbate combined with heat and fungicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potassium sorbate (KS), a common food preservative, was evaluated to control postharvest decay of citrus fruit. Significant advantages of KS over the commonly used sodium bicarbonate, which similarly improved fungicide performance, are the relatively low salt concentration of KS, the absence of sodi...

  18. Effectiveness of Different Classes of Fungicides on Botrytis cinerea Causing Gray Mold on Fruit and Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Oh; Shin, Jong-Hwan; Gumilang, Adiyantara; Chung, Keun; Choi, Ki Young; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic pathogen causing a major problem in the export and post-harvest of strawberries. Inappropriate use of fungicides leads to resistance among fungal pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the sensitivity of B. cinerea to various classes of fungicide and to determine the effectiveness of different concentrations of commonly used fungicides. We thus evaluated the effectiveness of six classes of fungicide in inhibiting the growth and development of this pathogen, namely, fludioxonil, iprodione, pyrimethanil, tebuconazole, fenpyrazamine, and boscalid. Fludioxonil was the most effective (EC50 < 0.1 μg/ml), and pyrimethanil was the least effective (EC50 = 50 μg/ml), at inhibiting the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. Fenpyrazamine and pyrimethanil showed relatively low effectiveness in inhibiting the germination and conidial production of B. cinerea. Our results are useful for the management of B. cinerea and as a basis for monitoring the sensitivity of B. cinerea strains to fungicides. PMID:27904464

  19. Effect of Chitosan Dissolved in Different Acids on its Ability to Control Postharvest Gray Mold of Table Grape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chitosan is a natural biopolymer that must be dissolved in an acid solution to activate its antimicrobial and eliciting properties. Among 15 acids, chitosan dissolved in 1% solutions of acetic, L-ascorbic, formic, L-glutamic, hydrochloric, lactic, maleic, malic, phosphorous, and succinic. Chitosan s...

  20. Efficacy of combined formulations of fungicides with different modes of action in controlling botrytis gray mold disease in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Rashid, M H; Hossain, M Ashraf; Kashem, M A; Kumar, Shiv; Rafii, M Y; Latif, M A

    2014-01-01

    Botrytis gray mold (BGM) caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers. Ex. Fr. is an extremely devastating disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and has a regional as well as an international perspective. Unfortunately, nonchemical methods for its control are weak and ineffective. In order to identify an effective control measure, six fungicides with different modes of action were evaluated on a BGM susceptible chickpea variety BARIchhola-1 at a high BGM incidence location (Madaripur) in Bangladesh for three years (2008, 2009, and 2010). Among the six fungicides tested, one was protectant [Vondozeb 42SC, a.i. mancozeb (0.2%)], two systemic [Bavistin 50 WP, a.i. carbendazim (0.2%), and Protaf 250EC, propiconazole (0.05%)], and three combination formulations [Acrobat MZ690, dimethomorph 9% + mancozeb 60%, (0.2%); Secure 600 WG, phenomadone + mancozeb (0.2%); and Companion, mancozeb 63% + carbendazim 12% (0.2%)]. The results showed superiority of combination formulations involving both protectant and systemic fungicides over the sole application of either fungicide separately. Among the combination fungicides, Companion was most effective, resulting in the lowest disease severity (3.33 score on 1-9 scale) and the highest increase (38%) of grain yield in chickpea. Therefore, this product could be preferred over the sole application of either solo protectant or systemic fungicides to reduce yield losses and avoid fungicide resistance.

  1. Botrytis pseudocinerea, a new cryptic species causing gray mold in French vineyards in sympatry with Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Walker, Anne-Sophie; Gautier, Ang Lique; Confais, Johann; Martinho, Daniel; Viaud, Muriel; Le P Cheur, Pascal; Dupont, Joelle; Fournier, Elisabeth

    2011-12-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a major crop pathogen infesting >220 hosts worldwide. A cryptic species has been identified in some French populations but the new species, B. pseudocinerea, has not been fully delimited and established. The aim of this study was to distinguish between the two species, using phylogenetic, biological, morphological, and ecological criteria. Multiple gene genealogies confirmed that the two species belonged to different, well-supported phylogenetic clades. None of the morphological criteria tested (spore size, germination rate, or mycelial growth) was able to discriminate between these two species. Sexual crosses between individuals from the same species and different species were carried out. Only crosses between individuals from the same species were successful. Moreover, population genetics analysis revealed a high level of diversity within each species and a lack of gene flow between them. Finally, a population survey over time showed that B. cinerea was the predominant species but that B. pseudocinerea was more abundant in spring, on floral debris. This observation could not be explained by temperature adaptation in tests carried out in vitro or by aggressiveness on tomato or bean leaves. This study clearly establishes that B. cinerea and B. pseudocinerea constitute a complex of two cryptic species living in sympatry on several hosts, including grapevine and blackberry. We propose several biological or molecular tools for unambiguous differentiation between the two species. B. pseudocinerea probably makes a negligible contribution to gray mold epidemics on grapevine. This new species has been deposited in the MycoBank international database.

  2. Gray mold populations in german strawberry fields are resistant to multiple fungicides and dominated by a novel clade closely related to Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Leroch, Michaela; Plesken, Cecilia; Weber, Roland W S; Kauff, Frank; Scalliet, Gabriel; Hahn, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea is a major threat to fruit and vegetable production. Strawberry fields usually receive several fungicide treatments against Botrytis per season. Gray mold isolates from several German strawberry-growing regions were analyzed to determine their sensitivity against botryticides. Fungicide resistance was commonly observed, with many isolates possessing resistance to multiple (up to six) fungicides. A stronger variant of the previously described multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype MDR1, called MDR1h, was found to be widely distributed, conferring increased partial resistance to two important botryticides, cyprodinil and fludioxonil. A 3-bp deletion mutation in a transcription factor-encoding gene, mrr1, was found to be correlated with MDR1h. All MDR1h isolates and the majority of isolates with resistance to multiple fungicides were found to be genetically distinct. Multiple-gene sequencing confirmed that they belong to a novel clade, called Botrytis group S, which is closely related to B. cinerea and the host-specific species B. fabae. Isolates of Botrytis group S genotypes were found to be widespread in all German strawberry-growing regions but almost absent from vineyards. Our data indicate a clear subdivision of gray mold populations, which are differentially distributed according to their host preference and adaptation to chemical treatments.

  3. Solidago canadensis L. Essential Oil Vapor Effectively Inhibits Botrytis cinerea Growth and Preserves Postharvest Quality of Strawberry as a Food Model System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shumin; Shao, Xingfeng; Wei, Yanzhen; Li, Yonghua; Xu, Feng; Wang, Hongfei

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the anti-fungal properties of Solidago canadensis L. essential oil (SCLEO) against Botrytis cinerea in vitro, and its ability to control gray mold and maintain quality in strawberry fruits. SCLEO exhibited dose-dependent antifungal activity against B. cinerea and profoundly altered mycelial morphology, cellular ultrastructure, and membrane permeability as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. SCLEO vapor at 0.1 mL/L maintained higher sensory acceptance and reduced decay of fresh strawberry fruit, and also reduced gray mold in artificially inoculated fruit. SCLEO treatment did not, however, stimulate phenylalanin ammonia-lyase, polyphenol oxidase, or chitinase, enzymes related to disease resistance. This suggests that SCLEO reduces gray mold by direct inhibition of pathogen growth. SCLEO vapor may provide a new and effective strategy for controlling postharvest disease and maintaining quality in strawberries. PMID:27531994

  4. Curative and preventive activity of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose-lipid edible composite coatings containing antifungal food additives to control citrus postharvest green and blue molds.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Chamorro, Silvia A; Pérez-Gago, María B; Del Río, Miguel A; Palou, Lluís

    2009-04-08

    Edible composite coatings based on hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), lipid components (beeswax and shellac), and food preservatives with antifungal properties were evaluated in vivo on clementine mandarins cv. Clemenules, hybrid mandarins cv. Ortanique, and oranges cv. Valencia. Their curative and preventive activity against citrus postharvest green (GM) and blue molds (BM), caused by Penicillium digitatum (PD) or Penicillium italicum (PI), respectively, were determined. Fruits were artificially inoculated before or after the application of the coatings and incubated up to 7 days at 20 degrees C. Selected food preservatives included mineral salts, organic acid salts, parabens, and 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Inoculated but uncoated fruits were used as controls. For curative activity, HPMC-lipid edible composite coatings containing sodium benzoate (SB) were most effective in reducing the incidence and severity of GM on clementine mandarins cv. Clemenules (86 and 90%, respectively). On this cultivar, the reduction in GM incidence by the SB-based coating was twice that of potassium sorbate (PS)-based coating. On mandarins cv. Ortanique, PS- and SB-based coatings reduced the incidence of GM and BM by more than 40 and 21%, respectively. However, the HPMC-lipid coating containing a mixture of PS and sodium propionate (PS + SP) exhibited a synergistic effect in the reduction of the incidence of GM (78%) and BM (67%). Coatings with parabens modestly reduced disease incidence and severity. On oranges cv. Valencia, coatings with food preservatives better controlled BM than GM. Coatings containing SB + PS and SB + SP reduced the incidence and severity of BM by 85% and 95%, respectively. PS- and SB- based coatings controlled GM more effectively than coatings formulated with other food preservatives. In every cultivar, fruit coated before inoculation did not show any incidence or severity reduction of both GM and BM (preventive activity). In every test, the antifungal action of the

  5. Ascorbic acid enhances oxidative stress tolerance and biological control efficacy of Pichia caribbica against postharvest blue mold decay of apples.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaolan; Zhang, Hongyin; Yang, Qiya; Komla, Mahunu Gustav; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Shuyun

    2014-07-30

    The effect of ascorbic acid (VC) on improving oxidative stress tolerance of Pichia caribbica and biocontrol efficacy against blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum on apples was investigated. P. caribbica showed susceptibility to the oxidative stress in vitro test, and 250 μg/mL VC treatment improved its oxidative stress tolerance. The higher viability exhibited by VC-treated yeast was associated with a lower intracellular ROS level. The activities of antioxidant enzymes of P. caribbica were improved by VC treatment, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Additionally, VC-treated yeast exhibited greater biocontrol activity against P. expansum and faster growth when stored at 25 and 4 °C, respectively, compared to the performance of the non-VC-treated yeast. In response to the VC treatment under oxidative stress, several differentially expressed proteins were identified in P. caribbica, and most of the poteins were confirmed to be related to basic metabolism. Therefore, the application of ascorbic acid is a useful approach to improve oxidative stress tolerance of P. caribbica and its biocontrol efficacy on apples.

  6. Ecofriendly hot water treatment reduces postharvest decay and elicits defense response in kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huizhen; Cheng, Zhe; Wisniewski, Michael; Liu, Yongsheng; Liu, Jia

    2015-10-01

    Hot water treatment (HWT) of fruit is an effective approach for managing postharvest decay of fruits and vegetables. In the present study, the effects of HWT (45 °C for 10 min) on the growth of Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum in vitro, and gray (B. cinerea) and blue mold (P. expansum) development in kiwifruit were investigated. HWT effectively inhibited spore germination and germ tube elongation of B. cinerea and P. expansum. Reactive oxygen species accumulation and protein impairment in the fungi triggered by HWT contributed to the inhibitory effect. Results of in vivo studies showed that HWT controlled gray and blue mold in kiwifruit stored at 4 and 25 °C. HWT induced a significant increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, including catalase and peroxidase, and the level of total phenolic compounds in kiwifruit. These findings indicate that the inhibition of postharvest decay in kiwifruit by HWT is associated with the inhibition of spore germination of both fungal pathogens and the elicitation of defense response in the kiwifruit host. Moreover, HWT used in this study did not impair fruit quality. HWT appears to represent a potential non-chemical alternative for the effective management of postharvest decay of kiwifruit.

  7. Evaluation of yeasts obtained from Antarctic soil samples as biocontrol agents for the management of postharvest diseases of apple (Malus × domestica).

    PubMed

    Vero, Silvana; Garmendia, Gabriela; González, M Belén; Bentancur, Oscar; Wisniewski, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Psychrotrophic yeasts were isolated from Antarctic soils, selected based on their ability to grow in apple juice at low temperatures, and were evaluated as potential biocontrol agents for the management of postharvest diseases of apple during cold storage. Among the species recovered, an isolate of Leucosporidium scottii, designated At17, was identified as a good biocontrol agent for blue and gray mold of two apple cultivars. The selected isolate produced soluble and volatile antifungal substances that were inhibitory to apple pathogens. Siderophore production was also demonstrated, but it did not appear to play a role in pathogen inhibition. The selected yeast had the capacity to form a biofilm when grown in apple juice, which is considered an important attribute of postharvest antagonists to successfully colonize wounds and intact fruit surfaces. At17 was resistant to commonly used postharvest fungicides, so application of a combination of low-dose fungicide along with the biocontrol agent could be used as an integrated management practice.

  8. Living colors in the gray mold pathogen Botrytis cinerea: codon-optimized genes encoding green fluorescent protein and mCherry, which exhibit bright fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Leroch, Michaela; Mernke, Dennis; Koppenhoefer, Dieter; Schneider, Prisca; Mosbach, Andreas; Doehlemann, Gunther; Hahn, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants have been widely used in modern biology as reporters that allow a variety of live-cell imaging techniques. So far, GFP has rarely been used in the gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea because of low fluorescence intensity. The codon usage of B. cinerea genes strongly deviates from that of commonly used GFP-encoding genes and reveals a lower GC content than other fungi. In this study, we report the development and use of a codon-optimized version of the B. cinerea enhanced GFP (eGFP)-encoding gene (Bcgfp) for improved expression in B. cinerea. Both the codon optimization and, to a smaller extent, the insertion of an intron resulted in higher mRNA levels and increased fluorescence. Bcgfp was used for localization of nuclei in germinating spores and for visualizing host penetration. We further demonstrate the use of promoter-Bcgfp fusions for quantitative evaluation of various toxic compounds as inducers of the atrB gene encoding an ABC-type drug efflux transporter of B. cinerea. In addition, a codon-optimized mCherry-encoding gene was constructed which yielded bright red fluorescence in B. cinerea.

  9. Biocontrol of gray mold disease on strawberry fruit by integration of Lactobacillus plantarum A7 with ajwain and cinnamon essential oils.

    PubMed

    Zamani-Zadeh, Maryam; Soleimanian-Zad, Sabihe; Sheikh-Zeinoddin, Mahmoud

    2013-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the Lactobacillus plantarum A7 (L. Plantarum), ajwain and cinnamon essential oils (AO and CO, respectively) in suppressing gray mold rot in strawberry fruit. AO and CO showed over 90% inhibition of radial mycelia growth with lower concentration of the oils per plate for all tested pathogens. Combined application of L. plantarum with AO and CO was tested to assess the possible synergistic effects of these 3 elements on the control of tested plant pathogens. In this case both combinations of L. plantarum + AO and L. plantarum + CO inhibited the mycelia growth of the pathogens completely. Results showed that the combined treatment of strawberry fruits with L. plantarum + AO (50 μL) and L. plantarum + CO (100 μL) resulted in remarkably improved control of Botrytis infections, in comparison with application of L. plantarum or essential oils alone. Quality attributes (that is pH, acidity, vitamin C, and total soluble solid) of the strawberry fruits did not change significantly (P < 0.01) when combination of Lactobacillus and essential oils was used. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the effects of combination of a Lactobacillus as an antagonist bacterium with essential oils to increase the shelf life of strawberry.

  10. The VELVET Complex in the Gray Mold Fungus Botrytis cinerea: Impact of BcLAE1 on Differentiation, Secondary Metabolism, and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julia; Simon, Adeline; Cohrs, Kim C; Traeger, Stefanie; Porquier, Antoine; Dalmais, Bérengère; Viaud, Muriel; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2015-06-01

    Botrytis cinerea, the gray mold fungus, is an important plant pathogen. Field populations are characterized by variability with regard to morphology, the mode of reproduction (conidiation or sclerotia formation), the spectrum of secondary metabolites (SM), and virulence. Natural variation in bcvel1 encoding the ortholog of Aspergillus nidulans VeA, a member of the VELVET complex, was previously shown to affect light-dependent differentiation, the formation of oxalic acid (OA), and virulence. To gain broader insight into the B. cinerea VELVET complex, an ortholog of A. nidulans LaeA, BcLAE1, a putative interaction partner of BcVEL1, was studied. BcVEL1 but not its truncated versions interacts with BcLAE1 and BcVEL2 (VelB ortholog). In accordance with the expected common as well as specific functions of BcVEL1 and BcLAE1, the deletions of both genes result in similar though not identical phenotypes. Both mutants lost the ability to produce OA, to colonize the host tissue, and to form sclerotia. However, mutants differ with regard to aerial hyphae and conidia formation. Genome-wide expression analyses revealed that BcVEL1 and BcLAE1 have common and distinct target genes. Some of the genes that are underexpressed in both mutants, e.g., those encoding SM-related enzymes, proteases, and carbohydrate-active enzymes, may account for their reduced virulence.

  11. Analysis of the Molecular Dialogue Between Gray Mold (Botrytis cinerea) and Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Reveals a Clear Shift in Defense Mechanisms During Berry Ripening.

    PubMed

    Kelloniemi, Jani; Trouvelot, Sophie; Héloir, Marie-Claire; Simon, Adeline; Dalmais, Bérengère; Frettinger, Patrick; Cimerman, Agnès; Fermaud, Marc; Roudet, Jean; Baulande, Sylvain; Bruel, Christophe; Choquer, Mathias; Couvelard, Linhdavanh; Duthieuw, Mathilde; Ferrarini, Alberto; Flors, Victor; Le Pêcheur, Pascal; Loisel, Elise; Morgant, Guillaume; Poussereau, Nathalie; Pradier, Jean-Marc; Rascle, Christine; Trdá, Lucie; Poinssot, Benoit; Viaud, Muriel

    2015-11-01

    Mature grapevine berries at the harvesting stage (MB) are very susceptible to the gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea, while veraison berries (VB) are not. We conducted simultaneous microscopic and transcriptomic analyses of the pathogen and the host to investigate the infection process developed by B. cinerea on MB versus VB, and the plant defense mechanisms deployed to stop the fungus spreading. On the pathogen side, our genome-wide transcriptomic data revealed that B. cinerea genes upregulated during infection of MB are enriched in functional categories related to necrotrophy, such as degradation of the plant cell wall, proteolysis, membrane transport, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and detoxification. Quantitative-polymerase chain reaction on a set of representative genes related to virulence and microscopic observations further demonstrated that the infection is also initiated on VB but is stopped at the penetration stage. On the plant side, genome-wide transcriptomic analysis and metabolic data revealed a defense pathway switch during berry ripening. In response to B. cinerea inoculation, VB activated a burst of ROS, the salicylate-dependent defense pathway, the synthesis of the resveratrol phytoalexin, and cell-wall strengthening. On the contrary, in infected MB, the jasmonate-dependent pathway was activated, which did not stop the fungal necrotrophic process.

  12. Morphological and phylogenetic identification of Botrytis sinoviticola, a novel cryptic species causing gray mold disease of table grapes (Vitis vinifera) in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y J; Zhang, J; Wang, X D; Yang, L; Jiang, D H; Li, G Q; Hsiang, T; Zhuang, W Y

    2014-01-01

    Seventy-five isolates of Botrytis collected from table grapes (Vitis vinifera) with gray mold symptoms in China were identified based on morpho-cultural characteristics on potato dextrose agar (20 C) and/or phylogenetic analysis using the sequences of three nuclear genes (G3PDH, HSP60, RPB2). Isolates of different species of Botrytis were compared with fenhexamid sensitivity, Bc-hch gene-RFLP haplotyping and pathogenicity to V. vinifera. The 75 isolates comprise two species, B. cinerea (63 isolates) and an undescribed Botrytis sp. (12 isolates) described here as Botrytis sinoviticola Zhang et al. sp., nov. Both B. sinoviticola (Bs) and B. cinerea (Bc) were found to have 20 C optimum for mycelial growth and 25 C for conidial germination. Sensitivity to fenhexamid was significantly greater (P < 0.05) for Bc (EC50 = 0.04 ± 0.01 μg mL(-1)) than for Bs (EC50 = 0.08 ± 0.02 μg mL(-1)). Digestion of the PCR amplicons of the Bc-hch gene with Hha I generated two haplotypes, Group I haplotype for Bs and Group II haplotype for Bc. Bs infected table grapes (leaves, berries) only through wounds, whereas Bc infected both injured and non-injured tissues of table grapes. This study suggests that Bs is a cryptic species sympatric with Bc on table grapes in China.

  13. Fungicide resistance of Botrytis cinerea in tomato greenhouses in the Canary Islands and effectiveness of non-chemical treatments against gray mold.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Acosta, A; Rodríguez, C

    2014-09-01

    Tomato greenhouses in the Canary Islands, Spain, were surveyed to estimate frequencies of resistance to benzimidazoles, dicarboximides, anilinopyrimidines and N-phenylcarbamates in Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to carbendazim, iprodione, pyrimethanil and diethofencarb was found in 74.2, 86.4, 28.8 and 31.8% of isolates, respectively. Benzimidazole- and anilinopyrimide-resistant isolates were highly resistant, showing EC50 values above 500 µg/ml carbendazim and a mean EC50 value of 28.42 µg/ml pyrimethanil, respectively. By contrast, a low level of resistance was observed among dicarboximide-resistant isolates (mean EC50 value of 1.81 µg/ml iprodione). Phenotypes with double resistance to carbendazim and iprodione, and triple resistance to carbendazim, iprodione and pyrimethanil were the most common, occurring in 36.4 and 28.8% of isolates. The surveyed greenhouses had never been treated with fenhexamid and Signum™ (pre-packed mixture of boscalid and pyraclostrobin), and baseline sensitivities of B. cinerea isolates to these fungicides were determined. The EC50 values were within the range of 0.009-0.795 µg/ml fenhexamid and of 0.014-0.48 µg/ml Signum. In addition, available formulations based on elicitors of plant defense response and biocontrol agents were evaluated against B. cinerea in tomato plants under semi-controlled greenhouse conditions, the yeast Candida sake CPA-1 being able to reduce gray mold significantly when it was applied on petiole wounds and the plants were inoculated 24 h later. Likewise, C. sake was effective against B. cinerea in harvested tomato fruits, yeast-treated tomatoes showed a 70.66 and 30.31% reduction in the diameters of decay lesions compared with controls after 10 days of storage at 20 and 9 °C, respectively.

  14. Physical properties and antifungal activity of bioactive films containing Wickerhamomyces anomalus killer yeast and their application for preservation of oranges and control of postharvest green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Aloui, Hajer; Licciardello, Fabio; Khwaldia, Khaoula; Hamdi, Moktar; Restuccia, Cristina

    2015-05-04

    This study assessed the ability of two bio-based films, obtained from sodium alginate (NaAlg) and locust bean gum (LBG), to protect the viability of Wickerhamomyces anomalus cells and control the growth of Penicillium digitatum. The effect of microbial cell incorporation on physical properties of the developed films was evaluated in terms of barrier, mechanical and optical properties. Furthermore, the application of these two matrices as bioactive coatings was investigated in order to evaluate their efficacy in preserving the postharvest quality of 'Valencia' oranges and inhibiting the growth of P. digitatum on artificially inoculated fruits. Results showed that NaAlg and LBG films were able to maintain more than 85% of the initial W. anomalus yeast population and that the developed films incorporating the killer yeast completely inhibited the growth of P. digitatum in synthetic medium. Likewise, NaAlg and LBG coatings enriched with W. anomalus yeast were effective at reducing weight loss and maintaining firmness of 'Valencia' oranges during storage, and reduced green mold in inoculated fruits by more than 73% after 13 days.

  15. A Chitosan Coating Containing Essential Oil from Origanum vulgare L. to Control Postharvest Mold Infections and Keep the Quality of Cherry Tomato Fruit.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Tainá A; Andrade, Sonalle C A; Maciel, Janeeyre F; Arcanjo, Narciza M O; Madruga, Marta S; Meireles, Bruno; Cordeiro, Ângela M T; Souza, Evandro L; Magnani, Marciane

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of an edible chitosan coating (CHI; 4 mg/mL) and Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO; 1.25 μL/mL) for maintaining the quality of cherry tomato fruit during storage at room (25°C; 12 days) and cold (12°C; 24 days) temperatures was assessed. CHI and OVEO in combination showed in vitro fungicidal effects against R. stolonifer and Aspergillus niger. CHI-OVEO coating reduced the incidence of black mold and soft rot caused by these fungi in artificially contaminated cherry tomato fruit during storage at both temperatures. CHI-OVEO coating delayed the appearance of the first visible signs of black mold and soft rot in artificially contaminated cherry tomato fruit stored at room temperature by 6 days and by more than 9 days in those stored at cold temperature. At the end of storage at room and cold temperature fruit coated with CHI-OVEO showed higher firmness (>2 N/mm) and lower weight loss (>2%) compared to uncoated tomato fruit. CHI-OVEO coating delayed the decrease of lycopene, ascorbic citric acid, glucose and fructose during the storage time assessed at room or cold temperatures. The increase of catechin, myricetin, caffeic and syringic acids was higher (1-9 mg/g) in cherry tomato fruit coated with CHI-OVEO compared to uncoated fruit during the storage at both temperatures studied. CHI-OVEO coating is a feasible treatment for maintaining the storage quality of cherry tomato fruit.

  16. Characterization of Postharvest Fungicide-Resistant Botrytis cinerea Isolates From Commercially Stored Apple Fruit.

    PubMed

    Jurick, Wayne M; Macarisin, Otilia; Gaskins, Verneta L; Park, Eunhee; Yu, Jiujiang; Janisiewicz, Wojciech; Peter, Kari A

    2017-03-01

    Botrytis cinerea causes gray mold and is an economically important postharvest pathogen of fruit, vegetables, and ornamentals. Fludioxonil-sensitive B. cinerea isolates were collected in 2011 and 2013 from commercial storage in Pennsylvania. Eight isolates had values for effective concentrations for inhibiting 50% of mycelial growth of 0.0004 to 0.0038 μg/ml for fludioxonil and were dual resistant to pyrimethanil and thiabendazole. Resistance was generated in vitro, following exposure to a sublethal dose of fludioxonil, in seven of eight dual-resistant B. cinerea isolates. Three vigorously growing B. cinerea isolates with multiresistance to postharvest fungicides were further characterized and found to be osmosensitive and retained resistance in the absence of selection pressure. A representative multiresistant B. cinerea strain caused decay on apple fruit treated with postharvest fungicides, which confirmed the in vitro results. The R632I mutation in the Mrr1 gene, associated with fludioxonil resistance in B. cinerea, was not detected in multipostharvest fungicide-resistant B. cinerea isolates, suggesting that the fungus may be using additional mechanisms to mediate resistance. Results from this study show for the first time that B. cinerea with dual resistance to pyrimethanil and thiabendazole can also rapidly develop resistance to fludioxonil, which may pose control challenges in the packinghouse environment and during long-term storage.

  17. A Chitosan Coating Containing Essential Oil from Origanum vulgare L. to Control Postharvest Mold Infections and Keep the Quality of Cherry Tomato Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Tainá A.; Andrade, Sonalle C. A.; Maciel, Janeeyre F.; Arcanjo, Narciza M. O.; Madruga, Marta S.; Meireles, Bruno; Cordeiro, Ângela M. T.; Souza, Evandro L.; Magnani, Marciane

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of an edible chitosan coating (CHI; 4 mg/mL) and Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO; 1.25 μL/mL) for maintaining the quality of cherry tomato fruit during storage at room (25°C; 12 days) and cold (12°C; 24 days) temperatures was assessed. CHI and OVEO in combination showed in vitro fungicidal effects against R. stolonifer and Aspergillus niger. CHI-OVEO coating reduced the incidence of black mold and soft rot caused by these fungi in artificially contaminated cherry tomato fruit during storage at both temperatures. CHI-OVEO coating delayed the appearance of the first visible signs of black mold and soft rot in artificially contaminated cherry tomato fruit stored at room temperature by 6 days and by more than 9 days in those stored at cold temperature. At the end of storage at room and cold temperature fruit coated with CHI-OVEO showed higher firmness (>2 N/mm) and lower weight loss (>2%) compared to uncoated tomato fruit. CHI-OVEO coating delayed the decrease of lycopene, ascorbic citric acid, glucose and fructose during the storage time assessed at room or cold temperatures. The increase of catechin, myricetin, caffeic and syringic acids was higher (1–9 mg/g) in cherry tomato fruit coated with CHI-OVEO compared to uncoated fruit during the storage at both temperatures studied. CHI-OVEO coating is a feasible treatment for maintaining the storage quality of cherry tomato fruit. PMID:27877156

  18. Mold Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home ▸ Conditions & Treatments ▸ Allergies ▸ Mold Allergy Share | Mold Allergy Overview Symptoms & Diagnosis Treatment & Management Mold Allergy Overview Molds are tiny fungi whose spores float ...

  19. Identification of a QTL for postharvest disease resistance to Penicillium expansum in Malus sieversii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blue mold of apple caused by Penicillium expansum is one of the most important postharvest rots of apple fruit. Little attention has been devoted to postharvest disease resistance in apple breeding programs due both to a lack of sources of genetic resistance and to the time required for seedlings t...

  20. HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE 'SQUEEZING' BOTH HALVES OF A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE 'SQUEEZING' BOTH HALVES OF A MOLD SURROUNDING A MATCHPLATE PATTERN, DENNIS GRAY OPERATOR. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  1. Effect of gamma irradiation and its convergent treatment for control of postharvest Botrytis cinerea of cut roses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Eun-Hee; Shin, Eun-Jung; Park, Hae-Jun; Jeong, Rae-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Postharvest diseases cause considerable losses to harvested crops. Among them, gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) is a major problem of exporting to cut rose flowers into Korea. Irradiation treatment is an alternative to phytosanitary purposes and a useful nonchemical approach to the control of postharvest diseases. Gamma irradiation was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity against B. cinerea on cut rose varieties, 'Shooting Star' and 'Babe'. The irradiating dose required to reduce the population by 90%, D10, was 0.99 kGy. Gamma irradiation showed complete inhibition of spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea, especially 4.0 kGy in vitro. Antifungal activity of gamma irradiation on rose B. cinerea is a dose-dependent manner. A significant phytotoxicity such as bent neck in cut rose quality was shown from gamma irradiation at over 0.4 kGy (p<0.05) in both varieties. Although there is no significant difference in both varieties for fresh weight, in the case of flower rate, 'Babe' shows more sensitivity than 'Shooting Star'. In vivo assays demonstrated that established doses in in vitro, over 4 kGy, could completely inactive fungal pathogens, but such high doses can cause severe flowers damage. Thus, to eliminate negative impact on their quality, gamma irradiation was evaluated at lower doses in combination with an eco-friendly chemical, sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) to examine the inhibition of B. cinerea. Intriguingly, only the combined treatment with 0.2 kGy of gamma irradiation and 70 ppm of NaDCC exhibited significant synergistic antifungal activity against blue mold decay in both varieties. Together, these results suggest that a synergistic effect of the combined treatment with gamma irradiation and NaDCC can be efficiently used to control the postharvest diseases in cut rose flowers, and will provide a promising technology for horticulture products for exportation.

  2. Biocontrol Ability and Action Mechanism of Starmerella bacillaris (Synonym Candida zemplinina) Isolated from Wine Musts against Gray Mold Disease Agent Botrytis cinerea on Grape and Their Effects on Alcoholic Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Lemos Junior, Wilson José Fernandes; Bovo, Barbara; Nadai, Chiara; Crosato, Giulia; Carlot, Milena; Favaron, Francesco; Giacomini, Alessio; Corich, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Gray mold is one of the most important diseases of grapevine in temperate climates. This plant pathogen affects plant growth and reduces wine quality. The use of yeasts as biocontrol agents to apply in the vineyard have been investigated in recent years as an alternative to agrochemicals. In this work, fermenting musts obtained from overripe grape berries, therefore more susceptible to infection by fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea, were considered for the selection of yeasts carrying antifungal activity. Thirty-six isolates were identified as Starmerella bacillaris, a species recently proven to be of enological interest. Among them 14 different strains were studied and antifungal activity against B. cinerea was demonstrated, for the first time, to be present in S. bacillaris species. The production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), tested in vitro, was found to be the main responsible of S. bacillaris antifungal effects. All the strains were able to reduce B. cinerea decay on wounded grape berries artificially inoculated with gray mold. The colonization level of wound was very high reaching, after 5 days, a concentration of 106 cells per ml of grape juice obtained after berry crushing. At this cell concentration S. bacillaris strains were used to ferment synthetic and natural musts. The sequential yeast inoculation, performed by adding S. cerevisiae 48 h after S. bacillaris, was needed to complete sugar consumption and determined a significant increase in glicerol content and a reduction of ethanol and acetic acid concentrations. The high wound colonization ability, found in this work, together with the propensity to colonize grape berry and the interesting enological traits possessed by the selected S. bacillaris strains allow the use of this yeast as biocontrol agent on vine and grape berries with possible positive effects on must fermentation, although the presence of S. cerevisiae is needed to complete the fermentation process. This work introduces

  3. Biocontrol Ability and Action Mechanism of Starmerella bacillaris (Synonym Candida zemplinina) Isolated from Wine Musts against Gray Mold Disease Agent Botrytis cinerea on Grape and Their Effects on Alcoholic Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Wilson J; Bovo, Barbara; Nadai, Chiara; Crosato, Giulia; Carlot, Milena; Favaron, Francesco; Giacomini, Alessio; Corich, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Gray mold is one of the most important diseases of grapevine in temperate climates. This plant pathogen affects plant growth and reduces wine quality. The use of yeasts as biocontrol agents to apply in the vineyard have been investigated in recent years as an alternative to agrochemicals. In this work, fermenting musts obtained from overripe grape berries, therefore more susceptible to infection by fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea, were considered for the selection of yeasts carrying antifungal activity. Thirty-six isolates were identified as Starmerella bacillaris, a species recently proven to be of enological interest. Among them 14 different strains were studied and antifungal activity against B. cinerea was demonstrated, for the first time, to be present in S. bacillaris species. The production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), tested in vitro, was found to be the main responsible of S. bacillaris antifungal effects. All the strains were able to reduce B. cinerea decay on wounded grape berries artificially inoculated with gray mold. The colonization level of wound was very high reaching, after 5 days, a concentration of 10(6) cells per ml of grape juice obtained after berry crushing. At this cell concentration S. bacillaris strains were used to ferment synthetic and natural musts. The sequential yeast inoculation, performed by adding S. cerevisiae 48 h after S. bacillaris, was needed to complete sugar consumption and determined a significant increase in glicerol content and a reduction of ethanol and acetic acid concentrations. The high wound colonization ability, found in this work, together with the propensity to colonize grape berry and the interesting enological traits possessed by the selected S. bacillaris strains allow the use of this yeast as biocontrol agent on vine and grape berries with possible positive effects on must fermentation, although the presence of S. cerevisiae is needed to complete the fermentation process. This work

  4. MOLDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, P.G.

    1963-10-01

    Molding apparatus capable of coating multiple elements each molding cycle is described. The apparatus comprises a centrally disposed reservoir penetrated by a plurality of circumferentially arranged and radially extending passageways. These passageways, in turn, communicate with passages in a separable annular member that retains selectively configured molds and mold seating arrangements. Each mold, which is readily removable from its respective seat, is adapted to retain an element therein in spaced relation to the interior of the mold by utilizing element positioning means within the mold seat and the mold so that coating material may flow about the entire outer surface of the element. (AEC)

  5. Genome sequence of Penicillium solitum RS1, which causes postharvest apple decay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium species cause postharvest decay, commonly known as blue mold, in pome fruits such as apples and pears. Among the species that cause blue mold, P. expansum is the most virulent and prevalent, while P. solitum is signficantly less virulent. For devising novel strategies to prevent and to r...

  6. Mold Materials For Permanent Molding of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    John F Wallace; David Schwam; Wen Hong dxs11@po.cwru.edu

    2001-09-14

    A test that involves immersion of the potential mod materials for permanent molds has been developed that provides a thermal cycle that is similar to the experienced during casting of aluminum in permanent molds. This test has been employed to determine the relative thermal fatigue resistance of several different types of mold materials. Four commercial mold coatings have been evaluated for their insulating ability, wear resistance and roughness. The results indicate that composition and structure of the mold materials have considerable effect on their thermal fatigue cracking behavior. Irons with a gray iron structure are the most prone to thermal fatigue cracking followed by compacted graphite irons with the least thermal fatigue cracking of the cast irons experienced by ductile iron. The composition of these various irons affects their behavior.

  7. HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATING THE SAME AS THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATING THE SAME AS THE HUNTER 10 AND OTHER HUNTER 20 COMPRESSES BOTH MOLD HALVES OVER A DOUBLE-SIDED MATCH PLATE PATTERN. DENNIS GRAY TESTS A MOLD'S HARDNESS TO ENSURE SAND MIXTURE AND MACHINE COMPRESSIBILITY ARE CORRECT. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Mold Charlatans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Offers a primer on toxic mold and its removal, warning against ignorant or unethical mold remediation companies and offering five considerations (checking references, considering the big picture, sampling more than the air, considering release, and considering the source) when hiring such services. (EV)

  9. MOLD POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mold pollution is the growth of molds in a building resulting in a negative impact on the use of that structure. The negative impacts generally fall into two categories: destruction of the structure itself and adverse health impacts on the building's occupants. It is estimated...

  10. New Postharvest Technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kidd and West’s discovery of the climacteric in apples in the 1920s and Blackman’s works on respiration of fruits in same time established the basis of modern postharvest plant physiology. Commercial use of controlled atmosphere rapidly expanded in the 1950s along with the in depth research. Ethylen...

  11. Acetic acid treatments to keep postharvest quality of "Regina" and "Taloppo" table grapes.

    PubMed

    Venditti, T; D'Hallewin, G; Dore, A; Molinu, M G; Fiori, P; Angiolino, C; Agabbio, M

    2008-01-01

    The most important postharvest pathogen for table grape is Botrytis cinerea (gray mold), which cause a rapid deterioration of fruit. An effective control of the disease during storage is difficult and remains an unsolved problem since no pesticide treatments are allowed by European legislation. GRAS compounds, employed with no restriction as preservatives in Europe and North America, are possible candidates to fulfil this gap. The aim of this work is to study the efficacy of Acetic Acid (AAC), used as postharvest treatment to control Botrytis cinerea on "Regina" and "Taloppo" table grapes, by Laboratory and storage tests. The activity of this compound was first assessed with laboratory tests, treating at different concentrations (0, 5, 10, 20, 50, 75 and 100 microl/L) of AAC vapors, for 15 minutes, single berries inoculated with B. cinerea. After treatments fruit was incubated at 20 degrees C for one week. The in vivo experiment took place by using the most promising AAC concentrations (50, 75 and 100 microl/L) followed by eight weeks of storage at 5 degrees C and 95% of relative humidity (RH) and four days at 20 degrees C and 85% RH (simulated shelf-life conditions). At the end of the in vivo experiment decay, weight loss and visual assessment were evaluated. Almost all treatments, after eight weeks of storage, reduced the incidence of gray mould. The best results were achieved by using 50 ppm of AAC, gaining a reduction of decay, compared to untreated "Taloppo" and "Regina" grapes of 61.0% and 41.4%, respectively. Following the simulated shelf-life period differences between treated and untreated (control) became no significant for "Taloppo" grape, while the lowest decay percentage was reached with 50 microl/L of AAC for "Regina" grape (52% of reduction if compared to control). Regarding fruit weight loss all treatments did not affect significantly this parameter that ranged between 8.2% and 11.5% after eight weeks of storage and 13.5% and 18.2% after shelf

  12. Draft genome sequence of Penicillium expansum (R19) that cause postharvest decay of apple fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among the species that cause blue mold, isolates of P. expansum are the most prevalent and virulent species causing more than 50 percent of postharvest decay. We report the draft genome sequence of P. expansum (R19) in order to identify fungal virulence factors and to understand the mechanism of inf...

  13. Genome Sequence of Penicillium solitum RS1, Which Causes Postharvest Apple Decay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guangxi; Jurick, Wayne M.; Gaskins, Verneta L.; Yin, Yanbin; Bennett, Joan W.; Shelton, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium species cause postharvest decay, commonly known as blue mold, in pome fruits, such as apples and pears. To devise novel strategies to prevent and reduce economic losses during storage, the genome sequence of Penicillium solitum RS1 is reported here for the first time. PMID:27174276

  14. Genome Sequencing and Analysis of the Postharvest Fungus Penicillium expansum R21

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuliang; Hua, Sui Sheng T.; Yu, Jiujiang; Bu, Lijing; Pennerman, Kayla K.; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Bennett, Joan W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Blue mold is the vernacular name of a common postharvest disease of stored apples, pears, and quince that is caused by several common species of Penicillium. This study reports the draft genome sequence of Penicillium expansum strain R21, which was isolated from a red delicious apple in 2011 in Pennsylvania. PMID:28209811

  15. Genome Sequencing and Analysis of the Postharvest Fungus Penicillium expansum R21.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guohua; Zhang, Yuliang; Hua, Sui Sheng T; Yu, Jiujiang; Bu, Lijing; Pennerman, Kayla K; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Bennett, Joan W

    2017-02-16

    Blue mold is the vernacular name of a common postharvest disease of stored apples, pears, and quince that is caused by several common species of Penicillium This study reports the draft genome sequence of Penicillium expansum strain R21, which was isolated from a red delicious apple in 2011 in Pennsylvania.

  16. Genome sequencing and analyses of the postharvest fungus Penicillium expansum R21

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blue mold is the vernacular name of a common postharvest disease of stored apples, pears and quince that is caused by several common species of Penicillium. This study reports the draft genome sequence of Penicillium expansum strain R21, a strain isolated from a Red Delicious apple in 2011 in Pennsy...

  17. Comparing the microbiological status of pre- and postharvest produce from small organic production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aixia; Pahl, Donna M; Buchanan, Robert L; Micallef, Shirley A

    2015-06-01

    Consumption of locally, organically grown produce is increasing in popularity. Organic farms typically produce on a small scale, have limited resources, and adopt low technology harvest and postharvest handling practices. Data on the food safety risk associated with hand harvesting, field packing, and packing-house handling with minimal treatment, at this production scale, are lacking. We followed produce from small organic farms from the field through postharvest handling and packing. Pre- and postharvest produce (177 samples) and water (29 samples) were collected and analyzed quantitatively for Escherichia coli, total coliforms (TC), aerobic bacteria (APC), yeasts, molds (M), and enteric pathogens. No pathogens were recovered. E. coli was detected in 3 (3.6%) of 83 preharvest produce samples, 2 (6.3%) of 32 unwashed and 0 of 42 washed postharvest produce samples, and 10 (34.5%) of 29 water samples. No correlation was found between bacterial levels in irrigation water and those on produce. Postharvest handling without washing was a factor for APC and M counts on tomatoes, with lower frequencies postharvest. Postharvest handling with washing was a factor for leafy greens for TC counts, with higher frequencies postharvest. APC (P = 0.03) and yeast (P = 0.05) counts were higher in preharvest than in unwashed postharvest tomatoes. Washed postharvest leafy greens had higher M counts (P = 0.03) and other washed produce had higher TC counts (P = 0.01) than did their preharvest counterparts. Barriers were found to the use of sanitizer in wash water for leafy greens among small farms using organic practices. Hand harvesting and dry handling did not appear to be associated with a significant food safety risk, but washed leafy greens carried higher levels of some microbial indicators, possibly because of the lack of sanitizer in the wash water. The development of resources and materials customized for this sector of growers could enhance dissemination of information on best

  18. Mold Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reduce Mold in Your Whole House: Use an electric dehumidifier to remove moisture and keep humidity in ... Find a Local Support Group Join Our Action Network Kids With Food Allergies AAFA Research Grants Health ...

  19. Mold and Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Molds have the potential to cause health problems. Molds produce allergens (substances that can cause allergic reactions) and irritants. Inhaling or touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals.

  20. INGOT MOLD

    DOEpatents

    Mangold, A.J. Jr.; MaHaffey, J.W.; Reese, S.L.

    1958-04-29

    An improved ingot-mold assembly is described, consisting of a body having a cavity and a recess extending through to the bottom of the body from the cavity, and the bottom of the cavity having an internal shoulder extending downward and a plug having an external shoulder. The plug extends above the shoulders and below the bottom of the body.

  1. Postharvest treatments of fresh produce

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, P. V.; Caleb, O. J.; Singh, Z.; Watkins, C. B.; Geyer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Postharvest technologies have allowed horticultural industries to meet the global demands of local and large-scale production and intercontinental distribution of fresh produce that have high nutritional and sensory quality. Harvested products are metabolically active, undergoing ripening and senescence processes that must be controlled to prolong postharvest quality. Inadequate management of these processes can result in major losses in nutritional and quality attributes, outbreaks of foodborne pathogens and financial loss for all players along the supply chain, from growers to consumers. Optimal postharvest treatments for fresh produce seek to slow down physiological processes of senescence and maturation, reduce/inhibit development of physiological disorders and minimize the risk of microbial growth and contamination. In addition to basic postharvest technologies of temperature management, an array of others have been developed including various physical (heat, irradiation and edible coatings), chemical (antimicrobials, antioxidants and anti-browning) and gaseous treatments. This article examines the current status on postharvest treatments of fresh produce and emerging technologies, such as plasma and ozone, that can be used to maintain quality, reduce losses and waste of fresh produce. It also highlights further research needed to increase our understanding of the dynamic response of fresh produce to various postharvest treatments. PMID:24797137

  2. Postharvest treatments of fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, P V; Caleb, O J; Singh, Z; Watkins, C B; Geyer, M

    2014-06-13

    Postharvest technologies have allowed horticultural industries to meet the global demands of local and large-scale production and intercontinental distribution of fresh produce that have high nutritional and sensory quality. Harvested products are metabolically active, undergoing ripening and senescence processes that must be controlled to prolong postharvest quality. Inadequate management of these processes can result in major losses in nutritional and quality attributes, outbreaks of foodborne pathogens and financial loss for all players along the supply chain, from growers to consumers. Optimal postharvest treatments for fresh produce seek to slow down physiological processes of senescence and maturation, reduce/inhibit development of physiological disorders and minimize the risk of microbial growth and contamination. In addition to basic postharvest technologies of temperature management, an array of others have been developed including various physical (heat, irradiation and edible coatings), chemical (antimicrobials, antioxidants and anti-browning) and gaseous treatments. This article examines the current status on postharvest treatments of fresh produce and emerging technologies, such as plasma and ozone, that can be used to maintain quality, reduce losses and waste of fresh produce. It also highlights further research needed to increase our understanding of the dynamic response of fresh produce to various postharvest treatments.

  3. Native Killer Yeasts as Biocontrol Agents of Postharvest Fungal Diseases in Lemons.

    PubMed

    Perez, María Florencia; Contreras, Luciana; Garnica, Nydia Mercedes; Fernández-Zenoff, María Verónica; Farías, María Eugenia; Sepulveda, Milena; Ramallo, Jacqueline; Dib, Julián Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Economic losses caused by postharvest diseases represent one of the main problems of the citrus industry worldwide. The major diseases affecting citrus are the "green mold" and "blue mold", caused by Penicillium digitatum and P. italicum, respectively. To control them, synthetic fungicides are the most commonly used method. However, often the emergence of resistant strains occurs and their use is becoming more restricted because of toxic effects and environmental pollution they generate, combined with trade barriers to international markets. The aim of this work was to isolate indigenous killer yeasts with antagonistic activity against fungal postharvest diseases in lemons, and to determine their control efficiency in in vitro and in vivo assays. Among 437 yeast isolates, 8.5% show to have a killer phenotype. According to molecular identification, based on the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain sequences analysis, strains were identified belonging to the genera Saccharomyces, Wickerhamomyces, Kazachstania, Pichia, Candida and Clavispora. Killers were challenged with pathogenic molds and strains that caused the maximum in vitro inhibition of P. digitatum were selected for in vivo assays. Two strains of Pichia and one strain of Wickerhamomyces depicted a significant protection (p <0.05) from decay by P. digitatum in assays using wounded lemons. Thus, the native killer yeasts studied in this work showed to be an effective alternative for the biocontrol of postharvest fungal infections of lemons and could be promising agents for the development of commercial products for the biological control industry.

  4. Native Killer Yeasts as Biocontrol Agents of Postharvest Fungal Diseases in Lemons

    PubMed Central

    Garnica, Nydia Mercedes; Fernández-Zenoff, María Verónica; Farías, María Eugenia; Sepulveda, Milena; Ramallo, Jacqueline; Dib, Julián Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Economic losses caused by postharvest diseases represent one of the main problems of the citrus industry worldwide. The major diseases affecting citrus are the "green mold" and "blue mold", caused by Penicillium digitatum and P. italicum, respectively. To control them, synthetic fungicides are the most commonly used method. However, often the emergence of resistant strains occurs and their use is becoming more restricted because of toxic effects and environmental pollution they generate, combined with trade barriers to international markets. The aim of this work was to isolate indigenous killer yeasts with antagonistic activity against fungal postharvest diseases in lemons, and to determine their control efficiency in in vitro and in vivo assays. Among 437 yeast isolates, 8.5% show to have a killer phenotype. According to molecular identification, based on the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain sequences analysis, strains were identified belonging to the genera Saccharomyces, Wickerhamomyces, Kazachstania, Pichia, Candida and Clavispora. Killers were challenged with pathogenic molds and strains that caused the maximum in vitro inhibition of P. digitatum were selected for in vivo assays. Two strains of Pichia and one strain of Wickerhamomyces depicted a significant protection (p <0.05) from decay by P. digitatum in assays using wounded lemons. Thus, the native killer yeasts studied in this work showed to be an effective alternative for the biocontrol of postharvest fungal infections of lemons and could be promising agents for the development of commercial products for the biological control industry. PMID:27792761

  5. Detection of mold-damaged chestnuts by near-infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mold infection is a significant postharvest problem for processors of chestnuts (Castanea sativa, Miller).Fungal disease causes direct loss of product or reduced value due to the lower-quality grade of the chest-nut lot. In most cases, fungal infection is not detectable using traditional sorting tec...

  6. Characterization of blue mold Penicillium species isolated from stored fruits using multiple highly conserved loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium is a large genus of common molds with over 400 described species; however, identification of individual species is difficult, including for those species that cause postharvest rots. In this study, blue rot fungi from stored apples and pears were isolated from a variety of hosts, locatio...

  7. Floods and Mold Growth

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mold growth may be a problem after flooding. Excess moisture in the home is cause for concern about indoor air quality primarily because it provides breeding conditions for pests, molds and other microorganisms.

  8. QUANTIFYING INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing awareness that indoor molds/fungi may be connected to such conditions as asthma, allergies, hemorrhaging, chronic rhinosinusitis, memory loss, and a symptom complex called sick-building-syndrome. In addition, molds cause frequently fatal nosocomical infections. ...

  9. Mold and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuscano, Antoinette

    1998-01-01

    Mold can seriously affect the health of children with asthma or allergies. Indoor air problems related to mold can be difficult to identify, but when several students who spend time in the same classroom area show allergic symptoms, it is important to consider mold and air quality. Failure to respond promptly can have serious consequences. (SM)

  10. Interactive Mold House Tour

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Get a quick glimpse of some of the most important ways to protect your home from mold by this interactive tour of the Mold House. Room-by-room, you'll learn about common mold issues and how to address them.

  11. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  12. Mold-Resistant Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckabee, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that one of the surest ways to prevent indoor air quality and mold issues is to use preventive construction materials, discussing typical resistance to dealing with mold problems (usually budget-related) and describing mold-resistant construction, which uses concrete masonry, brick, and stone and is intended to withstand inevitable…

  13. Gray marketing of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, P E; Walsh, M G

    1995-01-01

    Pharmaceutical marketers in the European Union are constrained by regulated prices, opening up opportunities for gray marketers. The authors investigate the legal framework that regulates gray markets by summarizing and analyzing relevant European Court of Justice decisions that favor gray marketers and actually foster parallel trade. Before marketing managers can develop effective strategies in this marketplace, they must first understand the precedents of the legal system in which they will be operating.

  14. Postharvest Biocontrol: Introspection and Paradigm Shifts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of postharvest biocontrol agents as an alternative to the synthetic, chemical fungicides on a widespread basis has many constraints. During the last twenty years, the field of postharvest biocontrol research has significantly grown and developed and seen the creation of several products. Des...

  15. Immunotherapy for mold allergy.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to review the available studies regarding mold immunotherapy. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed articles related to mold immunotherapy using the following keywords: mold, allergy, asthma, and immunotherapy. In addition, references cited within these articles were also reviewed. Articles were selected based on their relevance to the topic. Allergic responses to inhaled mold antigens are a recognized factor in allergic rhinitis and asthma. There are significant problems with respect to the production of relevant allergen material for the diagnosis and treatment of mold allergy with immunotherapy. Mold allergens contain proteases and should not be mixed with other allergens for immunotherapy. Most of the immunotherapy studies focus on two molds, Alternaria and Cladosporium. There is a lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials when evaluating the efficacy of mold immunotherapy with trials only focusing on immunotherapy to Alternaria and Cladosporium. Additional studies are needed regarding mold allergy and immunotherapy focusing on which molds are important for causing allergic disease.

  16. 53. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL MOLDS IN THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS COLLECTION, AND ARE USED TO PRESS TILES. THE FACTORY KEEPS TEN PRODUCTION MOLDS FOR EACH IMAGE. THE ORIGINAL MOLDS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  17. Henry Gray, plagiarist.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    The first edition of Anatomy Descriptive and Surgical (1858) was greeted with accolades, but also provoked serious controversy concerning Henry Gray's failure to acknowledge the work of earlier anatomists. A review in the Medical Times (1859) accused Gray of intellectual theft. The journal took the unusual step of substantiating its indictment by publishing twenty parallel texts from Gray and from a pre-existing textbook, Quain's Anatomy. At the recent "Vesalius Continuum" conference in Zakynthos, Greece (2014) Professor Brion Benninger disputed the theft by announcing from the floor the results of a computer analysis of both texts, which he reported exonerated Gray by revealing no evidence of plagiarism. The analysis has not been forthcoming, however, despite requests. Here the historian of Gray's Anatomy supplements the argument set out in the Medical Times 150 years ago with data suggesting unwelcome personality traits in Henry Gray, and demonstrating the utility of others' work to his professional advancement. Fair dealing in the world of anatomy and indeed the genuineness of the lustre of medical fame are important matters, but whether quantitative evidence has anything to add to the discussion concerning Gray's probity can be assessed only if Benninger makes public his computer analysis.

  18. Impact of preharvest and postharvest alginate treatments enriched with vanillin on postharvest decay, biochemical properties, quality and sensory attributes of table grapes.

    PubMed

    Konuk Takma, Dilara; Korel, Figen

    2017-04-15

    Alginate solution enriched with vanillin as a bioactive compound was investigated for improving preharvest and postharvest quality and safety of table grapes. Alginate treatments with or without vanillin as preharvest spray and postharvest coating were implemented on table grapes of Alphonse Lavalleé and Razaki cultivars. Fungal decay, biochemical properties, quality and sensory attributes were evaluated at day of preharvest treatment, at harvesting and during 35days of storage at 4±2°C. Alginate treatments with or without vanillin were effective in preventing weight and firmness losses. Total soluble solids, titratable acidity, and color of grapes coated with alginate coatings with or without vanillin showed minor changes compared to control grapes. Alginate coating incorporating vanillin provided significant reduction (1.73log CFU/g) in yeast-mold growth. Moreover, the coatings maintained greater total phenolic content and antioxidant activity compared to others during postharvest storage. In terms of sensory attributes, appearance was ranked as the highest for alginate coating without vanillin due to glossiness of alginate.

  19. Baseline sensitivity to fluopyram and fungicide resistance phenotypes of botrytis cinerea populations from table grapes in california

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is a major postharvest disease of table grapes grown in the Central Valley of California. Understanding fungicide-resistant phenotypes of B. cinerea is important to the development of pre-harvest fungicide programs for control of postharvest gray mold. Baseline s...

  20. Molded Magnetic Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A molded magnetic article and fabrication method are provided. Particles of ferromagnetic material embedded in a polymer binder are molded under heat and pressure into a geometric shape. Each particle is an oblate spheroid having a radius-to-thickness aspect ratio approximately in the range of 15-30. Each oblate spheroid has flattened poles that are substantially in perpendicular alignment to a direction of the molding pressure throughout the geometric shape.

  1. Guide to Molds at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., Albany, NY.

    Asserting that molds growing in schools can be harmful to children's health and learning, this guide offers information about the issue. It provides an overview of the basics, then addresses testing, types of molds, molds and health, monitoring schools for mold, mold prevention and clean-up tips for schools, and what parents should do if they…

  2. BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, PBQ AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, PBQ AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINE MAKES BOTH MOLD HALVES INDIVIDUALLY WHICH ARE LATER ROTATED, ASSEMBLED, AND LOWERED TO POURING CONVEYORS BY ASSISTING MACHINES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Mold Allergy: Proper Humidifier Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Home Conditions Allergy Allergy: Overview Allergy: Allergens Mold Allergy Proper Humidifier Care Proper Humidifier Care Make ... neglected humidifier can be a major source of mold and mold spores. Learn how to keep a ...

  4. Rapid mold replication

    SciTech Connect

    Heestand, G.M.; Beeler, R.G. Jr.; Brown, D.L.

    1995-06-01

    The desire to reduce tooling costs have driven manufacturers to investigate new manufacturing methods and materials. In the plastics injection molding industry replicating molds to meet production needs is time consuming (up to 6 months) and costly in terms of lost business. We have recently completed a feasibility study demonstrating the capability of high rate Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) in producing mold inserts in days, not months. In the current practice a graphite mandrel, in the shape of the insert`s negative image, was exposed to a jet of metal vapor atoms emanating from an electron beam heated source of an aluminum-bronze alloy. The condensation rate of the metal atoms on the mandrel was sufficient to allow the deposit to grow at over 30 {mu}m/min or 1.2 mils per minute. The vaporization process continued for approximately 14 hours after which the mandrel and deposit were removed from the EBPVD vacuum chamber. The mandrel and condensate were easily separated resulting in a fully dense aluminum-bronze mold insert about 2.5 cm or one inch thick. This mold was subsequently cleaned and drilled for water cooling passages and mounted on a fixture for operation in an actual injection molding machine. Results of the mold`s operation were extremely successful showing great promise for this technique. This paper describes the EBPVD feasibility demonstration in more detail and discusses future development work needed to bring this technique into practice.

  5. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  6. Mold design with simulation for chalcogenide glass precision molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Wang, Zhibin; Li, Junqi; Zhang, Feng; Su, Ying; Wang, Zhongqiang

    2016-10-01

    Compare with the manufacturing of the traditional infrared material, such as signal crystal germanium, zinc sulfide, zinc selenide etc, chalcogenide infrared glass is suitable for precision molding for the low soften temperature to have large mass industry production. So the researches of precision glass molding are necessary, especially for the fast development of infrared product. The mold design is one of the key technologies of precision glass molding. In this paper, the mold processing of a sample chalcogenide glass from the technical drawing, mold design, molding to the lens are introduced. From the result of the precision molding, the technology of finite element simulation is a useful way to guiding the mold design. The molded lens by using mold process fit the design requirement.

  7. Evaluation of food additives as alternative or complementary chemicals to conventional fungicides for the control of major postharvest diseases of stone fruit.

    PubMed

    Palou, Lluis; Smilanick, Joseph L; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate potential alternatives to conventional fungicides to control decay, more than 20 food additives and generally regarded as safe compounds were tested at three concentrations in in vivo primary screenings with several cultivars of California peaches, nectarines, and plums that had been artificially inoculated with seven major postharvest pathogens: Monilinia fructicola, Botrytis cinerea, Geotrichum candidum, Alternaria alternata, Penicillium expansum, Mucor piriformis, and Rhizopus stolonifer. Overall, the best compounds were 200 mM potassium sorbate (PS), 200 mM sodium benzoate (SB), 200 mM sodium sorbate, 100 mM 2-deoxy-D-glucose, 400 mM sodium carbonate, and 250 mM potassium carbonate. Sodium and ammonium molybdates, acid lactic, and hydrogen peroxide were somewhat effective but were phytotoxic to fruit skin tissues. However, the best compounds lacked effectiveness and persistence when tested against brown rot in small-scale trials of 60-s dips in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures; PS and SB reduced brown rot incidence by less than 40%. Rinsing treated fruit with tap water reduced the efficacy of the compounds by up to 30%. In contrast, heating the solutions to 55 or 60 degrees C significantly increased treatment efficacy. Brown rot incidence and severity were reduced by 35 and 25%, respectively, on PS-treated peaches after 7 days of incubation at 20 degrees C. However, treatment efficacy was not superior to that with water alone at these temperatures. In semicommercial trials, mixtures of fludioxonil with PS, SB, or 2-deoxy-D-glucose applied as fruit coatings on a packing line were not synergistic in their effect on brown rot, gray mold, and sour rot.

  8. Silicon micro-mold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  9. Glass molding process with mold lubrication

    DOEpatents

    Davey, Richard G.

    1978-06-27

    Improvements are provided in glass forming processes of the type wherein hot metal blank molds are employed by using the complementary action of a solid film lubricant layer, of graphite dispersed in a cured thermoset organopolysiloxane, along with an overspray of a lubricating oil.

  10. Effect of the yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum on postharvest decay and patulin accumulation in apples and pears.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ruiyu; Yu, Ting; Guo, Shuanghuan; Hu, Hao; Zheng, Xiaodong; Karlovsky, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a strain of marine yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum on postharvest blue mold and patulin accumulation in apples and pears stored at 23°C was evaluated. The occurrence and severity of apple and pear decay caused by Penicillium expansum were significantly inhibited by R. paludigenum. However, the application of the yeast at a high concentration (10(8) cells per ml) enhanced patulin accumulation after 7 days of storage; the amount of patulin increased 24.2 times and 12.6 times compared to the controls in infected apples and pears, respectively. However, R. paludigenum reduced the patulin concentration in the growth medium by both biological degradation and physical adsorption. Optimal in vitro patulin reduction was observed at 30°C and at pH 6.0. R. paludigenum incubated at 28°C was tolerant to patulin at concentrations up to 100 mg/liter. In conclusion, R. paludigenum was able to control postharvest decay in apples and pears and to remove patulin in vitro effectively. However, because the yeast induced patulin accumulation in fruit, the assessment of mycotoxin content after biological treatments in postharvest decay control is important. R. paludigenum may also be a promising source of gene(s) and enzyme(s) for patulin degradation and may be a tool to decrease patulin contamination in commercial fruit-derived products.

  11. Resin film infusion mold tooling and molding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Roger (Inventor); Grossheim, Brian (Inventor); Mouradian, Karbis (Inventor); Thrash, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A mold apparatus and method for resin film infusion molding including an outer mold tool having a facing sheet adapted to support a resin film and preform assembly. The facing sheet includes attachment features extending therefrom. An inner mold tool is positioned on the facing sheet to enclose the resin film and preform assembly for resin film infusion molding. The inner mold tool includes a plurality of mandrels positioned for engagement with the resin film and preform assembly. Each mandrel includes a slot formed therein. A plurality of locating bars cooperate with the slots and with the attachment features for locating the mandrels longitudinally on the outer mold tool.

  12. 92. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    92. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL MOLDS IN THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS COLLECTION, AND ARE USED TO PRESS TILES. THE FACTORY KEEPS TEN PRODUCTION MOLDS FOR EACH IMAGE. THE ORIGINAL MOLDS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. SAME VIEW AS PA-107-53. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  13. Molds in the Environment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Resources Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New National Center for Environmental ... issued additional guidance, the WHO Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality: Dampness and Mould [PDF – 2.52 MB] . Other ...

  14. Mold: Cleanup and Remediation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Resources Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New National Center for Environmental ... prevention ... more Fact Sheet: Flood Cleanup - Avoiding Indoor Air Quality Problems Flooding in a home or building can ...

  15. Breaking the Mold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckabee, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Using the example of a Texas elementary school, describes how to eliminate mold and mildew from school facilities, including discovering the problem, responding quickly, reconstructing the area, and crisis planning and prevention. (EV)

  16. Newborn head molding

    MedlinePlus

    ... molding. In: Graham JM, Sanchez-Lara PA, eds. Smiths' Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 35. Smith J. Initial evaluation. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar SU, ...

  17. Mold After a Disaster

    MedlinePlus

    ... ceiling tiles, insulation material, some clothing, leather, paper, wood, and food. Removal and cleaning are important because ... wish to disinfect, refer to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document, A Brief Guide to Mold ...

  18. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    MedlinePlus

    ... furnace and air conditioner filters often. Use high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to best remove mold from the air. In the bathroom: Use an exhaust fan when you shower or take baths. Use a ...

  19. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  20. Shades of Gray.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, John C.; Calibeo, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A university's financing choices cover many shades of gray. Some off-balance-sheet financing uses no debt capacity, while others represent or imply full financial commitment. Many others fall in between. The choices made by a number of institutions in financing facility expansions or improvements are discussed, and the Moody's Investors Service…

  1. Combination of Kluyveromyces marxianus and sodium bicarbonate for controlling green mold of citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Geng, Peng; Chen, Shaohua; Hu, Meiying; Rizwan-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Lai, Kaiping; Qu, Fei; Zhang, Yanbo

    2011-12-02

    Biocontrol efficacy of an antagonistic yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus was evaluated individually or in combination with sodium bicarbonate (SBC) against green mold of citrus fruit caused by Penicillium digitatum. Their effects on postharvest quality of citrus fruit were also investigated. The results indicated that the antagonistic activity of K. marxianus at 1×10⁸ CFU/mL on green mold of citrus fruit was enhanced by 2% SBC treatment. In artificial inoculation trials, disease control after 3 and 6 days, respectively, with the mixture of K. marxianus and 2% SBC (18.33%, 58.33%) was significantly improved over that obtained with K. marxianus (41.67%, 70.00%) or SBC (43.33%, 81.67%) alone. The combination of K. marxianus with SBC was as effective as the imazalil treatment in natural infection trials, which gave about 90% control of green mold. Addition of 2% SBC significantly stimulated the growth of K. marxianus in citrus fruit wounds after 72 h. Moreover, K. marxianus, SBC and their combination did not impair quality parameters including weight loss, fruit firmness, total soluble solids, titratable acidity and ascorbic acid at 4 °C for 30 days followed by 20 °C for 15 days. These results suggested that the use of SBC is a useful approach to improve the efficacy of K. marxianus for the postharvest green mold of citrus fruit.

  2. Why Does Hair Turn Gray?

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Why Does Hair Turn Gray? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Does Hair Turn Gray? Print A A A en español ¿ ... ever watched someone try to cover up gray hair by dyeing it? Or maybe you wonder why ...

  3. Why Does Hair Turn Gray?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Why Does Hair Turn Gray? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Does Hair Turn Gray? A A A en español ¿Por ... ever watched someone try to cover up gray hair by dyeing it? Or maybe you wonder why ...

  4. Biofumigation on Post-Harvest Diseases of Fruits Using a New Volatile-Producing Fungus of Ceratocystis fimbriata

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Wu, Lei; Hao, Jianjun; Luo, Laixin; Cao, Yongsong; Li, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    A variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by Ceratocystis fimbriata have strong bioactivity against a wide range of fungi, bacteria and oomycetes. Mycelial growth, conidial production, and spore germination of fungi and oomycetes were significantly inhibited after exposure to cultures of C. fimbriata, and colony formation of bacteria was also inhibited. Two post-harvest diseases, peach brown rot caused by Monilinia fructicola and citrus green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum, were controlled during a 4-day storage by enclosing wound-inoculated fruits with 10 standard diameter Petri plate cultures of C. fimbriata in a 15 L box. The fruits were freshly inoculated at onset of storage and the cultures of C. fimbriata were 6 days old. Percentage of control was 92 and 97%, respectively. After exposure to C. fimbriata VOCs, severely misshapen hyphae and conidia of these two post-harvest pathogens were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and their pathogenicity was lost or greatly reduced. PMID:26147922

  5. FILLING MOLDS MADE ON THE BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, AUTOMATIC COPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FILLING MOLDS MADE ON THE BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG (BMM) FROM MOBILE LADLE. EMPTY BULL LADLE IN FOREGROUND. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  6. TENDING THE MOLD, DURING THE TRANSFER FROM TUNDISH TO MOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TENDING THE MOLD, DURING THE TRANSFER FROM TUNDISH TO MOLD TO CONTAINMENT CHAMBER IS CONTINUOUS CASTING OPERATOR, CALVIN ANDERS. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Pressure molding of powdered materials improved by rubber mold insert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Pressure molding tungsten microspheres is accomplished by applying hydraulic pressure to a silicone rubber mold insert with several barrel shaped chambers which is placed in a steel die cavity. This technique eliminates castings containing shear fractures.

  8. Molding process for imidazopyrrolone polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for producing shaped articles of imidazopyrrolone polymers comprising molding imidazopyrrolone polymer molding power under pressure and at a temperature greater than 475 C. Moderate pressures may be employed. Preferably, prior to molding, a preform is prepared by isostatic compression. The preform may be molded at a relatively low initial pressure and temperature; as the temperature is increased to a value greater than 475 C., the pressure is also increased.

  9. Potato tuber dormancy and postharvest sprout control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For an indeterminate period of time following harvest, potatoes will not sprout and are physiologically dormant. Dormancy is gradually lost during postharvest storage and the resultant sprouting is detrimental to the nutritional and processing qualities of potatoes. Because of this, sprouting resu...

  10. Postharvest Rhizopus rot on sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizopus species have been reported as a minor post-harvest rot on sugar beet, particularly under temperatures above 5 deg C. In 2010, Rhizopus was isolated from beets collected from Michigan storage piles in February at a low frequency. However, recent evidence from Michigan has found a high incide...

  11. Postharvest biology and technology of ornamentals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relatively brief postharvest life of most cut flowers and potted flowering plants can be extended by a range of technologies. Studies have shown that vase life is negatively correlated with respiration after harvest, so prompt cooling to the lowest safe storage temperature is a key to long-dist...

  12. REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-06-24

    Refractory coating for graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is described. The coating is an alumino-silicate refractory composition which may be used as a mold surface in solid form or as a coating applied to the graphite mold. The composition consists of a mixture of ball clay, kaolin, alumina cement, alumina, water, sodium silicate, and sodium carbonate.

  13. High Cost/High Risk Components to Chalcogenide Molded Lens Model: Molding Preforms and Mold Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2012-10-05

    This brief report contains a critique of two key components of FiveFocal's cost model for glass compression molding of chalcogenide lenses for infrared applications. Molding preforms and mold technology have the greatest influence on the ultimate cost of the product and help determine the volumes needed to select glass molding over conventional single-point diamond turning or grinding and polishing. This brief report highlights key areas of both technologies with recommendations for further study.

  14. Synthesis of Oxylipin Mimics and Their Antifungal Activity against the Citrus Postharvest Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jimei; Li, Yupeng; Chen, Hangwei; Zeng, Zhen; Li, Zi-Long; Jiang, Hong

    2016-02-22

    Nine oxylipin mimics were designed and synthesized starting from d-mannose. Their antifungal activity against three citrus postharvest pathogens was evaluated by spore germination assay. The results indicated that all the compounds significantly inhibited the growth of Penicillium digitatum, Penicillium italicum and Aspergillus niger. The compound (3Z,6Z,8S,9R,10R)-octadeca-3,6-diene-8,9,10-triol (3) exhibited excellent inhibitory effect on both Penicillium digitatum (IC50 = 34 ppm) and Penicillium italicum (IC50 = 94 ppm). Their in vivo antifungal activities against citrus postharvest blue mold were tested with fruit inoculated with the pathogen Penicillium italicum. The compound (3R,4S)-methyl 3,4-dihydroxy-5-octyltetrahydrofuran-2-carboxylate (9) demonstrated significant efficacy by reducing the disease severity to 60%. The antifungal mechanism of these oxylipin mimics was postulated in which both inhibition of pathogenic mycelium and stimuli of the host oxylipin-mediated defense response played important roles.

  15. Simple method for screening aflatoxin-producing molds by UV photography.

    PubMed Central

    Yabe, K; Ando, Y; Ito, M; Terakado, N

    1987-01-01

    UV absorption by aflatoxins was monitored in GY agar medium by UV photography. In the UV photographs, aflatoxin-producing molds were identified as gray or black colonies, whereas aflatoxin-nonproducing molds appeared as white colonies. By cellophane transplantation experiments and silica gel thin-layer chromatography, the products absorbing UV light substantially were found to be mainly aflatoxins B1 and G1 excreted from the mold mycelium into the agar medium. UV absorption did not occur when the agar medium contained aflatoxin-noninducible carbon sources instead of glucose. Various inhibitors of aflatoxin production, such as dichlorovos and dimethyl sulfoxide, also decreased the intensity of UV absorption. These results indicate that this technique can be used as a simple, safe, and rapid method of screening aflatoxin-producing molds. Images PMID:3105453

  16. The citrus postharvest pathogen Penicillium digitatum depends on the PdMpkB kinase for developmental and virulence functions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haijie; Sun, Xuepeng; Wang, Mingshuang; Gai, Yunpeng; Chung, Kuang-Ren; Li, Hongye

    2016-11-07

    The postharvest pathogen Penicillium digitatum causes green mold decay on citrus fruit, resulting in severe economic losses. To explore possible factors involved in fungal pathogenesis, phenotypic characterization of the budding yeast Fus3/Kiss1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase homolog was carried out. The P. digitatum MAP kinase B coding gene, designated PdMpkB, was functionally inactivated via homologous recombination. The fungal strain (∆PdMpkB) carrying a PdMpkBdeletion demonstrated altered gene expression profiles, reduced growth and conidiogenesis, elevated resistance to osmotic stress, and failed to induce green mold decay on citrus fruit. ∆PdMpkB was more resistant to CaCl2, NaCl and sorbitol than its progenitor strain, indicating a negative regulatory function of PdMpkB in osmotic stress adaptation. Fungal infection assays on citrus fruit revealed that ∆PdMpkB proliferated poorly within host tissues, induced water-soaking lesions, failed to break through host cuticle layers and thus, failed to produce aerial hyphae and conidia. Introduction of a functional copy of PdMpkB into a null mutant restored all defective phenotypes. Transcriptome analysis revealed that inactivation of PdMpkB impacted expression of the genes associated with cell wall-degrading enzyme activities, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms, conidial formation, and numerous metabolic processes. Our results define pivotal roles of the PdMpkB-mediated signaling pathway in developmental and pathological functions in the citrus postharvest pathogen P. digitatum.

  17. Fabrication of Molded Magnetic Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A molded magnetic article and fabrication method are provided. Particles of ferromagnetic material embedded in a polymer binder are molded under heat and pressure into a geometric shape. Each particle is an oblate spheroid having a radius-to-thickness aspect ratio approximately in the range of 15-30. Each oblate spheroid has flattened poles that are substantially in perpendicular alignment to a direction of the molding pressure throughout the geometric shape.

  18. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Janney, M.A.

    1990-01-16

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, where after the product may be sintered.

  19. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Janney, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  20. Chitosan Controls Postharvest Decay on Cherry Tomato Fruit Possibly via the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danfeng; Wang, Hongtao; Hu, Yi; Liu, Yongsheng

    2015-08-26

    The inhibitive effects of chitosan on gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea on cherry tomato fruit were evaluated. Decay incidence was tested on tomato stored at 22 °C. Hydrogen peroxide accumulation, malondialdehyde (MDA) production, peroxidase (POD) activity, and several related gene expressions (including MPK3, MPK6, PR1a1, and PR5) were determined. Results showed that 0.2% of chitosan solution significantly inhibited the tomato gray mold 3 days after inoculation. Hydrogen peroxide accumulated in the fruit epidermal peel along with chitosan treatment, while MDA production was not increased. POD activity was remarkably enhanced by the application of chitosan. The relative expressions of MPK3, MPK6, and PR1a1 were significantly induced in 10 min after chitosan treatment, while PR5 was induced in 20 min. These findings suggested that the effects of chitosan on inhibiting gray mold in cherry tomato fruit were probably associated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway.

  1. 8. VIEW OF A MOLD FOR PRECISION CASTING. THE MOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF A MOLD FOR PRECISION CASTING. THE MOLD WAS USED IN FOUNDRY OPERATIONS THAT CAST PLUTONIUM EITHER AS INGOTS SUITABLE FOR ROLLING AND FURTHER WROUGHT PROCESSING OR INTO SHAPES AMENABLE TO DIRECT MACHINING OPERATIONS. (5/6/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  2. MOLD SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR: THE EMERGING STANDARD IN MOLD ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today I will talk about the use of quantitative or Real time PCR for the standardized identification and quantification of molds. There are probably at least 100,000 species of molds or fungi. But there are actually about 100 typically found indoors. Some pose a threat to human...

  3. Gray matter heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Barkovich, A J; Kuzniecky, R I

    2000-12-12

    Gray matter heterotopia are common malformations of cortical development. From a clinical perspective, affected patients are best divided into three groups: subependymal, subcortical, and band heterotopia (also called double cortex). Symptomatic women with subependymal heterotopia typically present with partial epilepsy during the second decade of life; development and neurologic examinations up to that point are typically normal. Symptoms in men with subependymal heterotopia vary, depending on whether they have the X-linked or autosomal form. Men with the X-linked form more commonly have associated CNS and visceral anomalies; their development is typically abnormal. Symptomatic men with the autosomal variety have clinical courses similar to symptomatic women. Both men and women with subcortical heterotopia typically have congenital fixed neurologic deficits and develop partial epilepsy during the second half of the first decade of life. The more extensive the subcortical heterotopia, the greater the deficit; bilateral heterotopia are almost invariably associated with severe developmental delay or mental retardation. In general, band heterotopia are seen exclusively in women; men with a mutation of the related gene (called XLIS or DCX) usually die in utero or have a much more severe brain anomaly. Symptoms in affected women vary from normal to severe developmental delay or mental retardation; the severity of the syndrome is related to the thickness of the band of arrested neurons. Nearly all affected patients that come to medical attention have epilepsy, with partial complex and atypical absence epilepsy being the most common syndromes. Some of the more severely affected patients develop attacks.

  4. The science, development, and commercialization of postharvest biocontrol products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postharvest biological control agents as a viable alternative to the use of synthetic chemicals have been the focus of considerable research for the last 30 years by many scientists and several commercial companies worldwide. Several antagonists of postharvest pathogens have been identified and tes...

  5. Effects of pre- and postharvest calcium treatments on shelf life and postharvest quality of broccoli microgreens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microgreens’ extremely short shelf life limits their commercial usage. The objective of this study is to compare the effect of pre- and post- harvest treatments using different forms of calcium on the postharvest quality and shelf-life of broccoli microgreens. Preharvest spray with calcium lactate, ...

  6. INDOOR MOLDS AND ALLERGIC POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Damp/moldy environments have been associated with asthma exacerbation, but mold¿s role in allergic asthma induction is less clear. Recently, 5 molds were statistically associated with water-damaged asthmatic homes in the Cleveland area. The asthma exacerbation...

  7. Twistable mold for helicopter blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, E. S.; Kiely, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    Design is described of mold for fabrication of blades composed of sets of aerodynamic shells having same airfoil section characteristics but different distributions. Mold consists of opposing stacks of thin templates held together by long bolts. When bolts are loosened, templates can be set at different positions with respect to each other and then locked in place.

  8. INJECTION-MOLDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Lobell, G.M.

    1958-02-11

    This patent is drawn to an injection molding apparatus for producing a tube closed at one end wherein the normally unsupported end of the core located in the cavity during the injection of the molten material to fill the space between the core and cavity wall, which supporting means is automatically removed from operation during the forming of the closed end of the tube. This support means is a plug extending through the end of the core into a recess in the bottom of the cavity where the closed end of the tube is to be formed. The plug is spring pressed into said recess and is forced out of the recess by a slidable bushing at the top of the cavity which is moved against the force of the spring by the molten material when it fills the uppormost open end portion of the cavity, thereby permitting the closed end of the tube to be formed.

  9. Evaluation under commercial conditions of the application of continuous, low concentrations of ozone during the cold storage of table grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botrytis cinerea causes gray mold, a postharvest disease of table grapes. The ability of ozone (O3) in air to inhibit gray mold in stored grapes was reported in chamber studies, but O3 needed evaluation under commercial conditions. Ozone merits attention because it is pesticide-residue free and all...

  10. Rapid control of mold temperature during injection molding process

    SciTech Connect

    Liparoti, Sara; Titomanlio, Giuseppe; Hunag, Tsang Min; Cakmak, Mukerrem; Sorrentino, Andrea

    2015-05-22

    The control of mold surface temperature is an important factor that determines surface morphology and its dimension in thickness direction. It can also affect the frozen molecular orientation and the mold surface replicability in injection molded products. In this work, thin thermally active films were used to quickly control the mold surface temperature. In particular, an active high electrical conductivity carbon black loaded polyimide composites sandwiched between two insulating thin polymeric layers was used to condition the mold surface. By controlling the heating time, it was possible to control precisely the temporal variation of the mold temperature surface during the entire cycle. The surface heating rate was about 40°C/s and upon contact with the polymer the surface temperature decreased back to 40°C within about 5 s; the overall cycle time increased only slightly. The effect on cross section sample morphology of samples of iPP were analyzed and discussed on the basis of the recorded temperature evolution.

  11. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  12. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R

    2005-04-30

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 The past and future implications for salmon habitat.

  13. Mold Cleanup in Your Home

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    If you found mold in your household, you will want to clean it up. Some considerations on how you will clean it up depend on the size of the area, the contaminated materials, and any additional health concerns.

  14. White mold of Jerusalem artichoke

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) is a Native American food plant closely related to the common sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Tubers of Jerusalem artichoke are increasingly available in retail grocery outlets. White mold (Sclerotinia stem rot), caused by the fungus, Sclerotinia sclerotioru...

  15. Mold remediation in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tang G

    2009-01-01

    As occupants in a hospital, patients are susceptible to air contaminants that can include biological agents dispersed throughout the premise. An exposed patient can become ill and require medical intervention. A consideration for patients is that they may have become environmentally sensitive and require placement in an environment that does not compromise their health. Unfortunately, the hospital environment often contains more biological substances than can be expected in an office or home environment. When a hospital also experiences water intrusion such as flooding or water leaks, resulting mold growth can seriously compromise the health of patients and others such as nursing staff and physicians (Burge, Indoor Air and Infectious Disease. Occupational Medicine: State of the Art Reviews, 1980; Lutz et al., Clinical Infectious Diseases 37: 786-793, 2003). Micro-organism growth can propagate if the water is not addressed quickly and effectively. Immunocompromised patients are particularly at risk when subjected to fungal infection such that the US Center for Disease Control issued guideline for building mold in health care facilities (Centers for Disease and Control [CDC], Centers for Disease and Control: Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds, 2000). This paper is based on mold remediation of one portion of a hospital unit due to water from construction activity and inadequate maintenance, resulting in mold growth. A large proportion of the hospital staff, primarily nurses in the dialysis unit, exhibited health symptoms consistent with mold exposure. Unfortunately, the hospital administrators did not consider the mold risk to be serious and refused an independent consultant retained by the nurse's union to examine the premise (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [CBC], Nurses file complaints over mold at Foothills. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2003). The nurse's union managed to have the premise examined by submitting a court order of

  16. Molded polymer solar water heater

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.

    2004-11-09

    A solar water heater has a rotationally-molded water box and a glazing subassembly disposed over the water box that enhances solar gain and provides an insulating air space between the outside environment and the water box. When used with a pressurized water system, an internal heat exchanger is integrally molded within the water box. Mounting and connection hardware is included to provide a rapid and secure method of installation.

  17. Survey Of Present Lens Molding Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollicove, Harvey M.

    1988-07-01

    This survey will provide an overview of glass molding technologies, with a concentration in the newest of the technologies - Precision Glass Molding (PGM). A brief description of various forms of glass molding, including an historical review of patents associated with precision molding, is given. A worldwide survey of known commercial availability and recent innovations in PGM at Kodak are presented as examples of the potential of the precision molding technology.

  18. Response of postharvest tree nut lepidopteran pests to vacuum treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Industry concerns over insect resistance, regulatory action, and the needs of organic processors have renewed interest in nonchemical alternative postharvest treatments to fumigants used for California tree nuts. The development of inexpensive polyvinyl chloride containers capable of holding low pre...

  19. The effect of locust bean gum (LBG)-based edible coatings carrying biocontrol yeasts against Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum causal agents of postharvest decay of mandarin fruit.

    PubMed

    Parafati, Lucia; Vitale, Alessandro; Restuccia, Cristina; Cirvilleri, Gabriella

    2016-09-01

    Strains belonging to Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Aureobasidium pullulans species were tested in vitro as biocontrol agents (BCAs) against the post-harvest pathogenic molds Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum. Moreover, studies aimed at screening the antifungal activity of selected yeast strains in vivo conditions against P. digitatum and P. italicum, and investigated the efficacy of a polysaccharidic matrix, locust bean gum (LBG), enriched with the tested BCAs, in controlling postharvest decays in artificially inoculated mandarins. The population dynamics of BCAs on wounds and the magnitude of peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in fruit tissues were also investigated after treatments of mandarins with antagonistic yeasts. W. anomalus BS91, M. pulcherrima MPR3 and A. pullulans PI1 provided excellent control of postharvest decays caused by P. digitatum and P. italicum on mandarins, both when the yeasts were used alone and in combination with LBG, which enhanced the yeast cell viability over time. Finally, the increased activity of POD and lower decrease in SOD activity in response to BCAs application in mandarin fruits confirmed their involvement in the biocontrol mechanism.

  20. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semirigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers. This paper will also highlight the interactions between academia and small businesses in developing new products and processes.

  1. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Stevenson, Paige; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers advantages of low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semi-rigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers.

  2. Injection molding of engineering plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyon, Dilhan M.

    1991-03-01

    This final report summarizes the findings of a study in injection molding of engineering plastics. Two engineering plastic resins, i.e., unmodified grades of a polyetherimide and a poly (2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene ether) were thoroughly characterized. The characterization included rheology, thermal properties and P-V-T behavior. The data were employed to predict various microstructural distributions including density, residual stress and birefringence distributions in compression and injection molded specimens of these two engineering plastics. The detailed microstructural distributions were also studied experimentally upon processing the two engineering plastics, employing instrumented machines and industrial practices. The experimental findings were elucidated under the light of the numerical simulation results. Overall, this study should furnish a first order understanding of the microstructure development in articles injection molded from amorphous engineering plastic resins.

  3. Flow behavior in liquid molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunston, D.; Phelan, F.; Parnas, R.

    1992-01-01

    The liquid molding (LM) process for manufacturing polymer composites with structural properties has the potential to significantly lower fabrication costs and increase production rates. LM includes both resin transfer molding and structural reaction injection molding. To achieve this potential, however, the underlying science base must be improved to facilitate effective process optimization and implementation of on-line process control. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has a major program in LM that includes materials characterization, process simulation models, on-line process monitoring and control, and the fabrication of test specimens. The results of this program are applied to real parts through cooperative projects with industry. The key feature in the effort is a comprehensive and integrated approach to the processing science aspects of LM. This paper briefly outlines the NIST program and uses several examples to illustrate the work.

  4. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1990-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  5. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1988-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  6. Quaternary chitosan oligomers enhance resistance and biocontrol efficacy of Rhodosporidium paludigenum to green mold in satsuma orange.

    PubMed

    Lu, Laifeng; Liu, Yan; Yang, Jiali; Azat, Ramila; Yu, Ting; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2014-11-26

    This study investigated the capacity of chitosan oligomers (COS), applied before harvest singly or in combination with antagonists, in controlling postharvest green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum in satsuma orange. Oranges treated with COS or Rhodosporidium paludigenum were observed having a delay in onset and progression of disease symptoms relative to wounded controls. Preharvest application of COS at different concentrations achieved similar biocontrol efficiency rates in green mold control after 4 days storage. However, the combination of pre-COS (1%, w/v) and R. paludigenum showed a more effective decay control than any other treatments. COS (1%, w/v) alone did not negatively affect R. paludigenum growth in wounds, but severely inhibited P. digitatum spore germination than lower dose treatments in vitro. The expression levels of the defense-related genes chitinase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase increased with decreased disease symptoms. Moreover, this phenomenon was more prominent in the integrated treatments than in the individual ones.

  7. Mold and Indoor Air Quality in Schools

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Mold and Indoor Air Quality in Schools Mold and Moisture in Schools Webinar ... premier resource on this issue is the Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools kit. Our schools-related resources ...

  8. Contamination Barrier For Contour-Molding Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James F.

    1988-01-01

    Release agent prevents molding compound from adhering to or contaminating surface. Cleaning agent, Turco 4215 NCLT, forms barrier preventing silicone molding compound from sticking to surface and leaving contaminating residue. Also see MFS-29243.

  9. National Allergy Bureau Pollen and Mold Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search AAAAI National Allergy Bureau Pollen and Mold Report Date: April 12, 2017 Location: San Antonio ( ... Service can automatically email you daily pollen and mold reports. Click here sign up! Return to Map ...

  10. Biocontrol Potential of Metchnikowia pulcherrima Strains Against Blue Mold of Apple.

    PubMed

    Janisiewicz, W J; Tworkoski, T J; Kurtzman, C P

    2001-11-01

    ABSTRACT Eight strains of Metschnikowia pulcherrima isolated over a 4-year period from an unmanaged orchard and selected for their biocontrol activity against blue mold (caused by Penicillium expansum) of apples were characterized phenotypically, genetically, and for their biocontrol potential against blue mold on apples. All strains grew well and only differed slightly in their growth in nutrient yeast dextrose broth medium at 1 degrees C after 216 h, but large differences occurred at 0 degrees C, with strain T5-A2 outgrowing other strains by more than 25% transmittance after 360 h. This strain was also one of the most resistant to diphenylamine (DPA), a postharvest antioxidant treatment. All strains required biotin for growth in minimum salt (MS) medium, although strain ST2-A10 grew slightly in MS medium containing riboflavin or folic acid, as did ST3-E1 in MS medium without vitamins. None of the strains produced killer toxins against an indicator strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of Biolog data from YT plates for all eight strains using the MLCLUST program resulted in separation of the strains into one major cluster containing four strains and four scattered strains from which strain ST1-D10 was the most distant from all other strains. This was particularly apparent in 3-D and principle component analysis. Genetic differentiation of the eight strains using maximum parsimony analysis of nucleotide sequences from domain D1/D2 of nuclear large subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA resulted in detection of two clades. Strain ST1-D10 grouped with the type strain of M. pulcherrima but the remaining seven strains grouped separately, which might possibly represent a new species. All strains significantly reduced blue mold on mature Golden Delicious apples during 1 month of storage at 1 degrees C followed by 7 days at room temperature, but strains T5-A2 and T4-A2 were distinctly more effective under these conditions. Strain T5-A2 also was the most effective in tests on

  11. Enhancing Florida strawberry shelf life using peroxiacetic acid pre-harvest treatments and postharvest edible coatings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strawberry is an important fruit crop in Florida. Yearly losses can be attributed to pre- and postharvest decay caused by Botrytis cinerea, and postharvest decay due primarily to Rhizopus stolonifer. Postharvest applications of edible coatings and sanitizers were tested. Among them, a medium-dens...

  12. MOLD-SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR: THE EMERGING STANDARD IN MOLD ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molds can cause health problems like infections and allergies, destroy crops, and contaminate our food or pharmaceuticals. We can't avoid molds. Molds are essential players in the biological processes on earth, but we can now identify and quantify the molds that will be most pr...

  13. Making Internal Molds Of Long, Curved Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.

    1989-01-01

    Mold material carried to internal weld joint and removed after impression taken. Remotely operated device makes impression mold of interior surface of tube at weld joint. Mold provides indication of extent of mismatch between members at joint. Maneuvered to weld inspected through curved tube 3 in. in diameter by 50 in. long. Readily adapted to making molds to measure depth of corrosion in boiler tubes or other pipes.

  14. Blow molding of melt processible rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, W.R.; Stuart, R.E.; Myrick, R.E.

    1991-07-01

    This article discusses the advantages of making hollow rubber parts by blow molding thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) versus conventional rubber processing. It describes the various types of blow molding processes and it provides some insight into the rheological properties of melt processible rubber (MPR) and how MPR should be molded by each of these processes. A number of blow molded applications for MPR are also discussed.

  15. Injection Molding of Plastics from Agricultural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, M.; Ruan, R.

    2001-02-22

    The objective of this research was to conduct a systematic study to relate injection molding parameters to properties of blends of starch and synthetic polymer. From this study, we wished to develop a thorough understanding of the injection molding process and gain significant insight into designing molds and aiding in developing products cheaply and efficiently.

  16. The Mold that Almost Ate the Principal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Wayne; Bishop, Chuck; Byars, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    New-building mold was a bane for many home construction companies and new homeowners during the 1990s. It was not unusual to read or watch the news and see the tragedy played out in one's local community. Untold, however, is the story of the toll new-building mold can take on school systems and their principals, especially as these mold problems…

  17. Planning an Injection Mold Design Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allyn, Edward P.

    With the increased use of plastics worldwide the shortage of trained personnel in moldmaking and design for plastic injection molds is becoming critical. Local schools and community colleges should provide courses in mold design and mold making, since most workers presently learn while working under experienced designers on the job. Following this…

  18. Surface Replication of Molded Products with Microneedle Features in Injection Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiumi, Kazuyasu; Takayama, Tetsuo; Ito, Hiroshi; Inou, Akinori

    Micro-molding of microneedle features was conducted using several injection-molding techniques. Injection compression molding and injection molding were performed with supercritical carbon dioxide fluid and with or without vacuum processing inside the mold cavity. Effects of process parameters on processability and surface replication of the molded parts were evaluated. The height replication ratio for microneedles was improved using injection compression molding. At a shorter compression stroke, the needle height was improved, and the influence of compression delay time was also small. Moreover, the effects of vacuum processing inside the mold cavity under the filling process were slight. The height replication ratio for microneedles showed the highest values using injection molding using supercritical carbon dioxide fluid with vacuum inside the mold cavity.

  19. Is Mold the New Asbestos?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colgan, Craig

    2003-01-01

    Mold and indoor air quality (IAQ) are matters of major concern to architects and their educational clients. The Environmental Protection Agency's Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools program offers help to districts seeking to tackle IAQ issues. Strengthening community relations is one way to be ready in case of a bad environmental or IAQ report.…

  20. ALLERGIC POTENTIAL OF INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many fungi have been associated with allergic lung disease, but few are well studied and even fewer allergens of fungal origin are well characterized. Exposure to damp moldy environments has been associated with the exacerbation of asthma, but the role of molds in the induction o...

  1. Mold production for polymer optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerret, Rainer; Raab, Jonas; Speich, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The fields of application for polymer optics are huge and thus the need for polymer optics is steadily growing. Most polymer optics are produced in high numbers by injection molding. Therefore molds and dies that fulfill special requirements are needed. Polishing is usually the last process in the common process chain for production of molds for polymer optics. Usually this process step is done manually by experienced polishers. Due to the small number of skilled professionals and health problems because of the monotonous work the idea was to support or probably supersede manual polishing. Polishing using an industrial robot as movement system enables totally new possibilities in automated polishing. This work focuses on the surface generation with a newly designed polishing setup and on the code generation for the robot movement. The process starts on ground surfaces and with different tools and polishing agents surfaces that fulfill the requirements for injection molding of optics can be achieved. To achieve this the attention has to be focused not only on the process itself but also on tool path generation. A proprietary software developed in the Centre for Optical Technologies in Aalen University allows the tool path generation on almost any surface. This allows the usage of the newly developed polishing processes on different surfaces and enables an easy adaption. Details of process and software development will be presented as well as results from different polishing tests on different surfaces.

  2. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  3. ANIMAL MODELS OF MOLD ALLERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concept of molds as causative agents for allergy/asthma is not new. In fact many fungal genera have been associated with allergic lung disease, but only a few fungi are well studied and even fewer fungal allergens well characterized. The complexity and variety of fungal pro...

  4. Effect of chitosan coatings on postharvest green asparagus quality.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Miao; Jiang, Hengjun; Ren, Gerui; Huang, Jianying; Wang, Xiangyang

    2013-02-15

    Fresh postharvest green asparagus rapidly deteriorate due to its high respiration rate. The main benefits of edible active coatings are their edible characteristics, biodegradability and increase in food safety. In this study, the quality of the edible coatings based on 0.50%, 0.25% high-molecular weight chitosan (H-chitosan), and 0.50%, 0.25% low-molecular weight chitosan (L-chitosan) on postharvest green asparagus was investigated. On the basis of the results obtained, 0.25% H-chitosan and 0.50% L-chitosan treatments ensured lower color variation, less weight loss and less ascorbic acid, decrease presenting better quality of asparagus than other concentrations of chitosan treatments and the control during the cold storage, and prolonging a shelf life of postharvest green asparagus.

  5. Understanding the Physiology of Postharvest Needle Abscission in Balsam Fir.

    PubMed

    Lada, Rajasekaran R; MacDonald, Mason T

    2015-01-01

    Balsam fir (Abies balsamea) trees are commonly used as a specialty horticultural species for Christmas trees and associated greenery in eastern Canada and United States. Postharvest needle abscission has always been a problem, but is becoming an even bigger challenge in recent years presumably due to increased autumn temperatures and earlier harvesting practices. An increased understanding of postharvest abscission physiology in balsam fir may benefit the Christmas tree industry while simultaneously advancing our knowledge in senescence and abscission of conifers in general. Our paper describes the dynamics of needle abscission in balsam fir while identifying key factors that modify abscission patterns. Concepts such as genotypic abscission resistance, nutrition, environmental factors, and postharvest changes in water conductance and hormone evolution are discussed as they relate to our understanding of the balsam fir abscission physiology. Our paper ultimately proposes a pathway for needle abscission via ethylene and also suggests other potential alternative pathways based on our current understanding.

  6. Understanding the Physiology of Postharvest Needle Abscission in Balsam Fir

    PubMed Central

    Lada, Rajasekaran R.; MacDonald, Mason T.

    2015-01-01

    Balsam fir (Abies balsamea) trees are commonly used as a specialty horticultural species for Christmas trees and associated greenery in eastern Canada and United States. Postharvest needle abscission has always been a problem, but is becoming an even bigger challenge in recent years presumably due to increased autumn temperatures and earlier harvesting practices. An increased understanding of postharvest abscission physiology in balsam fir may benefit the Christmas tree industry while simultaneously advancing our knowledge in senescence and abscission of conifers in general. Our paper describes the dynamics of needle abscission in balsam fir while identifying key factors that modify abscission patterns. Concepts such as genotypic abscission resistance, nutrition, environmental factors, and postharvest changes in water conductance and hormone evolution are discussed as they relate to our understanding of the balsam fir abscission physiology. Our paper ultimately proposes a pathway for needle abscission via ethylene and also suggests other potential alternative pathways based on our current understanding. PMID:26635863

  7. Biocontrol Activity of the Local Strain of Metschnikowia pulcherrima on Different Postharvest Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Türkel, Sezai; Korukluoğlu, Mihriban; Yavuz, Mümine

    2014-01-01

    The strains of the yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima have strong biocontrol activity against various microorganisms. Biocontrol activity of M. pulcherrima largely depends on its iron immobilizing pigment pulcherrimin. Biocontrol activity of pulcherrimin producing strain, M. pulcherrima UMY15, isolated from local vineyards, was tested on different molds that cause food spoilage. M. pulcherrima UMY15 was a very effective biocontrol agent against Penicillium roqueforti, P. italicum, P. expansum, and Aspergillus oryzae in in-vitro plate tests. However, the inhibitory activity of M. pulcherrima UMY15 was less effective on Fusarium sp. and A. niger species in biocontrol assays. In addition, M. pulcherrima UMY15 strain completely inhibited the germination and mycelia growth of A. oryzae, A. parasiticus, and Fusarium sp. spores on artificial wounds of apples when they coinoculated with M. pulcherrima UMY15. Moreover, when coinoculated, M. pulcherrima UMY15 strain also inhibited the growth of P. roqueforti, P. italicum, P. expansum, A. oryzae, Fusarium sp., and Rhizopus sp. in grape juice, indicating that M. pulcherrima UMY15 can be used as a very effective biocontrol yeast against various species of postharvest pathogens, including Penicillium, Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Rhizopus.

  8. Biocontrol Activity of the Local Strain of Metschnikowia pulcherrima on Different Postharvest Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Türkel, Sezai; Korukluoğlu, Mihriban; Yavuz, Mümine

    2014-01-01

    The strains of the yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima have strong biocontrol activity against various microorganisms. Biocontrol activity of M. pulcherrima largely depends on its iron immobilizing pigment pulcherrimin. Biocontrol activity of pulcherrimin producing strain, M. pulcherrima UMY15, isolated from local vineyards, was tested on different molds that cause food spoilage. M. pulcherrima UMY15 was a very effective biocontrol agent against Penicillium roqueforti, P. italicum, P. expansum, and Aspergillus oryzae in in-vitro plate tests. However, the inhibitory activity of M. pulcherrima UMY15 was less effective on Fusarium sp. and A. niger species in biocontrol assays. In addition, M. pulcherrima UMY15 strain completely inhibited the germination and mycelia growth of A. oryzae, A. parasiticus, and Fusarium sp. spores on artificial wounds of apples when they coinoculated with M. pulcherrima UMY15. Moreover, when coinoculated, M. pulcherrima UMY15 strain also inhibited the growth of P. roqueforti, P. italicum, P. expansum, A. oryzae, Fusarium sp., and Rhizopus sp. in grape juice, indicating that M. pulcherrima UMY15 can be used as a very effective biocontrol yeast against various species of postharvest pathogens, including Penicillium, Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Rhizopus. PMID:24860671

  9. Comparative study of antimicrobial peptides to control citrus postharvest decay caused by Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Alberto; López-García, Belén; Marcos, Jose F

    2007-10-03

    The objective of this study was to investigate and compare the in vitro efficacy and in vivo potential of eight distinct short antimicrobial peptides to control the postharvest green mold disease of oranges caused by the fungus Penicillium digitatum. The L-amino acid versions of the four peptides PAF26, PAF38, PAF40, and BM0, previously obtained by combinatorial approaches, were examined. The study included two antibacterial peptides formerly identified by rational design, BP15 and BP76, and it is demonstrated that they also have in vitro antifungal properties. The natural antimicrobial peptides melittin and indolicidin were also selected for comparison, due to their well-known properties and modes of action. In vitro and in vivo results indicated differential behaviors among peptides, regarding the inhibitory potency in growth media, selectivity against distinct microorganisms, fungicidal activity towards nongerminated conidia of P. digitatum, and efficacy in fruit inoculation assays. Interestingly, a high in vitro inhibitory activity did not necessarily associate with an effective control of fruit infection by P. digitatum. The short tryptophan-rich cationic peptides PAF26, PAF38, PAF40, and BM0 were lethal to conidia of P. digitatum, and this property is correlated with better protection in the decay control test.

  10. Precision injection molding of freeform optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fengzhou; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    Precision injection molding is the most efficient mass production technology for manufacturing plastic optics. Applications of plastic optics in field of imaging, illumination, and concentration demonstrate a variety of complex surface forms, developing from conventional plano and spherical surfaces to aspheric and freeform surfaces. It requires high optical quality with high form accuracy and lower residual stresses, which challenges both optical tool inserts machining and precision injection molding process. The present paper reviews recent progress in mold tool machining and precision injection molding, with more emphasis on precision injection molding. The challenges and future development trend are also discussed.

  11. HIGH TEMPERATURE REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-10-21

    An improved foundry mold coating for use with graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is presented. The refractory mold coating serves to keep the molten uranium from contact with graphite of the mold and thus prevents carbon pickup by the molten metal. The refractory coating is made by dry mixing certain specific amounts of aluminum oxide, bentonite, Tennessee ball clay, and a soluble silicate salt. Water is then added to the mixture and the suspension thus formed is applied by spraying onto the mold.

  12. Control of blue mold (Penicillium expansum) by fludioxonil in apples (cv Empire) under controlled atmosphere and cold storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Errampalli, Deena; Northover, John; Skog, Lisa; Brubacher, Nichole R; Collucci, Cheryl A

    2005-06-01

    A reduced risk fungicide, fludioxonil, was tested for its efficacy against blue mold caused by thiabendazole-resistant and -sensitive Penicillium expansum (Link) Thom in apples under three storage conditions. In a co-treatment, fludioxonil and inoculum were applied together to test the protective activity of the fungicide on wounds that had been aged for 1 or 2 days. The fungicide was also tested for its curative activity in post-inoculation treatment on apples that had been inoculated for 1 or 2 days. Fludioxonil was very effective as co-treatment and as post-inoculation treatment. At a concentration of 300 mg litre(-1), fludioxonil gave complete control of post-harvest blue mold caused by the thiabendazole-resistant and -sensitive P expansum for 105 days in controlled atmosphere (CA) storage at 2 (+/-1) degrees C, for 42 days in common cold storage at 4 (+/-1) degrees C and also in a shelf-life study for 6 days at 20 (+/-1) degrees C. Comparison on the effect of fludioxonil in CA storage and common cold storage showed that higher concentrations of fungicide were needed in cold storage than in CA storage. Fludioxonil at a concentration of 450 mg litre(-1), gave 98 and 92% control of blue mold of apples in the simulated shelf-life studies after CA and common cold storages, respectively. Fludioxonil has a potential to be incorporated in the fungicide resistance management strategies for control of blue mold in apples stored for 105 days.

  13. Laboratory Characterization of Gray Masonry Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R- 07 -2 3 Laboratory Characterization of Gray Masonry Concrete Erin M. Williams, Stephen A. Akers, and Paul A. Reed...07-23 August 2007 Laboratory Characterization of Gray Masonry Concrete Erin M. Williams, Stephen A. Akers, and Paul A. Reed Geotechnical and...constitutive property behavior of a gray masonry concrete . A total of 38 mechanical property tests were successfully completed: two hydrostatic

  14. Gamma radiation effects on physico-chemical parameters of apple fruit during commercial post-harvest preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, Hossein Ahari; Mirmajlessi, Seyed Mahyar; Mirjalili, Seyed Mohammad; Fathollahi, Hadi; Askari, Hadi

    2012-06-01

    The physico-chemical parameters (including moisture, total soluble solids, antioxidant activity, phenolic content and firmness) of cv. Red Delicious apple subjected to γ radiation were evaluated for their ability to avoid the post-harvest blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum during cold storage. Freshly harvested apples were inoculated with P. expansum. Treated fruits were irradiated at doses of 0, 300, 600, 900 and 1200 Gy and stored at 1 °C. Apples were evaluated at three month intervals. The results showed that there was a clear link between phenolic content and antioxidant activity, so that dose range of 900 Gy and higher significantly decreased phenolic content and antioxidant activity. The moisture percent of stored apples was more responsive to irradiation (at doses of 900-1200 Gy) than storage time and pathogen. Lesion diameter of pathogen-treated non-irradiated apples was significantly increased after three months. This means that storage at low temperature is not enough to avoid blue mold growth. As dose and storage time increased firmness decreased; also pathogen accelerated softening of stored apples. This study showed conclusively that low irradiation doses (300 and 600 Gy) combined with cold storage is a way to minimize apple quality losses during nine month storage period.

  15. Infrared image gray adaptive adjusting enhancement algorithm based on gray redundancy histogram-dealing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zi-long; Liu, Yong; Chen, Ruo-wang

    2016-11-01

    In view of the histogram equalizing algorithm to enhance image in digital image processing, an Infrared Image Gray adaptive adjusting Enhancement Algorithm Based on Gray Redundancy Histogram-dealing Technique is proposed. The algorithm is based on the determination of the entire image gray value, enhanced or lowered the image's overall gray value by increasing appropriate gray points, and then use gray-level redundancy HE method to compress the gray-scale of the image. The algorithm can enhance image detail information. Through MATLAB simulation, this paper compares the algorithm with the histogram equalization method and the algorithm based on gray redundancy histogram-dealing technique , and verifies the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  16. Biocontrol of Postharvest Anthracnose of Mango Fruit with Debaryomyces Nepalensis and Effects on Storage Quality and Postharvest Physiology.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shanshan; Wan, Bin; Feng, Shuhan; Shao, Yuanzhi

    2015-11-01

    Anthracnose is presently recognized as one of the most important postharvest disease of mango worldwide. To control the disease, chemical fungicides for a long time was widely used among fruit farmers, but recently found that pathogen had developed increasingly resistance to it. With people's growing desire of healthy and green food, finding new and environmentally friendly biological control approach was very necessary. In this paper, we provided a kind of new antagonistic yeast which enriched the strain resources and the efficacy of Debaryomyces nepalensis against postharvest anthracnose of mango fruit and the influence on quality parameters were investigated. The results showed that the decay incidence and lesion diameter of postharvest anthracnose of mango treated by D. nepalensis were significantly reduced compared with the control fruit stored at 25 °C for 30 d or at 15 °C for 40 d, and the higher concentration of D. nepalensis was, the better the efficacy of the biocontrol was. Study also found that 1 h was the best treatment duration and antagonistic yeast inoculated earlier had good biocontrol effect on anthracnose. Meanwhile, treatment by D. nepalensis could significantly reduce postharvest anthracnose of mango, delay the decrease in firmness, TSS, TA, and ascorbic acid value, and do not impair surface color during postharvest storage. Moreover, the increase in MDA (malondialdehyde) content and increase in cell membrane permeability of fruit treated by D. nepalensis was highly inhibited. The results suggested D. nepalensis treatment could not only maintain storage quality of mango fruit, but also decrease the decay incidence to anthracnose disease. All these results indicated that D. nepalensis has great potential for development of commercial formulations to control postharvest pathogens of mango fruit.

  17. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  18. [Mold infections in lung transplants].

    PubMed

    Solé, Amparo; Ussetti, Piedad

    2014-01-01

    Invasive infections by molds, mainly Aspergillus infections, account for more than 10% of infectious complications in lung transplant recipients. These infections have a bimodal presentation: an early one, mainly invading bronchial airways, and a late one, mostly focused on lung or disseminated. The Aspergillus colonization at any time in the post-transplant period is one of the major risk factors. Late colonization, together with chronic rejection, is one of the main causes of late invasive forms. A galactomannan value of 0.5 in bronchoalveolar lavage is currently considered a predictive factor of pulmonary invasive infection. There is no universal strategy in terms of prophylaxis. Targeted prophylaxis and preemptive treatment instead of universal prophylaxis, are gaining more followers. The therapeutic drug monitoring level of azoles is highly recommended in the treatment. Monotherapy with voriconazole is the treatment of choice in invasive aspergillosis; combined antifungal therapies are only recommended in severe, disseminated, and other infections due to non-Aspergillus molds.

  19. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

  20. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

  1. Onychomycosis due to opportunistic molds*

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Herrera, Erick Obed; Arroyo-Camarena, Stefanie; Tejada-García, Diana Luz; Porras-López, Carlos Francisco; Arenas, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Onychomycosis are caused by dermatophytes and Candida, but rarely by non- dermatophyte molds. These opportunistic agents are filamentous fungi found as soil and plant pathogens. OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of opportunistic molds in onychomycosis. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 4,220 cases with onychomycosis, diagnosed in a 39-month period at the Institute of Dermatology and Skin surgery "Prof. Dr. Fernando A. Cordero C." in Guatemala City, and confirmed with a positive KOH test and culture. RESULTS: 32 cases (0.76%) of onychomycosis caused by opportunistic molds were confirmed. The most affected age group ranged from 41 to 65 years (15 patients, 46.9%) and females were more commonly affected (21 cases, 65.6%) than males. Lateral and distal subungual onychomycosis (OSD-L) was detected in 20 cases (62.5%). The microscopic examination with KOH showed filaments in 19 cases (59.4%), dermatophytoma in 9 cases (28.1%), spores in 2 cases (6.25%), and filaments and spores in 2 cases (6.25%). Etiologic agents: Aspergillus sp., 11 cases (34.4%); Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, 8 cases (25.0%); Cladosporium sp., 3 cases (9.4%); Acremonium sp., 2 cases (6.25%); Paecilomyces sp., 2 cases (6.25%); Tritirachium oryzae, 2 cases (6.25%); Fusarium sp., Phialophora sp., Rhizopus sp. and Alternaria alternate, 1 case (3.1%) each. CONCLUSIONS: We found onychomycosis by opportunistic molds in 0.76% of the cases and DLSO was present in 62.5%. The most frequent isolated etiological agents were: Aspergillus sp. and Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. PMID:26131862

  2. Capillarity in metal casting mold filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilden, Jon L.

    In metal casting processes, surface tension of the molten metal typically resists filling of the metal into the mold. The effects are greater for smaller mold cavities, and ultimately, the smallest cavities may not be filled. Surface tension forces can be overcome by applying pressure (head) to the molten metal, thus forcing metal into the cavities. However, a pressure-window will exist, too little pressure resulting in non-filled cavities and too much pressure resulting in penetration of the mold, which is itself porous. Filling-pressure windows are investigated for cylindrical-shaped mold cavities on both a theoretical and experimental basis. The lower bound of the filling pressure window is examined by treating cylindrical mold cavities as cylinders lined with packed spheres representing mold particles. The upper bound is examined by treating the mold as a 3-D array of close-packed spheres. The experimental work concerns industrial-scale vacuum investment casting of superalloy IN718 into molds containing various cylindrical mold cavities at various heights (heads). The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the numerical modeling predictions for filling of rough (sphere-lined) cylindrical mold cavities.

  3. Future prospects for biological control of postharvest diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article reflects the current research and future prospects in the area of biological control of postharvest diseases (BCPD) of fruits. During the past decade, not only research interest in BCPD grew, which is reflected in a number of publications, but the use of the pioneering product Bio-save...

  4. Water use dynamics of peach trees under postharvest deficit irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postharvest deficit irrigation is a potential strategy for conserving valuable fresh water for production of early season tree fruit crops such as peaches. However, behaviors of evapotranspiration characteristics and crop coefficient (Kc) under deficit irrigation conditions are largely unknown. A th...

  5. Postharvest evaluations comparing Primocane- and Floricane-fruiting blackberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postharvest storage of blackberries from floricanes was compared with primocane berries in a study conducted at the University of Arkansas Fruit Research Substation, Clarksville in 2006. Berries were harvested directly into ½ pint polystyrene clamshells affixed with an absorbent liner and refrigera...

  6. Postharvest Physiology and Biochemistry of Fruits and Vegetables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haard, Norman F.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the diversity and dynamic nature of the chemical components of postharvest crops. Also discusses the role of respiration and genetic control in chemical transformations leading to desirable and undesirable changes in the quality of edible plants after harvest. The role of enzymes in producing these changes is considered. (JN)

  7. Advances in developing alternative treatments for postharvest pest control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    USDA-ARS made two significant advances in the last 10 years in the development of alternative treatments for postharvest pest control: oxygenated phosphine fumigation and nitric oxide fumigation. Oxygenated phosphine is phosphine fumigation in an oxygen enriched atmosphere. It is significantly more...

  8. The Effect of Illumination on Gray Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Da Pos, Osvaldo; Baratella, Linda; Sperandio, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    The present study explored the perceptual process of integration of luminance information in the production of the gray color of an object placed in an environment viewed from a window. The mean luminance of the object was varied for each mean luminance of the environment. Participants matched the gray color of the object with that of Munsell…

  9. Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) ecology and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, Judd A.

    1997-01-01

    The gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) is a petite member of the family Canidae in the order Carnivora with a long muzzle and pointed ears (Samuel and Nelson 1982). The coat of the gray fox is silver gray across the back with significant amounts of rufus along the sides. This characteristic is often confused by people who see the flash of red and assume that the fox is a red fox (Vulpes vulpes). The gray fox has a black tipped tail with a dorsal black stripe that differentiates this species from the kit fox (Vulpes macrotis). The red fox has a white tipped tail. The gray fox weighs between 3-5 kg, occasionally to 7 kg. TL 800-1125, T 275-443, HF 100-150. (Jameson and Peeters 1988).

  10. A genome survey and postharvest transcriptome analysis in Lentinula edodes.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yuichi; Nakade, Keiko; Sato, Shiho; Yoshida, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Kazuhiro; Natsume, Satoshi; Konno, Naotake

    2017-03-17

    Lentinula edodes is a popular cultivated edible and medicinal mushroom. Lentinula edodes is susceptible to postharvest problems such as gill browning, fruiting body softening, and lentinan degradation. We constructed a de novo assembly draft genome sequence and performed gene prediction of Lentinula edodesDe novo assembly was carried out using short reads from paired-end and mate-paired libraries and long reads by PacBio, resulting in a contig number of 1951 and an N50 of 1 Mb. Further, we predicted genes by Augustus using RNA-seq data from the whole life cycle of Lentinula edodes, resulting in 12,959 predicted genes. This analysis revealed that Lentinula edodes lacks lignin peroxidase. To reveal genes involved in Lentinula edodes postharvest fruiting body quality loss, transcriptome analysis was carried out using Super-SAGE. This analysis revealed that many cell wall-related enzymes are upregulated after harvest, such as β-1,3-1,6-glucan-degrading enzymes in glycoside hydrolase (GH) families 5, 16, 30, 55, 128, and thaumatin-like proteins. In addition, we found several chitin-related genes are upregulated, such as putative chitinases in GH family18, exo-chitinases in GH 20, and a putative chitosanase in GH 75. The results suggest that cell wall-degrading enzymes synergistically cooperate for rapid fruiting body autolysis. Many putative transcription factor genes were upregulated postharvest, such as genes containing high mobility group (HMG) domains and zinc finger domains. Several cell death-related proteins were also upregulated postharvest.Importance Our data collectively suggest that there is a rapid fruiting body autolysis system in Lentinula edodes The genes for postharvest quality loss newly found in this research will be targets for future breeding of strains that can keep freshness longer than present strains. De novo Lentinula edodes genome assembly data will be used for construction of the complete Lentinula edodes chromosome map for the future

  11. Amorphous materials molded IR lens progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, A. R., Sr.; McCord, James; Timm, Ronald; Le Blanc, R. A.

    2008-04-01

    Amorphous Materials began in 2000 a joint program with Lockheed Martin in Orlando to develop molding technology required to produce infrared lenses from chalcogenide glasses. Preliminary results were reported at this SPIE meeting by Amy Graham1 in 2003. The program ended in 2004. Since that time, AMI has concentrated on improving results from two low softening glasses, Amtir 4&5. Both glasses have been fully characterized and antireflection coatings have been developed for each. Lenses have been molded from both glasses, from Amtir 6 and from C1 Core glass. A Zygo unit is used to evaluate the results of each molded lens as a guide to improving the molding process. Expansion into a larger building has provided room for five production molding units. Molded lens sizes have ranged from 8 mm to 136 mm in diameter. Recent results will be presented

  12. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  13. Hydrogen silsesquioxane mold coatings for improved replication of nanopatterns by injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobæk, Thor Christian; Matschuk, Maria; Kafka, Jan; Pranov, Henrik J.; Larsen, Niels B.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the replication of nanosized pillars in polymer (cyclic olefin copolymer) by injection molding using nanostructured thermally cured hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) ceramic coatings on stainless steel mold inserts with mold nanostructures produced by a simple embossing process. At isothermal mold conditions, the average pillar height increases by up to 100% and a more uniform height distribution is observed compared to a traditional metal mold insert. Thermal heat transfer simulations predict that the HSQ film retards the cooling of the polymer melt during the initial stages of replication, thus allowing more time to fill the nanoscale cavities compared to standard metal molds. A monolayer of a fluorinated silane (heptadecafluorotrichlorosilane) deposited on the mold surface reduces the mold/polymer interfacial energy to support demolding of the polymer replica. The mechanical stability of thermally cured HSQ makes it a promising material for nanopattern replication on an industrial scale without the need for slow and energy intensive variotherm processes.

  14. Mold For Casting Radius-Inspection Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    Thin replicas viewed on comparator without sectioning. New mold machined from piece of transparent poly(methyl methacrylate). Fits around base of post. Two slots machined into inner surface form channels for casting inspection sections. Bottom of mold fits flush against surface around bottom of post. When surface slanted, mold automatically aligns in proper orientation. Time required to inspect elliptical radii located at bottoms of series of small posts reduced from 18 hours to 3 hours.

  15. Mold in My School: What Do I Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, Washington, DC.

    This publication provides information on the most important indoor mold-related health concerns and discusses how school districts can keep school facilities mold-free and avoid these problems. The document addresses when to be concerned, how molds cause health problems, symptoms caused by mold allergies, indoor molds that form toxins, who is most…

  16. Chalcogenide-mold interactions during precision glass molding (PGM) of GeAsSe glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, B.; Wachtel, P.; Musgraves, J. D.; Steinkopf, R.; Eberhardt, R.; Richardson, K.

    2013-09-01

    Five chalcogenide glasses in the GeAsSe ternary glass system were melted, fabricated into flats, and molded between planar, uncoated, binderless WC molds using a laboratory-scale precision glass molding machine. The five glasses originate at the binary arsenic triselenide (As40Se60) and are modified by replacing As with Se in 5 mol% increments, or by locking the As:Se ratio and adding Ge, also in 5 mol% increments. The glasses are separated into two groups, one for the Ge-free compositions and the other for the Ge-containing compositions. This effort analyzes the differences between the Ge-containing and the Ge-free glasses on the post-molded glass and mold surface behavior, as well as the mold lifetime. Fabrication features, such as scratch and/or dig marks were present on the glass and mold surfaces prior to the PGM process. White light interferometry analysis of the surfaces shows an overall reduction in the RMS roughness of the glass after molding, and an increase of the roughness of the molds, after 15 molding cycles. After molding, the quantity of observable defects, primarily deposits and dig marks are increased for both the glass and mold surfaces. Deposits found on the WC molds and glasses were analyzed using Electron Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and showed no evidence of being due to material transfer between the WC molds and the glass constituents. In general the main observable difference in the analysis of the two post molded sets, despite the changes in chemistry, is the quantity of molding induced defects near the edge of the GeAsSe samples.

  17. Mold Infections of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Matthew; Rosengart, Axel; Schuetz, Audrey N.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of exserohilum rostratum meningitis linked to epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate has brought renewed attention to mold infections of the central nervous system (CNS).1 Although uncommon, these infections are often devastating and difficult to treat. This focused review of the epidemiologic aspects, clinical characteristics, and treatment of mold infections of the CNS covers a group of common pathogens: aspergillus, fusarium, and scedosporium species, molds in the order Mucorales, and dematiaceous molds. Infections caused by these pathogen groups have distinctive epidemiologic profiles, clinical manifestations, microbiologic characteristics, and therapeutic implications, all of which clinicians should understand. PMID:25006721

  18. Mold and Human Health: a Reality Check.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Andrea T; Chang, Christopher; Eric Gershwin, M

    2017-03-16

    There are possibly millions of mold species on earth. The vast majority of these mold spores live in harmony with humans, rarely causing disease. The rare species that does cause disease does so by triggering allergies or asthma, or may be involved in hypersensitivity diseases such as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis or allergic fungal sinusitis. Other hypersensitivity diseases include those related to occupational or domiciliary exposures to certain mold species, as in the case of Pigeon Breeder's disease, Farmer's lung, or humidifier fever. The final proven category of fungal diseases is through infection, as in the case of onchomycosis or coccidiomycosis. These diseases can be treated using anti-fungal agents. Molds and fungi can also be particularly important in infections that occur in immunocompromised patients. Systemic candidiasis does not occur unless the individual is immunodeficient. Previous reports of "toxic mold syndrome" or "toxic black mold" have been shown to be no more than media hype and mass hysteria, partly stemming from the misinterpreted concept of the "sick building syndrome." There is no scientific evidence that exposure to visible black mold in apartments and buildings can lead to the vague and subjective symptoms of memory loss, inability to focus, fatigue, and headaches that were reported by people who erroneously believed that they were suffering from "mycotoxicosis." Similarly, a causal relationship between cases of infant pulmonary hemorrhage and exposure to "black mold" has never been proven. Finally, there is no evidence of a link between autoimmune disease and mold exposure.

  19. Porous media heat transfer for injection molding

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2016-05-31

    The cooling of injection molded plastic is targeted. Coolant flows into a porous medium disposed within an injection molding component via a porous medium inlet. The porous medium is thermally coupled to a mold cavity configured to receive injected liquid plastic. The porous medium beneficially allows for an increased rate of heat transfer from the injected liquid plastic to the coolant and provides additional structural support over a hollow cooling well. When the temperature of the injected liquid plastic falls below a solidifying temperature threshold, the molded component is ejected and collected.

  20. Analysis of optical properties in injection-molded and compression-molded optical lenses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung Yen; Wang, Pei Jen

    2014-04-10

    Numerical mold-flow simulations and experimental measurements for injection-molded lenses have been investigated in form accuracy on a two-cavity mold with various process conditions. First, form profiles of the molded lenses have been measured together with the corresponding simulated mold-temperature distribution and displacement distribution of the lens in the z direction. A flow-through type layout of cooling channels has been devised for balance of mold-temperature distribution in mold cavities with various parametric distances for assessments in uniformity of temperature distribution. Finally, a compression-molding process is proposed for the post-process of birefringence relaxation as well as adequate form accuracy of lenses. In conclusion, optimization of process parameters to achieve good form accuracy in a multicavity mold with symmetric geometry but nonuniform cooling conditions is difficult. A good design of cooling channels plus optimized process conditions could provide uniform mold-temperature distribution so that molded lenses of good quality would be possible. Then, the profile deviation of lenses could be further compensated by profile geometry corrections. In conclusion, the post-compression-molding process could make birefringence-free plastic lenses with good form accuracy.

  1. Efficacy of plant essential oils on postharvest control of rots caused by fungi on different stone fruits in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Reyes, Jorge Giovanny; Spadaro, Davide; Prelle, Ambra; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2013-04-01

    The antifungal activity of plant essential oils was evaluated as postharvest treatment on stone fruit against brown rot and grey mold rot of stone fruit caused by Monilinia laxa and Botrytis cinerea, respectively. The essential oils from basil (Ocimum basilicum), fennel (Foeniculum sativum), lavender (Lavandula officinalis), marjoram (Origanum majorana), oregano (Origanum vulgare), peppermint (Mentha piperita), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), sage (Salvia officinalis), savory (Satureja montana), thyme (Thymus vulgaris), and wild mint (Mentha arvensis) were tested at two different concentrations on apricots (cv. Kyoto and cv. Tonda di Costigliole), nectarines (cv. Big Top and cv. Nectaross) and plums (cv. Italia and cv. TC Sun). The volatile composition of the essential oils tested was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The treatments containing essential oils from oregano, savory, and thyme at 1% (vol/vol) controlled both B. cinerea and M. laxa growing on apricots cv. Tonda di Costigliole and plums cv. Italia and cv. TC Sun; however, the same treatments were phytotoxic for the carposphere of nectarines cv. Big Top and cv. Nectaross. Treatments with 10% (vol/vol) essential oils were highly phytotoxic, notwithstanding their efficacy against the pathogens tested. The essential oils containing as major components α-pinene, p-cymene, carvacrol, and thymol showed similar results on stone fruit, so their antimicrobial activity and the phytotoxicity produced could be based on the concentration of their principal compounds and their synergistic activity. The efficacy of the essential oil treatments on control of fungal pathogens in postharvest depended on the fruit cultivar, the composition and concentration of the essential oil applied, and the length of storage.

  2. Postharvest decay control of citrus fruit by preharvest pyrimethanil spray.

    PubMed

    D'Aquino, S; Angioni, A; Suming, D; Palma, A; Schirra, M

    2013-01-01

    Preharvest infections or conidia load on fruit surface by Penicillium digitatum, P. italicum, Alternaria citri and other filamentous fungi can cause important postharvest losses of citrus fruit. Reduction in pruning frequency occurred in the last decade together with un-picked yield that eventually rots on the trees have increased the risk of postharvest decay especially when environmental conditions at picking time are favourable to pathogens' development. Sanitation procedures in the packinghouses, alternate use of postharvest fungicides with different modes of action, along with fungicide application before harvest could be an effective approach to minimize postharvest decay in citrus fruit. The present study investigated the effectiveness of a preharvest treatment with pyrimethanil (PYR), a broad spectrum fungicide, recently registered in different citrus-producing countries for postharvest treatments of citrus fruit and widely used worldwide as a preharvest treatment to control various diseases in different crops. PYR (750 mg/L) was sprayed by a hand-back sprayer at run-off on 'Fremont' mandarins. The day after the treatment, half of the trees were sprayed with a 10(4) conidial suspension of P. digitatum at run-off. Fruit were harvested following 2 or 4 weeks from treatments. Sound or either wounded 2-mm-deep and 2-mm-wide or superficial wound-scratched fruit were stored at 20 degrees C and 90% RH and inspected for decay after 1, 2 or 3 weeks of storage. In fruit harvested after 2 weeks from field treatment, PYR remarkably reduced decay development during two weeks of storage in sound fruit and in wound-scratched fruit and was fairly effective even after 4 weeks from treatment, but was ineffective in fruit wounded 2 mm deep and 2 mm wide. PYR was also effective in reducing preharvest decay incited by P. digitatum, P. italicum and Botrytis cinerea, but not by other pathogens. Results show that preharvest treatment with PYR could be a feasible approach to reduce

  3. Commercial and Residential Water Damage: The Mold Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Del

    2002-01-01

    Describes the problem of toxic mold in residential and commercial property resulting from excess moisture. Includes common sources of unwanted moisture, design and construction flaws, determining the presence of mold, and advice for identifying and hiring reputable mold remediators. (PKP)

  4. Use of acrylic sheet molds for elastomeric products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Koerner, A. E.; Messineo, S. M.

    1970-01-01

    Molds constructed of acrylic sheet are more easily machined than metal, are transparent to ensure complete filling during injection, and have smooth surfaces free of contamination. Technique eliminates flashing on molded parts and mold release agents.

  5. Plastic molds reduce cost of encapsulating electric cable connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, D.

    1964-01-01

    Resin casting of the aluminum master pattern forms a plastic mold for encapsulating a cable connector. An elastomer is injected into the mold and cured. The mold is disassembled leaving an elastomeric encapsulation around the connector.

  6. Mold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homes Partnership project. The routine sampling included measuring air quality factors such as temperature, relative humidity, air circulation, ... World Health Organization) . 2009. WHO guidelines for indoor air quality: dampness and mould. Germany: Druckpartner Moser. 4 NTP ( ...

  7. Efficacy of Pichia caribbica in controlling blue mold rot and patulin degradation in apples.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jing; Zhang, Hongyin; Yang, Qiya; Ren, Rong

    2013-03-15

    The efficacy of Pichia caribbica in controlling postharvest blue mold and natural decay development of apples and degrading the patulin produced by Penicillium expansum was investigated. The decay incidence of the blue mold of apples treated by P. caribbica was significantly reduced compared with the control samples, and the higher the concentration of P. caribbica, the better the efficacy of the biocontrol. P. caribbica significantly controlled the natural decay development of apples following storage at 20°C for 35days or 4°C for 45 days followed by 20°C for 15 days. Germination of spores and growth of P. expansum were markedly inhibited by P. caribbica in in vitro testing. Rapid colonization of apple wounds by the yeast was observed in fruit stored at 20°C or 4°C. After incubation with P. caribbica at 20°C for 15 days, patulin production by P. expansum in apples was significantly reduced compared with the control. In vitro testing indicated that P. caribbica can degrade patulin directly.

  8. Mold-inhibitory activity of different yeast species during airtight storage of wheat grain.

    PubMed

    Adel Druvefors, Ulrika; Schnürer, Johan

    2005-02-01

    The yeast Pichia anomala J121 inhibits spoilage by Penicillium roqueforti in laboratory and pilot studies with high-moisture wheat in malfunctioning airtight storage. We tested the biocontrol ability of an additional 57 yeast species in a grain mini silo system. Most yeast species grew to CFU levels comparable to that of P. anomala J121 after 14 days of incubation (>10(6) CFU g(-1)). Of the 58 species, 38 (63 strains) had no mold-inhibitory effects (Pen. roqueforti levels >10(5) CFU g(-1)). Among these were 11 species (18 strains) that did not grow on the wheat grain. Several of the non-inhibiting yeast species have previously been reported as biocontrol agents in other postharvest environments. Weak inhibitory activity, reducing Pen. roqueforti levels to between 10(4) and 10(5) CFU g(-1), was observed with 11 species (12 strains). Candida silvicola and Pichia guillermondii reduced Pen. roqueforti to <10(4) CFU g(-1). Candida fennica, Candida pelliculosa, Candida silvicultrix, P. anomala (29 strains), Pichia burtonii, Pichia farinosa and Pichia membranifaciens strongly inhibited Pen. roqueforti (<10(3) CFU g(-1)) in the mini silos, but none had higher biocontrol activity than P. anomala strain J121. This report is the first of biocontrol activity of C. fennica and C. silvicultrix. The ability of 27 yeast species to grow to high CFU values without inhibiting mold growth suggests that nutrient competition may not be the main mode of action of P. anomala J121.

  9. Process for Making Ceramic Mold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An improved process for slip casting molds that can be more economically automated and that also exhibits greater dimensional stability is disclosed. The process involves subjecting an investment pattern, preferably made from wax, to successive cycles of wet-dipping in a slurry of colloidal, silica-based binder and dry powder-coating, or stuccoing with plaster of Paris or calcium sulfate mixtures to produce a multi-layer shell over the pattern. The invention as claimed entails applying a primary and a secondary coating to the investment pattern. At least two wet-dipping on in a primary slurry and dry-stuccoing cycles provide the primary coating, and an additional two wet-dippings and dry-stuccoing cycles provide the secondary, or back-up, coating. The primary and secondary coatings produce a multi-layered shell pattern. The multi-layered shell pattern is placed in a furnace first to cure and harden, and then to vaporize the investment pattern, leaving a detailed, high precision shell mold.

  10. Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation and Indoor Air.

    This document describes how to investigate and evaluate moisture and mold problems in educational facilities, and presents the key steps for implementing a remediation plan. A checklist is provided for conducting mold remediation efforts along with a resource list of helpful organizations and governmental agencies. Appendices contain a glossary,…

  11. EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN TO INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children now spend more than 90% of their time indoors. Thus, any exposure to indoor pollutants may be critical to their health. Molds are one of the most important pollutants children are exposed to indoors. Molds produce hundreds of allergens and toxins. These products ha...

  12. Dynamic Feed Control For Injection Molding

    DOEpatents

    Kazmer, David O.

    1996-09-17

    The invention provides methods and apparatus in which mold material flows through a gate into a mold cavity that defines the shape of a desired part. An adjustable valve is provided that is operable to change dynamically the effective size of the gate to control the flow of mold material through the gate. The valve is adjustable while the mold material is flowing through the gate into the mold cavity. A sensor is provided for sensing a process condition while the part is being molded. During molding, the valve is adjusted based at least in part on information from the sensor. In the preferred embodiment, the adjustable valve is controlled by a digital computer, which includes circuitry for acquiring data from the sensor, processing circuitry for computing a desired position of the valve based on the data from the sensor and a control data file containing target process conditions, and control circuitry for generating signals to control a valve driver to adjust the position of the valve. More complex embodiments include a plurality of gates, sensors, and controllable valves. Each valve is individually controllable so that process conditions corresponding to each gate can be adjusted independently. This allows for great flexibility in the control of injection molding to produce complex, high-quality parts.

  13. The Thermal Distortion of a Funnel Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbeler, Lance C.; Thomas, Brian G.; Schimmel, Ronald C.; Abbel, Gert

    2012-10-01

    This article investigates the thermal distortion of a funnel mold for continuous casting of thin slabs and explores the implications on taper and solidification of the steel shell. The three-dimensional mold temperatures are calculated using shell-mold heat flux and cooling water profiles that were calibrated with plant measurements. The thermal stresses and distorted shape of the mold are calculated with a detailed finite-element model of a symmetric fourth of the entire mold and waterbox assembly, and they are validated with plant thermocouple data and measurements of the wear of the narrow-face copper mold plates. The narrow-face mold distorts into the typical parabolic arc, and the wide face distorts into a "W" shape owing to the large variation in bolt stiffnesses. The thermal expansion of the wide face works against the applied narrow-face taper and funnel effects, so the effect of thermal distortion must be considered to accurately predict the ideal mold taper.

  14. 21ST CENTURY MOLD ANALYSIS IN FOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditionally, the indoor air community has relied on mold analysis performed by either microscopic observations or the culturing of molds on various media to assess indoor air quality. These techniques were developed in the 19th century and are very laborious and time consumin...

  15. The use of IR thermography to show the mold and part temperature evolution in injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bula, Karol; Różański, Leszek; Marciniak-Podsadna, Lidia; Wróbel, Dawid

    2016-12-01

    This study concerns the application of infrared camera for injection molding analysis by measuring temperatures of both injection molded parts and injection mold cavities in a function of injection cycles. The mold with two cavities, differing in thickness (1 and 3 mm), and a cold direct runner was used. Isotactic polypropylene homopolymer was utilized to produce parts. Mold temperature was set at 22°C and controlled by a water chiller. Five measuring points were determined: SP1, SP2 (placed in the 3 mm cavity), SP3, SP4 (located in the 1 mm cavity) and SP5 around an injection molding gate. Our investigations showed that the highest temperature is localized around SP2 point and the lowest at SP4. Also, it was proved that even after 62 injection molding cycles, temperatures of cavities were not stable, revealing their further increase with each cycle.

  16. Biocontrol ability and action mechanism of food-isolated yeast strains against Botrytis cinerea causing post-harvest bunch rot of table grape.

    PubMed

    Parafati, Lucia; Vitale, Alessandro; Restuccia, Cristina; Cirvilleri, Gabriella

    2015-05-01

    Strains belonging to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Aureobasidium pullulans, isolated from different food sources, were tested in vitro as biocontrol agents (BCAs) against the post-harvest pathogenic mold Botrytis cinerea. All yeast strains demonstrated antifungal activity at different levels depending on species and medium. Killer strains of W. anomalus and S. cerevisiae showed the highest biocontrol in vitro activity, as demonstrated by largest inhibition halos. The competition for iron and the ability to form biofilm and to colonize fruit wounds were hypothesized as the main action mechanisms for M. pulcherrima. The production of hydrolytic enzymes and the ability to colonize the wounds were the most important mechanisms for biocontrol activity in A. pullulans and W. anomalus, which also showed high ability to form biofilm. The production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with in vitro and in vivo inhibitory effect on pathogen growth was observed for the species W. anomalus, S. cerevisiae and M. pulcherrima. Our study clearly indicates that multiple modes of action may explain as M. pulcherrima provide excellent control of postharvest botrytis bunch rot of grape.

  17. Grinding technologies of small optical element molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuki, Masahide; Urushibata, Kazunori

    2003-05-01

    The high-precision grinding technology is making contribution in every field, which is especially remarkable in the optics-related field. Lenses for digital camera and projector, which are mass-produced, for instance, are molded by the injection molding machine and glass molding-press machine. Concerning materials of high-precision molds, nickel alloy is mainly used in plastic-molding. And brittle material such as tungsten carbide and ceramic is used in glass-molding because the molding temperature is generally high. High-precision machining of nickel alloy is possible with a single-crystal diamond tool. Brittle material is ground by means of a diamond wheel, etc. Glass is being widely used for the lenses and other optical elements due to its favorable characteristics and life. As a result, needs for advancement of the high-precision grinding technology are being heightened. In grinding of small, fine and complex profiles, consideration for wheel truing and wear is a key point. Also, as many optical mold products are convex, mold profile is mainly concave. Especially, grinding of a small-aperture mold with small radius of curvature is difficult. In other words, a wheel whose diameter is larger than the radius of curvature of a mold to be ground cannot be used, and use of a small-diameter wheel is required inevitably. Influence of wheel wear and wheel diameter input errors at creation of grinding program becomes large. To eliminate such errors, a cycle of grinding, measurement and compensation grinding is normally repeated in mold machining until the target accuracy is obtained. Recently, needs for molding optical elements of small body of non-revolution such as prism and cylinder lens are on the increase, in addition to the body of revolution including lens. As one example, we introduce the compensation grinding and its results when grinding molds for an extremely small-aperture lens used for optical communication and a cylindrical lens array used for semi

  18. Recent advancements in optical microstructure fabrication through glass molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianfeng; Liu, Xiaohua; Liang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yang; Xie, Jiaqing; Wang, Xibin

    2017-02-01

    Optical microstructures are increasingly applied in several fields, such as optical systems, precision measurement, and microfluid chips. Microstructures include microgrooves, microprisms, and microlenses. This paper presents an overview of optical microstructure fabrication through glass molding and highlights the applications of optical microstructures in mold fabrication and glass molding. The glass-mold interface friction and adhesion are also discussed. Moreover, the latest advancements in glass molding technologies are detailed, including new mold materials and their fabrication methods, viscoelastic constitutive modeling of glass, and microstructure molding process, as well as ultrasonic vibrationassisted molding technology.

  19. Strong, easy-to-mold, spiral buttress thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Buttress thread with steep taper connects two molded plastic cylinders without changing wall thickness or sacrificing longitudinal strength at the juncture. Technique lends itself to conventional molding methods.

  20. Castable plastic mold with electroplatable base

    DOEpatents

    Domeier, Linda A.; Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick M.

    2004-01-20

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided as are methods of making such a mold via the infusion of a castable liquid formulation through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale master mold. Upon casting and demolding, the porous metal substrate is embedded within the cast formulation and projects a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. The plastic structure provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate, which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved, leaving the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  1. IC chip stress during plastic package molding

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.W.; Benson, D.A.; Peterson, D.W.; Sweet, J.N.

    1998-02-01

    Approximately 95% of the world`s integrated chips are packaged using a hot, high pressure transfer molding process. The stress created by the flow of silica powder loaded epoxy can displace the fine bonding wires and can even distort the metalization patterns under the protective chip passivation layer. In this study the authors developed a technique to measure the mechanical stress over the surface of an integrated circuit during the molding process. A CMOS test chip with 25 diffused resistor stress sensors was applied to a commercial lead frame. Both compression and shear stresses were measured at all 25 locations on the surface of the chip every 50 milliseconds during molding. These measurements have a fine time and stress resolution which should allow comparison with computer simulation of the molding process, thus allowing optimization of both the manufacturing process and mold geometry.

  2. First morphomolecular identification of Penicillium griseofulvum and Penicillium aurantiogriseum toxicogenic isolates associated with blue mold on apple.

    PubMed

    Moslem, Mohmed; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel; Yassin, Mohamed; Bahkali, Ali

    2010-07-01

    Postharvest blue mold decay caused by Penicillium spp. is the most important disease of fresh apple fruit in the world, which extend from the field to the store. Two new Penicillium spp. responsible for apple fruit decay were recovered. The morphological and molecular features of Penicillium griseofulvum and Penicillium aurantiogriseum isolated from apple fruits were characterized morphologically and molecularly. Pathogenicity test exhibited that both P. griseofulvum and P. aurantiogriseum were responsible for blue mold decay in storage apple fruits. Lesion diameter indicated that P. aurantiogriseum was more aggressive than P. griseofulvum. All tested isolates were able to synthesize citrinin in addition to patulin. Not all of the isolates belonging to the same species showed the same profile of secondary metabolites. Microsatellite-primed polymerase chain reaction was able to differentiate these isolates at the species level and divided the analyzed isolates into two genetically different groups. Little intraspecific variability was evident. Microsatellite-primed polymerase chain reaction analysis proved to be an objective, rapid, and reliable tool to identify Penicillium spp. involved in blue mold of apple. This is the first report of occurrence of P. griseofulvum and P. aurantiogriseum on imported apple fruits in Saudi Arabia.

  3. Gray solitons on the surface of water.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Kimmoun, O; Branger, H; Kharif, C; Hoffmann, N; Onorato, M; Akhmediev, N

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of surface gravity water waves can be described by the self-defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Recent observations of black solitons on the surface of water confirmed its validity for finite, below critical depth. The black soliton is a limiting case of a family of gray soliton solutions with finite amplitude depressions. Here, we report observations of gray solitons in water waves, thus, complementing our previous observations of black solitons.

  4. Quantized-"Gray-Scale" Electronic Synapses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, James L.; Daud, Taher; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed array of programmable synaptic connections for electronic neural network applications offers multiple quantized levels of connection strength using only simple, two-terminal, binary microswitch devices. Subgrids in fine grid of programmable resistive connections connected externally in parallel to form coarser synaptic grid. By selection of pattern of connections in each subgrid, connection strength of synaptic node represented by that subgrid set at quantized "gray level". Device structures promise implementations of quantized-"gray-scale" synaptic arrays with very high density.

  5. Mold Simulator Study of the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel in Continuous Casting Mold: Part II. Effects of Mold Oscillation and Mold Level Fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-04-01

    The surface quality of the continuous casting strands is closely related to the initial solidification of liquid steel in the vicinity of the mold meniscus, and thus the clear understanding of the behavior of molten steel initial solidification would be of great importance for the control of the quality of final slab. With the development of the mold simulator techniques, the complex interrelationship between the solidified shell surface profile, heat flux, shell thickness, mold level fluctuation, and the infiltrated slag film was well illustrated in our previous study. As the second part, this article investigated the effect of the mold oscillation frequency, stroke, and mold level fluctuation on the initial solidification of the molten steel through the conduction of five different experiments. Results suggested that in the case of the stable mold level, the oscillation marks (OMs) exhibit equally spaced horizon depressions on the shell surface, where the heat flux at the meniscus area raises rapidly during negative strip time (NST) period and the presence of each OMs on the shell surface is corresponding to a peak value of the heat flux variation rate. Otherwise, the shell surface is poorly defined by the existence of wave-type defects, such as ripples or deep depressions, and the heat flux variation is irregular during NST period. The rising of the mold level leads to the longer-pitch and deeper OMs formation; conversely, the falling of mold level introduces shorter-pitch and shallower OMs. With the increase of the mold oscillation frequency, the average value of the low-frequency heat flux at the meniscus increases; however, it decreases when the mold oscillation stroke increases. Additionally, the variation amplitude of the high-frequency temperature and the high-frequency heat flux decreases with the increase of the oscillation frequency and the reduction of the oscillation stroke.

  6. Genome sequence of the necrotrophic fungus Penicillium digitatum, the main postharvest pathogen of citrus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Penicillium digitatum is a fungal necrotroph causing a common citrus postharvest disease known as green mold. In order to gain insight into the genetic bases of its virulence mechanisms and its high degree of host-specificity, the genomes of two P. digitatum strains that differ in their antifungal resistance traits have been sequenced and compared with those of 28 other Pezizomycotina. Results The two sequenced genomes are highly similar, but important differences between them include the presence of a unique gene cluster in the resistant strain, and mutations previously shown to confer fungicide resistance. The two strains, which were isolated in Spain, and another isolated in China have identical mitochondrial genome sequences suggesting a recent worldwide expansion of the species. Comparison with the closely-related but non-phytopathogenic P. chrysogenum reveals a much smaller gene content in P. digitatum, consistent with a more specialized lifestyle. We show that large regions of the P. chrysogenum genome, including entire supercontigs, are absent from P. digitatum, and that this is the result of large gene family expansions rather than acquisition through horizontal gene transfer. Our analysis of the P. digitatum genome is indicative of heterothallic sexual reproduction and reveals the molecular basis for the inability of this species to assimilate nitrate or produce the metabolites patulin and penicillin. Finally, we identify the predicted secretome, which provides a first approximation to the protein repertoire used during invasive growth. Conclusions The complete genome of P. digitatum, the first of a phytopathogenic Penicillium species, is a valuable tool for understanding the virulence mechanisms and host-specificity of this economically important pest. PMID:23171342

  7. The Graying of American Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Lindstedt, S. L. "Bud"

    1986-10-01

    We consider the distribution of scientific ages of professors in ten astronomy departments in the United States and find that the average astronomer is growing older at a rate of about 6 months per year at present. This aging will continue through the end of the 1990s, at which time we predict that the average professorial astronomer will be around 50 years old. The cause of this aging is the expansion of the profession that began in the late 1960s, an expansion that was not maintained for more than one decade. As a consequence, perhaps as many as one-third of all the professor-level astronomers in the country obtained doctorates between 1964 and 1970, inclusive. For comparison we briefly consider the distribution of ages of physicists and physiologists. The number of physiologists as a function of date of doctorate has been slightly increasing since around 1960; thus this profession has also been slowly getting older with time. The average age of physicists is significantly greater than that for astronomers. Because of the significant influence of social and political forces on university decisions, we find that the total budget for NASA has been a good predictor for the past demand for professorial astronomers, but the total NSF budget is not. We predict the future demand for astronomers in the U.S. and suggest, as a result of the expansion in the 1960s, that demand will increase significantly near the end of the 1990s, making employment easier to obtain and suitable job candidates, particularly postdoctoral associates, more difficult to find. We point out that because of greater average age, the physics community will have to find solutions to the problems of an elderly population before astronomers will. Furthermore, there may be a small increase in the demand for astronomers as large numbers of physicists retire in the early- to mid-1990s. Additional consequences of a graying astronomy are briefly considered.

  8. Medical diagnostics for indoor mold exposure.

    PubMed

    Hurraß, Julia; Heinzow, Birger; Aurbach, Ute; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bufe, Albrecht; Buzina, Walter; Cornely, Oliver A; Engelhart, Steffen; Fischer, Guido; Gabrio, Thomas; Heinz, Werner; Herr, Caroline E W; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Köberle, Martin; Lichtnecker, Herbert; Lob-Corzilius, Thomas; Merget, Rolf; Mülleneisen, Norbert; Nowak, Dennis; Rabe, Uta; Raulf, Monika; Seidl, Hans Peter; Steiß, Jens-Oliver; Szewszyk, Regine; Thomas, Peter; Valtanen, Kerttu; Wiesmüller, Gerhard A

    2017-04-01

    In April 2016, the German Society of Hygiene, Environmental Medicine and Preventative Medicine (Gesellschaft für Hygiene, Umweltmedizin und Präventivmedizin (GHUP)) together with other scientific medical societies, German and Austrian medical societies, physician unions and experts has provided an AWMF (Association of the Scientific Medical Societies) guideline 'Medical diagnostics for indoor mold exposure'. This guideline shall help physicians to advise and treat patients exposed indoors to mold. Indoor mold growth is a potential health risk, even without a quantitative and/or causal association between the occurrence of individual mold species and health effects. Apart from the allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and the mycoses caused by mold, there is only sufficient evidence for the following associations between moisture/mold damages and different health effects: Allergic respiratory diseases, asthma (manifestation, progression, exacerbation), allergic rhinitis, exogenous allergic alveolitis and respiratory tract infections/bronchitis. In comparison to other environmental allergens, the sensitizing potential of molds is estimated to be low. Recent studies show a prevalence of sensitization of 3-10% in the total population of Europe. The evidence for associations to mucous membrane irritation and atopic eczema (manifestation, progression, exacerbation) is classified as limited or suspected. Inadequate or insufficient evidence for an association is given for COPD, acute idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage in children, rheumatism/arthritis, sarcoidosis, and cancer. The risk of infections from indoor molds is low for healthy individuals. Only molds that are capable to form toxins can cause intoxications. The environmental and growth conditions and especially the substrate determine whether toxin formation occurs, but indoor air concentrations are always very low. In the case of indoor moisture/mold damages, everyone can be affected by odor effects and

  9. Mold management of wetted carpet.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kee-Hean; Dixit, Anupma; Lewis, Roger D; MacDonald Perkins, Maureen; Backer, Denis; Condoor, Sridhar; Emo, Brett; Yang, Mingan

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the growth and removal of fungi on wetted carpet using newly designed technologies that rely on physical principles of steam, heat, and fluid flow. Sixty samples of carpet were embedded with heat-treated house dust, followed by embedding, wearing with a hexapod, and wetting. Samples were inoculated using a liquid suspension of Cladosporium sphaerospermum prior to placement over a water-saturated foam pad. Incubation times were 24 hr, 7 days, and 30 days. Cleaning was performed using three methods; high-flow hot water extraction, hot water and detergent, and steam. Fungal loading increased from approximately 1500 colony forming units per area (CFU/cm(2)) in 24 hr to a maximum of approximately 10,200 CFU/cm(2) after 7 days with a slight decline to 9700 CFU/cm(2) after 30 days incubation. Statistically significant differences were found among all three methods for removal of fungi for all three time periods (p < 0.05). Steam-vapor was significantly better than the alternative methods (p <0.001) with over 99% efficiency in mold spore decline from wetted carpet after 24 hr and 30 days, and over 92% efficiency after 7 days. The alternative methods exhibited lower efficiencies with a decline over time, from a maximum of 82% and 81% at 24 hr down to 60% and 43% at 30 days for detergent-hot water and high-flow, hot water extraction, respectively. The net effect of the mold management study demonstrates that while steam has a consistent fungal removal rate, the detergent and high-flow, hot water methods decline in efficiency with increasing incubation time.

  10. Challenges in mold manufacturing for high precision molded diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongs, Guido; Bresseler, Bernd; Schweizer, Klaus; Bergs, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal precision glass molding of imaging optics is the key technology for mass production of precise optical elements. Especially for numerous consumer applications (e.g. digital cameras, smart phones, …), high precision glass molding is applied for the manufacturing of aspherical lenses. The usage of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can help to further reduce the number of lenses in the optical systems which will lead to a reduced weight of hand-held optical devices. But today the application of molded glass DOEs is limited due to the technological challenges in structuring the mold surfaces. Depending on the application submicrometer structures are required on the mold surface. Furthermore these structures have to be replicated very precisely to the glass lens surface. Especially the micro structuring of hard and brittle mold materials such as Tungsten Carbide is very difficult and not established. Thus a multitude of innovative approaches using diffractive optical elements cannot be realized. Aixtooling has investigated in different mold materials and different suitable machining technologies for the micro- and sub-micrometer structuring of mold surfaces. The focus of the work lays on ultra-precision grinding to generate the diffractive pattern on the mold surfaces. This paper presents the latest achievements in diffractive structuring of Tungsten Carbide mold surfaces by ultra-precision grinding.

  11. Biological control of major postharvest pathogens on apple with Candida sake.

    PubMed

    Viñas, I; Usall, J; Teixidó, N; Sanchis, V

    1998-03-03

    Epiphytic microorganisms isolated from apples, pears and the surfaces of apple leaves were screened for antagonistic activity against Penicillium expansum (blue-mold), Botrytis cinerea (gray-mold) and Rhizopus nigricans (Rhizopus rot) on apple (Malus domestica). A total of 933 bacteria and yeasts were tested in primary screening against P. expansum. Ninety-two strains reduced the lesion size on apples by more than 50%, 72 of which were isolated from the surface of apples. For secondary screening against P. expansum, B. cinerea and R. nigricans, 31 strains were selected. The most promising isolate, CPA-1, was identified as Candida sake. This yeast, isolated from apples in storage season was very effective against all three diseases. Wounded Golden Delicious apples protected with the yeast suspension at a concentration of 2.6 x 10(6) CFU/ml and inoculated with conidia of B. cinerea and R. nigricans of 10(5) and 10(4) conidia/ml, respectively, did not develop rot. Complete control of P. expansum was obtained at the same concentration of the antagonist with a pathogen inoculum concentration of 10(3) conidia/ml. This strain, also provided excellent control of rot development under cold storage conditions. The strain of Candida sake can grow actively in aerobic conditions. In drop-inoculated wounds of apples, the populations of C. sake increased by more than 50-fold during the first 24 h at 20 degrees C. The maximum population of C. sake on apple wounds was the same at 20 as at 1 degrees C and was recovered after three and twenty days, respectively.

  12. MQ-1C Gray Eagle Unmanned Aircraft System (MQ-1C Gray Eagle)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-420 MQ-1C Gray Eagle Unmanned Aircraft System (MQ-1C Gray Eagle) As of FY 2017 President’s...Program Manager POE - Program Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service

  13. Cost Comparison of Conventional Gray Combined Sewer Overflow Control Infrastructure versus a Green/Gray Combination

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper outlines a life-cycle cost analysis comparing a green (rain gardens) and gray (tunnels) infrastructure combination to a gray-only option to control combined sewer overflow in the Turkey Creek Combined Sewer Overflow Basin, in Kansas City, MO. The plan area of this Bas...

  14. Gray matter alterations and correlation of nutritional intake with the gray matter volume in prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Yang, Shwu-Huey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The neurophysiology of prediabetes plays an important role in preventive medicine. The dysregulation of glucose metabolism is likely linked to changes in neuron-related gray matter. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate gray matter alterations in medication-naive prediabetic patients. We expected to find alterations in the gray matter of prediabetic patients. A total of 64 prediabetic patients and 54 controls were enrolled. All subjects received T1 scans using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. Subjects also completed nutritional intake records at the 24-hour and 3-day time points to determine their carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry to estimate the gray matter differences between the patients and controls. In addition, the preprandial serum glucose level and the carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake levels were tested to determine whether these parameters were correlated with the gray matter volume. Prediabetic patients had lower gray matter volumes than controls in the right anterior cingulate gyrus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, left super temporal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus (corrected P < 0.05; voxel threshold: 33). Gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate was also negatively correlated with the preprandial serum glucose level gyrus in a voxel-dependent manner (r = –0.501; 2-tailed P = 0.001). The cingulo-temporal and insula gray matter alterations may be associated with the glucose dysregulation in prediabetic patients. PMID:27336893

  15. A new postharvest fruit rot in apple and pear caused by Phacidium lacerum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During surveys for postharvest diseases of apples and pears, an unknown postharvest fruit rot was observed in Washington State. The disease appeared to originate from infection of the stem and calyx tissue of the fruit or wounds on the fruit. An unknown pycnidial fungus was consistently isolated fro...

  16. Systems approach-based mitigation of postharvest diseases to overcome trade barriers for Washington apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Speck rot caused by Phacidiopycnis washingtonensis and Sphaeropsis rot caused by S. pyriputrescens were reported as new postharvest fruit rot diseases in Washington State in the mid-2000s. Both diseases can cause significant postharvest losses of fruit if left uncontrolled, and the two fungi have be...

  17. Biological control of postharvest diseases of fruits: from wound to latent infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research on biological control of postharvest diseases (BCPD) on fruits is in its third decade. For the past 15 years, BCPD has been used in packinghouses to control various postharvest diseases of temperate, subtropical and tropical fruits, and vegetables. The use of individual products has been ...

  18. Controlled atmosphere storage, temperature conditioning, and antioxidant treatment alter postharvest 'Honeycrisp' metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The physiology and metabolism characterizing postharvest chilling and CO2 injury in apple has important implications for postharvest management of soft scald and soggy breakdown. This research assessed differences of primary metabolism related to soggy breakdown (cortex chilling injury) and CO2 cor...

  19. Postharvest technology for developing countries: challenges and opportunities in research, outreach and advocacy.

    PubMed

    Kitinoja, Lisa; Saran, Sunil; Roy, Susanta K; Kader, Adel A

    2011-03-15

    This article discusses the needs and challenges of developing good, science-based, simple methods for postharvest handling that can be made available in developing countries. Some of the traditional challenges have been successfully met (i.e. identifying causes and sources of losses for key crops, identifying many potential postharvest technologies of practical use for reducing losses), but many challenges remain. These include the characterization of indigenous crops in terms of their unique postharvest physiology (e.g. respiration rate, susceptibility to water loss, chilling sensitivity, ethylene sensitivity), ascertaining the differences between handling recommendations made for well-known varieties and the needs of local varieties of crops, and determining cost effectiveness of scale-appropriate postharvest technologies in each locale and for each crop. Key issues include building capacity at the local level in postharvest science, university teaching and extension, and continued adaptive research efforts to match emerging postharvest technologies to local needs as these continue to change over time. Development of appropriate postharvest technology relies upon many disciplines that are relevant to the overall success of horticulture, i.e. plant biology, engineering, agricultural economics, food processing, nutrition, food safety, and environmental conservation. The expanding pool of new information derived from postharvest research and outreach efforts in these areas can lead in many directions which are likely to have an impact on relieving poverty in developing countries.

  20. Control of speck rot in apple fruit caused by Phacidiopycnis washingtonensis with pre- and postharvest fungicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Speck rot caused by Phacidiopycnis washingtonensis is a recently reported postharvest fruit rot disease of apple. Infection of apple fruit by the fungus occurs in the orchard, but symptoms develop during storage. In this study, selected pre- and postharvest fungicides were evaluated for control of s...

  1. RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND RUN OUT OF THE MOLD UNDER POURING JACKETS AND SPILLS ONTO THE MOLDING PLATFORM. WORKERS GENERALLY WAIT SEVERAL MINUTES FOR THE IRON TO SOLIDIFY AND, WHILE IT IS STILL RED-HOT, REMOVE IT FROM THE PLATFORM AND SCRAP THE MOLD. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  2. ROPS deficiency of gray-market tractors.

    PubMed

    Myers, M L; Purschwitz, M A

    2012-04-01

    Many used tractors that are imported from Japan are adding to the current national inventory in the U.S. and Canada of farm tractors that lack a rollover protective structure (ROPS). Gray-market tractors are built for use by the manufacturer for a certain country but are imported against the manufacture's wishes to a second country for use there, usually as a used tractor. Gray-market tractors may lack ROPS and seatbelts, depending on the date of manufacturer. The objective of this investigation is to describe the gray market for tractors imported from Japan into the U.S. and the policy implications regarding the hazards associated with these imports. Operator manuals and warning labels are typically not written in English. Foreign manufacturers that market tractors in the U.S. have established a variety of disincentives for the importation of gray-market tractors, including issuing warnings, not servicing or providing parts for these tractors, and banning their importation through actions by the U.S. International Trade Commission. Nonetheless, a U.S. market has developed that imports and provides services and parts for gray-market tractors, and some companies provide certified ROPS on the tractors that they sell. A product safety perspective and related policies are presented as an approach to ensuring that these imports are equipped with ROPS and seatbelts.

  3. Evaluation of yeasts from Tibetan fermented products as agents for biocontrol of blue mold of Nashi pear fruits*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Xu, Yang; Lu, Huang-ping; Xiao, Rui; Zheng, Xiao-dong; Yu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    A total of 20 strains of yeast isolated from Tibetan fermented products were screened for antagonism against blue mold of pear caused by Penicillium expansum. Six isolates that inhibited incidence of postharvest decay by 35% or more were selected for further screening. Among them, the most effective was Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. The results showed that washed cell suspensions of R. mucilaginosa yielded better antagonistic efficacy than unwashed cell-culture mixtures, cell-free culture filtrates, and autoclaved cell cultures. Biocontrol activity improved with increasing concentrations of incubated cells. The best concentration was 1×108 cells/ml, at which the incidence of decay was only 16.7% after 6 d of incubation. The germination of conidia of P. expansum in vitro was significantly inhibited by both washed cell-suspensions and unwashed cell-culture mixtures. Rapid colonization by yeast at different concentrations showed a relationship between yeast-cell concentration and biocontrol activity. Although the titratable acidity of pear fruits increased after treatment, R. mucilaginosa did not affect the total soluble solids or ascorbic acid content. This is the first study to report that the yeast R. mucilaginosa from Tibet Autonomous Region of China may have potential as an antagonist to control the postharvest decay of pear fruits. PMID:25845361

  4. Effects of Chitin and Its Derivative Chitosan on Postharvest Decay of Fruits: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyin; Li, Renping; Liu, Weimin

    2011-01-01

    Considerable economic losses to harvested fruits are caused by postharvest fungal decay during transportation and storage, which can be significantly controlled by synthetic fungicides. However, considering public concern over pesticide residues in food and the environment, there is a need for safer alternatives for the control of postharvest decay to substitute synthetic fungicides. As the second most abundant biopolymer renewable source in nature, chitin and its derivative chitosan are widely used in controlling postharvest decay of fruits. This review aims to introduce the effect of chitin and chitosan on postharvest decay in fruits and the possible modes of action involved. We found most of the actions discussed in these researches rest on physiological mechanisms. All of the mechanisms are summarized to lay the groundwork for further studies which should focus on the molecular mechanisms of chitin and chitosan in controlling postharvest decay of fruits. PMID:21541034

  5. Antagonistic Effect of Streptomyces sp. BS062 against Botrytis Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Sook; Lee, In-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    The use of microorganisms and their secreted molecules to prevent plant diseases is considered an attractive alternative and way to supplement synthetic fungicides for the management of plant diseases. Strain BS062 was selected based on its ability to inhibit the mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea, a major causal fungus of postharvest root rot of ginseng and strawberry gray mold disease. Strain BS062 was found to be closely related to Streptomyces hygroscopicus (99% similarity) on the basis of 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Postharvest root rot of ginseng and strawberry gray mold disease caused by B. cinerea were controlled up to 73.9% and 58%, respectively, upon treatment with culture broth of Streptomyces sp. BS062. These results suggest that strain BS062 may be a potential agent for controlling ginseng postharvest root rot and strawberry gray mold disease. PMID:26539052

  6. Online Measurement for Transient Mold Friction Based on the Hydraulic Oscillators of Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xudong; Wang, Zhaofeng; Yao, Man

    2013-12-01

    The interaction of the strand shell surface and mold copper plates has significant effects on the slab surface quality and casting productivity. This article focuses on developing a reliable approach to measure the transient friction force between the slab and the mold for the purpose of the investigation of lubrication and friction behavior inside a mold. This method is presented to monitor transient mold frictions for the slab continuous caster equipped with hydraulic oscillators. A mathematical model is also developed to calculate the empty working force of the no casting state, and a new algorithm, based on the particle swarm optimization, is proposed to predict the dynamic characteristic parameters of mold oscillation. The results have shown that the method has a sufficient sensitivity to variation, especially to the periodical variation of the mold friction, and it has been identified that the transient mold friction can be used as an effective index with regard to detecting mold oscillation and optimizing the casting parameters for process control. It may lay the practical foundation for the online detection of powder lubrication and the visualization of the continuous-casting mold process.

  7. Custom molded thermal MRg-FUS phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, Matthew D. C.; Snell, John W.; Hananel, Arik; Kassell, Neal F.

    2012-11-01

    This article describes a method for creating custom-molded thermal phantoms for use with MR-guided focused ultrasound systems. The method is defined here for intracranial applications, though it may be modified for other anatomical targets.

  8. Facts about Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Resources Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New National Center for Environmental ... issued additional guidance, the WHO Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality: Dampness and Mould [PDF - 2.52 MB] . Other ...

  9. Sacrificial Plastic Mold With Electroplatable Base

    DOEpatents

    Domeier, Linda A.; Hruby, Jill M.; Morales, Alfredo M.

    2005-08-16

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided. One embodiment consists of the infusion of a softened or molten thermoplastic through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale molding tool contacting the porous metal substrate. Upon demolding, the porous metal substrate will be embedded within the thermoplastic and will project a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. This plastic structure, in turn, provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved to leave the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  10. Sacrificial plastic mold with electroplatable base

    DOEpatents

    Domeier, Linda A.; Hruby, Jill M.; Morales, Alfredo M.

    2002-01-01

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided. One embodiment consists of the infusion of a softened or molten thermoplastic through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale molding tool contacting the porous metal substrate. Upon demolding, the porous metal substrate will be embedded within the thermoplastic and will project a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. This plastic structure, in turn, provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved to leave the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  11. Organic materials for ceramic molding processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, K.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramic molding processes are examined. Binders, wetting agents, lubricants, plasticizers, surface active agents, dispersants, etc., for pressing, rubber pressing, sip casting, injection casting, taping, extrusion, etc., are described, together with forming machines.

  12. Injection molded optical backplane for broadcast architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Paul; Mathai, Sagi; Sorin, Wayne V.; McLaren, Moray; Straznicky, Joseph; Panotopoulos, Georgios; Warren, David; Morris, Terry; Tan, Michael R. T.

    2012-01-01

    A low cost, blind mate, injection molded optical backplane is presented. The optical backplane is comprised of 12 channel optical broadcast buses, operating at 10Gbps/channel with six blindmate optical output ports spaced 1U apart.

  13. Antimicrobial Treatments of Indoor Mold and Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological contaminants especially mold in buildings are known to act as sources of indoor air pollution, discomfort, asthma and pulmonary disease to building occupants. Sick buildings are evidence of extremely problematic indoor air quality (IAQ), often resulting from unacceptab...

  14. Binding agent for molding ceramic items

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshentsev, B. D.; Vityuk, N. P.; Volkov, A. V.; Yevdokimov, A. I.; Novikov, M. N.; Piskunov, Y. G.; Pobortsev, E. P.; Sadovnichaya, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    The invention refers to the fabrication of ceramic items by the molding method. It can be used to produce items of complicated configuration, in particular composition of binding agent for electroceramic items.

  15. Traditional Mold Analysis Compared to a DNA-based Method of Mold Analysis with Applications in Asthmatics' Homes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional environmental mold analysis is based-on microscopic observations and counting of mold structures collected from the air on a sticky surface or culturing of molds on growth media for identification and quantification. A DNA-based method of mold analysis called mol...

  16. Indoor Molds and Respiratory Hypersensitivity: A Comparison of Selected Molds and House Dust Mite Induced Responses in a Mouse Model**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molds are ubiquitous in the environment and exposures to molds contribute to various human diseases. Damp/moldy environments have been associated with asthma exacerbation, but mold's role in allergic asthma induction is less clear. The molds selected for these studies are commonl...

  17. Salt Bath Oxinitriding of Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, M.; Teimouri, M.; Aliofkhazraee, M.; Mousavi Khoee, S. M.

    Salt bath oxinitriding is a duplex surface treatment developed to improve tribological and corrosion properties of ferrous materials. In this research, gray cast iron samples were nitrided at the temperature range of 480°C-580°C, and then oxidized in an oxidative salt bath. The phase composition of surface layer was identified by X-ray diffraction. Using a microhardness tester, hardness of nitrided gray cast iron was measured. Corrosion behavior of treated (nitrided and oxinitrided) samples was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization technique in 3.5% NaCl solution. XRD analyses indicate that the surface layer in nitrided and oxinitrided samples is composed of ɛ-iron nitride (Fe2-3N) and magnetite (Fe3O4), respectively. Results show that the corrosion resistance of gray cast iron can be improved up to 170%.

  18. Optimization and evaluation of metal injection molding by using X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shidi; Zhang, Ruijie; Qu, Xuanhui

    2015-06-15

    6061 aluminum alloy and 316L stainless steel green bodies were obtained by using different injection parameters (injection pressure, speed and temperature). After injection process, the green bodies were scanned by X-ray tomography. The projection and reconstruction images show the different kinds of defects obtained by the improper injection parameters. Then, 3D rendering of the Al alloy green bodies was used to demonstrate the spatial morphology characteristics of the serious defects. Based on the scanned and calculated results, it is convenient to obtain the proper injection parameters for the Al alloy. Then, reasons of the defect formation were discussed. During mold filling, the serious defects mainly formed in the case of low injection temperature and high injection speed. According to the gray value distribution of projection image, a threshold gray value was obtained to evaluate whether the quality of green body can meet the desired standard. The proper injection parameters of 316L stainless steel can be obtained efficiently by using the method of analyzing the Al alloy injection. - Highlights: • Different types of defects in green bodies were scanned by using X-ray tomography. • Reasons of the defect formation were discussed. • Optimization of the injection parameters can be simplified greatly by the way of X-ray tomography. • Evaluation standard of the injection process can be obtained by using the gray value distribution of projection image.

  19. Molding apparatus. [for thermosetting plastic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus for compression molding of thermosetting plastics compositions including interfitting hollow male and female components is reported. The components are adapted to be compressed to form a rocket nozzle in a cavity. A thermal jacket is provided exteriorly adjacent to the female component for circulating a thermal transfer fluid to effect curing of a thermosetting plastics material being molded. Each of the male and female components is provided with suitable inlets and outlets for circulating a thermal transfer fluid.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Review on micro molding of thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckele, M.; Schomburg, W. K.

    2004-03-01

    Molding of micro components from thermoplastic polymers has become a routinely used industrial production process. This paper describes both the more than 30-year-old history and the present state of development and applications. Hot embossing, injection molding, reaction injection molding, injection compression molding, thermoforming, and various types of tool fabrication are introduced and their advantages and drawbacks are discussed. In addition, design considerations, process limitations, and commercially available micro molding machines are presented.

  1. Mold contamination and air handling units.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephen C; Palmatier, Robert N; Andriychuk, Larysa A; Martin, Jared M; Jumper, Cynthia A; Holder, Homer W; Straus, David C

    2007-07-01

    An investigation was conducted on selected locations in air handling units (AHUs) to (a) identify common mold species found on these locations, (b) determine whether some locations (and subsets) featured mold growth sites more frequently than others, (c) ascertain whether the operating condition of AHUs is related to mold contamination, and (d) provide a basis for a microbial sampling protocol for AHUs. A total of 566 tape lifts and 570 swab samples were collected from the blower wheel fan blades, insulation, cooling coil fins, and ductwork from 25 AHUs. All AHU conditions were numerically rated using a heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) survey. Results showed that Cladosporium sp. fungi were commonly recovered in terms of growth sites and deposited spores, and they were found mainly in the blower wheel fan blades, the ductwork, and the cooling coil fins. Subsections of the fan blades, insulation, and cooling coil fins showed no preferred area for mold growth sites. Other organisms such as Penicillium sp., Aspergillus sp., and Paecilomyces sp. were recovered from the cooling coil fins and insulation. Because of the widespread prevalence of Cladosporium sp., there was no relationship between mold growth and operating condition. However, the presence of different species of molds in locations other than the blower wheel blades may indicate that the AHU condition is not optimal. A suggested microbial sampling protocol including interpretations of sample results is presented.

  2. Integrated mold/surface-micromachining process

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Hetherington, D.L.

    1996-03-01

    We detail a new monolithically integrated silicon mold/surface-micromachining process which makes possible the fabrication of stiff, high-aspect-ratio micromachined structures integrated with finely detailed, compliant structures. An important example, which we use here as our process demonstration vehicle, is that of an accelerometer with a large proof mass and compliant suspension. The proof mass is formed by etching a mold into the silicon substrate, lining the mold with oxide, filling it with mechanical polysilicon, and then planarizing back to the level of the substrate. The resulting molded structure is recessed into the substrate, forming a planar surface ideal for subsequent processing. We then add surface-micromachined springs and sense contacts. The principal advantage of this new monolithically integrated mold/surface-micromachining process is that it decouples the design of the different sections of the device: In the case of a sensitive accelerometer, it allows us to optimize independently the proof mass, which needs to be as large, stiff, and heavy as possible, and the suspension, which needs to be as delicate and compliant as possible. The fact that the high-aspect-ratio section of the device is embedded in the substrate enables the monolithic integration of high-aspect-ratio parts with surface-micromachined mechanical parts, and, in the future, also electronics. We anticipate that such an integrated mold/surface micromachining/electronics process will offer versatile high-aspect-ratio micromachined structures that can be batch-fabricated and monolithically integrated into complex microelectromechanical systems.

  3. Gray's paradox: A fluid mechanical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Patel, Namrata; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Gray reported that the drag power experienced by a dolphin was larger than the estimated muscle power – this is termed as Gray's paradox. We provide a fluid mechanical perspective of this paradox. The viewpoint that swimmers necessarily spend muscle energy to overcome drag in the direction of swimming needs revision. For example, in undulatory swimming most of the muscle energy is directly expended to generate lateral undulations of the body, and the drag power is balanced not by the muscle power but by the thrust power. Depending on drag model utilized, the drag power may be greater than muscle power without being paradoxical. PMID:25082341

  4. Ultrastructural studies of the gray platelet syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, J G

    1979-05-01

    The gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is a rare inherited disorder in which peripheral blood platelets are relatively large, vacuolated, and almost devoid of cytoplasmic granulation. In the present study we have evaluated the ultrastructure and cytochemistry of platelets from 2 patients with the GPS to determine precisely which organelles are missing from their cells. The findings indicate that gray platelets contain normal numbers of mitochondria, dense bodies, peroxisomes, and lysosomes but specifically lack alpha-granules. Preliminary studies of megakaryocytes from 1 of the 2 patients suggest that the defect in granule formation may lie at the level of the Golgi zone.

  5. Residue levels and effectiveness of pyrimethanil vs imazalil when using heated postharvest dip treatments for control of Penicillium decay on citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    D'Aquino, Salvatore; Schirra, Mario; Palma, Amedeo; Angioni, Alberto; Cabras, Paolo; Migheli, Quirico

    2006-06-28

    The influence of fungicide concentration and treatment temperature on residue levels of pyrimethanil (PYR) in comparison with the commonly used fungicide imazalil (IMZ) was investigated in orange fruits following postharvest dip treatments. The dissipation rate of PYR residues was recorded as a function of storage conditions. The fungicide efficacy against green and blue molds caused by Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum, respectively, was evaluated on different citrus varieties following the fungicide application at 20 or 50 degrees C. Residue levels of PYR in Salustiana oranges were significantly correlated with the fungicide dosage, but residue concentrations were notably higher (ca. 13-19-fold) after treatment at 50 degrees C as compared to treatments at 20 degrees C. After treatment at temperatures ranging from 20 to 60 degrees C, PYR and IMZ residues in Salustiana oranges were significantly correlated with dip temperatures. Dissipation rates of PYR during storage were negligible in both Salustiana and Tarocco oranges. Results obtained on wounded, noninoculated Miho satsumas revealed that when treatments were performed at 50 degrees C, PYR or IMZ concentrations needed to achieve the complete control of decay were 8- and 16-fold less than by treatment at 20 degrees C. When fruits were inoculated with either P. digitatum or P. italicum, the application of 400 mg L(-1) PYR at 20 degrees C or 100 mg L(-1) PYR at 50 degrees C similarly reduced green and blue mold development. These results were corroborated by storage trials on Marsh grapefruits and Tarocco oranges. The lowest concentration of PYR required to achieve almost total protection of the fruit against decay accounted for 100 mg L(-1) at 50 degrees C and 400 mg L(-1) at 20 degrees C, respectively. Treatments did not affect fruit external appearance, flavor, and taste. It is concluded that postharvest PYR treatment represents an effective option to control green and blue mold in citrus fruit and

  6. Gating of Permanent Molds for Aluminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-011D13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was to determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings. Equipment and procedure for real time X-Ray radiography of molten aluminum flow into permanent molds have been developed. Other studies have been conducted using water flow and behavior of liquid aluminum in sand mold using real time photography. This investigation utilizes graphite molds transparent to X-Rays making it possible to observe the flow pattern through a number of vertically oriented grating systems. These have included systems that are choked at the base of a rounded vertical sprue and vertical gating systems with a variety of different ingates into the bottom of a mold cavity. These systems have also been changed to include gating systems with vertical and horizontal gate configurations. Several conclusions can be derived from this study. A sprue-well, as designed in these experiments, does not eliminate the vena contracta. Because of the swirling at the sprue-base, the circulating metal begins to push the entering metal stream toward the open runner mitigating the intended effect of the sprue-well. Improved designs of

  7. Compression of gray-scale fingerprint images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Thomas

    1994-03-01

    The FBI has developed a specification for the compression of gray-scale fingerprint images to support paperless identification services within the criminal justice community. The algorithm is based on a scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform decomposition of the images, followed by zero run encoding and Huffman encoding.

  8. Gray whale, Eschrichtius robustus, bibliography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Setzler-Hamilton, E.; Oliver, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The report categorizes the research literature on gray whales according to major research topics, issues of concern to Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas development, and geographic areas. The report has an extensive cross-index. Selected references are depicted on an accompanying poster.

  9. Response to Biber, Gray, and Poonpon (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, WeiWei

    2013-01-01

    The recent "TESOL Quarterly" article by Biber, Gray, and Poonpon (2011) raises important considerations with respect to the use of syntactic complexity (SC) measures in second language (L2) studies. The article draws the field's attention to one particular measure--complexity of noun phrases (NP) (i.e., noun phrases with modifiers, such as…

  10. Government Publications and Gray Literature in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anameric, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates bibliographic control of government publications and gray literature in Turkey, in order to determine what further measures are needed to support researchers in both Turkey and abroad. It reports the circumstances surrounding the creation of "The Bibliography of Government Publications" prepared in 1971, and…

  11. Norma Gray: Leading the Way for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casto, James E.

    1999-01-01

    Founded by Norma Gray in 1972 as an early-childhood demonstration center, River Valley Child Development Services now operates various programs related to young children in nine southern West Virginia counties and a statewide apprenticeship program for child-development specialists. Programs provide child care, after-school programs,…

  12. Onychomycosis Due to Nondermatophytic Molds

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Min; Ha, Gyoung Yim

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there have been many studies about onychomycosis due to nondermatophytic molds (NDM), few studies about etiologic agents including NDM in onychomycosis have been reported in Korea. Objective: This study investigated onychomycosis due to NDM in the Gyeongju area of Korea. Objective This study investigated onychomycosis due to NDM in the Gyeongju area of Korea. Methods In the 10-year period from 1999~2009, we reviewed 59 patients with onychomycosis due to NDM. The etiologic agents were identified by cultures on Sabouraud's Dextrose agar with and without cycloheximide. In some cases, internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis was done. NDM isolated considered pathogens when the presence of fungal elements was identified by direct microscopy observation and in follow-up cultures yielding the same fungi. Results Onychomycosis due to NDM comprised 2.3% of all onychomycosis. Of the 59 patients with onychomycosis due to NDM, 84.7% were toenail onychomycosis and 15.3% were fingernail onychomycosis. The incidence rate was highest in the fifth decade (27.1%). The ratio of male to female patients was 1:1.6. The frequency of associated diseases, in descending order, was hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cerebral hematoma. Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis (86.4%) was the most common clinical type of onychomycosis. Aspergillus spp. was the most frequently isolated etiologic agent of onychomycosis due to NDM (83.0%). Other causative agents were Scopulariopsis brevicaulis (10.2%), Acremonium spp. (3.4%), Fusarium solani (1.7%), and Chaetomium globosum (1.7%). Conclusion Because of the increase in onychomycosis due to NDM, we suggest the need of a careful mycological examination in patients with onychomycosis. PMID:22577268

  13. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Faiz Aslam, Muhammad Altaf, Khurram Shirazi, Irfan

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  14. Post-harvest losses of fish in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Asma A

    2008-01-01

    As the world population grows, increasing food supply becomes an evermore urgent priority. One vital aspect is the reduction of food loss after harvesting. For fish and seafood, being perishable, the situation is more crucial and the reduction in quantity and/or quality is enormous and difficult to estimate. The effort to reduce these after harvest losses must begin with a quantitative assessment of the problem. The low accuracy of loss survey techniques and limitation of extrapolating means stands against reliable economic estimation in undeveloped countries where greater and more effective losses exist. In the present paper, post-harvest losses were assessed with special emphasis on the following topics: Cultural and socioeconomic aspects including traditional food conservation; economic factors for food conservation and cost-benefit; assessment of the effect of globalization and liberalization of food markets and the fish trade in artisanal fisheries. Strategies for loss reduction included estimation of loss, education and training for individuals and the organizations actively involved in post-harvest food conservation.

  15. Injection molding simulation with variothermal mold temperature control of highly filled polyphenylene sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholz, A.; Tschiersky, M.; Wortberg, J.

    2015-05-01

    For the installation of a fuel cell stack to convert chemical energy into electricity it is common to apply bipolar plates to separate and distribute reaction gases and cooling agents. For reducing manufacturing costs of bipolar plates a fully automated injection molding process is examined. The high performance thermoplastic matrix material, polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), defies against the chemical setting and the operation temperature up to 200 °C. To adjust also high electrical and thermal conductivity, PPS is highly filled with various carbon fillers up to an amount of 65 percentage by volume. In the first step two different structural plates (one-sided) with three different gate heights and molds are designed according to the characteristics of a bipolar plate. To cope with the approach that this plate should be producible on standard injection molding machines with variothermal mold temperature control, injection molding simulation is used. Additionally, the simulation should allow to formulate a quality prediction model, which is transferrable to bipolar plates. Obviously, the basis for a precise simulation output is an accurate description of the material properties and behavior of the highly filled compound. This, the design of the structural plate and mold and the optimization via simulation is presented, as well. The influence of the injection molding process parameters, e.g. injection time, cycle times, packing pressure, mold temperature, and melt temperature on the form filling have been simulated to determine optimal process conditions. With the aid of the simulation and the variothermal mold temperature control it was possible to reduce the required melt temperature below the decomposition temperature of PPS. Thereby, hazardous decomposition products as hydrogen sulfide are obviated. Thus, the health of the processor, the longevity of the injection molding machine as well as the material and product properties can be protected.

  16. The research of UV curing injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Pengcheng; Chang, Le; Song, Le; Cai, Tianze; Ding, Yumei; Yang, Weimin

    2015-05-01

    The micro-injection molding technology and the UV (ultraviolet) curing technique are combined to bring about a new plastic forming method, UV curing injection molding. The mean weight of micro-product is an important process characteristic for UV curing injection molding as well as the surface quality of micro-features is another important process characteristic for this new plastic forming method. This research investigates three effects of processing factors on the mass-change rate of micro-product and the surface quality of micro-features. In every particular, the following two factors are considered: UV material system temperature and the packing pressure. The study revealed that as usual, the micro-products gain weight with the imported increasing UV material system temperature and the improved packing pressure. Meanwhile, the increasing packing pressure also improves the surface quality, yet, warming the UV system temperature up has no effect on the quality of the product.

  17. High rate fabrication of compression molded components

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Dykstra, William C.; Smith, Glen L.; Miller, Robert J.

    2016-04-19

    A method for fabricating a thermoplastic composite component comprises inductively heating a thermoplastic pre-form with a first induction coil by inducing current to flow in susceptor wires disposed throughout the pre-form, inductively heating smart susceptors in a molding tool to a leveling temperature with a second induction coil by applying a high-strength magnetic field having a magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors, shaping the magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors to flow substantially parallel to a molding surface of the smart susceptors, placing the heated pre-form between the heated smart susceptors; and applying molding pressure to the pre-form to form the composite component.

  18. Ultrasonically-assisted Polymer Molding: An Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moles, Matthew; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    Energy reduction in extrusion and injection molding processes can be achieved by the introduction of ultrasonic energy. Polymer flow can be enhanced on application of ultrasonic vibration, which can reduce the thermal and pressure input requirements to produce the same molding; higher productivity may also be achieved. In this paper, a design of an ultrasound-assisted injection mold machine is explored. An extrusion-die design was augmented with a commercial 1.5 kW ultrasonic transducer and sonotrode designed to resonate close to 20 kHz with up to 100 μm vibration amplitude. The design was evaluated with modal and thermal analysis using finite-element analysis software. The use of numerical techniques, including computational fluid dynamics, fluid-structure interaction and coupled Lagrangian-Eulerian method, to predict the effect of ultrasound on polymer flow was considered. A sonotrode design utilizing ceramic to enhance thermal isolation was also explored.

  19. Method for encapsulating hazardous wastes using a staged mold

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1989-01-01

    A staged mold and method for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  20. Numerical recipes for mold filling simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, D.; Juric, D.; Lam, K.; Lally, B.

    1998-07-01

    Has the ability to simulate the filling of a mold progressed to a point where an appropriate numerical recipe achieves the desired results? If results are defined to be topological robustness, computational efficiency, quantitative accuracy, and predictability, all within a computational domain that faithfully represents complex three-dimensional foundry molds, then the answer unfortunately remains no. Significant interfacial flow algorithm developments have occurred over the last decade, however, that could bring this answer closer to maybe. These developments have been both evolutionary and revolutionary, will continue to transpire for the near future. Might they become useful numerical recipes for mold filling simulations? Quite possibly. Recent progress in algorithms for interface kinematics and dynamics, linear solution methods, computer science issues such as parallelization and object-oriented programming, high resolution Navier-Stokes (NS) solution methods, and unstructured mesh techniques, must all be pursued as possible paths toward higher fidelity mold filling simulations. A detailed exposition of these algorithmic developments is beyond the scope of this paper, hence the authors choose to focus here exclusively on algorithms for interface kinematics. These interface tracking algorithms are designed to model the movement of interfaces relative to a reference frame such as a fixed mesh. Current interface tracking algorithm choices are numerous, so is any one best suited for mold filling simulation? Although a clear winner is not (yet) apparent, pros and cons are given in the following brief, critical review. Highlighted are those outstanding interface tracking algorithm issues the authors feel can hamper the reliable modeling of today`s foundry mold filling processes.

  1. Mold Simulator Study of Heat Transfer Phenomenon During the Initial Solidification in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, mold simulator trials were firstly carried out to study the phenomena of the initial shell solidification of molten steel and the heat transfer across the initial shell to the infiltrated mold/shell slag film and mold. Second, a one-dimensional inverse heat transfer problem for solidification (1DITPS) was built to determine the temperature distribution and the heat transfer behavior through the solidifying shell from the measured shell thickness. Third, the mold wall temperature field was recovered by a 2DIHCP mathematical model from the measured in-mold wall temperatures. Finally, coupled with the measured slag film thickness and the calculations of 1DITPS and 2DIHCP, the thermal resistance and the thickness of liquid slag film in the vicinity of the meniscus were evaluated. The experiment results show that: the total mold/shell thermal resistance, the mold/slag interfacial thermal resistance, the liquid film thermal resistance, and the solid film thermal resistance is 8.0 to 14.9 × 10-4, 2.7 to 4.8 × 10-4, 1.5 to 4.6 × 10-4, and 3.9 to 6.8 × 10-4 m2 K/W, respectively. The percentage of mold/slag interfacial thermal resistance, liquid film thermal resistance, and solid film thermal resistance over the total mold/shell thermal resistance is 27.5 to 34.4, 17.2 to 34.0, and 38.5 to 48.8 pct, respectively. The ratio of radiation heat flux is around 14.1 to 51.9 pct in the liquid slag film.

  2. Mold Simulator Study of Heat Transfer Phenomenon During the Initial Solidification in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, mold simulator trials were firstly carried out to study the phenomena of the initial shell solidification of molten steel and the heat transfer across the initial shell to the infiltrated mold/shell slag film and mold. Second, a one-dimensional inverse heat transfer problem for solidification (1DITPS) was built to determine the temperature distribution and the heat transfer behavior through the solidifying shell from the measured shell thickness. Third, the mold wall temperature field was recovered by a 2DIHCP mathematical model from the measured in-mold wall temperatures. Finally, coupled with the measured slag film thickness and the calculations of 1DITPS and 2DIHCP, the thermal resistance and the thickness of liquid slag film in the vicinity of the meniscus were evaluated. The experiment results show that: the total mold/shell thermal resistance, the mold/slag interfacial thermal resistance, the liquid film thermal resistance, and the solid film thermal resistance is 8.0 to 14.9 × 10-4, 2.7 to 4.8 × 10-4, 1.5 to 4.6 × 10-4, and 3.9 to 6.8 × 10-4 m2 K/W, respectively. The percentage of mold/slag interfacial thermal resistance, liquid film thermal resistance, and solid film thermal resistance over the total mold/shell thermal resistance is 27.5 to 34.4, 17.2 to 34.0, and 38.5 to 48.8 pct, respectively. The ratio of radiation heat flux is around 14.1 to 51.9 pct in the liquid slag film.

  3. Manufacturing Science of Improved Molded Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-05

    Forrer, “Interaction of N-FK5 and L- BAL35 optical glass with various carbide and other precision glass mold tooling”, SPIE Optifab 2013 Conference...Richardson, S. Mourad, M. Huber, A. Kunz, M. Forrer. Interaction of N-FK5 and L-BAL35 optical glass with various carbide and other precision glass mold...stoichiometric compounds. As an example, if silicon and oxygen are present in a material, then it was assumed that they are present in the form of

  4. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  5. Recent advances in development of ultralow oxygen treatment for postharvest pest control on perishable commodities.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several controlled atmosphere treatments with ultralow oxygen (ULO treatments) have been developed for postharvest pest control on different types of perishable products. Complete control of green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), sweetpotato whitefly (Bemisia sp.), twopotted spider mite (Tetranychus u...

  6. Transcriptomic events associated with internal browning of apple during postharvest storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although apple (Malus x domestica) is of economic importance, little information is available about the transriptomic profiling of postharvest disorders, particularly internal browning. This study aimed to explore changes in the apple transcriptome associated with development of flesh browning durin...

  7. Modeling microstructure development in gray cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettsch, David D.; Dantzig, Jonathan A.

    1994-05-01

    Recent years have seen increasing use of solidification process modeling as a tool to aid in the analysis and elimination of manufacturing defects in castings. Grain size and other microstructural features such as second-phase morphology and distribution are the primary factors in determining the mechanical properties in cast metals. In this work, a representation of nucleation and growth kinetics for gray cast irons, based on a statistical description of the microstructure, has been coupled with a commercial finite-element method code for transient heat-flow calculation to determine microstructure. Features predicted include eutectic cell size, fractions of gray and white iron, graphite morphology, percent pearlite, percent ferrite, and pearlite spacing. The predicted microstructure can then be used to determine the strength and fatigue properties using published correlations. The theoretical development and results of the finite-elementbased model will be discussed and compared with experimental results.

  8. Is incest common in gray wolf packs?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.; Meier, T.; Geffen, E.; Mech, L.D.; Burch, J.W.; Adams, L.G.; Wayne, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Wolf packs generally consist of a breeding pair and their maturing offspring that help provision and protect pack young. Because the reproductive tenure in wolves often is short, reproductively mature offspring might replace their parents, resulting in sibling or parent-offspring matings. To determine the extent of incestuous pairings, we measure relatedness based on variability in 20 microsatellite loci of mated pairs, parent-offspring pairs and siblings in two populations of gray wolves. Our 16 sampled mated pairs had values of relatedness not overlapping those of known parent-offspring or sibling dyads, which is consistent with their being unrelated or distantly related. These results suggest that full siblings or a parent and their offspring rarely mate and that incest avoidance is an important constraint on gray wolf behavioral ecology.

  9. Chemotaxis in the Plasmodial Slime Mold, Physarum polycephalum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.; Martin, Denise A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a biology unit designed so that students pose their own questions and perform experiments to answer these questions. Plasmodial slime mold is employed as the focus of the study with background information about the mold provided. (DDR)

  10. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CORE SET IN MOLD HALF IN BOX ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CORE SET IN MOLD HALF IN BOX FLOOR AREA. AWAITING OTHER MOLD HALF TO BE PLACED ON TOP. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Ductile Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Looking east inside of the ingot mold stripeer building at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east inside of the ingot mold stripeer building at a mold being stripped from an ingot. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, 44" Slab Mill, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  12. MOLD SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR FOR RAPID IDENTIFICATION AND ENUMERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing awareness that indoor molds/fungi may be connected to such conditions as asthma, allergies, hemorrhaging, chronic rhinosinusitis, memory loss, and a symptom complex called sick-building-syndrome. In addition, molds cause frequently fatal nosocomical infections. ...

  13. 20. INTERIOR VIEW WITH IRON POURERS FILLING COMPLETED MOLDS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. INTERIOR VIEW WITH IRON POURERS FILLING COMPLETED MOLDS ON GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1 MOLD CONVEYOR. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. 19. INTERIOR VIEW WITH IRON POURERS FILLING COMPLETED MOLDS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR VIEW WITH IRON POURERS FILLING COMPLETED MOLDS ON GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1 MOLD CONVEYOR. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. MOLD MACHINE, BRASS FOUNDRY, USED TO COMPRESS CONDITIONED SAND IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MOLD MACHINE, BRASS FOUNDRY, USED TO COMPRESS CONDITIONED SAND IN FLASKS OVER PATTERNS TO CREATE MOLD CAVITIES WHICH ARE LATER FILLED WITH MOLTEN BRONZE. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Brass Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Exploring the problem of mold growth and the efficacy of various mold inhibitor methods during moisture sorption isotherm measurements.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Martin, S E; Schmidt, S J

    2008-03-01

    Mold growth is a common problem during the equilibration of food materials at high relative humidity values using the standard saturated salt slurry method. Exposing samples to toluene vapor and mixing samples with mold inhibitor chemicals are suggested methods for preventing mold growth while obtaining isotherms. However, no published research was found that examined the effect of mold growth on isotherm performance or the efficacy of various mold inhibitor methods, including their possible effect on the physicochemical properties of food materials. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to (1) explore the effect of mold growth on isotherm performance in a range of food materials, (2) investigate the effectiveness of 4 mold inhibitor methods, irradiation, 2 chemical inhibitors (potassium sorbate and sodium acetate), and toluene vapor, on mold growth on dent corn starch inoculated with A. niger, and (3) examine the effect of mold inhibitor methods on the physicochemical properties of dent corn starch, including isotherm performance, pasting properties, gelatinization temperature, and enthalpy. Mold growth was found to affect starch isotherm performance by contributing to weight changes during sample equilibration. Among the 4 mold inhibitor methods tested, irradiation and toluene vapor were found to be the most effective for inhibiting growth of A. niger on dent cornstarch. However, both methods exhibited a significant impact on the starches' physiochemical properties, suggesting the need to probe the efficacy of other mold inhibitor methods and explore the use of new rapid isotherm instruments, which hamper mold growth by significantly decreasing measurement time.

  17. 3D resolution gray-tone lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae

    2000-04-01

    With the conventional micro machining technologies: isotropic and anisotropic, dry and wet etching, a few shapes can be done. To overcome this limitation, both binary multi- tasking technique or direct EB writing were used, but an inexpensive one-step UV-lithographic method, using a so- called 'gray-tone reticle', seems to be the best choice to produce local intensity modulation during exposure process. Although, by using this method and common technologies in standard IC fabrication it is easy to obtain an arbitrarily 3D shaping of positive thick resists, there are some limitations, too. The maximum number of gray-levels, on projection reticle, achieved by e-beam writing, are only 200. Also, for very thick resists, the limited focus depth of the projection objective gives a poor lateral resolution. These are the reasons why the author prose da new approach to enhance the 3D resolution of gray-tone lithography applied for thick resist. By a high resolution, both for vertical direction, as well as for horizontal direction. Particular emphasis was put on the design, manufacturing and use of halftone transmission masks, required for UV- lithographic step in the fabrication process of mechanical, optical or electronics components. The original design and fabrication method for the gray-tone test reticle were supported by experiments showing the main advantage of this new technology: the 3D structuring of thick resist in a single exposure step and also a very promising aspect ratio obtained of over 9:1. Preliminary experimental results are presented for positive thick resists in SEM micrographs. A future optimization of the lithographic process opens interesting perspectives for application of this high 3D resolution structuring method in the fabrication process of different products, with imposed complex smooth profiles, such as: x-ray LiGA-masks, refractive optics and surface- relief DOEs.

  18. Field application of safe chemical elicitors induced the expression of some resistance genes against grey mold and cottony rot diseases during snap bean pods storage.

    PubMed

    El-Garhy, Hoda A S; Rashid, Ismail A S; Abou-Ali, Rania M; Moustafa, Mahmoud M A

    2016-01-15

    Phaseolus vulgaris is subjected to serious post-harvest diseases such as grey mold and cottony rot diseases caused by Botrytis cinerea and Pythium aphanidermatum, respectively. In current study, potassium silicate (KSi), potassium thiosulfate (KTS) and potassium sulfate (KS) suppressed moderately the growth of B. cinerea and P. aphanidermatum in vitro. The applied treatments significantly suppressed grey mold and cottony rot of Xera and Valentino snap beans varieties' pods stored at 7 ± 1°C and 90-95% RH for 20 days. Ethylene responsive factor (ERF), polygalacturonase inhibitor protein (PGIP), phosphatase associated to defense (PA) and pathogenesis-related protein (PR1) defense genes were over-expressed in leaves tissue of both bean varieties responding positively to potassium salts field application. The expression of these genes was influenced by plant genotype and environment as it varied by snap bean varieties. Accumulation of ERF, GIP, PA and PR1 genes transcript under KTS at 4000 ppm treatment were the highest in Xera tissues (3.5-, 4.8-, 4- and 4.8-fold, respectively). In conclusion, pre-harvest potassium salt in vivo application could be used as effective safe alternatives to fungicides against grey mold and cottony rot diseases of snap beans during storage for up to 20 days at 7 ± 1°C.

  19. Regional gray matter correlates of vocational interests

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have identified brain areas related to cognitive abilities and personality, respectively. In this exploratory study, we extend the application of modern neuroimaging techniques to another area of individual differences, vocational interests, and relate the results to an earlier study of cognitive abilities salient for vocations. Findings First, we examined the psychometric relationships between vocational interests and abilities in a large sample. The primary relationships between those domains were between Investigative (scientific) interests and general intelligence and between Realistic (“blue-collar”) interests and spatial ability. Then, using MRI and voxel-based morphometry, we investigated the relationships between regional gray matter volume and vocational interests. Specific clusters of gray matter were found to be correlated with Investigative and Realistic interests. Overlap analyses indicated some common brain areas between the correlates of Investigative interests and general intelligence and between the correlates of Realistic interests and spatial ability. Conclusions Two of six vocational-interest scales show substantial relationships with regional gray matter volume. The overlap between the brain correlates of these scales and cognitive-ability factors suggest there are relationships between individual differences in brain structure and vocations. PMID:22591829

  20. Causes and consequences of gray matter heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Watrin, Françoise; Manent, Jean-Bernard; Cardoso, Carlos; Represa, Alfonso

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiological bases of gray matter heterotopia and to appreciate their involvement in brain cortical development and functional consequences, namely epilepsy. The development of the cerebral cortex results from complex sequential processes including cell proliferation, cell migration, cortical organization, and formation of neuronal networks. Disruption of these steps yields different types of cortical malformations including gray matter heterotopia, characterized by the ectopic position of neurons along the ventricular walls or in the deep white matter. Cortical malformations are major causes of epilepsy, being responsible for up to 40% of drug-resistant epilepsy, and the cognitive level of affected patients varies from normal to severely impaired. This review reports data from human patients and animal models highlighting the genetic causes for these disorders affecting not only neuronal migration but also the proliferation of cortical progenitors. Therefore, gray matter heterotopias should not be considered as solely due to an abnormal neuronal migration and classifying them as such may be too restrictive. The review will also summarize literature data indicating that besides ectopic neurons, neighbor cortical areas also play a consistent role in epileptogenesis, supporting the notion that plastic changes secondary to the initial malformation are instrumental in the pathophysiology of epilepsy in affected patients.

  1. TRUFLO GONDOLA, USED WITH THE HUNTER 10 MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRUFLO GONDOLA, USED WITH THE HUNTER 10 MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATES THE SAME AS THE TWO LARGER TRUFLOS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE TWO HUNTER 20S. EACH GONDOLA IS CONNECTED TO THE NEXT AND RIDES ON A SINGLE TRACK RAIL FROM MOLDING MACHINES THROUGH POURING AREAS CARRYING A MOLD AROUND TWICE BEFORE THE MOLD IS PUSHED OFF ONTO A VIBRATING SHAKEOUT CONVEYOR. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  2. 56. ORIGINAL MOLDS. THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS HAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. ORIGINAL MOLDS. THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS HAS APPROXIMATELY 6,000 PLASTER MOLDS OF VARIOUS TYPES, INCLUDING THE DEEP CAVITY MOLDS IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THESE MOLDS PRODUCED ALLEGORICAL FIGURES TO BE INSTALLED AROUND THE CORNICES OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  3. Post-harvest quality risks by stress/ethylene: management to mitigate.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohammad W; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Fresh produce, in actual fact, is exposed to multiple stresses through entire post-harvest phase such as handling, storage and distribution. The biotic stresses are associated with various post-harvest diseases leading to massive produce loss. Abiotic stresses such as drought, heat and chilling cause cell weakening, membrane leakage, flavour loss, surface pitting, internal browning, textural changes, softening and mealiness of post-harvest produce. A burst in 'stress ethylene' formation makes post-harvest produce to be at high risk for over-ripening, decay, deterioration, pathogen attack and physiological disorders. The mutation study of genes and receptors involved in ethylene signal transduction shows reduced sensitivity to bind ethylene resulting in delayed ripening and longer shelf life of produce. This review is aimed to highlight the various detrimental effects of stress/ethylene on quality of post-harvest produce, primarily fruits, with special emphasize to its subsequent practical management involving the 'omics' tools. The outcome of the literature appraised herein will help us to understand the physiological and molecular bases of stress/ethylene which sustain fruit quality at post-harvest phase.

  4. Characterization of Starch Degradation Related Genes in Postharvest Kiwifruit

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiong; Kuang, Sheng; Zhang, Ai-Di; Zhang, Wang-Shu; Chen, Miao-Jin; Yin, Xue-Ren; Chen, Kun-Song

    2016-01-01

    Starch is one of the most important storage carbohydrates in plants. Kiwifruit typically accumulate large amounts of starch during development. The fruit retain starch until commercial maturity, and its postharvest degradation is essential for consumer acceptance. The activity of genes related to starch degradation has, however, rarely been investigated. Based on the kiwifruit genome sequence and previously reported starch degradation-related genes, 17 novel genes were isolated and the relationship between their expression and starch degradation was examined using two sets of materials: ethylene-treated (100 µL/L, 20 °C; ETH) vs. control (20 °C; CK) and controlled atmosphere stored (CA, 5% CO2 + 2% O2, 0 °C) vs. normal atmosphere in cold storage (NA, 0 °C). Physiological analysis indicated that ETH accelerated starch degradation and increased soluble solids content (SSC) and soluble sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose), while CA inhibited starch reduction compared with NA. Using these materials, expression patterns of 24 genes that may contribute to starch degradation (seven previously reported and 17 newly isolated) were analyzed. Among the 24 genes, AdAMY1, AdAGL3 and AdBAM3.1/3L/9 were significantly induced by ETH and positively correlated with starch degradation. Furthermore, these five genes were also inhibited by CA, conforming the likely involvement of these genes in starch degradation. Thus, the present study has identified the genes with potential for involvement in starch degradation in postharvest kiwifruit, which will be useful for understanding the regulation of kiwifruit starch content and metabolism. PMID:27983700

  5. Characterization of Starch Degradation Related Genes in Postharvest Kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiong; Kuang, Sheng; Zhang, Ai-Di; Zhang, Wang-Shu; Chen, Miao-Jin; Yin, Xue-Ren; Chen, Kun-Song

    2016-12-15

    Starch is one of the most important storage carbohydrates in plants. Kiwifruit typically accumulate large amounts of starch during development. The fruit retain starch until commercial maturity, and its postharvest degradation is essential for consumer acceptance. The activity of genes related to starch degradation has, however, rarely been investigated. Based on the kiwifruit genome sequence and previously reported starch degradation-related genes, 17 novel genes were isolated and the relationship between their expression and starch degradation was examined using two sets of materials: ethylene-treated (100 µL/L, 20 °C; ETH) vs. control (20 °C; CK) and controlled atmosphere stored (CA, 5% CO₂ + 2% O₂, 0 °C) vs. normal atmosphere in cold storage (NA, 0 °C). Physiological analysis indicated that ETH accelerated starch degradation and increased soluble solids content (SSC) and soluble sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose), while CA inhibited starch reduction compared with NA. Using these materials, expression patterns of 24 genes that may contribute to starch degradation (seven previously reported and 17 newly isolated) were analyzed. Among the 24 genes, AdAMY1, AdAGL3 and AdBAM3.1/3L/9 were significantly induced by ETH and positively correlated with starch degradation. Furthermore, these five genes were also inhibited by CA, conforming the likely involvement of these genes in starch degradation. Thus, the present study has identified the genes with potential for involvement in starch degradation in postharvest kiwifruit, which will be useful for understanding the regulation of kiwifruit starch content and metabolism.

  6. Damage Tolerance of Resin Transfer Molded Composite Sandwich Constructions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    cost manufacturing techniques to produce panels included; resin transfer molding ( RTM ), vacuum assisted resin infusion/transfer molding ( VARTM ), co...analysis conducted revealed that in terms of failure characteristics, the RTM / VARTM processed sandwich composites yielded similar performance as those...injection VARTM and vacuum assisted compression molding (VACM). Detailed experimental impact studies were performed under three scenarios low velocity

  7. 1928 MALLEABLE FOUNDRY MOLD CONVEYOR #1 SHOWING CONVEYOR AND TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1928 MALLEABLE FOUNDRY MOLD CONVEYOR #1 SHOWING CONVEYOR AND TRACK ARRANGEMENTS WITH OVERHEAD POURING WEIGHTS THAT REST ON A MOLD'S TOP SURFACE TO ENSURE THAT IRON DOES NOT FLOW OUT OF THE MOLD WHEN IT IS BEING POURED THROUGH THE OPENING IN THE WEIGHT. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Improved mold release for filled-silicone compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Accountius, O. E.

    1973-01-01

    Ceramic and filled-plastic materials used for fabrication of tiles are relatively brittle and easily break as they are being removed from molds. Dusting mold surfaces with commercially available glass microspheres provides mold release superior to existing spray releases. Glass-microsphere dusting also permits removal of uncured tile which has very little strength.

  9. 17. INTERIOR VIEW WITH GREY UNIT NO. 1 MOLD CONVEYOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR VIEW WITH GREY UNIT NO. 1 MOLD CONVEYOR SHOWING CHAIN HELD WEIGHTS THAT TRAVEL AT THE SAME SPEED AS THE CONVEYOR AND REST ON COMPLETED MOLDS TO HOLD THE SAND SEAMS TOGETHER AS MOLTED IRON IS POURED INTO THE MOLD CAVITY. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  10. 14. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR REMOVING A MOLD HALF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR REMOVING A MOLD HALF FROM THE PATTERN ON THE MOLDING MACHINE, REVEALING THE CAVITY THAT WILL BE FILLED WITH MOLTEN IRON AFTER IT IS ASSEMBLED WITH THE OTHER MOLD HALF INSIDE GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  12. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  13. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  14. Molding cork sheets to complex shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, M. H.; Simpson, W. G.; Walker, H. M.

    1977-01-01

    Partially cured cork sheet is easily formed to complex shapes and then final-cured. Temperature and pressure levels required for process depend upon resin system used and final density and strength desired. Sheet can be bonded to surface during final cure, or can be first-formed in mold and bonded to surface in separate step.

  15. Photorefractive polymer composites fabricated by injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlocker, J. A.; Fuentes-Hernandez, C.; Wang, J. F.; Peyghambarian, N.; Kippelen, B.; Zhang, Q.; Marder, S. R.

    2002-02-01

    We report on the fabrication of bulk samples of photorefractive polymers using the injection molding technique. The photorefractive properties of these materials are evaluated by four-wave mixing and two-beam coupling experiments. Samples with good optical quality, high diffraction efficiency, and net optical gain are obtained.

  16. Onychomycosis by molds. Report of 78 cases.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Cruz-Aguilar, Pamela; Ponce, Rosa María

    2007-01-01

    A retrospective study of onychomycohosis by molds was carried out during a 14-year period (1992-2005). All cases were clinically and mycologically proven (repetitive KOH and culture) and then each of the molds was identified. A total of 5,221 cases of onychomycosis were evaluated, 78 of which were molds (1.49%). Mean patient age was 44.1 years. 75/78 cases occurred in toenails. Associated factors were detected in 39/78 (50.0%) cases, with the major ones being: peripheral vascular disease, contact with soil, and trauma. The most frequent clinical presentation was distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis (DLSO), in 54/78 cases (69%). The most frequent causative agents were: Scopulariopsis brevicaulis in 34/78 cases and Aspergillus niger in 13/78 cases. Onychomycoses by molds are infrequent; in this study they accounted for 1.49% of cases. The clinical features are virtually similar to those caused by dermatophytes, which makes the clinicomycological tests necessary.

  17. Neuropsychological exploration of alleged mold neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Matthew J; Satz, Paul; Scaglione, Cris A; D'Elia, Louis F; Rassovsky, Yuri; Arita, Anthony A; Hinkin, Charles H; Thrasher, Delaney; Ordog, Gary

    2007-05-01

    Cognitive and emotional correlates of toxic mold exposure and potential dose-response effects for both outcomes were investigated. Self-reported length of exposure, time since last exposure, and serum immunoglobulin (IgG) levels were assessed. Despite CNS complaints often seen with mold exposed individuals, overall results did not uncover concomitant cognitive deficits suggested in previous studies or a significant reduction in intellectual functioning. Fewer subjects were excluded as result of failing effort/motivation assessment than expected. Correlations of IgG and cognitive function are discussed. A dose-effect for self-reported length of exposure and cognitive outcome was not seen. The sample's overall Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory II (MMPI-2) profile indicated elevations on scales 1, 2, 3, 7 and 8. MMPI-2 clinical scales 1 and 3 were significantly correlated with length of exposure. The MMPI-2 may be sensitive to increasing physical and emotional sequelae as length of exposure increases. A potential subgroup of cognitively impaired outliers within mold exposure litigants is explored. Limitations of self-reported and objective measurements for mold exposure and exploratory statistical methodology are discussed.

  18. Bell X-5 Model and Molds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    A Langley model maker examines the molds used to form a model of the Bell X-5, a variable sweep craft that first flew in June of 1951. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 64), by James Schultz.

  19. Epidemics of mold poisoning past and present.

    PubMed

    Meggs, William J

    2009-01-01

    Molds are ubiquitous throughout the biosphere of planet earth and cause infectious, allergic, and toxic diseases. Toxic diseases arise from exposure to mycotoxins produced by molds. Throughout history, there have been a number of toxic epidemics associated with exposure to mycotoxins. Acute epidemics of ergotism are caused by consumption of grain infested by fungi of the genus Claviceps, which produce the bioactive amine ergotamine that mimics the neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine. Acute aflatoxin outbreaks have occurred from ingestion of corn stored in damp conditions that potentiate growth of the molds of the species Aspergillus. Contemporary construction methods that use cellulose substrates such as fiber board and indoor moisture have caused an outbreak of contaminated buildings with Stachybotrys chartarum, with the extent of health effects still a subject of debate and ongoing research. This article reviews several of the more prominent epidemics and discusses the nature of the toxins. Two diseases that were leading causes of childhood mortality in England in the 1970s and vanished with changing dietary habits, putrid malignant fever, and slow nervous fever were most likely toxic mold epidemics.

  20. A REVOLUTION IN MOLD IDENTIFICATION AND ENUMERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    More than 100 assay were developed to identify and quantify indoor molds using quantitiative PCR (QPCR) assays. This technology incorporates fluorigenic 5' nuclease (TaqMan�) chemistry directed at the nuclear ribosomal RNA operon internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 or ITS2...

  1. Flexible Interior-Impression-Molding Tray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Jeffrey E.

    1991-01-01

    Device used inside combustion chamber of complicated shape for nondestructive evaluation of qualities of welds, including such features as offset, warping, misalignment of parts, and dropthrough. Includes flexible polypropylene tray trimmed to fit desired interior surface contour. Two neodymium boron magnets and inflatable bladder attached to tray. Tray and putty inserted in cavity to make mold of interior surface.

  2. Mold Die Making. 439-322/324.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunke, P.; And Others

    Each unit in this curriculum guide on mold die making contains an introduction, objectives, materials required, lessons, space for notes, figures, and diagrams. There are 10 units in this guide: (1) introduction to Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM); (2) EDM principles; (3) the single pulse; (4) EDM safety; (5) electrode material; (6) electrode…

  3. An Education Belief Worth Reflection: Molding Intellectuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Jie

    2006-01-01

    Molding intellectuals is one of the expectations people have, which comes from a deep-rooted belief in education. The humanity hypothesis of this belief is to take knowledge and the pursuit of knowledge as the only prescription for human beings. This hypothesis overturns the relation of knowledge and life. Intellectuals make scientific paradigm as…

  4. Molding Compound For Inspection Of Internal Contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Jim; Ricklefs, Steve

    1988-01-01

    Material clean, sets rapidly, and easy to use. Silicone elastomer, Citrocon or equivalent, commonly used in dentistry, in combination with mold-release agent (Also see MFS-29240), speeds and facilitates making of impressions of interior surfaces so surface contours examined. Elastomer easily moved around in cavity until required location found.

  5. Process for preparing sand cores and molds

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, N.C.; Kraemer, J.F.

    1984-11-27

    An improved process for preparing foundry cores and molds using a foundry aggregate and a binder therefor wherein the aggregate is mixed with an aqueous suspension of cereal flour and then with a core oil, the improvement comprising mixing the aggregate with phosphoric acid or sulfuric acid before mixing with the aqueous suspension of the cereal flour.

  6. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Plastics Molding Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in jobs in the plastics molding industry. Agency partners involved in this project include: the Illinois State Board of Education, Illinois Community…

  7. Clinical reactivity to ingestion challenge with mixed mold extract may be enhanced in subjects sensitized to molds.

    PubMed

    Luccioli, Stefano; Malka-Rais, Jonathan; Nsouli, Talal M; Bellanti, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    Manifestations of mold allergy are classically associated with inhalation of mold spores leading to symptoms of asthma and other respiratory illnesses. It is largely unknown, however, whether ingestion of aeroallergenic molds, mold spores, or other fungi found in food can also elicit hypersensitivity reactions in mold-sensitive individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between exposure to molds by oral challenge and elicitation of symptoms in mold- versus nonmold-sensitive individuals. Thirty-four adult atopic subjects were randomized into mold-sensitive groups based on skin test reactivity by skin percutaneous testing (SPT) and/or intradermal (ID) testing to a mixed mold (MM) extract preparation. All subjects underwent a single-blinded, placebo-controlled food challenge to the MM preparation. A modified scoring system was used to grade the clinical severity of symptoms elicited by challenge. All subjects tolerated challenges to the maximal oral mold dose concentration. However, higher symptom scores after challenge were found in mold-sensitive subjects compared with nonmold-sensitive subjects (p = 0.01). When mold-sensitive subjects were compared based on SPT and/or ID reactivity, higher symptom scores and lower symptom-eliciting concentrations of mold were associated with the SPT reactive subgroup compared with the subgroup with ID reactivity alone. In summary, based on our challenge results and scoring model, mold-sensitive subjects compared with nonmold-sensitive subjects experienced cumulatively higher symptom scores after oral challenge to an MM extract preparation. Future studies are warranted to confirm whether ingestion of aeroallergenic molds in food may be another contributor to symptoms in mold-sensitive individuals.

  8. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Satish V.; Christensen, Richard M.; Toland, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel (10) may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel (10) makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  9. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, S.V.; Christensen, R.M.; Toland, R.H.

    1980-09-24

    A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  10. Indoor Molds and Respiratory Hypersensitivity: A Comparison of Selected Molds and House Dust Mite Induced Responses in a Mouse Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction/Study Goal Molds are ubiquitous in the environment and exposures to molds contribute to various human diseases including allergic lung diseases. The Institute of Medicine reports and WHO gUidelines concluded that the role of molds in asthma induction is not clear bu...

  11. Pressurized Shell Molds For Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday K.; Lusignea, Richard N.; Cornie, James

    1993-01-01

    Balanced-pressure molds used to make parts in complex shapes from fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite materials. In single step, molding process makes parts in nearly final shapes; only minor finishing needed. Because molding pressure same on inside and outside, mold does not have to be especially strong and can be made of cheap, nonstructural material like glass or graphite. Fibers do not have to be cut to conform to molds. Method produces parts with high content of continuous fibers. Parts stiff but light in weight, and coefficients of thermal expansion adjusted. Parts resistant to mechanical and thermal fatigue superior to similar parts made by prior fabrication methods.

  12. Testing single point incremental forming molds for thermoforming operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, Daniel; de Sousa, Ricardo Alves; Torcato, Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Low pressure polymer processing processes as thermoforming or rotational molding use much simpler molds then high pressure processes like injection. However, despite the low forces involved with the process, molds manufacturing for this operations is still a very material, energy and time consuming operation. The goal of the research is to develop and validate a method for manufacturing plastically formed sheets metal molds by single point incremental forming (SPIF) operation for thermoforming operation. Stewart platform based SPIF machines allow the forming of thick metal sheets, granting the required structural stiffness for the mold surface, and keeping the short lead time manufacture and low thermal inertia.

  13. Mold infestation of wet spray-applied cellulose insulation.

    PubMed

    Godish, Thad J; Godish, Diana R

    2006-01-01

    Mold investigations were conducted in four buildings that had been insulated with wet spray-applied cellulose insulation (WSACI). Bulk WSACI samples were collected and analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) methods. Airborne mold was evaluated using both Burkard total mold spore and Andersen culturable/viable sampling methods. Although reportedly treated with biocidal borates, QPCR analyses indicated that elevated concentrations of mold cells (reported as spore equivalents per gram) may be present in WSACI. QPCR analyses showed the following: (1) very high concentrations of Penicillium chrysogenum in samples from two of four buildings; (2) very high concentrations of Stachybotrys chartarum in samples from one building and a more moderate presence in a second; (3) moderately high concentrations of Aspergillus versicolor in samples from one building and more moderate concentrations in a second; (4) the presence of the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, in samples from three of the four buildings, and (5) the presence of 22 of 23 target mold species. Elevated airborne total mold spore concentrations were observed in all four of the buildings investigated. Culturable/viable airborne mold concentrations were moderately elevated in three of the four buildings. Mold genera/types present were relatively consistent among airborne mold samples collected by both methods and bulk sample analyses. Results of this study suggest that WSACI has the potential to cause elevated airborne mold levels in buildings where it has been applied and pose significant mold exposure and public health risks.

  14. A comparison of molding procedures - Contact, injection and vacuum injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathiard, G.

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic aspects of the contact, injection and vacuum injection molding of reinforced plastic components are compared for the example of a tractor roof with a gel-coated surface. Consideration is given to the possibility of reinforcement, number of smooth faces, condition of the gel-coated surface, reliability, and labor and workplace requirements of the three processes, and advantages of molding between the mold and a countermold in smooth faces, reliability, labor requirements, working surface and industrial hygiene are pointed out. The times and labor requirements of each step in the molding cycles are examined, and material requirements and yields, investment costs, amortization and product cost prices of the processes are compared. It is concluded that, for the specific component examined, the processes of vacuum injection and injection molding appear very interesting, with injection molding processes resulting in lower cost prices than contact molding for any production volume.

  15. Effect of process parameters on cavity pressure in injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quan; Zhen, Mengxiang; Wu, Zhenghuan; Cai, Yujun

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an experimental work is performed on the effect of injection molding parameters on the polymer pressure inside the mold cavity. Different process parameters of the injection molding are considered during the experimental work (packing pressure, packing time, injection pressure, mold temperature, and melt temperature). A set analyses are carried out by combining the process parameters based on the L16(45)Taguchi orthogonal design. The cavity pressure is measured with time by using Kistler pressure sensor at different injection molding cycles. The results show the packing pressure is significant factor of affecting the maximum of diverse spline cavity pressure. The results obtained specify well the developing of the cavity pressure inside the mold cavity during the injection molding cycles.

  16. Ultra-precision molding of chalcogenide glass aspherical lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Yunlong; Su, Ying; Guo, Rui; Xu, Zengqi; Liu, Xuanmin

    2016-10-01

    With the development of infrared optical systems in military and civil areas, chalcogenide glass aspherical lens possess some advantages, such as large infrared transmission, good thermal stability performance and image quality. Aspherical lens using chalcogenide glass can satisfy the requirements of modern infrared optical systems. Therefore, precision manufacturing of chalcogenide glass aspheric has received more and more attention. The molding technology of chalcogenide glass aspheric has become a research hotspot, because it can achieve mass and low cost manufacturing. The article of molding technology is focusing on a kind of chalcogenide glass aspherical lens. We report on design and fabrication of the mold that through simulation analysis of molding. Finally, through molding test, the fabrication of mold's surface and parameters of molding has been optimized, ensuring the indicators of chalcogenide glass aspherical lens meet the requirements.

  17. Direct molding of pavement tiles made of ground tire rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadrini, Fabrizio; Gagliardi, Donatella; Tedde, Giovanni Matteo; Santo, Loredana; Musacchi, Ettore

    2016-10-01

    Large rubber products can be molded by using only ground tire rubber (GTR) without any additive or binder due to a new technology called "direct molding". Rubber granules and powders from tire recycling are compression molded at elevated temperatures and pressures. The feasibility of this process was clearly shown in laboratory but the step to the industrial scale was missing. Thanks to an European Project (SMART "Sustainable Molding of Articles from Recycled Tires") this step has been made and some results are reported in this study. The press used for compression molding is described. Some tests were made to measure the energy consumption so as to evaluate costs for production in comparison with conventional technologies for GTR molding (by using binders). Results show that 1 m2 tiles can be easily molded with several thicknesses in a reasonable low time. Energy consumption is higher than conventional technologies but it is lower than the cost for binders.

  18. Research of forming characteristic of precision glass molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhibin; Li, Junqi; Qin, Hui; Zhang, Yunlong; Zhang, Feng; Su, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Chalcogenide glass is widely used in infrared area for its cheap and good performance of infrared transmittance. Compare with the traditional material signal crystal germanium, zinc sulfide, zinc selenide etc. Chalcogenide glass is suit for precision molding for the low soften temperature which is suit for large mass industry production. And precision glass molding(PGM) is a kind of technology involving the molding machine, mold material, the glass, molding parameters etc. So the researches on the forming characteristic of precision glass molding are necessary. In this paper, the FEM simulation is used to assist research of the forming characteristic, especially the friction coefficient effect on the forming. At the last the surface profile compensation and micro-replication of molding is discussed.

  19. Mold exposure and health effects following hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Deborah N; Grimsley, L Faye; White, LuAnn E; El-Dahr, Jane M; Lichtveld, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    The extensive flooding in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita created conditions ideal for indoor mold growth, raising concerns about the possible adverse health effects associated with indoor mold exposure. Studies evaluating the levels of indoor and outdoor molds in the months following the hurricanes found high levels of mold growth. Homes with greater flood damage, especially those with >3 feet of indoor flooding, demonstrated higher levels of mold growth compared with homes with little or no flooding. Water intrusion due to roof damage was also associated with mold growth. However, no increase in the occurrence of adverse health outcomes has been observed in published reports to date. This article considers reasons why studies of mold exposure after the hurricane do not show a greater health impact.

  20. Gray Matter Involvement in Radiologically Isolated Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, Mª Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The unanticipated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection in the brain of asymptomatic subjects of white matter lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis has recently been named as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The pathophysiological processes of RIS remain largely unknown and questions as to whether gray matter alterations actually occur in this entity are yet to be investigated in more detail. By means of a 3 T multimodal MRI approach, we searched for cortical and deep gray matter changes in a cohort of RIS patients. Seventeen RIS patients, 17 clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) patients (median disease duration from symptom onset = 12 months), and 17 healthy controls underwent MRI and neuropsychological testing. Normalized deep gray matter volumes and regional cortical thickness were assessed using FreeSurfer. SIENAX was used to obtain normalized global and cortical brain volumes. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed by using SPM8 software to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Although no differences were observed between CIS and healthy controls groups, RIS patients showed significantly lower normalized cortical volume (673 ± 27.07 vs 641 ± 35.88 [cm3 × 103, Tukey P test = 0.009) and mean thalamic volume (0.0051 ± 0.4 vs 0.0046 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.014) compared with healthy controls. RIS patients also showed significant thinning in a number of cortical areas, that were primarily distributed in frontal and temporal lobes (P < 0.05, uncorrected). Strong correlations were observed between T2-white matter lesion volume and regional cortical thickness (rho spearman ranging from 0.60 to 0.80). Our data suggest that white matter lesions on T2-weighted images are not the only hallmark of RIS. Future longitudinal studies with larger samples are warranted to better clarify the effect of RIS-related white matter lesions on gray matter

  1. Gray Matter Involvement in Radiologically Isolated Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, M Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-03-01

    The unanticipated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection in the brain of asymptomatic subjects of white matter lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis has recently been named as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The pathophysiological processes of RIS remain largely unknown and questions as to whether gray matter alterations actually occur in this entity are yet to be investigated in more detail. By means of a 3 T multimodal MRI approach, we searched for cortical and deep gray matter changes in a cohort of RIS patients. Seventeen RIS patients, 17 clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) patients (median disease duration from symptom onset = 12 months), and 17 healthy controls underwent MRI and neuropsychological testing. Normalized deep gray matter volumes and regional cortical thickness were assessed using FreeSurfer. SIENAX was used to obtain normalized global and cortical brain volumes. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed by using SPM8 software to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Although no differences were observed between CIS and healthy controls groups, RIS patients showed significantly lower normalized cortical volume (673 ± 27.07 vs 641 ± 35.88 [cm³ × 10³, Tukey P test = 0.009) and mean thalamic volume (0.0051 ± 0.4 vs 0.0046 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.014) compared with healthy controls. RIS patients also showed significant thinning in a number of cortical areas, that were primarily distributed in frontal and temporal lobes (P < 0.05, uncorrected). Strong correlations were observed between T2-white matter lesion volume and regional cortical thickness (rho spearman ranging from 0.60 to 0.80). Our data suggest that white matter lesions on T2-weighted images are not the only hallmark of RIS. Future longitudinal studies with larger samples are warranted to better clarify the effect of RIS-related white matter lesions on gray matter tissue.

  2. Gray Extinction in the Orion Trapezium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krełowski, J.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Strobel, A.; Mulas, G.

    2016-12-01

    We estimated distances to several Orion Trapezium stars using our CaII-method and confirm the distance recommended by Menten et al. However, we found that in the case of HD 37020 both individual distances (based on the trigonometric VLBI parallax and/or CaII-method) differ from the spectrophotometric distance by a factor of 2.5. We interpret this fact as a result of presence of gray (neutral) extinction of about 1.8 mag in front of this star. The correctness of the applied spectral type/ luminosity class, Sp/L, (based on new original spectra from HARPS-N) and measurements of color indices is discussed.

  3. Information fusion for the Gray Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenstermacher, Laurie

    2016-05-01

    United States Special Operations Command (SOCOM) recently published a white paper describing the "Gray Zone", security challenges characterized by "ambiguity about the nature of the conflict, opacity of the parties involved…competitive interactions among and within state and non-state actors that fall between the traditional war and peace duality."1 Ambiguity and related uncertainty about actors, situations, relationships, and intent require new approaches to information collection, processing and fusion. General Votel, the current SOCOM commander, during a recent speech on "Operating in the Gray Zone" emphasized that it would be important to get left of the next crises and stated emphatically, "to do that we must understand the Human Domain."2 This understanding of the human domain must come from making meaning based on different perspectives, including the "emic" or first person/participant and "etic" or third person/observer perspectives. Much of the information currently collected and processed is etic. Incorporation and fusion with the emic perspective enables forecasting of behaviors/events and provides context for etic information (e.g., video).3 Gray zone challenges are perspective-dependent; for example, the conflict in Ukraine is interpreted quite differently by Russia, the US and Ukraine. Russia views it as war, necessitating aggressive action, the US views it as a security issue best dealt with by economic sanctions and diplomacy and the Ukraine views it as a threat to its sovereignty.4 General Otto in the Air Force ISR 2023 vision document stated that Air Force ISR is needed to anticipate strategic surprise.5 Anticipatory analysis enabling getting left of a crisis inherently requires a greater focus on information sources that elucidate the human environment as well as new methods that elucidate not only the "who's" and "what's", but the "how's and "why's," extracting features and/or patterns and subtle cues useful for forecasting behaviors and

  4. Exposures to Molds in School Classrooms of Children with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Baxi, Sachin N.; Muilenberg, Michael L.; Rogers, Christine A.; Sheehan, William J.; Gaffin, Jonathan; Permaul, Perdita; Kopel, Lianne S.; Lai, Peggy S.; Lane, Jeffrey P.; Bailey, Ann; Petty, Carter R.; Fu, Chunxia; Gold, Diane R.; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    Background Students spend a large portion of their day in classrooms which may be a source of mold exposure. We examined the diversity and concentrations of molds in inner-city schools and described differences between classrooms within the same school. Methods Classroom airborne mold spores, collected over a 2 day period, were measured twice during the school year by direct microscopy. Results There were 180 classroom air samples collected from 12 schools. Mold was present in 100% of classrooms. Classrooms within the same school had differing mold levels and mold diversity scores. The total mold per classroom was 176.6 ± 4.2 spores/m3 (geometric mean ± standard deviation) and ranged from 11.2 to 16,288.5 spores/m3. Mold diversity scores for classroom samples ranged from 1 to 19 (7.7 ± 3.5). The classroom accounted for the majority of variance (62%) in the total mold count, and for the majority of variance (56%) in the mold diversity score versus the school. The species with the highest concentrations and found most commonly included Cladosporium (29.3 ± 4.2 spores/m3), Penicillium/Aspergillus (15.0 ± 5.4 spores/m3), smut spores (12.6 ± 4.0 spores/m3), and basidiospores (6.6 ± 7.1 spores/m3). Conclusions Our study found that the school is a source of mold exposure, but particularly the classroom microenvironment varies in quantity of spores and species among classrooms within the same school. We also verified that visible mold may be a predictor for higher mold spore counts. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of mold exposure relative to asthma morbidity in sensitized and non-sensitized asthmatic children. PMID:24112429

  5. Short-term UV-B exposure induces metabolic and anatomical changes in peel of harvested lemons contributing in fruit protection against green mold.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, V E; Interdonato, R; Cerioni, L; Albornoz, P; Ramallo, J; Prado, F E; Hilal, M; Rapisarda, V A

    2016-06-01

    UV-B radiation (UVBR) is a small fraction of the solar spectrum from 280 to 315nm. UVBR produces photomorphogenic acclimation responses in plants, modulating their cellular structure and physiology. Here, changes in the peel of harvested lemons after short time exposure to UVBR were analyzed and its potential effects against fungal infection were studied. In the flavedo, UVBR treatment induced variations in the respiratory profiles and increased the phenolic compound contents. Final products of the flavonoid pathway (flavones, flavonols and anthocyanins) increased more markedly than their precursors (flavanones and dihydroflavonols). The increased accumulation of soluble phenolics in the flavedo of treated lemons is associated with the high antioxidant activity found in the flavedo of these samples. Supporting the biochemical determinations, anatomical observations showed abundant intravacuolar deposits of phenolic compounds and an increase in the cell wall thickness in UVBR-treated samples. Metabolic and anatomical modifications associated to UVBR improved natural defenses against Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of green mold disease. Our results suggest that mature postharvest lemons exposed to the artificial radiation showed phenotypic plasticity, allowing an acclimation response to UVBR which confers fruit resistance to pathogens. Thus, combination of UVBR with other treatments could represent an important improvement to control postharvest diseases on citrus.

  6. PET MRI Coregistration in Intractable Epilepsy and Gray Matter Heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Seniaray, Nikhil; Jain, Anuj

    2017-03-01

    A 25-year-old woman with intractable seizures underwent FDG PET/MRI for seizure focus localization. MRI demonstrated bilateral carpetlike nodular subependymal gray matter and asymmetrical focal dilatation in the right temporal horn. PET/MRI showed increased FDG within subependymal gray matter with significant hypometabolism in right anterior temporal lobe. EEG and ictal semiology confirmed the right temporal seizure origin. This case highlights the importance of identification of gray matter heterotopia on FDG PET/MRI.

  7. Multiwavelength pyrometer for gray and non-gray surfaces in the presence of interfering radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel L. P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting the temperature of gray and non-gray bodies in the presence of interfering radiation are presented. A gray body has a constant emissivity less than 1 and a non-gray body has an emissivity which varies with wavelength. The emissivity and reflectivity of the surface is determined over a range of wavelengths. Spectra are also measured of the extraneous interference radiation source and the surface of the object to be measured in the presence of the extraneous interference radiation source. An auxiliary radiation source is used to determine the reflectivity of the surface and also the emissivity. The measured spectrum of the surfaces in the presence of the extraneous interference radiation source is set equal to the emissivity of the surface multiplied by a Planck function containing a temperature term T plus the surface reflectivity multiplied by the spectrum of the extraneous interference radiation source. The equation is then solved for T to determine the temperature of the surface.

  8. Simulation of low carbon steel solidification and mold flux crystallization in continuous casting using a multi-mold simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Choi, Joo; Park, Jun-Yong; Sohn, Il

    2014-01-01

    An inverted water-cooled multi-mold continuous casting simulator was used to investigate initial solidification of low-carbon steels and crystallization of mold flux. Embedded mold thermocouples showed characteristic temperature profiles dependent on parameters including casting speed, oscillation frequency, and stroke. Higher maximum temperatures for thermocouples at higher casting speeds, higher frequencies, and lower stroke lengths were observed. The surface of the as-cast steel strips showed oscillation marks similar to those of industrially cast slabs and higher casting speeds resulted in shallower oscillation marks. The measured pitch agreed well with the theoretical pitch suggesting the multi-mold simulator to be a cost-effective alternative to pursue fundamental studies on initial solidification in the mold. Analysis of the mold flux taken between the copper mold and solidified steel shell showed highly dendritic uni-directional crystallization occurring within the flux film suggesting that the heat transfer direction is dominantly horizontal towards the water-cooled copper mold. In addition, the solidified flux located at the upper to lower part of the mold suggested morphological differences in the size and shape of the crystalline phases indicating that crystallization ratio can increase depending upon the retention in the mold and subsequently decrease radiative heat transfer as the flux traverses down the mold.

  9. Postharvest treatment of fresh fruit from California with methyl bromide for postharvest control of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide chamber fumigations were evaluated for postharvest control of light brown apple moth (LBAM), Epiphyas postvittana (Walker), in fresh fruit exports. To simulate external feeding, larvae were contained in gas-permeable cages and distributed throughout loads of peaches, plums, nectarines...

  10. The greenhouse effect in a gray planetary atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wildt, R.

    1966-01-01

    Hopf analytical solution for values of ratio of gray absorption coefficients for insolating and escaping radiation /greenhouse parameter/ assumed constant at all depths, presenting temperature distribution graphs

  11. Gray component replacement using color mixing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Henry R.

    1994-05-01

    A new approach to the gray component replacement (GCR) has been developed. It employs the color mixing theory for modeling the spectral fit between the 3-color and 4-color prints. To achieve this goal, we first examine the accuracy of the models with respect to the experimental results by applying them to the prints made by a Canon Color Laser Copier-500 (CLC-500). An empirical halftone correction factor is used for improving the data fitting. Among the models tested, the halftone corrected Kubelka-Munk theory gives the closest fit, followed by the halftone corrected Beer-Bouguer law and the Yule-Neilsen approach. We then apply the halftone corrected BB law to GCR. The main feature of this GCR approach is based on the spectral measurements of the primary color step wedges and a software package implementing the color mixing model. The software determines the amount of the gray component to be removed, then adjusts each primary color until a good match of the peak wavelengths between the 3-color and 4-color spectra is obtained. Results indicate that the average (Delta) Eab between cmy and cmyk renditions of 64 color patches is 3.11 (Delta) Eab. Eighty-seven percent of the patches has (Delta) Eab less than 5 units. The advantage of this approach is its simplicity; there is no need for the black printer and under color addition. Because this approach is based on the spectral reproduction, it minimizes the metamerism.

  12. Bringing CLARITY to Gray Matter Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Rory D.; Kurth, Florian; Itoh, Noriko; Mongerson, Chandler R.L.; Wailes, Shannon H.; Peng, Mavis S.; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Gray matter atrophy has been shown to be a strong correlate to clinical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its most commonly used animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the relationship between gray mater atrophy and the spinal cord pathology often observed in EAE has never been established. Here EAE was induced in Thy1.1-YFP mice and their brains imaged using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The brains and spinal cords were subsequently optically cleared using Clear Lipid-exchanged Acrylamide-hybridized Rigid Imaging-compatible Tissue-hYdrogel (CLARITY). Axons were followed 5 mm longitudinally in three dimensions in intact spinal cords revealing that 61% of the axons exhibited a mean of 22 axonal ovoids and 8% of the axons terminating in axonal end bulbs. In the cerebral cortex, we observed a decrease in the mean number of layer V pyramidal neurons and a decrease in the mean length of the apical dendrites of the remaining neurons, compared to healthy controls. MRI analysis demonstrated decreased cortical volumes in EAE. Cross-modality correlations revealed a direct relationship between cortical volume loss and axonal end bulb number in the spinal cord, but not ovoid number. This is the first report of the use of CLARITY in an animal model of disease and the first report of the use of both CLARITY and MRI. PMID:25038439

  13. Gray-scale photolithography using microfluidic photomasks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chihchen; Hirdes, Danny; Folch, Albert

    2003-01-01

    The ability to produce three-dimensional (3D) microstructures is of increasing importance in the miniaturization of mechanical or fluidic devices, optical elements, self-assembling components, and tissue-engineering scaffolds, among others. Traditional photolithography, the most widely used process for microdevice fabrication, is ill-suited for 3D fabrication, because it is based on the illumination of a photosensitive layer through a “photomask” (a transparent plate that contains opaque, unalterable solid-state features), which inevitably results in features of uniform height. We have devised photomasks in which the light-absorbing features are made of fluids. Unlike in conventional photomasks, the opacity of the photomask features can be tailored to an arbitrary number of gray-scale levels, and their spatial pattern can be reconfigured in the time scale of seconds. Here we demonstrate the inexpensive fabrication of photoresist patterns that contain features of multiple and/or smoothly varying heights. For a given microfluidic photomask, the developed photoresist pattern can be predicted as a function of the dye concentrations and photomask dimensions. For selected applications, microfluidic photomasks offer a low-cost alternative to present gray-scale photolithography approaches. PMID:12574512

  14. Ultrastructural studies of the gray platelet syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    White, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    The gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is a rare inherited disorder in which peripheral blood platelets are relatively large, vacuolated, and almost devoid of cytoplasmic granulation. In the present study we have evaluated the ultrastructure and cytochemistry of platelets from 2 patients with the GPS to determine precisely which organelles are missing from their cells. The findings indicate that gray platelets contain normal numbers of mitochondria, dense bodies, peroxisomes, and lysosomes but specifically lack alpha-granules. Preliminary studies of megakaryocytes from 1 of the 2 patients suggest that the defect in granule formation may lie at the level of the Golgi zone. Images Figure 15 Figure 16 Figures 17 and 18 Figures 19 and 20 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figures 5 and 6 Figures 7 and 8 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 Figure 31 Figure 32 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figures 13 and 14 Figures 21 and 22 Figures 23 through 26 Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:453324

  15. Molds on Food: Are They Dangerous?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... Molds on Food: Are they dangerous? Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

  16. Mechanical behaviors of molded pulp material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongwei; Wang, Huaiwen; Chen, Jinlong

    2008-11-01

    Many mechanical phenomena of interest for web-like materials, such as molded pulp, take place at the micro-scale. A SEM (scanning electron microscope) with SHIMADZU electrohydraulic servo experimental system was employed to study the micro-scale mechanical behavior of molded pulp materials. Uniaxial tension tests of molded pulp specimens were carried out, resulting in the stress-strain curves. Experimental results indicated that the material is not only elasticplastic, but also emplastic. The surface morphology evolution of the tensile specimen was visually monitored during the process of loading, and some SEM micrographs were captured under different load levels. Full-field deformations over an area of 190x170 μm2 were obtained using the digital image correlation method. The higher strains occurred at the fibre fines zone or around voids whereas the lower strains were obviously found at long fibres, demonstrating that the strain distribution is obviously uneven. The reason may be due to the random orientation and the fraction of the fibres, and the presence of impurities and voids as well.

  17. Characterization of airborne fungal levels after mold remediation.

    PubMed

    Kleinheinz, G T; Langolf, B M; Englebert, E

    2006-01-01

    The overall objective of this project was to evaluate levels of airborne fungi present after a mold remediation project and determine the effectiveness of this remediation using airborne mold levels to determine the success of these projects. Andersen N6 (viable) and Air-O-Cell (non-viable) sampling techniques were utilized. Both test methodologies demonstrated that levels of mold in the successfully remediated portions of buildings were significantly different (p<0.05) from the levels found in non-complaint and outdoor samples from the same building, respectively. Conversely, levels in unsuccessful remediation projects were not significantly different (p>0.05) to non-complaint and outdoor samples. Both techniques showed high variability in the overall mold levels found between sites; however, the ratios of specific mold groups in each area tested, within the same site, were remarkably similar. The use of either viable or non-viable mold sampling techniques after mold remediation is essential for determining the success of such projects. This project demonstrates the relationship between mold levels and the success of a mold remediation projects, and will assist in the interpretation of data collected at the conclusion of a mold remediation project.

  18. Heat pipe cooling of an aerospace foam mold manufacturing process

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, D.R.; Feldman, K.T.; Marjon, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    A passive heat pipe cooling system was developed to cool a Bendix foam mold used to manufacture aerospace foam parts. The cooling system consists of ten copper-water heat pipes with cooling fins implanted into the aluminum mold and cooled by a domestic size fan blowing ambient air. The number and location of the heat pipes was determined to provide the most effective cooling and mold isothermalization based on experimental measurements of mold temperatures during the exothermic foaming process and from practical considerations of the mold geometry and use. Performance tests were cnducted on an individual heat pipe and on the ten heat pipes implanted in the mold. Both exothermic foam heating and internal electrical heat input were used in the experiments. The experimental test results indicate that the heat pipe cooling system with a fan is four to six times faster than free convection cooling of the mold with no heat pipes or fan and nearly twice as fast as cooling by the fan only. Similarly fast increases in mold heating time in the cure furnace could be realized if the heat pipes are used during this part of the production process. The heat pipes also cool hot spots in the mold and help isothermalize the mold so that better quality foam parts should be produced.

  19. Effects of chitosan-based coatings containing peppermint essential oil on the quality of post-harvest papaya fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edible coatings comprised of antimicrobial polymers based on chitosan are promising technologies to preserve post-harvest fruit quality. In this study, we investigated the potential utility of a coating made from chitosan modified by N-acylation with fatty acid to preserve post-harvest papaya qualit...

  20. Postharvest internal browning of pineapple fruit originates at the phloem.

    PubMed

    Luengwilai, Kietsuda; Beckles, Diane M; Siriphanich, Jingtair

    2016-09-01

    A typical symptom of postharvest chilling injury (PCI) in pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) is internal browning (IB) near the fruit core. Since vascular bundles (VBs) are localized to this region, it was hypothesized that the VBs might be the site of IB. To test this, the anatomy and histochemistry of VBs during chilling stress in four pineapple cultivars with different levels of sensitivity to PCI were examined. Fruit were stored at 10°C for up to three weeks to stimulate translucency symptoms (TS; the initiation of IB). After three weeks of chilling exposure, the cultivars 'MD2' showed 0%, 'Pattavia' and 'Savee' showed 10-16%, and 'Trad Sri Thong' showed 100% TS and IB symptom. Scanning electron microscopy and in situ histochemical staining techniques that detect enzymes and substrates commonly associated with IB initiation were used in parallel. The TS of pineapple fruit coincided with the collapse of the phloem tissue. The VBs in the tissue where IB was initiated (i.e., the flesh adjacent to the core or F/C) had the highest activity of polyphenol oxidase, hydrogen peroxide, and phenolic compounds. The IB-resistant 'MD2' genotype had fewer VBs, but a greater proportion of sclerenchyma fibers (P<0.05) than did the susceptible 'Trad Sri Thong'. Based on these data, the first report of pineapple IB occurrence in the phloem was proposed.

  1. Melatonin attenuates postharvest physiological deterioration of cassava storage roots.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2016-05-01

    Melatonin reportedly increases abiotic and biotic stress tolerance in plants, but information on its in vivo effects during postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) in cassava is limited. In this study, we investigated the effect of melatonin in regulating cassava PPD. Treatment with 500 mg/L melatonin significantly delayed cassava PPD and reduced the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) while increasing the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione reductase (GR), but not ascorbate peroxidase (APX). Transcript analysis further showed that expression of copper/zinc SOD (MeCu/ZnSOD), MeCAT1, glutathione peroxidase (MeGPX), peroxidase 3 (MePX3), and glutathione S-transferases (MeGST) was higher in cassava roots sliced treated with 500 mg/L melatonin than in those not exposed to exogenous melatonin. These data demonstrate that melatonin delays cassava PPD by directly or indirectly maintaining homoeostasis of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that accumulation of endogenous melatonin and the transcript levels of melatonin biosynthesis genes changed dynamically during the PPD process. This finding suggested that endogenous melatonin acts as a signal modulator for maintaining cassava PPD progression and that manipulation of melatonin biosynthesis genes through genetic engineering might prevent cassava root deterioration.

  2. Biocontrol of postharvest Rhizopus decay of peaches with Pichia caribbica.

    PubMed

    Xu, Baitian; Zhang, Hongyin; Chen, Keping; Xu, Qin; Yao, Yao; Gao, Hui

    2013-08-01

    A new yeast antagonist, Pichia caribbica, isolated in our laboratory from the soil collected from unsprayed orchards, was evaluated for its biocontrol capability against Rhizopus stolonifer on peaches and the possible mechanisms involved. The decay incidence and lesion diameter of Rhizopus decay of peaches treated by P. caribbica were significantly reduced compared with the control fruits, and the higher the concentration of P. caribbica, the better the efficacy of the biocontrol. Rapid colonization of the yeast in peach wounds stored at 25 °C was observed. In peaches, the activities of peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) were significantly induced by P. caribbica treatment compared to those of the control fruits. All these results indicated that P. caribbica has a great potential for the development of commercial formulations to control postharvest Rhizopus decay of peaches. Its modes of action were based on competition for space and nutrients with pathogens, inducement of activities of defense-related enzymes such as POD, CAT, and PAL of peaches.

  3. Fungicide resistance phenotypes in Botrytis cinerea populations from blueberries in California and Washington

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is a major postharvest disease of blueberries grown in the Central Valley of California (CA) and western Washington State (WA). Understanding fungicide- resistant phenotypes of B. cinerea is important to the development of preharvest fungicide programs for contro...

  4. Preharvest fungicide, potassium sorbate, or chitosan use on quality and storage decay of table grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A program of four fungicides, potassium sorbate, or one of three chitosan formulations was applied to clusters of ‘Thompson Seedless’ grapes at berry set, pre-bunch closure, veraison, and 2 or 3 weeks before harvest. The natural incidence of postharvest gray mold after cold storage for 6 weeks was r...

  5. Application of low concentrations of ozone during the cold storage of table grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The control of postharvest decay of table grapes, caused by Botrytis cinerea and other pathogens, by ozone was evaluated in chambers and commercial storage facilities. Ozone at 0.100 µL/L or higher inhibited the spread of gray mold among stored grapes. Ozone diffusion into many types of commercial p...

  6. Evacuated, displacement compression mold. [of tubular bodies from thermosetting plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process of molding long thin-wall tubular bodies from thermosetting plastic molding compounds is described wherein the tubular body lengths may be several times the diameters. The process is accomplished by loading a predetermined quantity of molding compound into a female mold cavity closed at one end by a force mandrel. After closing the other end of the female mold with a balance mandrel, the loaded cavity is evacuated by applying a vacuum of from one-to-five mm pressure for a period of fifteen-to-thirty minutes. The mold temperature is raised to the minimum temperature at which the resin constituent of the compound will soften or plasticize and a pressure of 2500 psi is applied.

  7. Gray Areas of Assessment Systems. Synthesis Report 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Patricia; Quenemoen, Rachel; Olsen, Kenneth; Thurlow, Martha

    This paper discusses students with disabilities who do not fit into large-scale traditional assessment systems, seeks to clarify what is meant by "gray areas of assessment," delineates the primary issues that surround and contribute to gray areas, and provides suggestions for developing fully inclusive systems. It provides brief case studies of…

  8. Replication of the nano-scale mold fabricated with focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J. X.; Chan-Park, M. B.; Xie, D. Z.; Ngoi, Bryan K. A.

    2004-12-01

    Silicon mold fabricated with Focused Ion Beam lithography (FIB) was used to make silicone elastomer molds. The silicon mold is composed of lattice of holes which the diameter and depth are about 200 nm and 60 nm, respectively. The silicone elastomer material was then used to replicate slavery mold. Our study show the replication process with the elastomer mold had been performed successfully and the diameter of humps on the elastomer mold is near to that of holes on the master mold. But the height of humps in the elastomer mold is only 42 nm and it is different from the depth of holes in the master mold.

  9. Effect of chitosan and its derivatives as antifungal and preservative agents on postharvest green asparagus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Miao; Wu, Chu; Ren, Gerui; Liang, Xinle; Wang, Xiangyang; Huang, Jianying

    2014-07-15

    The antifungal activity and effect of high-molecular weight chitosan (H-chitosan), low-molecular weight chitosan (L-chitosan) and carboxymethyl chitosan (C-chitosan) coatings on postharvest green asparagus were evaluated. L-chitosan and H-chitosan efficiently inhibited the radial growth of Fusarium concentricum separated from postharvest green asparagus at 4 mg/ml, which appeared to be more effective in inhibiting spore germination and germ tube elongation than that of C-chitosan. Notably, spore germination was totally inhibited by L-chitosan and H-chitosan at 0.05 mg/ml. Coated asparagus did not show any apparent sign of phytotoxicity and maintained good quality over 28 days of cold storage, according to the weight loss and general quality aspects. Present results inferred that chitosan could act as an attractive preservative agent for postharvest green asparagus owing to its antifungal activity and its ability to stimulate some defense responses during storage.

  10. Advanced Polymer Composite Molding Through Intelligent Process Analysis and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) and Seemann Composite Resin Infusion Molding Process (SCRIMPT M). All variations of RTM are suitable for the...numerical simulations have been used to design the vent and gate locations for molds used for RTM , VARTM and SCRIMPTM [2,3,7-14]. Regardless of the research...200 Words) To prevent dry spot formation in RTM , a control interface and four different adaptive control algorithms were developed and tested with

  11. Three-dimensional pattern transfer and nanolithography: modified soft molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Park, Joonhyung; Lee, Hong H.

    2002-08-01

    One-step transfer of molded three-dimensional polymer structures into underlying substrate is reported. The one-step transfer is made possible by a molding technique presented here in the form of modified soft molding. Formation of a desired three-dimensional structure in a polymer film by this method, followed by one-step reactive ion etching, is utilized for the transfer. The technique is also shown to be effective in transferring sub-100-nm features.

  12. Preliminary concepts for high-temperature mold heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J.P.

    1990-12-01

    The feasibility and limitations of various methods for mold heating and cooling were investigated. Two methods were chosen for evaluation: electrical heating and water cooling, and electrical heating and heat pipe conduction cooling. A model mold of each method was built. Test results indicated that the electrical heating and circulated water cooling was the better method. An injection mold utilizing this method was fabricated and temperature-cycled between 300 and 770{degree}F. 1 ref., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Understanding the impact of molds on indoor air quality and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Molds are multi-celled, colony forming, eukaryotic microorganisms lacking chlorophyll belonging to the Kingdom Fungi. Furthermore, molds are ubiquitous in both indoor and outdoor environments. There are more than 200 different types of fungi to which people are routinely exposed (NAS. 2000). The growth of molds in homes, schools, offices, and other public buildings has been implicated as the cause of a wide variety of adverse health effects. Headlines resulting from moldy, water-damaged homes, particularly

  14. Design and development of injection molded Fresnel lenses for point-focus photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grendol, C.L.

    1987-05-01

    A summary of work performed on a method of injection molding an 80% efficient point-focus Fresnel lens is presented. A current optical design for compression molded lenses yields a 68.5% efficiency when translated directly to injection molding. An optical design optimized for injection molding, with a mold and process developed for high efficiency Fresnel lenses, yields an 82% efficiency.

  15. A hybrid optimization approach in non-isothermal glass molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Anh-Tuan; Kreilkamp, Holger; Krishnamoorthi, Bharathwaj Janaki; Dambon, Olaf; Klocke, Fritz

    2016-10-01

    Intensively growing demands on complex yet low-cost precision glass optics from the today's photonic market motivate the development of an efficient and economically viable manufacturing technology for complex shaped optics. Against the state-of-the-art replication-based methods, Non-isothermal Glass Molding turns out to be a promising innovative technology for cost-efficient manufacturing because of increased mold lifetime, less energy consumption and high throughput from a fast process chain. However, the selection of parameters for the molding process usually requires a huge effort to satisfy precious requirements of the molded optics and to avoid negative effects on the expensive tool molds. Therefore, to reduce experimental work at the beginning, a coupling CFD/FEM numerical modeling was developed to study the molding process. This research focuses on the development of a hybrid optimization approach in Non-isothermal glass molding. To this end, an optimal configuration with two optimization stages for multiple quality characteristics of the glass optics is addressed. The hybrid Back-Propagation Neural Network (BPNN)-Genetic Algorithm (GA) is first carried out to realize the optimal process parameters and the stability of the process. The second stage continues with the optimization of glass preform using those optimal parameters to guarantee the accuracy of the molded optics. Experiments are performed to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of the model for the process development in Non-isothermal glass molding.

  16. Addressing environmental health Implications of mold exposure after major flooding.

    PubMed

    Metts, Tricia A

    2008-03-01

    Extensive water damage resulting from major flooding is often associated with mold growth if materials are not quickly and thoroughly dried. Exposure to fungal contamination can lead to several infectious and noninfectious health effects impacting the respiratory system, skin, and eyes. Adverse health effects can be categorized as infections, allergic or hypersensitivity reactions, or toxic-irritant reactions. Workers and building occupants can minimize their exposure to mold by avoiding areas with excessive mold growth, using personal protective equipment, and implementing environmental controls. Occupational health professionals should encourage workers to seek health care if they experience any symptoms that may be linked to mold exposure.

  17. Effect of Electromagnetic Brake on Decreasing Unbalanced Flow in Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Yuji; Furumai, Kohei

    2015-06-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of suppression of unbalanced flow in the mold under high throughput conditions in continuous casting, the effect of using an electromagnetic brake on decreasing molten steel momentum and suppressing unbalanced flow in the mold was investigated. (1) The measured value of the effect of the electromagnetic brake on decreasing molten steel momentum was consistent with the calculated value. Molten steel momentum could be reduced by more than 50% when the Stuart number was more than 3. 5. (2) Increased mold level fluctuations caused by unbalanced flow in the mold are suppressed by applying the optimum magnetic flux density with an electromagnetic brake, even under high throughput conditions.

  18. Study on Nonisothermal Glass Molding Press for Aspherical Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianfeng; Yan, Jiwang; Yoshihara, Nobuhito; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto

    Nonisothermal glass molding press (NGMP) was proposed to fabricate aspherical lenses, and its characteristics were studied by both experiments and finite element method (FEM) simulations in comparison with the traditional isothermal glass molding press (IGMP). The cycle time, form accuracy, surface roughness, stress/strain distributions of the aspherical lenses made by IGMP and NGMP were examined and compared. Experimental results and simulation results show that NGMP is an effective way to improve the molding efficiency and prolong the service life of the molding dies.

  19. The First Report of Postharvest Stem Rot of Kohlrabi Caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Young; Aktaruzzaman, Md; Afroz, Tania; Hahm, Young-Il; Kim, Byung-Sup

    2014-12-01

    In March 2014, a kohlrabi stem rot sample was collected from the cold storage room of Daegwallyong Horticultural Cooperative, Korea. White and fuzzy mycelial growth was observed on the stem, symptomatic of stem rot disease. The pathogen was isolated from the infected stem and cultured on potato dextrose agar for further fungal morphological observation and to confirm its pathogenicity, according to Koch's postulates. Morphological data, pathogenicity test results, and rDNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS 1 and 4) showed that the postharvest stem rot of kohlrabi was caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This is the first report of postharvest stem rot of kohlrabi in Korea.

  20. Absorbable plate strength loss during molding.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Tiffany N S; Kelly, Kevin J; Zaydfudim, Victor; Walcutt, Noah L; Lahijani, Soheil S; Shack, R Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P

    2010-05-01

    Bioabsorbable plating systems play an integral role in cranial vault remodeling. After experiencing a case of plate failure requiring emergent reexploration, we investigated the potential causes. We hypothesize that extended submersion in the molding bath during plate preparation might advance the rate of hydrolysis and compromise plate structural integrity. Using an absorbable poly-D/L-lactic acid plating system, we assessed the effect of extended submersion on plate strength and stiffness when loaded in a cantilever fashion and with pure tension. We assessed these differences with the Student t test and linear regression modeling. We also generated a computer model of the plates for finite element analysis. When left in the molding bath for extended periods, the plates changed color and lost strength. After 5 minutes, 30% of maximum plate load capacity was lost in a cantilever beam test (P < 0.001) consistent with use of a 15% thinner plate. Tensile testing revealed the initial elastic modulus of 6.42 +/- 0.13 GPa decreased 16% to 5.41 +/- 0.50 GPa after 5 minutes of submersion (P = 0.027). The changes in plate strength and elastic modulus both worsened with increased submersion times. Finite element analysis of the plates also predicted clinically significant increases in plate deviation under normal loading conditions. Our study demonstrates that extended submersion of absorbable plates during molding results in a significant loss of plate strength and stiffness. Further, our computer model predicts that these changes could result in an unacceptable plate deviation under normal loading conditions. Together, these data caution against overmolding of plates to avoid compromising their structural integrity.

  1. Precision grinding of tungsten carbide mold insert for molding of sub-millimeter glass aspheric lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Choung-Lii; Chang, Chia-Jung; Chen, Chun-Chieh; Chou, Wen-Chen; Ma, Kung-Jeng

    2013-06-01

    As the demand for precision optical components with sub-millimeter feature size steadily increasing, numerous efforts have been made in developing new techniques and in improving the existing approaches to efficiently and economically produce those components. Glass molding process (GMP) is one of these methods to enable mass production of precision glass optical components in recent years. One of the key issues in GMP is precision mold insert fabrication. Since the mould are normally made of hard and brittle materials such as tungsten carbide (WC) and silicon carbide (SiC), precision diamond grinding is by far the principal choice used to machine the GMP mould. As the feature size of optical component gets smaller, the size of mould and grinding wheel used to fabricate the mould gets smaller too. This makes the grinding process a very time consuming and expensive task. This research aimed to improve the small mold fabrication processes by developing an effective way of producing small diamond wheels and in-process monitoring wheel profile. Diamond wheels of around 0.2mm to 0.5mm in diameter after truing and WC aspheric mold insert of form accuracy around 0.47μm were successfully produced in this research.

  2. Injection-molded capsular device for oral pulsatile release: development of a novel mold.

    PubMed

    Zema, Lucia; Loreti, Giulia; Macchi, Elena; Foppoli, Anastasia; Maroni, Alessandra; Gazzaniga, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    The development of a purposely devised mold and a newly set up injection molding (IM) manufacturing process was undertaken to prepare swellable/erodible hydroxypropyl cellulose-based capsular containers. When orally administered, such devices would be intended to achieve pulsatile and/or colonic time-dependent delivery of drugs. An in-depth evaluation of thermal, rheological, and mechanical characteristics of melt formulations/molded items made of the selected polymer (Klucel® LF) with increasing amounts of plasticizer (polyethylene glycol 1500, 5%-15% by weight) was preliminarily carried out. On the basis of the results obtained, a new mold was designed that allowed, through an automatic manufacturing cycle of 5 s duration, matching cap and body items to be prepared. These were subsequently filled and coupled to give a closed device of constant 600 μm thickness. As compared with previous IM systems having the same composition, such capsules showed improved closure mechanism, technological properties, especially in terms of reproducibility of the shell thickness, and release performance. Moreover, the ability of the capsular container to impart a constant lag phase before the liberation of the contents was demonstrated irrespective of the conveyed formulation.

  3. Investigations on injection molded, glass-fiber reinforced polyamide 6 integral foams using breathing mold technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roch, A.; Kehret, L.; Huber, T.; Henning, F.; Elsner, P.

    2015-05-01

    Investigations on PA6-GF50 integral foams have been carried out using different material systems: longfiber- and shortfiber-reinforced PA6 as well as unreinforced PA6 as a reference material. Both chemical and physical blowing agents were applied. Breathing mold technology (decompression of the mold) was selected for the foaming process. The integral foam design, which can be conceived as a sandwich structure, helps to save material in the neutral axis area and maintains a distance between load-bearing, unfoamed skin layers. For all test series an initial mold gap of 2.5 mm was chosen and the same amount of material was injected. In order to realize different density reductions, the mold opening stroke was varied. The experiments showed that, at a constant mass per unit area, integral polyamide 6 foams have a significantly higher bending stiffness than compact components, due to their higher area moment of inertia after foaming. At a constant surface weight the bending stiffness in these experiments could be increased by up to 600 %. Both shortfiber- and longfiber-reinforced polyamide 6 showed an increase in energy absorption during foaming.

  4. Dip-molded t-shaped cannula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyles, H. F.; Cuddihy, E. F.; Moacanin, J.

    1978-01-01

    Cannula, fabricated out of polyetherurethane, has been designed for long-term service. Improved cannula is T-shaped to collect blood from both directions, thus replacing two conventional cannulas that are usually required and eliminating need for large surgical wound. It is fabricated by using dip-molding process that can be adapted to other elastomeric objects having complex shapes. Dimensions of cannula were chosen to optimize its blood-flow properties and to reduce danger of excessive clotting, making it suitable for continuous service up to 21 days in vein or artery of patient.

  5. Ordered framboids in dwarfed biotic molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dahhar, M. A.

    Abundant framboids of an ordered nature are encountered in some dwarfed biotic molds which were collected from an integral part of the Eocene sedimentary succession exposed at Garret Gehannan area, Fayoum Province, Egypt. These framboids are either clustered in polyframboids or occur as discrete individuals. Pyrite and/or limonite microaggregates constitute the internal makeup of both types. Morphology and other characteristics of the framboids and a genetic appraisal is further discussed. The invoked mechanism strongly suggests the necessity of a precursor in developing the framboid texture.

  6. Resin transfer molding of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Dursch, Harry; Nelson, Karl; Avery, William

    1993-01-01

    The design and manufacture of textile composite panels, tubes, and angle sections that were provided to NASA for testing and evaluation are documented. The textile preform designs and requirements were established by NASA in collaboration with Boeing and several vendors of textile reinforcements. The following four types of preform architectures were used: stitched uniweave, 2D-braids, 3D-braids, and interlock weaves. The preforms consisted primarily of Hercules AS4 carbon fiber; Shell RSL-1895 resin was introduced using a resin transfer molding process. All the finished parts were inspected using ultrasonics.

  7. Enhancement of Biocontrol Efficacy of Pichia carribbica to Postharvest Diseases of Strawberries by Addition of Trehalose to the Growth Medium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Zhang, Hongyin; Li, Jun; Cui, Jinghua; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    The effects of trehalose on the antagonistic activity of Pichia caribbica against Rhizopus decay and gray mold decay of strawberries and the possible mechanisms involved were investigated. The proteomic analysis and comparison of P. carribbica in response to trehalose was analyzed based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The antagonistic activity of P. carribbica harvested from the culture media of NYDB amended with trehalose at 0.5% was improved greatly compared with that without trehalose. The PPO (Polyphenoloxidase) and POD (Peroxidase) activity of strawberries treated with P. carribbica cultured in the NYDB media amended with trehalose at 0.5% was higher than that of the strawberries treated with P. carribbica harvested from NYDB. The β-1, 3-glucanase activity of strawberries treated with P. carribbica cultured in the NYDB media amended with trehalose at 0.5% was also higher than that of the strawberries treated with P. carribbica harvested from NYDB and the control. Several differentially expressed proteins of P. carribbica in response to trehalose were identified in the cellular proteome, most of them were related to basic metabolism. PMID:22489189

  8. Thermal stress analysis in permanent mold processing determining mold life and utilizing a combined thermomechanical finite element model

    SciTech Connect

    Fackeldey, M.; Guan, J.; Helling, V.; Sahm, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    Permanent mold casting offers various advantages, but its process control requires high technical skill, especially when cast iron is utilized. Thermal stresses resulting from non-uniform cooling and hindering of shrinkage frequently cause cracks, which can lead to a destruction of the permanent mold. In this paper an in-house 3-dimensional finite element model is presented, which allows an easy and comfortable analysis of the origin of thermal and residual stresses. By varying single parameters, i.e. the initial temperature as well as the mold geometry, the process may be evaluated. This leads to an optimization of the process and allows an assessment of the mold life.

  9. Characteristics of medium carbon steel solidification and mold flux crystallization using the multi-mold simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Yong; Ko, Eun-yi; Choi, Joo; Sohn, Il

    2014-11-01

    An oscillating multi-mold simulator with embedded thermocouples was used to study the initial solidification of medium carbon steels and crystallization characteristics of the mold flux. Casting speed variations in the simulator from 0.7 m/min to 1.4 m/min at fixed oscillation frequency and stroke resulted in higher copper mold temperatures. Frequency modifications from 2.5 Hz to 5.0 Hz and stroke changes from 8.1 mm to 5.4 mm at fixed casting speeds also resulted in higher copper mold temperatures. Surface profile analysis of as-cast steel strips showed characteristic oscillation marks comparable to the narrow faces of the industrial cast slabs. The apparent effect of casting variables on the temperature and surface profiles during the solidification of the medium carbon steels could be correlated to the variations in the negative strip time and subsequent changes in the extent of mold flux infiltration. Back scattered scanning electron microscope analysis of the full length of the retrieved flux film after casting showed cuspidine crystallization ratio that increased from the upper to lower portion of the flux film. This dynamic crystallization and growth of the cuspidine phase increases as the flux is sustained at high temperatures for longer periods. Additional experiments with industrial fluxes designed for soft cooling of medium carbon steel grades showed comparable infiltration thickness of the flux, but the crystallization characteristics were significantly different, which could have a significant impact on the heat transfer rate and mechanism through the flux film.

  10. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  11. Thiabendazole resistance and mutations in the beta-tubulin gene of Penicillium expansum strains isolated from apples and pears with blue mold decay.

    PubMed

    Cabañas, Romualdo; Castellá, Gemma; Abarca, M Lourdes; Bragulat, M Rosa; Cabañes, F Javier

    2009-08-01

    Penicillium expansum is the causal agent of blue mold rot, a postharvest decay of stored fruits. This fungus also produces the mycotoxins patulin and citrinin. Control of P. expansum still relies mainly on the use of fungicides such as thiabendazole. Since its introduction, resistant strains have been reported. The aim of this work was to investigate the thiabendazole resistance and mutations in the beta-tubulin gene of P. expansum strains isolated from apples and pears with blue mold decay from Spain. A total of 71 strains of P. expansum were scored for resistance to thiabendazole and the beta-tubulin gene was sequenced. Out of 71 strains, 37 were sensitive and 34 were resistant to thiabendazole. Regarding the beta-tubulin gene sequence, 10 different genetic types were determined, with a 99.7-100% similarity. When the amino acid sequence was deduced, five different amino acid sequences were found. All except one of the sensitive strains lacked mutations in the region sequenced. Of the 34 resistant strains, only eight had mutations that involved the residues 198 and 240. All the strains with mutations at position 198 always corresponded to resistant isolates. However, a high percentage of resistant strains had no mutations in the region of the beta-tubulin gene sequenced, and so other mechanisms may be involved in thiabendazole resistance.

  12. Estuarine studies in upper Grays Harbor, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beverage, Joseph P.; Swecker, Milton N.

    1969-01-01

    Improved management of the water resources of Grays Harbor, Wash., requires more data on the water quality of the harbor and a better understanding of the influences of industrial and domestic wastes on the local fisheries resources. To provide a more comprehensive understanding of these influences, the U.S. Geological Survey joined other agencies in a cooperative study of Grays Harbor. This report summarizes the Survey's study of circulation patterns, description of water-quality conditions, and characterization of bottom material in the upper harbor. Salt water was found to intrude at least as far as Montesano, 28.4 nautical miles from the mouth of the harbor. Longitudinal salinity distributions were used to compute dispersion (diffusivity) coefficients ranging from 842 to 3,520 square feet per second. These values were corroborated by half-tidal-cycle dye studies. The waters of the harbor were found to be well mixed after extended periods of low fresh-water flow but stratified at high flows. Salinity data were used lo define the cumulative 'mean age' of the harbor water, which may be used to approximate a mean 'flushing time.' Velocity-time curves for the upper harbor are distorted from simple harmonic functions owing to channel geometry and frictional effects. Surface and bottom velocity data were used to estimate net tidal 'separation' distance, neglecting vertical mixing. Net separation distances between top and bottom water ranged from 1.65 nautical miles when fresh-water inflow was 610 cubic feet per second to 13.4 miles when inflow was 15,900 cubic feet per second. The cumulative mean age from integration of the fresh-water velocity equation was about twice that obtained from the salinity distribution. Excursion distances obtained with dye over half-tidal cycles exceeded those estimated from longitudinal salinity distributions and those obtained by earlier investigators who used floats. Net tidal excursions were as much as twice those obtained with floats

  13. Effect of antioxidants of aflatoxigenic molds

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    Growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus were measured in synthetic media and chicken feed treated with butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), ethoxyquin (EXQ), propyl gallate (PG) or t-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) at 50-250 ..mu..g/g and 50-1000 ..mu..g/g, respectively. BHA at 50 ..mu..g/g in broth or agar inhibited growth and alfatoxin production by both molds. In poultry feeds, 1000 ..mu..g/g BHA was required to depress CO/sub 2/ production at day 5 of incubation, while 200 ..mu..g/g decreased aflatoxin B/sub 1/ 23.8%. BHT, EXQ, and PG had slight effects on mold growth while TBHQ enhanced growth on broth but reduced it on agar. Afaltoxin B/sub 1/ production was stimulated by EXQ, although G/sub 1/ production declines. Measurement of cellular constituents released from mycelia over 5 hours indicated that BHA doubled the release of UV-absorbing materials and increase by threefold the release of previously incorporated radiolabeled compounds. Furthermore, BHA inhibited the uptake of /sup 14/C-amino acids 8 and 44%, /sup 3/H-uridine 65 and 91%, and /sup 3/H-methyl thymidine 67 and 71%, for A. flavus and A. parasiticus, respectively, compared to untreated controls.

  14. Method for collecting spores from a mold

    DOEpatents

    Au, Frederick H. F.; Beckert, Werner F.

    1977-01-01

    A technique and apparatus used therewith for determining the uptake of plutonium and other contaminants by soil microorganisms which, in turn, gives a measure of the plutonium and/or other contaminants available to the biosphere at that particular time. A measured quantity of uncontaminated spores of a selected mold is added to a moistened sample of the soil to be tested. The mixture is allowed to sit a predetermined number of days under specified temperature conditions. An agar layer is then applied to the top of the sample. After three or more days, when spores of the mold growing in the sample have formed, the spores are collected by a miniature vacuum collection apparatus operated under preselected vacuum conditions, which collect only the spores with essentially no contamination by mycelial fragments or culture medium. After collection, the fungal spores are dried and analyzed for the plutonium and/or other contaminants. The apparatus is also suitable for collection of pollen, small insects, dust and other small particles, material from thin-layer chromatography plates, etc.

  15. The cellular slime mold: eukaryotic model microorganism.

    PubMed

    Urushihara, Hideko

    2009-04-01

    Cellular slime molds are eukaryotic microorganisms in the soil. They feed on bacteria as solitary amoebae but conditionally construct multicellular forms in which cell differentiation takes place. Therefore, they are attractive for the study of fundamental biological phenomena such as phagocytosis, cell division, chemotactic movements, intercellular communication, cell differentiation, and morphogenesis. The most widely used species, Dictyostelium discoideum, is highly amenable to experimental manipulation and can be used with most recent molecular biological techniques. Its genome and cDNA analyses have been completed and well-annotated data are publicly available. A larger number of orthologues of human disease-related genes were found in D. discoideum than in yeast. Moreover, some pathogenic bacteria infect Dictyostelium amoebae. Thus, this microorganism can also offer a good experimental system for biomedical research. The resources of cellular slime molds, standard strains, mutants, and genes are maintained and distributed upon request by the core center of the National BioResource Project (NBRP-nenkin) to support Dictyostelium community users as well as new users interested in new platforms for research and/or phylogenic consideration.

  16. Rotational molding of bio-polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Antonio; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Forleo, Stefania

    2014-05-01

    This paper is aimed to study the suitability of bio-polymers, including poly-lactic acid (PLLA) and Mater-Bi, for the production of hollow components by rotational molding. In order to reduce the brittleness of PLLA, the material was mixed with two different plasticizers, bis-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate (DEHP) and poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG). The materials were characterized in terms of sinterability. To this purpose, thermomechanical (TMA) analysis was performed at different heating rates, in order to identify the endset temperatures of densification and the onset temperatures of degradation. Results obtained indicated that the materials are characterized by a very fast sintering process, occurring just above the melting temperature, and an adequately high onset of degradation. The difference between the onset of degradation and the endset of sintering, defined as the processing window of the polymer, is sufficiently wide, indicating that the polymers can be efficiently processed by rotational molding. Therefore, a laboratory scale apparatus was used for the production of PLLA and Mater-Bi prototypes. The materials were processed using very similar conditions to those used for LLDPE. The production of void-free samples of uniform wall thickness was considered as an indication of the potentiality of the process for the production of biodegradable containers.

  17. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  18. Black and gray Helmholtz-Kerr soliton refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Curto, Julio; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; McDonald, Graham S.

    2011-01-15

    Refraction of black and gray solitons at boundaries separating different defocusing Kerr media is analyzed within a Helmholtz framework. A universal nonlinear Snell's law is derived that describes gray soliton refraction, in addition to capturing the behavior of bright and black Kerr solitons at interfaces. Key regimes, defined by beam and interface characteristics, are identified, and predictions are verified by full numerical simulations. The existence of a unique total nonrefraction angle for gray solitons is reported; both internal and external refraction at a single interface is shown possible (dependent only on incidence angle). This, in turn, leads to the proposal of positive or negative lensing operations on soliton arrays at planar boundaries.

  19. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of a gray matter heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Marsh, L; Lim, K O; Sullivan, E V; Lane, B; Spielman, D

    1996-12-01

    We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to examine resonances representing metabolites containing N-acetyl (NA) groups (predominantly N-acetyl aspartate), choline, and creatine within a large left-hemispheric gray matter heterotopia (GMH) in a 35-year-old man with corpus callosum agenesis. In contrast to normal brain tissue, including gray matter regions, heterotopic gray matter was characterized by relatively increased choline and creatine resonances and a normal NA signal. These data suggest increased cellular activity or persistent immature neuronal tissue in GMH relative to unaffected tissue.

  20. ASTHMATIC HUMAN SERUM IGE-REACTIVITY WITH MOLD EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although molds have demonstrated the ability to induce allergic asthma-like responses in mouse models, their role in human disease is unclear. This study was undertaken to provide insight into the prevalence of human IgE-reactivity and identify the target mold protein(s). The st...

  1. ISOSTATIC COMPACTION OF METAL POWDERS IN CONVENTIONAL MOLDING TOOLS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    plastisols . The plastisol formulation (by weight) which appeared to be most suited for pliable molds consisted of 100 parts vinyl chloride resin, 60 parts...plasticizer, and 3 part epoxy resin. Curing the plastisol mix at a temperature of 350 = 10F for 30 = 2 minutes/inch of mold thickness proved to be

  2. Optimization of Mold Yield in MultiCavity Sand Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Vasudev D.; Joshi, Durgesh; Ravi, B.; Narasimhan, K.

    2013-06-01

    The productivity of ductile iron foundries engaging in mass production of castings for the automobile and other engineering sectors depends on the number of cavities per mold. A denser packing of cavities, however, results in slower heat transfer from adjacent cavities, leading to delayed solidification, possible shrinkage defects, and lower mechanical properties. In this article, we propose a methodology to optimize mold yield by selecting the correct combination of the mold box size and the number of cavities based on solidification time and mold temperature. Simulation studies were carried out by modeling solid and hollow cube castings with different values of cavity-wall gap and finding the minimum value of the gap beyond which there is no change in casting solidification time. Then double-cavity molds were modeled with different values of cavity-cavity gap, and simulated to find the minimum value of gap. The simulation results were verified by melting and pouring ductile iron in green sand molds instrumented with thermocouples, and recording the temperature in mold at predetermined locations. The proposed approach can be employed to generate a technological database of minimum gaps for various combinations of part geometry, metal and process, which will be very useful to optimize the mold cavity layouts.

  3. Crack-resistant siloxane molding compounds. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, J.W.; Swearngin, C.B.

    1980-11-03

    The crack resistance of phenyl silicone molding resins containing siliceous fillers is improved by incorporating therein about 0.5 to 5.5% by weight of ..beta..-eucryptite, a lithium aluminum silicate having a negative thermal expansion coefficient. These molding resins are particularly suitable for encapsulating electronic devices such as diodes, coils, resistors, and the like.

  4. New methods and materials for molding and casting ice formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Richter, G. Paul

    1987-01-01

    This study was designed to find improved materials and techniques for molding and casting natural or simulated ice shapes that could replace the wax and plaster method. By utilizing modern molding and casting materials and techniques, a new methodology was developed that provides excellent reproduction, low-temperature capability, and reasonable turnaround time. The resulting casts are accurate and tough.

  5. View of foundrymen casting ingot molds; The flames from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of foundrymen casting ingot molds; The flames from the mold in the center-right of the photo are present immediately after the pour has been completed - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Iron Foundry, Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  6. Occurrence of household mold and efficacy of sodium hypochlorite disinfectant.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Kelly A; Boone, Stephanie; Bright, Kelly R; Gerba, Charles P

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of mold on household surfaces and the efficacy of bleach-based (sodium hypochlorite, NaOCl) disinfectants on mold viability and allergenicity was documented. Household microenvironments prone to increased moisture were specifically targeted. Using the sticky tape method, 1330 samples were collected from non-porous indoor surfaces of 160 homes across the United States, and analyzed for mold. Homes were randomly selected and recruited via phone interviews. Culture and immunoassays were used to measure the viability and reduction of allergenic properties of Aspergillus fumigatus following 2.4% NaOCl treatment. All homes and 72.9% of surfaces tested positive for mold. Windowsills were the most frequently contaminated site (87.5%) and Cladosporium the most commonly identified mold (31.0%). Five-minute exposures to 2.4% NaOCl resulted in a >3 to >6-log₁₀ reduction of culturable mold counts in controlled laboratory studies. Organisms were nonculturable after 5- and 10-min contact times on non-porous and porous ceramic carriers, respectively, and A. fumigatus spore-eluted allergen levels were reduced by an average 95.8% in 30 sec, as indicated by immunoassay. All homes are contaminated with some level of mold, and regrowth is likely in moisture-prone microenvironments. The use of low concentrations (2.4%) of NaOCl for the reduction of culturable indoor mold and related allergens is effective and recommended.

  7. 42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. THE MOLD, WHICH HAS A RAISED DESIGN, LEAVES AND OUTLINE IN THE SLAB, THE PIECES THUS DEFINED, ARE THEN CUT APART TO BE FIRED SEPARATELY AND REASSEMBLED. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  8. 30. SECOND FLOOR, NORTHEAST ROOM, SOUTH WALL. Bolection mold fireplace ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. SECOND FLOOR, NORTHEAST ROOM, SOUTH WALL. Bolection mold fireplace surround probably original with house and only remaining one thus. Note bolection panel molds on raised-panel door, also probably original with house. - Mulberry, Cooper River, West Branch, Moncks Corner, Berkeley County, SC

  9. 25. CORES, WHICH FORM THE INTERIOR SURFACES OF MOLDS BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. CORES, WHICH FORM THE INTERIOR SURFACES OF MOLDS BY PROVIDING A SOLID STRUCTURE FOR MOLTEN IRON TO FLOW AROUND ARE CAREFULLY PLACED INTO THE CAVITIES OF MOLDS IN THE BRASS FOUNDRY, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Looking east inside of the ingot mold stripper building for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east inside of the ingot mold stripper building for the 44" slab mill at a row of ingots. A row of ingot molds are pictured east on the left. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, 44" Slab Mill, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  11. Grinding aspheric and freeform micro-optical molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohme, Yazid E.

    2007-02-01

    Fueled by the need for better performing optics, glass optics are now replacing plastic optics in many industrial and consumer electronic devices. One of these devices is the mobile phone camera. The optical sub-assembly in a mobile phone includes several micro lenses that are spherical and/or aspherical in shape and require form tolerances in the submicron range. These micro glass lenses are mass produced by a replication process known as glass press molding. The process entails the compression of a glass gob between two precise optical quality molds at an elevated temperature, usually near the transition temperature of the glass material. The elevated forces and temperatures required in the glass molding process limits the materials of the molds to very tough materials such as tungsten carbide or silicon carbide. These materials can withstand large pressing forces at high temperatures without any significant deformation. These materials offer great mechanical properties for glass press molding but they are also a challenge to machine to submicron accuracy. The work in this paper discusses a deterministic micro grinding manufacturing process referred to as wheel normal grinding, which is utilized to produce these optical quality molds. Wheel normal grinding is more accurate and more deterministic than most other grinding techniques and can produce molds to the form and finish tolerances required for optical molding. This method relies on the ability to recognize and compensate for grinding wheel wear and machine repeatable errors. Results will be presented to illustrate the accuracy of this micro grinding technique.

  12. A programmable nanoreplica molding for the fabrication of nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Longju; Zhang, Jingxiang; Badshah, Mohsin Ali; Dong, Liang; Li, Jingjing; Kim, Seok-Min; Lu, Meng

    2016-03-01

    The ability to fabricate periodic structures with sub-wavelength features has a great potential for impact on integrated optics, optical sensors, and photovoltaic devices. Here, we report a programmable nanoreplica molding process to fabricate a variety of sub-micrometer periodic patterns using a single mold. The process utilizes a stretchable mold to produce the desired periodic structure in a photopolymer on glass or plastic substrates. During the replica molding process, a uniaxial force is applied to the mold and results in changes of the periodic structure, which resides on the surface of the mold. Direction and magnitude of the force determine the array geometry, including the lattice constant and arrangement. By stretching the mold, 2D arrays with square, rectangular, and triangular lattice structures can be fabricated. As one example, we present a plasmonic crystal device with surface plasmon resonances determined by the force applied during molding. In addition, photonic crystal slabs with different array patterns are fabricated and characterized. This unique process offers the capability of generating various periodic nanostructures rapidly and inexpensively.

  13. 47 CFR 76.805 - Access to molding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to molding. 76.805 Section 76.805 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.805 Access to molding. (a) An MVPD shall be...

  14. Injection molded polymer optics in the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beich, William S.

    2005-08-01

    Precision polymer optics, manufactured by injection molding techniques, has been a key enabling technology for several decades now. The technology, which can be thought of as a subset of the wider field of precision optics manufacturing, was pioneered in the United States by companies such as Eastman Kodak, US Precision Lens, and Polaroid. In addition to suppliers in the U.S. there are several companies worldwide that design and manufacture precision polymer optics, for example Philips High Tech Plastics in Europe and Fujinon in Japan. Designers who are considering using polymer optics need a fundamental understanding of exactly how the optics are created. This paper will survey the technology and processes that are employed in the successful implementation of a polymer optic solution from a manufacturer's perspective. Special emphasis will be paid to the unique relationship between the molds and the optics that they produce. We will discuss the key elements of production: molding resins, molds and molding equipment, and metrology. Finally we will offer a case study to illustrate just how the optics designer carries a design concept through to production. The underlying theme throughout the discussion of polymer optics is the need for the design team to work closely with an experienced polymer optics manufacturer with a solid track record of success in molded optics. As will be seen shortly, the complex interaction between thermoplastics, molds, and molding machines dictates the need for working closely with a supplier who has the critical knowledge needed to manage all aspects of the program.

  15. 34. THESE INGOT MOLDS OF STEEL 32' X 83' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. THESE INGOT MOLDS OF STEEL - 32' X 83' IN SIZE - ARE READY TO BE TAKEN TO THE STRIPPER, WHERE THE MOLDS WILL BE REMOVED. INGOTS WILL NEXT BE PLACED INTO A 'SOAKING PIT,' WHERE THEY ARE HEATED TO A UNIFORM TEMPERATURE PRIOR TO ROLLING. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. THE CHALLENGE OF MOLDS FOR THE U.S. ARMY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Army and all armies have been interested in molds since there were armies. The most obvious interest was human infections by molds like trench foot. Then there were losses of military animals and contamination of their fodder, most notably the Soviet loss of thousands o...

  17. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  18. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  19. 18. INTERIOR VIEW WITH IRON POURERS FILLING COMPLETED MOLDS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. INTERIOR VIEW WITH IRON POURERS FILLING COMPLETED MOLDS ON GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1 MOLD CONVEYOR WITH MOLTEN IRON FROM MOBILE LADLES AS THEY STAND ON WHAT USED TO BE A PLATFORM MOVING AT THE SAME RATE OF SPEED AS THE CONVEYOR. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Folding tool for preparing FCC molded-plug terminations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, E. C.; Chambers, C. M.

    1971-01-01

    Assemblies consist of window piece, conductor spacer, insulator, outer seal, and molded portion that integrates all components. Preparation of FCC for molded plug termination requires that terminated ends of conductors in each cable be accurately folded simultaneously into spacer end and groove.

  1. 14. IN 1922, PRIOR TO THE INSTALLATION OF MOLDING MACHINES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. IN 1922, PRIOR TO THE INSTALLATION OF MOLDING MACHINES AND CONVEYORS, MOLDERS, SUCH AS THESE FROM THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY, HAND PACKED MOLDS AND LAID THEM OUT IN ROWS ON THE FLOOR TO BE POURED BY HAND-HELD CRUCIBLES, SHAKEN OUT, AND CLEANED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  2. SPECIFIC MOLDS ASSOCIATED WITH ASTHMA IN WATER-DAMAGED HOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objective: We sought to determine if specific molds were found in significantly higher concentrations in the water-damaged homes of asthmatic children compared to homes with no visible water damage. Methods: The mold concentrations in the dust in asthmatic children's bedrooms i...

  3. IGE IN ASTHMATIC HUMAN SERA IS REACTIVE AGAINST MOLD EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molds have been associated with various health effects including asthma, but their role in induction of asthma is unclear. However, the presence of mold-specific IgE indicates their capacity to induce allergic responses and possibly exacerbate asthma symptoms. This study was und...

  4. MOLD GROWTH ON GYPSUM WALLBOARD--A RESEARCH SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reducing occupant exposure to mold growing on damp gypsum wallboard is a research objective of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Often mold contaminated building materials are not properly removed but instead surface cleaners are used and then paint is applied in an attem...

  5. Improved molding process ensures plastic parts of higher tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.

    1968-01-01

    Single molding process ensures that plastic parts /of a given mechanical design/ produced from a conventional thermosetting molding compound will have a maximum tensile strength. The process can also be used for other thermosetting compounds to produce parts with improved physical properties.

  6. A programmable nanoreplica molding for the fabrication of nanophotonic devices

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Longju; Zhang, Jingxiang; Badshah, Mohsin Ali; Dong, Liang; Li, Jingjing; Kim, Seok-min; Lu, Meng

    2016-01-01

    The ability to fabricate periodic structures with sub-wavelength features has a great potential for impact on integrated optics, optical sensors, and photovoltaic devices. Here, we report a programmable nanoreplica molding process to fabricate a variety of sub-micrometer periodic patterns using a single mold. The process utilizes a stretchable mold to produce the desired periodic structure in a photopolymer on glass or plastic substrates. During the replica molding process, a uniaxial force is applied to the mold and results in changes of the periodic structure, which resides on the surface of the mold. Direction and magnitude of the force determine the array geometry, including the lattice constant and arrangement. By stretching the mold, 2D arrays with square, rectangular, and triangular lattice structures can be fabricated. As one example, we present a plasmonic crystal device with surface plasmon resonances determined by the force applied during molding. In addition, photonic crystal slabs with different array patterns are fabricated and characterized. This unique process offers the capability of generating various periodic nanostructures rapidly and inexpensively. PMID:26925828

  7. Ex ante economic evaluation of technologies for managing postharvest physiological disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently there has been much progress in the development of technologies that use bio-markers to detect and manage post-harvest physiological disorders for apples in long-tern storage. Such technologies have the capacity to alleviate fruit loss by allowing storage operators to more effectively mark...

  8. Postharvest salicylic acid treatment reduces storage rots in water-stressed but no unstressed sugarbeet roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exogenous application of salicylic acid (SA) reduces storage rots in a number of postharvest crops. SA’s ability to protect sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproots from common storage rot pathogens, however, is unknown. To determine the potential of SA to reduce storage losses caused by three common...

  9. Influence of postharvest storage, processing, and extraction methods on the analysis of phenolic phytochemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter provides an overview of the challenges associated with accurate analysis of phenolic compounds from foods, dietary supplements, and other matrices. It discusses the significance of sample preparation, post-harvest processing, and storage conditions on the assay of phenolic phytochemica...

  10. Effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on quality of Sea Buckthorn during postharvest storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) has been used to retain the quality of postharvest produce. In the present study the effect of MAP on quality of berry fruit of Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L., a hardy, deciduous shrub, native to Asia) during refrigerated storage was investigated. Sea buck...

  11. Application of real-time PCR to postharvest physiology – DNA isolation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Real-time PCR technology has been widely used in the postharvest plant physiology research. One of the difficulties to isolate DNA from plant martial and pathogen cells is the presence of rigid polysaccharide cell walls and capsules, which physically protect DNA from cell lysis. Many materials requi...

  12. Characterizing culturable microflora of nectarines: bacteria and their potential for biological control of postharvest fruit decay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microorganisms isolated from fruit surfaces have been used to control postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine fruit surfaces during fruit ...

  13. Management of bull’s-eye rot of apple using pre- and postharvest fungicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bull’s-eye rot caused by Cryptosporiopsis kienholzii, Neofabraea alba, N. malicorticis and N. perennans is a common postharvest disease of apple and pear in the US Pacific Northwest. Fruit infection by these causal fungi occurs in the orchard and is latent at harvest. A primary practice for control ...

  14. Quantifying residues from postharvest fumigation of almonds and walnuts with propylene oxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel analytical approach, involving solvent extraction with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) followed by gas chromatography (GC), was developed to quantify residues that result from the postharvest fumigation of almonds and walnuts with propylene oxide (PPO). Verification and quantification of PPO,...

  15. Influence of nonoptimal ripener applications and postharvest residue retention on sugarcane second ratoon yields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Retention of sugarcane (interspecific hybrids of Saccharum spp.) post-harvest residue and certain types of glyphosate ripener applications have independently been shown to reduce yields of the subsequent ratoon crop. The objective of this experiment was to determine the combined effects of post-har...

  16. Pre-harvest methyl jasmonate treatment enhances cauliflower chemoprotective attributes without a loss in postharvest quality.

    PubMed

    Ku, Kang Mo; Choi, Jeong-Hee; Kushad, Mosbah M; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Juvik, John A

    2013-06-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment can significantly increase glucosinolate (GS) concentrations in Brassica vegetables and potentially enhance anticancer bioactivity. Although MeJA treatment may promote ethylene biosynthesis, which can be detrimental to postharvest quality, there are no previous reports of its effect on cauliflower postharvest quality. To address this, cauliflower curds in field plots were sprayed with either 0.1 % Triton X-100 (control) or 500 μM MeJA solutions four days prior to harvest, then stored at 4 °C. Tissue subsamples were collected after 0, 10, 20, and 30 days of postharvest storage and assayed for visual color change, ethylene production, GS concentrations, and extract quinone reductase inductive activity. MeJA treatment increased curd GS concentrations of glucoraphanin, glucobrassicin, and neoglucobrassicin by 1.5, 2.4, and 4.6-fold over controls, respectively. MeJA treated cauliflower showed significantly higher quinone reductase activity, a biomarker for anticancer bioactivity, without reducing visual color and postharvest quality for 10 days at 4 °C storage.

  17. Effects of post-harvest handling conditions on internalization and growth of Salmonella enterica in tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Internalization during post-harvest handling is a significant route of tomato contamination by phytopathogens and foodborne human pathogens. This study was conducted to determine the effect of immersion time, immersion depth, and the temperature differential between bacterial suspension and tomato p...

  18. Relationships between applied nitrogen fertilizer and postharvest storage properties of sugarbeet roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the impact of nitrogen fertilizer rate on changes in processing quality of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) during postharvest storage. Based upon averages over three environments, seven fertilizer rates, and two storage intervals (30 and 90 days), each additional 43.2 kg ha-1 of nit...

  19. The use of agricultural by-products to capture methyl bromide following post-harvest fumigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activated carbons were prepared from plum and peach stone as well as almond and walnut shell and comparatively evaluated as sorbents to minimize the atmospheric emission of methyl bromide following postharvest fumigations. A variety of methods were used to make the activated carbons and each is desc...

  20. Commercial postharvest practices used to handle fresh citrus fruit with canker symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To assist in developing best postharvest practices for handling fruit with canker lesions, a survey was distributed in summers of 2008 and 2009 to better understand current practices. Approximately 60% of the surveys were returned each year representing about 55% of total fresh fruit shipments. As e...

  1. Effect of postharvest handling practices on phytochemical concentrations and bioactive potential in wild blueberry fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we quantified anthocyanin (ANC), proanthocyanidin (PAC), and chlorogenic acid (CA) concentrations in wild blueberry fruit (WBB) exposed to a variety of postharvest handling practices relevant to consumers and to industry. Additionally, we analyzed the bioactive potential of WBB subjec...

  2. Plant physiological response of strawberry fruit to chlorine dioxide gas treatment during postharvest storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide, a strong oxidizing and sanitizing agent, is used as a postharvest sanitizer for fruits and vegetables and generally applied on a packing line using a chlorine dioxide generator. The objective of this research was to study the physiological responses of strawberries to ClO2 when app...

  3. Evaluating carotenoid changes in tomatoes during postharvest ripening using Raman chemical imaging.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the postharvest ripening of tomato fruits, the increasing presence of lycopene in the tomatoe samples spanning a range of fruit maturity. In this study, Raman chemical images were acquired of tomato samples spanning a range of fruit maturity stages, and were evaluated for the presence and di...

  4. A postharvest fruit rot of apple caused by Lambertella corni-maris in Washington State

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During surveys for postharvest diseases of apples conducted in Washington State from 2003 to 2005, an unknown fruit rot was observed on stored apples collected from commercial fruit packinghouses. This disease was present in 66 of the 179 grower lots sampled, accounting for an average 1 to 3% of the...

  5. A postharvest fruit rot of apple caused by Lambertella sp. in Washington state

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During surveys for postharvest diseases of apples in 2003-05, a fruit rot disease was observed on stored apples collected from packinghouses. The disease appeared to originate from infections of wounds on the fruit, and lesions were brown and decayed tissues were spongy. Lambertella sp. was consiste...

  6. Postharvest irradiation treatment for quarantine control of the invasive Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irradiation is a postharvest quarantine treatment option for exported commodities such as stone fruits and small fruits to prevent movement of the new invasive pest spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Walker) (Diptera: Drosophilidae). The effects of irradiation on egg, larval, and pupal dev...

  7. Postharvest fumigation of California table grapes with ozone to control Western black widow spider (Araneae: Theridiidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ozone fumigations were evaluated for postharvest control of Western black widow spider (BWS), Latrodectus hesperus (Chamberlin and Ivie), in fresh table grapes destined for export from California USA. Mature adult female black widow spiders were contained in separate gas-permeable cages within a flo...

  8. Reducing Postharvest Losses during Storage of Grain Crops to Strengthen Food Security in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Kalita, Prasanta

    2017-01-01

    While fulfilling the food demand of an increasing population remains a major global concern, more than one-third of food is lost or wasted in postharvest operations. Reducing the postharvest losses, especially in developing countries, could be a sustainable solution to increase food availability, reduce pressure on natural resources, eliminate hunger and improve farmers’ livelihoods. Cereal grains are the basis of staple food in most of the developing nations, and account for the maximum postharvest losses on a calorific basis among all agricultural commodities. As much as 50%–60% cereal grains can be lost during the storage stage due only to the lack of technical inefficiency. Use of scientific storage methods can reduce these losses to as low as 1%–2%. This paper provides a comprehensive literature review of the grain postharvest losses in developing countries, the status and causes of storage losses and discusses the technological interventions to reduce these losses. The basics of hermetic storage, various technology options, and their effectiveness on several crops in different localities are discussed in detail. PMID:28231087

  9. Influence of packaging on quality retention of Longans (Dimocarpus longan) under constant and fluctuating postharvest temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan) fruit production and global exports are rapidly expanding. Consumer acceptance of this high value crop requires that fruit arrive at their final destination in excellent condition. Pericarp browning and fungal diseases are the main postharvest problems for longans. Researc...

  10. Application of ultraviolet-C light on oranges for the inactivation of postharvest wound pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Germicidal effects of ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light on the postharvest wound pathogens of citrus fruits namely Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum were investigated. P. digitatum and P. italicum spores were inoculated (4.00 – 4.50 log cfu/ orange) onto Washington navel oranges (Citrus sinens...

  11. Response of sugar beet recombinant inbred lines to post-harvest rot fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet is commonly stored in outdoor piles prior to processing. During this storage period the crop is subject to multiple post-harvest rots. Resistance to three post harvest rots was identified in two sugar beet germplasm in the 1970s, but there has been little work done on host resistance to p...

  12. Response of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) recombinant inbred lines to post-harvest rot fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) is commonly stored in outdoor piles prior to processing for food and animal feed. During this storage period the crop is subject to multiple post-harvest rots. Resistance to three post harvest rots was identified in two sugar beet germplasm in the 1970s, but there has been...

  13. Oxygenated phosphine fumigation for postharvest control of light brown apple moth on lettuce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postharvest treatment for light brown apple moth (LBAM), Epiphyas postvittana (Walker), is needed to safe guard domestic distribution and export of U.S. fresh fruits and vegetables including lettuce as the pest becomes established in California with risk of potential spread. Oxygenated phosphine fu...

  14. A Diagnostic Toolbox for Integrated Management of Apple Postharvest Necrotic Disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple postharvest physiological disorders, characterized by peel or flesh necrosis, result in significant yearly financial losses. Unfortunately, current chemical and cultural control systems are lacking or provide little assurance that apples will not develop disorders in storage or elsewhere in th...

  15. Cystofilobasidium infirmominiatum as a biocontrol agent of postharvest diseases of apple and citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two psycrotrophic yeasts isolated from the surface of lemons have been selected as biocontrol agents of the most common postharvest diseases of apples and citrus that develops during cold storage. The biocontrol yeasts were identified as Cystofilobasidium infirmominiatum and Leucosporidium scottii....

  16. Historical perspective on biological control of postharvest diseases – past, present, and future

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The birth of the field of biological control of postharvest diseases can be traced back to 1984 when a researcher testing an antagonist (Bacillus subtilis) in the field to control brown rot of peaches (caused by Monilinia fructicola ) decided to apply the antagonist directly to the peach to control ...

  17. THE DURABILITY OF LARGE-SCALE ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING COMPOSITE MOLDS

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Brian K; Love, Lonnie J; Duty, Chad; Vaidya, Uday; Pipes, R. Byron; Kunc, Vlastimil

    2016-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology permits the rapid production of thermoplastic composite molds using a carbon fiber filled Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) thermoplastic. Demonstration tools (i.e. 0.965 m X 0.559 m X 0.152 m) for composite part fabrication have been printed, coated, and finished with a traditional tooling gel. We present validation results demonstrating the stability of thermoplastic printed molds for room temperature Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) processes. Arkema s Elium thermoplastic resin was investigated with a variety of reinforcement materials. Experimental results include dimensional characterization of the tool surface using laser scanning technique following demolding of 10 parts. Thermoplastic composite molds offer rapid production compared to traditionally built thermoset molds in that near-net deposition allows direct digital production of the net geometry at production rate of 45 kg/hr.

  18. Prevalence of dampness and mold in European housing stock.

    PubMed

    Haverinen-Shaughnessy, Ulla

    2012-09-01

    An assessment of the prevalence of dampness and mold in European housing stock was carried out. It is based on general indicators of dampness and mold in dwellings reported in the literature. The assessment relies on recent studies, taking into account regional and climatic differences, as well as differences in study design, methodology, and definitions. Data were available from 31 European countries. Weighted prevalence estimates are 12.1% for damp, 10.3% for mold, 10.0% for water damage, and 16.5% for a combination of any one or more indicators. Significant (up to 18%) differences were observed for dampness and mold prevalence estimates depending on survey factors, region, and climate. In conclusion, dampness and/or mold problems could be expected to occur in one of every six of the dwellings in Europe. Prevalence and occurrence of different types of problems may vary across geographical areas, which can be partly explained by differences in climate.

  19. Silicon micro-mold and method for fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2005-01-11

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon micro-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  20. Injection-molded nanocomposites and materials based on wheat gluten.

    PubMed

    Cho, S-W; Gällstedt, M; Johansson, E; Hedenqvist, M S

    2011-01-01

    This is, to our knowledge, the first study of the injection molding of materials where wheat gluten (WG) is the main component. In addition to a plasticizer (glycerol), 5 wt.% natural montmorillonite clay was added. X-ray indicated intercalated clay and transmission electron microscopy indicated locally good clay platelet dispersion. Prior to feeding into the injection molder, the material was first compression molded into plates and pelletized. The filling of the circular mold via the central gate was characterized by a divergent flow yielding, in general, a stronger and stiffer material in the circumferential direction. It was observed that 20-30 wt.% glycerol yielded the best combination of processability and mechanical properties. The clay yielded improved processability, plate homogeneity and tensile stiffness. IR spectroscopy and protein solubility indicated that the injection molding process yielded a highly aggregated structure. The overall conclusion was that injection molding is a very promising method for producing WG objects.

  1. Development of extrusion molded Nd-Fe-B magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sakata, M.; Ikuma, K. ); Watanabe, R.; Iwasa, T.; Miyadera, H.; McAloon, K.

    1993-01-01

    A new manufacturing process for extrusion molded magnets, composed of isotropic Nd-Fe-B powder and Nylon-12, has been developed. This newly developed extrusion molding process has several interesting features. First, the extruded product contains 72% by volume magnetic powder and yields a (BH)[sub max] of 8.0 MGO[sub e]. Second, through the addition of an anti-oxidant, the viscosity of the magnetic powder-nylon compound remains almost constant during molding. Third, by means of a specially cooled outlet, which is separated from the heated die by a thermal insulator, an optimized temperature profile is obtained which yields uniformly smooth extrusion molded magnets. Both long thin-walled magnets and small arc-shaped (kawala) magnets are easily molded by this new process.

  2. Potential ungulate prey for Gray Wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Francis J.; Mack, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Data were gathered for six ungulate species that reside in or near Yellowstone National Park. If gray wolves (Canis lupus) are reintroduced into the Yellowstone area, their avoidance of human activities or their management by human may determine their range. Therefore, the area of wolf occupation cannot be predicted now. We restricted our analysis to Yellowstone National Park and to the adjacent national forest wilderness areas. We included mostly ungulate herds that summer inside or adjacent to the park and that would probably be affected by wolves. Our wolf study area includes Yellowstone National Park and adjacent wilderness areas most likely to be occupied by wolves. We reviewed publications, park records, survey reports, and state fish and game surveys and reports for statistics on ungulate populations. These data [provide an overview of ungulate populations and harvests. Each ungulate herd is described in detail. We restricted our analysis to 1980-89, because population surveys were more complete during that period and because population estimates of most ungulate populations had increased by the 1980's. We feel the higher estimates of the 1980's reflect more up-to-date techniques and are most representative of the situation into which the wolves would be reintroduced.

  3. Obituary: Albert Gray Mowbray, 1916-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Albert G. Mowbray was born on 23 June 1916. He was the son of Albert Henry Mowbray, a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley [UCB], and Elizabeth Gray Mowbray. He had one sister, Mary Elizabeth. Mowbray did undergraduate and graduate work at UCB. His 1943 PhD. dissertation had to do with the apparent sizes of globular clusters. Mowbray became an observing assistant at Lick Observatory in about 1942; later that year he went to the Perkins Observatory, operated for Ohio Wesleyan University by the Ohio State University [OSU]. Due to the wartime shortage of instructors, he also taught physics at OSU. In 1946 Mowbray joined the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. By 1948 he lived in Pasadena California, and was a volunteer observer at the Mount Wilson Observatory. Later, until 1956, he was employed by UCB professor Leland Cunningham, a solar-system dynamicist. Mowbray did computations and measured plates for Cunningham. Mowbray joined the physics faculty at San Jose State College (now California State University, San Jose) in 1957. In addition to the AAS, Mowbray was a member of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. He died in San Francisco, California, on 21 August 2002. The kind assistance of George Herbig, Virginia Trimble, and Elizabeth Roemer is acknowledged.

  4. Diterpene glycosides from Stevia phlebophylla A. Gray.

    PubMed

    Ceunen, Stijn; Wim, De Borggraeve; Compernolle, Frans; Mai, Anh Hung; Geuns, Jan M C

    2013-09-20

    The rare Mexican species Stevia phlebophylla A. Gray was long considered to be the only known Stevia species, beside the well-known S. rebaudiana, containing the highly sweet diterpenoid steviol glycosides. We report a re-evaluation of this claim after phytochemically screening leaves obtained from two herbarium specimens of S. phlebophylla for the presence of steviol glycosides. Despite extensive MS analyses, no steviol glycosides could be unambiguously verified. Instead, the main chromatographic peak eluting at retention times similar to those of steviol glycosides was identified as a new compound, namely 16β-hydroxy-17-acetoxy-ent-kauran-19-oic acid-(6-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl) ester (1) on the basis of extensive NMR and MS data as well as the characterization of its acid hydrolysate. Seven more compounds were detected by ESIMS which are possibly structurally related to 1. It can therefore be concluded that S. phlebophylla is unlikely to contain significant amounts of steviol glycosides, if any.

  5. Viscoelasticity of subcortical gray matter structures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Curtis L; Schwarb, Hillary; D J McGarry, Matthew; Anderson, Aaron T; Huesmann, Graham R; Sutton, Bradley P; Cohen, Neal J

    2016-12-01

    Viscoelastic mechanical properties of the brain assessed with magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) are sensitive measures of microstructural tissue health in neurodegenerative conditions. Recent efforts have targeted measurements localized to specific neuroanatomical regions differentially affected in disease. In this work, we present a method for measuring the viscoelasticity in subcortical gray matter (SGM) structures, including the amygdala, hippocampus, caudate, putamen, pallidum, and thalamus. The method is based on incorporating high spatial resolution MRE imaging (1.6 mm isotropic voxels) with a mechanical inversion scheme designed to improve local measures in pre-defined regions (soft prior regularization [SPR]). We find that in 21 healthy, young volunteers SGM structures differ from each other in viscoelasticity, quantified as the shear stiffness and damping ratio, but also differ from the global viscoelasticity of the cerebrum. Through repeated examinations on a single volunteer, we estimate the uncertainty to be between 3 and 7% for each SGM measure. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the use of specific methodological considerations-higher spatial resolution and SPR-both decrease uncertainty and increase sensitivity of the SGM measures. The proposed method allows for reliable MRE measures of SGM viscoelasticity for future studies of neurodegenerative conditions. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4221-4233, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Differences in quantitative assessment of myocardial scar and gray zone by LGE-CMR imaging using established gray zone protocols.

    PubMed

    Mesubi, Olurotimi; Ego-Osuala, Kelechi; Jeudy, Jean; Purtilo, James; Synowski, Stephen; Abutaleb, Ameer; Niekoop, Michelle; Abdulghani, Mohammed; Asoglu, Ramazan; See, Vincent; Saliaris, Anastasios; Shorofsky, Stephen; Dickfeld, Timm

    2015-02-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) imaging is the gold standard for myocardial scar evaluation. Heterogeneous areas of scar ('gray zone'), may serve as arrhythmogenic substrate. Various gray zone protocols have been correlated to clinical outcomes and ventricular tachycardia channels. This study assessed the quantitative differences in gray zone and scar core sizes as defined by previously validated signal intensity (SI) threshold algorithms. High quality LGE-CMR images performed in 41 cardiomyopathy patients [ischemic (33) or non-ischemic (8)] were analyzed using previously validated SI threshold methods [Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM), n-standard deviation (NSD) and modified-FWHM]. Myocardial scar was defined as scar core and gray zone using SI thresholds based on these methods. Scar core, gray zone and total scar sizes were then computed and compared among these models. The median gray zone mass was 2-3 times larger with FWHM (15 g, IQR: 8-26 g) compared to NSD or modified-FWHM (5 g, IQR: 3-9 g; and 8 g. IQR: 6-12 g respectively, p < 0.001). Conversely, infarct core mass was 2.3 times larger with NSD (30 g, IQR: 17-53 g) versus FWHM and modified-FWHM (13 g, IQR: 7-23 g, p < 0.001). The gray zone extent (percentage of total scar that was gray zone) also varied significantly among the three methods, 51 % (IQR: 42-61 %), 17 % (IQR: 11-21 %) versus 38 % (IQR: 33-43 %) for FWHM, NSD and modified-FWHM respectively (p < 0.001). Considerable variability exists among the current methods for MRI defined gray zone and scar core. Infarct core and total myocardial scar mass also differ using these methods. Further evaluation of the most accurate quantification method is needed.

  7. The ability of a cold-adapted Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain from Tibet to control blue mold in pear fruit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Yan, Fujie; Wilson, Charles; Shen, Qing; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    Cold-adapted yeasts were isolated from soil samples collected in Tibet and evaluated as potential biocontrol agents against blue mold (Penicillium expansum) of pear fruit in cold storage. YC1, an isolate identified as Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, was found to exhibit the greatest biocontrol activity among the different isolates that were screened. A washed cell suspension of YC1 exhibited the best biocontrol activity among three different preparations that were used in the current study. A concentration of 10(8) cells/ml reduced the incidence of decay to 35 %, compared to the control where decay incidence was 100 %. A higher intracellular level of trehalose and a higher proportion of polyunsaturated acids present in YC1, was associated with increased the tolerance of this strain to low temperatures, relative to the other strains that were evaluated. The increased tolerance to low temperature allowed the YC1 strain of yeast to more effectively compete for nutrients and space in wounded pear fruit that had been inoculated with spores of P. expansum and placed in cold storage. The present study demonstrated the ability to select cold-adapted yeasts from cold climates and use them as biocontrol agents of postharvest diseases of fruit placed in cold storage.

  8. Public health and economic impact of dampness and mold

    SciTech Connect

    Mudarri, David; Fisk, William J.

    2007-06-01

    The public health risk and economic impact of dampness and mold exposures was assessed using current asthma as a health endpoint. Individual risk of current asthma from exposure to dampness and mold in homes from Fisk et al. (2007), and asthma risks calculated from additional studies that reported the prevalence of dampness and mold in homes were used to estimate the proportion of U.S. current asthma cases that are attributable to dampness and mold exposure at 21% (95% confidence internal 12-29%). An examination of the literature covering dampness and mold in schools, offices, and institutional buildings, which is summarized in the appendix, suggests that risks from exposure in these buildings are similar to risks from exposures in homes. Of the 21.8 million people reported to have asthma in the U.S., approximately 4.6 (2.7-6.3) million cases are estimated to be attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home. Estimates of the national cost of asthma from two prior studies were updated to 2004 and used to estimate the economic impact of dampness and mold exposures. By applying the attributable fraction to the updated national annual cost of asthma, the national annual cost of asthma that is attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home is estimated to be $3.5 billion ($2.1-4.8 billion). Analysis indicates that exposure to dampness and mold in buildings poses significant public health and economic risks in the U.S. These findings are compatible with public policies and programs that help control moisture and mold in buildings.

  9. Predicting and preventing mold spoilage of food products.

    PubMed

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2013-03-01

    This article is a review of how to quantify mold spoilage and consequently shelf life of a food product. Mold spoilage results from having a product contaminated with fungal spores that germinate and form a visible mycelium before the end of the shelf life. The spoilage can be then expressed as the combination of the probability of having a product contaminated and the probability of mold growth (germination and proliferation) up to a visible mycelium before the end of the shelf life. For products packed before being distributed to the retailers, the probability of having a product contaminated is a function of factors strictly linked to the factory design, process, and environment. The in-factory fungal contamination of a product might be controlled by good manufacturing hygiene practices and reduced by particular processing practices such as an adequate air-renewal system. To determine the probability of mold growth, both germination and mycelium proliferation can be mathematically described by primary models. When mold contamination on the product is scarce, the spores are spread on the product and more than a few spores are unlikely to be found at the same spot. In such a case, models applicable for a single spore should be used. Secondary models can be used to describe the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on either the germination or proliferation of molds. Several polynomial models and gamma-type models quantifying the effect of water activity and temperature on mold growth are available. To a lesser extent, the effect of pH, ethanol, heat treatment, addition of preservatives, and modified atmospheres on mold growth also have been quantified. However, mold species variability has not yet been properly addressed, and only a few secondary models have been validated for food products. Once the probability of having mold spoilage is calculated for various shelf lives and product formulations, the model can be implemented as part of a risk management

  10. Mold damage in homes and wheezing in infants

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seung-Hyun; Reponen, Tiina; LeMasters, Grace; Levin, Linda; Huang, Jian; Meklin, Teija; Ryan, Patrick; Villareal, Manuel; Bernstein, David

    2007-01-01

    Background In most studies that investigate the association of mold or water damage and respiratory disorders in infants, the analysis is not adjusted for exposure to house dust mite (HDM), which is also a known cause of respiratory illnesses. Objective To investigate the relationship between visually observable mold or water damage and HDM (Der f 1) levels and the prevalence of lower respiratory tract symptoms and allergen sensitization in infants of atopic parents as part of a prospective birth cohort study. Methods On-site home visits (at the infants’ age of 8 months) were performed to evaluate observable mold or water damage and HDM exposure. At a clinic visit near the infant’s first birthday, medical histories, including parent-reported wheezing episodes, and a skin prick test to food and 15 common aeroallergens were conducted in 640 infants. Results More than half of the homes were found to have mold or water damage, and 5% had major mold or water damage with visible mold at 0.2 m2 or more. Only 16% of homes had a HDM allergen (Der f 1) concentration of more than 2 μg/g. Major mold or water damage increased the risk of recurrent wheezing nearly 2 times in infants, 5 times in food or aeroallergen-sensitized infants, and 6 times in aeroallergen-sensitized infants. Neither visible mold or water damage nor HDM exposure was associated with sensitization to either mold or aeroallergens. Conclusions Visible mold was shown to be a significant risk factor for recurrent wheezing in infants at high risk of developing atopic disorders, whereas HDM exposure did not significantly increase the risk. PMID:17069111

  11. ''Heat Transfer at the Mold-Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys'' Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Professor R. D. Pehlke, Principal Investigator, Dr. John M. Cookson, Dr. Shouwei Hao, Dr. Prasad Krishna, Kevin T. Bilkey

    2001-12-14

    This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting has been conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigation of squeeze casting at CMI-Tech Center (Now Hayes-Lemmerz Technical Center) and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive.

  12. Setting expansion of gray and white mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Storm, Buffy; Eichmiller, Frederick C; Tordik, Patricia A; Goodell, Gary G

    2008-01-01

    One possible reason for the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is its slight expansion upon setting. Both gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) and white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) are composed of approximately 75% Portland cement (PC). WMTA differs from GMTA in its lower content of tetracalcium aluminoferrite. This difference in composition may affect setting expansion. The purpose of this study was to compare the hydroscopic linear setting expansions of GMTA, WMTA, and PC with a new device. Materials were mixed with water, placed into a cylindrical mold, and covered with sterile water or Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). Expansion changes were measured by using a linear variable displacement transformer dilatometer. One-way analysis of variance and post hoc tests (alpha = 0.05) showed the mean expansion at 24 hours was 1.02% for GMTA, 0.29% for PC, and 0.08% for WMTA in water immersion and 0.68% for GMTA and 0.11% for WMTA in HBSS immersion. GMTA expanded significantly more than WMTA in either water or HBSS immersion.

  13. Cold Temperature Delays Wound Healing in Postharvest Sugarbeet Roots.

    PubMed

    Fugate, Karen K; Ribeiro, Wellington S; Lulai, Edward C; Deckard, Edward L; Finger, Fernando L

    2016-01-01

    Storage temperature affects the rate and extent of wound-healing in a number of root and tuber crops. The effect of storage temperature on wound-healing in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots, however, is largely unknown. Wound-healing of sugarbeet roots was investigated using surface-abraded roots stored at 6 and 12°C for 28 days. Surface abrasions are common injuries of stored roots, and the storage temperatures used are typical of freshly harvested or rapidly cooled roots. Transpiration rate from the wounded surface and root weight loss were used to quantify wound healing. At 12°C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface declined within 14 days and wounded roots lost weight at a rate similar to unwounded controls. At 6°C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface did not decline in the 28 days after injury, and wounded roots lost 44% more weight than controls after 28 days storage. Melanin formation, lignification, and suberization occurred more rapidly at 12°C than at 6°C, and a continuous layer of lignified and suberized cells developed at 12°C, but not at 6°C. Examination of enzyme activities involved in melanin, lignin, and suberin formation indicated that differences in melanin formation at 6 and 12°C were related to differences in polyphenol oxidase activity, although no relationships between suberin or lignin formation and phenylalanine ammonia lyase or peroxidase activity were evident. Wound-induced respiration was initially greater at 12°C than at 6°C. However, with continued storage, respiration rate of wounded roots declined more rapidly at 12°C, and over 28 days, the increase in respiration due to injury was 52% greater in roots stored at 6°C than in roots stored at 12°C. The data indicate that storage at 6°C severely slowed and impaired wound-healing of surface-abraded sugarbeet roots relative to roots stored at 12°C and suggest that postharvest losses may be accelerated if freshly harvested roots are cooled too quickly.

  14. Cold Temperature Delays Wound Healing in Postharvest Sugarbeet Roots

    PubMed Central

    Fugate, Karen K.; Ribeiro, Wellington S.; Lulai, Edward C.; Deckard, Edward L.; Finger, Fernando L.

    2016-01-01

    Storage temperature affects the rate and extent of wound-healing in a number of root and tuber crops. The effect of storage temperature on wound-healing in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots, however, is largely unknown. Wound-healing of sugarbeet roots was investigated using surface-abraded roots stored at 6 and 12°C for 28 days. Surface abrasions are common injuries of stored roots, and the storage temperatures used are typical of freshly harvested or rapidly cooled roots. Transpiration rate from the wounded surface and root weight loss were used to quantify wound healing. At 12°C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface declined within 14 days and wounded roots lost weight at a rate similar to unwounded controls. At 6°C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface did not decline in the 28 days after injury, and wounded roots lost 44% more weight than controls after 28 days storage. Melanin formation, lignification, and suberization occurred more rapidly at 12°C than at 6°C, and a continuous layer of lignified and suberized cells developed at 12°C, but not at 6°C. Examination of enzyme activities involved in melanin, lignin, and suberin formation indicated that differences in melanin formation at 6 and 12°C were related to differences in polyphenol oxidase activity, although no relationships between suberin or lignin formation and phenylalanine ammonia lyase or peroxidase activity were evident. Wound-induced respiration was initially greater at 12°C than at 6°C. However, with continued storage, respiration rate of wounded roots declined more rapidly at 12°C, and over 28 days, the increase in respiration due to injury was 52% greater in roots stored at 6°C than in roots stored at 12°C. The data indicate that storage at 6°C severely slowed and impaired wound-healing of surface-abraded sugarbeet roots relative to roots stored at 12°C and suggest that postharvest losses may be accelerated if freshly harvested roots are cooled too quickly. PMID

  15. Post-harvest field manipulations to conserve waste rice for waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, J.D.; Kaminski, R.M.; Reinecke, K.J.; Kurtz, M.E.; Manley, S.W.

    2005-01-01

    Rice seeds escaping collection by combines during harvest (hereafter, waste rice) provide quality forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV) and other rice growing regions in the United States. Recent sample surveys across the MAV have revealed abundance of waste rice in fields declined an average of 71% between harvest and late autumn. Thus, we evaluated the ability of common post-harvest, field-management practices to conserve waste rice for waterfowl until early winter via controlled experiments in Mississippi rice test plots in 2001 and 2003 and analyses of data from MAV-wide surveys of waste rice in rice production fields in 2000-2002. Our experiments indicated test plots with burned rice stubble that were not flooded during autumn contained more waste rice than other treatments in 2001 (P?0.10). Waste-rice abundance in test plots did not differ among postharvest treatments in 2003 (P = 0.97). Our analyses of data from the MAV sample surveys did not detect differences in abundance of waste rice among fields burned, rolled, disked, or left in standing stubble post-harvest (P?0.04; Bonferroni corrected critical ( a= 0.017). Because results from test-plot experiments were inconclusive, we based our primary inference regarding best post-harvest treatments on patterns of rice abundance identified from the MAV surveys and previously documented environmental and agronomic benefits of managing harvested rice fields for wintering waterfowl. Therefore, we recommend leaving standing stubble in rice fields after harvest as a preliminary beneficial management practice. We suggest future research evaluate potential of postharvest practices to conserve waste rice for waterfowl and reduce straw in production rice fields managed for wintering waterfowl throughout the MAV.

  16. Severe maxillary osteomyelitis in a Gray Wolf (Canis lupus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber-Meyer, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Dental injuries to or abnormalities in functionally important teeth and associated bones in predators may significantly reduce the ability to kill and consume prey (Lazar et al. 2009). This impairment is likely exacerbated in coursing predators, such as Gray Wolves, that bite and hold onto fleeing and kicking prey with their teeth. Damage to carnassials (upper fourth premolar, P4, and lower first molar, M1) and associated bones in Gray Wolves may especially inhibit the consumption of prey because these teeth slice meat and crush bone. Here I report maxillary osteomyelitis involving the carnassials in a wild Gray Wolf from northeastern Minnesota of such severity that I hypothesize it ultimately caused the Gray Wolf to starve to death.

  17. Gray Matter Is Targeted in First-Attack Multiple Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schutzer, Steven E.; Angel, Thomas E.; Liu, Tao; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xie, Fang; Bergquist, Jonas P.; Vecsei, Lazlo'; Zadori, Denes; Camp, David G.; Holland, Bart K.; Smith, Richard D.; Coyle, Patricia K.

    2013-09-10

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS), its driving pathogenesis at the earliest stages, and what factors allow the first clinical attack to manifest remain unknown. Some imaging studies suggest gray rather than white matter may be involved early, and some postulate this may be predictive of developing MS. Other imaging studies are in conflict. To determine if there was objective molecular evidence of gray matter involvement in early MS we used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of first-attack MS patients (two independent groups) compared to established relapsing remitting (RR) MS and controls. We found that the CSF proteins in first-attack patients were differentially enriched for gray matter components (axon, neuron, synapse). Myelin components did not distinguish these groups. The results support that gray matter dysfunction is involved early in MS, and also may be integral for the initial clinical presentation.

  18. Gray Matter Is Targeted in First-Attack Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schutzer, Steven E.; Angel, Thomas E.; Liu, Tao; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xie, Fang; Bergquist, Jonas; Vécsei, László; Zadori, Denes; Camp, David G.; Holland, Bart K.; Smith, Richard D.; Coyle, Patricia K.

    2013-01-01

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS), its driving pathogenesis at the earliest stages, and what factors allow the first clinical attack to manifest remain unknown. Some imaging studies suggest gray rather than white matter may be involved early, and some postulate this may be predictive of developing MS. Other imaging studies are in conflict. To determine if there was objective molecular evidence of gray matter involvement in early MS we used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of first-attack MS patients (two independent groups) compared to established relapsing remitting (RR) MS and controls. We found that the CSF proteins in first-attack patients were differentially enriched for gray matter components (axon, neuron, synapse). Myelin components did not distinguish these groups. The results support that gray matter dysfunction is involved early in MS, and also may be integral for the initial clinical presentation. PMID:24039694

  19. [Heterotopic gray matter: A rare cause of epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Aissa, A; Ben Lassoued, M; Alouini, R

    2013-03-01

    Various etiologic diagnoses are put forward for certain forms of infant epilepsy. We report four cases illustrating a rare cause: gray matter heterotopia. There were three girls and one boy, aged 3 months to 4 years at onset of seizures and 8 to 30 years at diagnosis of gray matter heterotopia. All patients sought healthcare because of repeated seizures. One patient also presented severe mental retardation. No consanguinity was noted. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the interposition of an ectopic ribbon of gray matter within the white matter in all cases. Ectopic gray matter formed bilateral subependymal nodules in one patient and bilateral nodules in the subcortical region suggestive of concentric laminar organization in another. The two other patients presented both of these forms. Other anomalies were associated: partial agenesis of the corpus callosum associated with colpocephaly causing cortical atrophy in one patient and hippocampal sclerosis in another.

  20. GrayStarServer: Stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, C. Ian

    2017-01-01

    GrayStarServer is a stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis code of pedagogical accuracy that is accessible in any web browser on commonplace computational devices and that runs on a timescale of a few seconds.